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Sample records for baboons

  1. The baboon syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hjorth, N; Menné, T

    1984-01-01

    The catchword "baboon syndrome" is used to denote a characteristic distribution pattern of systemic allergic contact dermatitis. Diffuse erythema of the buttocks, upper inner surface of the thighs, and axillae are characteristic features. We describe 3 cases provoked by ampicillin, nickel...... and mercury. The condition may be overlooked and suspected of being a textile dermatitis or seborrhoeic dermatitis of the elderly....

  2. Seed size selection by olive baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Britta Kerstin; Linsenmair, Karl Eduard

    2008-10-01

    Seed size is an important plant fitness trait that can influence several steps between fruiting and the establishment of a plant's offspring. Seed size varies considerably within many plant species, yet the relevance of the trait for intra-specific fruit choice by primates has received little attention. Primates may select certain seed sizes within a species for a number of reasons, e.g. to decrease indigestible seed load or increase pulp intake per fruit. Olive baboons (Papio anubis, Cercopithecidae) are known to select seed size in unripe and mature pods of Parkia biglobosa (Mimosaceae) differentially, so that pods with small seeds, and an intermediate seed number, contribute most to dispersal by baboons. We tested whether olive baboons likewise select for smaller ripe seeds within each of nine additional fruit species whose fruit pulp baboons commonly consume, and for larger seeds in one species in which baboons feed on the seeds. Species differed in fruit type and seed number per fruit. For five of these species, baboons dispersed seeds that were significantly smaller than seeds extracted manually from randomly collected fresh fruits. In contrast, for three species, baboons swallowed seeds that were significantly longer and/or wider than seeds from fresh fruits. In two species, sizes of ingested seeds and seeds from fresh fruits did not differ significantly. Baboons frequently spat out seeds of Drypetes floribunda (Euphorbiaceae) but not those of other plant species having seeds of equal size. Oral processing of D. floribunda seeds depended on seed size: seeds that were spat out were significantly larger and swallowed seeds smaller, than seeds from randomly collected fresh fruits. We argue that seed size selection in baboons is influenced, among other traits, by the amount of pulp rewarded per fruit relative to seed load, which is likely to vary with fruit and seed shape.

  3. Epizootic pertussis focus of hamadryad baboons

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    A. Yu. Medkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The absence of an adequate experimental animal model makes difficult study of immunity against whooping cough and its pathogenesis. Experimental whooping cough reported by us earlier in pubescent non-human primates of the Old World was accompanied by specific clinical and laboratory marks in the absence of cough. The possibility of pertussis modelling while experimental whooping cough in impuberal hamadryad baboons was investigated. In the process of selection of monkeys for the further studies for perfecting of experimental model for pertussis research unexpectedly were detected specific pertussis antibodies in impuberal hamadryad baboons.The aim of the study: revealing of source of infection and transmission of pertussis to hamadryad baboons and investigation of response of antibody-positive impuberal hamadryad baboons to secondary contagion by B. pertussis bacteria while experimental infection.Results. 18 veterinary checked, somatically healthy hamadryad baboons of various gender managed in two neighboring cages. Specific pertussis IgM and IgG antibodies were found in blood serum of all the animals and one of the monkey keepers. By real-time PCR in nasopharyngeal swabs of the monkey keeper and three 7- and 9-month-old hamadryad baboons were registered single B. pertussis genom equivalents. Seropositive impuberal hamadryad baboons were experimentally challenged by virulent B. pertussis 475 strain. Quantity of B. pertussis genom equivalents and percentage of IgM and IgG antibodies in impuberal hamadryad baboons after experimental infection were detected. These results were comparable with such received after secondary experimental challenge of monkeys by B. pertussis. Humoral immuneresponse was characterized by booster effect and rapid B. pertussis elimination.Conclusion. The case of transmission of B.pertussis bacteria to hamadryad baboons by natural contagion and epizootic focus of pertussis in apery conditions

  4. Deep learning of orthographic representations in baboons.

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    Hannagan, Thomas; Ziegler, Johannes C; Dufau, Stéphane; Fagot, Joël; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    What is the origin of our ability to learn orthographic knowledge? We use deep convolutional networks to emulate the primate's ventral visual stream and explore the recent finding that baboons can be trained to discriminate English words from nonwords. The networks were exposed to the exact same sequence of stimuli and reinforcement signals as the baboons in the experiment, and learned to map real visual inputs (pixels) of letter strings onto binary word/nonword responses. We show that the networks' highest levels of representations were indeed sensitive to letter combinations as postulated in our previous research. The model also captured the key empirical findings, such as generalization to novel words, along with some intriguing inter-individual differences. The present work shows the merits of deep learning networks that can simulate the whole processing chain all the way from the visual input to the response while allowing researchers to analyze the complex representations that emerge during the learning process.

  5. Renal histopathology of a baboon model with type 2 diabetes.

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    Rincon-Choles, Hernan; Abboud, Hanna E; Lee, Shuko; Shade, Robert E; Rice, Karen S; Carey, K Dee; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Barnes, Jeffrey L

    2012-10-01

    Naturally occurring type 2 diabetes has been found in a colony of baboons. Ongoing characterization of the baboon colony maintained at the Southwest National Primate Research Center has revealed a significant range of glucose sensitivity with some animals clearly diabetic.   Seven baboons, four with diabetes and three without diabetes, underwent histopathological investigation. Three diabetic animals were diagnosed using fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1C, and intravenous glucose tolerance test, and a fourth one was known to have hyperglycemia. One control baboon and three baboons with diabetes had microalbuminuria. On kidney biopsy, diabetic baboons had thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix expansion compared to controls. Immunohistochemistry showed the diabetic animals had increased mesangial expression of cellular fibronectin ED-A. Two diabetic animals with microalbuminuria had evidence of mesangiolysis with the formation of an early nodule. One diabetic animal had a Kimmestiel-Wilson nodule. We conclude that the baboon represents a useful primate model of diabetes and nephropathy that resembles the nephropathy associated with type 2 diabetes in humans.

  6. [Grooming and group structure in hamadryas baboons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The results of 3-year observation on coral living hamadryas baboons transported from natural habitat in Tuapse reservation have been presented. Despite of the fact that grooming between males and females accounted for 73% of total cases of grooming in adult individual pairs, only the relationships of males with high-ranked females of their harems fully corresponded to a star-shaped sociogram. The high-ranked females were not different from all the other females either according to a total number of grooming cases with their female partners or according to a proportion of a performed and received grooming. Grooming between the related females was noted predominantly in the cases when they belonged to the same harem. Grooming between the related males accounted for 59% of all the cases of grooming between the male partners.

  7. What baboons can (not) tell us about natural language grammars.

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    Poletiek, Fenna H; Fitz, Hartmut; Bocanegra, Bruno R

    2016-06-01

    Rey et al. (2012) present data from a study with baboons that they interpret in support of the idea that center-embedded structures in human language have their origin in low level memory mechanisms and associative learning. Critically, the authors claim that the baboons showed a behavioral preference that is consistent with center-embedded sequences over other types of sequences. We argue that the baboons' response patterns suggest that two mechanisms are involved: first, they can be trained to associate a particular response with a particular stimulus, and, second, when faced with two conditioned stimuli in a row, they respond to the most recent one first, copying behavior they had been rewarded for during training. Although Rey et al. (2012) 'experiment shows that the baboons' behavior is driven by low level mechanisms, it is not clear how the animal behavior reported, bears on the phenomenon of Center Embedded structures in human syntax. Hence, (1) natural language syntax may indeed have been shaped by low level mechanisms, and (2) the baboons' behavior is driven by low level stimulus response learning, as Rey et al. propose. But is the second evidence for the first? We will discuss in what ways this study can and cannot give evidential value for explaining the origin of Center Embedded recursion in human grammar. More generally, their study provokes an interesting reflection on the use of animal studies in order to understand features of the human linguistic system.

  8. Immunological compatibility between the chacma baboon and man.

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    Stark, J H; Smit, J A; Neethling, F A; Nortman, P J; Myburgh, J A

    1991-12-01

    Predictions of an increasing shortage of donor organs for the future has led to a resurgence of interest in xenotransplantation. We have methodically assessed the immunological compatibility of humans against the chacma baboon with a view to narrowing the gap of concordance by careful immunological screening. The necessity of major blood group compatibility in xenotransplantation is now established. While no group O universal donor exists in the baboon, groups A (45%), B (15%), and AB (40%) are well represented. Baboon histocompatibility antigens could not be precisely defined using human antisera. This does not necessarily imply lack of homology between the species, as we have shown specific crossreactivity of numerous antihuman monoclonal antibodies with baboon leukocytes. Normal humans do not exhibit preformed agglutinins to erythrocytes of the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus orientalis)) but cytotoxic antibodies are occasionally found. Sera from allosensitized patients may contain crossreacting hemagglutinins, leukoagglutinins and complement-dependent cytotoxic antibodies. Binding of human immunoglobulin-G and -M to baboon targets was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Negative crossmatch combinations for antibodies of the IgG subclass were easily found, but IgM antibodies from allosensitized patients were polyspecific in their action. In vitro assessment of lymphocyte mediated cytotoxicity showed that preformed cellular immunity between the species was rare. The response of human lymphocytes to xenoantigen stimulation in mixed lymphocyte cultures showed a normal distribution, permitting the selection of low-responding combinations. Screening for viruses, especially HTLV-1 and Coxsackie-BL34, is important. These findings demonstrate a closer degree of concordance than has previously been suspected.

  9. The Baboon (Papio spp. as a Model of Human Ebola Virus Infection

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    Gary L.White

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Baboons are susceptible to natural Ebola virus (EBOV infection and share 96% genetic homology with humans. Despite these characteristics, baboons have rarely been utilized as experimental models of human EBOV infection to evaluate the efficacy of prophylactics and therapeutics in the United States. This review will summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of EBOV infection in baboons compared to EBOV infection in humans and other Old World nonhuman primates. In addition, we will discuss how closely the baboon model recapitulates human EBOV infection. We will also review some of the housing requirements and behavioral attributes of baboons compared to other Old World nonhuman primates. Due to the lack of data available on the pathogenesis of Marburg virus (MARV infection in baboons, discussion of the pathogenesis of MARV infection in baboons will be limited.

  10. Metabolism of bupropion by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the biotransformation of bupropion by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes, identify the enzyme(s) catalyzing the reaction(s) and determine its kinetics. Bupropion was metabolized by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes to hydroxybupropion (OH-BUP), threo- (TB) and erythrohydrobupropion (EB). OH-bupropion was the major metabolite formed by hepatic microsomes (Km 36 ± 6 µM, Vmax 258 ± 32 pmol mg protein−1 min−1), however the formation of OH-...

  11. Influence of dehydration on locally mediated hindlimb vasodilation in baboons.

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    Thornton, R M; Proppe, D W

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies indicate that the heat stress-induced cutaneous vasodilation in baboons is attenuated during dehydration by mechanisms other than the well-known neurohumoral vasoconstrictor mechanisms. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether dehydration also attenuates locally mediated maximum hindlimb blood flow and vascular conductance in baboons. Five baboons were chronically instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and mean external iliac artery blood flow (MIBF). Hindlimb vasodilation was induced by occlusions of the external iliac artery for 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 min and by close-arterial injections of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (NP) in graded doses. These vasodilatory stimuli were applied in euhydrated and dehydrated states, the latter being produced by water deprivation for 64-68 h. Maximum MIBF and iliac vascular conductance (IVC) after arterial occlusion were reduced by 67-70% during dehydration. Also, maximum MIBF and IVC produced by ACh in the dehydrated state were 46-52% lower than in the euhydrated state. A similar reduction in the responses to NP occurred during dehydration. It is concluded that the maximum hindlimb blood flow and vascular conductance produced by local, nonneurohumoral mechanisms are attenuated in the baboon during dehydration.

  12. Inherently analog quantity representations in olive baboons (Papio anubis

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    Allison M Barnard

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Strong evidence indicates that non-human primates possess a numerical representation system, but the inherent nature of that system is still debated. Two cognitive mechanisms have been proposed to account for non-human primate numerical performance: (1 a discrete object-file system limited to quantities <4, and (2 an analog system which represents quantities comparatively but is limited by the ratio between two quantities. To test the underlying nature of non-human primate quantification, we asked eight experiment -naive olive baboons (Papio anubis to discriminate between number pairs containing small (<4, large (>4, or span (small vs. large numbers of food items presented simultaneously or sequentially. The prediction from the object-file hypothesis is that baboons will only accurately choose the larger quantity in small pairs, but not large or span pairs. Conversely, the analog system predicts that baboons will be successful with all numbers, and that success will be dependent on numerical ratio. We found that baboons successfully discriminated all pair types at above chance levels. In addition, performance significantly correlated with the ratio between the numerical values. Although performance was better for simultaneous trials than sequential trials, evidence favoring analog numerical representation emerged from both conditions, and was present even in the first exposure to number pairs. Together, these data favor the interpretation that a single, coherent analog representation system underlies spontaneous quantitative abilities in primates.

  13. Metabolism of bupropion by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes.

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    Wang, Xiaoming; Abdelrahman, Doaa R; Fokina, Valentina M; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the biotransformation of bupropion by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes, identify the enzyme(s) catalyzing the reaction(s) and determine its kinetics. Bupropion was metabolized by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes to hydroxybupropion (OH-BUP), threo- (TB) and erythrohydrobupropion (EB). OH-bupropion was the major metabolite formed by hepatic microsomes (Km 36±6 μM, Vmax 258±32 pmol mg protein(-1) min(-1)), however the formation of OH-BUP by placental microsomes was below the limit of quantification. The apparent Km values of bupropion for the formation of TB and EB by hepatic and placental microsomes were similar. The selective inhibitors of CYP2B6 (ticlopidine and phencyclidine) and monoclonal antibodies raised against human CYP2B6 isozyme caused 80% inhibition of OH-BUP formation by baboon hepatic microsomes. The chemical inhibitors of aldo-keto reductases (flufenamic acid), carbonyl reductases (menadione), and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (18β-glycyrrhetinic acid) significantly decreased the formation of TB and EB by hepatic and placental microsomes. Data indicate that CYP2B of baboon hepatic microsomes is responsible for biotransformation of bupropion to OH-BUP, while hepatic and placental short chain dehydrogenases/reductases and to a lesser extent aldo-keto reductases are responsible for the reduction of bupropion to TB and EB.

  14. Increased lymphoid tissue apoptosis in baboons with bacteremic shock.

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    Efron, Philip A; Tinsley, Kevin; Minnich, Douglas J; Monterroso, Victor; Wagner, J; Lainée, Pierre; Lorré, Katrien; Swanson, Paul E; Hotchkiss, Richard; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2004-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms of immune cell apoptosis during sepsis remain unclear. Two young adult baboons (Papio sp.) received a lethal dose of live Escherichia coli and were sacrificed at either 16 (for animal welfare concerns) or 24 h post-septic shock. An additional baboon, which received no bacteria, served as a control. Necropsy was performed immediately with subsequent immunohistochemical staining of lymphoid tissue. Immunohistologic analysis of tissues from the septic baboons revealed marked systemic lymphocyte apoptosis occurring in all lymphoid tissues examined. Focally, pyknotic and karyorrhectic lymphocytes demonstrated activation of a mitochondrial-dependent cell death pathway (active caspase 9 and apoptosis-inducing factor). Other regions demonstrated apoptotic lymphocytes with activation of a death receptor-dependent cell pathway (Fas ligand). Thus, we have demonstrated for the first time in primates that overwhelming gram-negative bacteremia produces an early and profound lymphocyte death that occurs through multiple cell death pathways. Bacteremic shock in the baboon may be an appropriate model for studying experimental therapies aimed at blocking lymphocyte apoptosis because their response appears comparable to humans dying from sepsis.

  15. Focused grooming networks and stress alleviation in wild female baboons.

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    Wittig, Roman M; Crockford, Catherine; Lehmann, Julia; Whitten, Patricia L; Seyfarth, Robert M; Cheney, Dorothy L

    2008-06-01

    We examine the relationship between glucocorticoid (GC) levels and grooming behavior in wild female baboons during a period of instability in the alpha male rank position. All females' GC levels rose significantly at the onset of the unstable period, though levels in females who were at lower risk of infanticide began to decrease sooner in the following weeks. Three factors suggest that females relied on a focused grooming network as a coping mechanism to alleviate stress. First, all females' grooming networks became less diverse in the weeks following the initial upheaval. Second, females whose grooming had already focused on a few predictable partners showed a less dramatic rise in GC levels than females whose grooming network had been more diverse. Third, females who contracted their grooming network the most experienced a greater decrease in GC levels in the following week. We conclude that close bonds with a few preferred partners allow female baboons to alleviate the stress associated with social instability.

  16. Giant cell lichenoid dermatitis in a patient with baboon syndrome.

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    Khelifa-Hamdani, Elhem; Touati-Serraj, Monia; Perriard, Jacqueline; Chavaz, Pierre; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Kaya, Gürkan

    2008-10-01

    Giant cell lichenoid dermatitis is a recently described pathological entity, which can be seen as an unusual lichenoid drug eruption, a manifestation of sarcoidosis or within herpes zoster scars. Histopathological findings include focal vacuolar alteration of the basal layer with cytoid bodies, dermal and intraepidermal multinucleated giant cells and a mixed chronic inflammatory infiltrate with a lichenoid pattern consisting of lymphocytes, histiocytes, eosinophils and plasma cells. Here, we report a giant cell lichenoid dermatitis in a 41-year-old male patient who developed, 3 days after intravenous treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for erysipelas of the left leg, a clinical picture suggesting a baboon syndrome characterized by an erythematous and pruritic eruption on the axillary, inguinal and popliteal areas and the anterior side of elbows. This is the first reported case of giant cell lichenoid dermatitis in a patient with baboon syndrome.

  17. Baboon feeding ecology informs the dietary niche of Paranthropus boisei.

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    Gabriele A Macho

    Full Text Available Hominins are generally considered eclectic omnivores like baboons, but recent isotope studies call into question the generalist status of some hominins. Paranthropus boisei and Australopithecus bahrelghazali derived 75%-80% of their tissues' δ(13C from C4 sources, i.e. mainly low-quality foods like grasses and sedges. Here I consider the energetics of P. boisei and the nutritional value of C4 foods, taking into account scaling issues between the volume of food consumed and body mass, and P. boisei's food preference as inferred from dento-cranial morphology. Underlying the models are empirical data for Papio cynocephalus dietary ecology. Paranthropus boisei only needed to spend some 37%-42% of its daily feeding time (conservative estimate on C4 sources to meet 80% of its daily requirements of calories, and all its requirements for protein. The energetic requirements of 2-4 times the basal metabolic rate (BMR common to mammals could therefore have been met within a 6-hour feeding/foraging day. The findings highlight the high nutritional yield of many C4 foods eaten by baboons (and presumably hominins, explain the evolutionary success of P. boisei, and indicate that P. boisei was probably a generalist like other hominins. The diet proposed is consistent with the species' derived morphology and unique microwear textures. Finally, the results highlight the importance of baboon/hominin hand in food acquisition and preparation.

  18. Efficacy of fenbendazole and milbemycin oxime for treating baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) infected with Trichuris trichiura.

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    Reichard, Mason V; Wolf, Roman F; Carey, David W; Garrett, Jennifer Jane; Briscoe, Heather A

    2007-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of fenbendazole (FBZ) and milbemycin oxime (MO) in the treatment of baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) with naturally acquired Trichuris trichiura infection by comparing fecal egg count reduction (FECR) tests. We assigned 7 baboons, each singly housed and confirmed infected with T. trichiura, to treatment groups of FBZ (n=3) or MO (n=3), or as a control (n=1). All (100%) baboons that received FBZ stopped shedding T. trichiura eggs within 6 d of treatment, and fecal egg counts remained negative at 65 d after treatment. Although the number of T. trichiura eggs shed per gram of feces from 2 (67%) baboons decreased significantly after the second treatment with MO, this regimen never totally eliminated eggs of T. trichiura. The results of our study indicate that FBZ was more effective for treating baboons with T. trichiura than was MO.

  19. Upper limit of cerebral blood flow autoregulation in experimental renovascular hypertension in the baboon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgaard, S; Jones, J V; MacKenzie, E T;

    1975-01-01

    The effect of arterial hypertension on cerebral blood flow was studied by the intracarotid 133Xe clearance method in baboons. The arterial blood pressure was raised in gradual steps with angiotensin. Baboons with renal hypertension of 8-12 weeks duration were studied along with normotensive baboons....... In initially normotensive baboons, cerebral blood flow remained constant until the mean arterial blood pressure had risen to the range of 140 to 154 mm Hg; thereafter cerebral blood flow increased with each rise in mean arterial blood pressure. In the chronically hypertensive baboons, cerebral blood flow...... remained constant until the mean arterial blood pressure had been elevated to the range of 155 to 169 mm Hg. Thus, in chronic hypertension it appears that there are adaptive changes in the cerebral circulation which may help to protect the brain from further increases in arterial blood pressure....

  20. Taste responses to neohesperidin dihydrochalcone in rats and baboon monkeys.

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    Naim, M; Rogatka, H; Yamamoto, T; Zehavi, U

    1982-06-01

    Preference-aversion behavior to solutions containing neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDHC) was studied rats and baboon monkeys. Electrophysiological responses evoked by application of NHDHC solutions to taste receptors innervated by the chorda tympani and the glossopharyngeal nerves were also measured. As a group, rats were indifferent to solutions containing up to 1.2 x 10(-3) M NHDHC in short and long-term preference tests. A solution containing the very high concentration of 8.2 x 10(-3) M NHDHC was consumed less than water by all rats. The aversive behavior of rats to the 8.2 x 10(-3) M NHDHC solution appeared to be due to taste quality rather than olfaction. When percent preferences were calculated on an individual basis for the long-term preference tests, 59% of the rats were indifferent to solutions containing up to 1.2 x 10(-3) M NHDHC, 33% of the animals found this solution aversive and less than 8% showed preference. Behavioral responses to a solution of 3.4 x 10(-4) M aspartame also varied considerably among rats. The electrophysiological data were in line with the behavioral responses suggesting weak taste responses for NHDHC in rats. More pronounced responses observed in the glossopharyngeal nerve as compared to the chorda tympani. Baboon monkeys showed a strong preference for solutions containing 1.6 x 10(-5) M-1.6 x 10(-3) M NHDHC. A solution of 1.6 x 10(-2) M was consumed to a lesser extent than water. It is concluded that baboon monkeys present a better experimental model than rats for investigating the sweetness of NHDHC.

  1. Learning of spatial statistics in nonhuman primates: contextual cueing in baboons (Papio papio).

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    Goujon, Annabelle; Fagot, Joel

    2013-06-15

    A growing number of theories of cognition suggest that many of our behaviors result from the ability to implicitly extract and use statistical redundancies present in complex environments. In an attempt to develop an animal model of statistical learning mechanisms in humans, the current study investigated spatial contextual cueing (CC) in nonhuman primates. Twenty-five baboons (Papio papio) were trained to search for a target (T) embedded within configurations of distrators (L) that were either predictive or non-predictive of the target location. Baboons exhibited an early CC effect, which remained intact after a 6-week delay and stable across extensive training of 20,000 trials. These results demonstrate the baboons' ability to learn spatial contingencies, as well as the robustness of CC as a cognitive phenomenon across species. Nevertheless, in both the youngest and oldest baboons, CC required many more trials to emerge than in baboons of intermediate age. As a whole, these results reveal strong similarities between CC in humans and baboons, suggesting similar statistical learning mechanisms in these two species. Therefore, baboons provide a valid model to investigate how statistical learning mechanisms develop and/or age during the life span, as well as how these mechanisms are implemented in neural networks, and how they have evolved throughout the phylogeny.

  2. Mechanisms of xenogeneic baboon platelet aggregation and phagocytosis by porcine liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

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    Qiang Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Baboons receiving xenogeneic livers from wild type and transgenic pigs survive less than 10 days. One of the major issues is the early development of profound thrombocytopenia that results in fatal hemorrhage. Histological examination of xenotransplanted livers has shown baboon platelet activation, phagocytosis and sequestration within the sinusoids. In order to study the mechanisms of platelet consumption in liver xenotransplantation, we have developed an in vitro system to examine the interaction between pig endothelial cells with baboon platelets and to thereby identify molecular mechanisms and therapies. METHODS: Fresh pig hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal and aortic endothelial cells were isolated by collagenase digestion of livers and processing of aortae from GTKO and Gal+ MGH-miniature swine. These primary cell cultures were then tested for the differential ability to induce baboon or pig platelet aggregation. Phagocytosis was evaluated by direct observation of CFSE labeled-platelets, which are incubated with endothelial cells under confocal light microscopy. Aurintricarboxylic acid (GpIb antagonist blocking interactions with von Willebrand factor/vWF, eptifibatide (Gp IIb/IIIa antagonist, and anti-Mac-1 Ab (anti-α(Mβ(2 integrin Ab were tested for the ability to inhibit phagocytosis. RESULTS: None of the pig cells induced aggregation or phagocytosis of porcine platelets. However, pig hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal and aortic endothelial cells (GTKO and Gal+ all induced moderate aggregation of baboon platelets. Importantly, pig liver sinusoidal endothelial cells efficiently phagocytosed baboon platelets, while pig aortic endothelial cells and hepatocytes had minimal effects on platelet numbers. Anti-MAC-1 Ab, aurintricarboxylic acid or eptifibatide, significantly decreased baboon platelet phagocytosis by pig liver endothelial cells (P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Although pig hepatocytes and aortic endothelial cells directly caused

  3. GROUP DECISIONS. Shared decision-making drives collective movement in wild baboons.

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    Strandburg-Peshkin, Ariana; Farine, Damien R; Couzin, Iain D; Crofoot, Margaret C

    2015-06-19

    Conflicts of interest about where to go and what to do are a primary challenge of group living. However, it remains unclear how consensus is achieved in stable groups with stratified social relationships. Tracking wild baboons with a high-resolution global positioning system and analyzing their movements relative to one another reveals that a process of shared decision-making governs baboon movement. Rather than preferentially following dominant individuals, baboons are more likely to follow when multiple initiators agree. When conflicts arise over the direction of movement, baboons choose one direction over the other when the angle between them is large, but they compromise if it is not. These results are consistent with models of collective motion, suggesting that democratic collective action emerging from simple rules is widespread, even in complex, socially stratified societies.

  4. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio).

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    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  5. Age Effects on Transfer Index Performance and Executive Control in Baboons (Papio papio

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    Elodie eBonté

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Reversal performance in the transfer index (TI task is known to improve from prosimians to apes, suggesting that this task is a marker of cognitive evolution within the primate taxa (Rumbaugh, 1970. However, the cognitive processes recruited by this task remain unclear. In the present study, 19 socially-housed baboons (Papio papio from 1.6 to 14.3 years were tested on a computerized version of the TI task, using an automated self-testing procedure. Age was a significant factor in the level of success, with the younger baboons outperforming the adults. The younger baboons also learned the pre-reversal discrimination faster and improved their post-reversal performance more rapidly than adult baboons. As the same baboons had been tested in previous studies on inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility tasks, comparison across tasks provide indicators of the underlying cognitive processes. Age variations in performance were similar between the TI task and in an adaptation of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task measuring cognitive flexibility (Bonté, Flemming and Fagot, 2011. This contrasts previous results from a task requiring motor inhibitory control (Fagot, Bonté and Hopkins, 2013. Therefore, these findings suggest that cognitive flexibility was a central component of the cognitive system that evolved within nonhuman primates. They also implicate a decline in executive control with age that begins during early adulthood in the baboon species.

  6. Metabolism of 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate by hepatic and placental microsomes of human and baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ru; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N; Zharikova, Olga L; Mattison, Donald R; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S

    2008-05-01

    Recent data from our laboratory revealed the formation of an unknown metabolite of 17 hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-HPC), used for treatment of preterm deliveries, during its perfusion across the dually perfused human placental lobule. Previously, we demonstrated that the drug is not hydrolyzed, neither in vivo nor in vitro, to progesterone and caproate. Therefore, the hypothesis for this investigation is that 17-HPC is actively metabolized by human and baboon (Papio cynocephalus) hepatic and placental microsomes. Baboon hepatic and placental microsomes were investigated to validate the nonhuman primate as an animal model for drug use during pregnancy. Data presented here indicate that human and baboon hepatic microsomes formed several mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxylated derivatives of 17-HPC. However, microsomes of human and baboon placentas metabolized 17-HPC to its mono-hydroxylated derivatives only in quantities that were a fraction of those formed by their respective livers, except for two metabolites (M16' and M17') that are unique for placenta and contributed to 25% and 75% of the total metabolites formed by human and baboon, respectively. The amounts of metabolites formed, relative to each other, by human and baboon microsomes were different suggesting that the affinity of 17-HPC to CYP enzymes and their activity could be species-dependent.

  7. DSCR9 gene simultaneous expression in placental, testicular and renal tissues from baboon (papio hamadryas

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    Rodriguez-Sanchez Irám

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2002 Takamatsu and co-workers described the human DSCR9 gene and observed that it was transcriptionally active in human testicular tissue, but no protein was identified as a product of this transcript. Similar results were obtained in chimpanzee tissue. This gene has not been detected in species other than primates, suggesting that DSCR9 is exclusively found in these mammals. Results We report evidence of DSCR9 expression in placenta, testis and kidney of baboon (Papio hamadryas. We used primers specific for DSCR9 to amplify transcripts through reverse transcription (RT coupled to polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Furthermore, PCR was used to amplify the complete DSCR9 gene from genomic DNA from three baboons. We amplified and sequenced five overlapping segments that were assembled into the 3284 bp baboon DSCR9 gene, including the putative promoter and the entire transcriptional unit (5'-UTR, CDS and 3'-UTR. Conclusions The baboon DSCR9 gene is highly similar to the human counterpart. The isolated transcripts from baboon tissues (placenta, testis and kidney of three different baboons correspond to the human orthologous gene.

  8. Rodent models of ischemic stroke lack translational relevance... are baboon models the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecien, Timothy D; Sy, Christopher; Ding, Yuchuan

    2014-05-01

    Rodent models of ischemic stroke are associated with many issues and limitations, which greatly diminish the translational potential of these studies. Recent studies demonstrate that significant differences exist between rodent and human ischemic stroke. These differences include the physical characteristics of the stroke, as well as changes in the subsequent inflammatory and molecular pathways following the acute ischemic insult. Non-human primate (NHP) models of ischemic stroke, however, are much more similar to humans. In addition to evident anatomical similarities, the physiological responses that NHPs experience during ischemic stroke are much more applicable to the human condition and thus make it an attractive model for future research. The baboon ischemic stroke model, in particular, has been studied extensively in comparison to other NHP models. Here we discuss the major shortcomings associated with rodent ischemic stroke models and provide a comparative overview of baboon ischemic stroke models. Studies have shown that baboons, although more difficult to obtain and handle, are more representative of ischemic events in humans and may have greater translational potential that can offset these deficiencies. There remain critical issues within these baboon stroke studies that need to be addressed in future investigations. The most critical issue revolves around the size and the variability of baboon ischemic stroke. Compared to rodent models, however, issues such as these can be addressed in future studies. Importantly, baboon models avoid many drawbacks associated with rodent models including vascular variability and inconsistent inflammatory responses - issues that are inherent to the species and cannot be avoided.

  9. Unusually high predation on chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) by female leopards (Panthera pardus) in the Waterberg Mountains, South Africa.

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    Jooste, E; Pitman, R T; van Hoven, W; Swanepoel, L H

    2012-01-01

    Leopards do not preferentially favour baboons as prey, but they are considered the primary predators of baboons across Africa. Even in areas where baboons are abundant, their contribution to leopard diet seldom exceeds 5% of biomass. It is suggested that the extreme aggressiveness of baboons, group vigilance and their high mobility when escaping may limit leopard predation. Male baboons are particularly aggressive, and retaliation often leads to the death of the leopard. However, evidence suggests that leopards may learn to catch and kill certain dangerous prey. This study reports predation on chacma baboons by 3 female leopards on a private game reserve in the Waterberg Mountains of South Africa. Potential leopard feeding sites were identified using global positioning system (GPS) location clusters obtained from GPS collars. Over a 5-month period, we investigated 200 potential leopard feeding sites and located 96 leopard feeding/kill sites. Baboons constituted 18.7% of the leopards' biomass intake. The majority of baboons preyed upon were adults and 70% of the kills were diurnal. In terms of the measured variables, there were no significant differences in the way the leopards preyed upon baboons, compared to the rest of the prey species.

  10. Social networks predict gut microbiome composition in wild baboons.

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    Tung, Jenny; Barreiro, Luis B; Burns, Michael B; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Lynch, Josh; Grieneisen, Laura E; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C; Blekhman, Ran; Archie, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Social relationships have profound effects on health in humans and other primates, but the mechanisms that explain this relationship are not well understood. Using shotgun metagenomic data from wild baboons, we found that social group membership and social network relationships predicted both the taxonomic structure of the gut microbiome and the structure of genes encoded by gut microbial species. Rates of interaction directly explained variation in the gut microbiome, even after controlling for diet, kinship, and shared environments. They therefore strongly implicate direct physical contact among social partners in the transmission of gut microbial species. We identified 51 socially structured taxa, which were significantly enriched for anaerobic and non-spore-forming lifestyles. Our results argue that social interactions are an important determinant of gut microbiome composition in natural animal populations-a relationship with important ramifications for understanding how social relationships influence health, as well as the evolution of group living.

  11. Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2016-04-19

    In humans and other animals, harsh circumstances in early life predict morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Multiple adverse conditions are thought to be especially toxic, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested in a prospective, longitudinal framework, especially in long-lived mammals. Here we use prospective data on 196 wild female baboons to show that cumulative early adversity predicts natural adult lifespan. Females who experience ≥3 sources of early adversity die a median of 10 years earlier than females who experience ≤1 adverse circumstances (median lifespan is 18.5 years). Females who experience the most adversity are also socially isolated in adulthood, suggesting that social processes partially explain the link between early adversity and adult survival. Our results provide powerful evidence for the developmental origins of health and disease and indicate that close ties between early adversity and survival arise even in the absence of health habit and health care-related explanations.

  12. Performance of juvenile baboons on neuropsychological tests assessing associative learning, motivation and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürcher, Nicole R; Rodriguez, Jesse S; Jenkins, Sue L; Keenan, Kate; Bartlett, Thad Q; McDonald, Thomas J; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Nijland, Mark J

    2010-05-15

    The CANTAB (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery), a system developed for human neuropsychological testing, has previously been used to assess cognitive function in two species of nonhuman primates, common marmoset monkeys and rhesus macaques. We describe the application of the system to the juvenile baboon, a nonhuman primate species offering specific investigative advantages. Juvenile baboons were trained and tested on a progressive ratio task to assess motivation, simple discrimination and simple reversal tasks to assess associative learning, and intra- and extra-dimensional set-shifting tasks to assess selective attention and attentional set-shifting, respectively. Study subjects were 8 juvenile baboons (Papio sp.), 4 females and 4 males aged 3.0+/-0.1 (mean+SEM) years and weight 8.2+/-0.4 kg. All baboons were easily trained, readily learned the neuropsychological tests and exhibited a stable performance. Applying a method such as the CANTAB has significant implications for expanding on the translational utility of the baboon in studies of neurodevelopment.

  13. Bomb-spike dating of a mummified baboon in Ludwig Cave, Namibia

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    Hodgins Greg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1982 a mummified adult female baboon was discovered on a ledge in Ludwig Cave in Namibia. A toe bone was removed for dating in July 1995. AMS radiocarbon dating of bone collagen, tendon, and skin indicates a post-modern age. Application of the atomic bomb-spike calibration curve suggests death in late 1977 and an age at death of around 19 years. Baboons roost in the cave and the mummified female, along with a mummified juvenile male discovered in 2002 and three rotting corpses discovered in 1995, were probably chased by other baboons or by leopards down a ca. 6 m drop during the rainy season, and were unable to climb the steep and very slippery slope to escape. The large number of baboons trapped in the cave in less than 20 years, and mummification of two individuals on dry, dusty ledges in the cave, may explain why large numbers of baboon skeletons have been discovered in ancient bone breccias (up to 4 Ma old in a number of caves throughout Southern Africa.

  14. Effect of sodium depletion on peripheral vascular responses to heat stress in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proppe, D W

    1987-04-01

    The cutaneous vasodilation and renal vasoconstriction in baboons during environmental heating (EH) appear to be produced predominantly by sympathetic vasoconstrictor withdrawal and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, respectively. Since these mechanisms may be influenced differently by sodium depletion, this study examined the hypothesis that sodium depletion would have a differential effect on cutaneous and renal vascular responses to EH. Sodium depletion was produced in chronically instrumented baboons by placing them on low-salt intake for 8-19 days along with diuretic administration. EH consisted of exposing the baboon to an ambient temperature of 40-42 degrees C until core temperature (Tc) reached 39.8-40.0 degrees C. Both control plasma renin activity (PRA) and the rise in PRA with Tc during EH were considerably larger in sodium-depleted baboons. However, the magnitudes of the progressive increases in iliac vascular conductance (used as an index of hindlimb cutaneous vasodilation) and renal vascular resistance with rising Tc during EH were unaltered by sodium depletion. Therefore, neither cutaneous nor renal vascular responses to EH are influenced by elevated PRA and other changes accompanying sodium depletion in the baboon.

  15. Spontaneous disc degeneration in the baboon model: magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platenberg, R C; Hubbard, G B; Ehler, W J; Hixson, C J

    2001-10-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of disability in humans. The baboon model is an excellent natural disease model to study comparable human disease, because baboons are relatively large (adult males 20-26 kg, adult females 12-17 kg), long-lived (30-45 years), well defined, easy to use, and closely related to humans. Published investigations with plain radiographs of disc degeneration in baboons indicated vertebral anatomy and changes that were remarkably similar to those seen in humans, and it would be valuable to determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluation would be useful methods for studying the model, as MRI allows multi-planar visualization of tissues without the use of intravenous contrast and it is superior for evaluating disc hydration, annulus tears, and herniations. The thoracolumbar junctions from 47 randomly selected baboons, ranging in age from 2 weeks to 34 years, were evaluated with MRI and histopathology. Excellent correlation with MRI was observed for changes in disc desiccation, height, and age (P discs seen by MRI were in baboons 14 years of age or older.

  16. Comparing responses of four ungulate species to playbacks of baboon alarm calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Dawn M; Bergman, Thore J; Cheney, Dorothy L; Nicholson, James R; Seyfarth, Robert M

    2010-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that a wide range of animals can recognize and respond appropriately to calls produced by other species. Social learning has been implicated as a possible mechanism by which heterospecific call recognition might develop. To examine whether familiarity and/or shared vulnerability with the calling species might influence the ability of sympatric species to distinguish heterospecific alarm calls, we tested whether four ungulate species (impala: Aepyceros melampus; tsessebe: Damaliscus lunatus; zebra: Equus burchelli; wildebeest: Connochaetes taurinus) could distinguish baboon (Papio hamadryas ursinus) alarm calls from other loud baboon calls produced during intra-specific aggressive interactions ('contest' calls). Overall, subjects' responses were stronger following playback of alarm calls than contest calls. Of the species tested, impala showed the strongest responses and the greatest difference in composite response scores, suggesting they were best able to differentiate call types. Compared with the other ungulate species, impala are the most frequent associates of baboons. Moreover, like baboons, they are susceptible to both lion and leopard attacks, whereas leopards rarely take the larger ungulates. Although it seems possible that high rates of association and/or shared vulnerability may influence impala's greater ability to distinguish among baboon call types, our results point to a stronger influence of familiarity. Ours is the first study to compare such abilities among several community members with variable natural histories, and we discuss future experiments that would more systematically examine development of these skills in young ungulates.

  17. Schistosoma mansoni: parasitology and immunology of baboons vaccinated with irradiated cryopreserved schistosomula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damian, R.T.; Powell, M.R.; Roberts, M.L. (Georgia Univ., Athens (USA). Dept. of Zoology); Clark, J.D. (Georgia Univ., Athens (USA). Lab. Animal Medicine); Stirewalt, M.A.; Lewis, F.A. (Biomedical Research Inst., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1985-06-01

    Young baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were vaccinated with ..gamma..-irradiated (500 Gy) cryopreserved Puerto Rican strain schistosomula of S. mansoni. Protection against heterologous, normal Kenyan Strain S. mansoni challenge infection was erratic and partial; and two putative correlates of immunity, reduced worm fecundity and change in worm location (anterior shift) were not observed. However, immunization of baboons with this vaccine resulted in a stimulated immune system. Both cellular and humoral anamnesis were demonstrable in vaccinated-challenged baboons. Schistosome infection-associated IgM hypergammaglobulinemia was also greatly reduced in vaccinated-challenged baboons. However IgG antibodies to adult, egg, and cercarial antigens were increased after challenge infection in preimmunized baboons. Vaccination appears to have resulted in a redirection of the immune system into anti-parasite channels, but this more specific immune response was insufficient to confer good protection against challenge infection in this experiment. The dampening effect of the vaccine on the hypergammaglobulinemia of schistosomiasis is another candidate for a possible ''anti-pathogenesis'' effect of irradiated schistosome larval vaccines.

  18. Human infants and baboons show the same pattern of handedness for a communicative gesture.

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    Helene Meunier

    Full Text Available To test the role of gestures in the origin of language, we studied hand preferences for grasping or pointing to objects at several spatial positions in human infants and adult baboons. If the roots of language are indeed in gestural communication, we expect that human infants and baboons will present a comparable difference in their pattern of laterality according to task: both should be more right-hand/left-hemisphere specialized when communicating by pointing than when simply grasping objects. Our study is the first to test both human infants and baboons on the same communicative task. Our results show remarkable convergence in the distribution of the two species' hand biases on the two kinds of tasks: In both human infants and baboons, right-hand preference was significantly stronger for the communicative task than for grasping objects. Our findings support the hypothesis that left-lateralized language may be derived from a gestural communication system that was present in the common ancestor of baboons and humans.

  19. S110, a novel decitabine dinucleotide, increases fetal hemoglobin levels in baboons (P. anubis

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    Banzon Virryan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S110 is a novel dinucleoside analog that could have advantages over existing DNA methyltransferase (DNMT inhibitors such as decitabine. A potential therapeutic role for S110 is to increase fetal hemoglobin (HbF levels to treat β-hemoglobinopathies. In these experiments the effect of S110 on HbF levels in baboons and its ability to reduce DNA methylation of the γ-globin gene promoter in vivo were evaluated. Methods The effect of S110 on HbF and γ-globin promoter DNA methylation was examined in cultured human erythroid progenitors and in vivo in the baboon pre-clinical model. S110 pharmacokinetics was also examined in the baboon model. Results S110 increased HbF and reduced DNA methylation of the γ-globin promoter in human erythroid progenitors and in baboons when administered subcutaneously. Pharmacokinetic analysis was consistent with rapid conversion of S110 into the deoxycytosine analog decitabine that binds and depletes DNA. Conclusion S110 is rapidly converted into decitabine, hypomethylates DNA, and induces HbF in cultured human erythroid progenitors and the baboon pre-clinical model.

  20. Olfactomedin-like 3 (OLFML3) gene expression in baboon and human ocular tissues: cornea, lens, uvea and retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iràm Pablo; Garza-Rodríguez, Maria Lourdes; Mohamed-Noriega, Karim; Voruganti, Venkata Saroja; Tejero, Maria Elizabeth; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Ibave, Diana Cristina Perez; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E.; Mohamed-Noriega, Jibran; Martinez-Fierro, Margarita L; Reséndez-Pérez, Diana; Cole, Shelley A; Cavazos-Adame, Humberto; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Mohamed-Hamsho, Jesús; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Background Olfactomedin-like is a polyfunctional polymeric glycoprotein. This family has at least four members. One member of this family is OLFML3, which is preferentially expressed in placenta but is also detected in other adult tissues including the liver and heart. However, the orthologous rat gene is expressed in the iris, sclera, trabecular meshwork, retina, and optic nerve. Methods OLFML3 amplification was performed by RT-PCR from human and baboon ocular tissues. The products were cloned and sequenced. Results We report OFML3 expression in human and baboon eye. The full CDS has 1221 bp, from which a OFR of 406 amino acid was obtained. The baboon OLFML3 gene nucleotidic sequence has 98%, and amino acidic 99% similarity with humans. Conclusions OLFML3 expression in human and baboon ocular tissues and its high similarity make the baboon a powerful model to deduce the physiological and/or metabolic function of this protein in the eye. PMID:23398349

  1. A non-Levy random walk in chacma baboons: what does it mean?

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    Cédric Sueur

    Full Text Available The Lévy walk is found from amoebas to humans and has been described as the optimal strategy for food research. Recent results, however, have generated controversy about this conclusion since animals also display alternatives to the Lévy walk such as the Brownian walk or mental maps and because movement patterns found in some species only seem to depend on food patches distribution. Here I show that movement patterns of chacma baboons do not follow a Lévy walk but a Brownian process. Moreover this Brownian walk is not the main process responsible for movement patterns of baboons. Findings about their speed and trajectories show that baboons use metal maps and memory to find resources. Thus the Brownian process found in this species appears to be more dependent on the environment or might be an alternative when known food patches are depleted and when animals have to find new resources.

  2. Male-driven grooming bouts in mixed-sex dyads of Kinda baboons (Papio kindae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyher, Anna H; Phillips-Conroy, Jane E; Fourrier, Marc S; Jolly, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the Central African Kinda baboon (Papio kindae) is not well documented. Having previously noted distinctive grooming behavior in several Kinda baboon populations, we investigated the topic more systematically in the Kafue National Park, Zambia. We recorded the duration and details of male-female dyadic interactions (approaches, withdrawals and time spent grooming) in the early morning and late afternoon. Such interactions were more often initiated by the male and terminated by the female partner. The male groomed the female more often, and longer, than she groomed him, regardless of the female's reproductive state or the presence of an infant. The bias towards male grooming was stronger in morning than evening interactions. These behaviors, whose function is not immediately obvious, and which are unlike those previously reported in baboons, further exemplify the distinctiveness of the taxon.

  3. The Regulation of Proresolving Lipid Mediator Profiles in Baboon Pneumonia by Inhaled Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalli, Jesmond; Kraft, Bryan D.; Colas, Romain A.; Shinohara, Masakazu; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Hess, Dean R.; Chiang, Nan; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Choi, Augustine M.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Strategies for the treatment of bacterial pneumonia beyond traditional antimicrobial therapy have been limited. The recently discovered novel genus of lipid mediators, coined “specialized proresolving mediators” (SPMs), which orchestrate clearance of recruited leukocytes and restore epithelial barrier integrity, have offered new insight into the resolution of inflammation. We performed lipid mediator (LM) metabololipidomic profiling and identification of LMs on peripheral blood leukocytes and plasma from a baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Leukocytes and plasma were isolated from whole blood of S. pneumoniae–infected (n = 5–6 per time point) and control, uninfected baboons (n = 4 per time point) at 0, 24, 48, and 168 hours. In a subset of baboons with pneumonia (n = 3), we administered inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) at 48 hours (200–300 ppm for 60–90 min). Unstimulated leukocytes from control animals produced a proresolving LM signature with elevated resolvins and lipoxins. In contrast, serum-treated, zymosan-stimulated leukocytes and leukocytes from baboons with S. pneumoniae pneumonia produced a proinflammatory LM signature profile with elevated leukotriene B4 and prostaglandins. Plasma from baboons with S. pneumoniae pneumonia also displayed significantly reduced LM–SPM levels, including eicosapentaenoic acid–derived E-series resolvins (RvE) and lipoxins. CO inhalation increased levels of plasma RvE and lipoxins relative to preexposure levels. These results establish the leukocyte and plasma LM profiles biosynthesized during S. pneumoniae pneumonia in baboons and provide evidence for pneumonia-induced dysregulation of these proresolution programs. Moreover, these SPM profiles are partially restored with inhaled low-dose CO and SPM, which may shorten the time to pneumonia resolution. PMID:25568926

  4. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio.

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    Sascha Knauf

    Full Text Available The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum, yaws (ssp. pertenue, and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90% baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560 versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7. Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication

  5. Are there advantages in the use of specific pathogen-free baboons in pig organ xenotransplantation models?

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    Zhou, Huidong; Iwase, Hayato; Wolf, Roman F; Ekser, Burcin; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Hara, Hidetaka; White, Gary; Cooper, David K C

    2014-01-01

    Baboons have natural antibodies against pig antigens. We have investigated whether there are differences in anti-non-Gal pig antibody levels between baboons maintained under specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions and those housed under conventional conditions (non-SPF) that might be associated with improved outcome after pig-to-baboon organ transplantation. Baboons (n = 40) were housed indoors (SPF n = 8) or in indoor/outdoor pens (non-SPF n = 32) in colonies of similar size and structure. Non-SPF colonies harbor a number of pathogens common to non-human primate species, whereas many of these pathogens have been eliminated from the SPF colony. Complete blood cell counts (CBC), blood chemistry, and anti-non-Gal IgM and IgG levels were monitored. There were no significant differences in CBC or blood chemistry between SPF and non-SPF baboons. Anti-non-Gal IgM levels were significantly lower in the SPF baboons than in the non-SPF baboons (MFI 7.1 vs. 8.8, P 20; if these three baboons are omitted, the mean MFIs were 4.8 (SPF) vs. 7.5 (non-SPF) (P xenotransplantation studies as the initial binding of anti-pig IgM to an α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout pig organ may be less, thus resulting in less complement and/or endothelial cell activation. However, even under identical SPF conditions, an occasional baboon will express a high level of anti-non-Gal IgM, the reason for which remains uncertain.

  6. Heritability of lumbar trabecular bone mechanical properties in baboons.

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    Havill, L M; Allen, M R; Bredbenner, T L; Burr, D B; Nicolella, D P; Turner, C H; Warren, D M; Mahaney, M C

    2010-03-01

    Genetic effects on mechanical properties have been demonstrated in rodents, but not confirmed in primates. Our aim was to quantify the proportion of variation in vertebral trabecular bone mechanical properties that is due to the effects of genes. L3 vertebrae were collected from 110 females and 46 male baboons (6-32 years old) from a single extended pedigree. Cranio-caudally oriented trabecular bone cores were scanned with microCT then tested in monotonic compression to determine apparent ultimate stress, modulus, and toughness. Age and sex effects and heritability (h(2)) were assessed using maximum likelihood-based variance components methods. Additive effects of genes on residual trait variance were significant for ultimate stress (h(2)=0.58), toughness (h(2)=0.64), and BV/TV (h(2)=0.55). When BV/TV was accounted for, the residual variance in ultimate stress accounted for by the additive effects of genes was no longer significant. Toughness, however, showed evidence of a non-BV/TV-related genetic effect. Overall, maximum stress and modulus show strong genetic effects that are nearly entirely due to bone volume. Toughness shows strong genetic effects related to bone volume and shows additional genetic effects (accounting for 10% of the total trait variance) that are independent of bone volume. These results support continued use of bone volume as a focal trait to identify genes related to skeletal fragility, but also show that other focal traits related to toughness and variation in the organic component of bone matrix will enhance our ability to find additional genes that are particularly relevant to fatigue-related fractures.

  7. Methoxychlor and its metabolites inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupesh K; Aberdeen, Graham; Babus, Janice K; Albrecht, Eugene D; Flaws, Jodi A

    2007-08-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC), an organochlorine pesticide, inhibits growth and induces atresia of antral follicles in rodents. MXC metabolites, mono-OH MXC (mono-OH) and bis-OH MXC (HPTE), are thought to be more toxic than the parent compound. Although studies have examined effects of MXC in rodents, few studies have evaluated the effects of MXC in primates. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that MXC, mono-OH, and HPTE inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles were isolated from adult baboon ovaries and cultured with vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide; DMSO), MXC (1-100 micro g/ml), mono-OH (0.1-10 micro g/ml), or HPTE (0.1-10 micro g/ml) for 96 hr. Growth was monitored at 24 hr intervals. After culture, follicles were processed for histological evaluation of atresia. MXC, mono-OH, and HPTE significantly inhibited follicular growth and increased atresia compared to DMSO. Moreover, the adverse effects of MXC and its metabolites on growth and atresia in baboon antral follicles were observed at lower (100-fold) doses than those causing similar effects in rodents. These data suggest that MXC and its metabolites inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles, and that primate follicles are more sensitive to MXC than rodent follicles.

  8. Carbon-11 labelled ketamine-synthesis, distribution in mice and PET studies in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiue, C.-Y.; Vallabhahosula, Shankar; Wolf, Alfred P.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Schlyer, David J.; Arnett, Carroll D.; Zhou Yiguo

    1997-02-01

    No-carrier-added (NCA)[{sup 11}C]({+-})-ketamine (2a) and its enantiomers (+)-2b and (-)-2c were synthesized by methylation of the corresponding norketamine (1a-c) with [{sup 11}C]H{sub 3}I in an overall radiochemical yield of 20% (EOB) with specific activities of 0.35-0.45 Ci/{mu}mole at EOB in a synthesis time of 40 min from EOB. Compound 2a was metabolized rapidly in mouse brain and labeled metabolites appeared in baboon plasma. PET studies of compounds 2a-c in a baboon showed that influx of compounds 2a-c into the brain was high for the first few min but radioactivity then declined rapidly. Although the retention of radioactivity in the baboon striatum was not significantly different for 2a-c 20 min post-injection, graphical analysis of time-activity data for each enantiomer and for the racemate in baboon striatum suggested that (+)-ketamine may interact with receptors slightly more effectively than its (-)-enantiomer or racemate. However, due to its rapid metabolism in the brain and a similar uptake in the striatum and cerebellum, [{sup 11}C]ketamine may not be an ideal tracer for studying NMDA receptor with PET.

  9. Sarcoglycan complex in masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles of baboons: an immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cutroneo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The sarcoglycan complex consists of a group of single-pass transmembrane glycoproteins that are essential to maintain the integrity of muscle membranes. Any mutation in each sarcoglycan gene causes a series of recessive autosomal dystrophin-positive muscular dystrophies. Negative fibres for sarcoglycans have never been found in healthy humans and animals. In this study, we have investigated whether the social ranking has an influence on the expression of sarcoglycans in the skeletal muscles of healthy baboons. Biopsies of masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles were processed for confocal immunohistochemical detection of sarcoglycans. Our findings showed that baboons from different social rankings exhibited different sarcoglycan expression profiles. While in dominant baboons almost all muscles were stained for sarcoglycans, only 55% of muscle fibres showed a significant staining. This different expression pattern is likely to be due to the living conditions of these primates. Sarcoglycans which play a key role in muscle activity by controlling contractile forces may influence the phenotype of muscle fibres, thus determining an adaptation to functional conditions. We hypothesize that this intraspecies variation reflects an epigenetic modification of the muscular protein network that allows baboons to adapt progressively to a different social status.

  10. Mapping cocaine binding sites in human and baboon brain in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J S; Volkow, N D; Wolf, A P; Dewey, S L; Schlyer, D J; Macgregor, R R; Hitzemann, R; Logan, J; Bendriem, B; Gatley, S J

    1989-01-01

    The first direct measurements of cocaine binding in the brain of normal human volunteers and baboons have been made by using positron emission tomography (PET) and tracer doses of [N-11C-methyl]-(-)-cocaine ([11C]cocaine). Cocaine's binding and release from brain are rapid with the highest regional uptake of carbon-11 occurring in the corpus striatum at 4-10 minutes after intravenous injection of labeled cocaine. This was followed by a clearance to half the peak value at about 25 minutes with the overall time course paralleling the previously documented time course of the euphoria experienced after intravenous cocaine administration. Blockade of the dopamine reuptake sites with nomifensine reduced the striatal but not the cerebellar uptake of [11C]cocaine in baboons indicating that cocaine binding is associated with the dopamine reuptake site in the corpus striatum. A comparison of labeled metabolites of cocaine in human and baboon plasma showed that while cocaine is rapidly metabolized in both species, the profile of labeled metabolites is different, with baboon plasma containing significant amounts of labeled carbon dioxide, and human plasma containing no significant labeled carbon dioxide. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using [11C]cocaine and PET to map binding sites for cocaine in human brain, to monitor its kinetics, and to characterize its binding mechanism by using appropriate pharmacological challenges.

  11. Inferential reasoning and modality dependent discrimination learning in olive baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Vanessa; Fischer, Julia

    2009-08-01

    Apes use inferential reasoning by exclusion to locate food both in the visual and auditory domain. To test whether olive baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis) show similar abilities as the apes object choice experiments with differing information about food located in 1 of 2 cups were conducted in the visual and auditory modality. Although all baboons (N = 7) were able to locate the reward when they had previously seen it, they failed to make use of auditory cues or arbitrary acoustic signals. When only partial information was given (i.e., only 1 cup was opened) 4 of the baboons were apparently able to infer the location of the reward by reasoning, whereas the other 3 may have adopted an alternative strategy ("avoid the empty cup"). In addition, 3 of the baboons were able to use arbitrary visual markers to locate the food reward. The results suggest that inferential reasoning is not restricted to apes but is shared with Old World monkeys. Furthermore, they also highlight some important differences in the processing of auditory versus visual information in operant conditioning settings.

  12. Rank and grooming reciprocity among females in a mixed-sex group of captive hamadryas baboons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leinfelder, I.; Vries, Han de; Deleu, R.; Nelissen, M.

    2001-01-01

    In a mixed-sex, captive group of hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas hamadryas) we investigated whether female grooming relationships are affected by their dominance ranks. Seyfarths [1977] grooming for support model and Barrett et al.s [1999] biological market model both predict that in primate grou

  13. Mitochondrial Genome Analyses Suggest Multiple Trichuris Species in Humans, Baboons, and Pigs from Different Geographical Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed B F Hawash

    Full Text Available The whipworms Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis are two parasitic nematodes of humans and pigs, respectively. Although whipworms in human and non-human primates historically have been referred to as T. trichiura, recent reports suggest that several Trichuris spp. are found in primates.We sequenced and annotated complete mitochondrial genomes of Trichuris recovered from a human in Uganda, an olive baboon in the US, a hamadryas baboon in Denmark, and two pigs from Denmark and Uganda. Comparative analyses using other published mitochondrial genomes of Trichuris recovered from a human and a porcine host in China and from a françois' leaf-monkey (China were performed, including phylogenetic analyses and pairwise genetic and amino acid distances. Genetic and protein distances between human Trichuris in Uganda and China were high (~19% and 15%, respectively suggesting that they represented different species. Trichuris from the olive baboon in US was genetically related to human Trichuris in China, while the other from the hamadryas baboon in Denmark was nearly identical to human Trichuris from Uganda. Baboon-derived Trichuris was genetically distinct from Trichuris from françois' leaf monkey, suggesting multiple whipworm species circulating among non-human primates. The genetic and protein distances between pig Trichuris from Denmark and other regions were roughly 9% and 6%, respectively, while Chinese and Ugandan whipworms were more closely related.Our results indicate that Trichuris species infecting humans and pigs are phylogenetically distinct across geographical regions, which might have important implications for the implementation of suitable and effective control strategies in different regions. Moreover, we provide support for the hypothesis that Trichuris infecting primates represents a complex of cryptic species with some species being able to infect both humans and non-human primates.

  14. Kinetics of glyburide metabolism by hepatic and placental microsomes of human and baboon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharikova, Olga L; Ravindran, Selvan; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N; Hill, Ronald A; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S

    2007-06-15

    Glyburide (glibenclamide) is under investigation for treatment of gestational diabetes. Two metabolites of glyburide have been previously identified in patients, namely, 4-trans-(M1) and 3-cis-(M2) hydroxycyclohexyl glyburide. Recently, the metabolism of glyburide by microsomes of liver and placenta from humans and baboons revealed the formation of four additional metabolites: 4-cis-(M2a), 3-trans-(M3), and 2-trans-(M4) hydroxycyclohexyl glyburide, and ethyl-hydroxy glyburide (M5). The aim of this investigation was to determine the kinetics for the metabolism of glyburide by cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes of human and baboon placental and hepatic microsomes. The metabolism of glyburide by microsomes from the four organs revealed saturation kinetics and apparent K(m) values between 4 and 12 microM. However, the rates for formation of the metabolites varied between organs and species. M1 was the major metabolite (36% of total), formed by human hepatic microsomes with V(max) of 80+/-13 pmol mg protein(-1)min(-1), and together with M2, accounted for only 51% of the total. M5 was the major metabolite (87%) formed by human placental microsomes with V(max) of 11 pmol mg protein(-1)min(-1). In baboon liver, M5 had the highest rate of formation (V(max) 135+/-32 pmol mg protein(-1)min(-1), 39% of total), and in its placenta, was M4 (V(max) 0.7+/-0.1 pmol mg protein(-1)min(-1), 65%). The activity of human and baboon hepatic microsomes in metabolizing glyburide was similar, but the activity of human and baboon placental microsomes was 7% and 0.3% of their respective hepatic microsomes. The data obtained suggest that more than 1 CYP isozyme is responsible for catalyzing the hydroxylation of glyburide.

  15. Pleistocene aridification cycles shaped the contemporary genetic architecture of Southern African baboons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riashna Sithaldeen

    Full Text Available Plio-Pleistocene environmental change influenced the evolutionary history of many animal lineages in Africa, highlighting key roles for both climate and tectonics in the evolution of Africa's faunal diversity. Here, we explore diversification in the southern African chacma baboon Papio ursinus sensu lato and reveal a dominant role for increasingly arid landscapes during past glacial cycles in shaping contemporary genetic structure. Recent work on baboons (Papio spp. supports complex lineage structuring with a dominant pulse of diversification occurring 1-2Ma, and yet the link to palaeoenvironmental change remains largely untested. Phylogeographic reconstruction based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data supports a scenario where chacma baboon populations were likely restricted to refugia during periods of regional cooling and drying through the Late Pleistocene. The two lineages of chacma baboon, ursinus and griseipes, are strongly geographically structured, and demographic reconstruction together with spatial analysis of genetic variation point to possible climate-driven isolating events where baboons may have retreated to more optimum conditions during cooler, drier periods. Our analysis highlights a period of continuous population growth beginning in the Middle to Late Pleistocene in both the ursinus and the PG2 griseipes lineages. All three clades identified in the study then enter a state of declining population size (Nef through to the Holocene; this is particularly marked in the last 20,000 years, most likely coincident with the Last Glacial Maximum. The pattern recovered here conforms to expectations based on the dynamic regional climate trends in southern Africa through the Pleistocene and provides further support for complex patterns of diversification in the region's biodiversity.

  16. Experimental infections of baboons (Papio spp. and vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops with Trichinella zimbabwensis and successful treatment with ivermectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mukaratirwa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Trichinella zimbabwensis infections were established in three baboons (Papios p.and four vervet monkeys (Cercopithecuase thiops and the clinical-pathological manifestations assessed. The infected animals showed clinical signs ranging from fever, diarrhoea, periorbitaol edema and muscular pain in varying degrees. One baboon became blind due to the infection. Levels of creatinine phosphokinase and lactated ehydrogenase increased to reach a peak on Day 42 post-infection(pifor both baboons and monkeys. Blood parameters such as packed cell volume, levels of red blood cells and white blood cells did not change significantly from the normal ranges except for the levels of eosinophils which peaked above the normal ranges at Day 28 and 56 pi in baboons and at Day 56 pi in monkeys.

  17. Road and Street Centerlines, Baboon Peak, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'Baboon Peak'. The extent of these data...

  18. Brucella papionis sp. nov., isolated from baboons (Papio spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatmore, Adrian M; Davison, Nicholas; Cloeckaert, Axel; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Zygmunt, Michel S; Brew, Simon D; Perrett, Lorraine L; Koylass, Mark S; Vergnaud, Gilles; Quance, Christine; Scholz, Holger C; Dick, Edward J; Hubbard, Gene; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E

    2014-12-01

    Two Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming coccoid bacteria (strains F8/08-60(T) and F8/08-61) isolated from clinical specimens obtained from baboons (Papio spp.) that had delivered stillborn offspring were subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, both strains, which possessed identical sequences, were assigned to the genus Brucella. This placement was confirmed by extended multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), where both strains possessed identical sequences, and whole-genome sequencing of a representative isolate. All of the above analyses suggested that the two strains represent a novel lineage within the genus Brucella. The strains also possessed a unique profile when subjected to the phenotyping approach classically used to separate species of the genus Brucella, reacting only with Brucella A monospecific antiserum, being sensitive to the dyes thionin and fuchsin, being lysed by bacteriophage Wb, Bk2 and Fi phage at routine test dilution (RTD) but only partially sensitive to bacteriophage Tb, and with no requirement for CO2 and no production of H2S but strong urease activity. Biochemical profiling revealed a pattern of enzyme activity and metabolic capabilities distinct from existing species of the genus Brucella. Molecular analysis of the omp2 locus genes showed that both strains had a novel combination of two highly similar omp2b gene copies. The two strains shared a unique fingerprint profile of the multiple-copy Brucella-specific element IS711. Like MLSA, a multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) showed that the isolates clustered together very closely, but represent a distinct group within the genus Brucella. Isolates F8/08-60(T) and F8/08-61 could be distinguished clearly from all known species of the genus Brucella and their biovars by both phenotypic and molecular properties. Therefore, by applying the species concept for the genus Brucella suggested by the ICSP

  19. Mitochondrial genome analyses suggest multiple Trichuris species in humans, baboons, and pigs from different geographical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawash, Mohamed B. F.; Andersen, Lee O.; Gasser, Robin B.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The whipworms Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis are two parasitic nematodes of humans and pigs, respectively. Although whipworms in human and non-human primates historically have been referred to as T. trichiura, recent reports suggest that several Trichuris spp. are found...... in primates. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We sequenced and annotated complete mitochondrial genomes of Trichuris recovered from a human in Uganda, an olive baboon in the US, a hamadryas baboon in Denmark, and two pigs from Denmark and Uganda. Comparative analyses using other published mitochondrial genomes...... of Trichuris recovered from a human and a porcine host in China and from a françois' leaf-monkey (China) were performed, including phylogenetic analyses and pairwise genetic and amino acid distances. Genetic and protein distances between human Trichuris in Uganda and China were high (~19% and 15%, respectively...

  20. Activation of porcine cytomegalovirus, but not porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus, in pig-to-baboon xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nicolas J; Livingston, Christine; Knosalla, Christoph; Barth, Rolf N; Yamamoto, Shin; Gollackner, Bernd; Dor, Frank J M F; Buhler, Leo; Sachs, David H; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Cooper, David K C; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-05-01

    Tissue-invasive disease due to porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) has been demonstrated after pig-to-baboon solid-organ xenotransplantation. Porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus (PLHV)-1 is associated with B cell proliferation and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in swine but has not been observed in pig-to-primate xenotransplantation. Activation of PCMV and PLHV-1 was investigated in 22 pig-to-baboon xenotransplants by use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PCMV was found in all xenografts; increased viral replication occurred in 68% of xenografts during immunosuppression. PLHV-1 was found in 12 xenografts (55%); no increases in viral replication occurred during immunosuppression. Control immunosuppressed swine coinfected with PCMV and PLHV-1 had activation of PCMV but not PLHV-1. PCMV, but not PLHV-1, is activated in solid-organ xenotransplantation.

  1. Role of Grooming in Reducing Tick Load in Wild Baboons (Papio cynocephalus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyi, Mercy Y; Tung, Jenny; Jeneby, Maamun; Patel, Nilesh B; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2013-03-01

    Nonhuman primate species spend a conspicuous amount of time grooming during social interactions, a behavior that probably serves both social and health-related functions. While the social implications of grooming have been relatively well studied, less attention has been paid to the health benefits, especially the removal of ectoparasites, which may act as vectors in disease transmission. In this study, we examined the relationship between grooming behavior, tick load (number of ticks), and haemoprotozoan infection status in a population of wild free-ranging baboons (Papio cynocephalus). We found that the amount of grooming received was influenced by an individual's age, sex and dominance rank. The amount of grooming received, in turn, affected the tick load of an individual. Baboons with higher tick loads had lower packed red cell volume (PCV or haematocrit), one general measure of health status. We detected a tick-borne haemoprotozoan, Babesia microti, but its low prevalence in the population precluded identifying sources of variance in infection.

  2. Zoledronic acid-associated symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE): report of baboon syndrome in a woman with recurrent metastatic breast cancer after receiving zoledronic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background:  Baboon syndrome is a distinctive skin reaction in which the patient typically develops erythematous buttocks that appear similar to those of a baboon.  The non-contact allergenic variant of baboon syndrome is also referred to as symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE).  Zoledronic acid is a bisphosphonate that is used in patients with metastatic cancer to prevent bone complications. Purpose:  Zoledronic acid-associated baboon syndrome is ...

  3. Antenatal Corticosteroids Alter Insulin Signaling Pathways in Fetal Baboon Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    BLANCO, Cynthia L.; MOREIRA, Alvaro G.; McGILL, Lisa L.; ANZUETO, Diana G.; NATHANIELSZ, Peter; MUSI, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Objective We hypothesize that prenatal exposure to glucocorticoids (GCs) will negatively alter the insulin signal transduction pathway and has differing effects on the fetus according to gestational age at exposure. Methods Twenty-three fetal baboons were delivered from twenty-three healthy, non-diabetic mothers. Twelve preterm (0.67 gestational age) and eleven near term (0.95 gestational age) baboons were euthanized immediately after delivery. Half of the pregnant baboons at each gestation received two doses of intramuscular betamethasone 24-hours apart (170 μg.kg−1) before delivery, while the other half received no intervention. Vastus lateralis muscle was obtained from postnatal animals to measure protein content and gene expression of insulin receptor (IR)-β, IR-β Tyr 1361 phosphorylation (pIR-β), IR substate-1 (IRS-1), IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation (pIRS-1), p85 subunit of PI3-kinase (p85), Akt (Protein Kinase B), phospho-Akt Ser473 (pAkt), Akt-1, Akt-2, and glucose transporters (GLUT1 and GLUT4). Results Skeletal muscle from preterm baboons exposed to glucocorticoids had markedly reduced protein content of Akt and Akt-1 (respectively, 73% and 72% from 0.67 gestational age Control, P<0.001); IR-β and pIR-β were decreased (respectively, 94% and 85%, P<0.01) in the muscle of premature GC exposed fetuses, but not in term fetuses. GLUT1 and GLUT4 tended to increase with GC exposure in preterm animals (P=0.09), while GLUT4 increased 6.0 fold in term animals after GC exposure (P<0.05). Conclusion Exposure to a single course of antenatal GCs during fetal life alters the insulin-signaling pathway in fetal muscle in a manner dependent on the stage of gestation. PMID:24756099

  4. Serum Vitamin D Concentrations in Baboons (Papio spp.) during Pregnancy and Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Mahaney, Michael M; Hubbard, Gene B.; DICK, EDWARD J.; Kocak, Mehmet; Gupta, Sonali; Carrillo, Maira; Schenone, Mauro; Postlethwaite, Arnold; Slominski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with vitamin D deficiency, which can lead to serious problems during pregnancy. However, the mechanisms of the deficiency and guidelines for vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy are not established yet, and variations in environmental exposures combined with the difficulties of performing research in pregnant women are obstacles in the evaluation of vitamin D metabolism. Baboons (Papio spp.) are an excellent, well-established model for reproductive research and rep...

  5. The Ontogeny of the Endocrine Pancreas in the Fetal/Newborn Baboon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Amy R.; Blanco, Cynthia L.; Perego, Carla; Finzi, Giovanna; La Rosa, Stefano; Capella, Carlo; Guardado-Mendoza, Rodolfo; Casiraghi, Francesca; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Johnson, Marney; Dick, Edward J.; Folli, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Background Erratic regulation of glucose metabolism including hyperglycemia is a common condition of premature infants and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Objective To examine histological and ultra-structural differences in the endocrine pancreas in fetal (throughout gestation) and neonatal baboons. Methods Twelve fetal baboons were delivered at 125 days (d) gestational age (GA), 140dGA, or 175dGA. Eight animals were delivered at term (185dGA); half were fed for 5d. Seventy-three non-diabetic adult baboons were used for comparison. Pancreatic tissue was studied utilizing light microscopy, confocal imaging and electron microscopy. Results The fetal and neonatal endocrine pancreas islet architecture became more organized as GA advanced. The percent areas of α-β-δ-cell type were similar within each fetal and newborn GA (NS), but were higher than the adults (P<0.05) regardless of GA. The ratio of β-cells within the islet (whole and core) increased with gestation (P<0.01). Neonatal baboons who survived for 5 days (feeding), had a 2.5-fold increase in pancreas weight compared to their counterparts euthanized at birth (P=0.01). Endocrine cells were found amongst exocrine ductal and acinar cells in 125,140 and 175dGA fetuses. Subpopulation of cells that co-expressed trypsin and glucagon/insulin show the presence of cells with mixed endo-exocrine lineage in fetuses. Conclusions The fetal endocrine pancreas has no prevalence of a of α-β-δ-cell type with larger endocrine cell percent areas than adults. Cells with mixed endocrine/exocrine phenotype occur during fetal development. Developmental differences may play a role in glucose homeostasis during the neonatal period and may have long term implications. PMID:22723715

  6. Microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes in the olive baboon (papio anabis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1975-01-01

    1.1. The activity of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes—azo reductase, nitroreductase, p-hydroxylation, N-demethylation, O-demethylation, NADPH cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome P P-450—in the olive baboon are lower than in other animal species, e.g. mouse, rat, guinea-pig. 2. 2. The level...... and beta-glucuronidase is present more in the lysosomal than in the microsomal fraction....

  7. Treponema pallidum infection in the wild baboons of East Africa: distribution and genetic characterization of the strains responsible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Kristin N; Fyumagwa, Robert D; Hoare, Richard; Wambura, Philemon N; Coppenhaver, Dorian H; Sapolsky, Robert M; Alberts, Susan C; Tung, Jenny; Rogers, Jeffrey; Kilewo, Morris; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K; Leendertz, Fabian H; Armelagos, George J; Knauf, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for decades that wild baboons are naturally infected with Treponema pallidum, the bacterium that causes the diseases syphilis (subsp. pallidum), yaws (subsp. pertenue), and bejel (subsp. endemicum) in humans. Recently, a form of T. pallidum infection associated with severe genital lesions has been described in wild baboons at Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. In this study, we investigated ten additional sites in Tanzania and Kenya using a combination of macroscopic observation and serology, in order to determine whether the infection was present in each area. In addition, we obtained genetic sequence data from six polymorphic regions using T. pallidum strains collected from baboons at two different Tanzanian sites. We report that lesions consistent with T. pallidum infection were present at four of the five Tanzanian sites examined, and serology was used to confirm treponemal infection at three of these. By contrast, no signs of treponemal infection were observed at the six Kenyan sites, and serology indicated T. pallidum was present at only one of them. A survey of sexually mature baboons at Lake Manyara National Park in 2006 carried out as part of this study indicated that roughly ten percent displayed T. pallidum-associated lesions severe enough to cause major structural damage to the genitalia. Finally, we found that T. pallidum strains from Lake Manyara National Park and Serengeti National Park were genetically distinct, and a phylogeny suggested that baboon strains may have diverged prior to the clade containing human strains. We conclude that T. pallidum infection associated with genital lesions appears to be common in the wild baboons of the regions studied in Tanzania. Further study is needed to elucidate the infection's transmission mode, its associated morbidity and mortality, and the relationship between baboon and human strains.

  8. Treponema pallidum infection in the wild baboons of East Africa: distribution and genetic characterization of the strains responsible.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin N Harper

    Full Text Available It has been known for decades that wild baboons are naturally infected with Treponema pallidum, the bacterium that causes the diseases syphilis (subsp. pallidum, yaws (subsp. pertenue, and bejel (subsp. endemicum in humans. Recently, a form of T. pallidum infection associated with severe genital lesions has been described in wild baboons at Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. In this study, we investigated ten additional sites in Tanzania and Kenya using a combination of macroscopic observation and serology, in order to determine whether the infection was present in each area. In addition, we obtained genetic sequence data from six polymorphic regions using T. pallidum strains collected from baboons at two different Tanzanian sites. We report that lesions consistent with T. pallidum infection were present at four of the five Tanzanian sites examined, and serology was used to confirm treponemal infection at three of these. By contrast, no signs of treponemal infection were observed at the six Kenyan sites, and serology indicated T. pallidum was present at only one of them. A survey of sexually mature baboons at Lake Manyara National Park in 2006 carried out as part of this study indicated that roughly ten percent displayed T. pallidum-associated lesions severe enough to cause major structural damage to the genitalia. Finally, we found that T. pallidum strains from Lake Manyara National Park and Serengeti National Park were genetically distinct, and a phylogeny suggested that baboon strains may have diverged prior to the clade containing human strains. We conclude that T. pallidum infection associated with genital lesions appears to be common in the wild baboons of the regions studied in Tanzania. Further study is needed to elucidate the infection's transmission mode, its associated morbidity and mortality, and the relationship between baboon and human strains.

  9. Mental maps in chacma baboons (Papio ursinus): using inter-group encounters as a natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noser, Rahel; Byrne, Richard W

    2007-07-01

    Encounters between groups of wild chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) can be viewed as a natural experiment to investigate the nature of these primates' mental representations of large-scale space. During a 16-month field study in a high population density habitat we recorded the foraging routes and the most important resources of a group of 25 individuals. Also, we estimated the locations of additional baboon groups relative to the study group. Routes were less linear, travel speed was higher, and inter-resource distances were larger when other groups were present within 500 m of the focal group; thus, the study group avoided others by taking detours. We predicted that evasive manoeuvres would be characteristic of different possible orientation mechanisms, and compared them with our observations. We analysed 34 evasive manoeuvres in detail. In an area that lacked prominent landmarks, detours were small; larger detours occurred when resources were directly visible, or in the vicinity of a hill offering conspicuous landmarks. In areas without prominent landmarks, detours were along familiar routes and waiting bouts of up to 60 min occurred; on one occasion the study group aborted their entire day's journey. We discuss these findings in the light of time and energy costs and suggest that the baboons lack the ability to compute Euclidean relations among locations, but use network maps to find their way to out-of-sight locations.

  10. A baboon syndrome induced by intravenous human immunoglobulins: report of a case and immunological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaud, A; Tréchot, P; Granel, F; Lonchamp, P; Faure, G; Schmutz, J L; Béné, M C

    1999-01-01

    Following the second series of intravenous human immunoglobulins (IVIg; 0.4 g/kg) prescribed to treat a sensorimotor polyneuritis, a 28-year-old woman developed pompholyx that recurred after each of the following monthly treatments with IVIg. During the administration of the 10th series, the patient developed a typical baboon syndrome. Immunohistochemical studies of a skin biopsy revealed an unexpected epidermal expression of P-selectin, usually expressed by endothelial cells. Patch, prick and intradermal tests performed with IVIg on the back, arms and buttocks gave negative results on immediate and delayed readings. IVIg were re-administered, with the informed consent of the patient, and induced a generalized maculopapular rash. This is the first reported case of baboon syndrome induced by IVIg. Although extensive skin testing was performed, all test sites remained negative. We wonder whether IVIg could reproduce immunological mechanisms involved in the 3 types of systemic contact dermatitis (pompholyx, baboon syndrome and maculopapular rash), including the epidermal expression of P-selectin.

  11. When good neighbors don't need fences: Temporal landscape partitioning among baboon social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, A Catherine; Guttal, Vishwesha; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne

    2013-06-01

    Intraspecific competition is a key factor shaping space-use strategies and movement decisions in many species, yet how and when neighbors utilize shared areas while exhibiting active avoidance of one another is largely unknown. Here we investigated temporal landscape partitioning in a population of wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus). We used global positioning system (GPS) collars to synchronously record the hourly locations of 5 baboon social groups for ~900 days, and we used behavioral, demographic, and life history data to measure factors affecting use of overlap areas. Annual home ranges of neighboring groups overlapped substantially, as predicted (baboons are considered non-territorial), but home ranges overlapped less when space use was assessed over shorter time scales. Moreover, neighboring groups were in close spatial proximity to one another on fewer days than predicted by a null model, suggesting an avoidance-based spacing pattern. At all time scales examined (monthly, biweekly, and weekly), time spent in overlap areas was greater during time periods when groups fed on evenly dispersed, low-quality foods. The percent of fertile females in social groups was negatively correlated with time spent in overlap areas only during weekly time intervals. This suggests that broad temporal changes in ecological resources are a major predictor of how intensively overlap areas are used, and groups modify these ecologically driven spacing patterns at short time scales based on female reproductive status. Together these findings offer insight into the economics of territoriality by highlighting the dynamics of spacing patterns at differing time scales.

  12. Control of plasma renin activity in heat-stressed baboons on varied salt intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proppe, D W

    1987-04-01

    The characteristics and control of the increase in plasma renin activity (PRA) during environmental heating (EH) were determined in 12 unanesthetized, chronically catheterized baboons. Each EH experiment consisted of a 1.5- to 4-h exposure to an ambient temperature of 39-44 degrees C until core temperature (Tc) reached 39.5-40.0 degrees C. These EH experiments were done on the baboon in an unblocked state and during beta-adrenergic receptor blockade produced by propranolol when on normal-to-high salt intake (NHSI) and on low-salt intake (LSI). PRA rose linearly with Tc during EH, but the increase in PRA was considerably larger when the baboon was on LSI. The PRA-Tc linear regression coefficients were 2.32 and 5.98 ng angiotensin I X ml-1 X h-1 X degrees C-1 in NHSI and LSI states, respectively. This rise in PRA during EH was completely eliminated during beta-blockade in both NHSI and LSI states. It is concluded that heat stress activates the sympathetic nervous system to stimulate beta-receptor-mediated renin secretion by the kidney, this activation is controlled primarily by internal thermoreceptors, and variations in salt intake alters only the magnitude of the increase in PRA during heat stress, not the mechanisms that produce it.

  13. Vasopressin contributes to maintenance of arterial blood pressure in dehydrated baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, K L; Thornton, R M; Proppe, D W

    1989-02-01

    This study primarily sought to determine whether the role of vasopressin (VP) in maintenance of arterial blood pressure is enhanced in awake, chronically instrumented baboons after 68-72 h of dehydration. This question was approached by pharmacologically blocking vasopressin V1-receptors in euhydrated and dehydrated baboons with or without a normally functioning renin-angiotensin system (RAS). VP blockade during dehydration produced a rapidly occurring (within 5 min), statistically significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 5 +/- 1 mmHg in the RAS-intact condition and an identical decline in MAP (5 +/- 1 mmHg) during blockade of the RAS by captopril, an angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor. At 15 min after induction of VP blockade, heart rate was elevated by 9 +/- 2 beats/min in the RAS-intact condition and by 20 +/- 5 beats/min in the RAS-blocked condition. In addition, VP blockade in the dehydrated state produced small and equal increases in hindlimb vascular conductance in RAS-intact and RAS-blocked conditions. None of these cardiovascular changes were produced by VP blockade in the euhydrated state. RAS blockade produced modest declines in MAP in both hydration states, but the fall was larger by 7 +/- 4 mmHg in the dehydrated state. Thus both VP and the RAS contribute to the maintenance of arterial blood pressure during dehydration in the conscious baboon.

  14. Relationship between canine dimorphism and mandibular morphology in the hamadryas baboon and the Japanese monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukase, Hitoshi

    2011-04-01

    To examine morphological interrelationships between canine size and mandibular corpus shape, inter-sex comparisons were made in the hamadryas baboon and the Japanese monkey, known to display extreme and moderate canine dimorphism, respectively. Results of adult comparisons showed that all mandibular dimensions were significantly larger in the males than in the females in both species. In the hamadryas baboon, the males also exhibited a higher ratio of anterior to posterior corpus height than the females. This sex difference in corpus shape was not significant in the Japanese monkey, indicating lack of involvement of canine dimorphism. Analysis of mandibular growth patterns in the hamadryas baboon demonstrated that significant sexual size difference did not occur before incisor eruption, and that the anteriorly high corpus of the adult male mandible was associated with a rapidly increasing symphyseal height after incisor eruption. It was also shown that the female canine started to erupt shortly after incisor eruption, while the forming male canine continued to stay near the mandibular base and developed further in size until eruption. The relative positions of the incisors kept shifting upwards even after eruption in the males, while they hardly changed in the females. It is therefore suggested that the prolonged development and size increase of the male canine is accompanied by further enlargement of the symphysis, resulting in the higher anterior corpus of the adult males compared to the adult females. The results thus indicate the importance of understanding the spatial relationships of the developing teeth in interpreting mandibular morphology.

  15. Efficacy of fenbendazole formulated in a commercial primate diet for treating specific pathogen-free baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) infected with Trichuris trichiura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Mason V; Wolf, Roman F; Clingenpeel, Lindsay C; Doan, Sandra K; Jones, Amy N; Gray, Kristene M

    2008-11-01

    Trichuris trichiura is a common intestinal nematode parasite of captive baboons. We evaluated the efficacy of fenbendazole formulated in a commercial primate diet (FBZ-PD) for treating specific pathogen-free (SPF) baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) naturally infected with Trichuris trichiura. Twenty-nine baboons, housed indoors in 3 separate rooms, were fed FBZ-PD for 5 d, whereas 4 baboons housed in another isolated area served as untreated controls. The efficacy of FBZ-PD was measured as reduction in the number of T. trichiura eggs in host feces after treatment as determined by quantitative fecal flotation examination. All baboons that received FBZ-PD stopped shedding T. trichiura eggs by 7 d after initiation of treatment, and remained negative until at least 119 d after treatment. However, eggs of T. trichiura were present in the feces of 3 (10.3%) experimental baboons at 154 d after treatment. Untreated control baboons shed T. trichiura eggs throughout the entire study. Our results indicate that FBZ-PD was efficacious for treating SPF baboons infected with T. trichiura.

  16. Gaze following in baboons (Papio anubis): juveniles adjust their gaze and body position to human's head redirections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parron, Carole; Meguerditchian, Adrien

    2016-12-01

    Gaze following, the ability to follow the gaze of other individuals, has been widely studied in non-human primate species, mostly in adult individuals. Yet, the literature on gaze following revealed a quite variability across the different findings, some of it might reflect true inter-species differences, while others might be related to methodological differences, or to an underestimation of the factors involved in the expression of gaze following. In the current study, we tested 54 captive olive baboons (Papio anubis), housed in social groups, to assess how juvenile and adult baboons would spontaneously react to a sudden change in the direction of a human experimenter's head. First, our results showed that juveniles, more than adult baboons, co-oriented their gaze with the experimenter's gaze. We also observed a strong habituation effect in adult baboons but not in juveniles, as the adults' response vanished at the second exposure to a change of direction of the experimenter's head. Second, our results showed that juveniles subsequently adopted an original strategy when the experimenter's head indicated some new directions: they reliably adjusted their spatial body position to keep a gaze contact with the experimenter's line of sight. We discussed how the age class and the individual expertise of the baboons could lead to some modulations in terms of attentiveness, motivation, or cognitive abilities, and thus likely influence gaze following.

  17. Follow up of infection of chacma baboons with inoculum containing a and non-a genotypes of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marina Baptista; Anna Kramvis; Saffie Jammeh; Jocelyn Naicker; Jacqueline S.Galpin; Michael C.Kew

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether one genotype (A or non-A genotypes of HBV) predominated over the other during the course of HBV infection.METHODS: Four baboons were inoculated with HBV. DNA was extracted from serum obtained at monthly intervals postinoculation for 52 weeks and HBV DNA was amplified using primers specific for the core region containing an insert characteristic of genotype A (nt 2 354-2 359, numbering from the EcoRI site). The amplicons were cloned into PCRScriptTM and a minimum of 15 clones per time point were sequenced in both directions.RESULTS: Both genotypes persisted for the entire followup period of 52 weeks. Genotype non-A predominated in two baboons and genotype A in one baboon. Neither genotype predominated in the fourth baboon, as shown at a 5 % level of testing.CONCLUSION: No conclusions concerning the dominance of either genotype or the natural progression or replication rates of HBV could be drawn because the pattern of the genotypes found may have been caused by sampling fluctuations at the time of DNA extraction and cloning as a result of the very low viral loads in the baboon sera.

  18. Establishment and Characterization of Baboon Embryonic Stem Cell Lines An Old World Primate Model for Regeneration and Transplantation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simerly, Calvin R.; Navara, Christopher S.; Castro, Carlos A.; Turpin, Janet C.; Redinger, Carrie J.; Mich-Basso, Jocelyn D.; Jacoby, Ethan S.; Grund, Kevin J.; McFarland, David A.; Oliver, Stacie L.; Ben-Yehudah, Ahmi; Carlisle, Diane L.; Frost, Patricia; Penedo, Cecilia; Hewitson, Laura; Schatten, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Here we have developed protocols using the baboon as a complementary alternative Old World Primate to rhesus and other macaques which have severe limitations in their availability. Baboons are not limited as research resources, they are evolutionarily closer to humans and the multiple generations of pedigreed colonies which display complex human disease phenotypes all support their further optimization an invaluable primate model. Since neither baboon assisted reproductive technologies nor baboon embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been reported, here we describe the first derivations and characterization of baboon ESC lines from IVF-generated blastocysts. Two ESCs lines (BabESC-4 and BabESC-15) display ESC morphology, express pluripotency markers (Oct-4, hTert, Nanog, Sox-2, Rex-1, TRA1–60, TRA1–81), and maintain stable euploid female karyotypes with parentage confirmed independently. They have been grown continuously for >430 and 290 days, respectively. Teratomas from both lines have all three germ layers. Availabilities of these BabESCs represent another important resource for stem cell biologists. PMID:19393591

  19. Training experience in gestures affects the display of social gaze in baboons' communication with a human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourjade, Marie; Canteloup, Charlotte; Meguerditchian, Adrien; Vauclair, Jacques; Gaunet, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Gaze behaviour, notably the alternation of gaze between distal objects and social partners that accompanies primates' gestural communication is considered a standard indicator of intentionality. However, the developmental precursors of gaze behaviour in primates' communication are not well understood. Here, we capitalized on the training in gestures dispensed to olive baboons (Papio anubis) as a way of manipulating individual communicative experience with humans. We aimed to delineate the effects of such a training experience on gaze behaviour displayed by the monkeys in relation with gestural requests. Using a food-requesting paradigm, we compared subjects trained in requesting gestures (i.e. trained subjects) to naïve subjects (i.e. control subjects) for their occurrences of (1) gaze behaviour, (2) requesting gestures and (3) temporal combination of gaze alternation with gestures. We found that training did not affect the frequencies of looking at the human's face, looking at food or alternating gaze. Hence, social gaze behaviour occurs independently from the amount of communicative experience with humans. However, trained baboons-gesturing more than control subjects-exhibited most gaze alternation combined with gestures, whereas control baboons did not. By reinforcing the display of gaze alternation along with gestures, we suggest that training may have served to enhance the communicative function of hand gestures. Finally, this study brings the first quantitative report of monkeys producing requesting gestures without explicit training by humans (controls). These results may open a window on the developmental mechanisms (i.e. incidental learning vs. training) underpinning gestural intentional communication in primates.

  20. Complement inhibition decreases early fibrogenic events in the lung of septic baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Zhu, Hua; Georgescu, Constantin; Popescu, Narcis; Keshari, Ravi S; Peer, Glenn; Lupu, Cristina; Taylor, Fletcher B; Pereira, Heloise Anne; Kinasewitz, Gary; Lambris, John D; Lupu, Florea

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by severe sepsis can trigger persistent inflammation and fibrosis. We have shown that experimental sepsis in baboons recapitulates ARDS progression in humans, including chronic inflammation and long-lasting fibrosis in the lung. Complement activation products may contribute to the fibroproliferative response, suggesting that complement inhibitors are potential therapeutic agents. We have been suggested that treatment of septic baboons with compstatin, a C3 convertase inhibitor protects against ARDS-induced fibroproliferation. Baboons challenged with 109 cfu/kg (LD50) live E. coli by intravenous infusion were treated or not with compstatin at the time of challenge or 5 hrs thereafter. Changes in the fibroproliferative response at 24 hrs post-challenge were analysed at both transcript and protein levels. Gene expression analysis showed that sepsis induced fibrotic responses in the lung as early as 24 hrs post-bacterial challenge. Immunochemical and biochemical analysis revealed enhanced collagen synthesis, induction of profibrotic factors and increased cell recruitment and proliferation. Specific inhibition of complement with compstatin down-regulated sepsis-induced fibrosis genes, including transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), various collagens and chemokines responsible for fibrocyte recruitment (e.g. chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and 12 (CCL12)). Compstatin decreased the accumulation of myofibroblasts and proliferating cells, reduced the production of fibrosis mediators (TGF-β, phospho-Smad-2 and CTGF) and inhibited collagen deposition. Our data demonstrate that complement inhibition effectively attenuates collagen deposition and fibrotic responses in the lung after severe sepsis. Inhibiting complement could prove an attractive strategy for preventing sepsis-induced fibrosis of the lung. PMID:26337158

  1. Acute Lung Injury and Fibrosis in a Baboon Model of Escherichia coli Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshari, Ravi S.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Zhu, Hua; Popescu, Narcis I.; Peer, Glenn; Chaaban, Hala; Lambris, John D.; Polf, Holly; Lupu, Cristina; Kinasewitz, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis-induced inflammation of the lung leads to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which may trigger persistent fibrosis. The pathology of ARDS is complex and poorly understood, and the therapeutic approaches are limited. We used a baboon model of Escherichia coli sepsis that mimics the complexity of human disease to study the pathophysiology of ARDS. We performed extensive biochemical, histological, and functional analyses to characterize the disease progression and the long-term effects of sepsis on the lung structure and function. Similar to humans, sepsis-induced ARDS in baboons displays an early inflammatory exudative phase, with extensive necrosis. This is followed by a regenerative phase dominated by proliferation of type 2 epithelial cells, expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers, myofibroblast migration and proliferation, and collagen synthesis. Baboons that survived sepsis showed persistent inflammation and collagen deposition 6–27 months after the acute episodes. Long-term survivors had almost double the amount of collagen in the lung as compared with age-matched control animals. Immunostaining for procollagens showed persistent active collagen synthesis within the fibroblastic foci and interalveolar septa. Fibroblasts expressed markers of transforming growth factor-β and platelet-derived growth factor signaling, suggesting their potential role as mediators of myofibroblast migration and proliferation, and collagen deposition. In parallel, up-regulation of the inhibitors of extracellular proteases supports a deregulated matrix remodeling that may contribute to fibrosis. The primate model of sepsis-induced ARDS mimics the disease progression in humans, including chronic inflammation and long-lasting fibrosis. This model helps our understanding of the pathophysiology of fibrosis and the testing of new therapies. PMID:24066737

  2. Monkey Management: Using Spatial Ecology to Understand the Extent and Severity of Human-Baboon Conflict in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali S. Hoffman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Conflict with humans poses one of the greatest threats to the persistence and survival of all wildlife. In the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, human-baboon conflict levels remain high despite substantial investment by conservation authorities in a variety of mitigation measures. Here we explore how spatial ecology can inform wildlife managers on the extent and severity of both current and projected human-baboon conflict. We apply conservative and generous densities - 2.3 and 5.9 baboons/km2 - to hypothetical landscape management scenarios to estimate whether the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus population in the Cape Peninsula is currently overabundant. We correlate conflict indices with spatial variables to explain intertroop differences in conflict levels. We investigate how an understanding of key elements of baboon ecology, including sleeping-site characteristics and intertroop territoriality, can direct management efforts and mitigate conflict. Our findings suggest that the current population of 475 baboons is below even the most conservative density estimate and that the area could potentially sustain up to 799 baboons. Conflict levels correlated positively with the loss of access to low-lying land through habitat transformation (Pearson r = 0.77, p = 0.015, n = 9 troops, and negatively with the distance of sleeping sites from the urban edge (Pearson r = 0.81, p = 0.001, n = 9 troops. Despite the availability of suitable sleeping sites elsewhere, more than half of all troops slept

  3. Endogenous type C viral gene expression in cultures of fetal diploid baboon cells treated with 5'-bromodeoxyuridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavelle, G.; Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.

    1981-04-30

    Cultures of fetal diploid baboon fibroblasts treated with 5-bromodeoxyuridine synthesized protein antigenically related to baboon endogenous type C viral gag gene product, p28. Radioimmunoassays detected p28 antigenic specificities indistinguishable from those of purified virus. However, viral RNA-dependent DNA polymerase was not detected in culture fluids, and infectious virus was rarely recovered by cocultivation with susceptible heterologous cells. Extracellular particles containing p28 were not readily detected, further indicating that viral gag gene-coded proteins were synthesized independently of whole virus. Normal cultures of the same baboon cells exhibited endogenous expression of a glycoprotein antigenically related to BEV gp70, suggesting differential regulation of the endogenous gag and env gene-coded products. Baboon cell cultures exogenously infected with BEV produced extracellular particles having viral p28 and gp70 as measured by radioimmunoassays of culture fluids. Since induced cultures have about 10% positive cells versus close to 100% for infected culture, the amount of p28 per producing cell was about the same in both cell populations.

  4. Canine length in wild male baboons: maturation, aging and social dominance rank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Galbany

    Full Text Available Canines represent an essential component of the dentition for any heterodont mammal. In primates, like many other mammals, canines are frequently used as weapons. Hence, tooth size and wear may have significant implications for fighting ability, and consequently for social dominance rank, reproductive success, and fitness. We evaluated sources of variance in canine growth and length in a well-studied wild primate population because of the potential importance of canines for male reproductive success in many primates. Specifically, we measured maxillary canine length in 80 wild male baboons (aged 5.04-20.45 years from the Amboseli ecosystem in southern Kenya, and examined its relationship with maturation, age, and social dominance rank. In our analysis of maturation, we compared food-enhanced baboons (those that fed part time at a refuse pit associated with a tourist lodge with wild-feeding males, and found that food-enhanced males achieved long canines earlier than wild-feeding males. Among adult males, canine length decreased with age because of tooth wear. We found some evidence that, after controlling for age, longer canines were associated with higher adult dominance rank (accounting for 9% of the variance in rank, but only among relatively high-ranking males. This result supports the idea that social rank, and thus reproductive success and fitness, may depend in part on fighting ability mediated by canine size.

  5. Effect of water or saline intake on heat-induced limb vasodilation in dehydrated baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, K L; Proppe, D W

    1990-02-01

    Dehydration markedly attenuates the increase in hindlimb blood flow elicited by environmental heating (EH) in baboons. This study sought to determine the importance of gradually produced increases in body fluid osmolality and decreases in body fluid volume in producing this attenuation. The hindlimb blood flow increases during EH of seven unanesthetized chronically instrumented baboons were examined during euhydration, dehydration (64-68 h of water deprivation), and after ad libitum oral rehydration with either water or a hyperosmotic saline solution. EH consisted of acute exposure to ambient temperatures of 38-42 degrees C until internal temperature reached 39.5 degrees C. Dehydration depressed the maximal external iliac artery blood flow (MIBF) and iliac vascular conductance (IVC) attained during EH in the euhydrated state by 37 and 43%, respectively. Rehydration with either water or saline solution, however, restored maximal MIBF and IVC to euhydrated levels. Because plasma osmolality remained at dehydrated levels after rehydration with saline, hyperosmolality does not produce the dehydration-induced attenuation in hindlimb blood flow.

  6. Effects of hyperosmolality and diuretics on heat-induced limb vasodilation in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proppe, D W

    1990-02-01

    Dehydration attenuates the increase in limb skin blood flow elicited by environmental heating (EH). This study sought to determine which of the two primary effects of dehydration, increased body fluid osmolality or decreased body fluid volume, was primarily responsible for this cutaneous vasoconstrictor bias in baboons. Unanesthetized chronically instrumented baboons were exposed to EH while in euhydrated state, after 65-69 h of water deprivation (dehydration), after infusion of a small volume of hypertonic (20%) saline to raise plasma osmolality and sodium concentration to dehydration levels, and after injections of the diuretic furosemide over a 64-h period to produce an isosmotic fall in extracellular fluid volume. EH consisted of an acute elevation of ambient temperature to 39.5-42.0 degrees C until internal temperature reached 39.5-39.8 degrees C. The normal increases in external iliac artery blood flow and iliac vascular conductance during EH were unchanged by hyperosmolality but were attenuated by 39 and 31%, respectively, after furosemide treatment and by 42 and 46%, respectively, during dehydration. Thus the fall in extracellular fluid volume is the component of dehydration that attenuates the increase in hindlimb blood flow during EH in the same way as dehydration itself.

  7. alpha-Adrenergic control of intestinal circulation in heat-stressed baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proppe, D W

    1980-05-01

    The mechanisms involved in producing intestinal vasoconstriction during a hyperthermia-producing intestinal vasoconstriction during a hyperthermia-producing environmental heat stress are unknown. Five conscious baboons (Papio anubis), each with chronically implanted catheters and a flow probe around the superior mesenteric artery, were subjected to environmental heating (Ta 40-45 degrees C) to raise their arterial blood temperature (Tbl) 2.0-2.6 degrees C to approximately 39.5 degrees C. Accompanying the gradual rise in Tbl was a fall in mean superior mesenteric artery blood flow (MSMF) and a progressive rise in superior mesenteric vascular resistance (SMR). At peak Tbl, MSMF had fallen 28.8 +/- 0.6% (mean +/- SE) and SMR had risen 50.2 +/- 4.2%. To determine the involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in producing this intestinal vasoconstriction, the baboon was subjected to environmental heating after induction of alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade by phenoxybenzamine or phentolamine. In this state, the rise in Tbl was accompanied by no change in MSMF and a slight, but not statistically significant, rise (7.8 +/- 3.8%) in SMR. Since alpha-receptor blockade nearly completely abolishes intestinal vasoconstriction during heat stress, this intestinal vasoconstriction must be mediated primarily by elevated sympathetic outflow.

  8. Temporal dynamics of gene expression in the lung in a baboon model of E. coli sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Hua

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial invasion during sepsis induces disregulated systemic responses that could lead to fatal lung failure. The purpose of this study was to relate the temporal dynamics of gene expression to the pathophysiological changes in the lung during the first and second stages of E. coli sepsis in baboons. Results Using human oligonucleotide microarrays, we have explored the temporal changes of gene expression in the lung of baboons challenged with sublethal doses of E. coli. Temporal expression pattern and biological significance of the differentially expressed genes were explored using clustering and pathway analysis software. Expression of selected genes was validated by real-time PCR. Cytokine levels in tissue and plasma were assayed by multiplex ELISA. Changes in lung ultrastructure were visualized by electron microscopy. We found that genes involved in primary inflammation, innate immune response, and apoptosis peaked at 2 hrs. Inflammatory and immune response genes that function in the stimulation of monocytes, natural killer and T-cells, and in the modulation of cell adhesion peaked at 8 hrs, while genes involved in wound healing and functional recovery were upregulated at 24 hrs. Conclusion The analysis of gene expression modulation in response to sepsis provides the baseline information that is crucial for the understanding of the pathophysiology of systemic inflammation and may facilitate the development of future approaches for sepsis therapy.

  9. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: comparison with radiolabeled microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, J P; Morrow, W R; Gerstmann, D R; Taylor, A F; deLemos, R A

    1991-04-01

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). We conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress.

  10. Canine length in wild male baboons: maturation, aging and social dominance rank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbany, Jordi; Tung, Jenny; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Canines represent an essential component of the dentition for any heterodont mammal. In primates, like many other mammals, canines are frequently used as weapons. Hence, tooth size and wear may have significant implications for fighting ability, and consequently for social dominance rank, reproductive success, and fitness. We evaluated sources of variance in canine growth and length in a well-studied wild primate population because of the potential importance of canines for male reproductive success in many primates. Specifically, we measured maxillary canine length in 80 wild male baboons (aged 5.04-20.45 years) from the Amboseli ecosystem in southern Kenya, and examined its relationship with maturation, age, and social dominance rank. In our analysis of maturation, we compared food-enhanced baboons (those that fed part time at a refuse pit associated with a tourist lodge) with wild-feeding males, and found that food-enhanced males achieved long canines earlier than wild-feeding males. Among adult males, canine length decreased with age because of tooth wear. We found some evidence that, after controlling for age, longer canines were associated with higher adult dominance rank (accounting for 9% of the variance in rank), but only among relatively high-ranking males. This result supports the idea that social rank, and thus reproductive success and fitness, may depend in part on fighting ability mediated by canine size.

  11. Knockouts of high-ranking males have limited impact on baboon social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Mathias; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    Social network structures can crucially impact complex social processes such as collective behaviour or the transmission of information and diseases. However, currently it is poorly understood how social networks change over time. Previous studies on primates suggest that `knockouts' (due to death or dispersal) of high-ranking individuals might be important drivers for structural changes in animal social networks. Here we test this hypothesis using long-term data on a natural population of baboons, examining the effects of 29 natural knockouts of alpha or beta males on adult female social networks. We investigated whether and how knockouts affected (1) changes in grooming and association rates among adult females, and (2) changes in mean degree and global clustering coefficient in these networks. The only significant effect that we found was a decrease in mean degree in grooming networks in the first month after knockouts, but this decrease was rather small, and grooming networks rebounded to baseline levels by the second month after knockouts. Taken together our results indicate that the removal of high-ranking males has only limited or no lasting effects on social networks of adult female baboons. This finding calls into question the hypothesis that the removal of high-ranking individuals has a destabilizing effect on social network structures in social animals.

  12. Evidence for varying social strategies across the day in chacma baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sick, Claudia; Carter, Alecia J; Marshall, Harry H; Knapp, Leslie A; Dabelsteen, Torben; Cowlishaw, Guy

    2014-07-01

    Strong social bonds can make an important contribution to individual fitness, but we still have only a limited understanding of the temporal period relevant to the adjustment of social relationships. While there is growing recognition of the importance of strong bonds that persist for years, social relationships can also vary over weeks and months, suggesting that social strategies may be optimized over shorter timescales. Using biological market theory as a framework, we explore whether temporal variation in the benefits of social relationships might be sufficient to generate daily adjustments of social strategies in wild baboons. Data on grooming, one measure of social relationships, were collected from 60 chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) across two troops over a six month period. Our analyses suggest that social strategies can show diurnal variation, with subordinates preferentially grooming more dominant individuals earlier in the day compared with later in the day. These findings indicate that group-living animals may optimize certain elements of their social strategies over relatively short time periods.

  13. Effect of the antiestrogen ethamoxytriphetol (MER-25) on placental low density lipoprotein uptake and degradation in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, M.C.; Babischkin, J.S.; Pepe, G.J.; Albrecht, E.D.

    1988-05-01

    The present study determined if the decline in placental progesterone (P4) production that results from administration of the antiestrogen ethamoxytriphetol (MER-25) to pregnant baboons results from a change in placental low density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake and/or degradation. Pregnant baboons (Papio anubis) were untreated (n = 10) or received MER-25 (25 mg/kg BW, orally; n = 10) daily on days 140-170 of gestation (term, 184 days). Placentas were removed by cesarean section on day 170 of gestation, and villous tissue was dispersed with 0.1% collagenase at 37 C for 40 min. Placental cells (10(6)) were incubated in medium 199 (pH 7.2) for 12 h at 37 C with increasing amounts (5-100 micrograms) of (125I)LDL, with or without a 100-fold excess of unlabeled baboon LDL. Mean (+/- SE) peripheral serum P4 concentrations on days 140-170 of gestation were 51% lower (P less than 0.01) in MER-25-treated (5.7 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) than in untreated (11.6 +/- 0.5 ng/ml) baboons. The uptake of LDL was 56% lower (P less than 0.01) in placental cells from antiestrogen-treated (6.3 +/- 1.6 ng/micrograms cell protein) than in those from untreated (14.4 +/- 1.9 ng/micrograms cell protein) baboons. The dissociation constants for placental LDL uptake, as assessed by Scatchard analysis, however, were similar in untreated (0.80 microgram/ml) and MER-25-treated (0.76 microgram/ml) animals. The amount of (125I)LDL concomitantly degraded by cells from baboons that received MER-25 was 54% of that degraded by cells from untreated controls. The relative decline in LDL degradation by cells of antiestrogen-treated baboons was proportionate to the decline in overall LDL uptake. The results indicate, therefore, that antiestrogen treatment decreased the amount of placental LDL uptake, but did not change the affinity for the lipoprotein.

  14. Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6-O-[{sup 11}C]methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galynker, Igor; Schlyer, David J.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Gatley, S. John; MacGregor, Robert R.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Holland, M. J.; Brodie, Jonathan; Simon, Eric; Wolf, Alfred P

    1996-04-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[{sup 11}C]methyl]buprenorphine ([{sup 11}C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution of radioactivity in baboon brain determined with PET was striatum > thalamus > cingulate gyrus > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > occipital cortex > cerebellum. This distribution corresponded to opiate receptor density and to previously published data (37). The tracer uptake in adult female baboons showed no significant variation in serial scans in the same baboon with no intervention in the same scanning session. HPLC analysis of baboon plasma showed the presence of labeled metabolites with 92% {+-} 2.2% and 43% {+-} 14.4% of the intact tracer remaining at 5 and 30 min, respectively. Naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, administered 30-40 min after tracer injection at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg i.v., reduced [{sup 11}C]BPN binding in thalamus, striatum, cingulate gyrus, and frontal cortex to values 0.25 to 0.60 of that with no intervention. There were minimal (< 15%) effects on cerebellum. Naloxone treatment significantly reduced the slope of the Patlak plot in receptor-containing regions. These results demonstrate that [{sup 11}C]BPN can be displaced by naloxone in vivo, and they affirm the feasibility of using this tracer and displacement methodology for short-term kinetics studies with PET. Mouse tissue distribution data were used to estimate the radiation dosimetry to humans. The critical organ was the small intestine, with a radiation dose estimate to humans of 117 nrad/mCi.

  15. Anti-GaL IgG antibodies in sera of newborn humans and baboons and its significance in pig xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minanov, O P; Itescu, S; Neethling, F A; Morgenthau, A S; Kwiatkowski, P; Cooper, D K; Michler, R E

    1997-01-27

    We have previously demonstrated that hyperacute rejection does not occur in a pig-to-newborn baboon heart transplant model, presumably because of low levels of cytotoxic antipig antibodies present in the serum of newborn baboons. Cytotoxic antipig antibodies are primarily directed to alpha-1,3-galactosyl (alpha Gal) residues on endothelial cell surface structures Twenty-one full-term humans and 5 full-term baboons were tested for complement mediated lysis (CML) of pig kidney (PK-15) cells and anti-alpha Gal activity with an ELISA using BSA-conjugated alpha Gal residues as target. To evaluate the significance of the anti-alpha Gal titers in vivo 5 newborn baboons underwent heterotopic pig cardiac xenotransplantation. Six of 21 human samples and 1 of 5 baboon samples demonstrated significant cytotoxicity to PK-15 cells. Twelve of 21 newborn humans had anti-alpha Gal IgG antibodies at titers of 1:80 or greater. None of the samples had anti-alpha Gal IgM. In newborn baboons, 1 of 5 sera had anti-alpha Gal IgG antibodies at titers greater than 1:80 and none of these samples had anti-alpha Gal IgM. Xenografts survived for an average of 3.6 days, even in the baboon with high anti-alpha Gal IgG titers. Analysis of the explanted grafts showed minimal evidence of complement-mediated hyperacute rejection (HAR), but prominent mononuclear cell infiltrates. In serum tested posttransplant there was an induced anti-alpha Gal response with cytotoxicity against PK-15 cells. These results show that anti-alpha Gal IgM is absent in newborn human and baboon sera, allowing pig grafts to avoid HAR. However, the presence of anti-alpha Gal IgG may be associated with mononuclear cell infiltration of the xenograft and its subsequent rejection.

  16. Nicotine Blocks Brain Estrogen Synthase (Aromatase): In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography Studies in Female Baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A.; Biegon, A.; Kim, S.-W.; Logan, J.; Hooker, J.M.; Muench, L.; Fowler, J.S.

    2010-01-12

    Cigarette smoking and nicotine have complex effects on human physiology and behavior, including some effects similar to those elicited by inhibition of aromatase, the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. We report the first in vivo primate study to determine whether there is a direct effect of nicotine administration on brain aromatase. Brain aromatase availability was examined with positron emission tomography and the selective aromatase inhibitor [{sup 11}C]vorozole in six baboons before and after exposure to IV nicotine at .015 and .03 mg/kg. Nicotine administration produced significant, dose-dependent reductions in [{sup 11}C]vorozole binding. The amygdala and preoptic area showed the largest reductions. Plasma levels of nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine were similar to those found in cigarette smokers. Nicotine interacts in vivo with primate brain aromatase in regions involved in mood, aggression, and sexual behavior.

  17. Paternity alone does not predict long-term investment in juveniles by male baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovice, Liza R; Heesen, Marlies; Di Fiore, Anthony; Seyfarth, Robert M; Cheney, Dorothy L

    2009-08-01

    Adult male chacma baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus) form preferential associations, or friendships, with particular lactating females. Males exhibit high levels of affiliative contact with their friends' infants and defend them from potentially infanticidal attacks (Palombit et al. 1997). Little is known about males' associations with juveniles once they have passed the period of infanticidal risk. We conducted an observational, experimental, and genetic study of adult male and juvenile chacma baboons in the Moremi Reserve, Botswana. We identified preferential associations between males and juveniles and used behavioral data and a playback experiment to explore whether those associations have potential fitness benefits for juveniles. We determined whether males preferentially invest in care of their own offspring. We also determined how often males invest in care of their former friends' offspring. The majority of juveniles exhibited preferential associations with one or two males, who had almost always been their mother's friend during infancy. However, in only a subset of these relationships was the male the actual father, in part because many fathers died or disappeared before their offspring were weaned. Male caretakers intervened on behalf of their juvenile associates in social conflicts more often than they intervened on behalf of unconnected juveniles, and they did not appear to differentiate between genetic offspring and unrelated associates. Playbacks of juveniles' distress calls elicited a stronger response from their caretakers than from control males. Chacma males may provide care to unrelated offspring of former friends because the costs associated with such care are low compared with the potentially high fitness costs of refusing aid to a juvenile who is a possible offspring.

  18. Pulp response to ferric sulfate, diluted formocresol and IRM in pulpotomized primary baboon teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuks, A B; Eidelman, E; Cleaton-Jones, P; Michaeli, Y

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the pulp response to a 15.5 percent ferric sulfate solution (FS) and a 20 percent dilution of formocresol (DFC) in pulpotomized primary teeth of baboons, after four and eight weeks. Pulpotomies were performed in seventy-nine primary teeth of 4 baboons. After coronal pulp resection, the pulp stumps were painted with ferric sulfate for fifteen seconds, in thirty-two teeth (group 1); in another thirty-two teeth, a cotton pellet moistened with dilution of formocresol was placed over the pulp stumps for five minutes, and removed (group 2). In fifteen teeth, IRM was placed directly over the pulp stumps after hemostasis (group 3--control). The teeth of all groups were sealed with IRM, and examined for inflammatory changes under a microscope by two blinded examiners. Seventy-seven teeth were assessed. Mild or no inflammation was found in 58 percent (18/31) of the teeth of group 1, in 48 percent (15/31) of those of group 2, and in 73 percent (11/15) of those of group 3. Severe inflammation was found in 35 percent (11/31) of group 1, 29 percent (9/31) of group 2, and in 7 percent (1/15) of group 3. No statistically significant difference between the three groups was observed for degree of inflammation, periradicular or interradicular abscess or inflammatory root resorption (chi-square p > 0.05). Dentin bridges were observed in 52 percent (16/31) of the teeth in group 1, 52 percent (16/31) of those of group 2, and in 73 percent (11/15) of those of group 3. No difference was found between the experimental and control groups for the presence of dentin bridge, (p > 0.05). Ferric sulfate produced pulp responses that compared favorably to those of diluted formocresol.

  19. Endothelial reconstitution by CD34+ progenitors derived from baboon embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiang; Schatten, Gerald; Hodara, Vida; Simerly, Calvin; VandeBerg, John L

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we used a large non-human primate model, the baboon, to establish a step-wise protocol to generate CD34+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and to demonstrate their reparative effects. Baboon ESCs were sequentially differentiated from embryoid body cultures for 9 days and then were specified into EPCs by culturing them in monolayer for 12 days. The resulting EPCs expressed CD34, CXCR4 and UEA-1, but neither CD31 nor CD117. The EPCs were able to form intact lumen structures when seeded on Matrigel, took up Dil-LDL, and responded to TNF-α. Angioblasts specified in EGM-2 medium and ECGS medium had 6.41 ± 1.16% (n = 3) and 9.32 ± 3.73% CD34+ cells (n = 3). The efficiency of generating CD34+ EPCs did not differ significantly from ECGS to EGM-2 culture media, however, angioblasts specified in ECGS medium expressed a higher percentage of CD34+/CXCR4+ cells (3.49 ± 1.32%, n = 3) than those specified in EGM-2 medium (0.49 ± 0.52%, n = 3). To observe their reparative capacity, we purified CD34+ progenitors after specification by EGM-2 medium; inoculated fluorescently labelled CD34+ EPCs into an arterial segment denuded of endothelium in an ex vivo system. After 14 days of ex vivo culture, the grafted cells had attached and integrated to the denuded surface; in addition, they had matured further and expressed terminally differentiated endothelial markers including CD31 and CD146. In conclusion, we have proved that specified CD34+ EPCs are promising therapeutic agents for repairing damaged vasculature.

  20. The baboon (Papio anubis extracranial carotid artery: An anatomical guide for endovascular experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laufer Ilya

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As novel endovascular strategies are developed for treating neurological disease, there is an increasing need to evaluate these techniques in relevant preclinical models. The use of non-human primates is especially critical given their structural and physiological homology with humans. In order to conduct primate endovascular studies, a comprehensive understanding of the carotid anatomy is necessary. We therefore performed a detailed examination of the vessel lengths, lumen diameters and angles of origin of the baboon extracranial carotid system. Methods We characterized the extracranial carotid system often male baboons (Papio anubis, range 15.1–28.4 kg by early post-mortem dissection. Photographic documentation of vessel lengths, lumen diameters, and angles of origin were measured for each segment of the carotid bilaterally. Results The common carotid arteries averaged 94.7 ± 1.7 mm (left and 87.1 ± 1.6 mm (right in length. The average minimal common carotid lumen diameters were 3.0 ± 0.3 mm (left and 2.9 ± 0.2 mm (right. Each animal had a common brachiocephalic artery arising from the aorta which bifurcated into the left common carotid artery and right braciocephalic artery after 21.5 ± 1.6 mm. The vascular anatomy was found to be consistent among animals despite a wide range of animal weights. Conclusions The consistency in the Papio anubis extracranial carotid system may promote the use of this species in the preclinical investigation of neuro-interventional therapies.

  1. White monkey syndrome and presumptive copper deficiency in wild savannah baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, A Catherine; Gesquiere, Laurence R; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne

    2011-11-01

    In immature wild savannah baboons (Papio cynocephalus), we observed symptoms consistent with copper (Cu) deficiency and, more specifically, with a disorder referred to as white monkey syndrome (WMS) in laboratory primates. The objectives of this study were to characterize this pathology, and test three hypotheses that (1) Cu deficiency may have been induced by zinc (Zn) toxicity, (2) it may have been induced by molybdenum (Mo) toxicity, and (3) cumulative rainfall during the perinatal period and particularly during gestation is an ecological factor distinguishing infants afflicted with WMS from non-WMS infants. During 2001-2009, we observed 22 instances of WMS out of a total 377 live births in the study population. Visible symptoms exhibited by WMS infants included whitening of the animal's fur and/or impaired mobility characterized by an apparent "stiffening" of the hindlimbs. Occurrence of WMS did not vary significantly by gender. However, among individuals that survived at least 180 days, WMS males had a significantly lower survivorship probability than non-WMS males. Zn/Cu ratios assessed from hair samples of adult female baboons were higher in females who had produced at least one WMS offspring relative to females who had not had a WMS offspring. This was true even when the hair sample was collected long after the birth of the female's afflicted infant. We consider this potentially indicative of a robust tendency for low Cu levels induced by elevated Zn intake in some individuals. No significant differences of Mo/Cu ratios were observed. Cumulative rainfall during gestation (∼179 days) was 50% lower for WMS infants relative to non-WMS infants. In contrast, rainfall for the two classes of infants did not differ in the 180 days before conception or in the 180 days following birth. This finding highlights the importance of prenatal ecological conditions in healthy fetal development with regard to WMS.

  2. Derivation and characterization of novel nonhuman primate embryonic stem cell lines from in vitro-fertilized baboon preimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tien-Cheng; Liu, Ya-Guang; Eddy, Carlton A; Jacoby, Ethan S; Binkley, Peter A; Brzyski, Robert G; Schenken, Robert S

    2011-06-01

    The development of nonhuman primate (NHP) embryonic stem cell (ESC) models holds great promise for cell-mediated treatment of debilitating diseases and to address numerous unanswered questions regarding the therapeutic efficacy of ESCs while supplanting ethical considerations involved with human studies. Here we report successful establishment and characterization of 3 novel baboon (Papio cynocephalus) ESC lines from the inner cell mass of intracytoplasmic sperm injection-derived blastocysts. Embryos were cultured in an improved baboon embryo in vitro culture protocol. The inner cell mass of blastocyst was laser-dissected and plated on mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cell monolayer in the NHP ESC culture medium. Three cell lines with characteristic ESC morphology have been cultured through an extended period (>14 months), with 2 male cell lines (UT-1 and -2) and 1 female cell line (UT-3) displaying normal baboon karyotypes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed that all 3 lines express primate ESC pluripotency markers, including OCT-4, NANOG, SOX-2, TERT, TDGF, LEFTYA, and REX-1. All 3 lines demonstrated positive immunocytochemical staining for OCT-4, stage-specific embryonic antigen-3, stage-specific embryonic antigen-4, TRA-1-60, and TRA-1-81. Baboon ESCs injected into NOD/SCID mice formed teratomas with all 3 germ layers. In addition, embryoid body-like spherical structures were derived and initial outgrowth was observed when embedded into extracellular matrix Matrigel. The ESC lines established in this NHP model have the potential to extend our knowledge in the fields of developmental biology, regenerative medicine, and future applications, including preclinical safety assessment of in vivo stem cell therapy.

  3. Predictive models of insulin resistance derived from simple morphometric and biochemical indices related to obesity and the metabolic syndrome in baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Alberto O; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Guardado-Mendoza, Rodolfo; Lopez-Alvarenga, Juan C; Leland, M Michelle; Tejero, M Elizabeth; Sorice, GianPio; Casiraghi, Francesca; Davalli, Alberto; Bastarrachea, Raúl A; Comuzzie, Anthony G; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Folli, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Background Non-human primates are valuable models for the study of insulin resistance and human obesity. In baboons, insulin sensitivity levels can be evaluated directly with the euglycemic clamp and is highly predicted by adiposity, metabolic markers of obesity and impaired glucose metabolism (i.e. percent body fat by DXA and HbA1c). However, a simple method to screen and identify obese insulin resistant baboons for inclusion in interventional studies is not available. Methods We studied a population of twenty baboons with the euglycemic clamp technique to characterize a population of obese nondiabetic, insulin resistant baboons, and used a multivariate linear regression analysis (adjusted for gender) to test different predictive models of insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose uptake = Rd) using abdominal circumference and fasting plasma insulin. Alternatively, we tested in a separate baboon population (n = 159), a simpler model based on body weight and fasting plasma glucose to predict the whole-body insulin sensitivity (Rd/SSPI) derived from the clamp. Results In the first model, abdominal circumference explained 59% of total insulin mediated glucose uptake (Rd). A second model, which included fasting plasma insulin (log transformed) and abdominal circumference, explained 64% of Rd. Finally, the model using body weight and fasting plasma glucose explained 51% of Rd/SSPI. Interestingly, we found that percent body fat was directly correlated with the adipocyte insulin resistance index (r = 0.755, p < 0.0001). Conclusion In baboons, simple morphometric measurements of adiposity/obesity, (i.e. abdominal circumference), plus baseline markers of glucose/lipid metabolism, (i.e. fasting plasma glucose and insulin) provide a feasible method to screen and identify overweight/obese insulin resistant baboons for inclusion in interventional studies aimed to study human obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:19389241

  4. Predictive models of insulin resistance derived from simple morphometric and biochemical indices related to obesity and the metabolic syndrome in baboons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastarrachea Raúl A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-human primates are valuable models for the study of insulin resistance and human obesity. In baboons, insulin sensitivity levels can be evaluated directly with the euglycemic clamp and is highly predicted by adiposity, metabolic markers of obesity and impaired glucose metabolism (i.e. percent body fat by DXA and HbA1c. However, a simple method to screen and identify obese insulin resistant baboons for inclusion in interventional studies is not available. Methods We studied a population of twenty baboons with the euglycemic clamp technique to characterize a population of obese nondiabetic, insulin resistant baboons, and used a multivariate linear regression analysis (adjusted for gender to test different predictive models of insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose uptake = Rd using abdominal circumference and fasting plasma insulin. Alternatively, we tested in a separate baboon population (n = 159, a simpler model based on body weight and fasting plasma glucose to predict the whole-body insulin sensitivity (Rd/SSPI derived from the clamp. Results In the first model, abdominal circumference explained 59% of total insulin mediated glucose uptake (Rd. A second model, which included fasting plasma insulin (log transformed and abdominal circumference, explained 64% of Rd. Finally, the model using body weight and fasting plasma glucose explained 51% of Rd/SSPI. Interestingly, we found that percent body fat was directly correlated with the adipocyte insulin resistance index (r = 0.755, p Conclusion In baboons, simple morphometric measurements of adiposity/obesity, (i.e. abdominal circumference, plus baseline markers of glucose/lipid metabolism, (i.e. fasting plasma glucose and insulin provide a feasible method to screen and identify overweight/obese insulin resistant baboons for inclusion in interventional studies aimed to study human obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Influence of heat stress on arterial baroreflex control of heart rate in the baboon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, A J; Proppe, D W

    1982-07-01

    The influence of environmental heat stress on the arterial baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) was studied in eight conscious, chronically instrumented baboons. Inflations of balloon occluders around the inferior vena cava (IVC) and thoracic descending aorta (DA) were used to produce acute, graded changes in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in 5 mm Hg intervals ranging from +/- 5 to +/- 25 mm Hg. After determination of the HR responses to changes in MABP in the normothermic baboon (blood temperature less than or equal to 37.6 degrees C), the animal was subjected to environmental heating to produce hyperthermia. When blood temperature reached approximately 39.5 degrees C, HR responses to graded DA and IVC occlusions were again determined. During hyperthermia, the HR sensitivity (delta HR/ delta MABP) to MABP changes was markedly diminished for reductions in MABP and significantly enhanced for increases in MABP. To determine whether these alterations in the HR response to changes in MABP were due to an alteration of the baroreflex control of HR, full, sigmoid-shaped HR-MABP curves for both the normothermic and hyperthermic states were constructed and characterized by total HR range, estimated slope of the steep portion of the curve, and MABP at the midpoint of the HR range (BP50). During hyperthermia (1) the whole HR-MABP curve shifted significantly upward by 35-40 beats/min, (2) total HR range, the estimated slope, and BP50 did not change, and (3) the control point (pre-occlusion HR-MABP value) curves were also constructed during either beta-adrenergic blockade or cholinergic (Ch)-receptor blockade in the normothermic and hyperthermic state. Similar to that seen for the unblocked heart, the whole HR-MABP curves were also shifted upward during hyperthermia in this group of baboons with no alteration in the total HR range, the estimated slope, or BP50. The upward shift in the HR-MABP curve during Ch-receptor blockade, unlike during beta-receptor blockade, was

  6. Papio Cranium from the Hominin-Bearing Site of Malapa: Implications for the Evolution of Modern Baboon Cranial Morphology and South African Plio-Pleistocene Biochronology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C Gilbert

    Full Text Available A new partial cranium (UW 88-886 of the Plio-Pleistocene baboon Papio angusticeps from Malapa is identified, described and discussed. UW 88-886 represents the only non-hominin primate yet recovered from Malapa and is important both in the context of baboon evolution as well as South African hominin site biochronology. The new specimen may represent the first appearance of modern baboon anatomy and coincides almost perfectly with molecular divergence date estimates for the origin of the modern P. hamadryas radiation. The fact that the Malapa specimen is dated between ~2.026-2.36 million years ago (Ma also has implications for the biochronology of other South African Plio-Pleistocene sites where P. angusticeps is found.

  7. Crowding increases salivary cortisol but not self-directed behavior in captive baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Brandon L; Reeder, DeeAnn M; Judge, Peter G

    2015-04-01

    Reduced space can lead to crowding in social animals. Crowding increases the risk of agonistic interactions that, in turn, may require additional physiological defensive coping mechanisms affecting health. To determine the stress induced from increased social density in a group of nineteen baboons living in an indoor/outdoor enclosure, saliva cortisol levels and rates of anxiety-related behavior were analyzed across two unique crowding episodes. Initially, mean salivary cortisol levels when animals were restricted to their indoor quarters were compared to those when they also had access to their larger outdoor enclosure. Then, mean cortisol levels were compared before, during, and after two distinct crowding periods of long and short duration. Crowding resulted in significantly elevated cortisol during crowding periods compared to non-crowded periods. Cortisol levels returned to baseline following two crowding episodes contrasting in their length and ambient climate conditions. These cortisol elevations indicate greater metabolic costs of maintaining homeostasis under social stress resulting from reduced space. Self-directed behavior, conversely, was not reliably elevated during crowding. Results suggest that the potential for negative social interactions, and/or the uncertainty associated with social threat can cause physiological stress responses detected by salivary cortisol. Self-directed behavioral measures of stress may constitute inadequate indicators of social stress in colony-housed monkeys or represent subjective emotional arousal unrelated to hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis activation.

  8. Whole body [{sup 11}C]-dihydrotetrabenazine imaging of baboons: biodistribution and human radiation dosimetry estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, Rajan [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Harris, Paul; Leibel, Rudolph [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Simpson, Norman; Parsey, Ramin [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Van Heertum, Ronald [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Mann, J.J. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 abundance quantified using the radiotracer [{sup 11}C]-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has been used to study diagnosis and pathogenesis of dementia and psychiatric disorders in humans. In addition, it may be a surrogate marker for insulin-producing pancreatic beta cell mass, useful for longitudinal measurements using positron emission tomography to track progression of autoimmune diabetes. To support the feasibility of long-term repeated administrations, we estimate the biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ in humans. Five baboon studies were acquired using a Siemens ECAT camera. After transmission scanning, 165-210 MBq of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ were injected, and dynamic whole body emission scans were conducted. Time-activity data were used to obtain residence times and estimate absorbed radiation dose according to the MIRD model. Most of the injected tracer localized to the liver and the lungs, followed by the intestines, brain, and kidneys. The highest estimated absorbed radiation dose was in the stomach wall. The largest radiation dose from [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ is to the stomach wall. This dose estimate, as well as the radiation dose to other radiosensitive organs, must be considered in evaluating the risks of multiple administrations. (orig.)

  9. Ozone treatment of alveolar bone in the cape chacma baboon does not enhance healing following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotze, Marthinus; Bütow, Kürt-W; Olorunju, Steve A; Kotze, Harry F

    2014-06-01

    In the international literature, the role of Ozone (O3) in the advancement in alveolar bone healing in the absence of bone pathology was not tested before. The purpose of this study was to evaluate alveolar bone regeneration after a bone defect was created and treated with a single topical administration of O3. Alveolar bone defects were created on five healthy chacma baboons. One side of the maxilla and mandible was topically treated with a single treatment of an O3/O2 mixture (3,5-4 % O3), while the opposite sides were not treated and thus served as control. Regeneration was measured radiologically, using a standardized gray scale, as the increase in bone density in the treatment area at 3 and 6 weeks post-operative and was statistically analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). There were no significant differences in densities observed between the O3/O2 mixture treatment and the control (p > 0.05). A single O3 treatment did not increase alveolar bone healing over a 3- and 6-week period in the mandible and the maxilla.

  10. Selective inhibition by a synthetic hirudin peptide of fibrin-dependent thrombosis in baboons

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    Cadroy, Y.; Hanson, S.R.; Harker, L.A. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)); Maraganore, J.M. (Biogen Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1991-02-15

    To determine the importance of the thrombin substrate recognition exosite for fibrinogen binding in the formation of both arterial and venous thrombi the authors evaluated the antithrombotic effects of the tyrosine-sulfated dodecapeptide from residues 53-64 of hirudin (H peptide) in a nonhuman primate model. This peptide was studied because it inhibits thrombin cleavages of fibrinogen by simple competition without blocking enzyme catalytic-site function. When an exteriorized arteriovenous access shunt model was used in baboons (Papio anubis), thrombus formation was induced by placing a thrombogenic device made of (i) a segment of tubing coated covalently with type I collagen, which generated platelet-rich thrombi under arterial flow conditions, and (ii) two subsequent annular regions of flow expansion that produced fibrin-rich thrombi typically associated with venous valves and veins. Thrombus formation was quantified by measurements of {sup 111}In-labeled platelet and {sup 125}I-labeled fibrinogen deposition in both arterial-flow and venous-flow portions of the device. These finding suggest that, by competitive inhibition of fibrinogen binding to thrombin, fibrin-rich venous-type thrombus formation may be selectively prevented. This strategy may be therapeutically attractive for preserving normal platelet function when conventional anticoagulant therapy is contraindicated.

  11. Behavioural processes in social context: female abductions, male herding and female grooming in hamadryas baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Pablo; Colmenares, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    The formation of bonds between strangers is an event that occurs routinely in many social animals, including humans, and, as social bonds in general, they affect the individuals' welfare and biological fitness. The present study was motivated by an interest in the behavioural processes that drive bond formation in a social context of hostility, in which the incumbent partners vary greatly in physical power and reproductive interests, a situation in which individuals of many group-living species find themselves often throughout their lives. We focused on the quantitative analysis of female abductions via male aggressive herding in a nonhuman primate, the hamadryas baboon, in which intersexual bonds are known to be strong. We tested three hypotheses informed by sexual conflict/sexual coercion theory (male herding-as-conditioning and female grooming-as-appeasement) and by socioecological theory (unit size and female competition). The results supported the predictions: males resorted to coercive tactics (aggressive herding) with abducted females, and abducted females elevated the amount of grooming directed at their new unit males; in fact, they escaped from the otherwise negative effect of unit size on female-to-male grooming. These findings reveal that conflicts of interest are natural ingredients underpinning social bonds and that resorting to coercive aggression may be an option especially when partners differ greatly in their physical power.

  12. Social environment influences the relationship between genotype and gene expression in wild baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runcie, Daniel E; Wiedmann, Ralph T; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Wray, Gregory A; Alberts, Susan C; Tung, Jenny

    2013-05-19

    Variation in the social environment can have profound effects on survival and reproduction in wild social mammals. However, we know little about the degree to which these effects are influenced by genetic differences among individuals, and conversely, the degree to which social environmental variation mediates genetic reaction norms. To better understand these relationships, we investigated the potential for dominance rank, social connectedness and group size to modify the effects of genetic variation on gene expression in the wild baboons of the Amboseli basin. We found evidence for a number of gene-environment interactions (GEIs) associated with variation in the social environment, encompassing social environments experienced in adulthood as well as persistent effects of early life social environment. Social connectedness, maternal dominance rank and group size all interacted with genotype to influence gene expression in at least one sex, and either in early life or in adulthood. These results suggest that social and behavioural variation, akin to other factors such as age and sex, can impact the genotype-phenotype relationship. We conclude that GEIs mediated by the social environment are important in the evolution and maintenance of individual differences in wild social mammals, including individual differences in responses to social stressors.

  13. The role of cromakalim and a nitric oxide synthase blocker in cardiac arrhythmia in the intact baboon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, L; Schutte, P J; Du Plooy, W J; Kahler, C P

    2000-02-01

    The arrhythmogenic effect of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channel openers is controversial and may be dependent on the type of animal model used. Information on the effect of these drugs in the normal primate model is limited. The purpose of this study was first to determine the arrhythmogenic properties of cromakalim in the baboon and second to determine whether N-omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) has any effect on the induced arrhythmia. Adult (2-4 years old) baboons (Papio ursinus) were anesthetized with a continuous i.v. infusion of ketamine (100 mg/ ml), diazepam (5 mg/ml), and saline (ratio 2:2:50) at a rate of 40-60 ml/h. Sympathetic responses were inhibited by administration of propranolol (1 mg/kg) before the start of the experiments. Cromakalim (30 microg/kg) was administered before and after L-NAME (7.5 mg/kg), and the parameters were monitored for 15 min after each intervention. A Millar double-tipped microcatheter was used to record left ventricular and aortic pressures. Lead II of the ECG was monitored. During a 15-min period after administration of cromakalim, 22.3 +/- 6.0 abnormal ventricular complexes were recorded. L-NAME administration significantly reduced these abnormal complexes to 4.5 +/- 2 (paired t test, p < or = 0.05). We therefore conclude that cromakalim has arrhythmogenic properties in the baboon and that these can be attenuated by L-NAME.

  14. UniPron is A Fully Effective Non-hormonal Reversible Contraceptive in Baboon Model(Papio Anubis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jael A.Obiero; Maureen N.Mburu; Benson M.Ndung'u; Kenneth K.Waititu; Isaac Mulei; Idle O.Farah; Peter G.Mwethera

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety and efficacy of UniPron as a reversible contraceptive.Methods Vaginal swabs were obtained before and after UniPron administration.cultured onto appropriate culture media and bacteria identification was done based on type of media used,Gram stain reactions,colony morphology and biochemical tests.Vaginal biopsy tissues were processed using paraffin wax method,stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined under light microscopy to determine the effect of the product on vaginal tissues.The effect of UniPron on sperm was examined by mixing the product with electroejaculated spermatozoa in vitro at different concentrations.For efficacy studies,male baboons of proven fertility were mated with UniPron treated or untreated females of proven fertility during the fertile stages.Results All the five females(100%)that were treated with UniPron did not conceive and they regained total fertitity when the treatment was stopped while all the controls conceived.At a concentration of 40%,UniPron completely immobilized spermatozoa in an in-vitro system.UniPron mechanism of action was by lowering the vaginal pH and on application in baboon,the pH was lowered for at least 3 h after which it went back to normal.Conclusions As we plan for a study to test UniPron as a microbicide to prevent STIs including HIV,our current study has established that this novel product is effective in contraception and harmless to vaginal tissues and vaginal microbial flora in a baboon model(Papio anubis).

  15. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona M. Keane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis.

  16. Intracellular maturation of apolipoprotein[a] and assembly of lipoprotein[a] in primary baboon hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A L; Rainwater, D L; Lanford, R E

    1993-03-01

    The glycoprotein apolipoprotein[a] (apo[a]) is present in plasma at highly variable concentrations and appears as a number of genetically determined size isoforms (400-800 kDa), disulfide linked to apoB-100 in low density lipoprotein to produce lipoprotein [a](Lp[a]). Apo[a] is synthesized by the liver, but the site of association of apo[a] and apoB and factors that regulate its production are unknown. To examine the morphogenesis of the Lp[a] particle, baboon hepatocytes expressing a single, low molecular weight isoform of apo[a] were labeled with [35S]cysteine and methionine, and apo[a] was analyzed by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE. Steady-state labeling revealed two molecular weight forms of apo[a] inside the cell. Only the large form was recovered from the culture medium. Pulse-chase studies and endoglycosidase treatment revealed that the lower molecular weight form of apo[a] represented a precursor with a prolonged residence time in the endoplasmic reticulum or an early Golgi compartment, after which it was processed to the mature form. A proportion of the mature form of apo[a] was rapidly secreted after synthesis, whereas the remainder had a prolonged residence time in a late Golgi compartment. In all experiments, apoB co-precipitated with apo[a] from the culture medium, but not from cell lysates. Density gradient ultracentrifugation and immunoblot analysis revealed that the majority of apo[a] was secreted into the medium in a free form, suggesting that the association between apo[a] and apoB occurred after secretion. Regulation of the movement of apo[a] between intracellular compartments may be one mechanism by which the plasma levels of Lp[a] are influenced.

  17. Pulp response to collagen and glutaraldehyde in pulpotomized primary teeth of baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuks, A B; Jones, P C; Michaeli, Y; Bimstein, E

    1991-01-01

    This investigation assessed histologically the pulp tissue reaction to glutaraldehyde (GA) and to a commercial collagen preparation in pulpotomized primary teeth of baboons. One hundred and eighty-eight primary teeth were pulpotomized; in half of them inflammation was induced prior to the treatment. The teeth were divided into five groups: in three of them GA was used as a pulp dressing and applied for 1 min (group 1), 5 min (group 2), or mixed into the paste (group 3); collagen was used in group 4 and in group 5 (control) IRM was placed directly over the pulp stumps. Follow-up times were two, eight, and 24 weeks. Total necrosis was observed only in the collagen group. Partial necrosis and severe inflammation also were seen mainly in this group, and when the GA was incorporated into the paste. Slight to moderate inflammation was evident in all groups two and eight weeks postoperatively; however, 78% of the teeth of group 2 (GA 5 min) were inflammation-free after 24 weeks. Partial dentin bridges were seen in 92% of the teeth of the control group, in 82% of group 2, and 50% each of groups 1 and 3 eight weeks postoperatively. Dentin bridges were present in only 4% of the collagen group. After 24 weeks, all the teeth in group 2 and 83% of group 1 had dentin bridges. We conclude that Zyderm (Colagen Corp. Palo Alto, CA) led to unacceptable results, 5 min application of GA presented the best healing response, and GA 1 min and IRM also were satisfactory.

  18. Effects of inhaled CO administration on acute lung injury in baboons with pneumococcal pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Bryan D.; Hess, Dean R.; Harris, R. Scott; Wolf, Monroe A.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Roggli, Victor L.; Davies, John D.; Winkler, Tilo; Stenzler, Alex; Baron, Rebecca M.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Choi, Augustine M.; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) gas has therapeutic potential for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome if a safe, evidence-based dosing strategy and a ventilator-compatible CO delivery system can be developed. In this study, we used a clinically relevant baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia to 1) test a novel, ventilator-compatible CO delivery system; 2) establish a safe and effective CO dosing regimen; and 3) investigate the local and systemic effects of CO therapy on inflammation and acute lung injury (ALI). Animals were inoculated with S. pneumoniae (108-109 CFU) (n = 14) or saline vehicle (n = 5); in a subset with pneumonia (n = 5), we administered low-dose, inhaled CO gas (100–300 ppm × 60–90 min) at 0, 6, 24, and/or 48 h postinoculation and serially measured blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. We found that CO inhalation at 200 ppm for 60 min is well tolerated and achieves a COHb of 6–8% with ambient CO levels ≤ 1 ppm. The COHb level measured at 20 min predicted the 60-min COHb level by the Coburn-Forster-Kane equation with high accuracy. Animals given inhaled CO + antibiotics displayed significantly less ALI at 8 days postinoculation compared with antibiotics alone. Inhaled CO was associated with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the lung and with augmentation of renal antioxidative programs. These data support the feasibility of safely delivering inhaled CO gas during mechanical ventilation and provide preliminary evidence that CO may accelerate the resolution of ALI in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate pneumonia model. PMID:26320156

  19. Haplotypes in the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene cluster affect plasma lipids in both humans and baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qian-fei; Liu, Xin; O' Connell, Jeff; Peng, Ze; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rainwater, David L.; VandeBerg, John L.; Rubin, Edward M.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-15

    Genetic studies in non-human primates serve as a potential strategy for identifying genomic intervals where polymorphisms impact upon human disease-related phenotypes. It remains unclear, however, whether independently arising polymorphisms in orthologous regions of non-human primates leads to similar variation in a quantitative trait found in both species. To explore this paradigm, we studied a baboon apolipoprotein gene cluster (APOA1/C3/A4/A5) for which the human gene orthologs have well established roles in influencing plasma HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Our extensive polymorphism analysis of this 68 kb gene cluster in 96 pedigreed baboons identified several haplotype blocks each with limited diversity, consistent with haplotype findings in humans. To determine whether baboons, like humans, also have particular haplotypes associated with lipid phenotypes, we genotyped 634 well characterized baboons using 16 haplotype tagging SNPs. Genetic analysis of single SNPs, as well as haplotypes, revealed an association of APOA5 and APOC3 variants with HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, respectively. Thus, independent variation in orthologous genomic intervals does associate with similar quantitative lipid traits in both species, supporting the possibility of uncovering human QTL genes in a highly controlled non-human primate model.

  20. Early graft failure of GalTKO pig organs in baboons is reduced by expression of a human complement pathway-regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Kelishadi, Sean S; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B; Singh, Avneesh K; Stoddard, Tiffany; Iwase, Hayato; Zhang, Tianshu; Burdorf, Lars; Sievert, Evelyn; Avon, Chris; Cheng, Xiangfei; Ayares, David; Horvath, Keith A; Corcoran, Philip C; Mohiuddin, Muhammad M; Barth, Rolf N; Cooper, David K C; Pierson, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    We describe the incidence of early graft failure (EGF, defined as loss of function from any cause within 3 days after transplant) in a large cohort of GalTKO pig organs transplanted into baboons in three centers, and the effect of additional expression of a human complement pathway-regulatory protein, CD46 or CD55 (GalTKO.hCPRP). Baboon recipients of life-supporting GalTKO kidney (n = 7) or heterotopic heart (n = 14) grafts received either no immunosuppression (n = 4), or one of several partial or full immunosuppressive regimens (n = 17). Fourteen additional baboons received a GalTKO.hCPRP kidney (n = 5) or heart (n = 9) and similar treatment regimens. Immunologic, pathologic, and coagulation parameters were measured at frequent intervals. EGF of GalTKO organs occurred in 9/21 baboons (43%). hCPRP expression reduced the GalTKO EGF incidence to 7% (1/14; P organs in which EGF developed (P organ failure, and (iii) the expression of a hCPRP reduces EGF but does not prevent systemic coagulation activation. Additional strategies will be required to control coagulation activation.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of proteoglycan 4 by 17β-estradiol in immortalized baboon temporomandibular joint disc cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Jennifer S; Akula Suresh Babu, Ramya; Navarro, Mary M; LeBaron, Richard G

    2014-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) affect a significant portion of the population of the USA, with the majority of those seeking treatment being women of childbearing age. Owing to this striking sexual dimorphism it has been postulated that sex hormones play a role in the maintenance of normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is a secreted lubricating molecule required for maintaining low frictional levels within articular joints; however, its role in the TMJ is not well characterized. In this study we describe the development of immortalized baboon cells isolated from specific regions of the TMJ disc and their use in the investigation of PRG4 expression and localization patterns in the TMJ. We identified conserved estrogen response elements within the 5' flanking region of the PRG4 gene of several species, and found that treatment of baboon TMJ disc cells with estrogen led to reduced PRG4 promoter activity and reduced expression of PRG4 mRNA in vitro. The observed negative regulation of PRG4 by estrogen could lead to increased friction and degradation of joint components over time. This study, for the first time, provides evidence of the regulatory potential of estrogen on PRG4 gene expression and suggests a novel etiology for the gender disparity observed among TMD patients.

  2. Social affiliation matters: both same-sex and opposite-sex relationships predict survival in wild female baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archie, Elizabeth A; Tung, Jenny; Clark, Michael; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2014-10-22

    Social integration and support can have profound effects on human survival. The extent of this phenomenon in non-human animals is largely unknown, but such knowledge is important to understanding the evolution of both lifespan and sociality. Here, we report evidence that levels of affiliative social behaviour (i.e. 'social connectedness') with both same-sex and opposite-sex conspecifics predict adult survival in wild female baboons. In the Amboseli ecosystem in Kenya, adult female baboons that were socially connected to either adult males or adult females lived longer than females who were socially isolated from both sexes--females with strong connectedness to individuals of both sexes lived the longest. Female social connectedness to males was predicted by high dominance rank, indicating that males are a limited resource for females, and females compete for access to male social partners. To date, only a handful of animal studies have found that social relationships may affect survival. This study extends those findings by examining relationships to both sexes in by far the largest dataset yet examined for any animal. Our results support the idea that social effects on survival are evolutionarily conserved in social mammals.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatto)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Grover, GScott; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 {+-} 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 {+-} 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 {+-} 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  4. Particle deposition in a child respiratory tract model: in vivo regional deposition of fine and ultrafine aerosols in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque-Silva, Iolanda; Vecellio, Laurent; Durand, Marc; Avet, John; Le Pennec, Déborah; de Monte, Michèle; Montharu, Jérôme; Diot, Patrice; Cottier, Michèle; Dubois, Francis; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2014-01-01

    To relate exposure to adverse health effects, it is necessary to know where particles in the submicron range deposit in the respiratory tract. The possibly higher vulnerability of children requires specific inhalation studies. However, radio-aerosol deposition experiments involving children are rare because of ethical restrictions related to radiation exposure. Thus, an in vivo study was conducted using three baboons as a child respiratory tract model to assess regional deposition patterns (thoracic region vs. extrathoracic region) of radioactive polydisperse aerosols ([d16-d84], equal to [0.15 µm-0.5 µm], [0.25 µm-1 µm], or [1 µm-9 µm]). Results clearly demonstrated that aerosol deposition within the thoracic region and the extrathoraic region varied substantially according to particle size. High deposition in the extrathoracic region was observed for the [1 µm-9 µm] aerosol (72% ± 17%). The [0.15 µm-0.5 µm] aerosol was associated almost exclusively with thoracic region deposition (84% ± 4%). Airborne particles in the range of [0.25 µm-1 µm] showed an intermediate deposition pattern, with 49% ± 8% in the extrathoracic region and 51% ± 8% in the thoracic region. Finally, comparison of baboon and human inhalation experiments for the [1 µm-9 µm] aerosol showed similar regional deposition, leading to the conclusion that regional deposition is species-independent for this airborne particle sizes.

  5. Particle deposition in a child respiratory tract model: in vivo regional deposition of fine and ultrafine aerosols in baboons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Albuquerque-Silva

    Full Text Available To relate exposure to adverse health effects, it is necessary to know where particles in the submicron range deposit in the respiratory tract. The possibly higher vulnerability of children requires specific inhalation studies. However, radio-aerosol deposition experiments involving children are rare because of ethical restrictions related to radiation exposure. Thus, an in vivo study was conducted using three baboons as a child respiratory tract model to assess regional deposition patterns (thoracic region vs. extrathoracic region of radioactive polydisperse aerosols ([d16-d84], equal to [0.15 µm-0.5 µm], [0.25 µm-1 µm], or [1 µm-9 µm]. Results clearly demonstrated that aerosol deposition within the thoracic region and the extrathoraic region varied substantially according to particle size. High deposition in the extrathoracic region was observed for the [1 µm-9 µm] aerosol (72% ± 17%. The [0.15 µm-0.5 µm] aerosol was associated almost exclusively with thoracic region deposition (84% ± 4%. Airborne particles in the range of [0.25 µm-1 µm] showed an intermediate deposition pattern, with 49% ± 8% in the extrathoracic region and 51% ± 8% in the thoracic region. Finally, comparison of baboon and human inhalation experiments for the [1 µm-9 µm] aerosol showed similar regional deposition, leading to the conclusion that regional deposition is species-independent for this airborne particle sizes.

  6. In vivo imaging of brain aromatase in female baboons: [11C]vorozole kinetics and effect of the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareto, Deborah; Biegon, Anat; Alexoff, David; Carter, Pauline; Shea, Coreen; Muench, Lisa; Xu, Youwen; Fowler, Joanna S; Kim, Sunny W; Logan, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the brain distribution of the enzyme aromatase in the female baboon with positron emission tomography and the tracer [11C]vorozole using three different quantification methods for estimating the total distribution volume (V(T)): a graphical method, compartment modeling, and a tissue to plasma ratio. The graphical model and the compartment modeling gave similar estimates to the data and similar values (correlation R  =  .988; p  =  .0001). [11C]Vorozole shows a rapid uptake by the brain followed by a relatively constant accumulation, suggesting the possibility of using the tissue to plasma ratio as an estimate of V(T). The highest uptake of [11C]vorozole in the baboon brain was measured in the amygdala, followed by the preoptic area and hypothalamus, basal ganglia, and cortical areas. Pretreatment studies with vorozole or letrozole showed a generalized decrease in brain accumulation and V(T). The results suggested that the physiologic changes in gonadal hormone levels accompanying the menstrual cycle had a significant effect on brain aromatase V(T).

  7. In vivo regulation of hepatic LDL receptor mRNA in the baboon. Differential effects of saturated and unsaturated fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J C; McGill, H C; Carey, K D; Getz, G S

    1987-05-25

    The effects of diets enriched with cholesterol and different fats upon plasma lipoproteins and hepatic low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mRNA levels were studied in a group of 18 normal baboons. Animals were fed diets containing 1% cholesterol and 25% fat as either coconut oil, peanut oil, or olive oil for a period of 20 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, beta-lipoprotein (LDL + very low density lipoprotein) cholesterol, apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein A-I were measured in samples obtained at 4-week intervals. All three diet groups demonstrated a statistically significant increase in plasma cholesterol as compared to base line throughout the experiment. Hepatic LDL receptor (LDL-R) mRNA levels were quantified by dot blot hybridization in serial liver biopsies. Animals fed saturated fat sustained a significant reduction in hepatic LDL-R mRNA as compared to those fed either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat. A strong negative correlation between LDL-R mRNA and plasma total cholesterol (r = -0.71), HDL cholesterol (r = -0.76), and plasma apo A-I (r = -0.77) was observed only in those animals fed coconut oil. Weak negative correlations between LDL-R mRNA and other plasma parameters did not achieve statistical significance. We conclude that saturated and unsaturated oils may influence plasma cholesterol levels in part through differential effects on LDL receptor biosynthesis in baboons.

  8. Testing the function of reconciliation and third-party affiliation for aggressors in hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas hamadryas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Teresa; Colmenares, Fernando; Aureli, Filippo

    2009-01-01

    In social groups, agonistic conflicts can have different negative consequences. Several post-conflict interactions have been suggested as post-conflict management behaviors to mitigate those negative effects. In this study, we investigated the function of two post-conflict behaviors--reconciliation and aggressor-initiated third-party affiliation--on the aggressor's levels of post-conflict anxiety and aggression in a large colony of hamadryas baboons. We also examined variation in the aggressor's levels of post-conflict anxiety as a function of relationship quality between the opponents as predicted by the Integrated Hypothesis. We found that after conflicts hamadryas baboon aggressors showed increased rates of anxiety-related behaviors and that they were also more likely to be involved in renewed aggressive interactions. Although both reconciliation and aggressor-initiated third-party affiliation reduced the probability of receiving post-conflict aggression, only reconciliation reduced the rates of anxiety-related behaviors, suggesting that the aggressors' post-conflict anxiety might be owing mainly to the damage that the conflict causes to their relationship with the victim. Furthermore, aggressor's rates of post-conflict anxiety were higher after conflicts with individuals with whom they had a high-quality relationship, supporting the idea that levels of post-conflict anxiety mediate the occurrence of reconciliation depending on the quality of the relationship with former opponent as predicted by the Integrated Hypothesis.

  9. Seroprevalence of Zika Virus in Wild African Green Monkeys and Baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechler, Connor R.; Bailey, Adam L.; Weiler, Andrea M.; Barry, Gabrielle L.; Breitbach, Meghan E.; Stewart, Laurel M.; Jasinska, Anna J.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Apetrei, Cristian; Phillips-Conroy, Jane E.; Jolly, Clifford J.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Friedrich, Thomas C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) has recently spread through the Americas and has been associated with a range of health effects, including birth defects in children born to women infected during pregnancy. Although the natural reservoir of ZIKV remains poorly defined, the virus was first identified in a captive “sentinel” macaque monkey in Africa in 1947. However, the virus has not been reported in humans or nonhuman primates (NHPs) in Africa outside Gabon in over a decade. Here, we examine ZIKV infection in 239 wild baboons and African green monkeys from South Africa, the Gambia, Tanzania, and Zambia using combinations of unbiased deep sequencing, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and an antibody capture assay that we optimized using serum collected from captive macaque monkeys exposed to ZIKV, dengue virus, and yellow fever virus. While we did not find evidence of active ZIKV infection in wild NHPs in Africa, we found variable ZIKV seropositivity of up to 16% in some of the NHP populations sampled. We anticipate that these results and the methodology described within will help in continued efforts to determine the prevalence, natural reservoir, and transmission dynamics of ZIKV in Africa and elsewhere. IMPORTANCE Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne virus originally discovered in a captive monkey living in the Zika Forest of Uganda, Africa, in 1947. Recently, an outbreak in South America has shown that ZIKV infection can cause myriad health effects, including birth defects in the children of women infected during pregnancy. Here, we sought to investigate ZIKV infection in wild African primates to better understand its emergence and spread, looking for evidence of active or prior infection. Our results suggest that up to 16% of some populations of nonhuman primate were, at some point, exposed to ZIKV. We anticipate that this study will be useful for future studies that examine the spread of infections from wild animals to humans in general and

  10. Evaluation of 6-([{sup 18}F]fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide for PET imaging of histone deacetylase in the baboon brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Alicia E. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)], E-mail: areid@bnl.gov; Hooker, Jacob; Shumay, Elena; Logan, Jean; Shea, Colleen; Kim, Sung Won [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Collins, Shanika [School of Science, Health and Technology Medgar Evers College, Brooklyn, NY 11225 (United States); Xu Youwen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Volkow, Nora [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Introduction: Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes involved in epigenetic modifications that shift the balance toward chromatin condensation and silencing of gene expression. Here, we evaluate the utility of 6-([{sup 18}F]fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide ([{sup 18}F]FAHA) for positron emission tomography imaging of HDAC activity in the baboon brain. For this purpose, we assessed its in vivo biodistribution, sensitivity to HDAC inhibition, metabolic stability and the distribution of the putative metabolite [{sup 18}F]fluoroacetate ([{sup 18}F]FAC). Methods: [{sup 18}F]FAHA and its metabolite [{sup 18}F]FAC were prepared, and their in vivo biodistribution and pharmacokinetics were determined in baboons. [{sup 18}F]FAHA metabolism and its sensitivity to HDAC inhibition using suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) were assessed in arterial plasma and by in vitro incubation studies. The chemical form of F-18 in rodent brain was assessed by ex vivo studies. Distribution volumes for [{sup 18}F]FAHA in the brain were derived. Results: [{sup 18}F]FAHA was rapidly metabolized to [{sup 18}F]FAC, and both labeled compounds entered the brain. [{sup 18}F]FAHA exhibited regional differences in brain uptake and kinetics. In contrast, [{sup 18}F]FAC showed little variation in regional brain uptake and kinetics. A kinetic analysis that takes into account the uptake of peripherally produced [{sup 18}F]FAC indicated that SAHA inhibited binding of [{sup 18}F]FAHA in the baboon brain dose-dependently. In vitro studies demonstrated SAHA-sensitive metabolism of [{sup 18}F]FAHA to [{sup 18}F]FAC within the cell and diffusion of [{sup 18}F]FAC out of the cell. All radioactivity in brain homogenate from rodents was [{sup 18}F]FAC at 7 min postinjection of [{sup 18}F]FAHA. Conclusion: The rapid metabolism of [{sup 18}F]FAHA to [{sup 18}F]FAC in the periphery complicates the quantitative analysis of HDAC in the brain. However, dose-dependent blocking studies with SAHA and kinetic modeling

  11. Baboons' hand preference resists to spatial factors for a communicative gesture but not for a simple manipulative action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourjade, Marie; Meunier, Hélène; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Vauclair, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    Olive baboons (Papio anubis) do acquire and use intentional requesting gestures in experimental contexts. Individual's hand preference for these gestures is consistent with that observed for typical communicative gestures, but not for manipulative actions. Here, we examine whether the strength of hand preference may also be a good marker of hemispheric specialization for communicative gestures, hence differing from the strength of hand preference for manipulative actions. We compared the consistency of individuals' hand preference with regard to the variation in space of either (i) a communicative partner or (ii) a food item to grasp using a controlled set-up. We report more consistent hand preference for communicative gestures than for grasping actions. Established hand preference in the midline was stronger for gesturing than for grasping and allowed to predict the consistency of hand preference across positions. We found no significant relation between the direction of hand preference and the task.

  12. Evidence of a Vocalic Proto-System in the Baboon (Papio papio) Suggests Pre-Hominin Speech Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boë, Louis-Jean; Berthommier, Frédéric; Legou, Thierry; Captier, Guillaume; Kemp, Caralyn; Sawallis, Thomas R.; Becker, Yannick; Rey, Arnaud; Fagot, Joël

    2017-01-01

    Language is a distinguishing characteristic of our species, and the course of its evolution is one of the hardest problems in science. It has long been generally considered that human speech requires a low larynx, and that the high larynx of nonhuman primates should preclude their producing the vowel systems universally found in human language. Examining the vocalizations through acoustic analyses, tongue anatomy, and modeling of acoustic potential, we found that baboons (Papio papio) produce sounds sharing the F1/F2 formant structure of the human [ɨ æ ɑ ɔ u] vowels, and that similarly with humans those vocalic qualities are organized as a system on two acoustic-anatomic axes. This confirms that hominoids can produce contrasting vowel qualities despite a high larynx. It suggests that spoken languages evolved from ancient articulatory skills already present in our last common ancestor with Cercopithecoidea, about 25 MYA. PMID:28076426

  13. A cocktail of humanized anti-pertussis toxin antibodies limits disease in murine and baboon models of whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Annalee W; Wagner, Ellen K; Laber, Joshua R; Goodfield, Laura L; Smallridge, William E; Harvill, Eric T; Papin, James F; Wolf, Roman F; Padlan, Eduardo A; Bristol, Andy; Kaleko, Michael; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread vaccination, pertussis rates are rising in industrialized countries and remain high worldwide. With no specific therapeutics to treat disease, pertussis continues to cause considerable infant morbidity and mortality. The pertussis toxin is a major contributor to disease, responsible for local and systemic effects including leukocytosis and immunosuppression. We humanized two murine monoclonal antibodies that neutralize pertussis toxin and expressed them as human immunoglobulin G1 molecules with no loss of affinity or in vitro neutralization activity. When administered prophylactically to mice as a binary cocktail, antibody treatment completely mitigated the Bordetella pertussis-induced rise in white blood cell counts and decreased bacterial colonization. When administered therapeutically to baboons, antibody-treated, but not untreated control animals, experienced a blunted rise in white blood cell counts and accelerated bacterial clearance rates. These preliminary findings support further investigation into the use of these antibodies to treat human neonatal pertussis in conjunction with antibiotics and supportive care.

  14. Characterization of very-low-density lipoproteins isolated from baboons, and fractionated using heparin-Sepharose chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainwater, D L; Kushwaha, R S

    1988-02-19

    Plasma very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) (d less than 1.006 g/ml) were purified from baboons by repeated ultracentrifugation. The weight composition of VLDL purified from these animals was 59% triacylglycerol, 17% phospholipid, 13% cholesterol plus cholesteryl esters, and 11% protein. When purified VLDL was fractionated using heparin-Sepharose chromatography, an average of 33% of the total recovered proteins were unbound in a saline solution, and 67% (range, 31 to 92%) were bound by the column, but could be eluted with 3 M NaCl. Recoveries of starting protein and the major classes of lipids in the two fractions were 70-80%. The two fractions differed in both apolipoprotein and lipid compositions. Analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated apolipoproteins using 3-21.5% acrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis indicated that both VLDL fractions contained apolipoprotein B, but only the bound fraction possessed significant amounts of apolipoprotein E. On a weight percent basis, the apolipoprotein-E-rich (bound) VLDL fraction contained significantly more cholesterol and cholesteryl esters (P less than 0.001) and less phospholipids (P less than 0.005) compared to the apolipoprotein E-poor (unbound) VLDL. Apolipoprotein-E-poor VLDL had shorter retention times than E-rich VLDL upon gel filtration chromatography, suggesting a larger size. There was no significant correlation between plasma levels of apolipoprotein-E-poor VLDL and levels of apolipoprotein B. These results demonstrate that baboons possess VLDL which can be separated into apolipoprotein-E-poor and E-rich fractions and these fractions differ in protein and lipid composition and in size.

  15. Behavioral effects and pharmacokinetics of (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) after intragastric administration to baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Amy K; Mueller, Melanie; Shell, Courtney D; Ricaurte, George A; Ator, Nancy A

    2013-06-01

    (±)-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is a popular drug of abuse. We aimed to characterize the behavioral effects of intragastric MDMA in a species closely related to humans and to relate behavioral effects to plasma MDMA and metabolite concentrations. Single doses of MDMA (0.32-7.8 mg/kg) were administered via an intragastric catheter to adult male baboons (N = 4). Effects of MDMA on food-maintained responding were assessed over a 20-hour period, whereas untrained behaviors and fine-motor coordination were characterized every 30 minutes until 3 hours postadministration. Levels of MDMA and metabolites in plasma were measured in the same animals (n = 3) after dosing on a separate occasion. MDMA decreased food-maintained responding over the 20-hour period, and systematic behavioral observations revealed increased frequency of bruxism as the dose of MDMA was increased. Drug blood level determinations showed no MDMA after the lower doses of MDMA tested (0.32-1.0 mg/kg) and modest levels after higher MDMA doses (3.2-7.8 mg/kg). High levels of 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (HHMA) were detected after all doses of MDMA, suggesting extensive first-pass metabolism of MDMA in the baboon. The present results demonstrate that MDMA administered via an intragastric catheter produced behavioral effects that have also been reported in humans. Similar to humans, blood levels of MDMA after oral administration may not be predictive of the behavioral effects of MDMA. Metabolites, particularly HHMA, may play a significant role in the behavioral effects of MDMA.

  16. Parasitological, Hematological and Biochemical Characteristics of a Model of Hyper-microfilariaemic Loiasis (Loa loa in the Baboon (Papio anubis.

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    Samuel Wanji

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Loiasis, a filarial infection caused by Loa loa usually thought to cause relatively minor morbidity, can cause serious and often fatal reactions in patients carrying very high levels of circulating Loa loa microfilariae (mf following administration of microfilaricidal drugs. An experimental model of this condition would greatly aid the definition of the optimal management of this important clinical presentation.Fifteen baboons (Papio anubis were infected with 600 infective larvae (L3 isolated from Chrysops vector flies. Animals were observed for any clinical changes; blood samples were collected every 1-2 months for 22 months, and analysed for parasitological, hematological and biochemical profiles using standard techniques. All animals became patent but remained clinically normal throughout the study. The parasitological pre-patent period was between 4-8 months, with a majority (60% of animals becoming patent by 5 months post infection (MPI; all animals were patent by 8 MPI. Microfilarial loads increased steadily in all animals and reached a peak at 18 MPI. By 10 MPI >70% of animals had mf >8,000 mf/mL, and at 18 MPI >70% of animals had mf >30,000 mf/mL with 50% of these animals with mf >50,000 mf/mL. Absolute eosinophil, creatinine, Ca2+ and K+ levels were generally above normal values (NV. Positive associations were seen between microfilariaemia and eosinophilia, Hb, Ca2+, and gamma-GT values, whilst significant negative associations were seen between microfilariaemia and potassium, glucose and mononuclear leukocyte levels.Infection of splenectomised baboons with L. loa can induce levels of circulating microfilariae, and corresponding haematological profiles, which parallel those seen in those humans in danger of the severe post-microfilariacide clinical responses. Utilization of this experimental model could contribute to the improved management of the loiasis related adverse responses in humans.

  17. Antibody to E- and L-selectin does not prevent lung injury or mortality in septic baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraway, M S; Welty-Wolf, K E; Kantrow, S P; Huang, Y C; Simonson, S G; Que, L G; Kishimoto, T K; Piantadosi, C A

    1998-03-01

    Recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) through upregulation of cellular adhesion molecules is a proposed mechanism of injury in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that pretreatment of baboons with a monoclonal antibody to human E- and L-selectin (EL-246) during sepsis would decrease PMN influx into tissues and result in less organ injury during gram-negative sepsis. We studied 14 anesthetized, ventilated adult baboons; six animals received 1 mg/kg of EL-246 before infusion of an LD100 of live Escherichia coli and six received the E. coli infusion without antibody therapy. Two other animals received 1 mg/kg of EL-246 intravenously without an infusion of bacteria. Intermittent measurements were made of circulatory pressures, cardiac output, urine output, arterial blood gases, ventilation:perfusion ratio (VA/Q), and hematologic status. The experiments were ended at 48 h or at the time of death. Tissues were harvested for pathology and biochemical measurements. The E. coli infusions were associated with a hyperdynamic state, pulmonary hypertension, systemic hypotension, decreased urine output (UOP), and metabolic acidosis. The antibody partly blocked PMN migration, but there were few significant physiologic or biochemical differences between the EL-246-treated and untreated animals. In the antibody-treated animals, UOP was decreased, metabolic acidosis was worsened, and median survival time was decreased significantly. We conclude that treatment with an antibody to E- and L-selectin in gram-negative sepsis does not improve gas exchange or protect against lung injury, and is associated with decreased survival time in primates.

  18. Male takeovers are reproductively costly to females in hamadryas baboons: a test of the sexual coercion hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Polo

    Full Text Available During male takeovers, in addition to fighting off the female's current mating partner, males may exhibit intense aggressive mate guarding of the newly acquired females. Recent studies indicate that coercive sexual aggression by males is an important strategy through which sexual conflict is expressed. Previous tests of the sexual coercion hypothesis in primates have focused on assessing if female mate choice is effectively reduced by male aggression, however, only one recent study has tested a critical prediction of this hypothesis, namely, that male coercion is reproductively costly to victim females. The present study uses 15 years of data on inter-birth intervals from a large multilevel colony of baboons, mostly Papio h. hamadryas, with a mating system based on harem-defence polygyny to examine if male takeovers impact the length of the abducted females' inter-birth intervals. Our analysis of 121 inter-birth intervals from 45 adult females indicates that male takeovers are reproductively costly to abducted females as they are associated with an increase in the time they take to conceive and a lengthening of the inter-birth intervals. We discuss how several factors may contribute to this reproductive cost, including male-female sexual conflict, male-male competition, and female-female competition. Our findings suggest that the male's aggressive herding is the main contributor to the abducted females' immediate reproductive cost. We argue that although some of the male's aggressive herding may be driven by male-male competition, nonetheless, it serves a coercive function as it both constrains the female's mate choice options and hampers her immediate breeding performance. This conclusion is backed up by results obtained in the only other study that has tested the same prediction and which has been carried out in a wild population of hamadryas baboons.

  19. Male takeovers are reproductively costly to females in hamadryas baboons: a test of the sexual coercion hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Pablo; Hernández-Lloreda, Victoria; Colmenares, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    During male takeovers, in addition to fighting off the female's current mating partner, males may exhibit intense aggressive mate guarding of the newly acquired females. Recent studies indicate that coercive sexual aggression by males is an important strategy through which sexual conflict is expressed. Previous tests of the sexual coercion hypothesis in primates have focused on assessing if female mate choice is effectively reduced by male aggression, however, only one recent study has tested a critical prediction of this hypothesis, namely, that male coercion is reproductively costly to victim females. The present study uses 15 years of data on inter-birth intervals from a large multilevel colony of baboons, mostly Papio h. hamadryas, with a mating system based on harem-defence polygyny to examine if male takeovers impact the length of the abducted females' inter-birth intervals. Our analysis of 121 inter-birth intervals from 45 adult females indicates that male takeovers are reproductively costly to abducted females as they are associated with an increase in the time they take to conceive and a lengthening of the inter-birth intervals. We discuss how several factors may contribute to this reproductive cost, including male-female sexual conflict, male-male competition, and female-female competition. Our findings suggest that the male's aggressive herding is the main contributor to the abducted females' immediate reproductive cost. We argue that although some of the male's aggressive herding may be driven by male-male competition, nonetheless, it serves a coercive function as it both constrains the female's mate choice options and hampers her immediate breeding performance. This conclusion is backed up by results obtained in the only other study that has tested the same prediction and which has been carried out in a wild population of hamadryas baboons.

  20. Pancreatic islet amyloidosis, β-cell apoptosis, and α-cell proliferation are determinants of islet remodeling in type-2 diabetic baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardado-Mendoza, Rodolfo; Davalli, Alberto M.; Chavez, Alberto O.; Hubbard, Gene B.; Dick, Edward J.; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Tene-Perez, Carlos E.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Hart, John; Perego, Carla; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Tejero, Maria Elizabeth; Finzi, Giovanna; Placidi, Claudia; La Rosa, Stefano; Capella, Carlo; Halff, Glenn; Gastaldelli, Amalia; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Folli, Franco

    2009-01-01

    β-Cell dysfunction is an important factor in the development of hyperglycemia of type-2 diabetes mellitus, and pancreatic islet amyloidosis (IA) has been postulated to be one of the main contributors to impaired insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of IA with metabolic parameters and its effect on islets of Langerhans remodeling and relative endocrine-cell volume in baboons. We sequenced the amylin peptide, determined the fibrillogenic propensities, and evaluated pancreatic histology, clinical and biochemical characteristics, and endocrine cell proliferation and apoptosis in 150 baboons with different metabolic status. Amylin sequence in the baboon was 92% similar to humans and showed superimposable fibrillogenic propensities. IA severity correlated with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (r = 0.662, P < 0.001) and HbA1c (r = 0.726, P < 0.001), as well as with free fatty acid, glucagon values, decreased homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) insulin resistance, and HOMA-B. IA severity was associated with a decreased relative β-cell volume, and increased relative α-cell volume and hyperglucagonemia. These results strongly support the concept that IA and β-cell apoptosis in concert with α-cell proliferation and hypertrophy are key determinants of islets of Langerhans “dysfunctional remodeling” and hyperglycemia in the baboon, a nonhuman primate model of type-2 diabetes mellitus. The most important determinants of IA were age and FPG (R2 = 0.519, P < 0.0001), and different FPG levels were sensitive and specific to predict IA severity. Finally, a predictive model for islet amyloid severity was generated with age and FPG as required variables. PMID:19666551

  1. The influence of baboon predation and time in water on germination and early establishment of Opuntia stricta (Australian pest pear in the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.D. Lotter

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The alien invader weed, Opuntia stricta Haw (family Cactaceae, is seriously threatening biodiversity in veld habitats of the Kruger National Park. Basic biological and ecological information on the establishment, growth and reproduction of the species is necessary for the development of effective strategies for its control. The rapid spread of the plant is apparently mainly due to seed dispersal by baboon (Papio ursinus. Sixty percent of seed taken from baboon faeces resulted in seedlings that established. Although palatability criteria for ripe fruit were more favourable than for unripe or medium-ripe fruit, seed from fruit at all three degrees of ripeness germinated equally well, and seedling establishment was similar. Despite their lower acidity, as well as higher total soluble sugar content and pH, cladodes are not subject to herbivory to near the extent that ripe fruit are. Freshly collected seed kept in Sabie River water showed significantly better germination/emergence after seven days submersion (83 than at 14 or 28 days (52 and 66 , respectively. Results suggest that seed dispersal of the species by animals, principally baboon, is an important cause of rapidly expanding infestations, and that dissipation in water will intensify the problem. Current findings should contribute toward the development of long-term weed management strategies aimed at con- tainment/eradication of the weed.

  2. Differential regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 and -2 by insulin in the baboon (Papio anubis endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazleabas Asgerally T

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of insulin on expression and synthesis of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 in the baboon endometrium in vitro. Methods Baboon endometrial explants collected from cycling, ovariectomized, steroid-treated, simulated-pregnant and pregnant animals were cultured for 48 h in the presence or absence of insulin, with or without estradiol, progesterone and hCG. Results Insulin clearly inhibited IGFBP-1 production and mRNA expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas IGFBP-2 synthesis was not significantly affected. The inhibitory effects of insulin on IGFBP-1 were more evident in explants of non-pregnant tissue or tissue away from the implantation site. In the absence of insulin, synthesis of IGFBP-1 was induced in explants with low levels of de novo synthesis whereas IGFBP-2 synthesis was inhibited. This effect was potentiated by steroids and hCG in the explant cultures. Conclusion Insulin differentially regulates endometrial IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 secretion in the baboon.

  3. [{sup 11}C]d-threo-Methylphenidate, a new radiotracer for the dopamine transporter. Characterization in baboon and human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    dl-threo Methylphenidate (MP, Ritalin) is a psychostimulant drug which binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT). We evaluated [{sup 11}C]d-threo-methylphenidate ([{sup 11}C]d-MP), the more active enantiomer, as a radiotracer for the DAT in baboons and human brain. Stereoselectivity, saturability and pharmacological specificity and reproducibility were examined. Stereoselectivity was examined in baboons by comparing [{sup 11C}]d-MP,[{sup 11}C]l-MP and [{sup 11}C]dl-MP. Unlabeled MP was used to assess the reversibility and saturability of the binding. GBR 12909,{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester ({beta}-CIT), tomoxetine and citalopram were used to assess the specificity of the binding. The ratios between the radioactivity in the striatum to that in cerebellum (ST/CB) were 3.3,2.2 and 1.1 for [{sup 11}C]d-MP,[{sup 11}C]dl-MP and [{sup 11}C]l-MP respectively. Most of the striatal binding of [{sup 11}C]d-threo-MP was displaced by injection of nonradioactive MP demonstrating reversibility. Pretreatment with MP (0.5 mg/kg), GBR12909 (1.5 mg/kg) or {beta}-CIT (0.3 mg/kg) reduced ST/CB by about 60% and the ratios of distribution volumes at the steady-state for the triatum to cerebellum (DV{sub st/}DV{sub cb}) by about 50%. Pretreatment with tomoxetine (3.0 mg/kg) or citalopram (2.0 mg/kg), inhibitors of the norepinephrine and serotonin transporter, had no effect. Studies of [{sup 11}C]d-MP in the human brain showed highest uptake in basal ganglia with a half clearance time of about 60 minutes. Repeated studies in 6 normal human subjects showed differences in DV{sub st/}DV{sub cb} between -7% and 8%. MP pretreatment decreased BG but no cortical or cerebellar binding and reduced Bmax/Kd by 91%.

  4. Evaluation of pancreatic VMAT2 binding with active and inactive enantiomers of 18F-FP-DTBZ in baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Keunpoong; Labaree, David; Ropchan, Jim; Harris, Paul; Huang, Yiyun; Ichise, Masanori; Carson, Richard E.; Cline, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction 18F-Fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine (18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ) is a vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) radiotracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to quantify human β-cell mass. Renal cortex and spleen have been suggested as reference regions, however, little is known about 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ binding in these regions including the fraction of radiometabolite. We compared the kinetics of 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ and its inactive enantiomer 18F-FP-(−)-DTBZ in baboons, estimated the non-displaceable binding (VND) of the tracers, and used ex vivo studies to measure radiometabolite fractions. Methods PET scans were conducted for up to 4 h with (+) and (−) enantiomers. Displacement experiments using unlabeled (+) and (−) enantiomers of FP-DTBZ and fluvoxamine (to evaluate sigma-1 receptor binding) were performed. SUV curves were used to calculate displacement values in the pancreas, renal cortex, and spleen. Distribution volumes (VT) were computed, and three approaches for calculation of VND were compared: (1) 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ reference VT, (2) 18F-FP-(−)-DTBZ pancreatic VT, and (3) a scaled 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ reference VT values. Ex vivo study was conducted to measure radiometabolite fraction in homogenized tissue samples from baboons at 90 min post-injection. Results Spleen uptake was lowest for both tracers. Highest uptake was in the pancreas with 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ and renal cortex with 18F-FP-(−)-DTBZ. Substantial displacement effect was observed only with unlabeled FP-(+)-DTBZ in the 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ studies. Radiometabolite fraction was higher in the renal cortex than the spleen. Approaches (1) and (3) with spleen to estimate VND provided lowest inter-subject variability of BPND. Conclusions VT differences among organs and between enantiomers indicated that scaling of reference region values is needed for quantification of VMAT2 binding in the pancreas with 18F-FP-(+)-DTBZ. Since the kidney PET signal has greater partial volume

  5. Iliac artery mural thrombus formation. Effect of antiplatelet therapy on 111In-platelet deposition in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, S.R.; Paxton, L.D.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    To measure the rate, extent, and time course of arterial mural thrombus formation in vivo and to assess the effects of antiplatelet therapy in that setting, we have studied autologous /sup 111/In-platelet deposition induced by experimental iliac artery aneurysms in baboons. Scintillation camera imaging analyses were performed at 1, 24, 48, and 72 hours after implantation of the device. Correction for tissue attenuation was determined by using a small, comparably located /sup 111/In source implanted at the time of surgery. In five animals, /sup 111/In-platelet activity accumulated progressively after device implantation, reaching a maximum after the third day. Repeat image analysis carried out 2 weeks after the surgical procedure also showed progressive accumulation of /sup 111/In-platelets over 3 days but at markedly reduced amounts as compared with the initial study. In five additional animals, treatment with a combination of aspirin and dipyridamole begun 1 hour after surgical implantation reduced /sup 111/In-platelet deposition to negligible levels by the third day. Although platelet survival time was shortened and platelet turnover was reciprocally increased in all operated animals, platelet survival and turnover were not affected by antiplatelet therapy. We conclude that, in contrast to platelet survival and turnover measurements, /sup 111/In-platelet imaging is a reliable and sensitive method for localizing and quantifying focal arterial thrombi and for assessing the effects of antiplatelet therapy.

  6. Synthesis, radiolabeling, and baboon SPECT imaging of 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(3′-[123I]iodophenyl)tropane ([123I]YP256) as a serotonin transporter radiotracer.([123I]YP256) a potential serotonin transporter radiotracer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bois, Frederic; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Amici, Louis; Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S.; Kula, Nora; Baldessarini, Ross; Innis, Robert B.; Staley, Julie K.; Tamagnan., Gilles D.

    2008-01-01

    To develop a potential SPECT probe to evaluate the integrity of the serotoninergic system (5-HTT) whose dysfunction is linked to several disease conditions such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s diseases and depression, we report the synthesis, radiolabeling and in vivo baboon imaging of 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(3′-[123I]iodophenyl) tropane (YP256, 6). The radiolabeling was performed by iododestannylation using sodium [123I]iodide and peracetic acid. Although the ligand displayed high selectivity for 5-HTT over dopamine transporter (DAT) in vitro, SPECT imaging in baboons did not reveal selective 5-HTT accumulation in brain in vivo. PMID:18158943

  7. Synthesis, radiolabeling and baboon SPECT imaging of 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(3'-[{sup 123}I]iodophenyl)tropane ([{sup 123}I]YP256) as a serotonin transporter radiotracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bois, Frederic; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Amici, Louis; Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S. [Yale University, School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A2), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Kula, Nora; Baldessarini, Ross [Department of Psychiatry and Neuroscience Program, Harvard Medical School, Mailman Research Center McLean Division of Massachusetts General Hospital, Belmont, MA 02478 (United States); Innis, Robert B.; Staley, Julie K. [Yale University, School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A2), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Tamagnan, Gilles D. [Yale University, School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A2), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)], E-mail: gtamagnan@indd.org

    2008-01-15

    To develop a potential SPECT probe to evaluate the integrity of the serotoninergic system (5-HTT) whose dysfunction is linked to several disease conditions such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and depression, we report the synthesis, radiolabeling and in vivo baboon imaging of 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(3'-[{sup 123}I]iodophenyl) tropane (YP256, ). The radiolabeling was performed by iododestannylation using sodium [{sup 123}I]iodide and peracetic acid. Although the ligand displayed high selectivity for 5-HTT over dopamine transporter in vitro, SPECT imaging in baboons did not reveal selective 5-HTT accumulation in brain in vivo.

  8. Mapping primary gyrogenesis during fetal development in primate brains: high-resolution in utero structural MRI study of fetal brain development in pregnant baboons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kochunov

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The global and regional changes in the fetal cerebral cortex in primates were mapped during primary gyrification (PG; weeks 17-25 of 26 weeks total gestation. Studying pregnant baboons using high-resolution MRI in utero, measurements included cerebral volume, cortical surface area, gyrification index and length and depth of ten primary cortical sulci. Seven normally developing fetuses were imaged in two animals longitudinally and sequentially. We compared these results to those on PG that from the ferret studies and analyzed them in the context of our recent studies of phylogenetics of cerebral gyrification. We observed that in both primates and non-primates, the cerebrum undergoes a very rapid transformation into the gyrencephalic state, subsequently accompanied by an accelerated growth in brain volume and cortical surface area. However, PG trends in baboons exhibited some critical differences from those observed in ferrets. For example, in baboons, the growth along the long (length axis of cortical sulci was unrelated to the growth along the short (depth axis and far outpaced it. Additionally, the correlation between the rate of growth along the short sulcal axis and heritability of sulcal depth was negative and approached significance (r=-0.60;p<.10, while the same trend for long axis was positive and not significant (p=0.3;p=0.40. These findings, in an animal that shares a highly orchestrated pattern of PG with humans, suggest that ontogenic processes that influence changes in sulcal length and depth are diverse and possibly driven by different factors in primates than in non-primates.

  9. Eight week exposure to a high sugar high fat diet results in adiposity gain and alterations in metabolic biomarkers in baboons (Papio hamadryas sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejero M Elizabeth

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Baboons (Papio hamadryas Sp. develop features of the cardiometabolic syndrome and represent a clinically-relevant animal model in which to study the aetiology of the disorder. To further evaluate the baboon as a model for the study of the cardiometabolic syndrome, we developed a high sugar high fat diet and hypothesized that it could be used to induce adiposity gain and affect associated circulating biomarkers. Methods We developed a diet enriched with monosaccharides and saturated fatty acids that was composed of solid and liquid energy sources. We provided a group of baboons (n = 9 ad libitum access to this diet for 8 weeks. Concurrently, a control group (n = 6 was maintained with ad libitum access to a low sugar low fat baseline diet and normal water for 8 weeks. Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and circulating metabolic biomarkers were measured using standard methodology before and after the 8 week study period. Results Neither body composition nor circulating biomarkers changed in the control group. Following the 8 weeks, the intervention group had a significant increase in fat mass (1.71 ± 0.98 vs. 3.23 ± 1.70 kg, p = 0.004, triglyceride (55 ± 13 vs. 109 ± 67 mg/dL, p = 0.006,, and leptin (1.19 ± 1.40 vs. 3.29 ± 2.32 ng/mL, p = 0.001 and a decline in adiponectin concentrations (33530 ± 9744 vs. 23330 ± 7863 ng/mL, p = 0.002. Percentage haemoglobin A1C (4.0 ± 0.3 vs. 6.0 ± 1.4, p = 0.002 also increased in the intervention group. Conclusions Our findings indicate that when exposed to a high sugar high fat diet, young adult male baboons develop increased body fat and triglyceride concentrations, altered adipokine concentrations, and evidence of altered glucose metabolism. Our findings are in keeping with observations in humans and further demonstrate the potential utility of this highly clinically-relevant animal model for studying diet-induced metabolic dysregulation.

  10. A comparative cerebral blood flow study in a baboon model with acetazolamide provocation: {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO vs {sup 123}I(IMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormehl, I.C.; Oliver, D.W.; Hugo, N.; Rossouw, D

    1995-04-01

    Pharmacological interactions are important when nuclear medical procedures are applied to patients under drug therapy, or drug provocation. This study compares in baboon models (regional) cerebral blood flow [(r)CBF] results from {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and {sup 123}I-iodoamphetamine [{sup 123}I(IMP)] each with and without acetazolamide, the latter a suggested drug for testing cerebrovascular reserve. Expected differences in cerebral uptake were observed between the two radio-tracers without acetazolamide. The increase in tracer uptake resulting from acetazolamide is significantly enhanced for {sup 123}I(IMP), which could have diagnostic implications.

  11. Stability of cardiodynamic and some blood parameters in the baboon following intravenous anaesthesia with ketamine and diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J. Du Plooy

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The stability of cardiodynamic and some blood parameters during a slow, continuous infusion of a combination of ketamine and diazepam is reported. Contractility (dP/dt, myocardial relaxation (Tln, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP, arterial blood pressure and certain blood parameters were assessed in 3 male and 3 female juvenile baboons (Papio ursinus. Anaesthesia was induced with 15 mg/kg ketamine IM and maintained with a continuous IV infusion (40-60 mℓ/h of ketamine and diazepam. The mixture consisted of 2 mℓ ketamine (100 mg/mℓ, 2 mℓ diazepam (5 mg/mℓ and 50 mℓ saline. A period of 75 + 10 min was allowed for preparation of the animals, after which lead II of the ECG, femoral artery blood pressure and left ventricular pressure were recorded at 15-min intervals for a period of 2 h: the total duration of anaesthesia was 195 min. Arterial blood samples were analysed at 30-min intervals for blood gases, electrolytes, glucose and insulin. Left ventricular parameters were derived from the left ventricular pressure curve. Tln, LVSP and LVEDP showed small fluctuations. Contractility decreased (p < 0.037 at the 195-min interval. No arrhythmias or ECG changes were seen, while blood pressure decreased gradually. Serum calcium concentration decreased and blood glucose levels increased gradually over time. Anaesthesia and analgesia were sufficient and no other drugs were necessary. The animals appeared sedated and dazed 60-80 min after the procedure. A continuous infusion of a combination of ketamine and diazepam for a duration of 150 min can provide stable anaesthesia for cardiodynamic measurements.

  12. Influence of infant and juvenile diets on serum cholesterol, lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein concentrations in juvenile baboons (Papio sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, G E; McMahan, C A; Kelley, J L; Farley, C M; McGill, H C

    1982-11-01

    The long-term effects of infant diet (breast milk or formula containing 2, 30, or 60 mg/dl cholesterol) and subsequent dietary cholesterol (1 mg/kcal) and fat (saturated or unsaturated) on serum lipid and apolipoprotein concentrations were estimated using 82 juvenile baboons 4-6 years of age. A significant interaction of infant diet (breast vs formula) with type of fat (saturated vs unsaturated) at 4-6 years of age was observed on HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) concentrations. That is, animals breast-fed as infants had higher HDL cholesterol and apoA-I concentrations when fed unsaturated fat from weaning to 4-6 years of age than those fed saturated fat (77 vs 68 mg/dl). In contrast, animals fed formulas in infancy followed by a diet containing unsaturated fat had lower HDL cholesterol and apoA-I concentrations at 4-6 years of age than did those fed saturated fat (67 vs 78 mg/dl). However, breast feeding or feeding formulas containing various levels of cholesterol for 3 months during infancy did not result in statistically significant differences in total serum cholesterol, VLDL + LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apoB) concentrations. Dietary cholesterol after infancy significantly increased serum total cholesterol, VLDL + LDL and HDL cholesterol, apoA-I and apoB concentrations. All of these response variables also were higher in animals fed saturated fat compared to those fed unsaturated fat on the same level of cholesterol. At 4-6 years of age, regardless of diet, females had significantly higher serum VLDL + LDL cholesterol (57 vs 43 mg/dl) and apoB concentrations (39 vs 30 mg/dl) than did males.

  13. Revisiting Biomarkers of Total-Body and Partial-Body Exposure in a Baboon Model of Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Marco; Denis, Josiane; Grenier, Nancy; Arvers, Philippe; Foucher, Barbara; Desangles, François; Martigne, Patrick; Chaussard, Hervé; Drouet, Michel; Abend, Michael; Hérodin, Francis

    2015-01-01

    In case of a mass casualty radiation event, there is a need to distinguish total-body irradiation (TBI) and partial-body irradiation (PBI) to concentrate overwhelmed medical resources to the individuals that would develop an acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and need hematologic support (i.e., mostly TBI victims). To improve the identification and medical care of TBI versus PBI individuals, reliable biomarkers of exposure could be very useful. To investigate this issue, pairs of baboons (n = 18) were exposed to different situations of TBI and PBI corresponding to an equivalent of either 5 Gy 60Co gamma irradiation (5 Gy TBI; 7.5 Gy left hemibody/2.5 right hemibody TBI; 5.55 Gy 90% PBI; 6.25 Gy 80% PBI; 10 Gy 50% PBI, 15 Gy 30% PBI) or 2.5 Gy (2.5 Gy TBI; 5 Gy 50% PBI). More than fifty parameters were evaluated before and after irradiation at several time points up to 200 days. A partial least square discriminant analysis showed a good distinction of TBI from PBI situations that were equivalent to 5 Gy. Furthermore, all the animals were pooled in two groups, TBI (n = 6) and PBI (n = 12), for comparison using a logistic regression and a non parametric statistical test. Nine plasmatic biochemical markers and most of hematological parameters turned out to discriminate between TBI and PBI animals during the prodromal phase and the manifest illness phase. The most significant biomarkers were aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactico dehydrogenase, urea, Flt3-ligand, iron, C-reactive protein, absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the early period, and Flt3-ligand, iron, platelet count, hemoglobin, monocyte count, absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the ARS phase. These results suggest that heterogeneity could be distinguished within a range of 2.5 to 5 Gy TBI.

  14. Revisiting Biomarkers of Total-Body and Partial-Body Exposure in a Baboon Model of Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Valente

    Full Text Available In case of a mass casualty radiation event, there is a need to distinguish total-body irradiation (TBI and partial-body irradiation (PBI to concentrate overwhelmed medical resources to the individuals that would develop an acute radiation syndrome (ARS and need hematologic support (i.e., mostly TBI victims. To improve the identification and medical care of TBI versus PBI individuals, reliable biomarkers of exposure could be very useful. To investigate this issue, pairs of baboons (n = 18 were exposed to different situations of TBI and PBI corresponding to an equivalent of either 5 Gy 60Co gamma irradiation (5 Gy TBI; 7.5 Gy left hemibody/2.5 right hemibody TBI; 5.55 Gy 90% PBI; 6.25 Gy 80% PBI; 10 Gy 50% PBI, 15 Gy 30% PBI or 2.5 Gy (2.5 Gy TBI; 5 Gy 50% PBI. More than fifty parameters were evaluated before and after irradiation at several time points up to 200 days. A partial least square discriminant analysis showed a good distinction of TBI from PBI situations that were equivalent to 5 Gy. Furthermore, all the animals were pooled in two groups, TBI (n = 6 and PBI (n = 12, for comparison using a logistic regression and a non parametric statistical test. Nine plasmatic biochemical markers and most of hematological parameters turned out to discriminate between TBI and PBI animals during the prodromal phase and the manifest illness phase. The most significant biomarkers were aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactico dehydrogenase, urea, Flt3-ligand, iron, C-reactive protein, absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the early period, and Flt3-ligand, iron, platelet count, hemoglobin, monocyte count, absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the ARS phase. These results suggest that heterogeneity could be distinguished within a range of 2.5 to 5 Gy TBI.

  15. Novel Inducers of Fetal Globin Identified through High Throughput Screening (HTS Are Active In Vivo in Anemic Baboons and Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Boosalis

    Full Text Available High-level fetal (γ globin expression ameliorates clinical severity of the beta (β hemoglobinopathies, and safe, orally-bioavailable γ-globin inducing agents would benefit many patients. We adapted a LCR-γ-globin promoter-GFP reporter assay to a high-throughput robotic system to evaluate five diverse chemical libraries for this activity. Multiple structurally- and functionally-diverse compounds were identified which activate the γ-globin gene promoter at nanomolar concentrations, including some therapeutics approved for other conditions. Three candidates with established safety profiles were further evaluated in erythroid progenitors, anemic baboons and transgenic mice, with significant induction of γ-globin expression observed in vivo. A lead candidate, Benserazide, emerged which demonstrated > 20-fold induction of γ-globin mRNA expression in anemic baboons and increased F-cell proportions by 3.5-fold in transgenic mice. Benserazide has been used chronically to inhibit amino acid decarboxylase to enhance plasma levels of L-dopa. These studies confirm the utility of high-throughput screening and identify previously unrecognized fetal globin inducing candidates which can be developed expediently for treatment of hemoglobinopathies.

  16. Short-term effects of high-dose khat on sperm parameters and reproductive hormonal levels in olive baboons (Papio anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachieo, Atunga; Kiraithe, Muthamia M; Spiessens, Carl; Chai, Daniel C; Kiulia, Nicholas M; D'Hooghe, Thomas M; Mwenda, Jason M

    2013-01-01

    The biological effects of khat (Catha edulis) on reproduction and fertility are inadequately investigated and controversial, hence we determined the effects of oral administration of high-dose khat on sperm parameters and male hormonal levels in olive baboons. In this study, 6 male baboons received a high dose of khat (500 g/week) during 1 month. Electroejaculation for sperm studies (concentration, motility and chromatin integrity) and plasma collection for hormonal analysis (testosterone, prolactin and cortisol) were done weekly during 1 month before and 1 month during khat administration as well as 2 weeks after the last dose of khat administration. Administration of khat extract induced a significant reduction in sperm motility (p = 0.008), sperm count (p = 0.041), sperm chromatin integrity (p = 0.0003), testosterone levels (p = 0.035) and prolactin levels (p = 0.0115), but not in cortisol levels and sperm volume (p > 0.05). The results suggest that high-dose khat decreases sperm quality and testosterone and hence may contribute to male infertility.

  17. Centre-embedded structures are a by-product of associative learning and working memory constraints: evidence from baboons (Papio Papio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Arnaud; Perruchet, Pierre; Fagot, Joël

    2012-04-01

    Influential theories have claimed that the ability for recursion forms the computational core of human language faculty distinguishing our communication system from that of other animals (Hauser, Chomsky, & Fitch, 2002). In the present study, we consider an alternative view on recursion by studying the contribution of associative and working memory processes. After an intensive paired-associate training with visual shapes, we observed that baboons spontaneously ordered their responses in keeping with a recursive, centre-embedded structure. This result suggests that the human ability for recursion might partly if not entirely originate from fundamental processing constraints already present in nonhuman primates and that the critical distinction between animal communication and human language should more likely be found in working memory capacities than in an ability to produce recursive structures per se.

  18. Fecal microbial diversity and putative function in captive western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas) and binturongs (Arctictis binturong).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Erin A; Ashwell, Melissa; Lambert, Joanna E; Fellner, Vivek

    2014-11-01

    Microbial populations in the gastrointestinal tract contribute to host health and nutrition. Although gut microbial ecology is well studied in livestock and domestic animals, little is known of the endogenous populations inhabiting primates or carnivora. We characterized microbial populations in fecal cultures from gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas) and binturongs (Arctictis binturong) to compare the microbiomes associated with different gastrointestinal morphologies and different omnivorous feeding strategies. Each species was fed a distinct standardized diet for 2 weeks prior to fecal collection. All diets were formulated to reflect the species' feeding strategies in situ. Fresh fecal samples were pooled within species and used to inoculate in vitro batch cultures. Acetate, propionate, butyrate and valerate were measured after 24 h of incubation. Eubacterial DNA was extracted from individual fecal samples, pooled, and the cpn60 gene region was amplified and then sequenced to identify the major eubacterial constituents associated with each host species. Short chain fatty acids (P < 0.001) and methane (P < 0.001) were significantly different across species. Eubacterial profiles were consistent with fermentation data and suggest an increase in diversity with dietary fiber.

  19. Characterisation of [11C]PR04.MZ in Papio anubis baboon: A selective high-affinity radioligand for quantitative imaging of the dopamine transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riss P. J.; Fowler J.; Riss, P.J.; Hooker, J.M.; Shea, C.; Xu, Y.; Carter, P.; Warner, D.; Ferrari V.; Kim, S.W.; Aigbirhio, F.I.; Fowler, J.S.; Roesch, F.

    2011-10-25

    N-(4-fluorobut-2-yn-1-yl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4{prime}-tolyl)nortropane (PR04.MZ, 1) is a PET radioligand for the non-invasive exploration of the function of the cerebral dopamine transporter (DAT). A reliable automated process for routine production of the carbon-11 labelled analogue [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ ([{sup 11}C]-1) has been developed using GMP compliant equipment. An adult female Papioanubis baboon was studied using a test-retest protocol with [{sup 11}C]-1 in order to assess test-retest reliability, metabolism and CNS distribution profile of the tracer in non-human primates. Blood sampling was performed throughout the studies for determination of the free fraction in plasma (fP), plasma input functions and metabolic degradation of the radiotracer [{sup 11}C]-1. Time-activity curves were derived for the putamen, the caudate nucleus, the ventral striatum, the midbrain and the cerebellum. Distribution volumes (VT) and non-displaceable binding potentials (BPND) for various brain regions and the blood were obtained from kinetic modelling. [{sup 11}C]-1 shows promising results as aselective marker of the presynaptic dopamine transporter. With the reliable visualisation of the extra-striatal dopaminergic neurons and no indication on labelled metabolites, the tracer provides excellent potential for translation into man.

  20. Autologous cell therapy as a new approach to treatment of radiation-induced bone marrow aplasia: preliminary study in a baboon model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herodin, F.; Drouet, M. [Radiohematology Unit, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France)

    2002-07-01

    The sparing of viable hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells located in underexposed bone marrow territories associated with the relative radioresistance of certain stem cell populations is the rationale for autologous cell therapy consisting of ex vivo expansion of residual cells after collection postirradiation. The feasibility of this treatment mainly depends on time constraints and hematopoietic cell threshold. We showed in this study that in the absence of early-acting mobilizing agent administration, subliminar amounts of CD34{sup +} cells can be collected (1 x 10{sup 6} CD34{sup +} cells/100 mL bone marrow or for 1 L apheresis) from 6-Gy {gamma} globally irradiated baboons. Residual CD34{sup +} cells were successfully expanded in serum-free medium in the presence of antiapoptotic cytokine combination (stem cell factor + FLT-3 ligand + thrombopoietin + interleukin 3, 50 ng/mL each, i.e., 4F): K{sub CD34{sup +}} = x2.8 and x13.7 (n=2). Moreover, we demonstrated the short-term neutrophil engraftment potential of a low-size mixed expanded graft (1.5 x 10{sup 6} final CD34{sup +}cells/kg) issued from the coculture of unirradiated (20%) and 2.5-Gy in vitro irradiated (80%) CD34{sup +} cells on an allogeneic stromal cell layer in the presence of 4F. Further preclinical research needs to be performed to clearly establish this therapeutic approach that could be optimized by the early administration of antiapoptotic cytokines. (author)

  1. Early endothelial damage detected by circulating particles in baboons fed a diet high in simple carbohydrates in conjunction with saturated or unsaturated fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiang; Hodara, Vida; Meng, Qinghe; Voruganti, V Saroja; Rice, Karen; Michalek, Joel E; Comuzzie, Anthony G; VandeBerg, John L

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that high-fat diets cause blood vessel damage, however, assessing pathological effects accurately and efficiently is difficult. In this study, we measured particle levels of static endothelium (CD31+ and CD105+) and activated endothelium (CD62E+, CD54+ and CD106+) in plasma. We determined individual responses to two dietary regimens in two groups of baboons. One group (n = 10), was fed a diet high in simple carbohydrates and saturated fats (the HSF diet) and the other (n = 8) received a diet high in simple carbohydrates and unsaturated fats (the HUF diet). Plasma samples were collected at 0, 3, and 7 weeks. The percentages of CD31+ and CD62E+ particles were elevated at 3 weeks in animals fed either diet, but these elevations were statistically significant only in animals fed the HUF diet. Surprisingly, both percentages and counts of CD31+ particles were significantly lower at week 7 compared to week 0 and 3 in the HSF group. The median absolute counts of CD105+ particles were progressively elevated over time in the HSF group with a significant increase from week 0 to 7; the pattern was somewhat different for the HUF group with significant increase from week 3 to 7. The counts of CD54+ particles exhibited wide variation in both groups during the dietary challenge, while the median counts of CD106+ particles were significantly lower at week 3 than at week 0 and week 7. Endothelial particles exhibited time-dependent changes, suggesting they were behaving as quantifiable surrogates for the early detection of vascular damage caused by dietary factors.

  2. Baclofen effects on alcohol seeking, self-administration and extinction of seeking responses in a within-session design in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Angela N; Kaminski, Barbara J; Weerts, Elise M

    2014-01-01

    Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptor agonist, is currently under investigation as a potential treatment to prevent relapse to drinking in alcohol-dependent persons. In the current study, two groups of baboons were trained under a chained schedule of reinforcement (CSR), with three linked components, which were each correlated with different response requirements and cues. Fulfilling the requirement in the second link initiated the third link where either alcohol (n = 4) or a preferred non-alcoholic beverage (Tang, n = 5) was available for self-administration; failure to complete the response requirement in Link 2 ended the session (no access to alcohol or Tang). Seeking responses in Link 2 were used as indices of the motivational processes thought to be involved in relapse. The effects of baclofen (0.1-2.4 mg/kg) were examined under conditions with alcohol or Tang access and under extinction. Under the CSR, baclofen (1.8 and 2.4 mg/kg) significantly decreased (P baclofen (2.4 mg/kg) reduced Tang self-administration and consumption. Under within-session extinction conditions, baclofen (1.8 and 2.4 mg/kg) facilitated extinction of responding for both alcohol and Tang, particularly during the first 10 minutes of extinction. Baclofen may be effective in reducing craving and alcohol drinking, although the facilitation of extinction and suppression of both alcohol and Tang self-administration by baclofen suggests these effects may be related to a more general suppression of consummatory and conditioned behaviors.

  3. No-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-( sup 18 F)fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine and N-(3-( sup 18 F)fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine -synthesis, anatomical distribution in mice and rats, and tomographic studies in a baboon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanqin Bai; Renrui Teng; Chyngyann Shiue; Wolf, A.P.; Dewey, S.L. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Holland, M.J.; Simon, E.J. (New York Univ., NY (USA). Medical Center)

    1990-01-01

    N-(3-Fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3a) and N-(3-fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4a) were synthesized by N-alkylation of norbuprenorphine (1) and nordiprenorphine (2) with 1-bromo-3-fluoropropane. The corresponding no-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-({sup 18}F)fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3b) and N-(3-({sup 18}F)fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4b) were synthesized by N-alkylation of 1 and 2 with NCA 1-({sup 18}F)fluoro-3-iodopropane. In vitro studies indicate that in the absence of sodium chloride, compounds 3a, 4a, N-propyl-N-norbuprenorphine (5), buprenorphine and diprenorphine are reasonably comparable in binding affinity for opioid receptors. In the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride, however, compounds 3a, 4a and 5, are clearly less potent than buprenorphine and diprenorphine. The anatomical distribution study of compound 3b in mice shows radioactivity accumulating in bone. Rat studies of both compounds 3b and 4b indicate the specific distribution of these two radioligands within certain cortical and subcortical regions of rat brain. However, the absolute uptake of compound 4b in rat brain was only half that of compound 3b. PET studies of 3b in a baboon revealed specific binding of compound 3b in striatum and cerebellum. At 1 h after injection, ratios of specific/non-specific binding of 3b in striatum and cerebellum of a baboon were 1.9 and 1.7 respectively. (author).

  4. Synthesis and positron emission tomographic (PET) baboon studies of [{sup 11}C]methadone and R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]methandone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Methadone (MET) maintenance has been used successfully for many years in the rehabilitation of heroin addicts. MET, a typical m{mu}-opioid receptor agonist, exists as two enantiomers and is used clinically as the racemic mixture. However, R-(-)-MET has a 10-fold higher affinity for m{mu} receptors than S-(+)-MET (IC{sub 50}: 3.0 nM and 26.4 nM, respectively) and R-(-)-MET is almost entirely responsible for the therapeutic actions of the racemate. In order to examine the pharmacokinetics and stereoselectivity of the drug, we have synthesized both [{sup 11}C]MET and R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET. Preparing the precursor by one-step approach to the N-demethylated methadone was precluded as other investigators cited problems with intramolecular cyclization. Therefore, a four-step synthesis using MET (or R-(-)-MET) as starting material was required to obtain the precursor, followed by a two-step radiolabeling synthesis (N-methylation followed by oxidation) to obtain [{sup 11}C]MET (or R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET). Comparative PET studies in the same baboon showed peak striatal uptake was 0.022%/cc at 5 minutes with a half time of clearance from peak of 100 minutes for R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET and a peak uptake of 0.013%/cc with a half time of 90 min for [{sup 11}C]MET. R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET also showed a slower disappearance in plasma. Both tracers showed higher C-11 in basal ganglia (BG), thalamus and midbrain relative to the cerebellum (CB) and occipital cortex (OC) but the BG/OC ratio was higher for R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET (1.3 vs 1.1). Pretreatment with naloxone (1 mg/kg, iv) increased R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET uptake in all brain regions whereas unlabeled MET slightly increased C-11 clearance in BG, OC and CB. These initial results show higher brain concentration and specificity of the pharmacologically active enantiomer of methadone along with significant non-specific binding.

  5. Seasonality of reproductive events and early mortality in a colony of hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas hamadryas) over a 30-year period: Capital breeding and life history patterns in a food-provisioned population seasonally thermally stressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Pablo; Colmenares, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    In environments where energy demands and resource availability vary seasonally, individuals are expected to time the optimal allocation of resources to support survival and reproduction. Although female baboons are regarded as all year round, capital breeders, we wondered how they would respond in an ecological scenario where food were not limiting, foraging effort were negligible, and they were thermally stressed during the cold winter. This study analyzes a 30-year database of conceptions, births, resumptions of postlactational ovarian activity, menarches, and prenatal and early postnatal reproductive failures recorded in a food-provisioned colony of hamadryas baboons located in a temperate zone (40°25'N) to search for seasonal patterns in their life-history patterns and explore its fitness consequences. The results show that the study females exhibited moderate seasonality and behaved like capital breeders; ovarian activity peaked during the period of benign weather conditions (spring and early summer) and births and lactation peaked during the period when they were thermally stressed and faced a negative energy balance (winter). Mistimed conceptions were more likely to fail than timed conceptions were, although this association could be artefactual due to the difficulty to accurately detect prenatal losses. Insolation and, to a lesser extent, temperature were positively associated with conceptions, resumptions of postlactational ovarian activity and onsets of menarche, and negatively associated with births. These findings highlight the extent of plasticity (width of peaks) and resiliency (retention of a capital breeding tactic even under highly seasonally thermally stressful cold conditions) in how primates can adjust their life history patterns and solve tradeoffs in a scenario of strong seasonal variation. Am. J. Primatol. 78:1149-1164, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999, a new radioligand to study the dopamine transporter with PET: characterization in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, W.; Schollhorn, M.A.; Valette, H.; Dolle, F.; Bottlaender, M. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, DRM/DSV, 91 - Orsay (France); Chalon, S.; Garreau, L.; Emond, P.; Guilloteau, D. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U619, 37 - Tours (France); Deloye, J.B. [Cyclopharma, 63 - Clermont Ferrand (France)

    2008-02-15

    The dopamine transporter (D.A.T.) is the main regulator of the synaptic concentration of dopamine in the brain and plays a key role in many neurological and psychiatric diseases. The goal of the study was to characterize the properties of [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 in baboons. Regional brain distribution was examined in vitro by autoradiographic studies on brain sections and in vivo by PET. Results of in vitro autoradiographic studies were in agreement with the localisation of the D.A.T. and revealed high level of [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 binding in the putamen and caudate, moderate level in the midbrain, and low level in the cortex and cerebellum. In PET study, the time course of the concentration of [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 in different regions of the brain showed that the highest accumulation of [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 was observed in the striatum with a peak uptake at 50 min (maximum = 5.7 {+-} 1.7 and 4.7 {+-}1.0% I.D./100 ml in putamen and caudate nucleus respectively, n 5). The radioactivity uptake peaked at 8 min in the midbrain (2.3 {+-} 1.2% I.D./100 ml) and decreased rapidly as a function of time. The lowest uptake was observed in the cortex (0.62 {+-}0.1 % I.D./100 ml, at 50 min) and in the cerebellum (0.44 {+-} 0.08% I.D./100 ml, at 50 min). In the test retest studies (n = 3) the variability of the uptake was 5% in the putamen and 6% in the caudate. Following HPLC analysis of plasma samples, [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 was rapidly metabolized. Unchanged [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 accounted for around 21% and 7% of the radioactivity at 30 and 120 min post-injection respectively. The region to cerebellum radioactivity ratio was calculated. This ratio reached a maximum at 110 min post injection (22.1 {+-} 4.6 and 18.8 {+-} 2.1 in the putamen and the caudate respectively) and remained stable during the time of the PET scan (4 h). This ratio was 4.21 {+-} 0.92, 2.0 {+-} 0.3 and 1.6 {+-} 0.2 in the midbrain, thalamus, and cortical structure at 110 min post-injection. Binding

  7. Neutron-gamma irradiation and protein thiols: development of a protein thiol evaluation micro-method and application to irradiated baboons; Irradiation neutron-gamma et groupements thiols proteiques: developpement d`une micromethode d`evaluation des thiols proteiques et application au babouin irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancerelle, Y.; Lafond, J.L.; Della-Maura, L.; Faure, P.; Mathieu, J.; Costa, P.; Mestries, J.C.; Kergonou, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    The essential non-protein sulfhydryl compound implicated in cellular radioprotection is glutathione. Protein thiols seem to be also involved in this protection and might be scavengers for free radical injury. We developed an analytical procedure for protein thiols measurement and we applied this method in neutron-gamma irradiated baboons. Our results demonstrated the reliability and sensitivity of the procedure. They also a drastic decrease of in vivo protein thiols after irradiation. (author). 5 refs.

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: Guinea baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available o_papio_L.png Papio_papio_NL.png Papio_papio_S.png Papio_papio_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/...icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: hamadryas baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te Papio_hamadryas_L.png Papio_hamadryas_NL.png Papio_hamadryas_S.png Papio_hamadryas_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio...+hamadryas&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&...t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=186 ...

  10. Comparative anatomical study of the leg's nerves of Cebus (barbed capuchins with baboons, chimpanzees and modern humans Estudo anatômico comparativo dos nervos da perna de Cebus (macaco-prego com babuínos, chimpanzés e humanos modernos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainá de Abreu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical comparative studies among the primates are important for the investigation of ethology, evolution, taxonomy, and comprehension of tools by hominoids. Especially the anatomical knowledge of Cebus contributes to conservation of the species, and to development of surgical procedures and clinical treatments of these animals, as they frequently are victims of automobile accidents. Recent anatomical studies came to a wrong conclusion regarding behavioral traits of Cebus, ascribed to few data available in previous literature. Therefore, to provide anatomical data and to support the other sciences related to anatomy, and to develop surgical and/or clinical procedures, we described the nerves of the legs of Cebus foccusing on their position and trajectory, as wll as innerved muscles, and compared these results with those of humans and other primates. Eight adult capuchin specimens were used for this study. The anatomical comparative study of the leg's nerves of Cebus demonstrated that, in general, structural organization of the nerves is similar among the four primates analyzed here (Cebus, chimpanzees, baboons and humans, which might be attributed to the fact that the all four primates have similar body structures. However, nerve trajectory and muscles innervation in Cebus was more similar to baboons.Os estudos anatômicos comparativos entre os primatas são importantes para pesquisas associadas com a etologia, evolução, taxonomia e compreensão dos usos de ferramentas pelos hominídeos. Especificamente, o conhecimento anatômico sobre Cebus contribui para sua própria conservação e para o desenvolvimento de procedimentos cirúrgicos e tratamentos clínicos destes animais, pois são frequentemente vítimas de acidentes automobilísticos. Recentemente, estudos sobre características comportamentais de Cebus indicaram conclusões erradas sobre sua anatomia, o que pode ser atribuído aos poucos dados disponíveis sobre a anatomia desses

  11. Cardiac Ischemia Model for +Gz Using Miniature Swine and Baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    vitamins. The animals were sampled monthly for serum lipids (total cholesterol, LDL , HDL , total cholesterol/ HDL ratio, and triglycerides) and weighed...Moreover, total cholesterol, HDL , LDL , and the total cholesterol/ HDL ratio for studies A and B were signifi - cantly higher than Control through...foam cells as they accumulate lipids (cholesterol and oxidized LDL ). Also, smooth muscle cells migrate from the vas- cular media into the intima

  12. Right Hemisphere Dominance for Emotion Processing in Baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallez, Catherine; Vauclair, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetries of emotional facial expressions in humans offer reliable indexes to infer brain lateralization and mostly revealed right hemisphere dominance. Studies concerned with oro-facial asymmetries in nonhuman primates largely showed a left-sided asymmetry in chimpanzees, marmosets and macaques. The presence of asymmetrical oro-facial…

  13. Protective Effect of Chronic Schistosomiasis in Baboons Coinfected with Schistosoma mansoni and Plasmodium knowlesi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyakundi, Ruth K; Nyamongo, Onkoba; Maamun, Jeneby;

    2016-01-01

    cercariae. At 14 and 15 weeks postinfection, one group was given praziquantel to treat schistosomiasis infection. Four weeks later, the two groups plus a new malaria control group (n = 8) were intravenously inoculated with 10(5) Plasmodium knowlesi parasites and monitored daily for development of severe...

  14. Genetic structure in a dynamic baboon hybrid zone corroborates behavioural observations in a hybrid population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charpentier, M J E; Fontaine, M C; Cherel, E; Renoult, J P; Jenkins, T; Benoit, L; Barthès, N; Alberts, S C; Tung, J

    2012-01-01

    Behaviour and genetic structure are intimately related: mating patterns and patterns of movement between groups or populations influence the movement of genetic variation across the landscape and from one generation to the next. In hybrid zones, the behaviour of the hybridizing taxa can also impact

  15. Nickel-induced systemic contact dermatitis and intratubal implants: the baboon syndrome revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibas, Nathalie; Lassere, Jacques; Paul, Carle; Aquilina, Christian; Giordano-Labadie, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Permanent sterilization using intratubal implants is becoming increasingly popular worldwide. We report the first case of a 40-year-old woman presenting a systemic contact dermatitis due to nickel-containing intratubal implants: the Essure system. The diagnosis was confirmed with positive patch test result for nickel and total clearance of dermatitis after removing the implants that contain a metallic spiral of nitinol (alloy of 55% nickel and 45% titanium). Systemic contact dermatitis to the intratubal implants could be explained by the corrosion of nitinol after implantation resulting in the release of nickel. In the literature, no similar case has been reported despite the introduction of intratubal implants since 2002. Dermatologists and gynecologists need to be aware of this type of complication. In practice, a thorough assessment for possible nickel contact dermatitis in a woman undergoing sterilization with Essure is recommended. Preoperative patch testing must be carried out if there is any doubt.

  16. Recombinant human C1-inhibitor prevents acute antibody-mediated rejection in alloimmunized baboons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillou, Xavier; Poirier, Nicolas; Le Bas-Bernardet, Stephanie; Hervouet, Jeremy; Minault, David; Renaudin, Karine; Vistoli, Fabio; Karam, Georges; Daha, Mohamed; Soulillou, Jean Paul; Blancho, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection is an unsolved issue in transplantation, especially in the context of pretransplant immunization. The deleterious effect of preformed cytotoxic anti-HLA antibodies through complement activation is well proven, but very little is known concerning complement blockade

  17. Bombesin-like peptide mediates lung injury in a baboon model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunday, ME; Yoder, BA; Cuttitta, F; Haley, KJ; Emanuel, RL

    1998-01-01

    The etiology of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disease of infants surviving respiratory distress syndrome, remains fundamentally enigmatic. BPD is decreasing in severity but continues to be a major problem in pediatric medicine, being especially prevalent among very premature infan

  18. Infusion of Autologous Lysed Plasma Into the Baboon: Assessment of Coagulation, Platelet, and Pulmonary Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Bleeding time was determined in duplicate using the Simplate II bleeding time device (General Diagnostics; Durham, NC) and the technique of Mielke et al...molecules. Evidence for a large intraplatelet pool of glycoprotein IB. J Clin Invest, 1988; 81:1734-1740. Mielke Jr CH, Kaneshiro MM, Maher IA

  19. Transcriptional regulation of Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) by 17β-estradiol in immortalized baboon temporomandibular joint disc cells

    OpenAIRE

    McDaniel, Jennifer S.; Babu, Ramya Akula Suresh; Navarro, Mary M; LeBaron, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) affect a significant portion of the U.S. population with the majority seeking treatment being women of childbearing age. Due to this striking sexual dimorphism it has been postulated that there is a role for sex hormones in the maintenance of normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is a secreted lubricating molecule required for maintaining low frictional levels within articular joints, however its role in the TMJ is not we...

  20. Preliminary Study of the Effects of Prolonged Acceleration on Spinal Dynamics of Baboons. 1. Acceleration. 2. Biomechanical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    cortical thickness, increased diameter/cortlcal thickness ratio, thinned and distorted epiphyseal plate, and thickened condylar cartilage in female rats...histomorphometric and histodynamic (tetracycline fixation) studies were conducted on calcified sections by analyzing six bone parameters (e,g,, bone volume , relative...growth cartilage alterations, a decrease in bone volume without an Increase in osteocytic activity, and (by tetracycline fluroescent analysis) a reduced

  1. Comparison of [11C]cocaine binding at tracer and pharmacological doses of baboon brain: A PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    In vitro studies have shown that cocaine (C) binds to both high and low affinity sites on the dopamine transporter (DAT). We have previously characterized the binding of tracer doses of [{sup 11}C]cocaine (C*)to a high affinity site on the DAT. To assess if in vivo C also binds to low affinity sites we used PET to compare binding of tracer doses (17.8{plus_minus}12.2 {mu}g C) of C* to pharmacological doses (8 mg of C coadministered with C*). Sixteen paired studies were done to assess test/retest variability, specific versus non specific binding and to characterize binding profile. Dynamic scans were started immediately after injection of C* (5-8 mCi) for 50 min on the CTI-931 (6 x 6 x 6.5 mm FWHM). Time activity curves for tissue concentration and for unchanged tracer in plasma were used to calculate the transport constant between plasma and tissue (K1) and to obtain the distribution volume (DV). The ratio of the DV in striatum (ST) to that in cerebellum (CB) (which corresponds to Bmax/Kd-1) was used as model parameter. Peak brain uptake of C* was significantly higher for tracer than for pharmacological doses (0.041 versus 0.033 % dose/cc), as were the values for K1 (1.07{plus_minus}0.21 versus 0.68{plus_minus}0.26 (t=3.0 p<0.01)). Repeated measures were reproducible for tracer ({plus_minus}2%) and pharmacological doses of C* ({plus_minus}4%). Tracer dose C* showed highest binding and slowest clearance in ST which was reduced by C (0.5-2.0 mg/kg iv, -25 to -30%) and by drugs that inhibit DAT (2mg/kg nomifensine - 21%, 0.5 mg/kg methylphenidate -12%) and was increased by serotonin transporter inhibitors (5HT-Ti) (2 mg/kg citalopram +11%, 0.5 mg/kg fluoxetine +6%) and not changed by NE transporter inhibitors (0.5 mg/kg desipramine or 2 mg/kg tomoxetine). The increase with (5HT-Ti) may reflect neurotransmitter interactions or changes in bioavailability. At pharmacological doses C* showed homogeneous distribution and was not changed by C nor by any of the above drugs.

  2. Centre-Embedded Structures Are a By-Product of Associative Learning and Working Memory Constraints: Evidence from Baboons ("Papio Papio")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Arnaud; Perruchet, Pierre; Fagot, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Influential theories have claimed that the ability for recursion forms the computational core of human language faculty distinguishing our communication system from that of other animals (Hauser, Chomsky, & Fitch, 2002). In the present study, we consider an alternative view on recursion by studying the contribution of associative and working…

  3. Comparative Anatomy of the Hind Limb Vessels of the Bearded Capuchins (Sapajus libidinosus with Apes, Baboons, and Cebus capucinus: With Comments on the Vessels' Role in Bipedalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roqueline A. G. M. F. Aversi-Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capuchin monkeys are known to exhibit sporadic bipedalism while performing specific tasks, such as cracking nuts. The bipedal posture and locomotion cause an increase in the metabolic cost and therefore increased blood supply to lower limbs is necessary. Here, we present a detailed anatomical description of the capuchin arteries and veins of the pelvic limb of Sapajus libidinosus in comparison with other primates. The arterial pattern of the bearded capuchin hind limb is more similar to other quadrupedal Cebus species. Similarities were also found to the pattern observed in the quadruped Papio, which is probably due to a comparable pelvis and the presence of the tail. Sapajus' traits show fewer similarities when compared to great apes and modern humans. Moreover, the bearded capuchin showed unique patterns for the femoral and the short saphenous veins. Although this species switches easily from quadrupedal to bipedal postures, our results indicate that the bearded capuchin has no specific or differential features that support extended bipedal posture and locomotion. Thus, the explanation for the behavioral differences found among capuchin genera probably includes other aspects of their physiology.

  4. Genetic variations in the beta-tubulin gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 region of Trichuris species from man and baboons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina Vicky Alstrup; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Olsen, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The whipworm Trichuris trichiura has been estimated to infect 604 -- 795 million people worldwide. The current control strategy against trichuriasis using the benzimidazoles (BZs) albendazole (400 mg) or mebendazole (500 mg) as single-dose treatment is not satisfactory. The occurrence of single n...

  5. Induction of immunological tolerance in the pig-to-baboon xenotransplantation model : studies aimed at achieving mixed hematopoietic chimerism and preventing associated thrombotic complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P.J. Alwayn (Ian)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe outcome of clinical organ transplantation has dramatically improved since the introduction of cyclosporine (CyA) in 1979 and of other, more recently introduced, immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and sirolimus. Furthermore, due to more re

  6. Comparative seric TGF({beta}1, {beta}2) levels and platelets count response in total body irradiated baboons; Evolution comparee des taux seriques des TGF ({beta}1, {beta}2) et de la numeration plaquettaire chez le babouin irradie globalement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestries, J.C.; Veyret, J.; Agay, D.; Van Uye, A.; Caterini, R.; Herodin, F.; Mathieu, J.; Chancerelle, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Total body irradiation associated or not with r-hIL-6 treatment a relation between TGF-{beta}1 and TGF-{beta}2 blood levels and platelets count. During radio-induced thrombocytopenia, by decreasing its ability to inhibit proliferation of stem cells and megakaryocytopoiesis, the TGF-{beta} falling induced a favorable condition for hematopoietic recovery. (author). 5 refs.

  7. Human parainfluenza virus type 3 in wild nonhuman primates, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michihito; Ishii, Akihiro; Orba, Yasuko; Thomas, Yuka; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Moonga, Ladslav; Mweene, Aaron S; Ogawa, Hirohito; Nakamura, Ichiro; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) genome was detected in 4 baboons in Zambia. Antibody for HPIV3 was detected in 13 baboons and 6 vervet monkeys in 2 distinct areas in Zambia. Our findings suggest that wild nonhuman primates are susceptible to HPIV3 infection.

  8. PREPARATION OF IgA MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO MURINE LACTIC DEHYDROGENASE-C4 (LDH-C4)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENGShu-Lin; BENKun-Long; LIANGZhi-Guo

    1989-01-01

    LDH--C4 is a sperm specific lactic dehydrogcnase in mammals and human, and is consid ered as a model molecule for contraceptive vaccine research. Significant contraceptive effects were observed in female mice, rabbits and baboons immunized with purified

  9. 怎样说“一群……”?(英文)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Ant:A colony or An army of ants Ape[猿]:A shrewdness of apes Baboons[狒狒]:A troop of baboons Bear:A sleuth or sloth of bears Bee:A swarm,grist or hive of bees Bird:A flock,flight,congregation or volery of birds Buffalo:A herd of buffalo Cat:A clowder or clutter of cats Cattle:A herd or drove of cattle

  10. Parasitology of five primates in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooriyama, Takanori; Hasegawa, Hideo; Shimozuru, Michito; Tsubota, Toshio; Nishida, Toshisada; Iwaki, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    Parasitological surveillance in primates has been performed using coprological observation and identification of specimens from chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania (Mahale). In this study, we conducted coprological surveillance to identify the fauna of parasite infection in five primate species in Mahale: red colobus (Procolobus badius tephrosceles), red-tailed monkeys (Cercopithecus ascanius schmidti), vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops pygerythrus), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), and chimpanzees. Fecal samples were examined microscopically, and parasite identification was based on the morphology of cysts, eggs, larvae, and adult worms. Three nematodes (Oesophagostomum spp., Strongyloides sp., and Trichuris sp.), Entamoeba coli, and Entamoeba spp. were found in all five primate species. The following infections were identified: Bertiella studeri was found in chimpanzees and yellow baboons; Balantidium coli was found in yellow baboons; three nematodes (Streptopharagus, Primasubulura, an undetermined genus of Spirurina) and Dicrocoeliidae gen. sp. were found in red-tailed monkeys, vervet monkeys, and yellow baboons; Chitwoodspirura sp. was newly identified in red colobus and red-tailed monkeys; Probstmayria gombensis and Troglocorys cava were newly identified in chimpanzees, together with Troglodytella abrassarti; and Enterobius sp. was newly identified in red colobus. The parasitological data reported for red colobus, vervet monkeys, and yellow baboons in Mahale are the first reports for these species.

  11. 3-(/sup 18/F)Acetylcyclofoxy: a useful probe for the visualization of opiate receptors in living animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pert, C.B.; Danks, J.A. (National Inst. of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Channing, M.A.; Eckelman, W.C.; Larson, S.M.; Bennett, J.M. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Burke, T.R. Jr.; Rice, K.C. (National Inst. of Arthritis, Metabolism, and Digestive Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1984-11-19

    A fluoro-analogue of the potent narcotic antagonist, naltrexone, was synthesized and shown to bind with high affinity to opiate receptors in vitro. 3-(/sup 18/F)acetylcyclofoxy was prepared via a one-step triflate displacement reaction with the positron emitting /sup 18/F ion from tetraethylammonium(/sup 18/F)fluoride. 3-(/sup 18/F)acetylcyclofoxy accumulation in opiate receptor rich brain regions of both rat and baboon is shown to be completely displaced by the active enantiomer of naloxone ((-)-naloxone) while the identical dose of the pharmacologically inert (+)-naloxone has no detectable effect. Moreover, both rat and baboon brain showed the well documented, typical opiate receptor distribution so that basal ganglia and thalamus are clearly visible in the living baboon brain up to 95 min after intravenous injection of 3-(/sup 18/F)acetylcyclofoxy.

  12. High-resolution imaging of the large non-human primate brain using microPET: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo-Variawa, S [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Hey-Cunningham, A J [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Lehnert, W [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Kench, P L [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Kassiou, M [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Banati, R [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Meikle, S R [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia)

    2007-11-21

    The neuroanatomy and physiology of the baboon brain closely resembles that of the human brain and is well suited for evaluating promising new radioligands in non-human primates by PET and SPECT prior to their use in humans. These studies are commonly performed on clinical scanners with 5 mm spatial resolution at best, resulting in sub-optimal images for quantitative analysis. This study assessed the feasibility of using a microPET animal scanner to image the brains of large non-human primates, i.e. papio hamadryas (baboon) at high resolution. Factors affecting image accuracy, including scatter, attenuation and spatial resolution, were measured under conditions approximating a baboon brain and using different reconstruction strategies. Scatter fraction measured 32% at the centre of a 10 cm diameter phantom. Scatter correction increased image contrast by up to 21% but reduced the signal-to-noise ratio. Volume resolution was superior and more uniform using maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstructed images (3.2-3.6 mm{sup 3} FWHM from centre to 4 cm offset) compared to both 3D ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) (5.6-8.3 mm{sup 3}) and 3D reprojection (3DRP) (5.9-9.1 mm{sup 3}). A pilot {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) scan was performed on a healthy female adult baboon. The pilot study demonstrated the ability to adequately resolve cortical and sub-cortical grey matter structures in the baboon brain and improved contrast when images were corrected for attenuation and scatter and reconstructed by MAP. We conclude that high resolution imaging of the baboon brain with microPET is feasible with appropriate choices of reconstruction strategy and corrections for degrading physical effects. Further work to develop suitable correction algorithms for high-resolution large primate imaging is warranted.

  13. Refractive power and biometric properties of the nonhuman primate isolated crystalline lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, David; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur; Ziebarth, Noel M; Acosta, Ana Carolina; Arrieta-Quintera, Esdras; Augusteyn, Robert C; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. To characterize the age dependence of shape, refractive power, and refractive index of isolated lenses from nonhuman primates. Methods. Measurements were performed on ex vivo lenses from cynomolgus monkeys (cyno: n = 120; age, 2.7-14.3 years), rhesus monkeys (n = 61; age, 0.7-13.3 years), and hamadryas baboons (baboon: n = 16; age, 1.7-27.3 years). Lens thickness, diameter, and surface curvatures were measured with an optical comparator. Lens refractive power was measured with a custom optical system based on the Scheiner principle. The refractive contributions of the gradient, the surfaces, and the equivalent refractive index were calculated with optical ray-tracing software. The age dependence of the optical and biometric parameters was assessed. Results. Over the measured age range isolated lens thickness decreased (baboon: -0.04, cyno: -0.05, and rhesus: -0.06 mm/y) and equatorial diameter increased (logarithmically for the baboon and rhesus, and linearly for cyno: 0.07 mm/y). The isolated lens surfaces flattened and the corresponding refractive power from the surfaces decreased with age (-0.33, -0.48, and -0.68 D/y). The isolated lens equivalent refractive index decreased (only significant for the baboon, -0.001 D/y), and as a result the total isolated lens refractive power decreased with age (baboon: -1.26, cyno: -0.97, and rhesus: -1.76 D/y). Conclusions. The age-dependent trends in the optical and biometric properties, growth, and aging, of nonhuman primate lenses are similar to those of the pre-presbyopic human lens. As the lens ages, the decrease in refractive contributions from the gradient refractive index causes a rapid age-dependent decrease in maximally accommodated lens refractive power.

  14. R-Smad competition controls activin receptor output in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan J Peterson

    Full Text Available Animals use TGF-β superfamily signal transduction pathways during development and tissue maintenance. The superfamily has traditionally been divided into TGF-β/Activin and BMP branches based on relationships between ligands, receptors, and R-Smads. Several previous reports have shown that, in cell culture systems, "BMP-specific" Smads can be phosphorylated in response to TGF-β/Activin pathway activation. Using Drosophila cell culture as well as in vivo assays, we find that Baboon, the Drosophila TGF-β/Activin-specific Type I receptor, can phosphorylate Mad, the BMP-specific R-Smad, in addition to its normal substrate, dSmad2. The Baboon-Mad activation appears direct because it occurs in the absence of canonical BMP Type I receptors. Wing phenotypes generated by Baboon gain-of-function require Mad, and are partially suppressed by over-expression of dSmad2. In the larval wing disc, activated Baboon cell-autonomously causes C-terminal Mad phosphorylation, but only when endogenous dSmad2 protein is depleted. The Baboon-Mad relationship is thus controlled by dSmad2 levels. Elevated P-Mad is seen in several tissues of dSmad2 protein-null mutant larvae, and these levels are normalized in dSmad2; baboon double mutants, indicating that the cross-talk reaction and Smad competition occur with endogenous levels of signaling components in vivo. In addition, we find that high levels of Activin signaling cause substantial turnover in dSmad2 protein, providing a potential cross-pathway signal-switching mechanism. We propose that the dual activity of TGF-β/Activin receptors is an ancient feature, and we discuss several ways this activity can modulate TGF-β signaling output.

  15. Assessment of PCR-DGGE for the identification of diverse Helicobacter species, and application to faecal samples from zoo animals to determine Helicobacter prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu Al-Soud, W.; Bennedsen, M.; On, Stephen L.W.;

    2003-01-01

    bilis and Helicobacter hepaticus in a Nile crocodile, Helicobacter cinaedi in a baboon and a red panda, and Helicobacter felis in a wolf and a Taiwan beauty snake. All of these PCR products (similar to400 bp) showed 100 % sequence similarity to 16S rDNA sequences of the mentioned species. These results...

  16. Comment: 39 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hamadryas baboon Papio hamadryas Papio_hamadryas_L.png ちょっと色白すぎかもしれません。差し替えますので少々お待ちください。 ttamura 2008/12/24 16:18:18 ...

  17. Thermal and Physiological Responses of Rats Exposed to 2.45-GHz Radiofrequency Radiation: A Comparison of E and H Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    HR (Gorman and Proppe 1984). In the present study, RR significantly increased during irradiation in the H orientation, but not in the E orientation...of RF eneriy. Proc IEEE 62:1171-1175 Gorman AJ, Proppe DW (1984) Mechanisms producing tachycardia in conscious baboons during environmental heat

  18. Animal Models of Human Placentation - A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony Michael

    2007-01-01

    , baboon and human. Non-human primates are therefore important models for understanding the dysfunction that has been linked to pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. Models that are likely to be established in the wake of comparative genomics include the marmoset, tree shrew, hedgehog tenrec and nine...

  19. Morphology and History of Spinal Ligaments from Three Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    anatomical geometry of the vertebrae has been described in the literature by Swindler and Wood (1973), Kapandji (1974), Hamilton (1976), Gray (1977...131, 1978. 6. Heyling, D.J.A., "The supraspinous and Intraspinous Ligaments in the Dog, Cat and Baboon," J. Anati, 130(2):223-228, 1980. -. Kapandji

  20. Scatter correction for large non-human primate brain imaging using microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo-Variawa, S; Lehnert, W; Banati, R B; Meikle, S R, E-mail: snai3212@uni.sydney.edu.au [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia)

    2011-04-07

    The baboon is well suited to pre-clinical evaluation of novel radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET). We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of using a high resolution animal PET scanner for this application in the baboon brain. However, the non-homogenous distribution of tissue density within the head may give rise to photon scattering effects that reduce contrast and compromise quantitative accuracy. In this study, we investigated the magnitude and distribution of scatter contributing to the final reconstructed image and its variability throughout the baboon brain using phantoms and Monte Carlo simulated data. The scatter fraction is measured up to 36% at the centre of the brain for a wide energy window (350-650 keV) and 19% for a narrow (450-650 keV) window. We observed less than 3% variation in the scatter fraction throughout the brain and found that scattered events arising from radioactivity outside the field of view contribute less than 1% of measured coincidences. In a contrast phantom, scatter and attenuation correction improved contrast recovery compared with attenuation correction on its own and reduced bias to less than 10% at the expense of the reduced signal-to-noise ratio. We conclude that scatter correction is a necessary step for ensuring high quality measurements of the radiotracer distribution in the baboon brain with a microPET scanner, while it is not necessary to model out of field of view scatter or a spatially variant scatter function.

  1. Presence of interleukin 6 at the cutaneous level after in vivo neutron irradiation; Presence d`interleukine 6 au niveau cutane apres irradiation neutronique in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agay, D.; Pradeau, P.; Edgard, L.; Van Uye, A.; Mestries, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    In this study we investigated the in situ localization of IL-6 in mixed neutron-gamma irradiated baboons belly skin. Using immunohistochemical methods, we demonstrated the presence of IL-6 as early as the first day after the irradiation day. However experimental conditions did not allow us to conclude to a causality relation between irradiation and IL-6 cutaneous presence. (author). 4 refs.

  2. Mammalian mismatches in nucleotide metabolism: implications for xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalpey, Zain; Yuen, Ada H Y; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; McGregor, Christopher G A; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Yacoub, Magdi H; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2007-10-01

    Acute humoral rejection (AHR) limits the clinical application of animal organs for xenotransplantation. Mammalian disparities in nucleotide metabolism may contribute significantly to the microvascular component in AHR; these, however remain ill-defined. We evaluated the extent of species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism. HPLC analysis was performed on venous blood samples (nucleotide metabolites) and heart biopsies (purine enzymes) from wild type mice, rats, pigs, baboons, and human donors.Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (E5'N) activities were 4-fold lower in pigs and baboon hearts compared to human and mice hearts while rat activity was highest. Similar differences between pigs and humans were also observed with kidneys and endothelial cells. More than 10-fold differences were observed with other purine enzymes. AMP deaminase (AMPD) activity was exceptionally high in mice but very low in pig and baboon hearts. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was highest in baboons. Adenosine kinase (AK) activity was more consistent across different species. Pig blood had the highest levels of hypoxanthine, inosine and adenine. Human blood uric acid concentration was almost 100 times higher than in other species studied. We conclude that species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism may affect compatibility of pig organs within a human metabolic environment. Furthermore, nucleotide metabolic mismatches may affect clinical relevance of animal organ transplant models. Supplementation of deficient precursors or application of inhibitors of nucleotide metabolism (e.g., allopurinol) or transgenic upregulation of E5'N may overcome some of these differences.

  3. Phase I Report: Technetium Radiotracers for the Dopamine Transporter. [September 1998 - March 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, R.N.

    1999-03-17

    This project (a) demonstrated specific dopamine transporter (DAT) uptake in vivo and metabolic stability of a radiolabelled cycloplentadieny rhenium compound in rats and baboons, (b) showed that cyclopentadieny tricarbonyl rhenium and technetium compounds conjugated tropanel could be made by metal transfer with ferrocenes; and (c) explored new methods of synthesizing these compounds under mild conditions.

  4. Ex vivo evaluation of the serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist [³H]CUMI-101 in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; Underwood, Mark D; Kumar, Dileep J S;

    2011-01-01

    [³H]CUMI-101 is a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist, which has been evaluated for use as a positron emission tracer in baboon and humans. We sought to evaluate the properties of [³H]CUMI-101 ex vivo in awake rats and determine if [³H]CUMI-101 can measure changes in synaptic levels of serotonin after...

  5. Allelic Lineages of the Ficolin Genes (FCNs) Are Passed from Ancestral to Descendant Primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Tina; Nissen, Janna; Fog, Lea Munthe

    2011-01-01

    -human primates. The exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FCN1-3 genes were sequenced in the following primate species: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus macaque, baboon and common marmoset. We found that the exon organisation of the FCN genes was very similar between all the non...

  6. Allelic lineages of the ficolin genes (FCNs) are passed from ancestral to descendant primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Tina; Nissen, Janna; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2011-01-01

    -human primates. The exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FCN1-3 genes were sequenced in the following primate species: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus macaque, baboon and common marmoset. We found that the exon organisation of the FCN genes was very similar between all the non...

  7. AcEST: BP918131 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lyprotein OS=Baboon endogenous virus (... 53 9e-07 sp|P31795|POL_MLVRK Pol polyprotein (Fragment) OS=Radiation... muri... 52 1e-06 sp|P11227|POL_MLVRD Pol polyprotein OS=Radiation murine leuke

  8. Translational In Vivo Models for Women's Health: The Nonhuman Primate Endometrium--A Predictive Model for Assessing Steroid Receptor Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayden, Ov Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Macaques and baboons display physiological responses to steroid hormones that are similar to those of women. Herein, we describe various uses of nonhuman primates for preclinical studies on menstruation, endometriosis, and as a model system to evaluate reproductive therapies and contraceptives. Our goal is to outline the strengths of the nonhuman primate model for studies leading to improved therapies for women.

  9. Cortical evoked potential and extracellular K+ and H+ at critical levels of brain ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, J; Symon, L; Branston, N M;

    1977-01-01

    As shown previously, the electrical function of the brain is critically dependent on cerebral blood flow in the sense that reduction beyond an ischemic threshold of approximately 15 ml/100 gm per minute (approximately 35% of control) in the baboon leads to complete failure of the somatosensory...

  10. Phylogenetic evidence that two distinct Trichuris genotypes infect both humans and non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiana F Ravasi

    Full Text Available Although there has been extensive debate about whether Trichuris suis and Trichuris trichiura are separate species, only one species of the whipworm T. trichiura has been considered to infect humans and non-human primates. In order to investigate potential cross infection of Trichuris sp. between baboons and humans in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, we sequenced the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of adult Trichuris sp. worms isolated from five baboons from three different troops, namely the Cape Peninsula troop, Groot Olifantsbos troop and Da Gama Park troop. This region was also sequenced from T. trichiura isolated from a human patient from central Africa (Cameroon for comparison. By combining this dataset with Genbank records for Trichuris isolated from other humans, non-human primates and pigs from several different countries in Europe, Asia, and Africa, we confirmed the identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes that infect primates. Trichuris sp. isolated from the Peninsula baboons fell into two distinct clades that were found to also infect human patients from Cameroon, Uganda and Jamaica (named the CP-GOB clade and China, Thailand, the Czech Republic, and Uganda (named the DG clade, respectively. The divergence of these Trichuris clades is ancient and precedes the diversification of T. suis which clustered closely to the CP-GOB clade. The identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes infecting both humans and non-human primates is important for the ongoing treatment of Trichuris which is estimated to infect 600 million people worldwide. Currently baboons in the Cape Peninsula, which visit urban areas, provide a constant risk of infection to local communities. A reduction in spatial overlap between humans and baboons is thus an important measure to reduce both cross-transmission and zoonoses of helminthes in Southern Africa.

  11. Phylogenetic evidence that two distinct Trichuris genotypes infect both humans and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravasi, Damiana F; O'Riain, Mannus J; Davids, Faezah; Illing, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Although there has been extensive debate about whether Trichuris suis and Trichuris trichiura are separate species, only one species of the whipworm T. trichiura has been considered to infect humans and non-human primates. In order to investigate potential cross infection of Trichuris sp. between baboons and humans in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, we sequenced the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of adult Trichuris sp. worms isolated from five baboons from three different troops, namely the Cape Peninsula troop, Groot Olifantsbos troop and Da Gama Park troop. This region was also sequenced from T. trichiura isolated from a human patient from central Africa (Cameroon) for comparison. By combining this dataset with Genbank records for Trichuris isolated from other humans, non-human primates and pigs from several different countries in Europe, Asia, and Africa, we confirmed the identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes that infect primates. Trichuris sp. isolated from the Peninsula baboons fell into two distinct clades that were found to also infect human patients from Cameroon, Uganda and Jamaica (named the CP-GOB clade) and China, Thailand, the Czech Republic, and Uganda (named the DG clade), respectively. The divergence of these Trichuris clades is ancient and precedes the diversification of T. suis which clustered closely to the CP-GOB clade. The identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes infecting both humans and non-human primates is important for the ongoing treatment of Trichuris which is estimated to infect 600 million people worldwide. Currently baboons in the Cape Peninsula, which visit urban areas, provide a constant risk of infection to local communities. A reduction in spatial overlap between humans and baboons is thus an important measure to reduce both cross-transmission and zoonoses of helminthes in Southern Africa.

  12. Cytokine expression in malaria-infected non-human primate placentas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Gicheru

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites are known to mediate the induction of inflammatory immune responses at the maternal-foetal interface during placental malaria (PM leading to adverse consequences like pre-term deliveries and abortions. Immunological events that take place within the malaria-infected placental micro-environment leading to retarded foetal growth and disruption of pregnancies are among the critical parameters that are still in need of further elucidation. The establishment of more animal models for studying placental malaria can provide novel ways of circumventing problems experienced during placental malaria research in humans such as inaccurate estimation of gestational ages. Using the newly established olive baboon (Papio anubis-Plasmodium knowlesi (P. knowlesi H strain model of placental malaria, experiments were carried out to determine placental cytokine profiles underlying the immunopathogenesis of placental malaria. Four pregnant olive baboons were infected with blood stage P. knowlesi H strain parasites on the one fiftieth day of gestation while four other uninfected pregnant olive baboons were maintained as uninfected controls. After nine days of infection, placentas were extracted from all the eight baboons through cesarean surgery and used for the processing of placental plasma and sera samples for cytokine sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Results indicated that the occurrence of placental malaria was associated with elevated concentrations of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interleukin 12 (IL-12. Increased levels of IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ levels were detected in uninfected placentas. These findings match previous reports regarding immunity during PM thereby demonstrating the reliability of the olive baboon-P. knowlesi model for use in further studies.

  13. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, N. [New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine

    1989-03-15

    A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations (such as organ partition coefficients and excretion fractions), were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrificed at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man. A thorough review of the Po urinalysis procedure showed that significant recovery losses resulted when metabolized {sup 210}Po was deposited out of raw urine. Polonium-210 was found throughout the soft tissues of the baboon but not with the partition coefficients for liver, kidneys, and spleen that are predicted by the ICRP 30 metabolic model. A fractional distribution of 0.29 for liver, 0.07 for kidneys, and 0.006 for spleen was determined. Retention times for {sup 210}Po in tissues are described by single exponential functions with biological half-times ranging from 15 to 50 days.

  14. Validation of serological tests for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Knauf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG, however, could be considered as a confirmatory test.

  15. Validation of serological tests for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-03-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test.

  16. PET Imaging of the AT{sub 1} receptor with [{sup 11}C]KR31173

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zober, Tamas G. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Mathews, William B. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Seckin, Esen [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Yoo, Sung-eun [Center for Biological Modulators, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Hilton, John [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Xia Jinsong [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Sandberg, Kathryn [Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Ravert, Hayden T. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Dannals, Robert F. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Szabo, Zsolt [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States)]. E-mail: zszabo@jhmi.edu

    2006-01-15

    Aim: The goal of this study was to investigate the binding characteristics of [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and its applicability for PET studies of the AT{sub 1} receptor (AT{sub 1}R). Methods: Ex vivo biodistribution and pharmacology were tested in mice. PET imaging was performed in mice, beagle dogs and a baboon. To assess nonspecific binding, PET imaging was performed both before and after pretreatment with a potent AT{sub 1}R antagonist. In the baboon, PET imaging was also performed with the previously developed radioligand [{sup 11}C]L-159,884 for comparison. Results: Ex vivo biodistribution studies in mice showed specific binding rates of 80-90% in the adrenals, kidneys, lungs and heart. Specific binding was confirmed in mice using small animal PET. In dogs, renal cortex tissue concentration at 75-95 min postinjection (pi) was 63 nCi/ml per millicurie at a specific binding rate of 95%. In the baboon renal cortex, tissue activity at 55-75 min pi was 345 nCi/ml per millicurie. In the baboon the specific binding of [{sup 11}C]KR31173 was higher (81%) than the specific binding of [{sup 11}C]L-159,884 (34%). Conclusion: [{sup 11}C]KR31173 shows accumulation and significant specific binding to the AT{sub 1}R in the kidneys of mice, dogs and baboon. These findings suggest that this radioligand is suited for imaging the renal cortical AT{sub 1}R in multiple species.

  17. Effect of Synthetic Truncated Apolipoprotein C-I Peptide on Plasma Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Nonhuman Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rampratap S. Kushwaha

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present studies were conducted to determine whether a synthetic truncated apoC-I peptide that inhibits CETP activity in baboons would raise plasma HDL cholesterol levels in nonhuman primates with low HDL levels. We used 2 cynomolgus monkeys and 3 baboons fed a cholesterol- and fat-enriched diet. In cynomolgus monkeys, we injected synthetic truncated apoC-I inhibitor peptide at a dose of 20 mg/kg and, in baboons, at doses of 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg at weekly intervals. Blood samples were collected 3 times a week and VLDL + LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations were measured. In cynomolgus monkeys, administration of the inhibitor peptide caused a rapid decrease in VLDL + LDL cholesterol concentrations (30%–60% and an increase in HDL cholesterol concentrations (10%–20%. VLDL + LDL cholesterol concentrations returned to baseline levels in approximately 15 days. In baboons, administration of the synthetic inhibitor peptide caused a decrease in VLDL + LDL cholesterol (20%–60% and an increase in HDL cholesterol (10%–20%. VLDL + LDL cholesterol returned to baseline levels by day 21, whereas HDL cholesterol concentrations remained elevated for up to 26 days. ApoA-I concentrations increased, whereas apoE and triglyceride concentrations decreased. Subcutaneous and intravenous administrations of the inhibitor peptide had similar effects on LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations. There was no change in body weight, food consumption, or plasma IgG levels of any baboon during the study. These studies suggest that the truncated apoC-I peptide can be used to raise HDL in humans.

  18. Comparative anatomy of the thigh nerves of Cebus libidinosus (Rylands et al., 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A.G.M.F. Aversi-Ferreira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-human primates have constituted an important group among animals subjected to various studies. Ethological, evolutionary and paleontological studies have revealed changes in anatomical structures linked to the evolution of primates, considered in studies on the comparative anatomy between Cebus libidinosus and other neotropical monkeys or those from the Old World, and the detailed knowledge on their anatomy may represent an important factor for their preservation and protection when the animals are brought to veterinary clinics after accidents or illnesses. In terms of veterinary importance, sometimes these animals arrive in the veterinary medical clinics after accidents, needing surgery or clinical treatment, but the little data available on anatomy has impaired the correct proceedings. The main justification for studies on C. libidinosus, is due to little information about the anatomy related to C. libidinosus in Brazilian and worldwide scientific literature. In this study, the distribution, enervation and path of the femoral and sciatic nerves of the pelvic limb (thigh of C. libidinosus were studied and these results were compared with literature on the anatomy of humans, chimpanzees and baboons. In general, the enervation model of the four primates is identical, but in specific terms, the differences in enervations indicate evolution convergence closer to the branch of baboons in the evolutionary tree, and these data corroborate other comparative studies in relation to the same primates to vessels, muscles and nerves. In conclusion, the nerve organization in the thigh of C. libidinosus is identical to baboon, chimpanzee and homo, but more similar to baboon. The specific differences found indicate an ancient phylogenic origin to C. libidinosus and baboons (data corroborated by other studies.

  19. Convergent evolution in primates and an insectivore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffelli, Dario; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-04-16

    The cardiovascular risk factor apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) has a puzzling distribution among mammals, its presence being limited to a subset of primates and a member of the insectivore lineage, the hedgehog. To explore the evolutionary history of apo(a), we performed extensive genomic sequence comparisons of multiple species with and without an apo(a) gene product, such as human, baboon, hedgehog, lemurand mouse. This analysis indicated that apo(a) arose independently in a subset of primates, including baboon and human, and an insectivore, the hedgehog, and was not simply lost by species lacking it. The similar structural domains shared by the hedgehog and primate apo(a) indicate that they were formed by a unique molecular mechanism involving the convergent evolution of paralogous genes in these distantspecies.

  20. An investigation of an autonomic innervation of the vertebral artery using monoamine histofluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JA Mitchell

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood flow to the hindbrain, via the paired vertebral arteries, must be uncompromised for adequate neurological functioning of its vital centres. Therefore, it would seem unlikely that the intracranial vertebral artery would need to vasoconstrict, thus reducing its blood flow. In order to investigate the existence and location of a noradrenaline-mediated constrictor mechanism in the wall of the intracranial vertebral artery, transverse sections of ten baboon and ten monkey vessels were stained with sucrose-potassium phosphate-glyoxylic acid (counterstained with malachite-green. This method allows the visualisation of catecholaminergic nerves when the sections are exposed to ultraviolet light. In this study of primate vascular tissue, however, none of the monkey or baboon vertebral artery sections showed the presence of noradrenergic nerves in the tunica media – tunica adventitia junction or penetrating the tunica media of the arteries. These findings indicate that the intracranial vertebral artery does not have a neurogenic vasomotor function in primates.

  1. The pattern of the arterial supply of the pancreas in anthropoid apes, catarrhine monkeys and platyrrhine monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawuti, Alimujiang; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Saito, Toshiyuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2009-11-01

    To get the full understanding of the arterial distribution to the pancreas, the analysis of the distribution of the variety of monkey species would be helpful. In this study, we studied the layout of the pancreatic artery in anthropoids (1 gorilla, 3 chimpanzees and 2 white-handed gibbons), in catarrhine monkeys (1 hamadryas baboon, 2 anubid baboons, 10 savannah monkeys) and in platyrrhine monkeys (6 squirrel monkeys). The pancreas of the monkeys was supplied by the arteries originating from the celiac trunk and/or superior mesenteric artery. There were three patterns in the arterial distribution; (1) the celiac artery supplied the major area of the pancreas. (2) the superior mesenteric artery supplied the major area of the pancreas. (3) the celiac artery supplied the whole pancreas. The pattern of the arterial distribution to the monkey pancreas had a wide variety. The result would be helpful for the elucidation of the development of the vascular distribution in the pancreas.

  2. Replication-competent chimeric lenti-oncovirus with expanded host cell tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiprich, S; Gundlach, B R; Fleckenstein, B; Uberla, K

    1997-04-01

    Baboon bone marrow was grafted into human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients in the course of recent trials for AIDS treatment. Since the baboon genome harbors multiple copies of an endogenous oncovirus, chimeric lenti-oncoviruses could emerge in the xenotransplant recipient. To analyze the potential replication competence of hybrid viruses between different genera of retroviruses, we replaced most of the env gene of simian immunodeficiency virus with the env gene of an amphotropic murine leukemia virus. The hybrid virus could be propagated in human T-cell lines, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of rhesus macaques, and in CD4- B-cell lines. Because of the expanded cell tropism, the hybrid virus might have a selective advantage in comparison to parental viruses. Therefore, emerging chimeric viruses may be considered a serious risk of xenotransplantation. A note of caution is also suggested for the use of pseudotyped lentiviral vectors for human gene therapy.

  3. Development of Treatment Strategies to Combat Ebola and Marburg Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-02

    HIV, acyclovir for herpes simplex virus and ribavirin for the arenviruses and bunyaviruses. Filoviruses replicate and transcribe their genomes using a...treatment of experimental Ebola virus infections. J. Infect. Dis. 179(Suppl. 1), S224–S234 (1999). • Demonstrates that hyperimmune equine ...Virusol. 40(6), 270–273 (1995). • Reports that hyperimmune equine IgG protected a small cohort of baboons against challenge with a low dose of

  4. The evolution of the patterning of human lactation: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noordwijk, Maria A; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Van Schaik, Carel P

    2013-01-01

    Some four decades ago, Jeanne Altmann started her detailed field studies of baboon mothers and their infants with a focus on the behavioral ecology of maternal reproductive investment. Around the same time, Sarah Hrdy studied langur mothers and their infants, focusing on the influence of the social environment on a female's reproductive options and decisions. Their pioneering work has inspired many subsequent studies of female primate reproduction in its natural context and shaped our own work on primate mothers.

  5. The Effects of CW (Chemical Warfare)-Related Chemicals on Social Behavior and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    the effects of two other stimulants, methamphetamine and methylphenidate , the animals maintained the "scallop" in the FI response curve, indicating that...d-amphetamine and methylphenidate (Beatty, Dodge, Dodge, White, and Panksepp, 1962). Beatty, ot al, Suggest that the activation of catecholamine...injection in baboon. National Institute of Drua Abuse Monograph in Science, 1983ý, 43, 1215-131. Grossman, E. M. Some methodologi~al issues in the conduct

  6. Molecular Targets of Chromatin Repressive Mark H3K9me3 in Primate Progenitor Cells within Adult Neurogenic Niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Foret

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Histone 3 Lysine 9 (H3K9 methylation is known to be associated with pericentric heterochromatin and important in genomic stability. In this study, we show that trimethylation at H3K9 (H3K9me3 is enriched in an adult neural stem cell niche- the subventricular zone (SVZ on the walls of the lateral ventricle in both rodent and non-human primate baboon brain. Previous studies have shown that there is significant correlation between baboon and human regarding genomic similarity and brain structure, suggesting that findings in baboon are relevant to human. To understand the function of H3K9me3 in this adult neurogenic niche, we performed genome-wide analyses using ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep-sequencing and RNA-Seq for in vivo SVZ cells purified from baboon brain. Through integrated analyses of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq, we found that H3K9me3-enriched genes associated with cellular maintenance, post-transcriptional and translational modifications, signaling pathways, and DNA replication are expressed, while genes involved in axon/neuron, hepatic stellate cell, or immune-response activation are not expressed. As neurogenesis progresses in the adult SVZ, cell fate restriction is essential to direct proper lineage commitment. Our findings highlight that H3K9me3 repression in undifferentiated SVZ cells is engaged in the maintenance of cell type integrity, implicating a role for H3K9me3 as an epigenetic mechanism to control cell fate transition within this adult germinal niche.

  7. Coordinated Defects in Hepatic Long Chain Fatty Acid Metabolism and Triglyceride Accumulation Contribute to Insulin Resistance in Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldelli, Amalia; Casiraghi, Francesca; Halff, Glenn A.; Abrahamian, Gregory A.; Davalli, Alberto M.; Bastarrachea, Raul A.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Guardado-Mendoza, Rodolfo; Jimenez-Ceja, Lilia M.; Mattern, Vicki; Paez, Ana Maria; Ricotti, Andrea; Tejero, Mary E.; Higgins, Paul B.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram Pablo; Tripathy, Devjit; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Dick, Edward J.; Cline, Gary W.; Folli, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Non-Alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by accumulation of triglycerides (TG) in hepatocytes, which may also trigger cirrhosis. The mechanisms of NAFLD are not fully understood, but insulin resistance has been proposed as a key determinant. Aims To determine the TG content and long chain fatty acyl CoA composition profile in liver from obese non-diabetic insulin resistant (IR) and lean insulin sensitive (IS) baboons in relation with hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. Methods Twenty baboons with varying grades of adiposity were studied. Hepatic (liver) and peripheral (mainly muscle) insulin sensitivity was measured with a euglycemic clamp and QUICKI. Liver biopsies were performed at baseline for TG content and LCFA profile by mass spectrometry, and histological analysis. Findings were correlated with clinical and biochemical markers of adiposity and insulin resistance. Results Obese IR baboons had elevated liver TG content compared to IS. Furthermore, the concentration of unsaturated (LC-UFA) was greater than saturated (LC-SFA) fatty acyl CoA in the liver. Interestingly, LC-FA UFA and SFA correlated with waist, BMI, insulin, NEFA, TG, QUICKI, but not M/I. Histological findings of NAFLD ranging from focal to diffuse hepatic steatosis were found in obese IR baboons. Conclusion Liver TG content is closely related with both hepatic and peripheral IR, whereas liver LC-UFA and LC-SFA are closely related only with hepatic IR in non-human primates. Mechanisms leading to the accumulation of TG, LC-UFA and an altered UFA: LC-SFA ratio may play an important role in the pathophysiology of fatty liver disease in humans. PMID:22125617

  8. Coordinated defects in hepatic long chain fatty acid metabolism and triglyceride accumulation contribute to insulin resistance in non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Kamath

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is characterized by accumulation of triglycerides (TG in hepatocytes, which may also trigger cirrhosis. The mechanisms of NAFLD are not fully understood, but insulin resistance has been proposed as a key determinant.To determine the TG content and long chain fatty acyl CoA composition profile in liver from obese non-diabetic insulin resistant (IR and lean insulin sensitive (IS baboons in relation with hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity.Twenty baboons with varying grades of adiposity were studied. Hepatic (liver and peripheral (mainly muscle insulin sensitivity was measured with a euglycemic clamp and QUICKI. Liver biopsies were performed at baseline for TG content and LCFA profile by mass spectrometry, and histological analysis. Findings were correlated with clinical and biochemical markers of adiposity and insulin resistance.Obese IR baboons had elevated liver TG content compared to IS. Furthermore, the concentration of unsaturated (LC-UFA was greater than saturated (LC-SFA fatty acyl CoA in the liver. Interestingly, LC-FA UFA and SFA correlated with waist, BMI, insulin, NEFA, TG, QUICKI, but not M/I. Histological findings of NAFLD ranging from focal to diffuse hepatic steatosis were found in obese IR baboons.Liver TG content is closely related with both hepatic and peripheral IR, whereas liver LC-UFA and LC-SFA are closely related only with hepatic IR in non-human primates. Mechanisms leading to the accumulation of TG, LC-UFA and an altered UFA: LC-SFA ratio may play an important role in the pathophysiology of fatty liver disease in humans.

  9. Energy expenditure evaluation in humans and non-human primates by SenseWear Armband. Validation of energy expenditure evaluation by SenseWear Armband by direct comparison with indirect calorimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Casiraghi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to compare and validate the use of SenseWear Armband (SWA placed on the arm (SWA ARM and on the back (SWA BACK in healthy humans during resting and a cycle-ergometer exercise and to evaluate the SWA to estimate Resting Energy Expenditure (REE and Total Energy Expenditure (TEE in healthy baboons. METHODS: We studied 26 (15F/11M human subjects wearing SWA in two different anatomical sites (arm and back during resting and a cycle-ergometer test and directly compared these results with indirect calorimetry evaluation (IC, performed at the same time. We then inserted the SWA in a metabolic jacket for baboons and evaluated the TEE and REE in free living condition for 6 days in 21 (8F/13M non-human primates. RESULTS: In humans we found a good correlation between SWA place on the ARM and on the BACK with IC during the resting experiment (1.1±0.3 SWAs, 1±0.2 IC kcal/min and a slight underestimation in the SWAs data compared with IC during the cycle-ergometer exercise (5±1.9 SWA ARM, 4.5±1.5 SWA BACK and 5.4±2.1 IC kcal/min. In the non-human primate (baboons experiment SWA estimated a TEE of 0.54±0.009 kcal/min during free living and a REE of 0.82±0.06 kcal/min. CONCLUSION: SWA, an extremely simple and inexpensive apparatus, provides quite accurate measurements of energy expenditure in humans and in baboons. Energy expenditure data obtained with SWA are highly correlated with the data obtained with "gold standard", IC, in humans.

  10. Development of a portable blood irradiator for potential clinical uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungate, F.P.

    1988-12-01

    This document provides an account of the development of a fully portable blood irradiator and the evaluation of its safety and efficacy when implanted in goats, sheep, a baboon and dogs. The program was initiated because the control of lymphocyte populations by irradiation is a potential method for improving success in organ or tissue transplantation and for treating a variety of blood diseases. 15 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. An Investigation of Bonding Mechanisms at the Interface of a Prosthetic Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    an excess of calcium and phosphate ions lead to cell death and ectopic calcification. The compositional dependence of the bone—bioglass bond...tooth bioglass Implants were f abr icated to match the anatomical shape of teeth in adult female baboons . The bioglass teeth were bracketed into the...in restoring oral function to Ind ividuals with diseased teeth . 1’ 2 Silicate and phosphate cements also play an important role In dental repair

  12. Pharmacological and Behavioral Enhancement of Neuroplasticity in the MPTP Lesioned Mouse and Nonhuman Primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    baboons. Neurosci 53, 169-178. Harvey, D. C., Lacan , G., Melega, W. P. (2000a). Regional heterogeneity of dopaminerigc deficits in vervet monkey...striatum and substantia nigra after methamphetamine exposure. Experimental Brain Research 133, 349-358. Harvey, D. C., Lacan , G., Tanious, S. P., Melega... Lacan , G., Huang, S.-C., Phelps, M. E. (1997). Recovery of striatal dopamine function after acute amphetamine- and methamphetamine-induced

  13. Prevention of 3-methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcomas in rats pre-inoculated with endogenous rat retrovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Fish, D C; Demarais, J T; Djurickovic, D B; Huebner, R J

    1981-01-01

    Weanling Fischer 344 rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of a 1000-fold concentrated preparation of endogenous nontransforming rat retrovirus. Ten days later, the rats were each given a single subcutaneous injection of 3-methylcholanthrene. The rats inoculated with the endogenous rat retrovirus were significantly protected against the development of cancer, whereas uninoculated rats and rats given one of several murine retroviruses or baboon retrovirus were not protected.

  14. Internal Prosthetic Replacement of Skeletal Segments Lost in Combat Related Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    proceeds over a large strain range. There is no fracture but simply a progressive tearing as with a fabric. The tensile strength is very significantly...approach the problem of a cementless acetabulum as well and the site on a female baboon is too small. The femur component is monolithic incorporating...outer porosity available for bony ingrowth. This arrangement for a molded polyethylene acetabulum prosthesis is shown in Figure 16. In this case, the

  15. Posters

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, E M; Bian, L.; Lima, E.; Stoker, A.; Marberry, K.M.; Nagai, T; M. Sato; Furukawa, K.; Ushida, T; Mochida, J; X Wei; Sheibani-Rad, S.; Appleyard, D.; Dickenson, R; DiGiovanni, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Articular cartilage of higher animals does not regenerate, but under some circumstances mesenchymal cells can be inducted to behave phenotypically as chondrocytes. Tissue engineering has produced only partial cartilage repair and inconsistent outcomes. This study reports full thickness articular cartilage regeneration induced by freeze-dried particulate cartilage. Methods and Materials Full thickness cartilage defects in the femoral condyles of 22 baboons were filled with freeze-...

  16. Dopamine D1 receptor imaging in the rodent and primate brain using the isoquinoline (+)-[{sup 11}C]A-69024 and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besret, L.; Herard, A.S.; Guillermier, M.; Hantraye, P. [CNRS, URA 2210, F-91406 Orsay (France); Dolle, F.; Demphel, S.; Hinnen, F.; Coulon, C.; Ottaviani, M.; Bottlaender, M. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, SHFJ, Lab Imagerie Mol Expt, F-91406 Orsay (France); Herard, A.S.; Guillermier, M.; Hantraye, P. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, Mol Imaging Res Ctr, F-92265 Fontenay Aux Roses (France); Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Discipline Med Radiat Sci, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Brain and Mind Res Inst, Sydney, NSW 2050 (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Sch Chem, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    In vivo pharmacokinetic and brain binding characteristics of (+)-[{sup 11}C]A-69024, a high-affinity-D1-selective dopamine receptor antagonist, were assessed with micro-PET and {beta}-microprobes in the rat and PET in the baboon. The biodistribution of (+)-[{sup 11}C]A-69024 in rats and baboons showed a rapid brain uptake (reaching a maximal value at 5 and 15 min postinjection in rats and baboons, respectively), followed by a slow wash out. The region/cerebellum concentration ratio was characterized by a fourfold higher uptake in striatum and a twofold higher uptake in cortical regions, consistent with in vivo specific binding of the radiotracer in these cerebral regions. Furthermore, this specific (+)-[{sup 11}C]A-69024 binding significantly correlated with the reported in vitro distribution of dopamine D1-receptors. Finally, the specific uptake of the tracer in the striatum and cortical regions was completely prevented by either a pretreatment with large doses of nonradioactive {+-}A-69024 or of the D1-selective antagonist SCH23390, resulting in a similar uptake in the reference region (cerebellum) and in other brain regions. Thus, (+)-[{sup 11}C]A-69024 appears to be a specific and enantioselective radioligand to visualize and quantify brain dopamine D1 receptors in vivo using positron emission tomography. (authors)

  17. Role of Intrinsic (Graft) Versus Extrinsic (Host) Factors in the Growth of Transplanted Organs Following Allogeneic and Xenogeneic Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, T; Watanabe, H; Shah, J A; Sahara, H; Shimizu, A; Nomura, S; Asfour, A; Danton, M; Boyd, L; Dardenne Meyers, A; Ekanayake-Alper, D K; Sachs, D H; Yamada, K

    2017-01-24

    In our studies of life-supporting α-1,3-galactocyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) pig-to-baboon kidneys, we found that some recipients developed increased serum creatinine with growth of the grafts, without histological or immunological evidence of rejection. We hypothesized that the rapid growth of orthotopic pig grafts in smaller baboon recipients may have led to deterioration of organ function. To test this hypothesis for both kidneys and lungs, we assessed whether the growth of outbred (Yorkshire) organ transplants in miniature swine was regulated by intrinsic (graft) or extrinsic (host environment) factors. Yorkshire kidneys exhibited persistent growth in miniature swine, reaching 3.7 times their initial volume over 3 mo versus 1.2 times for miniature swine kidneys over the same time period. Similar rapid early growth of lung allografts was observed and, in this case, led to organ dysfunction. For xenograft kidneys, a review of our results suggests that there is a threshold for kidney graft volume of 25 cm(3) /kg of recipient body weight at which cortical ischemia is induced in transplanted GalT-KO kidneys in baboons. These results suggest that intrinsic factors are responsible, at least in part, for growth of donor organs and that this property should be taken into consideration for growth-curve-mismatched transplants, especially for life-supporting organs transplanted into a limited recipient space.

  18. Discrimination between platelet-mediated and coagulation-mediated mechanisms in a model of complex thrombus formation in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadroy, Y.; Horbett, T.A.; Hanson, S.R.

    1989-04-01

    To study mechanisms of complex thrombus formation in vivo, and to compare the relative antithrombotic effects of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, a model was developed in baboons. Segments of collagen-coated tubing followed by two sequentially placed expansion chambers exhibiting disturbed flow patterns were exposed to native blood under laminar flow conditions. The device was incorporated for 1 hour into an exteriorized arteriovenous shunt in baboons under controlled blood flow (20 ml/min). Morphologic evaluation by scanning electron microscopy showed that thrombi associated with collagen were relatively rich in platelets but thrombi in the chambers were rich in fibrin and red cells. Deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets was continuously measured with a scintillation camera. Platelet deposition increased in a linear (collagen-coated segment) or exponential (chambers 1 and 2) fashion over time, with values after 40 minutes averaging 24.1 +/- 3.3 x 10(8) platelets (collagen segment), 16.7 +/- 3.4 x 10(8) platelets (chamber 1), and 8.4 +/- 2.4 x 10(8) platelets (chamber 2). Total fibrinogen deposition after 40 minutes was determined by using iodine 125-labeled baboon fibrinogen and averaged 0.58 +/- 0.14 mg in the collagen segment, 1.51 +/- 0.27 mg in chamber 1, and 0.95 +/- 0.25 mg in chamber 2. Plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG), platelet-factor 4 (PF4), and fibrinopeptide A (FPA) increased fourfold to fivefold after 60 minutes of blood exposure to the thrombotic device. Platelet deposition onto the collagen segment, chamber 1, and chamber 2 was linearly dependent on the circulating platelet count. Platelet accumulation in chamber 1 and chamber 2 was also dependent on the presence of the proximal collagen segment.

  19. The ties that bind: Maternal kin bias in a multilevel primate society despite natal dispersal by both sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Städele, Veronika; Pines, Mathew; Swedell, Larissa; Vigilant, Linda

    2016-07-01

    In many social animals, individuals derive fitness benefits from close social bonds, which are often formed among kin of the philopatric sex. Hamadryas baboons, however, exhibit a hierarchical, multilevel social system where both sexes disperse from their natal one-male-unit (OMU). Although this would seem to hinder maintenance of kin ties, both sexes appear largely philopatric at the higher order band and clan levels, possibly allowing for bonds with same sex kin by both males and females. In order to investigate the possibility of kin bonds in hamadryas baboons, we identified kin dyads in a band without known pedigree information using a large panel of genetic markers: 1 Y-linked, 4 X-linked, and 23 autosomal microsatellites and part of the mitochondrial hypervariable region I. With these data, we performed a kinship analysis while accounting for misclassification rates through simulations and determined kinship among two types of dyads: leader and follower males and female dyads within OMUs. Leader and follower males were maternal relatives more often than expected by chance, suggesting that kinship plays a role in the formation of these relationships. Moreover, maternal female relatives were found in the same OMU more often than expected by chance, indicating that females may be motivated to maintain post-dispersal contact with maternal female kin. Our results suggest that hamadryas baboons can recognize maternal kin and that kin selection has contributed to shaping their complex social system. This implies that an ancestral maternal kin bias has been retained in hamadryas society. Am. J. Primatol. 78:731-744, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Thrombus imaging in a primate model with antibodies specific for an external membrane protein of activated platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palabrica, T.M.; Furie, B.C.; Konstam, M.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Connolly, R.; Brockway, B.A.; Ramberg, K.L.; Furie, B.

    1989-02-01

    The activated platelet is a potential target for the localization of thrombi in vivo since, after stimulation and secretion of granule contents, activated platelets are concentrated at sites of blood clot formation. In this study, we used antibodies specific for a membrane protein of activated platelets to detect experimental thrombi in an animal model. PADGEM (platelet activation-dependent granule-external membrane protein), a platelet alpha-granule membrane protein, is translocated to the plasma membrane during platelet activation and granule secretion. Since PADGEM is internal in unstimulated platelets, polyclonal anti-PADGEM and monoclonal KC4 antibodies do not bind to circulating resting platelets but do interact with activated platelets. Dacron graft material incubated with radiolabeled KC4 or anti-PADGEM antibodies in the presence of thrombin-activated platelet-rich plasma bound most of the antibody. Imaging experiments with 123I-labeled anti-PADGEM in baboons with an external arterial-venous Dacron shunt revealed rapid uptake in the thrombus induced by the Dacron graft; control experiments with 123I-labeled nonimmune IgG exhibited minimal uptake. Deep venous thrombi, formed by using percutaneous balloon catheters to stop blood flow in the femoral vein of baboons, were visualized with 123I-labeled anti-PADGEM. Thrombi were discernible against blood pool background activity without subtraction techniques within 1 hr. No target enhancement was seen with 123I-labeled nonimmune IgG. 123I-labeled anti-PADGEM cleared the blood pool with an initial half-disappearance time of 6 min and did not interfere with hemostasis. These results indicate that radioimmunoscintigraphy with anti-PADGEM antibodies can visualize thrombi in baboon models and is a promising technique for clinical thrombus detection in humans.

  1. Naturally acquired picornavirus infections in primates at the Dhaka zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberste, M Steven; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Maher, Kaija; Nix, W Allan; Engel, Gregory A; Begum, Sajeda; Hasan, Kamrul M; Oh, Gunwha; Pallansch, Mark A; Jones-Engel, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The conditions in densely populated Bangladesh favor picornavirus transmission, resulting in a high rate of infection in the human population. Data suggest that nonhuman primates (NHP) may play a role in the maintenance and transmission of diverse picornaviruses in Bangladesh. At the Dhaka Zoo, multiple NHP species are caged in close proximity. Their proximity to other species and to humans, both zoo workers and visitors, provides the potential for cross-species transmission. To investigate possible interspecies and intraspecies transmission of picornaviruses among NHP, we collected fecal specimens from nine NHP taxa at the Dhaka Zoo at three time points, August 2007, January 2008, and June 2008. Specimens were screened using real-time PCR for the genera Enterovirus, Parechovirus, and Sapelovirus, and positive samples were typed by VP1 sequencing. Fifty-two picornaviruses comprising 10 distinct serotypes were detected in 83 fecal samples. Four of these serotypes, simian virus 19 (SV19), baboon enterovirus (BaEV), enterovirus 112 (EV112), and EV115, have been solely associated with infection in NHP. EV112, EV115, and SV19 accounted for 88% of all picornaviruses detected. Over 80% of samples from cages housing rhesus macaques, olive baboons, or hamadryas baboons were positive for a picornavirus, while no picornaviruses were detected in samples from capped langurs or vervet monkeys. In contrast to our findings among synanthropic NHP in Bangladesh where 100% of the picornaviruses detected were of human serotypes, in the zoo population, only 15% of picornaviruses detected in NHP were of human origin. Specific serotypes tended to persist over time, suggesting either persistent infection of individuals or cycles of reinfection.

  2. A rapid solid-phase extraction method for measurement of non-metabolised peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands, [{sup 18}F]PBR102 and [{sup 18}F]PBR111, in rat and primate plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsifis, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.katsifis@ansto.gov.a [ANSTO LifeSciences, Sydney, 2234 (Australia); Loc' h, Christian [ANSTO LifeSciences, Sydney, 2234 (Australia); Henderson, David [Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, 2050 (Australia); Bourdier, Thomas; Pham, Tien; Greguric, Ivan [ANSTO LifeSciences, Sydney, 2234 (Australia); Lam, Peter [Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, 2050 (Australia); Callaghan, Paul; Mattner, Filomena [ANSTO LifeSciences, Sydney, 2234 (Australia); Eberl, Stefan [Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, 2050 (Australia); School of Information Technology, University of Sydney, Sydney, 2006 (Australia); Fulham, Michael [Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, 2050 (Australia); School of Information Technology, University of Sydney, Sydney, 2006 (Australia); Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, 2006 (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    Objectives: To develop a rapid and reliable method for estimating non-metabolised PBR ligands fluoroethoxy ([{sup 18}F]PBR102)- and fluoropropoxy ([{sup 18}F]PBR111)-substituted 2-(6-chloro-2-phenyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-yl)-N,N-diethylacetamides in plasma. Methods: Rats and baboons were imaged with PET up to 2 h postinjection of [{sup 18}F]PBR102 and [{sup 18}F]PBR111 under baseline conditions, after pre-blocking or displacement with PK11195. Arterial plasma samples were directly analysed by reverse-phase solid-phase extraction (RP-SPE) and RP-HPLC and by normal-phase TLC. SPE cartridges were successively washed with acetonitrile/water mixtures. SPE eluant radioactivity was measured in a {gamma}-counter to determine the parent compound fraction and then analysed by HPLC and TLC for validation. Results: In SPE, hydrophilic and lipophilic radiolabelled metabolites were eluted in water and 20% acetonitrile/water. All non-metabolised [{sup 18}F]PBR102 and [{sup 18}F]PBR111 were in SPE acetonitrile fraction as confirmed by HPLC and TLC analysis. Unchanged (%) [{sup 18}F]PBR102 and [{sup 18}F]PBR111 from SPE analysis in rat and baboon plasma agreed with those from HPLC and TLC analysis. In rats and baboons, the fraction of unchanged tracer followed a bi-exponential decrease, with half-lives of 7 to 10 min for the fast component and >80 min for the slow component for both tracers. Conclusions: Direct plasma SPE analysis of [{sup 18}F]PBR102 and [{sup 18}F]PBR111 can reliably estimate parent compound fraction. SPE was superior to HPLC for samples with low activity; it allows rapid and accurate metabolite analysis of a large number of plasma samples for improved estimation of metabolite-corrected input function during quantitative PET imaging studies.

  3. Methotrexate for immunosuppression in life-supporting pig-to-cynomolgus monkey renal xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Emanuele; Cadrobbi, Roberto; Baldan, Nicola; Dedja, Arben; Calabrese, Fiorella; Castagnaro, Massimo; Fante, Fabio; Boldrin, Massimo; Iacopetti, Ilaria; Ravarotto, Licia; Carraro, Paolo; Bronte, Vincenzo; De Santo, Carmela; Busetto, Roberto; Plebani, Mario; Cancellotti, Francesco Maria; Rigotti, Paolo; Thiene, Gaetano; Ancona, Ermanno

    2003-11-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has been used successfully as an immunosuppressant in rodent xenotransplantation models, but the data generated so far with MTX in pig-to-baboon cardiac transplantation studies have been disappointing. The potential of this agent was consequently explored in a life-supporting pig-to-primate renal model using the cynomolgus monkey as the recipient species. Introductory in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies with MTX were conducted in three cynomolgus monkeys. Subsequently, 10 cynomolgus monkey recipients of a life-supporting kidney from human decay-accelerating factor transgenic pigs were administered MTX intravenously according to three different regimens. All the animals also received cyclosporine A and steroids. In addition, mycophenolate sodium (MPS) was administered post-operatively in two of the three groups of transplanted animals. At clinically relevant concentrations, MTX is able in vitro to inhibit the mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) in cynomolgus monkeys. After intravenous administration, moreover, exposure of cynomolgus monkeys to MTX appeared to be higher than had been previously reported in baboons. Graft function was observed in the transplanted animals, which survived from 0 to 41 days. All but two animals revealed acute humoral rejection in the explanted graft and developed diarrhea. Diarrhea was the cause of euthanasia in five cases. It was unrelated to the administration of MPS and associated with severe histopathological signs of enteritis. This study demonstrates that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles if MTX vary substantially between non-human primate species. In vitro, MTX has immunosuppressive properties in the cynomolgus monkey at clinically relevant concentrations. In vivo, MTX has a very narrow therapeutic window in cynomolgus monkeys, however, as it does in baboons. We conclude that MTX is scarcely effective as an immunosuppressant, be it for induction or maintenance, in pig

  4. Modification of the Farr assay using ethanol-ammonium acetate precipitation and its application to the measurement of affinity of anti-HCG produced in several species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanavala, Y M; Hay, F C

    1978-01-01

    A double isotope modified Farr assay was used to determine the total binding sites and affinity of antibodies to human chorionic gonadotrophin. Precipitation of the antigen--antibody complex at equilibrium with ammonium sulphate gave very high levels of nonspecific binding. Good discrimination over background was observed using a specific anti-immunoglobulin serum. However since we were interested in measuring the affinity of antibodies raised in several animal species it was more appropriate to use a single nonspecies precipitating reagent. We found that the use of a mixture of ethanol-ammonium acetate gave very low levels of non-specific binding in baboons, marmosets, rabbits and mice.

  5. Comparative anatomical analyses of the forearm muscles of Cebus libidinosus (Rylands et al. 2000: manipulatory behavior and tool use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales Alexandre Aversi-Ferreira

    Full Text Available The present study describes the flexor and extensor muscles in Cebus libidinosus' forearm and compares them with those from humans, chimpanzees and baboons. The data is presented in quantitative anatomical indices for similarity. The capuchin forearm muscles showed important similarities with chimpanzees and humans, particularly those that act on thumb motion and allow certain degree of independence from other hand structures, even though their configuration does not enable a true opposable thumb. The characteristics of Cebus' forearm muscles corroborate the evolutionary convergence towards an adaptive behavior (tool use between Cebus genus and apes.

  6. Crystals of Serum Albumin for Use in Genetic Engineering and Rational Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Serum albumin crystal forms have been produced which exhibit superior x-ray diffraction quality. The crystals are produced from both recombinant and wild-type human serum albumin, canine, and baboon serum albumin and allow the performance of drug-binding studies as well as genetic engineering studies. The crystals are grown from solutions of polyethylene glycol or ammonium sulphate within prescribed limits during growth times from one to several weeks and include the following space groups: P2(sub 1), C2, P1.

  7. Department of Clinical Investigation Annual Research Progress Report, Fiscal Year 1985. Volume 2,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    7Ga gamma scans. Progress: "Healing curves" based on 6 7Ga uptake ratios in the traumatized vs non-traumatized leg reveal no statistically significant...was done in sink table mock circulatory system using aortas from necropsy. Sine/ wave spike stimuli were used. Progress: Six control baboons and five...Investigator Facility Glenn M. Mills M.D._ MAT MC Hrok Ar.. a^dia C--tr Dept/Svc ssocateInvestigators: Department of Medit -ineOnrnnlgy Walter H. Harvey

  8. Current status of pig heart xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, Muhammad M; Reichart, Bruno; Byrne, Guerard W; McGregor, Christopher G A

    2015-11-01

    Significant progress in understanding and overcoming cardiac xenograft rejection using a clinically relevant large animal pig-to-baboon model has accelerated in recent years. This advancement is based on improved immune suppression, which attained more effective regulation of B lymphocytes and possibly newer donor genetics. These improvements have enhanced heterotopic cardiac xenograft survival from a few weeks to over 2 years, achieved intrathoracic heterotopic cardiac xenograft survival of 50 days and orthotopic survival of 57 days. This encouraging progress has rekindled interest in xenotransplantation research and refocused efforts on preclinical orthotopic cardiac xenotransplantation.

  9. In vivo imaging of serotonin transporters with [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 in nonhuman primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresel, S.H.J.; Kung, M.T.; Huang, X.F.; Ploessl, K.; Hou, C.; Shiue, C.Y.; Karp, J. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Kung, H.F. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology]|[Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1999-04-29

    [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 was the first {sup 99m}Tc-labeled imaging agent to show specific binding to dopamine transporters (DAT) in the striatum (STR) of human brain. Additionally, in vitro binding and autoradiographic experiments demonstrated that this tracer also binds to serotonin transporters (SERT) in the midbrain/hypothalamus (MB) area. In this study, [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 was investigated as a potentially useful ligand to image SERT in the MB of living brain. A total of eight single-photon emission tomography (SPET) scans were performed in two baboons (Papio anubis) after intravenous (i.v.) injection of 740 MBq (20 mCi) of [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 using a triple-head gamma camera equipped with ultra-high-resolution fan-beam collimators (scan time: 0-210 min). In four blocking studies, baboons were pretreated with (+)McN5652 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) or methylphenidate (1 mg/kg, i.v.) to specifically block SERT or DAT, respectively. After co-registration with magnetic resonance images of the same baboon, a region of interest analysis was performed using predefined templates to calculate specific uptake in the midbrain area and the striatum, with the cerebellum as the background region [(MB-CB)/CB, (STR-CB)/CB]. Additionally, two PET scans of the same baboons were performed after i.v. injections of 74-111 MBq (2-3 mCi) of [{sup 11}C](+)McN5652 to identify the SERT sites. In [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1/SPET scans, the SERT sites in the MB region were clearly visualized. Semiquantitative analysis revealed a specific uptake in MB ([MB-CB]/CB) of 0.30{+-}0.02, which was decreased to 0.040{+-}0.005 after pretreatment with nonradioactive (+)McN5652, a selective SERT ligand. Pretreatment with methylphenidate reduced the specific binding of [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 to DAT sites [(STR-CB)/CB] from 2.45{+-}0.13 to 0.32{+-}0.04 without any effect on its binding to SERT sites [(MB-CB)/CB], which was confirmed by the co-registration of the [{sup 11}C](+)McN5652/PET scans. This preliminary study

  10. Search for CEA-like molecules in polymorphonuclear leukocytes of non-human primates using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantscheff, P; Indzhiia, L V; Micheel, B

    1986-01-01

    The monoclonal anti-CEA antibody ZIK-A42-A/C1 which reacts with NCA of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was found to bind also to polymorphonuclear blood leukocytes of the following non-human primates tested: hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas), stump-tailed monkey (Macaca arctoides), pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemestrina), and rhesus monkey (Macaca mulata). No binding was observed to mononuclear blood leukocytes. It was concluded that non-human primates contain CEA-like substances in their polymorphonuclear leukocytes as humans do and that these substances carry some identical epitopes.

  11. Examining a scaled dynamical system of telomere shortening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrenne, Benoit M.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2015-02-01

    A model of telomere dynamics is proposed and examined. Our model, which extends a previously introduced model that incorporates stem cells as progenitors of new cells, imposes the Hayflick limit, the maximum number of cell divisions that are possible. This new model leads to cell populations for which the average telomere length is not necessarily a monotonically decreasing function of time, in contrast to previously published models. We provide a phase diagram indicating where such results would be expected via the introduction of scaled populations, rate constants and time. The application of this model to available leukocyte baboon data is discussed.

  12. Deep trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodelling in the placental bed of the lowland gorilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pijnenborg, R; Vercruysse, L; Carter, Anthony Michael

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to baboon or rhesus macaque, trophoblast invasion in the human placental bed occurs by the interstitial as well as the endovascular route and reaches as deep as the inner myometrium. We here describe two rare specimens of gorilla placenta. In the light of recent findings in the chimpa......In contrast to baboon or rhesus macaque, trophoblast invasion in the human placental bed occurs by the interstitial as well as the endovascular route and reaches as deep as the inner myometrium. We here describe two rare specimens of gorilla placenta. In the light of recent findings...... in the chimpanzee, we postulated the occurrence of deep invasion in gorilla pregnancy. Tissues were processed for histology (PAS, orcein), lectin staining (Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1) and immunohistochemistry (cytokeratin 7/17, α-actin). A specimen of young but undetermined gestational age included deep placental...... intramural trophoblast. Absence of inner myometrial tissue precluded assessment of invasion depth in this later specimen. Despite the limited material we can conclude that key aspects of trophoblast invasion are shared by the three hominid species: gorilla, chimpanzee and human....

  13. Intergroup conflict: Ecological predictors of winning and consequences of defeat in a wild primate population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, A Catherine; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne

    2012-08-01

    In many social species, competition between groups is a major factor proximately affecting group-level movement patterns and space use and ultimately shaping the evolution of group living and complex sociality. Here we evaluated the factors influencing group-level dominance among 5 social groups of wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus), in particular focusing on the spatial determinants of dominance and the consequences of defeat. When direct conflict occurred between conspecific baboon groups, the winning group was predicted by differences in the number of adult males in each group and/or groups that had used the areas surrounding the encounter location more intensively than their opponent in the preceding 9 or 12 months. Relative intensity of space use over shorter timescales examined (3 and 6 months) was a poor predictor of the interaction's outcome. Losing groups but not winning groups experienced clear short-term costs. Losing groups used the area surrounding the interaction less following an agonistic encounter (relative to their intensity of use of the area prior to the interaction). These findings offer insight into the influences and consequences of intergroup competition on group-level patterns of space use.

  14. Results of gal-knockout porcine thymokidney xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesemer, A D; Hirakata, A; Shimizu, A; Moran, S; Tena, A; Iwaki, H; Ishikawa, Y; Schule, P; Arn, J S; Robson, S C; Fishman, J A; Sykes, M; Sachs, D H; Yamada, K

    2009-12-01

    Clinical transplantation for the treatment of end-stage organ disease is limited by a shortage of donor organs. Successful xenotransplantation could immediately overcome this limitation. The development of homozygous alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) pigs removed hyperacute rejection as the major immunologic hurdle to xenotransplantation. Nevertheless, GalT-KO organs stimulate robust immunologic responses that are not prevented by immunosuppressive drugs. Murine studies show that recipient thymopoiesis in thymic xenografts induces xenotolerance. We transplanted life-supporting composite thymokidneys (composite thymus and kidneys) prepared in GalT-KO miniature swine to baboons in an attempt to induce tolerance in a preclinical xenotransplant model. Here, we report the results of seven xenogenic thymokidney transplants using a steroid-free immunosuppressive regimen that eliminated whole-body irradiation in all but one recipient. The regimen resulted in average recipient survival of over 50 days. This was associated with donor-specific unresponsiveness in vitro and early baboon thymopoiesis in the porcine thymus tissue of these grafts, suggesting the development of T-cell tolerance. The kidney grafts had no signs of cellular infiltration or deposition of IgG, and no grafts were lost due to rejection. These results show that xenogeneic thymus transplantation can support early primate thymopoiesis, which in turn may induce T-cell tolerance to solid organ xenografts.

  15. Measurement of Bmax and Kd with the glycine transporter 1 radiotracer ¹⁸F-MK6577 using a novel multi-infusion paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Holden, Daniel; Lin, Shu-fei; Kapinos, Michael; Ropchan, Jim; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Glycine is a co-agonist of glutamate at the NMDA receptor. Glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) inhibitors are reported to be potential therapeutic agents for schizophrenia. (18)F-MK6577 is a new positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer useful for imaging brain GlyT1 and its occupancy in humans. We devised a novel multi-infusion paradigm of radiolabeled and unlabeled compound and an iterative linear/nonlinear alternating fitting method to allow for the determination of in vivo affinity (Kd) and target concentration (Bmax) images, constraining Kd to be uniform across the brain. This paradigm was tested with (18)F-MK6577 in baboons. Voxel-based analysis produced high quality Bmax images and reliable Kd estimates, and also suggested that the nondisplaceable distribution volume (VND) is not uniform throughout the brain. In vivo GlyT1 Kd was estimated to be 1.87 nmol/L for (18)F-MK6577, and the rank order of GlyT1 distribution measured in the baboon brain was: high in the brainstem (133 nmol/L), medium in the cerebellum (83 nmol/L), and low in the cortex (30 nmol/L). These in vivo Kd and Bmax values agreed well with those determined in vitro, thus validating our novel multi-infusion approach.

  16. Cardiovascular depressant effects of the neomycin-streptomycin group of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, H R

    1975-01-01

    Cardiovascular depressant effects of the neomycin-streptomycin group of antibiotics (aminoglycoside antibiotics) were examined during pentobarbital anesthesia in cats, dogs, and 4 species of nonhuman primates: owl (Aotus trivirgatus), squirrel (Saimiri sciureus), and rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys, and dog-faced baboons (Papio cynocephalus). Intravenous administration of kanamycin, streptomycin, gentamicin, or neomycin produced various degrees of hypotension and relative bradycardia in all species examined. In surgically prepared (open-chest) baboons, neomycin consistently induced a dose-related depression of myocardial contractile force, maximum dF/dt of myocardial contraction, cardiac output, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Maximum depression of hemodynamic values usually occurred within 2 to 5 minutes after administration of neomycin; cardiovascular function then gradually returned to control or near control levels within 30 to 60 minutes. Intravenous administration of calcium chloride rapidly reversed the neomycin-mediated alterations of cardiovascular function. Present findings indicated that aminoglycoside antibiotics altered cardiovascular dynamics in anesthetized animals, and indicated that this deleterious action(s) may be related to modification of calcium ion function.

  17. Ancient polymorphism and functional variation in the primate MHC-DQA1 5' cis-regulatory region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, Dagan A; Rockman, Matthew V; Wray, Gregory A; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2006-10-31

    Precise regulation of MHC gene expression is critical to vertebrate immune surveillance and response. Polymorphisms in the 5' proximal promoter region of the human class II gene HLA-DQA1 have been shown to influence its transcriptional regulation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We investigated the evolutionary history of this cis-regulatory region by sequencing the DQA1 5' proximal promoter region in eight nonhuman primate species. We observed unexpectedly high levels of sequence variation and multiple strong signatures of balancing selection in this region. Specifically, the considerable DQA1 promoter region diversity was characterized by abundant shared (or trans-species) polymorphism and a pronounced lack of fixed differences between species. The majority of transcription factor binding sites in the DQA1 promoter region were polymorphic within species, and these binding site polymorphisms were commonly shared among multiple species despite evidence for negative selection eliminating a significant fraction of binding site mutations. We assessed the functional consequences of intraspecific promoter region diversity using a cell line-based reporter assay and detected significant differences among baboon DQA1 promoter haplotypes in their ability to drive transcription in vitro. The functional differentiation of baboon promoter haplotypes, together with the significant deviations from neutral sequence evolution, suggests a role for balancing selection in the evolution of DQA1 transcriptional regulation in primates.

  18. Amounts of nutrients recommended by the NRC abate the effects of a toxic alcohol dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derr, R.F.; Draves, K. (VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (USA))

    1989-02-09

    Diet is the food and drink taken daily by an animal. Although the composition of the Lieber-DeCarli 36% alcohol diet is such that recommended amounts of nutrients could be ingested when the diet is fed, the fact is that rats have an aversion to alcohol, ingestion is reduced and the intake of total energy and several nutrients are below recommended levels. Hence the diet is nutritionally inadequate for growth, gestation and lactation. Recent studies with baboons have also shown that the baboon liquid diet is also deficient in total energy and several nutrients. Hence all studies with these liquid alcohol diets have involved two treatments; namely, ethanol and malnutrition. Thus, effects observed when these diets were fed could have been due to alcohol, malnutrition or an interaction effect of alcohol and malnutrition. When liquid diets are fed to rats that provide recommended amounts of nutrients for growth, gestation and lactation and the same dose of ethanol per kg body weight as the 36% alcohol diet, no toxic effects of alcohol are observed. Hence, effects not observed in the malnourished pair-fed controls but observed in the alcohol diet fed rats were likely due to the interaction effect of alcohol and malnutrition.

  19. Efficient Genome-Wide Sequencing and Low-Coverage Pedigree Analysis from Noninvasively Collected Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Majoros, William H; Yuan, Michael L; Shaver, Amanda O; Gordon, Jacob B; Kopp, Gisela H; Schlebusch, Stephen A; Wall, Jeffrey D; Alberts, Susan C; Mukherjee, Sayan; Zhou, Xiang; Tung, Jenny

    2016-06-01

    Research on the genetics of natural populations was revolutionized in the 1990s by methods for genotyping noninvasively collected samples. However, these methods have remained largely unchanged for the past 20 years and lag far behind the genomics era. To close this gap, here we report an optimized laboratory protocol for genome-wide capture of endogenous DNA from noninvasively collected samples, coupled with a novel computational approach to reconstruct pedigree links from the resulting low-coverage data. We validated both methods using fecal samples from 62 wild baboons, including 48 from an independently constructed extended pedigree. We enriched fecal-derived DNA samples up to 40-fold for endogenous baboon DNA and reconstructed near-perfect pedigree relationships even with extremely low-coverage sequencing. We anticipate that these methods will be broadly applicable to the many research systems for which only noninvasive samples are available. The lab protocol and software ("WHODAD") are freely available at www.tung-lab.org/protocols-and-software.html and www.xzlab.org/software.html, respectively.

  20. Pollical oblique ligament in humans and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, Marvin

    2003-04-01

    A morphological study of the oblique ligament in the thumb is presented. The ligament was consistently described in human specimens and compared with dissections of non-human primates from different species. The oblique ligament was found in some, but not all, specimens in each of the following species examined: chimpanzee, orangutan, gibbon, anubis baboon, hamadryas baboon, squirrel monkey, lemur and marmoset. A revised identity of the oblique ligament is proposed as a reinforced distal border of a fibro-osseous annular pollical flexor sheath and whose function is not independent of the flexor sheath. The constant presence and tendinous trait of the pollical oblique ligament in humans, when compared with non-human primates, supports the notion that the oblique ligament strengthens the pollical flexor sheath in humans for restraint of the flexor pollicis longus tendon during forceful precision pinching. A derivation of the pollical oblique ligament is considered as representing a vestigial radial limb of a flexor pollicis superficialis tendon in the thumb.

  1. Plum, an immunoglobulin superfamily protein, regulates axon pruning by facilitating TGF-β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaomeng M; Gutman, Itai; Mosca, Timothy J; Iram, Tal; Ozkan, Engin; Garcia, K Christopher; Luo, Liqun; Schuldiner, Oren

    2013-05-08

    Axon pruning during development is essential for proper wiring of the mature nervous system, but its regulation remains poorly understood. We have identified an immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) transmembrane protein, Plum, that is cell autonomously required for axon pruning of mushroom body (MB) γ neurons and for ectopic synapse refinement at the developing neuromuscular junction in Drosophila. Plum promotes MB γ neuron axon pruning by regulating the expression of Ecdysone Receptor-B1, a key initiator of axon pruning. Genetic analyses indicate that Plum acts to facilitate signaling of Myoglianin, a glial-derived TGF-β, on MB γ neurons upstream of the type-I TGF-β receptor Baboon. Myoglianin, Baboon, and Ecdysone Receptor-B1 are also required for neuromuscular junction ectopic synapse refinement. Our study highlights both IgSF proteins and TGF-β facilitation as key promoters of developmental axon elimination and demonstrates a mechanistic conservation between MB axon pruning during metamorphosis and the refinement of ectopic larval neuromuscular connections.

  2. Discovery and characterization of distinct simian pegiviruses in three wild African Old World monkey species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Sibley

    Full Text Available Within the Flaviviridae, the recently designated genus Pegivirus has expanded greatly due to new discoveries in bats, horses, and rodents. Here we report the discovery and characterization of three simian pegiviruses (SPgV that resemble human pegivirus (HPgV and infect red colobus monkeys (Procolobus tephrosceles, red-tailed guenons (Cercopithecus ascanius and an olive baboon (Papio anubis. We have designated these viruses SPgVkrc, SPgVkrtg and SPgVkbab, reflecting their host species' common names, which include reference to their location of origin in Kibale National Park, Uganda. SPgVkrc and SPgVkrtg were detected in 47% (28/60 of red colobus and 42% (5/12 red-tailed guenons, respectively, while SPgVkbab infection was observed in 1 of 23 olive baboons tested. Infections were not associated with any apparent disease, despite the generally high viral loads observed for each variant. These viruses were monophyletic and equally divergent from HPgV and pegiviruses previously identified in chimpanzees (SPgVcpz. Overall, the high degree of conservation of genetic features among the novel SPgVs, HPgV and SPgVcpz suggests conservation of function among these closely related viruses. Our study describes the first primate pegiviruses detected in Old World monkeys, expanding the known genetic diversity and host range of pegiviruses and providing insight into the natural history of this genus.

  3. Synthesis and positron emission tomography studies of C-11-labeled isotopomers and metabolites of GTS-21, a partial {alpha}7 nicotinic cholinergic agonist drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Won [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)]. E-mail: swkim@bnl.gov; Ding Yushin [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Department of Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8048 (United States); Alexoff, David [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Patel, Vinal [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Logan, Jean [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Lin, K.-S. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Shea, Colleen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Muench, Lisa [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Xu Youwen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Carter, Pauline [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); King, Payton [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Constanzo, Jasmine R. [Department of Chemistry, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Ciaccio, James A. [Department of Chemistry, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Introduction: (3E)-3-[(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methylene]-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2,3'-bipyridine (GTS-21), a partial {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drug, has recently been shown to improve cognition in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. One of its two major demethylated metabolites, 4-OH-GTS-21, has been suggested to contribute to its therapeutic effects. Methods: We labeled GTS-21 in two different positions with carbon-11 ([2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 and [4-{sup 11}C]GTS-21) along with two corresponding demethylated metabolites ([2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]4-OH-GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]2-OH-GTS-21) for pharmacokinetic studies in baboons and mice with positron emission tomography (PET). Results: Both [2-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 showed similar initial high rapid uptake in baboon brain, peaking from 1 to 3.5 min (0.027-0.038%ID/cc) followed by rapid clearance (t {sub 1/2}<15 min), resulting in low brain retention by 30 min. However, after 30 min, [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 continued to clear while [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 plateaued, suggesting the entry of a labeled metabolite into the brain. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics of the two labeled metabolites confirmed expected higher brain uptake and retention of [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]2-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21) relative to [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]4-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21), which had negligible brain uptake. Ex vivo studies in mice showed that GTS-21 is the major chemical form in the mouse brain. Whole-body dynamic PET imaging in baboon and mouse showed that the major route of excretion of C-11 is through the gallbladder. Conclusions: The major findings are as follows: (a) extremely rapid uptake and clearance of [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 from the brain, which may need to be considered in developing optimal dosing of GTS-21 for patients, and (b) significant brain uptake of 2-OH-GTS-21

  4. Synthesis and PET studies of [11C-cyano]letrozole (Femara®), an aromatase inhibitor drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Kun-Eek; Biegon, Anat; Ding, Yu-Shin; Fischer, Andre; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Kim, Sung Won; Pareto, Deborah; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 family, converts androgens such as androstenedione and testosterone to estrone and estradiol respectively. Letrozole (1-[bis-(4-cyanophenyl)methyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole, Femara®) is a high affinity aromatase inhibitor (Ki=11.5 nM) which has FDA approval for breast cancer treatment. Here we report the synthesis of carbon-11 labeled letrozole and its assessment as a radiotracer for brain aromatase in the baboon. Methods Letrozole and its precursor (4-[(4-bromophenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl]benzonitrile, 3) were prepared in two-step syntheses from 4-cyanobenzyl bromide and 4-bromobenzyl bromide, respectively. The [11C]cyano group was introduced via the tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) catalyzed coupling of [11C]cyanide with the bromo-precursor (3). PET studies in the baboon brain were carried out to assess regional distribution and kinetics, reproducibility of repeated measures and saturability. The free fraction of letrozole in the plasma, log D, and the [11C-cyano]letrozole fraction in the arterial plasma were also measured. Results [11C-cyano]Letrozole was synthesized in 60 min with a radiochemical yield of 79–80%, with a radiochemical purity greater than 98% and a specific activity of 4.16±2.21 Ci/μmol at the end of bombardment (n=4). PET studies in the baboon revealed initial rapid and high uptake and initial rapid clearance followed by slow clearance of carbon-11 from the brain with no difference between brain regions. The brain kinetics was not affected by co-injection of unlabeled letrozole (0.1 mg/kg). The free fraction of letrozole in plasma was 48.9% and log D was 1.84. Conclusion [11C-cyano]Letrozole is readily synthesized via a palladium catalyzed coupling reaction with [11C]cyanide. Although it is unsuitable as a PET radiotracer for brain aromatase as revealed by the absence of regional specificity and saturability in brain regions, such as amygdala, which are known to contain

  5. PBN (Phenyl-N-Tert-Butylnitrone-Derivatives Are Effective in Slowing the Visual Cycle and Rhodopsin Regeneration and in Protecting the Retina from Light-Induced Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Stiles

    Full Text Available A2E and related toxic molecules are part of lipofuscin found in the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in eyes affected by Stargardt's disease, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and other retinal degenerations. A novel therapeutic approach for treating such degenerations involves slowing down the visual cycle, which could reduce the amount of A2E in the RPE. This can be accomplished by inhibiting RPE65, which produces 11-cis-retinol from all-trans-retinyl esters. We recently showed that phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN inhibits RPE65 enzyme activity in RPE cells. In this study we show that like PBN, certain PBN-derivatives (PBNDs such as 4-F-PBN, 4-CF3-PBN, 3,4-di-F-PBN, and 4-CH3-PBN can inhibit RPE65 and synthesis of 11-cis-retinol in in vitro assays using bovine RPE microsomes. We further demonstrate that systemic (intraperitoneal, IP administration of these PBNDs protect the rat retina from light damage. Electroretinography (ERG and histological analysis showed that rats treated with PBNDs retained ~90% of their photoreceptor cells compared to a complete loss of function and 90% loss of photoreceptors in the central retina in rats treated with vehicle/control injections. Topically applied PBN and PBNDs also significantly slowed the rate of the visual cycle in mouse and baboon eyes. One hour dark adaptation resulted in 75-80% recovery of bleachable rhodopsin in control/vehicle treated mice. Eye drops of 5% 4-CH3-PBN were most effective, inhibiting the regeneration of bleachable rhodopsin significantly (60% compared to vehicle control. In addition, a 10% concentration of PBN and 5% concentration of 4-CH3-PBN in baboon eyes inhibited the visual cycle by 60% and by 30%, respectively. We have identified a group of PBN related nitrones that can reach the target tissue (RPE by systemic and topical application and slow the rate of rhodopsin regeneration and therefore the visual cycle in mouse and baboon eyes. PBNDs can also protect the rat

  6. Brain kinetics of methylphenidate (Ritalin) enantiomers after oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Gatley, S John; Thanos, Panayotis K; Shea, Colleen; Garza, Victor; Xu, Youwen; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Warner, Don; Taintor, Nicholas B; Park, Daniel J; Pyatt, Bea; Fowler, Joanna S; Volkow, Nora D

    2004-09-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) (Ritalin) is widely used for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is a chiral drug, marketed as the racemic mixture of d- and l-threo enantiomers. Our previous studies (PET and microdialysis) in humans, baboons, and rats confirm the notion that pharmacological specificity of MP resides predominantly in the d-isomer. A recent report that intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered l-threo-MP displayed potent, dose-dependent inhibition of cocaine- or apomorphine-induced locomotion in rats, raises the question of whether l-threo-MP has a similar effect when given orally. It has been speculated that l-threo-MP is poorly absorbed in humans when it is given orally because of rapid presystemic metabolism. To investigate whether l-threo-MP or its metabolites can be delivered to the brain when it is given orally, and whether l-threo-MP is pharmacologically active. PET and MicroPET studies were carried out in baboons and rats using orally delivered C-11-labeled d- and l-threo-MP ([methyl-(11)C]d-threo-MP and [methyl-(11)C]l-threo-MP). In addition, we assessed the effects of i.p. l-threo-MP on spontaneous and cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity in mice. There was a higher global uptake of carbon-11 in both baboon and rat brain for oral [(11)C]l-threo-MP than for oral [(11)C]d-threo-MP. Analysis of the chemical form of radioactivity in rat brain after [(11)C]d-threo-MP indicated mainly unchanged tracer, whereas with [(11)C]l-threo-MP, it was mainly a labeled metabolite. The possibility that this labeled metabolite might be [(11)C]methanol or [(11)C]CO(2), derived from demethylation, was excluded by ex vivo studies in rats. When l-threo-MP was given i.p. to mice at a dose of 3 mg/kg, it neither stimulated locomotor activity nor inhibited the increased locomotor activity due to cocaine administration. These results suggest that, in animal models, l-threo-MP or its metabolite(s) is (are) absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and

  7. Tomographic measurement of cerebral blood flow by the /sup 68/Ga-labelled-microsphere and continuous-C/sup 15/O/sub 2/-inhalation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinling, M.; Baron, J.C.; Maziere, B.; Loc' h, C.; Lasjaunias, P.; Canabis, E.A.; Guillon, B.

    1985-05-01

    The measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by continuous C/sup 15/O/sub 2/ inhalation has only been validated previously by indirect experimental protocols. In the present study using baboons, these measurements were compared directly with those obtained by injection of /sup 68/Ga-labelled serum-albumin microspheres in the left cardiac ventricle. Using a modified labelling technique, no elution of /sup 68/Ga occurred in vivo. Both methods provided similar regional CBF values, which could be described by a significant linear correlation (CBFsub(CO2) = 0.82 CBFsub(microspheres)+5.7; P < 0.001). The validity of the labelled-microsphere-injection method was verified. The feasibility of stable in vivo labelling of /sup 68/Ga to serum-albumin microspheres provides a reference method for organ blood-flow measurements using positron-emission tomography.

  8. Tomographic measurement of cerebral blood flow by the /sup 68/Ga-labelled-microsphere and continuous-C/sup 15/O/sub 2/-inhalation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinling, M.; Baron, J.C.; Maziere, B.; Loc' h, C.; Lasjaunias, P.; Canabis, E.A.; Guillon, B.

    1985-07-01

    The measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by continuous C/sup 15/O/sub 2/ inhalation has only been validated previously by indirect experimental protocols. In the present study using baboons, these measurements were compared directly with those obtained by injection of /sup 68/Ga-labelled serum-albumin microspheres in the left cardiac ventricle. Using a modified labelling technique, no elution of /sup 68/Ga occurred in vivo. Both methods provided similar regional CBF values, which could be described by a significant linear correlation (CBFsub(CO2)=0.82 CBFsub(microspheres)+5.7; P < 0.001). The validity of the labelled-microsphere-injection method was verified. The feasibility of stable in vivo labelling of /sup 68/Ga to serum-albumin microspheres provides a reference method for organ blood-flow measurements using positron-emission tomography.

  9. Loa loa and Onchocerca ochengi miRNAs detected in host circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritten, Lucienne; O'Neill, Maeghan; Nutting, Chuck; Wanji, Samuel; Njouendoui, Abdel; Fombad, Fanny; Kengne-Ouaffo, Jonas; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    A combination of deep-sequencing and bioinformatics analysis enabled identification of twenty-two microRNA candidates of potential nematode origin in plasma from Loa loa-infected baboons and a further ten from the plasma of an Onchocerca ochengi-infected cow. The obtained data were compared to results from previous work on miRNA candidates from Dirofilaria immitis and O. volvulus found in host circulating blood, to examine the species specificity of the released miRNA. None of the miRNA candidates was found to be present in all four host-parasite scenarios and most of them were specific to only one of them. Eight candidate miRNAs were found to be identical in the full sequence in at least two different infections, while nine candidate miRNAs were found to be similar but not identical in at least four filarial species.

  10. Incorporating the Hayflick Limit into a model of Telomere Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cyrenne, Benoit M

    2013-01-01

    A model of telomere dynamics is proposed and examined. Our model, which extends a previously introduced two-compartment model that incorporates stem cells as progenitors of new cells, imposes the Hayflick Limit, the maximum number of cell divisions that are possible. This new model leads to cell populations for which the average telomere length is not necessarily a monotonically decreasing function of time, in contrast to previously published models. We provide a phase diagram indicating where such results would be expected. In addition, qualitatively different results are obtained for the evolution of the total cell population. Last, in comparison to available leukocyte baboon data, this new model is shown to provide a better fit to biological data.

  11. The Influence of Facial Characteristics on the Relation between Male 2D:4D and Dominance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ryckmans

    Full Text Available Although relations between 2D:4D and dominance rank in both baboons and rhesus macaques have been observed, evidence in humans is mixed. Whereas behavioral patterns in humans have been discovered that are consistent with these animal findings, the evidence for a relation between dominance and 2D:4D is weak or inconsistent. The present study provides experimental evidence that male 2D:4D is related to dominance after (fictitious male-male interaction when the other man has a dominant, but not a submissive or neutral face. This finding provides evidence that the relationship between 2D:4D and dominance emerges in particular, predictable situations and that merely dominant facial characteristics of another person are enough to activate supposed relationships between 2D:4D and dominance.

  12. Acceleration of Directional Medain Filter Based Deinterlacing Algorithm (DMFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addanki Purna Ramesh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel directional median filter based deinterlacing algorithm (DMFD. DMFD is a content adaptive spatial deinterlacing algorithm that finds the direction of the edge and applies the median filtering along the edge to interpolate the odd pixels from the 5 pixels from the upper and 5 pixels from the lower even lines of the field. The proposed algorithm gives a significance improvement of 3db for baboon standard test image that has high textured content compared to CADEM, DOI, and MELA and also gives improved average PSNR compared previous algorithms. The algorithm written and tested in C and ported onto Altera’s NIOS II embedded soft processor and configured in CYCLONE-II FPGA. The ISA of Nios-II processor has extended with two additional instructions for calculation of absolute difference and minimum of four numbers to accelerate the FPGA implementation of the algorithms by 3.2 times

  13. Ex vivo expansion of Primate CD34+ Cells isolated from Bone Marrow and Human Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells using a Novel Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaprasad D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow derived CD34+ cells have been in clinical application in patients with haematological malignancies. One of the major problems with this treatment is the non-availability of matched donors or the necessity of multiple transfusions depending upon the pathology. Recently evidences have been accumulating to prove the safety and efficacy of autologous CD34+ cells in diseases such as myocardial dysfunction, peripheral vascular diseases and neurological certain conditions. However there are only a few reports in the literature on ex vivo expansion of the bone marrow derived CD34+ cells. We have in two different studies proven that isolated CD34+ cells from baboon bone marrow and non-isolated BMMNCs from human bone marrow could be expanded with increase in percentage of CD34+ cells using a novel scaffold.

  14. Evaluation of the Extension of the Cerebral Blood Flow and its Main Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Gersten, A

    1999-01-01

    Among the major factors controlling the cerebral blood flow (CBF) - cerebral perfusion pressure, arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), cerebral metabolism, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), and cardiac output, the effect of PaCO2 is peculiar in being independent of autoregulatory CBF mechanisms and it allows to explore the full range of the CBF. We have developed a simple physical model, and have derived a simple four parameter formula, relating the CBF to PaCO2. The parameters can be extracted in an easy way, directly from the experimental data. With this model five experimental data sets of human, rats, baboons and dogs were well fitted. The same type of parametrization was also used successfully for fitting experimental data of PaO2 of dogs. We have also looked on the dependence of the parameters on other factors and were able to evaluate their dependence on the mean arterial blood pressure.

  15. Radiotracers in PETT: strategies for in vivo receptor activity, Schizophernia, and Alzheimer's Dementia studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    Using /sup 18/F-spiperone, a one compartment system with a driving function as model, blocking agents such as butaclamol and ketanserin, assay of the live adult female baboon striatum over the 8 h period, and assay of the parent compound in plasma, it is apparent that residence times in the living tissue and those estimated from in vitro tritium data are at variance. Occupancy rises to a maximum for /sup 18/F benperidol and /sup 18/F haloperidol after approx. 25 minutes and for /sup 18/F spiperone after approx. 75 minutes, but the striatum concentration of /sup 18/F-spiperone and benperiodol remain nearly constant over an eight hour period whereas /sup 18/F haloperidol concentration starts falling almost immediately to half its maximum value at 8 hrs. The best fit to our current data gives a preliminary off rate constant of 0.0057 min/sup -1/.

  16. Bordetella pertussis transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Elizabeth A; Nicholson, Tracy L; Merkel, Tod J

    2015-11-01

    Bordetella pertussis and B. bronchiseptica are Gram-negative bacterial respiratory pathogens. Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough and is considered a human-adapted variant of B. bronchiseptica. Bordetella pertussis and B. bronchiseptica share mechanisms of pathogenesis and are genetically closely related. However, despite the close genetic relatedness, these Bordetella species differ in several classic fundamental aspects of bacterial pathogens such as host range, pathologies and persistence. The development of the baboon model for the study of B. pertussis transmission, along with the development of the swine and mouse model for the study of B. bronchiseptica, has enabled the investigation of different aspects of transmission including the route, attack rate, role of bacterial and host factors, and the impact of vaccination on transmission. This review will focus on B. pertussis transmission and how animal models of B. pertussis transmission and transmission models using the closely related B. bronchiseptica have increased our understanding of B. pertussis transmission.

  17. Importance of (antibody-dependent) complement-mediated serum killing in protection against Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurtsen, Jeroen; Fae, Kellen C; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P J M

    2014-10-01

    Pertussis is a highly contagious respiratory disease that is caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite being vaccine preventable, pertussis rates have been rising steadily over the last decades, even in areas with high vaccine uptake. Recently, experiments with infant baboons indicated that although vaccination with acellular pertussis vaccines prevented disease, no apparent effect was observed on infection and transmission. One explanation may be that current acellular pertussis vaccines do not induce high levels of opsonophagocytic and/or bactericidal activity, implying that engineering of vaccines that promote bacterial killing may improve efficacy. Here, we discuss the importance of complement-mediated killing in vaccine-induced protection against B. pertussis. We first examine how B. pertussis may have evolved different complement evasion strategies. Second, we explore the benefits of opsonophagocytic and/or bactericidal killing in vaccine-induced protection and discuss whether or not inclusion of new opsonophagocytic or bactericidal target antigens in pertussis vaccines may benefit efficacy.

  18. Herpesvirus infections in xenotransplantation: pathogenesis and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nicolas J; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-11-01

    Infectious risk remains an important consideration in the clinical application of xenotransplantation. Vascularized xenografts create unique immunological niches in which bidirectional transmission of pathogens between donor and recipient may occur. Enhanced replication of many pathogens is stimulated by the immune responses induced by transplantation and by the immune suppression used to prevent graft rejection. Herpesviruses are the prototype viruses that are activated during immunosuppression. Quantitative diagnostic molecular assays have been developed for the known herpesviruses causing infection in pigs. Recent data suggest that some herpesviral infections, such as porcine cytomegalovirus, may be excluded from swine used as source animals by careful breeding, while others will require novel strategies for control. This review focuses on porcine and baboon herpesviruses in pig-to-non-human primate solid organ xenotransplantation including direct effects (tissue damage), indirect effects (coagulopathy, rejection), and possible approaches to these infections.

  19. Infection with A2 Hong Kong influenza virus in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniker, C K; Nair, C M

    1970-01-01

    The antigenic relationship of A2 Hong Kong influenza virus with equine influenza virus, and its ability to infect horses and baboons, have led to studies on the susceptibility of domestic animals to the virus.In this study it was found that cats could be infected with A2 Hong Kong influenza virus by intranasal inoculation or by contact with an infected cat or with a human influenza patient. There was no clinical illness, but infected animals shed the virus from the throat for 1 week and developed haemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies. A survey of normal cat sera showed that 6 out of 28 sera inhibited haemagglutination by A2 Hong Kong influenza virus.The results suggest that domestic cats may act as vectors in the transmission of influenza virus. Experimental infection in cats may be used as a laboratory model for influenza.

  20. Infection with A2 Hong Kong influenza virus in domestic cats*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniker, C. K. J.; Nair, C. M. G.

    1970-01-01

    The antigenic relationship of A2 Hong Kong influenza virus with equine influenza virus, and its ability to infect horses and baboons, have led to studies on the susceptibility of domestic animals to the virus. In this study it was found that cats could be infected with A2 Hong Kong influenza virus by intranasal inoculation or by contact with an infected cat or with a human influenza patient. There was no clinical illness, but infected animals shed the virus from the throat for 1 week and developed haemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies. A survey of normal cat sera showed that 6 out of 28 sera inhibited haemagglutination by A2 Hong Kong influenza virus. The results suggest that domestic cats may act as vectors in the transmission of influenza virus. Experimental infection in cats may be used as a laboratory model for influenza. PMID:5314017

  1. Rapid Characterization of S. mansoni Expression Library Clones of Potential Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KANAMURA Herminia Yohko

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A S. mansoni adult worm cDNA expression library was screened with sera from baboons in a early phase after infection. The clones that were positive with the early infection sera were examined for reactivity with pre-infection sera and heterologous infection sera. In order to discriminate a positive antibody reaction from the reactivity due to residual anti-E. coli antibodies, an unrelated cDNA clone was plated with the positive clone. The unrelated clone provided the negative background and the contrast necessary to discern a positive antibody reaction. In this way, we were able to eliminate selected clones that were positive with the pre-infection sera or heterologous infection sera. This characterization of the expression library clones enabled us to quickly target only clones with the desired pattern of antibody reactivity for sequencing, subcloning, and expressing

  2. Radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F] N-(3-Fluoropropyl)-2-{beta}-Carbomethoxy-3-{beta}-(4-Bromophenyl) Nortropane and the regional brain uptake in non human primate using PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaly, Thomas E-mail: tchaly@nshs.edu; Baldwin, R.M.; Neumeyer, John L.; Hellman, Matthew J.; Dhawan, Vijay; Garg, Pradeep K.; Tamagnan, Gilles; Staley, Julie K.; Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S.; Hou, Yankun; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Gu Xiaohui; Zong, R.; Eidelberg, David

    2004-01-01

    A synthetic procedure for the preparation of [{sup 18}F]FPCBT, an imaging agent for the dopamine transporter (DAT), has been developed. The radiosynthesis was carried out in a two step procedure. Even though the yield was low, we were able to prepare 20 to 30mCi of the product, which was enough for two or three studies. The radiochemical purity was greater than 96%. The in vivo properties of this radiotracer were evaluated using baboon and it showed highest uptake in the striatum. The studies also revealed that the maximum uptake was reached within 7 to 10 minutes post injection. Plasma metabolite analysis indicated that there is only one metabolite and it is less lipophilic than the parent compound. [{sup 18}F]FPCBT displayed good brain uptake and its high target to non target ratio indicate that it is a potential candidate for DAT imaging.

  3. Effect of Noise on hidden data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Tomar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper simulates an effective data hiding technique i.e. steganography based on LSB insertion and RSA encryption in order to provide seven million times better security than the previous work. The Main idea of proposed scheme is to encrypt secret data by RSA 1024 algorithm, convert it in to binary sequence bit and then embedded into each cover pixels by modifying the least significant bits (LSBs of cover pixels. The result image is also known as steganography image. The PSNR value of this steganography image is 54.34 db. In this paper Baboon image is used for experimental purpous.This steganography image is transmitted through AWGN channel, and performance is simulated. The image and hidden data are reconstructed with the SNR level ≥9 dB.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of primate chorionic villi following ultrasonic microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B F

    1991-01-01

    Villi from human, macaque and baboon placentae were subjected to ultrasonication after prolonged osmication, and examined by scanning electron microscopy. The technique was often successful in removing the overlying trophoblast and revealing expanses of the trophoblastic basal lamina, a conclusion corroborated by transmission electron microscopy. These preparations bore a remarkable similarity in appearance to microvascular cast preparations of the fetal vasculature. Relatively straight parallel tubules appeared to correspond in position to the location of fetal vessels in intermediate villi, whereas portions of the basal laminae of terminal villi were in the form of convoluted, branched cylinders similar to SEM images of fetal capillaries of terminal villi. The basal lamina did not have evidence of pores as has been described in some basal laminae.

  5. Application of palladium-mediated (18F-fluorination to PET radiotracer development: overcoming hurdles to translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam S Kamlet

    Full Text Available New chemistry methods for the synthesis of radiolabeled small molecules have the potential to impact clinical positron emission tomography (PET imaging, if they can be successfully translated. However, progression of modern reactions from the stage of synthetic chemistry development to the preparation of radiotracer doses ready for use in human PET imaging is challenging and rare. Here we describe the process of and the successful translation of a modern palladium-mediated fluorination reaction to non-human primate (NHP baboon PET imaging-an important milestone on the path to human PET imaging. The method, which transforms [(18F]fluoride into an electrophilic fluorination reagent, provides access to aryl-(18F bonds that would be challenging to synthesize via conventional radiochemistry methods.

  6. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled.

  7. First-pass extraction fraction of iodine-123 labeled perfusion tracers in living primate brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moerlein, S.M.; Perlmutter, J.S.; Raichle, M.E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Edward Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology]|[Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). School of Medicine; Welch, M.J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Edward Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology

    1994-08-01

    The cerebral extraction and retention of three radioiodinated SPECT perfusion tracers were measured using residue detection in a baboon. A permeability-surface area product PS` with special relevance to SPECT was calculated from the retention of tracer in the brain after 10 min. PS` differs from the traditional PS value, which is calculated from the tracer clearance curve at 2 min. The PS` values ranged from 50 to 95 mL/min/100 g, decreased in the order [{sup 123}I]IMP > [{sup 123}I]iodoperidol=[{sup 123}I] HIPDM, and did not differ for specific activities of 10 MBq/mmol to 74 TBq/mmol. These radioiodinated compounds exhibited extraction characteristics superior to those of [{sup 99m}Tc]HMPAO but underestimated cerebral blood flow when flows were above 20-30 mL/min/100 g, underscoring the need for development of a more ideal SPECT perfusion tracer. (author).

  8. Sarcocystis nesbitti Infection in Human Skeletal Muscle: Possible Transmission from Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Yee Ling; Chang, Phooi Yee; Tan, Chong Tin; Fong, Mun Yik; Mahmud, Rohela; Wong, Kum Thong

    2014-01-01

    Sarcocystis nesbitti is an intracellular protozoan parasite found as sarcocysts within muscle fibers of intermediate hosts (monkey and baboon). The definitive host is suspected to be the snake. We report two cases from a larger cohort of 89 patients who had fever, headache, and generalized myalgia after a trip to Pangkor Island, Malaysia. Sarcocysts were detected in skeletal muscle biopsy specimens by light and electron microscopy from these two patients. DNA sequencing based on the 18S ribosomal DNA region identified the Sarcocystis species as S. nesbitti. We also identified S. nesbitti sequences in the stools of a snake (Naja naja). Phylogenetic analysis showed that these sequences form a cluster with most of the other known Sarcocystis species for which the snake is a definitive host. We believe these two patients were likely to have symptomatic acute muscular sarcocystosis after S. nesbitti infection that may have originated from snakes. PMID:24420776

  9. Differences in activities of the enzymes of nucleotide metabolism and its implications for cardiac xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, A H Y; Khalpey, Z; Lavitrano, M; McGregor, C G A; Kalsi, K K; Yacoub, M H; Smolenski, R T

    2006-01-01

    Xenotransplantation is one be possible solution for a severe shortage of human organs available for transplantation. However, only a few studies addressed metabolic compatibility of transplanted animal organs. Our aim was to compare activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in the heart of different species that are relevant to clinical or experimental xenotransplantation. We noted fundamental differences: ecto-5' nucleotidease (E5' N) activity was 4-fold lower in pig and baboon hearts compared to the human hearts while mouse activity was compatible with human and rat activity was three times higher than human. There also were significant differences in AMP-deaminase (AMPD), adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) activities. We conclude that differences in nucleotide metabolism may contribute to organ dysfunction after xenotransplantation.

  10. Potential uses of milk epithelial cells: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutinaud, Marion; Jammes, Hélène

    2002-01-01

    Secretions collected from the mammary gland of different species contain heterogeneous populations of cells including lymphocytes, neutrophils, macrophages and epithelial cells in different species. Several factors influence the somatic cell count in milk and the distribution of cell types, such as species, infection status, physiological status and management practices. The epithelial cells are shed into milk during the lactation process. Most of them are viable and exhibit the characteristics of fully differentiated alveolar cells. Primary cultures of epithelial cells from colostrum and milk of humans, baboons, cows and goats together with established cell lines from human and goat milk, provide a good model for the study of lactogenesis, immunity transmission, cancer research and infection by viruses. The RNA extracted from milk cells have been shown to be representative of gene expression in the mammary gland and thus provide a source of material for molecular studies of gene expression and environmental interactions.

  11. Zoonotic viruses associated with illegally imported wildlife products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine M Smith

    Full Text Available The global trade in wildlife has historically contributed to the emergence and spread of infectious diseases. The United States is the world's largest importer of wildlife and wildlife products, yet minimal pathogen surveillance has precluded assessment of the health risks posed by this practice. This report details the findings of a pilot project to establish surveillance methodology for zoonotic agents in confiscated wildlife products. Initial findings from samples collected at several international airports identified parts originating from nonhuman primate (NHP and rodent species, including baboon, chimpanzee, mangabey, guenon, green monkey, cane rat and rat. Pathogen screening identified retroviruses (simian foamy virus and/or herpesviruses (cytomegalovirus and lymphocryptovirus in the NHP samples. These results are the first demonstration that illegal bushmeat importation into the United States could act as a conduit for pathogen spread, and suggest that implementation of disease surveillance of the wildlife trade will help facilitate prevention of disease emergence.

  12. Recent Advances in BLV Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Yves Barez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Different animal models have been proposed to investigate the mechanisms of Human T-lymphotropic Virus (HTLV-induced pathogenesis: rats, transgenic and NOD-SCID/γcnull (NOG mice, rabbits, squirrel monkeys, baboons and macaques. These systems indeed provide useful information but have intrinsic limitations such as lack of disease relevance, species specificity or inadequate immune response. Another strategy based on a comparative virology approach is to characterize a related pathogen and to speculate on possible shared mechanisms. In this perspective, bovine leukemia virus (BLV, another member of the deltaretrovirus genus, is evolutionary related to HTLV-1. BLV induces lymphoproliferative disorders in ruminants providing useful information on the mechanisms of viral persistence, genetic determinants of pathogenesis and potential novel therapies.

  13. Isolation of a simian immunodeficiency virus from a malbrouck (Chlorocebus cynosuros).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael; Kawaguchi, Akira; Sasaki, Michihito; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Ito, Kimihito; Thomas, Yuka; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Zhao, Guoyan; Wang, David; Orba, Yasuko; Ishii, Akihiro; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the diversity of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) among nonhuman primates (NHPs) in Zambia, next-generation sequencing was performed to determine the complete genome sequence of a novel SIV recovered by co-culturing African green monkey (AGM) peripheral blood lymphocytes with human CD4(+) T-cell lines. We report the first described SIV (SIVagmMAL-ZMB) from a malbrouck (Chlorocebus cynosuros). SIVagmMAL-ZMB was detected by real-time PCR analysis of splenic RNA in 3.2% (3/94) of AGMs and was undetectable in baboons (0/105). SIVagmMAL-ZMB possessed <80% nucleotide sequence identity to known SIV isolates and was located basally to vervet monkey SIV strains in all phylogenies.

  14. An ecological and behavioural approach to hominin evolution during the Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Gabriele A.

    2014-07-01

    The study considers the turnover in hominins, together with carnivorans and other primates, at 3.5 Ma against an environmental backdrop. Communalities are identified between evolving guilds that may directly inform hominin evolution. These are the evolution of (a) dietary generalists and (b) evidence for sociality in carnivores, baboons and hominins. Sociality and behavioural flexibility are regarded advantageous for the procurement of resources while, at the same time, reducing intraspecific competition; in primates it may initially also have served to reduce predation risk. Behavioural flexibility explains the evolutionary success of Panthera leo, Papio and Homo. Viewed within a wider palaeoecological and environmental context, it is possible that sociality in hominins, including allocare, were triggered by abiotic changes at about 3.5 Ma. If confirmed in future studies, this would mark the beginning of hominin life history evolution.

  15. Acquired Localized Hypertrichosis Induced by Rivastigmine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernón-Moya, Adrian; Podlipnik, Sebastian; Burgos, Fernando; Vargas-Laguna, Elena; Aguilar-Martínez, Antonio; Fernández-Cogolludo, Eva; Gallego-Valdes, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is the excessive hair growth in any area of the skin surface. Acquired localized hypertrichosis may be secondary to multiple causes and there is a secondary form due to several drugs, which is usually reversible with discontinuation of the causative agent. Rivastigmine is a reversible and competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase used for symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer dementia and Parkinson's disease. It has an adequate safety profile and cutaneous side effects are unusual. Irritant contact dermatitis, allergic dermatitis, baboon syndrome, and cutaneous rash due to rivastigmine have been reported. We report on a Caucasian 80-year-old male with personal history of Alzheimer's disease. The patient started therapy with oral rivastigmine one month prior to clinical presentation of localized hypertrichosis on both forearms. Norgalanthamine has been shown to promote hair growth activity via the proliferation of dermal papilla. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can induce hair growth. PMID:27073702

  16. Acquired Localized Hypertrichosis Induced by Rivastigmine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Imbernón-Moya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrichosis is the excessive hair growth in any area of the skin surface. Acquired localized hypertrichosis may be secondary to multiple causes and there is a secondary form due to several drugs, which is usually reversible with discontinuation of the causative agent. Rivastigmine is a reversible and competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase used for symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer dementia and Parkinson’s disease. It has an adequate safety profile and cutaneous side effects are unusual. Irritant contact dermatitis, allergic dermatitis, baboon syndrome, and cutaneous rash due to rivastigmine have been reported. We report on a Caucasian 80-year-old male with personal history of Alzheimer’s disease. The patient started therapy with oral rivastigmine one month prior to clinical presentation of localized hypertrichosis on both forearms. Norgalanthamine has been shown to promote hair growth activity via the proliferation of dermal papilla. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can induce hair growth.

  17. AcEST: BP917617 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000103_C03 527 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000103_C03. BP917617 - Show BP917617...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000103_C03. Accession BP917617 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig I...323|POL3_DROME Retrovirus-related Pol polyprotein from transposon 17.6 OS=Drosophila melanogaster Align leng..., Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402. Query= BP917617|Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA, clone: YMU001_000103_C03....eukemia... 31 2.9 sp|P10272|POL_BAEVM Pol polyprotein OS=Baboon endogenous virus (... 31 2.9 sp|P317

  18. Molecular characterization of the first polyomavirus from a New World primate: squirrel monkey polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoor, Ernst J; Groenewoud, Marlous J; Fagrouch, Zahra; Kewalapat, Aruna; van Gessel, Sabine; Kik, Marja J L; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2008-01-01

    DNA samples from a variety of New World monkeys were screened by using a broad-spectrum PCR targeting the VP1 gene of polyomaviruses. This resulted in the characterization of the first polyomavirus from a New World primate. This virus naturally infects squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sp.) and is provisionally named squirrel monkey polyomavirus (SquiPyV). The complete genome of SquiPyV is 5,075 bp in length, and encodes the small T and large T antigens and the three structural proteins VP1, VP2 and VP3. Interestingly, the late region also encodes a putative agnoprotein, a feature that it shares with other polyomaviruses from humans, baboons and African green monkeys. Comparison with other polyomaviruses revealed limited sequence similarity to any other polyomavirus, and phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene confirmed its uniqueness.

  19. Characterizing Vocal Repertoires--Hard vs. Soft Classification Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Wadewitz

    Full Text Available To understand the proximate and ultimate causes that shape acoustic communication in animals, objective characterizations of the vocal repertoire of a given species are critical, as they provide the foundation for comparative analyses among individuals, populations and taxa. Progress in this field has been hampered by a lack of standard in methodology, however. One problem is that researchers may settle on different variables to characterize the calls, which may impact on the classification of calls. More important, there is no agreement how to best characterize the overall structure of the repertoire in terms of the amount of gradation within and between call types. Here, we address these challenges by examining 912 calls recorded from wild chacma baboons (Papio ursinus. We extracted 118 acoustic variables from spectrograms, from which we constructed different sets of acoustic features, containing 9, 38, and 118 variables; as well 19 factors derived from principal component analysis. We compared and validated the resulting classifications of k-means and hierarchical clustering. Datasets with a higher number of acoustic features lead to better clustering results than datasets with only a few features. The use of factors in the cluster analysis resulted in an extremely poor resolution of emerging call types. Another important finding is that none of the applied clustering methods gave strong support to a specific cluster solution. Instead, the cluster analysis revealed that within distinct call types, subtypes may exist. Because hard clustering methods are not well suited to capture such gradation within call types, we applied a fuzzy clustering algorithm. We found that this algorithm provides a detailed and quantitative description of the gradation within and between chacma baboon call types. In conclusion, we suggest that fuzzy clustering should be used in future studies to analyze the graded structure of vocal repertoires. Moreover, the use of

  20. Characterizing Vocal Repertoires—Hard vs. Soft Classification Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadewitz, Philip; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Battaglia, Demian; Witt, Annette; Wolf, Fred; Fischer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    To understand the proximate and ultimate causes that shape acoustic communication in animals, objective characterizations of the vocal repertoire of a given species are critical, as they provide the foundation for comparative analyses among individuals, populations and taxa. Progress in this field has been hampered by a lack of standard in methodology, however. One problem is that researchers may settle on different variables to characterize the calls, which may impact on the classification of calls. More important, there is no agreement how to best characterize the overall structure of the repertoire in terms of the amount of gradation within and between call types. Here, we address these challenges by examining 912 calls recorded from wild chacma baboons (Papio ursinus). We extracted 118 acoustic variables from spectrograms, from which we constructed different sets of acoustic features, containing 9, 38, and 118 variables; as well 19 factors derived from principal component analysis. We compared and validated the resulting classifications of k-means and hierarchical clustering. Datasets with a higher number of acoustic features lead to better clustering results than datasets with only a few features. The use of factors in the cluster analysis resulted in an extremely poor resolution of emerging call types. Another important finding is that none of the applied clustering methods gave strong support to a specific cluster solution. Instead, the cluster analysis revealed that within distinct call types, subtypes may exist. Because hard clustering methods are not well suited to capture such gradation within call types, we applied a fuzzy clustering algorithm. We found that this algorithm provides a detailed and quantitative description of the gradation within and between chacma baboon call types. In conclusion, we suggest that fuzzy clustering should be used in future studies to analyze the graded structure of vocal repertoires. Moreover, the use of factor analyses to

  1. Unraveling Host-Vector-Arbovirus Interactions by Two-Gene High Resolution Melting Mosquito Bloodmeal Analysis in a Kenyan Wildlife-Livestock Interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Omondi

    Full Text Available The blood-feeding patterns of mosquitoes are directly linked to the spread of pathogens that they transmit. Efficient identification of arthropod vector bloodmeal hosts can identify the diversity of vertebrate species potentially involved in disease transmission cycles. While molecular bloodmeal analyses rely on sequencing of cytochrome b (cyt b or cytochrome oxidase 1 gene PCR products, recently developed bloodmeal host identification based on high resolution melting (HRM analyses of cyt b PCR products is more cost-effective. To resolve the diverse vertebrate hosts that mosquitoes may potentially feed on in sub-Saharan Africa, we utilized HRM profiles of both cyt b and 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Among 445 blood-fed Aedeomyia, Aedes, Anopheles, Culex, Mansonia, and Mimomyia mosquitoes from Kenya's Lake Victoria and Lake Baringo regions where many mosquito-transmitted pathogens are endemic, we identified 33 bloodmeal hosts including humans, eight domestic animal species, six peridomestic animal species and 18 wildlife species. This resolution of vertebrate host species was only possible by comparing profiles of both cyt b and 16S markers, as melting profiles of some pairs of species were similar for either marker but not both. We identified mixed bloodmeals in a Culex pipiens from Mbita that had fed on a goat and a human and in two Mansonia africana mosquitoes from Baringo that each had fed on a rodent (Arvicanthis niloticus in addition to a human or baboon. We further detected Sindbis and Bunyamwera viruses in blood-fed mosquito homogenates by Vero cell culture and RT-PCR in Culex, Aedeomyia, Anopheles and Mansonia mosquitoes from Baringo that had fed on humans and livestock. The observed mosquito feeding on both arbovirus amplifying hosts (including sheep and goats and possible arbovirus reservoirs (birds, porcupine, baboons, rodents informs arbovirus disease epidemiology and vector control strategies.

  2. Evaluation of a potential generator-produced PET tracer for cerebral perfusion imaging: single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and imaging with radiolabeled Cu-PTSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, C J; Welch, M J; Raichle, M E; Mintun, M A; Lich, L L; McGuire, A H; Zinn, K R; John, E K; Green, M A

    1990-03-01

    Copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM), copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-dimethylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM2), and copper(II) ethylglyoxal bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ETSM), have been proposed as PET tracers for cerebral blood flow (CBF) when labeled with generator-produced 62Cu (t1/2 = 9.7 min). To evaluate the potential of Cu-PTSM for CBF PET studies, baboon single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and PET imaging were carried out with the use of 67Cu (t1/2 = 2.6 days) and 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 hr), respectively. All three chelates were extracted into the brain with high efficiency. There was some clearance of all chelates in the 10-50-sec time frame and Cu-PTSM2 continued to clear. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ETSM have high residual brain activity. PET imaging of baboon brain was carried out with the use of [64Cu]-Cu-PTSM. For comparison with the 64Cu brain image, a CBF (15O-labeled water) image (40 sec) was first obtained. Qualitatively, the H2(15)O and [64Cu]-Cu-PTSM images were very similar; for example, a comparison of gray to white matter uptake resulted in ratios of 2.42 for H2(15)O and 2.67 for Cu-PTSM. No redistribution of 64Cu was observed in 2 hr of imaging, as was predicted from the single-pass study results. Quantitative determination of blood flow using Cu-PTSM showed good agreement with blood flow determined with H2(15)O. This data suggests that [62Cu]-Cu-PTSM may be a useful generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for blood flow studies with PET.

  3. Radiation dosimetry and biodistribution of the beta-amyloid plaque imaging tracer {sup 11}C-BTA-1 in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thees, S. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Neumaier, B.; Glatting, G.; Deisenhofer, S.; Reske, S.N.; Mottaghy, F.M. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Arnim, C.A.F. von [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neurologie

    2007-07-01

    Aim: [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole({sup 11}C-BTA-1)) is a thioflavin-T derivative that has been one of the promising PET tracers for imaging of amyloid plaque distribution in the Alzheimer patients brain in vivo. The biodistribution and dosimetry of this tracer in humans is presented and compared to the results of a previous dosimetry and biodistribution study of another thioflavin-T derivative [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-hydroxy-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole ({sup 11}C-OH-BTA-1)) in baboons. Methods: Five subjects underwent 2D dynamic PET imaging. Source organs were segmented using a semiautomatic algorithm based on clustering. Residence times for each source organ were determined by analytical integration of an exponential fit of the time activity curves. Finally organ doses were estimated using the software OLINDA/EXM. Results: The administration of 286 {+-} 93 MBq {sup 11}C-BTA-1 was well tolerated by all subjects. Effective radiation dose was 4.3 {mu}Sv/MBq, range 3.6-5.0 {mu}Sv/MBq. In four ofthe five subjects the liver, in one of the subjects the gallbladder was the critical organ. Conclusion: The radiation burden of a single dose of 300 MBq {sup 11}C-BTA-1 is within the accepted limits for research purpose. In contrast to the previous non-human primate study revealing the gallbladder as the critical organ for {sup 11}C-6-OH-BTA-1, we found the liver as the critical organ in humans using {sup 11}C-BTA-1. Possible explanations may be (1) a reduced bile concentration of {sup 11}C-BTA-1 due to the absent OH-group or (2) a different hepatic metabolism of thioflavin derivatives in human and baboon. (orig.)

  4. Imaging opiate receptors with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wong, D.F.; Links, J.M.; Burns, H.D.; Kuhar, M.J.; Snyder, S.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Opiate receptors exist in the mammalian brain and are thought to meditate the diverse pharmacological actions of the opiates, such as analgesia, euphoria, and sedation. The 4-carbomethoxyl derivatives of fentanyl, such as lofentanil and R31833 (4-carbomethoxyfentanyl) bind to the opiate receptor with high affinity. C-11 R31833 was synthesized by reacting C-11 methyl iodide with the appropriate carboxylate. Male ICR mice were injected intravenously with C-11 R31833 (5..mu..g/kg), killed 30 minutes later, and the brains rapidly dissected. The thalami, striata, and cerebral cortex are rich in opiate receptors, but the cerebellum contains a very low concentration of opiate receptors. The thalamus/cerebellum and striatum/cerebellum activity ratios, calculated per mg of wet tissue, were 4.1 and 5.2 respectively. Coinjection of 5mg/kg naloxone reduced the ratios to 1.1, which indicates that the preferential localization of C-11 R31833 in the thalami and striata is due to binding to opiate is due to binding to opiate receptors. A 22 kg anesthetized male baboon was imaged using the NeuroECAT after injection of 18.9 mCi of C-11 R13833 (0.50 ..mu..g/kg, specific activity 616 Ci/mmole at time of injection). From 15-70 minutes after injection preferential accumulation of activity could be seen in the thalami, caudate nuclei, and cerebral cortex and, conversely, low activity was demonstrated in the cerebellum. At one hour postinjection the maximum measured caudate/cerebellum activity ratio per pixel was 2.9. For the NeuroECAT the recovery coefficient for the baboon caudate is ca. 0.2-0.3, and therefore the actual caudate/cerebellum ratio is ca. 10-15.

  5. New primate model for the study of intravenous thrombotic potential and its modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoenfeld, N.A.; Yeager, A.; Connolly, R.; Ramberg, K.; Forgione, L.; Giorgio, A.; Valeri, C.R.; Callow, A.D.

    1988-07-01

    Advances in venous reconstruction have been limited by inherent venous thrombogenicity and the absence of a suitable prosthetic material for use in the venous system. We have designed an in vivo experimental model to evaluate early blood-material interactions within the venous system and to quantitate drug efficacy in the alteration of platelet function and fibrin deposition in the baboon. An 8F catheter was placed percutaneously in the femoral vein of an adult male baboon. Indium 111-labeled autogenous platelets or iodine 125-labeled human fibrinogen was infused before the introduction, into the inferior vena cava, of a linear array of 5 x 15 mm alternating Dacron and polytetrafluoroethylene samples attached to a benzalkonium-heparin-treated guide wire. At 60 or 120 minutes the samples were removed and a 1 ml aliquot of blood was drawn. The materials and blood samples were counted in a gamma well counter, and the material counts were normalized to the circulating label present in the 1 ml blood sample. The experiment was repeated after pretreatment with heparin, aspirin, or dextran. Whole blood clotting times and bleeding times were monitored. The results showed decreased platelet and fibrin deposition on polytetrafluoroethylene when compared with Dacron in the venous system. Aspirin, heparin, and dextran were all found to decrease platelet and fibrin deposition onto intravenously placed graft material samples (p less than 0.05, Student's t test). The data confirm the ability of the model to evaluate quantitatively anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, and prospective graft materials for use in venous reconstructions.

  6. Developmental biomechanics of the cervical spine: Tension and compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuckley, David J; Ching, Randal P

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological data and clinical indicia reveal devastating consequences associated with pediatric neck injuries. Unfortunately, neither injury prevention nor clinical management strategies will be able to effectively reduce these injuries or their effects on children, without an understanding of the cervical spine developmental biomechanics. Thus, we investigated the relationship between spinal development and the functional (stiffness) and failure biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine in a baboon model. A correlation study design was used to define the relationships between spinal tissue maturation and spinal biomechanics in both tension and compression. Eighteen baboon cervical spine specimens distributed across the developmental spectrum (1-26 human equivalent years) were dissected into osteoligamentous functional spinal units. Using a servo-hydraulic MTS, these specimens (Oc-C2, C3-C4, C5-C6, C7-T1) were non-destructively tested in tension and compression and then displaced to failure in tension while measuring the six-axes of loads and displacements. The functions describing the developmental biomechanical response of the cervical spine for stiffness and normalized stiffness exhibited a significant direct relationship in both tension and compression loading. Similarly, the tensile failure load and normalized failure load demonstrated significant maturational increases. Further, differences in biomechanical response were observed between the spinal levels examined and all levels exhibited clinically relevant failure patterns. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental biomechanics perspective and facilitate the development of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects.

  7. Repurposed automated handheld counter as a point-of-care tool to identify individuals 'at risk' of serious post-ivermectin encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasisekhar Bennuru

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Administration of ivermectin (IVM as part of mass drug administration (MDA campaigns for onchocerciasis and/or lymphatic filariasis (LF has been suspended in areas co-endemic for Loa loa due to severe post-treatment adverse events (SAEs associated with high-burden of infection (>30,000 mf/ml. One simple approach for preventing SAEs is to identify and exclude individuals at risk from MDA. Here, we describe a repurposed hand-held automated cell counter (Scepter 2.0; HHAC as a rapid, point-of-care method for quantifying microfilariae (mf in the blood of infected individuals.The quantification of microfilarial levels in blood of naturally infected humans, experimentally infected baboons, or mf-spiked human blood was tested using a microfluidic-based automated counter and compared to traditional calibrated thick-smears. We demonstrate that mf can be quantified in 20 µl of whole blood following lysis with 10% saponin within a minute of obtaining blood. There was a highly significant concordance between the counts obtained by the HHAC and those by microscopy for mf densities of >5,000 (p30,000 per ml (p<0.0001, r(c = 0.90. Preliminary proof of concept field studies in Cameroon with 20 µl of blood from L. loa infected humans (n = 22 and baboons (n = 4 also demonstrated a significantly high concordance (p<0.0001, r(c = 0.89 with calibrated thick blood smears counts.A repurposed HHAC is a portable, sensitive, rapid, point-of-care and quantitative tool to identify individuals with high levels of L. loa mf that put them at risk for SAEs following MDA. In addition, it provides ease of data storage and accessibility.

  8. Nodular Worm Infections in Wild Non-human Primates and Humans Living in the Sebitoli Area (Kibale National Park, Uganda: Do High Spatial Proximity Favor Zoonotic Transmission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Cibot

    Full Text Available Nodular Oesophagostomum genus nematodes are a major public health concern in some African regions because they can be lethal to humans. Their relatively high prevalence in people has been described in Uganda recently. While non-human primates also harbor Oesophagostomum spp., the epidemiology of this oesophagostomosis and the role of these animals as reservoirs of the infection in Eastern Africa are not yet well documented.The present study aimed to investigate Oesophagostomum infection in terms of parasite species diversity, prevalence and load in three non-human primates (Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis, Colobus guereza and humans living in close proximity in a forested area of Sebitoli, Kibale National Park (KNP, Uganda. The molecular phylogenetic analyses provided the first evidence that humans living in the Sebitoli area harbored O. stephanostomum, a common species in free-ranging chimpanzees. Chimpanzees were also infected by O. bifurcum, a common species described in human populations throughout Africa. The recently described Oesophagostomum sp. found in colobine monkeys and humans and which was absent from baboons in the neighboring site of Kanyawara in KNP (10 km from Sebitoli, was only found in baboons. Microscopic analyses revealed that the infection prevalence and parasite load in chimpanzees were significantly lower in Kanyawara than in Sebitoli, an area more impacted by human activities at its borders.Three different Oesophagostomum species circulate in humans and non-human primates in the Sebitoli area and our results confirm the presence of a new genotype of Oesophagostomum recently described in Uganda. The high spatiotemporal overlap between humans and chimpanzees in the studied area coupled with the high infection prevalence among chimpanzees represent factors that could increase the risk of transmission for O. stephanostomum between the two primate species. Finally, the importance of local-scale research for zoonosis risk

  9. Unraveling Host-Vector-Arbovirus Interactions by Two-Gene High Resolution Melting Mosquito Bloodmeal Analysis in a Kenyan Wildlife-Livestock Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omondi, David; Masiga, Daniel K; Ajamma, Yvonne Ukamaka; Fielding, Burtram C; Njoroge, Laban; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2015-01-01

    The blood-feeding patterns of mosquitoes are directly linked to the spread of pathogens that they transmit. Efficient identification of arthropod vector bloodmeal hosts can identify the diversity of vertebrate species potentially involved in disease transmission cycles. While molecular bloodmeal analyses rely on sequencing of cytochrome b (cyt b) or cytochrome oxidase 1 gene PCR products, recently developed bloodmeal host identification based on high resolution melting (HRM) analyses of cyt b PCR products is more cost-effective. To resolve the diverse vertebrate hosts that mosquitoes may potentially feed on in sub-Saharan Africa, we utilized HRM profiles of both cyt b and 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Among 445 blood-fed Aedeomyia, Aedes, Anopheles, Culex, Mansonia, and Mimomyia mosquitoes from Kenya's Lake Victoria and Lake Baringo regions where many mosquito-transmitted pathogens are endemic, we identified 33 bloodmeal hosts including humans, eight domestic animal species, six peridomestic animal species and 18 wildlife species. This resolution of vertebrate host species was only possible by comparing profiles of both cyt b and 16S markers, as melting profiles of some pairs of species were similar for either marker but not both. We identified mixed bloodmeals in a Culex pipiens from Mbita that had fed on a goat and a human and in two Mansonia africana mosquitoes from Baringo that each had fed on a rodent (Arvicanthis niloticus) in addition to a human or baboon. We further detected Sindbis and Bunyamwera viruses in blood-fed mosquito homogenates by Vero cell culture and RT-PCR in Culex, Aedeomyia, Anopheles and Mansonia mosquitoes from Baringo that had fed on humans and livestock. The observed mosquito feeding on both arbovirus amplifying hosts (including sheep and goats) and possible arbovirus reservoirs (birds, porcupine, baboons, rodents) informs arbovirus disease epidemiology and vector control strategies.

  10. Placental Estrogen Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression in the Nonhuman Primate Fetal Adrenal Cortex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W.; Pepe, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy. PMID:25247468

  11. Placental estrogen suppresses cyclin D1 expression in the nonhuman primate fetal adrenal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W; Pepe, Gerald J; Albrecht, Eugene D

    2014-12-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27(Kip1) and p57(Kip2) were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy.

  12. SPECT imaging with the serotonin transporter radiotracer [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT in nonhuman primate brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, Kelly P., E-mail: kelly.cosgrove@yale.ed [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Staley, Julie K.; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Bois, Frederic [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Plisson, Christophe [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S. [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Seibyl, John P. [Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Goodman, Mark M. [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Tamagnan, Gilles D. [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Introduction: Serotonin dysfunction has been linked to a variety of psychiatric diseases; however, an adequate SPECT radioligand to probe the serotonin transporter system has not been successfully developed. The purpose of this study was to characterize and determine the in vivo selectivity of iodine-123-labeled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane, [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT, in nonhuman primate brain. Methods: Two ovariohysterectomized female baboons participated in nine studies (one bolus and eight bolus to constant infusion at a ratio of 9.0 h) to evaluate [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT. To evaluate the selectivity of [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT, the serotonin transporter blockers fenfluramine (1.5, 2.5 mg/kg) and citalopram (5 mg/kg), the dopamine transporter blocker methylphenidate (0.5 mg/kg) and the norepinephrine transporter blocker nisoxetine (1 mg/kg) were given at 8 h post-radiotracer injection. Results: In the bolus to constant infusion studies, equilibrium was established by 4-8 h. [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT was 93% and 90% protein bound in the two baboons and there was no detection of lipophilic radiolabeled metabolites entering the brain. In the high-density serotonin transporter regions (diencephalon and brainstem), fenfluramine and citalopram resulted in 35-71% and 129-151% displacement, respectively, whereas methylphenidate and nisoxetine did not produce significant changes (<10%). Conclusion: These findings suggest that [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT is a favorable compound for in vivo SPECT imaging of serotonin transporters with negligible binding to norepinephrine and dopamine transporters.

  13. Unraveling Host-Vector-Arbovirus Interactions by Two-Gene High Resolution Melting Mosquito Bloodmeal Analysis in a Kenyan Wildlife-Livestock Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omondi, David; Masiga, Daniel K.; Ajamma, Yvonne Ukamaka; Fielding, Burtram C.; Njoroge, Laban; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2015-01-01

    The blood-feeding patterns of mosquitoes are directly linked to the spread of pathogens that they transmit. Efficient identification of arthropod vector bloodmeal hosts can identify the diversity of vertebrate species potentially involved in disease transmission cycles. While molecular bloodmeal analyses rely on sequencing of cytochrome b (cyt b) or cytochrome oxidase 1 gene PCR products, recently developed bloodmeal host identification based on high resolution melting (HRM) analyses of cyt b PCR products is more cost-effective. To resolve the diverse vertebrate hosts that mosquitoes may potentially feed on in sub-Saharan Africa, we utilized HRM profiles of both cyt b and 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Among 445 blood-fed Aedeomyia, Aedes, Anopheles, Culex, Mansonia, and Mimomyia mosquitoes from Kenya’s Lake Victoria and Lake Baringo regions where many mosquito-transmitted pathogens are endemic, we identified 33 bloodmeal hosts including humans, eight domestic animal species, six peridomestic animal species and 18 wildlife species. This resolution of vertebrate host species was only possible by comparing profiles of both cyt b and 16S markers, as melting profiles of some pairs of species were similar for either marker but not both. We identified mixed bloodmeals in a Culex pipiens from Mbita that had fed on a goat and a human and in two Mansonia africana mosquitoes from Baringo that each had fed on a rodent (Arvicanthis niloticus) in addition to a human or baboon. We further detected Sindbis and Bunyamwera viruses in blood-fed mosquito homogenates by Vero cell culture and RT-PCR in Culex, Aedeomyia, Anopheles and Mansonia mosquitoes from Baringo that had fed on humans and livestock. The observed mosquito feeding on both arbovirus amplifying hosts (including sheep and goats) and possible arbovirus reservoirs (birds, porcupine, baboons, rodents) informs arbovirus disease epidemiology and vector control strategies. PMID:26230507

  14. The paradox of human equivalent dose formula: A canonical case study of abrus precatorius aqueous leaf extract in monogastric animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saganuwan Alhaji Saganuwan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is abundant literature on the toxicity of A. precatorius seeds. However there is a need to define the toxicity limit of the Abrus precatorius leaf in monogastric animals. Human Equivalent Dose (HED which is equal to animal dose multiplied by animal km (metabolism constant divided by human km was used to project the LD50 of fifteen monogastric animals , where human km factor is body weight (kg divided by body surface area (m2. Human Equivalent No-observable Adverse Effect Doses were determined by multiplying the animal no-observable adverse effect dose by animal weight (Wa divided by human weight (Wh. The LD50 of the aqueous leaf extract of Abrus precatorius in mice was estimated to be between 2559.5 and 3123.3 mg/kg body weight. The LD50 extrapolated from mouse to rat (1349.3-1646.6 mg/kg, hamster (1855.3-2264.1 mg/kg, guinea pig (1279.5-1561.4 mg/kg, rabbit (618.4-754.7 mg/kg, monkey (593.7-724.5 mg/kg, cat (392.7-479.2 mg/kg, dog and baboon (371.1-452.8 mg/kg, child (297-362 mg/kg and adult human (197.8-241.5 mg/kg body weight respectively could be a reality. The therapeutic safe dose range for the animals was 1-12.5 mg/kg body weight for a period of 7 days, but at a dose (≤ 200 mg/kg body weight the leaf extract showed haematinic effect. However, at a higher dose (> 200 mg/kg, the extract showed haemolytic activity in rats, whereas at a dose (≥25.0 mg/kg, the leaf extract might be organotoxic in hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, monkey, cat, dog, baboon, child and adult human if administered orally for a period of 7 days.

  15. A Non-Human Primate Model of Severe Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Luis F.; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Hinojosa, Cecilia A.; Soni, Nilam J.; Shenoy, Anukul T.; Gilley, Ryan P.; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Noda, Julio R.; Winter, Vicki T.; de la Garza, Melissa A.; Shade, Robert E.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Anzueto, Antonio; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and infectious death in adults worldwide. A non-human primate model is needed to study the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of severe pneumonia, identify diagnostic tools, explore potential therapeutic targets, and test clinical interventions during pneumococcal pneumonia. Objective To develop a non-human primate model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Seven adult baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were surgically tethered to a continuous monitoring system that recorded heart rate, temperature, and electrocardiography. Animals were inoculated with 109 colony-forming units of S. pneumoniae using bronchoscopy. Three baboons were rescued with intravenous ampicillin therapy. Pneumonia was diagnosed using lung ultrasonography and ex vivo confirmation by histopathology and immunodetection of pneumococcal capsule. Organ failure, using serum biomarkers and quantification of bacteremia, was assessed daily. Results Challenged animals developed signs and symptoms of pneumonia 4 days after infection. Infection was characterized by the presence of cough, tachypnea, dyspnea, tachycardia and fever. All animals developed leukocytosis and bacteremia 24 hours after infection. A severe inflammatory reaction was detected by elevation of serum cytokines, including Interleukin (IL)1Ra, IL-6, and IL-8, after infection. Lung ultrasonography precisely detected the lobes with pneumonia that were later confirmed by pathological analysis. Lung pathology positively correlated with disease severity. Antimicrobial therapy rapidly reversed symptomology and reduced serum cytokines. Conclusions We have developed a novel animal model for severe pneumococcal pneumonia that mimics the clinical presentation, inflammatory response, and infection kinetics seen in humans. This is a novel model to test vaccines and treatments, measure biomarkers to diagnose pneumonia, and predict outcomes. PMID:27855182

  16. Characterization of bromine-76-labelled 5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine for PET studies of the serotonin transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundkvist, Camilla E-mail: Lundkvis@shfj.cea.fr; Loc' h, Christian; Halldin, Christer; Bottlaender, Michel; Ottaviani, Michele; Coulon, Christine; Fuseau, Chantal; Mathis, Chester; Farde, Lars; Maziere, Bernard

    1999-07-01

    The development of suitable radioligands for brain imaging of the serotonin transporter is of great importance for the study of depression and other affective disorders. The potent and selective serotonin transporter ligand, 5-iodo-6-nitro-2-piperazinylquinoline, has been labelled with iodine-123 and used as a radioligand for single photon emission computerized tomography. To evaluate the potential of the bromine-76-labelled analogue, 5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine, as a radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET), its brain distribution and binding characteristics were examined in rats. In vivo brain distribution and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine enters the brain rapidly. The regional brain distribution of [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine was consistent with the known distribution of serotonin transporters in the midbrain, pons, thalamus, striatum, and neocortex. Specific binding was inhibited by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram. The peripheral metabolism in plasma was rapid, but more than 90% of the radioactivity in brain represented unchanged radioligand 2 h postinjection (p.i.). A preliminary PET study was also performed in a baboon. Following the intravenous injection of [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine in a baboon, there was a conspicuous accumulation of radioactivity in thalamus, striatum, and pons. The radioactivity in these brain regions was 1.5 times higher than in the cerebellum at 3 h and 2.5-4 times higher at 24 h. A rapid metabolism of the radioligand in plasma was observed (38% unchanged after 5 min). The results indicate that [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine has potential for PET imaging of the serotonin transporter.

  17. Candidate PET radioligands for cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors: [{sup 18}F]AM5144 and related pyrazole compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zizhong [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Gifford, Andrew [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Liu Qian [Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thotapally, Rajesh [Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ding Yushin [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Makriyannis, Alexandros [Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Gatley, S. John [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)]. E-mail: s.gatley@neu.edu

    2005-05-01

    Introduction: The mammalian brain contains abundant G protein-coupled cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors that respond to {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol, the active ingredient of cannabis. The availability of a positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand would facilitate studies of the addictive and medicinal properties of compounds that bind to this receptor. Among the known classes of ligands for CB{sub 1} receptors, the pyrazoles are attractive targets for radiopharmaceutical development because they are antagonists and are generally less lipophilic than the other classes. Methods: A convenient high-yield synthesis of N-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorophenyl)-5-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)- 1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM5144) was devised by coupling the appropriate pyrazole-3-carboxyl chloride compound with 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoroaniline. The labeled precursor was synthesized from 1-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-4-nitrobenzene in 60% radiochemical yield for 10 min using an improved procedure involving sodium borohydride reduction with cobalt chloride catalysis. The product was purified by HPLC to give a specific activity >400 mCi/{mu}mol and a radiochemical purity >95%, and a PET study was conducted in a baboon. Results: Although the regional uptake of AM5144 in baboon brain was consistent with binding to cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors, absolute uptake at <0.003% injected radioactivity per cubic centimeter was lower than the previously reported uptake of the radioiodinated pyrazole AM281. Conclusions: The relatively poor brain uptake of AM5144 and other pyrazole CB{sub 1} receptor ligands is not surprising because of their high lipophilicity as compared with most brain PET radiotracers. However, for nine pyrazole compounds for which rodent data are available, brain uptake and calculated logP values are not correlated. Thus, high logP values should not preclude evaluation of radiotracers for targets such as the CB{sub 1} receptor that may require very lipophilic ligands.

  18. Protective Potential of Antioxidant Enzymes as Vaccines for Schistosomiasis in a Non-Human Primate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Queiroz, Claudia; Nyakundi, Ruth; Ogongo, Paul; Rikoi, Hitler; Egilmez, Nejat K.; Farah, Idle O.; Kariuki, Thomas M.; LoVerde, Philip T.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a major cause of morbidity in the world. The challenge today is not so much in the clinical management of individual patients, but rather in population-based control of transmission in endemic areas. Despite recent large-scale efforts, such as integrated control programs aimed at limiting schistosomiasis by improving education and sanitation, molluscicide treatment programs and chemotherapy with praziquantel, there has only been limited success. There is an urgent need for complementary approaches, such as vaccines. We demonstrated previously that anti-oxidant enzymes, such as Cu–Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S peroxidase (GPX), when administered as DNA-based vaccines induced significant levels of protection in inbred mice, greater than the target 40% reduction in worm burden compared to controls set as a minimum by the WHO. These results led us to investigate if immunization of non-human primates with antioxidants would stimulate an immune response that could confer protection as a prelude study for human trials. Issues of vaccine toxicity and safety that were difficult to address in mice were also investigated. All baboons in the study were examined clinically throughout the study and no adverse reactions occurred to the immunization. When our outbred baboons were vaccinated with two different formulations of SOD (SmCT-SOD and SmEC-SOD) or one of GPX (SmGPX), they showed a reduction in worm number to varying degrees, when compared with the control group. More pronounced, vaccinated animals showed decreased bloody diarrhea, days of diarrhea, and egg excretion (transmission), as well as reduction of eggs in the liver tissue and in the large intestine (pathology) compared to controls. Specific IgG antibodies were present in sera after immunizations and 10 weeks after challenge infection compared to controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, mesenteric, and inguinal node cells from vaccinated animals proliferated and

  19. In vivo evaluation of [{sup 11}C]N-(2-chloro-5-thiomethylphenyl)-N'- (3-methoxy-phenyl)-N'-methylguanidine ([{sup 11}C]GMOM) as a potential PET radiotracer for the PCP/NMDA receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterhouse, Rikki N. E-mail: rnw7@columbia.edu; Slifstein, Mark; Dumont, Filip; Zhao Jun; Chang, Raymond C.; Sudo, Yasuhiko; Sultana, Abida; Balter, Andrew; Laruelle, Marc

    2004-10-01

    The development of imaging methods to measure changes in NMDA ion channel activation would provide a powerful means to probe the mechanisms of drugs and device based treatments (e.g., ECT) thought to alter glutamate neurotransmission. To provide a potential NMDA/PCP receptor PET tracer, we synthesized the radioligand [{sup 11}C]GMOM (K{sub i} = 5.2 {+-}0.3 nM; log P = 2.34) and evaluated this ligand in vivo in awake male rats and isoflurane anesthetized baboons. In rats, the regional brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]GMOM ranged from 0.75{+-}0.13% ID/g in the medulla and pons to 1.15{+-}0.17% ID/g in the occipital cortex. MK801 (1 mg/kg i.v.) significantly reduced (24-28%) [{sup 11}C]GMOM uptake in all regions. D-serine (10 mg/kg i.v.) increased [{sup 11}C]GMOM %ID/g values in all regions (10-24%) reaching significance in the frontal cortex and cerebellum only. The NR2B ligand RO 25-6981 (10 mg/kg i.v.) reduced [{sup 11}C]GMOM uptake significantly (24-38%) in all regions except for the cerebellum and striatum. Blood activity was 0.11{+-}0.03 %ID/g in the controls group and did not vary significantly across groups. PET imaging in isoflurane-anesthetized baboons with high specific activity [{sup 11}C]GMOM provided fairly uniform regional brain distribution volume (V{sub T}) values (12.8-17.1 ml g{sup -1}). MK801 (0.5 mg/kg, i.v., n = 1, and 1.0 mg/kg, i.v., n = 1) did not significantly alter regional V{sub T} values, indicating a lack of saturable binding. However, the potential confounding effects associated with ketamine induction of anesthesia along with isoflurane maintenance must be considered because both agents are known to reduce NMDA ion channel activation. Future and carefully designed studies, presumably utilizing an optimized NMDA/PCP site tracer, will be carried out to further explore these hypotheses. We conclude that, even though [{sup 11}C]GMOM is not an optimized PCP site radiotracer, its binding is altered in vivo in awake rats as expected by modulation of

  20. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of [O-methyl-{sup 11}C](2R,4R)-4-hydroxy-2-[2-[2-[2-(3-methoxy)phenyl]ethyl]phenoxy] ethyl-1-methylpyrrolidine as a 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor PET ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, J.S. Dileep [Dept. of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]|[Div. of Brain Imaging, Dept. of Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]. E-mail: dk2038@columbia.edu; Prabhakaran, Jaya [Dept. of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Erlandsson, Kjell [Dept. of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]|[Dept. of Radiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Majo, Vattoly J. [Dept. of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Simpson, Norman R. [Dept. of Radiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Pratap, Mali [Dept. of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]|[Div. of Brain Imaging, Dept. of Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Heertum, Ronald L. van [Dept. of Radiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Mann, J. John [Dept. of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]|[Dept. of Radiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]|[Div. of Brain Imaging, Dept. of Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Parsey, Ramin V. [Dept. of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]|[Div. of Brain Imaging, Dept. of Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    The serotonin{sub 2A} (5-HT{sub 2A}) receptor is implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and mood disorders, and in vivo studies of this receptor would be of value in studying the pathophysiology of these disorders and in measuring the relationship of clinical response to receptor occupancy for 5-HT{sub 2A} antagonists such as atypical antipsychotics. Therefore, (2R,4R)-4-hydroxy-2-[2-[2-[2-(3-methoxy)-phenyl]ethyl] phenoxy]ethyl-1-methylpyrrolidine (MPM) (13), a selective and high-affinity (K {sub i}=0.79 nM) 5HT{sub 2A} antagonist, has been radiolabeled with carbon-11 by O-methylation of the corresponding desmethyl analogue (2R,4R)-4-hydroxy-2-[2-[2-[2-(3-hydroxy)phenyl]ethyl]phenoxy] ethyl-1-methylpyrrolidine (12) with [{sup 11}C]methyltriflate in order to determine the suitability of [{sup 11}C]MPM to quantify 5-HT{sub 2A} in living brain using PET. Desmethyl-MPM 12 and standard MPM were prepared, starting from 3-hydroxymethylphenol (2), in excellent yield. The yield obtained for radiolabeling was 40{+-}5% (EOB), and the total synthesis time was 30 min at EOS. PET studies with [{sup 11}C]MPM in baboon showed a distribution in the brain consistent with the known distribution of 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors. The time-activity curves for the high-binding regions peaked at {approx}45 min after injection. Blocking studies with M100907 demonstrated not only 38-57% blocking of tracer binding in brain regions known to have 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors but also 38% blocking in cerebellum, which has a low 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor concentration. Although [{sup 11}C]MPM exhibits appropriate kinetics in baboon for imaging 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors, its specific binding in cerebellum and higher proportion of nonspecific binding limit its usefulness for the in vivo quantification of 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors with PET.

  1. Anatomy of large animal spines and its comparison to the human spine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Yi-Fei

    2010-01-01

    Animal models have been commonly used for in vivo and in vitro spinal research. However, the extent to which animal models resemble the human spine has not been well known. We conducted a systematic review to compare the morphometric features of vertebrae between human and animal species, so as to give some suggestions on how to choose an appropriate animal model in spine research. A literature search of all English language peer-reviewed publications was conducted using PubMed, OVID, Springer and Elsevier (Science Direct) for the years 1980-2008. Two reviewers extracted data on the anatomy of large animal spines from the identified articles. Each anatomical study of animals had to include at least three vertebral levels. The anatomical data from all animal studies were compared with the existing data of the human spine in the literature. Of the papers retrieved, seven were included in the review. The animals in the studies involved baboon, sheep, porcine, calf and deer. Distinct anatomical differences of vertebrae were found between the human and each large animal spine. In cervical region, spines of the baboon and human are more similar as compared to other animals. In thoracic and lumbar regions, the mean pedicle height of all animals was greater than the human pedicles. There was similar mean pedicle width between animal and the human specimens, except in thoracic segments of sheep. The human spinal canal was wider and deeper in the anteroposterior plane than any of the animals. The mean human vertebral body width and depth were greater than that of the animals except in upper thoracic segments of the deer. However, the mean vertebral body height was lower than that of all animals. This paper provides a comprehensive review to compare vertebrae geometries of experimental animal models to the human vertebrae, and will help for choosing animal model in vivo and in vitro spine research. When the animal selected for spine research, the structural similarities and

  2. Do rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) perceive the Zöllner illusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrillo, Christian; Parrish, Audrey E; Beran, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    A long-standing debate surrounds the issue of whether human and nonhuman animals share the same perceptual mechanisms. In humans, the Zöllner illusion occurs when two parallel lines appear to be convergent when oblique crosshatching lines are superimposed. Although one baboon study suggests that they too might perceive this illusion, the results of that study were unclear, whereas two recent studies suggest that birds see this illusion in the opposite direction from humans. It is currently unclear whether these mixed results are an artifact of the experimental design or reflect a peculiarity of birds' visual system or, instead, a wider phenomenon shared among nonhuman mammals. Here, we trained 6 monkeys to select the narrower of two gaps at the end of two convergent lines. Three different conditions were set up: control (no crosshatches), perpendicular (crosshatches not inducing the illusion), and Zöllner (crosshatches inducing the illusion in humans). During training, the degrees of convergence between the two lines ranged from 15° to 12°. Monkeys that reached the training criterion were tested with more difficult discriminations (11°-1°), including probe trials with parallel lines (0°). The results showed that monkeys perceived the Zöllner illusion in the same direction as humans. Comparison of these data with the data from bird studies points toward the existence of different orientation-tuned mechanisms between primate and nonprimate species.

  3. Isolation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 Strain from Fecal Samples of Zoo Animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseel Mohammed Hamzah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains from 22 out of 174 fecal samples from petting zoo animals representing twenty-two different species (camel, lion, goats, zebra, bear, baboon monkey, Siberian monkey, deer, elk, llama, pony, horses, fox, kangaroo, wolf, porcupine, chickens, tiger, ostrich, hyena, dogs, and wildcats were investigated. One petting Al-Zawraa zoological society of Baghdad was investigated for E. coli O157:H7 over a 16-month period that spanned two summer and two autumn seasons. Variation in the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7-positive petting zoo animals was observed, with animals being culture positive only in the summer months but not in the spring, autumn, or winter. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were distinguished by agglutination with E. coli O157:H7 latex reagent (Oxoid, identified among the isolates, which showed that multiple E. coli strains were isolated from one petting zoo animal, in which a single animal simultaneously shed multiple E. coli strains; E. coli O157:H7 was isolated only by selective enrichment culture of 2 g of petting zoo animal feces. In contrast, strains other than O157:H7 were cultured from feces of petting zoo animals without enrichment.

  4. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of [{sup 11}C]zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with agonist properties at central benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, Filip; Waterhouse, Rikki N. E-mail: rnw7@columbia.edu; Montoya, Julie A.; Mattner, Filomena; Katsifis, Andrew; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Laruelle, Marc

    2003-05-01

    The synthesis and evaluation of [{sup 11}C]zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with agonist properties at central benzodiazepine receptors, is reported herein. The reaction of desmethylzolpidem with [{sup 11}C] methyl iodide afforded the title compound [{sup 11}C]zolpidem in a yield of 19.19 {+-} 3.23% in 41 {+-} 2 min in specific activities of 0.995-1.19 Ci/{mu}mol (1.115 {+-} 0.105 Ci/{mu}mol) (n = 3; decay corrected, EOB). The amount of radioactivity in the brain after tail vein injection in male Wistar rats was low, and the regional distribution was homogeneous and not consistent with the known distribution of the central benzodiazepine receptors. The frontal cortex/cerebellum ratio was not significantly greater than one (1.007 {+-} 0.266 at 5 min) and did not increase from 5 to 40 min post-injection. A PET brain imaging study in one baboon confirmed the results obtained in rats. Therefore, it can be concluded that [{sup 11}C]zolpidem is not a suitable tracer for in vivo visualization of central benzodiazepine receptors.

  5. The utility of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta and other non-human primate models for preclinical testing of Leishmania candidate vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Grimaldi Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis causes significant morbidity and mortality, constituting an important global health problem for which there are few effective drugs. Given the urgent need to identify a safe and effective Leishmania vaccine to help prevent the two million new cases of human leishmaniasis worldwide each year, all reasonable efforts to achieve this goal should be made. This includes the use of animal models that are as close to leishmanial infection in humans as is practical and feasible. Old world monkey species (macaques, baboons, mandrills etc. have the closest evolutionary relatedness to humans among the approachable animal models. The Asian rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta are quite susceptible to leishmanial infection, develop a human-like disease, exhibit antibodies to Leishmania and parasite-specific T-cell mediated immune responses both in vivo and in vitro, and can be protected effectively by vaccination. Results from macaque vaccine studies could also prove useful in guiding the design of human vaccine trials. This review summarizes our current knowledge on this topic and proposes potential approaches that may result in the more effective use of the macaque model to maximize its potential to help the development of an effective vaccine for human leishmaniasis.

  6. Authigenic carbonates from active methane seeps offshore southwest Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Catherine; Blanc-Valleron, Marie-Madeleine; Demange, Jérôme; Boudouma, Omar; Foucher, Jean-Paul; Pape, Thomas; Himmler, Tobias; Fekete, Noemi; Spiess, Volkhard

    2012-12-01

    The southwest African continental margin is well known for occurrences of active methane-rich fluid seeps associated with seafloor pockmarks at water depths ranging broadly from the shelf to the deep basins, as well as with high gas flares in the water column, gas hydrate accumulations, diagenetic carbonate crusts and highly diverse benthic faunal communities. During the M76/3a expedition of R/V METEOR in 2008, gravity cores recovered abundant authigenic carbonate concretions from three known pockmark sites—Hydrate Hole, Worm Hole, the Regab pockmark—and two sites newly discovered during that cruise, the so-called Deep Hole and Baboon Cluster. The carbonate concretions were commonly associated with seep-benthic macrofauna and occurred within sediments bearing shallow gas hydrates. This study presents selected results from a comprehensive analysis of the mineralogy and isotope geochemistry of diagenetic carbonates sampled at these five pockmark sites. The oxygen isotope stratigraphy obtained from three cores of 2-5 m length indicates a maximum age of about 60,000-80,000 years for these sediments. The authigenic carbonates comprise mostly magnesian calcite and aragonite, associated occasionally with dolomite. Their very low carbon isotopic compositions (-61.0 Hole and Worm Hole pockmarks which were interpreted to reflect spatiotemporal variations in AOM related to subsurface gas hydrate formation-decomposition.

  7. Folk Narratives and the Reflection of (UTU Humanness in Shaaban Robert Adili na Nduzuze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Madoshi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the novel Adili na Nduguze by Shaaban Robert. It seeks to explain how humanness is embedded in the plot of this prose fiction. The study uses Utu/Ubuntu as a theory of analyzing and explaining the events and the actions within this novel. The focus of the paper is to explore the plot of the novel in order to see how it reflects humanness (Utu/Ubuntu as it is perceived among the Bantu. The analysis is done by examining the reason of characters appellation and the author attention to diction which shows how royal characters intervene a conflict within this creative work. Also the study examines the novel in order to provide an account of the ontological conflict of two opposing beliefs in which a city is turned into stones (Mji Uliogeuka Mawe. Lastly, the paper attempts to inspect and explain reasons why Hasidi and Mwivu, Adili two brothers are turned into baboons, subjected to severe whipping from Adili and the cause of the removal of the curse placed upon them which subsequently makes them humans again.

  8. Pulp response to a composite resin inserted in deep cavities with and without a surface seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuks, A B; Funnell, B; Cleaton-Jones, P

    1990-02-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to observe pulp response to a composite material (Occlusin) placed in deep cavities with and without a zinc oxide-eugenol covering. Deep cavities were prepared in 116 teeth of four young baboons and divided into four groups. In group 1, Occlusin material was placed directly into the cavity, without etching, to approximately half the depth, cured, and covered to the surface with zinc oxide-eugenol. In group 2, the cavities were etched, a bonding agent was applied, and Occlusin material was used and cured in two increments to fill the cavities up to the surface. In group 3, the composite resin was placed in two increments as in group 2, but without etching and bonding; and in group 4 (control), the cavities were filled up to the surface with zinc oxide-eugenol. Follow-up times were 5, 30, and 90 days. Light microscopy revealed that, although some differences were observed, a good pulp response was evident in all groups.

  9. Recombinant human C1-inhibitor inhibits cytotoxicity induced by allo- and xenoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, N; Blancho, G

    2008-03-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is usually poorly controlled, especially in the context of pretransplant immunization, and remains an unsolved issue in xenotransplantation. In order to study prevention and/or treatment of AMR through an early blockade of the complement classical pathway, we designed two strategies to test the effect of a new recombinant human C1-inhibitor that inhibits C1 esterase (rhC1-INH; Pharming, The Netherlands), in a complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay, in the contexts of pretransplant anti-donor alloimmunization and pig-to-primate combinations in order to compare the situations. RhC1-INH appeared to be efficient, in allo- and xenotransplantation settings to block cytotoxicity when given at the initiation of (preventive strategy) or during (curative strategy) the cytotoxicity assay. Importantly, we showed that a small amount of exogenous rhC1-INH was sufficient to prevent cytotoxicity induced by anti-donor alloantibody, thus possibly helping to prevent or treat AMR in preimmunized patients. These in vitro data lead to future in vivo studies in models of AMR in pigs and baboons in allotransplantation and xenotransplantation, in which cytotoxicity due to Gal and non-Gal antibodies is so detrimental.

  10. Coprological study of gastrointestinal parasites of captive animals at Rangpur Recreational Garden and Zoo in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Khatun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in different groups of mammals housed at Rangpur Recreational Garden and Zoo in Bangladesh. A total of 45 fecal samples of different animals (11 carnivores, 26 herbivores and 8 primates were examined from April to September 2011 for the presence of gastrointestinal parasites. The overall prevalence of parasitic infection was 60% (27/45 of which 35.6% (16/45 were helminth infections and 24% (11/45 were protozoic infections. The identified parasites included protozoa (Balantidium coli and Coccidia sp., nematodes (Toxascaris leonina, Toxocara cati, Strongyloides sp., Dictyocaulus sp., Trichuris sp. and stomach worm, cestodes (Spirometra sp. and Moniezia benedeni and trematodes (Fasciola sp.. At least one parasite was identified in the fecal samples of all animals except of the samples from bear, python, water buck and olive baboon. Mixed infections were observed in Rhesus monkey (Trichuris sp. and Balantidium coli, in deer (Strongyloides sp. and Coccidia sp. and in lion (Toxascaris leonina and Spirometra sp.. Helminth infections were more common than protozoic infections in carnivores and herbivores, whereas in primates, protozoic infections were more common than helminth infections. The high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites found in zoo animals in this study emphasizes the importance of controlling these parasitic infections in order to safeguard the health of housed wild animals and of the humans working with these animals.

  11. A brief history of clinical xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David K C; Ekser, Burcin; Tector, A Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Between the 17th and 20th centuries, blood was transfused from various animal species into patients with a variety of pathological conditions. Skin grafts were carried out in the 19th century, with grafts from a variety of animals, with frogs being the most popular. In the 1920s, Voronoff advocated the transplantation of slices of chimpanzee testis into elderly men, believing that the hormones produced by the testis would rejuvenate his patients. In 1963-4, when human organs were not available and dialysis was not yet in use, Reemtsma transplanted chimpanzee kidneys into 13 patients, one of whom returned to work for almost 9 months before suddenly dying from what was believed to be an electrolyte disturbance. The first heart transplant in a human ever performed was by Hardy in 1964, using a chimpanzee heart, but the patient died within 2 h. Starzl carried out the first chimpanzee-to-human liver transplantation in 1966; in 1992 he obtained patient survival for 70 days following a baboon liver transplant. The first clinical pig islet transplant was carried out by Groth in 1993. Today, genetically-modified pigs offer hope of a limitless supply of organs and cells for those in need of a transplant.

  12. Biocompatibility testing of a silicone maxillofacial prosthetic elastomer: soft tissue study in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfaardt, J F; Cleaton-Jones, P; Lownie, J; Ackermann, G

    1992-08-01

    Little information exists on the biocompatibility of maxillofacial prosthetic materials. Cosmesil material is a purpose-designed facial prosthetic elastomer that has an established clinical profile in humans but results of biocompatibility testing have not been published. Cosmesil, acrylic resin (positive control), black surgical gutta-percha (negative control), and Silastic 382 material (Dow Corning, Midland, Mich.) (reference control) were processed as custom-designed implants. The implants were inserted into five chacma baboons for a 12-week period in intraosseous, subperiosteal, submucosal, and intramuscular sites. The histologic assessment was based on a modified form of the FDI-ISO Technical Report 7405 for subcutaneous implants. An evaluation was made of capsule formation and inflammatory response. The statistical analysis involved a three-way ANOVA and a Tukey-Kramer Student range test. The critical level of statistical significance chosen was p less than 0.05. The study found that gutta-percha provoked a statistically significantly thicker capsule and a severe inflammatory response. Acrylic resin, Cosmesil material, and Silastic 382 material produced capsule formations and an inflammatory response that did not differ significantly. Cosmesil material is not manufactured as an implant material, but from the present findings it is considered acceptably biocompatible for its intended use where there may be contact with internal tissue spaces that are contiguous to external surfaces.

  13. Taking sociality seriously: the structure of multi-dimensional social networks as a source of information for individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Louise; Henzi, S Peter; Lusseau, David

    2012-08-01

    Understanding human cognitive evolution, and that of the other primates, means taking sociality very seriously. For humans, this requires the recognition of the sociocultural and historical means by which human minds and selves are constructed, and how this gives rise to the reflexivity and ability to respond to novelty that characterize our species. For other, non-linguistic, primates we can answer some interesting questions by viewing social life as a feedback process, drawing on cybernetics and systems approaches and using social network neo-theory to test these ideas. Specifically, we show how social networks can be formalized as multi-dimensional objects, and use entropy measures to assess how networks respond to perturbation. We use simulations and natural 'knock-outs' in a free-ranging baboon troop to demonstrate that changes in interactions after social perturbations lead to a more certain social network, in which the outcomes of interactions are easier for members to predict. This new formalization of social networks provides a framework within which to predict network dynamics and evolution, helps us highlight how human and non-human social networks differ and has implications for theories of cognitive evolution.

  14. Balancing Ecosystem Services and Disservices: Smallholder Farmers' Use and Management of Forest and Trees in an Agricultural Landscape in Southwestern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tola Gemechu Ango

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Farmers' practices in the management of agricultural landscapes influence biodiversity with implications for livelihoods, ecosystem service provision, and biodiversity conservation. In this study, we examined how smallholding farmers in an agriculture-forest mosaic landscape in southwestern Ethiopia manage trees and forests with regard to a few selected ecosystem services and disservices that they highlighted as "beneficial" or "problematic." Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from six villages, located both near and far from forest, using participatory field mapping and semistructured interviews, tree species inventory, focus group discussions, and observation. The study showed that farmers' management practices, i.e., the planting of trees on field boundaries amid their removal from inside arable fields, preservation of trees in semimanaged forest coffee, maintenance of patches of shade coffee fields in the agricultural landscape, and establishment of woodlots with exotic trees result in a restructuring of the forest-agriculture mosaic. In addition, the strategies farmers employed to mitigate crop damage by wild mammals such as baboons and bush pigs, e.g., migration and allocation of migrants on lands along forests, have contributed to a reduction in forest and tree cover in the agricultural landscape. Because farmers' management practices were overall geared toward mitigating the negative impact of disservices and to augment positive services, we conclude that it is important to operationalize ecosystem processes as both services and disservices in studies related to agricultural landscapes.

  15. PROBLEMAS ALTRUISTAS DARWINIANOS Darwinian Altruistic Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JORGE MARTÍNEZ-CONTRERAS

    Full Text Available Darwin propuso en 1871 que preferiría descender de un mono que de los -salvajes-. El mono es un babuino Papio hamadryas que, en un relato de Brehm, salva a un infante de una jauría. Los -salvajes- son los fueguinos a los que visitó en el año 1833. ¿Por qué Darwin, a pesar de haber sido tan buen observador del comportamiento animal, no pudo discernir en qué consistía la sociedad de cazadores-recolectores de los cuatro grupos humanos de Tierra del Fuego? Esto es lo que tratamos de dilucidar en este trabajo.In 1871 Darwin mentioned that he would rather descent from a monkey than from -savages-. The monkey in question was a Papio hamadryas baboon that, in Brehm's account, saves an infant from a pack of dogs. The -savages- were the now disappeared Fuegians, whom he visited in the Beagle's voyage, in 1833. Why Darwin through he was a very good observer of animal behavior could not discern the social characteristics of the four hunter-gatherer human societies he knew in Tierra del Fuego? Our aim in this work is to try to elucidate this dilemma.

  16. The evolution of primate general and cultural intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Simon M; Hager, Yfke; Laland, Kevin N

    2011-04-12

    There are consistent individual differences in human intelligence, attributable to a single 'general intelligence' factor, g. The evolutionary basis of g and its links to social learning and culture remain controversial. Conflicting hypotheses regard primate cognition as divided into specialized, independently evolving modules versus a single general process. To assess how processes underlying culture relate to one another and other cognitive capacities, we compiled ecologically relevant cognitive measures from multiple domains, namely reported incidences of behavioural innovation, social learning, tool use, extractive foraging and tactical deception, in 62 primate species. All exhibited strong positive associations in principal component and factor analyses, after statistically controlling for multiple potential confounds. This highly correlated composite of cognitive traits suggests social, technical and ecological abilities have coevolved in primates, indicative of an across-species general intelligence that includes elements of cultural intelligence. Our composite species-level measure of general intelligence, 'primate g(S)', covaried with both brain volume and captive learning performance measures. Our findings question the independence of cognitive traits and do not support 'massive modularity' in primate cognition, nor an exclusively social model of primate intelligence. High general intelligence has independently evolved at least four times, with convergent evolution in capuchins, baboons, macaques and great apes.

  17. A web-based brain atlas of the vervet monkey, Chlorocebus aethiops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Roger P; Fears, Scott C; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Fairbanks, Lynn A; Toga, Arthur W; Freimer, Nelson B

    2011-02-01

    Vervet monkeys are a frequently studied animal model in neuroscience research. Although equally distantly related to humans, the ancestors of vervets diverged from those of macaques and baboons more than 11 million years ago, antedating the divergence of the ancestors of humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. To facilitate anatomic localization in the vervet brain, two linked on-line electronic atlases are described, one based on registered MRI scans from hundreds of vervets (http://www.loni.ucla.edu/Research/Atlases/Data/vervet/vervetmratlas/vervetmratlas.html) and the other based on a high-resolution cryomacrotome study of a single vervet (http://www.loni.ucla.edu/Research/Atlases/Data/vervet/vervetatlas/vervetatlas.html). The averaged MRI atlas is also available as a volume in Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative format. In the cryomacrotome atlas, various sulcal and subcortical structures have been anatomically labeled and surface rendered views are provided along the primary planes of section. Both atlases simultaneously provide views in all three primary planes of section, rapid navigation by clicking on the displayed images, and stereotaxic coordinates in the averaged MRI atlas space. Despite the extended time period since their divergence, the major sulcal and subcortical landmarks in vervets are highly conserved relative to those described in macaques.

  18. Influence of skin temperature on central thermoregulatory control of leg blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proppe, D W

    1981-05-01

    This study examined the influence of elevated skin temperature (Tsk) on the central thermoregulatory control of leg blood flow in five unanesthetized, chronically instrumented, resting baboons (Papio anubis and P. cynocephalus). In each experiment, mean iliac blood flow (MIBF), mean arterial blood pressure, arterial blood temperature (Tbl), and Tsk were measured, and iliac vascular conductance (IVC) was calculated. A heat exchanger was incorporated into a chronic arteriovenous femoral shunt to control Tbl. The protocol consisted of raising Tbl approximately 2.6 degrees C in thermoneutral environment (cool Tsk) an then again after Tsk had been elevated by environmental heating. A major influence of raising Tsk was the lowering of threshold Tbl at which the rise in MIBF and IVC commenced. This threshold Tbl was lowered at least 0.8 degrees C on the average. Also, over the whole range of Tbl studied (37.0-39.6 degrees C), MIBF and IVC were higher at high Tsk than at cool Tsk. Thus an elevation of Tsk significantly influences the control of skin blood flow by central thermoreceptors.

  19. Review of the neutrophil response to Bordetella pertussis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Joshua C; Hoffman, Casandra L; Gonyar, Laura A; Hewlett, Erik L

    2015-12-01

    The nature and timing of the neutrophil response to infection with Bordetella pertussis is influenced by multiple virulence factors expressed by the bacterium. After inoculation of the host airway, the recruitment of neutrophils signaled by B. pertussis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is suppressed by pertussis toxin (PTX). Over the next week, the combined activities of PTX, LOS and adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) result in production of cytokines that generate an IL-17 response, promoting neutrophil recruitment which peaks at 10-14 days after inoculation in mice. Arriving at the site of infection, neutrophils encounter the powerful local inhibitory activity of ACT, in conjunction with filamentous hemagglutinin. With the help of antibodies, neutrophils contribute to clearance of B. pertussis, but only after 28-35 days in a naïve mouse. Studies of the lasting, antigen-specific IL-17 response to infection in mice and baboons has led to progress in vaccine development and understanding of pathogenesis. Questions remain about the mediators that coordinate neutrophil recruitment and the mechanisms by which neutrophils overcome B. pertussis virulence factors.

  20. Inter-α inhibitor protein and its associated glycosaminoglycans protect against histone-induced injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaban, Hala; Keshari, Ravi S.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Popescu, Narcis I.; Mehta-D’Souza, Padmaja; Lim, Yow-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular histones are mediators of tissue injury and organ dysfunction; therefore they constitute potential therapeutic targets in sepsis, inflammation, and thrombosis. Histone cytotoxicity in vitro decreases in the presence of plasma. Here, we demonstrate that plasma inter-α inhibitor protein (IAIP) neutralizes the cytotoxic effects of histones and decreases histone-induced platelet aggregation. These effects are mediated through the negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) chondroitin sulfate and high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA) associated with IAIP. Cell surface anionic glycosaminoglycans heparan sulfate and HA protect the cells against histone-mediated damage in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance showed that both IAIP and HMW-HA directly bind to recombinant histone H4. In vivo neutralization of histones with IAIP and HMW-HA prevented histone-induced thrombocytopenia, bleeding, and lung microvascular thrombosis, decreased neutrophil activation, and averted histone-induced production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. IAIP and HMW-HA colocalized with histones in necrotic tissues and areas that displayed neutrophil extracellular traps. Increasing amounts of IAIP-histone complexes detected in the plasma of septic baboons correlated with increase in histones and/or nucleosomes and consumption of plasma IAIP. Our data suggest that IAIP, chondroitin sulfate, and HMW-HA are potential therapeutic agents to protect against histone-induced cytotoxicity, coagulopathy, systemic inflammation, and organ damage during inflammatory conditions such as sepsis and trauma. PMID:25631771

  1. The Reconfigured Body. Human-animal relations in xenotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Hansson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article explores issues concerning the reconfiguration of human and animal bodies in modern biotechnology. The examples are based on xenotransplantation: Transplantation of cells, tissue and organs from animals to humans. Three thematic issues that emerged from xenotransplantation research in Sweden in the 1990s and early 2000s are examined in the article. The first issue concerns how the pig was introduced as a donor animal in xenotransplantation and, at the same time, dehumanized in relation to what is human. Baboons and chimpanzees that had previously been used in xenotransplantation now became an ethically problematic choice, and were in stead humanized. The second issue concerns the introduction of transgenic and cloned pigs as commoditized objects. The biotechnological development reconfigured the pig’s cells, tissue and organs to become more human-like. The third issue concerns the risk that pigs contain retrovirus that could infect the transplanted patients. The human body became part of a network of both animal and retrovirus. Boundlessness between human and animal bodies appears in these three thematic phases and is analysed from a cultural perspective.

  2. Audience effects, but not environmental influences, explain variation in gorilla close distance vocalizations-A test of the acoustic adaptation hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedwig, Daniela; Mundry, Roger; Robbins, Martha M; Boesch, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Close distance vocalizations are an integral part of primate vocal communication. They exhibit large acoustic variation which has been suggested to constitute flexible responses to the highly variable social setting of group living animals. However, a recent study suggested that acoustic variation in close distance calls of baboons may also arise from acoustic adaptations to environmental factors in order to counteract sound degradation. We tested whether the variation in calling rate and acoustic structure of gorilla close distance vocalizations may serve to counteract distorting effects of vegetation during sound propagation. Using focal animal sampling we recorded the vocal behavior of 15 adult individuals living in two groups: one group of western lowland gorillas Gorilla gorilla gorilla and one group of mountain gorillas Gorilla beringei beringei. We considered the distance between the caller and its nearest neighbor as the minimum transmission distance of calls; while vegetation density was quantified through measures of visibility. Our analysis revealed vocal plasticity in gorilla close calls in relation to changes in visibility and nearest neighbor distance. However, the observed changes in fundamental frequency and calling rate are unlikely to counteract degrading effects of vegetation, but rather seem to reflect reactions to variation in spatial and visual separation from other group members, similar to the audience effects demonstrated in a range of other species. We propose that vocal plasticity to counteract distorting environmental effects may not be prevalent across taxa and perhaps confined to species living in heterogeneous habitats with highly variable transmission conditions.

  3. Minimally modified low density lipoprotein induces monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in human endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, S.D.; Berliner, J.A.; Valente, A.J.; Territo, M.C.; Navab, M.; Parhami, F.; Gerrity, R.; Schwartz, C.J.; Fogelman, A.M.

    1990-07-01

    After exposure to low density lipoprotein (LDL) that had been minimally modified by oxidation (MM-LDL), human endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) cultured separately or together produced 2- to 3-fold more monocyte chemotactic activity than did control cells or cells exposed to freshly isolated LDL. This increase in monocyte chemotactic activity was paralleled by increases in mRNA levels for a monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) that is constitutively produced by the human glioma U-105MG cell line. Antibody that had been prepared against cultured baboon smooth muscle cell chemotactic factor (anti-SMCF) did not inhibit monocyte migration induced by the potent bacterial chemotactic factor f-Met-Leu-Phe. However, anti-SMCF completely inhibited the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the media of U-105MG cells, EC, and SMC before and after exposure to MM-LDL. Moreover, monocyte migration into the subendothelial space of a coculture of EC and SMC that had been exposed to MM-LDL was completely inhibited by anti-SMCF. Anti-SMCF specifically immunoprecipitated 10-kDa and 12.5-kDa proteins from EC. Incorporation of (35S)methionine into the immunoprecipitated proteins paralleled the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the medium of MM-LDL stimulated EC and the levels of MCP-1 mRNA found in the EC. We conclude that SMCF is in fact MCP-1 and MCP-1 is induced by MM-LDL.

  4. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Synthesis of ethyl 8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-(/sup 11/C)methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,5-a)(1,4)benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate (RO 15. 1788-/sup 11/C): a specific radioligand for the in vivo study of central benzodiazepine receptors by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziere, M.; Hantraye, P.; Prenant, C.; Sastre, J.; Comar, D. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1984-10-01

    A method of labelling ethyl 8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-(/sup 11/C) methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,5-a)(1,4)benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate (RO 15.1788 /sup 11/C), a benzodiazepine antagonist with carbon-11 has been developed. RO 15.1788-/sup 11/C was prepared by methylation of the nor derivative by I/sup 11/CH/sub 3/. About 100 mCi (maximum 153 mCi, 5.66 GBq) of the chemically and radiochemically pure labelled product were obtained within 25 min with a specific activity on average of 1100 mCi/..mu.. mol (maximum 1740 mCi/..mu..mol-64.4 GBq/..mu..mol). Preliminary results obtained after i.v. administration in the baboon have shown RO 15.1788-/sup 11/C to be of interest as a benzodiazepine radioligand for the in vivo study of benzodiazepine receptors by positron emission tomography.

  6. Synthesis of [{sup 11}C]-S21007 a novel 5HT{sub 3} partial agonist as a potential tracer for PET studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillouet, S.; Barre, L.; Gourand, F. [CEA Centre de Cyceron, 14 -Caen (France); Lasne, M.C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 14 - Caen (France); Rault, S. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Faculte de Pharmacie

    1996-04-01

    5HT{sub 3} receptors have been the focus of much research during the last decade. The presence of these receptors has been demonstrated in many neuronal tissues, both in periphery and in the CNS. The identification of selective agonists and antagonists for this receptor subtype has allowed the discovery of several important new therapeutic applications as the inhibition of pain, migraine, cytotoxic and radiation-induced emesis and treatment of psychoses and anxiety. The first 5HT{sub 3} antagonist labelled with a {beta}+ emitter atom was [{sup 11}C]MDL72222. The PET studies which have been performed with it in the brain of baboon (distribution, kinetics and binding) have established that it was not a good radioligand to detect a specific binding, due to its high lipophilicity. Other radioligands have been developed since, but their affinities for 5HT{sub 3} receptors PET studies have not been demonstrated. Among a series of of tricyclic piperazine derivatives synthesized, S21007 has been described as a novel selective and partial agonist which possesses a good affinity for 5HT{sub 3} receptors (IC{sub 50} = 1nM) versus other 5HT subtypes studied where IC{sub 50} > 1{mu}M. We report here the radiosynthesis of [{sup 11}C]S21007. (author).

  7. Isolation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 strain from fecal samples of zoo animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Hamzah, Aseel; Mohammed Hussein, Aseel; Mahmoud Khalef, Jenan

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains from 22 out of 174 fecal samples from petting zoo animals representing twenty-two different species (camel, lion, goats, zebra, bear, baboon monkey, Siberian monkey, deer, elk, llama, pony, horses, fox, kangaroo, wolf, porcupine, chickens, tiger, ostrich, hyena, dogs, and wildcats) were investigated. One petting Al-Zawraa zoological society of Baghdad was investigated for E. coli O157:H7 over a 16-month period that spanned two summer and two autumn seasons. Variation in the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7-positive petting zoo animals was observed, with animals being culture positive only in the summer months but not in the spring, autumn, or winter. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were distinguished by agglutination with E. coli O157:H7 latex reagent (Oxoid), identified among the isolates, which showed that multiple E. coli strains were isolated from one petting zoo animal, in which a single animal simultaneously shed multiple E. coli strains; E. coli O157:H7 was isolated only by selective enrichment culture of 2 g of petting zoo animal feces. In contrast, strains other than O157:H7 were cultured from feces of petting zoo animals without enrichment.

  8. Eye Contact Is Crucial for Referential Communication in Pet Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savalli, Carine; Resende, Briseida; Gaunet, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Dogs discriminate human direction of attention cues, such as body, gaze, head and eye orientation, in several circumstances. Eye contact particularly seems to provide information on human readiness to communicate; when there is such an ostensive cue, dogs tend to follow human communicative gestures more often. However, little is known about how such cues influence the production of communicative signals (e.g. gaze alternation and sustained gaze) in dogs. In the current study, in order to get an unreachable food, dogs needed to communicate with their owners in several conditions that differ according to the direction of owners’ visual cues, namely gaze, head, eyes, and availability to make eye contact. Results provided evidence that pet dogs did not rely on details of owners’ direction of visual attention. Instead, they relied on the whole combination of visual cues and especially on the owners’ availability to make eye contact. Dogs increased visual communicative behaviors when they established eye contact with their owners, a different strategy compared to apes and baboons, that intensify vocalizations and gestures when human is not visually attending. The difference in strategy is possibly due to distinct status: domesticated vs wild. Results are discussed taking into account the ecological relevance of the task since pet dogs live in human environment and face similar situations on a daily basis during their lives. PMID:27626933

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of inhaled [11C]butane and intravenously injected [11C]acetone as potential radiotracers for studying inhalant abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, Madina R; Ferrieri, Richard A; Pareto, Deborah; Logan, Jean; Alexoff, David; Ding, Yu-Shin

    2005-02-01

    The phenomenon of inhalant abuse is a growing problem in the US and many countries around the world. Yet, relatively little is known about the pharmacokinetic properties of inhalants that underlie their abuse potential. While the synthesis of 11C-labeled toluene, acetone and butane has been proposed in the literature, none of these compounds has been developed as radiotracers for PET studies. In the present report we extend our previous studies with [11C]toluene to include [11C]acetone and [11C]butane with the goal of comparing the pharmacokinetic profiles of these three volatile abused substances. Both [11C]toluene and [11C]acetone were administered intravenously and [11C]butane was administered via inhalation to anesthesized baboons. Rapid and efficient uptake of radiolabeled toluene and acetone into the brain was followed by fast clearance in the case of toluene and slower kinetics in the case of acetone. [11C]Butane was detected in the blood and brain following inhalation, but the levels of radioactivity in both tissues dropped to half of the maximal values over the period of less than a minute. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study of the in vivo brain pharmacokinetics of labeled acetone and butane in nonhuman primates. These data provide insight into the pharmacokinetic features possibly associated with the abuse liability of toluene, acetone and butane.

  10. Design, synthesis, and structure-affinity relationships of regioisomeric N-benzyl alkyl ether piperazine derivatives as sigma-1 receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Iman A; Banister, Samuel D; Beinat, Corinne; Giboureau, Nicolas; Reynolds, Aaron J; Kassiou, Michael

    2010-08-26

    A series of N-(benzofuran-2-ylmethyl)-N'-benzylpiperazines bearing alkyl or fluoroalkyl aryl ethers were synthesized and evaluated at various central nervous system receptors. Examination of in vitro sigma1 {[3H]+-pentazocine} and sigma2 ([3H]DTG) receptor binding profiles of piperazines 11-13 and 25-36 revealed several highly potent and sigma1 selective ligands, notably, N-(benzofuran-2-ylmethyl)-N'-(4'-methoxybenzyl)piperazine (13, Ki=2.7 nM, sigma2/sigma1=38) and N-(benzofuran-2-ylmethyl)-N'-(4'-(2''-fluoroethoxy)benzyl)piperazine (30, Ki=2.6 nM, sigma2/sigma1=187). Structural features for optimal sigma1 receptor affinity and selectivity over the sigma2 receptor were identified. On the basis of its favorable log D value, 13 was selected as a candidate for the development of a sigma1 receptor positron emission tomography radiotracer. [11C]13 showed high uptake in the brain and other sigma receptor-rich organs of a Papio hamadryas baboon. The in vivo evaluation of [11C]13 indicates that this radiotracer is a suitable candidate for imaging the sigma1 receptor in neurodegenerative processes.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine as a PET tracer for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y.-S. E-mail: ding@bnl.gov; Liu, N.; Wang, T.; Marecek, J.; Garza, V.; Ojima, I.; Fowler, J.S

    2000-05-01

    Both ABT-594 ((R)-2-chloro-5-(2-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine) and A-85380 (3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine), novel nicotinic agonists that possess potent non-opioid analgesic properties, have high affinity for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) but do not elicit the pronounced toxicity of epibatidine. 6-[{sup 18}F]Fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380), a F-18 labeled analogue of these two compounds, is therefore a promising radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) studies in humans. The use of trimethylammonium as a leaving group in nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions has proven to be a versatile and efficient strategy, and offers several advantages over other leaving groups. Here, we report the synthetic strategy for the preparation of a precursor, as a trimethylammonium iodide salt, and its use in the radiosynthesis to 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380. Preliminary comparative PET studies of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 and 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 were carried out in baboon to examine their suitability as tracers for studying nAChR system.

  12. Wide-field diffuse amacrine cells in the monkey retina contain immunoreactive Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ye; Bordt, Andrea S; Liu, Weiley S; Davis, Elizabeth P; Lee, Stephen J; Tseng, Luke; Chuang, Alice Z; Whitaker, Christopher M; Massey, Stephen C; Sherman, Michael B; Marshak, David W

    2016-10-01

    The goals of this study were to localize the neuropeptide Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) in primate retinas and to describe the morphology, neurotransmitter content and synaptic connections of the neurons that contain it. Using in situ hybridization, light and electron microscopic immunolabeling, CART was localized to GABAergic amacrine cells in baboon retinas. The CART-positive cells had thin, varicose dendrites that gradually descended through the inner plexiform layer and ramified extensively in the innermost stratum. They resembled two types of wide-field diffuse amacrine cells that had been described previously in macaque retinas using the Golgi method and also A17, serotonin-accumulating and waterfall cells of other mammals. The CART-positive cells received synapses from rod bipolar cell axons and made synapses onto the axons in a reciprocal configuration. The CART-positive cells also received synapses from other amacrine cells. Some of these were located on their primary dendrites, and the presynaptic cells there included dopaminergic amacrine cells. Although some CART-positive somas were localized in the ganglion cell layer, they did not contain the ganglion cell marker RNA binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS). Based on these results and electrophysiological studies in other mammals, the CART-positive amacrine cells would be expected to play a major role in the primary rod pathway of primates, providing feedback inhibition to rod bipolar cells.

  13. The case for xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David K C

    2015-04-01

    The availability of organs and cells from deceased humans for transplantation is not meeting the demand. Xenotransplantation, specifically the transplantation of organs and cells from genetically engineered pigs, could resolve this problem. Diabetic monkeys have remained normoglycemic and insulin-independent after pig islet transplantation for >one yr, and a pig heterotopic (non-life-supporting) heart transplant recently reached the one-yr milestone in a baboon. With these encouraging results, why is it that, with some notable exceptions, research into xenotransplantation has received relatively little support by industry, government funding agencies, and medical charitable foundations? Industry appears reluctant to support research that will take more than two to three yr to come to clinical trial, and the funding agencies appear to have been "distracted" by the current appeal of stem cell technology and regenerative medicine. It has only been the willingness of living donors to provide organs that has significantly increased the number of transplants being performed worldwide. These altruistic donations are not without risk of morbidity and even mortality to the donor. Although with the best of intentions, we are therefore traversing the Hippocratic Oath of doctors to "do no harm." This should be a stimulus to fund exploration of alternative approaches, including xenotransplantation.

  14. Monitoring the in vivo and in vitro metabolism of immunomodulators by time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muddiman, D.C.; Gusev, A.I.; Proctor, A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion (TOF-SIMS) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) Mass Spectrometry are emerging as useful methods for the investigation of drugs and metabolites in real biological systems. Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for the analysis of drugs and metabolites that may prove to be a viable alternative to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and immunoassays (e.g. Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay (FPIA)) in the clinical laboratory. Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a well characterized and extensively used anti-rejection drug with newer agents, such as FK-506, undergoing clinical trials. The therapeutic index of these agents can be improved by understanding the nature of their metabolism and pharmacokinetics. This report expands upon the initial CsA study by monitoring the in vivo metabolism of the drug and quantifying the major metabolite, AMI (M17) in whole blood extracts. Initial MALDI results of the in vitro metabolism of FK-506 using a hepatic microsomal system are also presented. FK-506 metabolism was investigated using Baboon microsomes because FK-506 will be used in xenotransplantation; thus it is important to understand how the drug is metabolized by other species that may serve as donors.

  15. Proteomics of the human endometrial glandular epithelium and stroma from the proliferative and secretory phases of the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Brian L; Liu, Baoquan; Alkhas, Addie; Shoji, Yutaka; Challa, Rusheeswar; Wang, Guisong; Ferguson, Susan; Oliver, Julie; Mitchell, Dave; Bateman, Nicholas W; Zahn, Christopher M; Hamilton, Chad A; Payson, Mark; Lessey, Bruce; Fazleabas, Asgerally T; Maxwell, G Larry; Conrads, Thomas P; Risinger, John I

    2015-04-01

    Despite its importance in reproductive biology and women's health, a detailed molecular-level understanding of the human endometrium is lacking. Indeed, no comprehensive studies have been undertaken to elucidate the important protein expression differences between the endometrial glandular epithelium and surrounding stroma during the proliferative and midsecretory phases of the menstrual cycle. We utilized laser microdissection to harvest epithelial cells and stromal compartments from proliferative and secretory premenopausal endometrial tissue and performed a global, quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis. This analysis identified 1224 total proteins from epithelial cells, among which 318 were differentially abundant between the proliferative and secretory phases (q glandular cells in the secretory phase, was confirmed to be elevated in midsecretory-phase baboon uterine lavage samples and also observed to have an N-linked glycosylated form that was not observed in the proliferative phase. This study provides a detailed view into the global proteomic alterations of the epithelial cells and stromal compartments of the cycling premenopausal endometrium. These proteomic alterations during endometrial remodeling provide a basis for numerous follow-up investigations on the function of these differentially regulated proteins and their role in reproductive biology and endometrial pathologies.

  16. Chorionic gonadotropin and uterine dialogue in the primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strakova Zuzana

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Implantation is a complex spatio-temporal interaction between the growing embryo and the mother, where both players need to be highly synchronized to be able to establish an effective communication to ensure a successful pregnancy. Using our in vivo baboon model we have shown that Chorionic Gonadotropin (CG, as the major trophoblast derived signal, not only rescues the corpus luteum but also modulates the uterine environment in preparation for implantation. This response is characterized by an alteration in both the morphological and biochemical activity in the three major cell types: luminal and glandular epithelium and stromal fibroblasts. Furthermore, CG and factors from the ovary have a synergistic effect on the receptive endometrium. Novel local effects of CG which influence the immune system to permit the survival of the fetal allograft and prevent endometrial cell death are also discussed in this review. An alternate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK activation pathway observed in epithelial endometrial cells and the possibility of differential expression of the CG/LH-R isoforms during gestation, open many questions regarding the mechanism of action of CG and its signal transduction pathway within the primate endometrium.

  17. Estrogen and its role in gastrointestinal health and disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, Aisling M

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: While the concept of a role of estrogen in gastrointestinal (in particular, colonic) malignancy has generated excitement in recent years, no review has examined the role of this potent and omnipresent steroid hormone in physiological states or its contribution to the development of benign pathological processes. Understanding these effects (and mechanisms therein) may provide a platform for a deeper understanding of more complex disease processes. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database and the search terms were "estrogen," "estrogen AND gastrointestinal tract," "estrogen AND colon," "estrogen AND esophagus," "estrogen AND small intestine," "estrogen AND stomach," "estrogen AND gallbladder," and "estrogen AND motility." Bibliographies of extracted studies were further cross-referenced. In all, 136 full-text articles were selected for review. A logical organ-based approach was taken to enable extraction of data of clinical relevance and meaningful interpretation thereof. Insight is provided into the hypotheses, theories, controversies, and contradictions generated over the last five decades by extensive investigation of estrogen in human, animal, and cell models using techniques as diverse as autoradiographic studies of baboons to human population analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Effects from esophagus through to the colon and rectum are summarized in this first concise collection of data pertaining to estrogenic actions in gastrointestinal health and disease. Mechanisms of these actions are discussed where possible. Undoubtedly, this hormone exerts many actions yet to be elucidated, and its potential therapeutic applications remain, as yet, largely unexplored.

  18. Can old-world and new-world monkeys judge spatial above/below relations to be the same or different? Some of them, but not all of them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Roger K R; Flemming, Timothy M; Hagmann, Carl Erick

    2016-02-01

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) with the aid of token training can achieve analogical reasoning, or the ability to understand relations-between-relations (e.g., Premack, 1976; Thompson, Oden, & Boysen, 1997). However, extraordinarily few numbers of old- and new-world monkeys have demonstrated this ability in variants of relational matching to sample tasks. Moreover, the rarity of replications leaves open the question of whether the results are normative for other captive colonies of the same species. In experiment one we attempted to replicate whether old world rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) might demonstrate the same level of proficiency on a spatial above/below relational matching task as reported for old world baboons (Papio papio). None of the rhesus monkeys attained above chance performances over 10,000 training trials. In experiment two we attempted to replicate results demonstrating that new-world capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) match above/below relations. The capuchin monkeys performed above chance only in the absence of 'Clever Hans' controls for cuing of the correct choice by the experimenters. These failures to replicate previously reported results demonstrate that some, but definitely not all monkeys can judge the equivalence of abstract 'relations between relations' and warrant further investigations into the behavioral and cognitive characteristics that underlie these similarities and differences within population and between individuals of different primate species.

  19. Leukocyte accumulation promoting fibrin deposition is mediated in vivo by P-selectin on adherent platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palabrica, Theresa; Lobb, Roy; Furie, Barbara C.; Aronovitz, Mark; Benjamin, Christopher; Hsu, Yen-Ming; Sajer, Susan A.; Furie, Bruce

    1992-10-01

    THE glycoprotein P-selectin is a cell adhesion molecule of stimulated platelets and endothelial cells, which mediates the interaction of these cells with neutrophils and monocytes1,2. It is a membrane component of cell storage granules3-6, and is a member of the selectin family which includes E-selectin and L-selectin7,8. P-selectin recognizes both lineage-specific carbohydrate ligands on monocytes and neutrophils, including the Lewis x antigen, sialic acid, and a protein component9-12. In inflammation and thrombosis, P-selectin may mediate the interaction of leukocytes with platelets bound in the region of tissue injury and with stimulated endothelium1,2. To evaluate the role of P-selectin in platelet-leukocyte adhesion in vivo, the accumulation of leukocytes within an experimental thrombus was explored in an arteriovenous shunt model in baboons13. A Dacron graft implanted within an arteriovenous shunt is thrombogenic, accumulating platelets and fibrin within its lumen. These bound platelets express P-selectin14. Here we show that antibody inhibition of leukocyte binding to P-selectin expressed on platelets immobilized on the graft blocks leukocyte accumulation and inhibits the deposition of fibrin within the thrombus. These results indicate that P-selectin is an important adhesion molecule on platelets, mediating platelet-leukocyte binding in vivo, that the presence of leukocytes in thrombi is mediated by P-selectin, and that these leukocytes promote fibrin deposition.

  20. Mitigating human-wildlife conflicts through wildlife fencing: A Kenyan case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nyongesa Kassilly

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted between May and August 2007 to compare the severity of human-wildlife conflicts among local communities neighbouring a fenced wildlife protected area (Lake Nakuru National Park and an unfenced one (Maasai Mara Game Reserve in Kenya. A self-administered, drop-and-collect questionnaire was used to collect data from 480 (n=600, 80% response rate and 420 (n=600, 70% response rate respondents from communities on the fringes of the National Park and Game Reserve respectively. Five (5 problem species were identified around Lake Nakuru National Park and eighteen (19 around Maasai Mara Game Reserve. Major problem species around Lake Nauru National Park included baboon, warthog and monkey while those around Maasai Mara Game Reserve included elephant, lion, zebra and wildebeest. Major complaints against wildlife included destruction of crops and property, attacking/injuring humans, preying on domestic stock, causing fear among women and children, and being a nuisance. Some wildlife problems were season and location specific. Severity of the human-wildlife conflicts (prominence and intensity of wildlife invasions was higher within the interface area surrounding the unfenced Game Reserve than around the fenced National Park. Fencing was found to effectively control most but not all problem species. Where feasible, it is recommended to form part of the overall problem animal management strategy.

  1. Circulatory filling pressures during transient microgravity induced by parabolic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Ricky D.; Fanton, John W.; White, C. D.; Vernalis, Mariana N.; Crisman, R. P.; Koenig, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical concepts hold that blood in the gravity dependent portion of the body would relocate to more cephalad compartments under microgravity. The result is an increase in blood volume in the thoraic and cardiac chambers. However, experimental data has been somewhat contradictory and nonconclusive. Early studies of peripheral venous pressure and estimates of central venous pressure (CVP) from these data did not show an increase in CVP under microgravity. However, CVP recorded in human volunteers during a parabolic flight revealed an increase in CVP during the microgravity state. On the STS 40 shuttle mission, a payload specialist wore a fluid line that recorded CVP during the first few hours of orbital insertion. These data revealed decreased CVP. When this CVP catheter was tested during parabolic flight in four subjects, two had increased CVP recordings and two had decreased CVP measurements. In 1991, our laboratory performed parabolic flight studies in several chronic-instrumented baboons. It was again noted that centrally recorded right atrial pressure varied with exposure to microgravity, some animals having an increase, and others a decrease.

  2. Female and male life tables for seven wild primate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronikowski, Anne M; Cords, Marina; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne; Brockman, Diane K; Fedigan, Linda M; Pusey, Anne; Stoinski, Tara; Strier, Karen B; Morris, William F

    2016-03-01

    We provide male and female census count data, age-specific survivorship, and female age-specific fertility estimates for populations of seven wild primates that have been continuously monitored for at least 29 years: sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) in Madagascar; muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) in Brazil; capuchin (Cebus capucinus) in Costa Rica; baboon (Papio cynocephalus) and blue monkey (Cercopithecus mitis) in Kenya; chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in Tanzania; and gorilla (Gorilla beringei) in Rwanda. Using one-year age-class intervals, we computed point estimates of age-specific survival for both sexes. In all species, our survival estimates for the dispersing sex are affected by heavy censoring. We also calculated reproductive value, life expectancy, and mortality hazards for females. We used bootstrapping to place confidence intervals on life-table summary metrics (R0, the net reproductive rate; λ, the population growth rate; and G, the generation time). These data have high potential for reuse; they derive from continuous population monitoring of long-lived organisms and will be invaluable for addressing questions about comparative demography, primate conservation and human evolution.

  3. Rapid-onset/offset, variably scheduled 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure reduces nocturnal serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Dept. of Biosciences and Bioengineering; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States). Dept. of Cellular and Structural Biology

    1995-12-31

    Experiments with rodents indicate that power-frequency electric field (EF) or magnetic field (MF) exposure can suppress the normal nocturnal increase in melatonin concentration in pineal gland and blood. In a separate set of three experiments conducted with nonhuman primates, the authors did not observe melatonin suppression as a result of 6 weeks of day-time exposure to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF) with regularly schedule ``slow`` E/MF onsets/offsets. The study described here used a different exposure paradigm in which two baboons were exposed to E/MF with ``rapid`` E/MF onsets/offsets accompanied by EF transients not found with slowly ramped E/MF onset/offset; profound reductions in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration were observed in this experiment. If replicated in a more extensive experiment, the observation of melatonin suppression only in the presence of E/MF transients would suggest that very specific exposure parameters determine the effects of 60 Hz E/MF on melatonin.

  4. Salvinorin A and derivatives: protection from metabolism does not prolong short-term, whole-brain residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Jacob M; Munro, Thomas A; Béguin, Cécile; Alexoff, David; Shea, Colleen; Xu, Youwen; Cohen, Bruce M

    2009-09-01

    Salvinorin A (SA) is a potent kappa opioid agonist with a brief duration of action. Consistent with this, our previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies of carbon-11 labeled SA showed that brain levels decrease rapidly after intravenous administration. SA is rapidly metabolized, giving the much less potent salvinorin B (SB), which is presumed to be responsible in part for SA's brief duration of action. To test this, we labeled the metabolically stable methyl ester of SA and SB with carbon-11 and compared their pharmacokinetics by PET imaging after intravenous administration to baboons. Labeling of salvinorin B ethoxymethyl ether (EOM-SB), a derivative with greater potency and resistance to metabolism, provided an additional test of the role of metabolism in brain efflux. Plasma analysis confirmed that SB and EOM-SB exhibited greater metabolic stability than SA. However, the three compounds exhibited very similar pharmacokinetics in brain, entering and exiting rapidly. This suggests that metabolism is not solely responsible for the brief brain residence time of SA. We determined that whole-brain concentrations of EOM-SB declined more slowly than SA after intraperitoneal administration in rodents. This is likely due to a combination in EOM-SB's increased metabolic stability and its decreased plasma protein affinity. Our results suggest that protecting salvinorin A derivatives from metabolism will prolong duration of action, but only when administered by routes giving slow absorption.

  5. Current status of pig lung xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, Natalia; Laird, Christopher; Burdorf, Lars; Pierson, Richard N; Azimzadeh, Agnes M

    2015-11-01

    Human organ transplantation has improved duration and quality of life for many people, but its full potential is critically limited by short supply of available organs. One solution is xenotransplantation, although this comes with its own set of challenges. Lungs in particular are highly sensitive to injury, during the transplantation process generally, and to multiple immune rejection mechanisms. Using pig lung donors, our lab has been working on lung transplants into baboons as a surrogate for a human recipient. Several ex vivo human blood perfusion models have also proven useful. The combination of these experiments allows us to test large animal models as well as whole organ or isolated endothelial reactions to perfusion with human blood. We have found that a multi-modality therapeutic approach to prevent various pathogenic cascades - such as antibody-driven complement activation, other immune pathway activation, thrombosis, and tissue ischemia-reperfusion injury - has met with progressively greater success to protect the xeno lung from injury. Pig gene knockout and human gene transfer has been perhaps the greatest contributor. This review will discuss mechanisms of xeno lung injury, relevant experimental models, as well as recent results and future targets for research.

  6. Phenotypic assortment in wild primate networks: implications for the dissemination of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Alecia J; Lee, Alexander E G; Marshall, Harry H; Ticó, Miquel Torrents; Cowlishaw, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Individuals' access to social information can depend on their social network. Homophily-a preference to associate with similar phenotypes-may cause assortment within social networks that could preclude information transfer from individuals who generate information to those who would benefit from acquiring it. Thus, understanding phenotypic assortment may lead to a greater understanding of the factors that could limit the transfer of information between individuals. We tested whether there was assortment in wild baboon (Papio ursinus) networks, using data collected from two troops over 6 years for six phenotypic traits-boldness, age, dominance rank, sex and the propensity to generate/exploit information-using two methods for defining a connection between individuals-time spent in proximity and grooming. Our analysis indicated that assortment was more common in grooming than proximity networks. In general, there was homophily for boldness, age, rank and the propensity to both generate and exploit information, but heterophily for sex. However, there was considerable variability both between troops and years. The patterns of homophily we observed for these phenotypes may impede information transfer between them. However, the inconsistency in the strength of assortment between troops and years suggests that the limitations to information flow may be quite variable.

  7. Coprological prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in carnivores and small mammals at Dhaka zoo, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M.R.U. Raja

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A study on the coprological prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites using 94 faecal samples from different carnivores (n=32 and small mammals (n=15 was undertaken from January to May 2012 at Dhaka Zoo. The overall prevalence of parasitic infection was 78.72%, with a prevalence of 51.06% for helminths and 27.66% for protozoa. The identified parasites included—Toxascaris leonina (9.57%, Balantidium coli (25.53% Spirometra sp. (10.64%, Toxocara cati (12.76%, Hook worm (4.26%, unidentified strongyles (3.19%, Trichuris sp. (7.45%, Coccidia sp. (2.12%, Capillaria sp. (1.06%, Trichostrongylus sp. (1.06%, and Physaloptera sp. (1.06%. Mixed infection was observed in Indian Lion (Toxascaris leonina and Spirometra sp., Royal Bengal Tiger (Balantidium coli and Toxocara cati, Spotted Hyena (Balantidium coli and hook worm, Leopard (Balantidium coli and Spirometra/I> sp., Rhesus Macaque (Trichuris sp. and Coccidia sp., Pig-tailed Macaque (Balantidium coli and Trichuris sp., Hamadryas Baboon (Balantidium coli and Trichuris sp., Golden Mangabey (Trichuris sp., Balantidium coli and unidentified strongyles, Large Indian Civet (Balantidium coli and unidentified strongyles, Torior Dog (Balantidium coli and Physaloptera, Rabbit (Balantidium coli and Hook worm, Hanuman Langur (Balantidium coli and Capillaria sp.. Due to the high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites, the present study suggests to apply control measures against these parasites in order to safeguard the health of housed wild animals, especially in case of threatened species.

  8. Quantification of the distribution of /sup 111/In-labelled platelets in organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Reenen, O.; Loetter, M.G.; Heyns, A.P.; de Kock, F.; Herbst, C.; Kotze, H.; Pieters, H.; Minnaar, P.C.; Badenhorst, P.N.

    1982-02-01

    A simple and practical approach to the in vivo quantification of /sup 111/indium-oxine labelled blood platelets with a scintillation camera and computer assisted imaging system was evaluated. Radioactivity of the 172 and 247 keV energies was measured in a phantom at various source distances from the collimator and the accuracy of anterior and posterior mode measurements compared with that of the geometrical mean (GM) method, with and without correction for Compton scatter (CS). Organ radioactivity, expressed as a percentage of whole body radioactivity, was determined in vivo in five baboons and the accuracy of the methods verified by post mortem quantification in the animals. Measurement in the anterior mode significantly overestimates hepatic and underestimates splenic radioactivity; posterior mode quantification reverses these results. Correction with the GM method made the accuracy and reproducibility very acceptable. Further correction for anterior-posterior attenuation and/or CS did not improve results materially. The GM method could readily be applied in five human subjects. This study shows that the GM method is an accurate and practical method for the in vivo quantification of organ and regional distribution of /sup 111/In-labelled platelets.

  9. Tuberculosis in kudus (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) in the Kruger National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keet, D F; Kriek, N P; Bengis, R G; Michel, A L

    2001-09-01

    Five kudus (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), three bulls and two cows, within the Greater Kruger National Park complex, were diagnosed with generalized tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis. The lesions seen in these animals were similar to those previously reported in kudus and included severe tuberculous lymphadenitis of the nodes of the head and neck (that resulted in noticeable uni- or bilateral swelling beneath the ear), thorax, and the mesentery. All the animals also suffered from severe granulomatous pneumonia. The lesions in the lungs were more severe cranially and had a miliary distribution elsewhere in the lungs. Based on the DNA patterns of the M. bovis isolates, at least some of these kudus were infected with strains commonly present in tuberculous buffaloes, lions, cheetahs, and baboons in the Park whereas other strains from these kudus were quite different and may reflect another source of infection. The presence of tuberculous kudus in the Park is expected to complicate control measures that may be instituted to contain or eradicate the disease in the Park.

  10. Evolutionary Conservation in Genes Underlying Human Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Michelle Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago and thirty one non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in primates supports the hypothesis that schizophrenia and autism are a cost of higher brain function. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained.

  11. New evidence from observations of progressions of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx): a multilevel or non-nested society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Shun

    2014-10-01

    African papionins are well known for the diversity of their social systems, ranging from multilevel societies based on one-male-multifemale units (OMUs) to non-nested societies. However, the characteristics of Mandrillus societies are still unclear due to difficult observational conditions in the dense forests of central Africa. To elucidate the characteristics of mandrill societies and their social systems, I analysed the age-sex compositions, behaviours, and progression patterns of their horde/subgroups using videos of them crossing open places. The progressions were very cohesive, and the very large aggregations (169-442 individuals) had only 3-6 adult males (1.4-1.8 % of all individuals) and 11-32 subadult males (6.5-7.2 %). No herding behaviours were observed in the males, and most of the small clusters within the progressions were not analogous to the OMUs of a multilevel society but instead consisted of only adult females and immatures. The progressions of alert mandrills showed patterns similar to those observed in a non-nested social system: females with dependent infants were concentrated toward the rear and adult and subadult males toward the front. These results suggest that cohesive aggregations and a female-biased sex ratio are common characteristics of mandrill species. Mandrills may form female-bonded and non-nested societies, although their fission-fusion dynamics may be different from those typical of savannah baboons.

  12. FID navigator-based MR thermometry method to monitor small temperature changes in the brain of ventilated animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulant, Nicolas; Bottlaender, Michel; Uhrig, Lynn; Giacomini, Eric; Luong, Michel; Amadon, Alexis; Massire, Aurélien; Larrat, Benoît; Vignaud, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    An MR thermometry method is proposed for measuring in vivo small temperature changes engendered by external RF heat sources. The method relies on reproducible and stable respiration and therefore currently applies to ventilated animals whose breathing is carefully controlled. It first consists in characterizing the stability of the main magnetic field as well as the variations induced by breathing during a first monitoring stage. Second, RF heating is applied while the phase and thus temperature evolutions are continuously measured, the corrections due to breathing and field drift being made thanks to the data accumulated during the first period. The RF heat source is finally stopped and the temperature rise likewise is continuously monitored during a third and last stage to observe the animal cooling down and to validate the assumptions made for correcting for the main field variation and the physiological noise. Experiments were performed with a clinical 7 T scanner on an anesthetized baboon and with a dedicated RF heating setup. Analysis of the data reveals a precision around 0.1°C, which allows us to reliably measure sub-degree temperature rises in the muscle and in the brain of the animal.

  13. Habitat differences in dung beetle assemblages in an African savanna-forest ecotone: implications for secondary seed dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Britta K; Krell, Frank-Thorsten

    2011-06-01

    The probability and pattern of secondary seed dispersal by dung beetles (Scarabaeinae) depend on their community structure and composition at the site of primary deposition, which, in turn, seem to be strongly determined by vegetation. Consequently, we expected pronounced differences in secondary seed dispersal between forest and savanna in the northern Ivory Coast, West Africa. We found 99 dung beetle species at experimentally exposed dung piles of the olive baboon (Papio anubis (Lesson, 1827)), an important primary seed disperser in West Africa. Seventy-six species belonged to the roller and tunneler guilds, which are relevant for secondary seed dispersal. Most species showed a clear habitat preference. Contrary to the Neotropics, species number and abundance were much higher in the savanna than in the forest. Rollers and tunnelers each accounted for approximately 50% of the individuals in the savanna, but in the forest rollers made up only 4%. Seeds deposited into the savanna by an omnivorous primary disperser generally have a higher overall probability of being more rapidly dispersed secondarily by dung beetles than seeds in the forest. Also, rollers disperse seeds over larger distances. In contrast to other studies, small rollers were active in dispersal of large seeds, which were seemingly mistaken for dung balls. Our results suggest that rollers can remove seeds from any plant dispersed in primate dung in this ecosystem.

  14. Vasomotor tone does not affect perfusion heterogeneity and gas exchange in normal primate lungs during normoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenny, R. W.; Robertson, H. T.; Hlastala, M. P.

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether vasoregulation is an important cause of pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity, we measured regional blood flow and gas exchange before and after giving prostacyclin (PGI(2)) to baboons. Four animals were anesthetized with ketamine and mechanically ventilated. Fluorescent microspheres were used to mark regional perfusion before and after PGI(2) infusion. The lungs were subsequently excised, dried inflated, and diced into approximately 2-cm(3) pieces (n = 1,208-1,629 per animal) with the spatial coordinates recorded for each piece. Blood flow to each piece was determined for each condition from the fluorescent signals. Blood flow heterogeneity did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Two other measures of spatial blood flow distribution, the fractal dimension and the spatial correlation, did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Alveolar-arterial O(2) differences did not change with PGI(2) infusion. We conclude that, in normal primate lungs during normoxia, vasomotor tone is not a significant cause of perfusion heterogeneity. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of blood flow, active regulation of regional perfusion is not required for efficient gas exchange.

  15. Classification of Novel Selected Region of Interest for Color Image Encryption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahieb Mohammed Jawad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Securing digital image in exchanging huge multimedia data over internet with limited bandwidth is a significant and sensitive issue. Selective image encryption being an effective method for reducing the amount of encrypted data can achieve adequate security enhancement. Determining and selecting the region of interest in digital color images is challenging for selective image encryption due to their complex structure and distinct regions of varying importance. We propose a new feature in acquiring and selecting Region of Interest (ROI for the color images to develop a selective encryption scheme. The hybrid domain is used to encrypt regions based on chaotic map approach which automatically generates secret key. This new attribute is a vitality facet representing the noteworthy part of the color image. The security performance of selective image encryption is found to enhance considerably based on the rates of encrypted area selection. Computation is performed using MATLAB R2008a codes on eight images (Lena, Pepper, Splash, Airplane, House, Tiffany, Baboon and Sailboat each of size 512*512 pixels obtained from standard USC-SIPI Image Database. A block size of 128*128 pixels with threshold levels 0.0017 and 0.48 are employed. Results are analyzed and compared with edge detection method using the same algorithm. Encrypted area, entropy and correlation coefficients performances reveal that the proposed scheme achieves good alternative in the confined region of interest, fulfills the desired confidentiality and protects image privacy.

  16. An infant formula toxicity and toxicokinetic feeding study on carrageenan in preweaning piglets with special attention to the immune system and gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, M L; Ferguson, H E; Thorsrud, B A; Nelson, K G; Blakemore, W R; Zeigler, B; Cameron, M J; Brant, A; Cochrane, L; Pellerin, M; Mahadevan, B

    2015-03-01

    A toxicity/toxicokinetic swine-adapted infant formula feeding study was conducted in Domestic Yorkshire Crossbred Swine from lactation day 3 for 28 consecutive days during the preweaning period at carrageenan concentrations of 0, 300, 1000 and 2250 ppm under GLP guidelines. This study extends the observations in newborn baboons (McGill et al., 1977) to piglets and evaluates additional parameters: organ weights, clinical chemistry, special gastrointestinal tract stains (toluidine blue, Periodic Acid-Schiff), plasma levels of carrageenan; and evaluation of potential immune system effects. Using validated methods, immunophenotyping of blood cell types (lymphocytes, monocytes, B cells, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, mature T cells), sandwich immunoassays for blood cytokine evaluations (IL-6, IL-8, IL1β, TNF-α), and immunohistochemical staining of the gut for IL-8 and TNF-α were conducted. No treatment-related adverse effects at any carrageenan concentration were found on any parameter. Glucosuria in a few animals was not considered treatment-related. The high dose in this study, equivalent to ~430 mg/kg/day, provides an adequate margin of exposure for human infants, as affirmed by JECFA and supports the safe use of carrageenan for infants ages 0-12 weeks and older and infants with special medical needs.

  17. Tuberculosis infection in wildlife from the Ruaha ecosystem Tanzania: implications for wildlife, domestic animals, and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, D L; Kazwala, R R; Sadiki, H; Roug, A; Muse, E A; Coppolillo, P C; Mazet, J A K

    2013-07-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, a pathogen of conservation, livestock, and public health concern, was detected in eight species of wildlife inhabiting protected areas bordering endemic livestock grazing lands. We tested tissues from 179 opportunistically sampled hunter-killed, depredation, road-killed, and live-captured wild animals, representing 30 species, in and adjacent to Ruaha National Park in south-central Tanzania. Tissue culture and PCR were used to detect 12 (8.1%) M. bovis-infected animals and 15 (10.1%) animals infected with non-tuberculosis complex mycobacteria. Kirk's dik-dik, vervet monkey, and yellow baboon were confirmed infected for the first time. The M. bovis spoligotype isolated from infected wildlife was identical to local livestock, providing evidence for livestock-wildlife pathogen transmission. Thus we advocate an ecosystem-based approach for bovine tuberculosis management that improves critical ecological functions in protected areas and grazing lands, reduces focal population density build-up along the edges of protected areas, and minimizes ecological stressors that increase animals' susceptibility to bovine tuberculosis.

  18. From Parasite Encounter to Infection: Multiple-Scale Drivers of Parasite Richness in a Wild Social Primate Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides J. A.; Huchard, E.; Pettorelli, N.; King, A. J.; Brown, M. E.; Archer, C. E.; Appleton, C. C.; Raymond, M.; Cowlishaw, G.

    2011-01-01

    Host parasite diversity plays a fundamental role in ecological and evolutionary processes, yet the factors that drive it are still poorly understood. A variety of processes, operating across a range of spatial scales, are likely to influence both the probability of parasite encounter and subsequent infection. Here, we explored eight possible determinants of parasite richness, comprising rainfall and temperature at the population level, ranging behavior and home range productivity at the group level, and age, sex, body condition, and social rank at the individual level. We used a unique dataset describing gastrointestinal parasites in a terrestrial subtropical vertebrate (chacma baboons, Papio ursinus), comprising 662 faecal samples from 86 individuals representing all age-sex classes across two groups over two dry seasons in a desert population. Three mixed models were used to identify the most important factor at each of the three spatial scales (population, group, individual); these were then standardised and combined in a single, global, mixed model. Individual age had the strongest influence on parasite richness, in a convex relationship. Parasite richness was also higher in females and animals in poor condition, albeit at a lower order of magnitude than age. Finally, with a further halving of effect size, parasite richness was positively correlated to day range and temperature. These findings indicate that a range of factors influence host parasite richness through both encounter and infection probabilities, but that individual-level processes may be more important than those at the group or population level.

  19. THE TREE SHREW APOLIPOPROTEIN C-I cDNA: SEQUENCE AND ITS EXPRESSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王克勤; 吕新跃; 吴钢; 薛红; 陈保生

    2001-01-01

    A rabbit anti-serum to tree shrew apolipoprotein C-I (apo C-l) was used to screen an expression cDNA li-braDy constructed by us from tree shrew (TS) liver tissue. Two apo C-I cDNA clones were obtained. The longerone consists of 380 nucleotides, including 21 bp and 95 bp at the 5' and 3' end of the non-translated region srespectively, and a 2 64-bp fragment in an open reading frame encoding 88 amino acids prepropeptide which con-ta-ins 26 amino acids of signal peptide and a mature protein (62 amino acids). Comparing the amino-acid se-quence deduced from this cDNA with those of the published mammalian apo C-Is reveals that it shared some struc-tural similarity with zat, mouse and dog apo C-l, but it had 5 more amino acids than that of human and baboon.The expression of apo C-I mRNA in 8 different tissues were also assayed with Northern blot. The results demonstrat-ed that liver had the highest expression, intestine had much less expression and no expression in other tissues,which is much different from human and other species. This study has laid down a good foundation for further study-ing on the function and the stucture of tree shrew apo C-I gene.``

  20. The potential of genetically-engineered pigs in providing an alternative source of organs and cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David K C; Hara, Hidetaka; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo; Phelps, Carol; Ayares, David; Dai, Yifan

    2013-07-01

    There is a critical shortage of organs, cells, and corneas from deceased human donors worldwide. There are also shortages of human blood for transfusion. A potential solution to all of these problems is the transplantation of organs, cells, and corneas from a readily available animal species, such as the pig, and the transfusion of red blood cells from pigs into humans. However, to achieve these ends, major immunologic and other barriers have to be overcome. Considerable progress has been made in this respect by the genetic modification of pigs to protect their tissues from the primate immune response and to correct several molecular incompatibilities that exist between pig and primate. These have included knockout of genes responsible for the expression of major antigenic targets for primate natural anti-pig antibodies, insertion of human complement- and coagulation-regulatory transgenes, and knockdown of swine leukocyte antigens that stimulate the primate's adaptive immune response. As a result of these manipulations, the administration of novel immunosuppressive agents, and other innovations, pig hearts have now functioned in baboons for 6-8 months, pig islets have maintained normoglycemia in diabetic monkeys for > 1 year, and pig corneas have maintained transparency for several months. Clinical trials of pig islet transplantation are already in progress. Future developments will involve further genetic manipulations of the organ-source pig, with most of the genes that are likely to be beneficial already identified.

  1. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele E Burastero

    Full Text Available To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  2. Electric and magnetic fields with a frequency of 50-60 Hz: assessment of 20 years of research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrozo, J. [Electricite de France - Gaz de France, Paris (France)

    2001-07-01

    Since electricity is used everywhere, exposure to electromagnetic fields of extremely low frequency (50-60 Hz) is unavoidable in our daily life. The question of whether these electromagnetic fields could possibly have any biological or health effects has been a major environmental issue for more than 20 years. At high field strengths, biological effects such as nerve and cardio-stimulation through the induction of currents in the body have been noted. These biological effects have been used in the drafting of standards for public and professional exposure. However, it is the search for effects at low field levels that has been the focus of much research. The main results of this research can be summarised as follows: in vivo studies on whole animals have shown that there is no convincing evidence that electromagnetic fields cause cancer or birth defects, and despite some reduction in pineal and blood melatonin in rodents, studies on lambs, baboons and humans do not support such an effect of electromagnetic fields, while in vitro studies have shown that exposure to electromagnetic fields at usual residential levels (<100 {mu}T) does not produce any significant in vitro effects that could be replicated in independent studies. These results, correlated with the data provided by more recent epidemiological studies, do not show that exposure to electromagnetic fields at the usual residential exposure levels presents a human health hazard. (author)

  3. Imaging benzodiazepine receptors in man with C-11-suriclone and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Links, J.M.; Trifiletti, R.; Snyder, S.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    Suriclone is a potent cyclopyrrolone, anti-anxiety drug which binds to the benzodiazepine receptor complex (BZR) with high affinity. Suriclone binds to a site on the BZR distinct from the site where benzodiazepines bind. The K/sub D/ of suriclone at 37oC is 0.03 nM. C-11-suriclone (SUR) was synthesized by reacting C-CH3I with the appropriate amine precursor. SUR (1 ..mu..g/kg) was injected IV into a baboon alone or with 1 mg/kg of Ro-151788, a benzodiazepine antagonist, and serial PET scans of the brain were obtained. High radioactivity concentrations were observed in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum which contain high densities of BZR, intermediate concentrations in thalamus and low concentrations in the striatum. When Ro-151788 was given a uniform distribution of radioactivity was observed; the radioactivity was reduced to ca. 25% of control values in the brain which was contained within the PET slice. SUR (0.2 ..mu..g/kg) was next administered to a human subject. From 30-60 minutes after injection high radioactivity concentrations were observed in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, intermediate concentrations in the thalamus and a low concentration in the caudate. Radioactivity in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum decreased slowly with time, implying that binding of SUR to a high affinity site had occurred. These results demonstrate utility of SUR for measuring binding to the benzodiazepine receptor complex non-invasively in man.

  4. Nucleotide sequence of the BamHI repetitive sequence, including the HindIII fundamental unit, as a possible mobile element from the Japanese monkey Macaca fuscata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassolov, V S; Kuchino, Y; Nemoto, K; Nishimura, S

    1986-01-01

    Clustered repeat units produced by BamHI digestion of genomic DNA from the Japanese monkey Macaca fuscata [JMr(BamHI)] were sequenced by dideoxy DNA sequencing. The nucleotide sequences of several individual repeats showed that the BamHI repeat contains the 170-bp HindIII element as an integral part, and that it has more than 90% homology with the HindIII repeat element [AGMr(HindIII)] found in the genomic DNA of the African green monkey. In the JMr(BamHI) repeat unit, the 170-bp HindIII element is flanked by a 6-bp inverted repeat, which is part of a 22-bp direct repeat. This latter repeat of 22-bp asymmetrically overlaps the border between the internal AGMr(HindIII)-like region and adjacent regions of the JMr(BamHI) repeat. A similar structural feature of the BamHI repeat unit has been found in the genomic DNA of the baboon, but not in that of the African green monkey. These results show clearly that the BamHI repeat of the modern Japanese monkey originated as a result of insertion of an AGMr(HindIII) element into a certain site(s) of the genomic DNA of an ancestor of the modern Japanese monkey before Macaca-Cercocebus divergence.

  5. DPA-714, a new translocator protein-specific ligand: Synthesis, radio-fluorination, and pharmacologic characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, M. [Univ Sydney, Dept Pharmacol, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Fulton, R.R.; Henderson, D.J. [Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Dept PET and Nucl Med, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); Vercoullie, J.; Garreau, L.; Chalon, S. [INSERM, U619, Tours (France); Dolle, F. [Inst Imagerie Biomed, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France); Selleri, S. [Univ Florence, Dipartimento Sci Farmaceut, I-50121 Florence (Italy); Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Brain and Mind Res Inst, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Discipline Med Radiat Sci, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Sch Chem, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO), formerly known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is dramatically up-regulated under pathologic conditions. Activated micro-glia are the main cell type expressing the TSPO at sites of central nervous system pathology. Radioligands for the TSPO can therefore measure active disease in the brain. This article details the synthesis, radio-fluorination, and pharmacologic evaluation of a new TSPO-specific pyrazolopyrimidine, DPA-714. Methods: The affinity of DPA-714 for the TSPO was measured in rat kidney membranes with {sup 3}H-PK11195. The in vitro functional activity of DPA-714 was measured in a steroidogenic assay in which the ability of DPA-714 to increase pregnenolone synthesis was measured with rat C6 glioma cells. The radio-fluorination of DPA-714 was achieved by nucleophilic {sup 18}F-fluoride displacement of the tosylate precursor. {sup 18}F-DPA-714 was assessed in rats harboring unilateral quinolinic acid (QA) lesions. In addition, pretreatment experiments were performed with PK11195 (5 mg/kg), DPA-714 (1 mg/kg), and DPA-713 (1 mg/kg). The in vivo binding and biodistribution of {sup 18}F-DPA-714 were determined in a baboon with PET. Experiments involving presaturation with PK11195 (1.5 mg/kg) and displacement with DPA-714 (1 mg/kg) were conducted to evaluate the specificity of radioligand binding. Results: In vitro binding studies revealed that DPA-714 displayed a high affinity for the TSPO (dissociation constant, 7.0 nM). DPA-714 stimulated pregnenolone synthesis at levels 80% above the baseline. {sup 18}F-DPA-714 was prepared at a 16% radiochemical yield and a specific activity of 270 GBq/{mu}mol. In rats harboring unilateral QA lesions, an 8-fold-higher level of uptake of {sup 18}F-DPA-714 was observed in the ipsilateral striatum than in the contralateral striatum. Uptake in the ipsilateral striatum was shown to be selective because it was inhibited to the level in the contralateral striatum in the presence

  6. Wildlife Population Dynamics in Human-Dominated Landscapes under Community-Based Conservation: The Example of Nakuru Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogutu, Joseph O; Kuloba, Bernard; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Kanga, Erustus

    2017-01-01

    Wildlife conservation is facing numerous and mounting challenges on private and communal lands in Africa, including in Kenya. We analyze the population dynamics of 44 common wildlife species in relation to rainfall variation in the Nakuru Wildlife Conservancy (NWC), located in the Nakuru-Naivasha region of Kenya, based on ground total counts carried out twice each year from March 1996 to May 2015. Rainfall in the region was quasi-periodic with cycle periods dependent on the rainfall component and varying from 2.8 years for the dry season to 10.9 years for the wet season. These oscillations are associated with frequent severe droughts and food scarcity for herbivores. The trends for the 44 wildlife species showed five general patterns during 1996-2015. 1) Steinbuck, bushbuck, hartebeest and greater kudu numbers declined persistently and significantly throughout 1996-2015 and thus merit the greatest conservation attention. 2) Klipspringer, mongoose, oribi, porcupine, cheetah, leopard, ostrich and Sykes monkey numbers also decreased noticeably but not significantly between 1996 and 2015. 3) Dik dik, eland, African hare, Jackal, duiker, hippo and Thomson's gazelle numbers first increased and then declined between 1996 and 2015 but only significantly for duiker and hippo. 4) Aardvark, serval cat, colobus monkey, bat-eared fox, reedbuck, hyena and baboon numbers first declined and then increased but only the increases in reedbuck and baboon numbers were significant. 5) Grant's gazelle, Grevy's zebra, lion, spring hare, Burchell's zebra, bushpig, white rhino, rock hyrax, topi, oryx, vervet monkey, guinea fowl, giraffe, and wildebeest numbers increased consistently between 1996 and 2015. The increase was significant only for rock hyrax, topi, vervet monkey, guinea fowl, giraffe and wildebeest. 6) Impala, buffalo, warthog, and waterbuck, numbers increased significantly and then seemed to level off between 1996 and 2015. The aggregate biomass of primates and carnivores

  7. Wildlife Population Dynamics in Human-Dominated Landscapes under Community-Based Conservation: The Example of Nakuru Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogutu, Joseph O.; Kuloba, Bernard; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Kanga, Erustus

    2017-01-01

    Wildlife conservation is facing numerous and mounting challenges on private and communal lands in Africa, including in Kenya. We analyze the population dynamics of 44 common wildlife species in relation to rainfall variation in the Nakuru Wildlife Conservancy (NWC), located in the Nakuru-Naivasha region of Kenya, based on ground total counts carried out twice each year from March 1996 to May 2015. Rainfall in the region was quasi-periodic with cycle periods dependent on the rainfall component and varying from 2.8 years for the dry season to 10.9 years for the wet season. These oscillations are associated with frequent severe droughts and food scarcity for herbivores. The trends for the 44 wildlife species showed five general patterns during 1996–2015. 1) Steinbuck, bushbuck, hartebeest and greater kudu numbers declined persistently and significantly throughout 1996–2015 and thus merit the greatest conservation attention. 2) Klipspringer, mongoose, oribi, porcupine, cheetah, leopard, ostrich and Sykes monkey numbers also decreased noticeably but not significantly between 1996 and 2015. 3) Dik dik, eland, African hare, Jackal, duiker, hippo and Thomson’s gazelle numbers first increased and then declined between 1996 and 2015 but only significantly for duiker and hippo. 4) Aardvark, serval cat, colobus monkey, bat-eared fox, reedbuck, hyena and baboon numbers first declined and then increased but only the increases in reedbuck and baboon numbers were significant. 5) Grant’s gazelle, Grevy’s zebra, lion, spring hare, Burchell’s zebra, bushpig, white rhino, rock hyrax, topi, oryx, vervet monkey, guinea fowl, giraffe, and wildebeest numbers increased consistently between 1996 and 2015. The increase was significant only for rock hyrax, topi, vervet monkey, guinea fowl, giraffe and wildebeest. 6) Impala, buffalo, warthog, and waterbuck, numbers increased significantly and then seemed to level off between 1996 and 2015. The aggregate biomass of primates and

  8. Chimerism and xenotransplantation. New concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzl, T E; Rao, A S; Murase, N; Demetris, A J; Thomson, A; Fung, J J

    1999-02-01

    In both transplant and infectious circumstances, the immune response is governed by migration and localization of the antigen. If the antigenic epitopes of transgenic xenografts are sufficiently altered to avoid evoking the destructive force of innate immunity, the mechanisms of engraftment should be the same as those that permit the chimerism-dependent immunologic confrontation and resolution that is the basis of allograft acceptance. In addition to "humanizing" the epitopes, one of the unanswered questions is whether the species restriction of complement described in 1994 by Valdivia and colleagues also necessitates the introduction of human complement regulatory genes in animal donors. Because the liver is the principal or sole source of most complement components, the complement quickly is transformed to that of the donor after hepatic transplantation. Thus, the need for complementary regulatory transgenes may vary according to the kind of xenograft used. Much evidence shows that physiologically important peptides produced by xenografts (e.g., insulin, clotting factors, and enzymes) are incorporated into the metabolic machinery of the recipient body. To the extent that this is not true, xenotransplantation could result in the production of diseases that are analogous to inborn errors of metabolism. In the climate of pessimism that followed the failures of baboon to human liver xenotransplantation in 1992-1993, it seemed inconceivable that the use of even more discordant donors, such as the pig, could ever be seriously entertained; however, this preceded insight into the xenogeneic and allogeneic barriers that has brought transplantation infectious immunity to common ground. With this new insight and the increasing ease of producing transgenic donors, the goal of clinical xenotransplantation may not be so distant.

  9. Reinvestigation of the synthesis and evaluation of [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]vorozole, a radiotracer targeting cytochrome P450 aromatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Won [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)], E-mail: swkim@bnl.gov; Biegon, Anat; Katsamanis, Zachary E. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Ehrlich, Carolin W. [Johannes-Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Organische Chemie, Duesbergweg 10-14, Mainz (Germany); Hooker, Jacob M.; Shea, Colleen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Muench, Lisa [National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, Bethesda, MD (United States); Xu Youwen; King, Payton; Carter, Pauline; Alexoff, David L. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Introduction: We reinvestigated the synthesis of [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]vorozole, a radiotracer for aromatase, and discovered the presence of an N-methyl isomer which was not removed in the original purification method. Herein we report the preparation and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of pure [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]vorozole. Methods: Norvorozole was alkylated with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide as previously described and also with unlabeled methyl iodide. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed to separate the regioisomers. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy ({sup 13}C and 2D-nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy NMR) was used to identify and assign structures to the N-methylated products. Pure [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]vorozole and the contaminating isomer were compared by PET imaging in the baboon. Results: Methylation of norvorozole resulted in a mixture of isomers (1:1:1 ratio) based on new HPLC analysis using a pentafluorophenylpropyl bonded silica column, in which vorozole coeluted one of its isomers under the original HPLC conditions. Baseline separation of the three labeled isomers was achieved. The N-3 isomer was the contaminant of vorozole, thus correcting the original assignment of isomers. PET studies of pure [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]vorozole with and without the contaminating N-3 isomer revealed that only [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]vorozole binds to aromatase. [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]Vorozole accumulated in all brain regions with highest accumulation in the aromatase-rich amygdala and preoptic area. Accumulation was blocked with vorozole and letrozole consistent with reports of some level of aromatase in many brain regions. Conclusions: The discovery of a contaminating labeled isomer and the development of a method for isolating pure [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]vorozole combine to provide a new scientific tool for PET studies of the biology of aromatase and for drug research and development.

  10. A high density of human communication-associated genes in chromosome 7q31-q36: differential expression in human and non-human primate cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E; Jensen, L R; Farcas, R; Kondova, I; Bontrop, R E; Navarro, B; Fuchs, E; Kuss, A W; Haaf, T

    2012-01-01

    The human brain is distinguished by its remarkable size, high energy consumption, and cognitive abilities compared to all other mammals and non-human primates. However, little is known about what has accelerated brain evolution in the human lineage. One possible explanation is that the appearance of advanced communication skills and language has been a driving force of human brain development. The phenotypic adaptations in brain structure and function which occurred on the way to modern humans may be associated with specific molecular signatures in today's human genome and/or transcriptome. Genes that have been linked to language, reading, and/or autism spectrum disorders are prime candidates when searching for genes for human-specific communication abilities. The database and genome-wide expression analyses we present here revealed a clustering of such communication-associated genes (COAG) on human chromosomes X and 7, in particular chromosome 7q31-q36. Compared to the rest of the genome, we found a high number of COAG to be differentially expressed in the cortices of humans and non-human primates (chimpanzee, baboon, and/or marmoset). The role of X-linked genes for the development of human-specific cognitive abilities is well known. We now propose that chromosome 7q31-q36 also represents a hot spot for the evolution of human-specific communication abilities. Selective pressure on the T cell receptor beta locus on chromosome 7q34, which plays a pivotal role in the immune system, could have led to rapid dissemination of positive gene variants in hitchhiking COAG.

  11. Over Hesperiaanse Melancholie: Eugène Nielen Marais en de Geschiedenis van een poëtische Gemoedsgesteldheid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Luijk Ruben

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a brief ‘idea history’ of Hesperian melancholy a.k.a. Hesperian depression, the fleeting state of dejection that some humans and animals experience at dusk. The term was apparently coined by the South African poet and naturalist Eugene Marais (1871-1936, who noticed the phenomenon during his field observations of baboons. Marais' observations of primates were in the first place an attempt to shed more light on the evolutionary roots of the human psyche and its afflictions - not in the least his own. A personal focus seems probable in his notes on the use of euphoria-inducing substances among animals and humans, which are an evident reflection of his own morphine addiction; but also in his writings about Hesperian depression. During his lifetime, Marais only published about Hesperian depression twice, once in a very concise article in English, and once in more elaborate form in Afrikaans. The term ‘Hesperian depression’ only became more current when his manuscript on primate behaviour, The Soul of the Ape, was posthumously published in 1963. Since then, the term and its description sometimes appear in (popular publications of paleobiologists and scholars of the evolution of human behaviour. In psychology and psychiatry, the term was introduced by the eminent American psychoanalyst William G. Niederlander, who presented it in a 1971 article in Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association as an idea of his own. It is evident, however, that he took his cue from Marais, who thus was posthumously plagiarized.

  12. Old world monkeys compare to apes in the primate cognition test battery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Schmitt

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolution of intelligence rests on comparative analyses of brain sizes as well as the assessment of cognitive skills of different species in relation to potential selective pressures such as environmental conditions and social organization. Because of the strong interest in human cognition, much previous work has focused on the comparison of the cognitive skills of human toddlers to those of our closest living relatives, i.e. apes. Such analyses revealed that apes and children have relatively similar competencies in the physical domain, while human children excel in the socio-cognitive domain; in particular in terms of attention sharing, cooperation, and mental state attribution. To develop a full understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of primate intelligence, however, comparative data for monkeys are needed. We tested 18 Old World monkeys (long-tailed macaques and olive baboons in the so-called Primate Cognition Test Battery (PCTB (Herrmann et al. 2007, Science. Surprisingly, our tests revealed largely comparable results between Old World monkeys and the Great apes. Single comparisons showed that chimpanzees performed only better than the macaques in experiments on spatial understanding and tool use, but in none of the socio-cognitive tasks. These results question the clear-cut relationship between cognitive performance and brain size and--prima facie--support the view of an accelerated evolution of social intelligence in humans. One limitation, however, is that the initial experiments were devised to tap into human specific skills in the first place, thus potentially underestimating both true nonhuman primate competencies as well as species differences.

  13. Concerted evolution of the tandemly repeated genes encoding primate U2 small nuclear RNA (the RNU2 locus) does not prevent rapid diversification of the (CT){sub n} {center_dot} (GA){sub n} microsatellite embedded within the U2 repeat unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, D.; Weiner, A.M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1995-12-10

    The RNU2 locus encoding human U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is organized as a nearly perfect tandem array containing 5 to 22 copies of a 5.8-kb repeat unit. Just downstream of the U2 snRNA gene in each 5.8-kb repeat unit lies a large (CT){sub n}{center_dot}(GA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat (n {approx} 70). This form of genomic organization, in which one repeat is embedded within another, provides an unusual opportunity to study the balance of forces maintaining the homogeneity of both kinds of repeats. Using a combination of field inversion gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction, we have been able to study the CT microsatellites within individual U2 tandem arrays. We find that the CT microsatellites within an RNU2 allele exhibit significant length polymorphism, despite the remarkable homogeneity of the surrounding U2 repeat units. Length polymorphism is due primarily to loss or gain of CT dinucleotide repeats, but other types of deletions, insertions, and substitutions are also frequent. Polymorphism is greatly reduced in regions where pure (CT){sub n} tracts are interrupted by occasional G residues, suggesting that irregularities stabilize both the length and the sequence of the dinucleotide repeat. We further show that the RNU2 loci of other catarrhine primates (gorilla, chimpanzee, ogangutan, and baboon) contain orthologous CT microsatellites; these also exhibit length polymorphism, but are highly divergent from each other. Thus, although the CT microsatellite is evolving far more rapidly than the rest of the U2 repeat unit, it has persisted through multiple speciation events spanning >35 Myr. The persistence of the CT microsatellite, despite polymorphism and rapid evolution, suggests that it might play a functional role in concerted evolution of the RNU2 loci, perhaps as an initiation site for recombination and/or gene conversion. 70 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Leveraging human genomic information to identify nonhuman primate sequences for expression array development

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    Boyle Nicholas F

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonhuman primates (NHPs are essential for biomedical research due to their similarities to humans. The utility of NHPs will be greatly increased by the application of genomics-based approaches such as gene expression profiling. Sequence information from the 3' end of genes is the key resource needed to create oligonucleotide expression arrays. Results We have developed the algorithms and procedures necessary to quickly acquire sequence information from the 3' end of nonhuman primate orthologs of human genes. To accomplish this, we identified terminal exons of over 15,000 human genes by aligning mRNA sequences with genomic sequence. We found the mean length of complete last exons to be approximately 1,400 bp, significantly longer than previous estimates. We designed primers to amplify genomic DNA, which included at least 300 bp of the terminal exon. We cloned and sequenced the PCR products representing over 5,500 Macaca mulatta (rhesus monkey orthologs of human genes. This sequence information has been used to select probes for rhesus gene expression profiling. We have also tested 10 sets of primers with genomic DNA from Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus monkey, Papio hamadryas (Baboon, and Chlorocebus aethiops (African green monkey, vervet. The results indicate that the primers developed for this study will be useful for acquiring sequence from the 3' end of genes for other nonhuman primate species. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human genomic DNA sequence can be leveraged to obtain sequence from the 3' end of NHP orthologs and that this sequence can then be used to generate NHP oligonucleotide microarrays. Affymetrix and Agilent used sequences obtained with this approach in the design of their rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarrays.

  15. A synthetic antimicrobial peptide BTD-S expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana confers enhanced resistance to Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Shen, Hao; Wang, Ming; Fan, Kai; Bibi, Noreen; Ni, Mi; Yuan, Shuna; Wang, Xuede

    2016-08-01

    BTD-S is a synthetic non-cyclic θ-defensin derivative which was previously designed in our laboratory based on baboon θ-defensins (BTDs). It shows robust antimicrobial activity against economically important phytopathogen, Verticillium dahliae. Here, we deduced the coding nucleotide sequence of BTD-S and introduced the gene into wild-type (ecotype Columbia-0) Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Results demonstrated that BTD-S-transgenic lines displayed in bioassays inhibitory effects on the growth of V. dahliae in vivo and in vitro. Based on symptom severity, enhanced resistance was found in a survey of BTD-S-transgenic lines. Besides, crude protein extracts from root tissues of BTD-S-transformed plants significantly restricted the growth of fungal hyphae and the germination of conidia. Also, fungal biomass over time determined by real-time PCR demonstrated the overgrowth of V. dahliae in wild-type plants 2-3 weeks after inoculation, while almost no fungal DNA was detected in aerial tissues of their transgenic progenitors. The result suggested that fungus failed to invade and progress acropetally up to establish a systemic infection in BTD-S-transgenic plants. Moreover, the assessment of basal defense responses was performed in the leaves of WT and BTD-S-transgenic plants. The mitigated oxidative stress and low antioxidase level in BTD-S-transgenic plants revealed that BTD-S acts via permeabilizing target microbial membranes, which is in a category different from hypersensitive response-dependent defense. Taken together, our results demonstrate that BTD-S is a promising gene to be explored for transgenic engineering for plant protection against Verticillium wilt.

  16. Herpesvirus pan encodes a functional homologue of BHRF1, the Epstein-Barr virus v-Bcl-2

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    Williams Tracey

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV latently infects about 90% of the human population and is associated with benign and malignant diseases of lymphoid and epithelial origin. BHRF1, an early lytic cycle antigen, is an apoptosis suppressing member of the Bcl-2 family. In vitro studies imply that BHRF1 is dispensable for both virus replication and transformation. However, the fact that BHRF1 is highly conserved not only in all EBV isolates studied to date but also in the analogous viruses Herpesvirus papio and Herpesvirus pan that infect baboons and chimpanzees respectively, suggests BHRF1 may play an important role in vivo. Results Herpesvirus papio BHRF1 has been shown to function in an analogous manner to EBV BHRF1 in response to DNA damaging agents in human keratinocytes. In this study we show that the heterologous expression of the previously uncharacterised Herpesvirus pan BHRF1 in the human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Ramos-BL provides similar anti-apoptotic functions to that of EBV BHRF1 in response to apoptosis triggered by serum withdrawal, etoposide treatment and ultraviolet (UV radiation. We also map the amino acid changes onto the recently solved structure of the EBV BHRF1 and reveal that these changes are unlikely to alter the 3D structure of the protein. Conclusions These findings show that the functional conservation of BHRF1 extends to a lymphoid background, suggesting that the primate virus proteins interact with cellular proteins that are themselves highly conserved across the higher primates. Further weight is added to this suggestion when we show that the difference in amino acid sequences map to regions on the 3D structure of EBV BHRF1 that are unlikely to change the conformation of the protein.

  17. Coevolution of URAT1 and Uricase during Primate Evolution: Implications for Serum Urate Homeostasis and Gout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Philip K.; Farrar, Jennifer E.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Miner, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid is the highly insoluble end-product of purine metabolism in humans. Serum levels exceeding the solubility threshold can trigger formation of urate crystals resulting in gouty arthritis. Uric acid is primarily excreted through the kidneys with 90% reabsorbed back into the bloodstream through the uric acid transporter URAT1. This reabsorption process is essential for the high serum uric acid levels found in humans. We discovered that URAT1 proteins from humans and baboons have higher affinity for uric acid compared with transporters from rats and mice. This difference in transport kinetics of URAT1 orthologs, along with inability of modern apes to oxidize uric acid due to loss of the uricase enzyme, prompted us to ask whether these events occurred concomitantly during primate evolution. Ancestral URAT1 sequences were computationally inferred and ancient transporters were resurrected and assayed, revealing that affinity for uric acid was increased during the evolution of primates. This molecular fine-tuning occurred between the origins of simians and their diversification into New- and Old-World monkey and ape lineages. Remarkably, it was driven in large-part by only a few amino acid replacements within the transporter. This alteration in primate URAT1 coincided with changes in uricase that greatly diminished the enzymatic activity and took place 27–77 Ma. These results suggest that the modifications to URAT1 transporters were potentially adaptive and that maintaining more constant, high levels of serum uric acid may have provided an advantage to our primate ancestors. PMID:27352852

  18. Biomphalaria alexandrina in Egypt: Past, present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Iman F Abou-El-Naga

    2013-09-01

    The African species of Biomphalaria appeared as a result of the relatively recent west-to-east trans-Atlantic dispersal of the Biomphalaria glabrata-like taxon. In Egypt, Biomphalaria alexandrina is the intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni. Biomphalaria alexandrina originated in the area between Alexandria and Rosetta and has historically been confined to the Nile Delta. Schistosoma mansoni reached Egypt via infected slaves and baboons from the Land of Punt through migrations that occurred as early as the Vth Dynasty. The suggestion of the presence of Schistosoma mansoni infection in Lower Egypt during Pharaonic times is discussed despite the fact that that there is no evidence of such infection in Egyptian mummies. It is only recently that Biomphalaria alexandrina colonized the Egyptian Nile from the Delta to Lake Nasser. This change was likely due to the construction of huge water projects, the development of new water resources essential for land reclamation projects and the movement of refugees from the Suez Canal zone to the Delta and vice versa. The situation with respect to Biomphalaria in Egypt has become complicated in recent years by the detection of Biomphalaria glabrata and a hybrid between both species; however, follow-up studies have demonstrated the disappearance of such species within Egypt. The National Schistosoma Control Program has made great strides with respect to the eradication of schistosoma; however, there has unfortunately been a reemergence of Schistosoma mansoni resistant to praziquantel. There are numerous factors that may influence the prevalence of snails in Egypt, including the construction of water projects, the increase in reclaimed areas, global climate change and pollution. Thus, continued field studies in addition to the cooperation of several scientists are needed to obtain an accurate representation of the status of this species. In addition, the determination of the genome sequence for Biomphalaria alexandrina and the

  19. GBR12909 attenuates amphetamine-induced striatal dopamine release as measured by [(11)C]raclopride continuous infusion PET scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villemagne, V L; Wong, D F; Yokoi, F; Stephane, M; Rice, K C; Matecka, D; Clough, D J; Dannals, R F; Rothman, R B

    1999-09-15

    Major neurochemical effects of methamphetamine include release of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE) via a carrier-mediated exchange mechanism. Preclinical research supports the hypothesis that elevations of mesolimbic DA mediate the addictive and reinforcing effects of methamphetamine and amphetamine. This hypothesis has not been adequately tested in humans. Previous in vivo rodent microdialysis demonstrated that the high affinity DA uptake inhibitor, GBR12909, attenuates cocaine- and amphetamine-induced increases in mesolimbic DA. The present study determined the ability of GBR12909 to attenuate amphetamine-induced increases in striatal DA as measured by [(11)C]raclopride continuous infusion positron emission tomography (PET) scans in two Papio anubis baboons. [(11)C]Raclopride was given in a continuous infusion paradigm resulting in a flat volume of distribution vs. time for up to 45 min postinjection. At that time, a 1.5 mg/kg amphetamine i.v. bolus was administered which caused a significant (30.3%) reduction in the volume of distribution (V(3)"). The percent reduction in the volume of distribution and, hence, a measure of the intrasynaptic DA release ranged between 22-41%. GBR12909 (1 mg/kg, slow i.v. infusion) was administered 90 min before the administration of the radiotracer. The comparison of the volume of distribution before and after administration of GBR12909 showed that GBR12909 inhibited amphetamine-induced DA release by 74%. These experiments suggest that GBR12909 is an important prototypical medication to test the hypothesis that stimulant-induced euphoria is mediated by DA and, if the DA hypothesis is correct, a potential treatment agent for cocaine and methamphetamine abuse. Furthermore, this quantitative approach demonstrates a way of testing various treatment medications, including other forms of GBR12909 such as a decanoate derivative.

  20. Old world monkeys and new age science: the evolution of nonhuman primate systems virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Robert E; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Korth, Marcus J; Katze, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    Nonhuman primate (NHP) biomedical models are critical to our understanding of human health and disease, yet we are still in the early stages of developing sufficient tools to support primate genomic research that allow us to better understand the basis of phenotypic traits in NHP models of disease. A mere 7 years ago, the limited NHP transcriptome profiling that was being performed was done using complementary DNA arrays based on human genome sequences, and the lack of NHP genomic information and immunologic reagents precluded the use of NHPs in functional genomic studies. Since then, significant strides have been made in developing genomics capabilities for NHP research, from the rhesus macaque genome sequencing project to the construction of the first macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray, paving the way for further resource development and additional primate sequencing projects. Complete published draft genome sequences are now available for the chimpanzee ( Chimpanzee Sequencing Analysis Consortium 2005), bonobo ( Prufer et al. 2012), gorilla ( Scally et al. 2012), and baboon ( Ensembl.org 2013), along with the recently completed draft genomes for the cynomolgus macaque and Chinese rhesus macaque. Against this backdrop of both expanding sequence data and the early application of sequence-derived DNA microarrays tools, we will contextualize the development of these community resources and their application to infectious disease research through a literature review of NHP models of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and models of respiratory virus infection. In particular, we will review the use of -omics approaches in studies of simian immunodeficiency virus and respiratory virus pathogenesis and vaccine development, emphasizing the acute and innate responses and the relationship of these to the course of disease and to the evolution of adaptive immunity.

  1. Alcohol ADME in primates studied with positron emission tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zizhong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The sensitivity to the intoxicating effects of alcohol as well as its adverse medical consequences differ markedly among individuals, which reflects in part differences in alcohol's absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME properties. The ADME of alcohol in the body and its relationship with alcohol's brain bioavailability, however, is not well understood. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: The ADME of C-11 labeled alcohol, CH(3 (11CH(2OH, 1 and C-11 and deuterium dual labeled alcohol, CH(3 (11CD(2OH, 2 in baboons was compared based on the principle that C-D bond is stronger than C-H bond, thus the reaction is slower if C-D bond breaking occurs in a rate-determining metabolic step. The following ADME parameters in peripheral organs and brain were derived from time activity curve (TAC of positron emission tomography (PET scans: peak uptake (C(max; peak uptake time (T(max, half-life of peak uptake (T(1/2, the area under the curve (AUC(60 min, and the residue uptake (C(60 min. KEY RESULTS: For 1 the highest uptake occurred in the kidney whereas for 2 it occurred in the liver. A deuterium isotope effect was observed in the kidneys in both animals studied and in the liver of one animal but not the other. The highest uptake for 1 and 2 in the brain was in striatum and cerebellum but 2 had higher uptake than 1 in all brain regions most evidently in thalamus and cingulate. Alcohol's brain uptake was significantly higher when given intravenously than when given orally and also when the animal was pretreated with a pharmacological dose of alcohol. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: The study shows that alcohol metabolism in peripheral organs had a large effect on alcohol's brain bioavailability. This study sets the stage for clinical investigation on how genetics, gender and alcohol abuse affect alcohol's ADME and its relationship to intoxication and medical consequences.

  2. Development of antifertility vaccine using sperm specific proteins

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    A H Bandivdekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm proteins are known to be associated with normal fertilization as auto- or iso-antibodies to these proteins may cause infertility. Therefore, sperm proteins have been considered to be the potential candidate for the development of antifertility vaccine. Some of the sperm proteins proved to be promising antigens for contraceptive vaccine includes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-C4, protein hyaluronidase (PH-20, and Eppin. Immunization with LDH-C4 reduced fertility in female baboons but not in female cynomolgus macaques. Active immunization with PH-20 resulted in 100 per cent inhibition of fertility in male guinea pigs but it induced autoimmune orchitis. Immunization with Eppin elicited high antibody titres in 78 per cent of immunized monkeys and induced infertility but the immunopathological effect of immunization was not examined. Human sperm antigen (80kDa HSA is a sperm specific, highly immunogenic and conserved sperm protein. Active immunization with 80kDa HSA induced immunological infertility in male and female rats. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of 80kDa HSA (Peptide NT and its peptides (Peptides 1, 2, 3 and 4 obtained by enzymatic digestion did not show homology with any of the known proteins in gene bank. Peptides NT, 1, 2 and 4 were found to mimic immunobiological activity of native protein. Passive administration of antibodies to peptides NT, 1, 2 and 4 induced infertility in male and female rats and peptide 1 was found to be most effective in suppressing fertility. Active immunization with keyhole limpet haemocynin (KLH conjugated synthetic peptide 1 impaired fertility in all the male rabbits and six of the seven male marmosets. The fertility was restored following decline in antibody titre. All these findings on 80kDA HAS suggest that the synthetic Peptide-1 of 80kDa HSA is the promising candidate for development of male contraceptive vaccine.

  3. The shrinking anthropoid nose, the human vomeronasal organ, and the language of anatomical reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy D; Laitman, Jeffrey T; Bhatnagar, Kunwar P

    2014-11-01

    Humans and most of our closest extant relatives, the anthropoids, are notable for their reduced "snout." The striking reduction in facial projection is only a superficial similarity. All anthropoids, including those with long faces (e.g., baboons), have lost numerous internal projections (turbinals) and spaces (recesses). In sum, this equates to the loss of certain regions of olfactory mucosa in anthropoids. In addition, an accessory olfactory organ, the vomeronasal organ, is non-functional or even absent in all catarrhine primates (humans, apes, monkeys). In this commentary, we revisit the concept of anatomical reductions as it pertains to the anthropoid nasal region. Certain nasal structures and spaces in anthropoids exhibit well-known attributes of other known vestiges, such as variability in form or number. The cupular recess (a vestige of the olfactory recess) and some rudimentary ethmoturbinals constitute reduced structures that presumably were fully functional in our ancestors. Humans and at least some apes retain a vestige that is bereft of chemosensory function (while in catarrhine monkeys it is completely absent). However, the function of the vomeronasal system also includes prenatal roles, which may be common to most or all mammals. Notably, neurons migrate to the brain along vomeronasal and terminal nerve axons during embryogenesis. The time-specific role of the VNO raises the possibility that our concept of functional reduction is too static. The vomeronasal system of humans and other catarrhine primates appears to qualify as a "chronological" vestige, one which fulfills part of its function during ontogeny, and then becomes lost or vestigial.

  4. Regeneration of a spinal ligament after total lumbar disk arthroplasty in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Bryan W; Berven, Sigurd H; Hu, Nianbin; Beatson, Helen J; De Deyne, Patrick G; McAfee, Paul C

    2009-01-01

    Total disk arthroplasty (TDA) is a new procedure that replaces the intervertebral disk space with an artificial motion segment and necessitates the resection of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL). We assessed whether a collagen-based graft made from porcine small-intestine submucosa (SIS) can be used as a regenerative scaffold to restore the function and structure of the ALL in the lumbar spine. A total of 10 mature male baboons underwent TDA at L5-L6 using one of two treatments: (1) TDA only (n = 5) or (2) TDA combined with SIS (n = 5). Six months postoperatively, mock revision surgery was performed to assess tissue adhesions followed by non-destructive multidirectional flexibility testing of the spinal segment. The vertebral segments were then processed for histology. The tissue adhesion score was 2.8 +/- 0.8 in the TDA only group and 1.8 +/- 1.4 in the TDA-SIS group (p = 0.2). Segmental range of motion and the length of the neutral zone were similar in both groups. Histology showed that the SIS scaffold led to an organized ligamentous structure with a significantly (p = 0.027) higher thickness (2.18 +/- 0.25 mm) compared to the connective tissue structure in the TDA-only group (1.66 +/- 0.33 mm). We concluded that using a SIS bioscaffold after TDA did not lead to increased great vessel adhesion while its use facilitated the formation of highly organized ligamentous tissues. However, the SIS- induced and newly formed ligamentous tissue anterior to the spinal segment did not lead to a measurable limitation of spinal extension.

  5. Using participatory risk mapping (PRM) to identify and understand people's perceptions of crop loss to animals in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Amanda D; Hill, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    Considering how people perceive risks to their livelihoods from local wildlife is central to (i) understanding the impact of crop damage by animals on local people and (ii) recognising how this influences their interactions with, and attitudes towards, wildlife. Participatory risk mapping (PRM) is a simple, analytical tool that can be used to identify and classify risk within communities. Here we use it to explore local people's perceptions of crop damage by wildlife and the animal species involved. Interviews (n = 93, n = 76) and seven focus groups were conducted in four villages around Budongo Forest Reserve, Uganda during 2004 and 2005. Farms (N = 129) were simultaneously monitored for crop loss. Farmers identified damage by wildlife as the most significant risk to their crops; risk maps highlighted its anomalous status compared to other anticipated challenges to agricultural production. PRM was further used to explore farmers' perceptions of animal species causing crop damage and the results of this analysis compared with measured crop losses. Baboons (Papio anubis) were considered the most problematic species locally but measurements of loss indicate this perceived severity was disproportionately high. In contrast goats (Capra hircus) were considered only a moderate risk, yet risk of damage by this species was significant. Surprisingly, for wild pigs (Potamochoerus sp), perceptions of severity were not as high as damage incurred might have predicted, although perceived incidence was greater than recorded frequency of damage events. PRM can assist researchers and practitioners to identify and explore perceptions of the risk of crop damage by wildlife. As this study highlights, simply quantifying crop loss does not determine issues that are important to local people nor the complex relationships between perceived risk factors. Furthermore, as PRM is easily transferable it may contribute to the identification and development of standardised approaches

  6. Multi-Bit Data Hiding Scheme for Compressing Secret Messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chung Kuo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of data hiding techniques usually considers two issues, embedding capacity and image quality. Consequently, in order to achieve high embedding capacity and good image quality, a data hiding scheme combining run-length encoding (RLE with multi-bit embedding is proposed in this paper. This work has three major contributions. First, the embedding capacity is increased 62% because the secret message is compressed before embedding into the cover image. Secondly, the proposed scheme keeps the multi-bit generalized exploiting modification direction (MGEMD characteristics, which are effective to reduce modified pixels in the cover image and to maintain good stego image quality. Finally, the proposed scheme can prevent modern steganalysis methods, such as RS steganalysis and SPAM (subtractive pixel adjacency matrix, and is compared to MiPOD (minimizing the power of the optimal detector scheme. From our simulation results and security discussions, we have the following results: First, there are no perceivable differences between the cover images and stego images from human inspection. For example, the average PSNR of stego images is about 44.61 dB when the secret message (80,000 bits is embedded for test cover images (such as airplane, baboon, Lena of size 512×512. Secondly, Appl. Sci. 2015, 5 1034 on average, 222,087 pixels were not modified after embedding for the cover image. That is to say, 12% less pixels are modified as compared to the MGEMD method. From the performance discussions, the proposed scheme achieves high embedding capacity and good image quality, but also maintains stego image security.

  7. 2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine (ADAM): an improved serotonin transporter ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oya, Shunichi; Choi, S.-R.; Hou, Catherine; Mu Mu; Kung, M.-P.; Acton, Paul D.; Siciliano, Michael; Kung, Hank F. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2000-04-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERT) are target-sites for commonly used antidepressants, such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and so on. Imaging of these sites in the living human brain may provide an important tool to evaluate the mechanisms of action as well as to monitor the treatment of depressed patients. Synthesis and characterization of an improved SERT imaging agent, ADAM (2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine)(7) was achieved. The new compound, ADAM(7), displayed an extremely potent binding affinity toward SERT (K{sub i}=0.013 nM, in membrane preparations of LLC-PK{sub 1}-cloned cell lines expressing the specific monoamine transporter). ADAM(7) also showed more than 1,000-fold selectivity for SERT over norepinephrine transporter (NET) and dopamine transporter (DAT) (K{sub i}=699 and 840 nM, for NET and DAT, respectively). The radiolabeled compound [{sup 125}I]ADAM(7) showed an excellent brain uptake in rats (1.41% dose at 2 min post intravenous [IV] injection), and consistently displayed the highest uptake (between 60-240 min post IV injection) in hypothalamus, a region with the highest density of SERT. The specific uptake of [{sup 125}I]ADAM(7) in the hypothalamus exhibited the highest target-to-nontarget ratio ([hypothalamus - cerebellum]/cerebellum was 3.97 at 120 min post IV injection). The preliminary imaging study of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in the brain of a baboon by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at 180-240 min post IV injection indicated a specific uptake in midbrain region rich in SERT. These data suggest that the new ligand [{sup 123}I]ADAM(7) may be useful for SPECT imaging of SERT binding sites in the human brain.

  8. Indices of environmental temperatures for primates in open habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Russell A; Weingrill, Tony; Barrett, Louise; Henzi, S Peter; Hill, Russel A; Barrett, Luise

    2004-01-01

    Studies of thermoregulation in primates are under-represented in the literature, although there is sufficient evidence to suggest that temperature represents an important ecological constraint. One of the problems in examining thermoregulation in primates, however, is the difficulty in quantifying the thermal environment, since shade temperatures, solar radiation, humidity and wind speed all serve to alter an animal's 'perceived' temperature. Since animals respond to their perceived temperature, we need methods to account for each of these factors, both individually and collectively, if we are to understand the integrated impact of the thermal environment on primates. Here, we present a review of some thermal indices currently available. Black bulb temperatures can account for the effect of solar radiation, with wind chill equivalent temperatures and the heat index providing quantifiable estimates of the relative impact of wind speed and humidity, respectively. We present three potential indices of the 'perceived environmental temperature' (PET) that account for the combined impact of solar radiation, humidity and wind speed on temperature, and perform a preliminary test of all of the climatic indices against behavioural data from a field study of chacma baboons ( Papio cynocephalus ursinus) at De Hoop Nature Reserve, South Africa. One measure of the perceived environmental temperature, PET2, is an effective thermal index, since it enters the models for feeding and resting behaviour, and also accounts for levels of allogrooming. Solar radiation intensity is an important factor underlying these relationships, although the wind chill equivalent temperature and humidity enter the models for other behaviours. Future studies should thus be mindful of the impact of each of these elements of the thermal environment. A detailed understanding of primate thermoregulation will only come with the development of biophysical models of the thermal characteristics of the species

  9. Calcium-dependent and calcium-sensitizing pathways in the mature and immature ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyman, Ronald I; Waleh, Nahid; Kajino, Hiroki; Roman, Christine; Mauray, Francoise

    2007-10-01

    Studies performed in sheep and baboons have shown that after birth, the normoxic muscle media of ductus arteriosus (DA) becomes profoundly hypoxic as it constricts and undergoes anatomic remodeling. We used isolated fetal lamb DA (pretreated with inhibitors of prostaglandin and nitric oxide production) to determine why the immature DA fails to remain tightly constricted during the hypoxic phase of remodeling. Under normoxic conditions, mature DA constricts to 70% of its maximal active tension (MAT). Half of its normoxic tension is due to Ca(2+) entry through calcium L-channels and store-operated calcium (SOC) channels. The other half is independent of extracellular Ca(2+) and is unaffected by inhibitors of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release (ryanodine) or reuptake [cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)]. The mature DA relaxes slightly during hypoxia (to 60% MAT) due to decreases in calcium L-channel-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Inhibitors of Rho kinase and tyrosine kinase inhibit both Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent DA tension. Although Rho kinase activity may increase during gestation, immature DA develop lower tensions than mature DA, primarily because of differences in the way they process Ca(2+). Calcium L-channel expression increases with advancing gestation. Under normoxic conditions, differences in calcium L-channel-mediated Ca(2+) entry account for differences in tension between immature (60% MAT) and mature (70% MAT) DA. Under hypoxic conditions, differences in both calcium L-channel-dependent and calcium L-channel-independent Ca(2+) entry, account for differences in tension between immature (33% MAT) and mature (60% MAT) DA. Stimulation of Ca(2+) entry through reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange or CPA-induced SOC channel activity constrict the DA and eliminate differences between immature and mature DA during both hypoxia and normoxia.

  10. Human transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) is downregulated during decidualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strakova, Zuzana; Reed, Jennifer; Ihnatovych, Ivanna

    2010-06-01

    Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) is known to bind to a variety of transcription factors to control cell differentiation and organ development. However, its role in uterine physiology has not yet been described. To study its regulation during the unique process of differentiation of fibroblasts into decidual cells (decidualization), we utilized the human uterine fibroblast (HuF) in vitro cell model. Immunocytochemistry data demonstrated that the majority of the TAZ protein is localized in the nucleus. Treatment of HuF cells with the embryonic stimulus cytokine interleukin 1 beta in the presence of steroid hormones (estradiol-17 beta and medroxyprogesterone acetate) for 13 days did not cause any apparent TAZ mRNA changes but resulted in a significant TAZ protein decline (approximately 62%) in total cell lysates. Analysis of cytosolic and nuclear extracts revealed that the decline of total TAZ was caused primarily by a drop of TAZ protein levels in the nucleus. TAZ was localized on the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor response element site (located at position -1200 bp relative to the transcription start site) of the genomic region of decidualization marker insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) in HuF cells as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation. TAZ is also present in human endometrium tissue as confirmed by immunohistochemistry. During the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, specific TAZ staining particularly diminishes in the stroma, suggesting its participation during the decidualization process, as well as implantation. During early baboon pregnancy, TAZ protein expression remains minimal in the endometrium close to the implantation site. In summary, the presented evidence shows for the first time to date TAZ protein in the human uterine tract, its downregulation during in vitro decidualization, and its localization on the IGFBP1 promoter region, all of which indicate its presence in the uterine

  11. Pattern of maternal circulating CRH in laboratory-housed squirrel and owl monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, M L; Williams, L E; Gibson, S V; Schulkin, J; Helfers, J; Zorrilla, E P

    2010-11-01

    The anthropoid primate placenta appears to be unique in producing corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Placental CRH is involved in an endocrine circuit key to the production of estrogens during pregnancy. CRH induces cortisol production by the maternal and fetal adrenal glands, leading to further placental CRH production. CRH also stimulates the fetal adrenal glands to produce dehydroepiandrostendione sulfate (DHEAS), which the placenta converts into estrogens. There are at least two patterns of maternal circulating CRH across gestation among anthropoids. Monkeys examined to date (Papio and Callithrix) have an early-to-mid gestational peak of circulating CRH, followed by a steady decline to a plateau level, with a possible rise near parturition. In contrast, humans and great apes have an exponential rise in circulating CRH peaking at parturition. To further document and compare patterns of maternal circulating CRH in anthropoid primates, we collected monthly blood samples from 14 squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis) and ten owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae) during pregnancy. CRH immunoreactivity was measured from extracted plasma by using solid-phase radioimmunoassay. Both squirrel and owl monkeys displayed a mid-gestational peak in circulating CRH: days 45-65 of the 152-day gestation for squirrel monkeys (mean±SEM CRH=2,694±276 pg/ml) and days 60-80 of the 133-day gestation for owl monkeys (9,871±974 pg/ml). In squirrel monkeys, circulating CRH declined to 36% of mean peak value by 2 weeks before parturition and then appeared to increase; the best model for circulating CRH over gestation in squirrel monkeys was a cubic function, similar to previous results for baboons and marmosets. In owl monkeys, circulating CRH appeared to reach plateau with no subsequent significant decline approaching parturition, although a cubic function was the best fit. This study provides additional evidence for a mid-gestational peak of maternal circulating CRH in ancestral

  12. Effect of ionizing radiation on hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells: Role of apoptosis and potential therapeutic significance of anti-apoptotic treatments; Effet des rayonnements ionisants sur les cellules souches et progeniteurs hematopoietiques : place de l'apoptose et interet therapeutique potentiel des traitements antiapoptotiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouet, M.; Mourcin, F.; Grenier, N.; Mayol, J.F.; Leroux, V. [Unite de Radiohematologie experimentale, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France); Sotto, J.J. [Inst. Albert Bonniot, La Tronche (France); Herodin, F. [Unite de Radiohematologie experimentale, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France)

    2002-07-01

    Bone marrow aplasia observed following ionizing radiation exposure (Total Body Irradiation; gamma dose range: 2-10 Gy) is a result, in particular, of the radiation-induced (RI) apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We have previously shown in a baboon model of mobilized peripheral blood CD34{sup +} cell irradiation in vitro that RI apoptosis in HSPC was an early event, mostly occurring within the first 24 hours, which involves the CD95 Fas pathway. Apoptosis may be significantly reduced with a combination of 4 cytokines (4F): Stem Cell Factor (SCF), FLT-3 Ligand (FL), thrombopoietin (TPO), and interleukin-3 (IL-3), each at 50 ng{center_dot}mL{sup -1} (15% survival versus <3% untreated cells, 24 h post-irradiation at 2.5 Gy). In this study we show that addition of TNF-{alpha}(800 IU/ml) induces an increase in 4F efficacy in terms of cell survival 24 h after incubation (26% survival after 24 h irradiation exposure at 2.5 Gy) and amplification (k) of CD34{sup +} cells after 6 days in a serum free culture medium (SFM) (k{sub CD34{sup +}} = 4.3 and 6.3 respectively for 4F and successive 4F + TNF-{alpha}/4F treatments). In addition, the 4F combination allows culture on pre-established allogenic irradiated stromal cells in vitro at 4 Gy (k{sub CD34{sup +}} = 4.5). Overall this study suggests (i) the potential therapeutic interest for an early administration of anti-apoptotic cytokines with or without hematopoiesis inhibitors (emergency cytokine therapy) and (ii) the feasibility in the accidentally irradiated individual, of autologous cell therapy based on ex vivo expansion in order to perform autograft of residual HSPC collected after the accident. (author)

  13. Evolution of the primate trypanolytic factor APOL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Russell; Genovese, Giulio; Canon, Chelsea; Kovacsics, Daniella; Higgins, Matthew K; Carrington, Mark; Winkler, Cheryl A; Kopp, Jeffrey; Rotimi, Charles; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Doumatey, Ayo; Ayodo, George; Alper, Seth L; Pollak, Martin R; Friedman, David J; Raper, Jayne

    2014-05-20

    ApolipoproteinL1 (APOL1) protects humans and some primates against several African trypanosomes. APOL1 genetic variants strongly associated with kidney disease in African Americans have additional trypanolytic activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the cause of acute African sleeping sickness. We combined genetic, physiological, and biochemical studies to explore coevolution between the APOL1 gene and trypanosomes. We analyzed the APOL1 sequence in modern and archaic humans and baboons along with geographic distribution in present day Africa to understand how the kidney risk variants evolved. Then, we tested Old World monkey, human, and engineered APOL1 variants for their ability to kill human infective trypanosomes in vivo to identify the molecular mechanism whereby human trypanolytic APOL1 variants evade T. brucei rhodesiense virulence factor serum resistance-associated protein (SRA). For one APOL1 kidney risk variant, a two-residue deletion of amino acids 388 and 389 causes a shift in a single lysine residue that mimics the Old World monkey sequence, which augments trypanolytic activity by preventing SRA binding. A second human APOL1 kidney risk allele, with an amino acid substitution that also restores sequence alignment with Old World monkeys, protected against T. brucei rhodesiense due in part to reduced SRA binding. Both APOL1 risk variants induced tissue injury in murine livers, the site of transgenic gene expression. Our study shows that both genetic variants of human APOL1 that protect against T. brucei rhodesiense have recapitulated molecular signatures found in Old World monkeys and raises the possibility that APOL1 variants have broader innate immune activity that extends beyond trypanosomes.

  14. Frequent simian foamy virus infection in persons occupationally exposed to nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, William M; Bhullar, Vinod; Shanmugam, Vedapuri; Cong, Mian-Er; Parekh, Bharat; Lerche, Nicholas W; Yee, JoAnn L; Ely, John J; Boneva, Roumiana; Chapman, Louisa E; Folks, Thomas M; Heneine, Walid

    2004-03-01

    The recognition that AIDS originated as a zoonosis heightens public health concerns associated with human infection by simian retroviruses endemic in nonhuman primates (NHPs). These retroviruses include simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV), simian type D retrovirus (SRV), and simian foamy virus (SFV). Although occasional infection with SIV, SRV, or SFV in persons occupationally exposed to NHPs has been reported, the characteristics and significance of these zoonotic infections are not fully defined. Surveillance for simian retroviruses at three research centers and two zoos identified no SIV, SRV, or STLV infection in 187 participants. However, 10 of 187 persons (5.3%) tested positive for SFV antibodies by Western blot (WB) analysis. Eight of the 10 were males, and 3 of the 10 worked at zoos. SFV integrase gene (int) and gag sequences were PCR amplified from the peripheral blood lymphocytes available from 9 of the 10 persons. Phylogenetic analysis showed SFV infection originating from chimpanzees (n = 8) and baboons (n = 1). SFV seropositivity for periods of 8 to 26 years (median, 22 years) was documented for six workers for whom archived serum samples were available, demonstrating long-standing SFV infection. All 10 persons reported general good health, and secondary transmission of SFV was not observed in three wives available for WB and PCR testing. Additional phylogenetic analysis of int and gag sequences provided the first direct evidence identifying the source chimpanzees of the SFV infection in two workers. This study documents more frequent infection with SFV than with other simian retroviruses in persons working with NHPs and provides important information on the natural history and species origin of these infections. Our data highlight the importance of studies to better define the public health implications of zoonotic SFV infections.

  15. Radiosynthesis and preliminary evaluation of Z.W.-90 and Z.W.-110, two novel acetylenic pyridines for imaging the nicotinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassiou, M.; Giboureau, N. [Sydney Univ., Brain and Mind Research Institute, NSW (Australia); Chellapan, S.; Wei, Z.L.; Kozikowski, A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, Dept. of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, IL (United States); Henderson, D.; Fulton, R. [RPAH Sydney, Dept. PET and Nuclear Medicine (Australia); Xiao, Y.; Kellar, K. [Georgetown Univ., Dept. of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Washington, DC (United States); Guilloteau, D.; Emond, P. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U619, 37 - Tours (France); Dolle, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV, Institut d' Imagerie BioMedicale, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2008-02-15

    Central nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (n.A.Ch.R.s) have been implicated in learning memory processes and neuro-psychiatric disorders. Recently it was reported that the introduction of a substituted alkynyl group into the C-5 position of the pyridinyl ring of A-84543, significantly increased the selectivity for the n.A.Ch.R. containing {beta}{sub 2} subunits over {beta}{sub 4} subunits. Two selected candidates, Z.W.-90 and Z.W.-110 were labelled with carbon{sup 11} and evaluated in vivo.{sup 11}C Z.W.-90 penetrated rapidly into the brain, with maximum uptake in the thalamus and cerebellum 2 min post injection followed by clearance. The washout from cerebellum was faster than from thalamus, suggesting that specific binding can be optimally measured at 20 min post injection; Pretreatment of the baboon with nicotine resulted in markedly decreased uptake of the radioligand. {sup 11}C Z.W.-110 also penetrated rapidly into the brain, with a high evident uptake in the thalamus within 5 min. Surprisingly there was also considerable uptake in the striatum. Pretreatment with nicotine resulted in inhibition of uptake of 8 and 1%, in the thalamus and cerebellum, respectively. In pretreatment studies using unlabelled Z.W.-110, 32% inhibition of radioligand uptake was observed in the thalamus and striatum while uptake in the cerebellum was reduced by 24 %.While further work will be necessary in the development of optimal imaging agents for n.A.Ch.Rs, efforts will be made to examine the potential of these newly developed radioligands to serve diagnostic agents in the early detection of neurological disorders. (N.C.)

  16. Novel radioiodinated neuroreceptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musachio, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Since many bioactive compounds do not readily undergo direct labeling with radioisotopes of iodine, the novel prosthetic groups, p-toluenesulfonate esters of (E)- and (Z)-3-(tri-n-butylstannyl)prop-2-en-1-ol, were designed to complement existing methods for radioiodine incorporation. The preparation and synthetic utility of these bifunctional reagents are described. These vinylstannylated alkylating agents were coupled with nucleophilic functionalities (amide nitrogen, secondary amine, tertiary alcohol) in acceptable to excellent yields. Regio- and stereospecific radioiododestannylation with retention of configuration occurred under mild, no-carrier-added conditions to give the corresponding radiolabeled N- or O-iodoallyl analogs in good radiochemical yields with high specific radioactivities. The methodology is versatile and well-suited to selective labeling of small molecules with radioisotopes of iodine. Of particular importance are the N-iodoallyl analogs of spiperone and the O-iodoallyl analog of diprenorphine for in vitro and in vivo studies of dopamine D[sub 2] and opioid receptors. For in vivo studies of central serotonin 5-HT[sub 2] receptors via single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), novel radioiodinated N1-alkyl-2-iodo-LSD derivatives were synthesized. These target radioligands were prepared in moderate radiochemical yields. D-(+)-N1-ethyl-2-iodo-LSD, EIL, was identified as the most promising candidate of this series. [[sup 125]I]-EIL binds to central 5-HT[sub 2] receptors with high affinity and selectivity in vitro and labels 5-HT[sub 2] receptors in vivo with high specificity. For preparation of EIL labeled with [sup 123]I, an optimized procedure was developed that gave [[sup 123]I]-EIL in acceptable yields. This radioligand allowed visualization of serotonin 5-HT[sub 2] sites in living baboon brain via SPECT. [[sup 123]I]-EIL may serve as an agent for tomographic studies of human cerebral 5-HT[sub 2] receptors in normal and disease states.

  17. The SKINT1-like gene is inactivated in hominoids but not in all primate species: implications for the origin of dendritic epidermal T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Hassan Mohamed

    Full Text Available Dendritic epidermal T cells, which express an invariant Vγ5Vδ1 T-cell receptor and account for 95% of all resident T cells in the mouse epidermis, play a critical role in skin immune surveillance. These γδ T cells are generated by positive selection in the fetal thymus, after which they migrate to the skin. The development of dendritic epidermal T cells is critically dependent on the Skint1 gene expressed specifically in keratinocytes and thymic epithelial cells, suggesting an indispensable role for Skint1 in the selection machinery for specific intraepithelial lymphocytes. Phylogenetically, rodents have functional SKINT1 molecules, but humans and chimpanzees have a SKINT1-like (SKINT1L gene with multiple inactivating mutations. In the present study, we analyzed SKINT1L sequences in representative primate species and found that all hominoid species have a common inactivating mutation, but that Old World monkeys such as olive baboons, green monkeys, cynomolgus macaques and rhesus macaques have apparently functional SKINT1L sequences, indicating that SKINT1L was inactivated in a common ancestor of hominoids. Interestingly, the epidermis of cynomolgus macaques contained a population of dendritic-shaped γδ T cells expressing a semi-invariant Vγ10/Vδ1 T-cell receptor. However, this population of macaque T cells differed from rodent dendritic epidermal T cells in that their Vγ10/Vδ1 T-cell receptors displayed junctional diversity and expression of Vγ10 was not epidermis-specific. Therefore, macaques do not appear to have rodent-type dendritic epidermal T cells despite having apparently functional SKINT1L. Comprehensive bioinformatics analysis indicates that SKINT1L emerged in an ancestor of placental mammals but was inactivated or lost multiple times in mammalian evolution and that Skint1 arose by gene duplication in a rodent lineage, suggesting that authentic dendritic epidermal T cells are presumably unique to rodents.

  18. Animal studies of the functional consequences of suboptimal polyunsaturated fatty acid status during pregnancy, lactation and early post-natal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenna, J Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Scores of animal studies demonstrate that seed oils replete with linoleic acid and very low in linolenic acid fed as the exclusive source of fat through pregnancy and lactation result in visual, cognitive, and behavioural deficits in the offspring. Commodity peanut, sunflower, and safflower oils fed to mother rats, guinea pigs, rhesus monkeys, and baboons induce predictable changes in tissue polyunsaturated fatty acid composition that are abnormal in free-living land mammals as well as changes in neurotransmitter levels, catecholamines, and signalling compounds compared with animals with a supply of ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acid. These diets consistently induce functional deficits in electroretinograms, reflex responses, reward or avoidance induced learning, maze learning, behaviour, and motor development compared with ω3 replete groups. Boosting neural tissue docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) by feeding preformed DHA enhances visual and cognitive function. Though no human randomized controlled trials on minimal ω3 requirements in pregnancy and lactation have been conducted, the weight of animal evidence compellingly shows that randomizing pregnant or lactating humans to diets that include high linoleate oils as the sole source of fat would be frankly unethical because they would result in suboptimal child development. Increasing use of commodity ω3-deficient oils in developing countries, many in the name of heart health, will limit brain development of the next generation and can be easily corrected at minimal expense by substituting high oleic acid versions of these same oils, in many cases blended with small amounts of α-linolenic acid oils like flax or perilla oil. Inclusion of DHA in these diets is likely to further enhance visual and neural development.

  19. Carpal kinematics in quadrupedal monkeys: towards a better understanding of wrist morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daver, Guillaume; Berillon, Gilles; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide new data on carpal kinematics in primates in order to deepen our understanding of the relationships between wrist morphology and function. To that end, we provide preliminary data on carpal kinematics in seven species of quadrupedal monkeys that have not been previously investigated in this regard (cercopithecoids, n = 4; ceboids, n = 3). We radiographed wrists from cadavers at their maximum radial and ulnar deviations, as well as at maximum flexion and extension. We took angular measurements to quantify the contribution of the mobility of the two main wrist joints (antebrachiocarpal and midcarpal) with respect to total wrist mobility. We also recorded qualitative observations. Our quantitative results show few clear differences among quadrupedal monkeys for radioulnar deviation and flexion-extension: all the primates studied exhibit a greater midcarpal mobility (approximately 54-83% of the total range of motion) than antebrachiocarpal mobility; however, we identified two patterns of carpal kinematics that show the functional impact of previously recognised morphological variations in quadrupedal monkeys. Firstly, qualitative results show that the partition that divides the proximal joint of the wrist in ceboids results in less mobility and more stability of the ulnar part of the wrist than is seen in cercopithecoids. Secondly, we show that the olive baboon specimen (Papio anubis) is characterised by limited antebrachiocarpal mobility for extension; this effect is likely the result of a radial process that projects on the scaphoid notch, as well as an intraarticular meniscus. Because of these close relationships between carpal kinematics and morphology in quadrupedal monkeys, we hypothesise that, to some extent, these functional tendencies are related to their locomotor hand postures.

  20. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Lisa M; Vallender, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of the potent hallucinogen, salvinorin A in primates parallels the rapid onset and short duration of effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Jacob M; Xu, Youwen; Schiffer, Wynne; Shea, Colleen; Carter, Pauline; Fowler, Joanna S

    2008-07-01

    Salvia divinorum, a mint plant originally used by the Mazatecs of Oaxaca, Mexico in spiritual rituals has gained popularity, in smoked form, as a legal hallucinogen in the United States and Europe. Abuse results in rapid onset and short-lasting effects that include visual hallucinations and motor-function impairment. Salvinorin A, the psychoactive component of S. divinorum, is a uniquely potent agonist at kappa-opioid receptors, targets for new therapeutic drugs. We labeled salvinorin A with C-11 by acylation of salvinorin B with [11C]-acetyl chloride to study whether its kinetic behavior in the brain parallels its uniquely fast, yet brief physiological effects. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies performed in 6 adult female baboons indicated extremely rapid brain uptake reaching a peak accounting for 3.3% of the total administered dose in 40 s and clearing with a half-life of 8 min. [11C]-salvinorin A was distributed throughout the brain with the highest concentration in the cerebellum and a notable concentration in the visual cortex, perhaps accounting for its physiological effects when smoked. Naloxone administration did not reduce the overall concentration of [11C]-salvinorin A significantly nor did it change its regional distribution. Peripheral organ kinetics suggested at least two modes of metabolism and excretion occur: through the renal and biliary systems. Our findings have revealed that the exceptionally rapid uptake and brief duration of salvinorin A in the brain match the time-course of visual hallucinations for S. divinorum when smoked. The effects of salvinorin A may occur at <10 mug in the human brain, emphasizing its remarkable potency.

  2. Isolation, expression, and chromosomal localization of the human mitochondrial capsule selenoprotein gene (MCSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, Hanne; Schwemmer, M.; Tessmann, D.; Murphy, D. [Institut fuer Humangenetik der Universitaet, Goettingen (Germany)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The mitochondrial capsule selenoprotein (MCS) (HGMW-approved symbol MCSP) is one of three proteins that are important for the maintenance and stabilization of the crescent structure of the sperm mitochondria. We describe here the isolation of a cDNA, the exon-intron organization, the expression, and the chromosomal localization of the human MCS gene. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the human and mouse MCS cDNAs reveals that the 5{prime}- and 3{prime}-untranslated sequences are more conserved (71%) than the coding sequences (59%). The open reading frame encodes a 116-amino-acid protein and lacks the UGA codons, which have been reported to encode the selenocysteines in the N-terminal of the deduced mouse protein. The deduced human protein shows a low degree of amino acid sequence identity to the mouse protein. The deduced human protein shows a low degree of amino acid sequence identity to the mouse protein (39%). The most striking homology lies in the dicysteine motifs. Northern and Southern zooblot analyses reveal that the MCS gene in human, baboon, and bovine is more conserved than its counterparts in mouse and rat. The single intron in the human MCS gene is approximately 6 kb and interrupts the 5{prime}-untranslated region at a position equivalent to that in the mouse and rat genes. Northern blot and in situ hybridization experiments demonstrate that the expression of the human MCS gene is restricted to haploid spermatids. The human gene was assigned to q21 of chromosome 1. 30 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Can fertility signals lead to quality signals? Insights from the evolution of primate sexual swellings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchard, Elise; Courtiol, Alexandre; Benavides, Julio A; Knapp, Leslie A; Raymond, Michel; Cowlishaw, Guy

    2009-05-22

    The sexual swellings of female primates have generated a great deal of interest in evolutionary biology. Two hypotheses recently proposed to elucidate their functional significance argue that maximal swelling size advertises either female fertility within a cycle or female quality across cycles. Published evidence favours the first hypothesis, and further indicates that larger swellings advertise higher fertility between cycles. If so, a male preference for large swellings might evolve, driving females to use swellings as quality indicators, as proposed by the second hypothesis. In this paper, we explore this possibility using a combination of empirical field data and mathematical modelling. We first test and find support for three key predictions of the female-quality hypothesis in wild chacma baboons (Papio ursinus): (i) inter-individual differences in swelling size are maintained across consecutive cycles, (ii) females in better condition have larger swellings and higher reproductive success, and (iii) males preferentially choose females with large swellings. We then develop an individual-based simulation model that indicates that females producing larger swellings can achieve higher mating success even when female-female competition is low and within-female variance in the trait is high. Taken together, our findings show that once sexual swellings have evolved as fertility signals, they might, in certain socio-sexual systems, be further selected to act as quality signals. These results, by reconciling two hypotheses, help to clarify the processes underlying sexual swelling evolution. More generally, our findings suggest that mate choice for direct benefits (fertility) can lead to indirect benefits (good genes).

  4. The genome sequence of Brucella pinnipedialis B2/94 sheds light on the evolutionary history of the genus Brucella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the discovery of the Malta fever agent, Brucella melitensis, in the 19th century, six terrestrial mammal-associated Brucella species were recognized over the next century. More recently the number of novel Brucella species has increased and among them, isolation of species B. pinnipedialis and B. ceti from marine mammals raised many questions about their origin as well as on the evolutionary history of the whole genus. Results We report here on the first complete genome sequence of a Brucella strain isolated from marine mammals, Brucella pinnipedialis strain B2/94. A whole gene-based phylogenetic analysis shows that five main groups of host-associated Brucella species rapidly diverged from a likely free-living ancestor close to the recently isolated B. microti. However, this tree lacks the resolution required to resolve the order of divergence of those groups. Comparative analyses focusing on a genome segments unshared between B. microti and B. pinnipedialis, b gene deletion/fusion events and c positions and numbers of Brucella specific IS711 elements in the available Brucella genomes provided enough information to propose a branching order for those five groups. Conclusions In this study, it appears that the closest relatives of marine mammal Brucella sp. are B. ovis and Brucella sp. NVSL 07-0026 isolated from a baboon, followed by B. melitensis and B. abortus strains, and finally the group consisting of B. suis strains, including B. canis and the group consisting of the single B. neotomae species. We were not able, however, to resolve the order of divergence of the two latter groups.

  5. Social interactions through the eyes of macaques and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard McFarland

    Full Text Available Group-living primates frequently interact with each other to maintain social bonds as well as to compete for valuable resources. Observing such social interactions between group members provides individuals with essential information (e.g. on the fighting ability or altruistic attitude of group companions to guide their social tactics and choice of social partners. This process requires individuals to selectively attend to the most informative content within a social scene. It is unclear how non-human primates allocate attention to social interactions in different contexts, and whether they share similar patterns of social attention to humans. Here we compared the gaze behaviour of rhesus macaques and humans when free-viewing the same set of naturalistic images. The images contained positive or negative social interactions between two conspecifics of different phylogenetic distance from the observer; i.e. affiliation or aggression exchanged by two humans, rhesus macaques, Barbary macaques, baboons or lions. Monkeys directed a variable amount of gaze at the two conspecific individuals in the images according to their roles in the interaction (i.e. giver or receiver of affiliation/aggression. Their gaze distribution to non-conspecific individuals was systematically varied according to the viewed species and the nature of interactions, suggesting a contribution of both prior experience and innate bias in guiding social attention. Furthermore, the monkeys' gaze behavior was qualitatively similar to that of humans, especially when viewing negative interactions. Detailed analysis revealed that both species directed more gaze at the face than the body region when inspecting individuals, and attended more to the body region in negative than in positive social interactions. Our study suggests that monkeys and humans share a similar pattern of role-sensitive, species- and context-dependent social attention, implying a homologous cognitive mechanism of

  6. A longitudinal analysis of the effects of age on the blood plasma metabolome in the common marmoset, Callithrix jacchus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jessica M; Tran, ViLinh; Wachtman, Lynn M; Green, Cara L; Jones, Dean P; Promislow, Daniel E L

    2016-04-01

    Primates tend to be long-lived for their size with humans being the longest lived of all primates. There are compelling reasons to understand the underlying age-related processes that shape human lifespan. But the very fact of our long lifespan that makes it so compelling, also makes it especially difficult to study. Thus, in studies of aging, researchers have turned to non-human primate models, including chimpanzees, baboons, and rhesus macaques. More recently, the common marmoset, Callithrix jacchus, has been recognized as a particularly valuable model in studies of aging, given its small size, ease of housing in captivity, and relatively short lifespan. However, little is known about the physiological changes that occur as marmosets age. To begin to fill in this gap, we utilized high sensitivity metabolomics to define the longitudinal biochemical changes associated with age in the common marmoset. We measured 2104 metabolites from blood plasma at three separate time points over a 17-month period, and we completed both a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of the metabolome. We discovered hundreds of metabolites associated with age and body weight in both male and female animals. Our longitudinal analysis identified age-associated metabolic pathways that were not found in our cross-sectional analysis. Pathways enriched for age-associated metabolites included tryptophan, nucleotide, and xenobiotic metabolism, suggesting these biochemical pathways might play an important role in the basic mechanisms of aging in primates. Moreover, we found that many metabolic pathways associated with age were sex specific. Our work illustrates the power of longitudinal approaches, even in a short time frame, to discover novel biochemical changes that occur with age.

  7. Allelic lineages of the ficolin genes (FCNs are passed from ancestral to descendant primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Hummelshøj

    Full Text Available The ficolins recognize carbohydrates and acetylated compounds on microorganisms and dying host cells and are able to activate the lectin pathway of the complement system. In humans, three ficolin genes have been identified: FCN1, FCN2 and FCN3, which encode ficolin-1, ficolin-2 and ficolin-3, respectively. Rodents have only two ficolins designated ficolin-A and ficolin-B that are closely related to human ficolin-1, while the rodent FCN3 orthologue is a pseudogene. Ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 have so far only been observed in humans. Thus, we performed a systematic investigation of the FCN genes in non-human primates. The exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FCN1-3 genes were sequenced in the following primate species: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus macaque, baboon and common marmoset. We found that the exon organisation of the FCN genes was very similar between all the non-human primates and the human FCN genes. Several variations in the FCN genes were found in more than one primate specie suggesting that they were carried from one species to another including humans. The amino acid diversity of the ficolins among human and non-human primate species was estimated by calculating the Shannon entropy revealing that all three proteins are generally highly conserved. Ficolin-1 and ficolin-2 showed the highest diversity, whereas ficolin-3 was more conserved. Ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 were present in non-human primate sera with the same characteristic oligomeric structures as seen in human serum. Taken together all the FCN genes show the same characteristics in lower and higher primates. The existence of trans-species polymorphisms suggests that different FCN allelic lineages may be passed from ancestral to descendant species.

  8. A quantitative model for the in vivo assessment of drug binding sites with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mintun, M.A.; Raichle, M.E.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Wooten, G.F.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-03-01

    We propose an in vivo method for use with positron emission tomography (PET) that results in a quantitative characterization of neuroleptic binding sites using radiolabeled spiperone. The data are analyzed using a mathematical model that describes transport, nonspecific binding, and specific binding in the brain. The model demonstrates that the receptor quantities Bmax (i.e., the number of binding sites) and KD-1 (i.e., the binding affinity) are not separably ascertainable with tracer methodology in human subjects. We have, therefore, introduced a new term, the binding potential, equivalent to the product BmaxKD-1, which reflects the capacity of a given tissue, or region of a tissue, for ligand-binding site interaction. The procedure for obtaining these measurements is illustrated with data from sequential PET scans of baboons after intravenous injection of carrier-added (18F)spiperone. From these data we estimate the brain tissue nonspecific binding of spiperone to be in the range of 94.2 to 95.3%, and the regional brain spiperone permeability (measured as the permeability-surface area product) to be in the range of 0.025 to 0.036 cm3/(s X ml). The binding potential of the striatum ranged from 17.4 to 21.6; these in vivo estimates compare favorably to in vitro values in the literature. To our knowledge this represents the first direct evidence that PET can be used to characterize quantitatively, locally and in vivo, drug binding sites in brain. The ability to make such measurements with PET should permit the detailed investigation of diseases thought to result from disorders of receptor function.

  9. Correction of an input function for errors introduced with automated blood sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlyer, D.J.; Dewey, S.L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Accurate kinetic modeling of PET data requires an precise arterial plasma input function. The use of automated blood sampling machines has greatly improved the accuracy but errors can be introduced by the dispersion of the radiotracer in the sampling tubing. This dispersion results from three effects. The first is the spreading of the radiotracer in the tube due to mass transfer. The second is due to the mechanical action of the peristaltic pump and can be determined experimentally from the width of a step function. The third is the adsorption of the radiotracer on the walls of the tubing during transport through the tube. This is a more insidious effect since the amount recovered from the end of the tube can be significantly different than that introduced into the tubing. We have measured the simple mass transport using [{sup 18}F]fluoride in water which we have shown to be quantitatively recovered with no interaction with the tubing walls. We have also carried out experiments with several radiotracers including [{sup 18}F]Haloperidol, [{sup 11}C]L-deprenyl, [{sup 18}]N-methylspiroperidol ([{sup 18}F]NMS) and [{sup 11}C]buprenorphine. In all cases there was some retention of the radiotracer by untreated silicone tubing. The amount retained in the tubing ranged from 6% for L-deprenyl to 30% for NMS. The retention of the radiotracer was essentially eliminated after pretreatment with the relevant unlabeled compound. For example less am 2% of the [{sup 18}F]NMS was retained in tubing treated with unlabelled NMS. Similar results were obtained with baboon plasma although the amount retained in the untreated tubing was less in all cases. From these results it is possible to apply a mathematical correction to the measured input function to account for mechanical dispersion and to apply a chemical passivation to the tubing to reduce the dispersion due to adsorption of the radiotracer on the tubing walls.

  10. Cu(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) radiopharmaceutical binding to serum albumin: further definition of species dependence and associated substituent effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basken, Nathan E. [Division of Nuclear Pharmacy, Department of Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Green, Mark A. [Division of Nuclear Pharmacy, Department of Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)], E-mail: magreen@purdue.edu

    2009-07-15

    Introduction: The pyruvaldehyde bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-PTSM) and diacetyl bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ATSM) radiopharmaceuticals exhibit strong, species-dependent binding to the IIA site of human serum albumin (HSA), while the related ethylglyoxal bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ETS) radiopharmaceutical appears to exhibit only nonspecific binding to HSA and animal serum albumins. Methods: To further probe the structural basis for the species dependence of this albumin binding interaction, we examined protein binding of these three radiopharmaceuticals in solutions of albumin and/or serum from a broader array of mammalian species (rat, sheep, donkey, rabbit, cow, pig, dog, baboon, mouse, cat and elephant). We also evaluated the albumin binding of several copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelates offering more diverse substitution of the ligand backbone. Results: Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM exhibit a strong interaction with HSA that is not apparent with the albumins of other species, while the binding of Cu-ETS to albumin is much less species dependent. The strong interaction of Cu-PTSM with HSA does not appear to simply correlate with variation, relative to the animal albumins, of a single amino acid lining HSA's IIA site. Those agents that selectively interact with HSA share the common feature of only methyl or hydrogen substitution at the carbon atoms of the diimine fragment of the ligand backbone. Conclusions: The interspecies variations in albumin binding of Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are not simply explained by unique amino acid substitutions in the IIA binding pocket of the serum albumins. However, the specific affinity for this region of HSA is disrupted when substituents bulkier than a methyl group appear on the imine carbons of the copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelate.

  11. Synthesis and PET imaging of the benzodiazepine receptor tracer [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]iomazenil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Ronald M.; Horti, Andrew G.; Bremner, J. Douglas; Stratton, Morgan D.; Dannals, Robert F.; Ravert, Hayden T.; Zea-Ponce, Yolanda; Ng, Chin K.; Dey, Holley M.; Soufer, Robert; Charney, Dennis S.; Mazza, Samuel M.; Sparks, Richard B.; Stubbs, James B.; Innis, Robert B

    1995-07-01

    The central benzodiazepine receptor tracer [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]iomazenil (Ro 16-0154) was synthesized by alkylation of the desmethyl precursor noriomazenil with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. The [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I (prepared by reduction of [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} with LiAlH{sub 4} followed by reaction with HI) was reacted with noriomazenil inN,N -dimethylformamide and Bu{sub 4}N{sup +}OH{sup -} for 1 min at 80 deg. C and purified by HPLC (C{sub 18}, 34% CH{sub 3}CN/H{sub 2}O, 7 mL/min). The product was obtained with synthesis time 35 {+-} 5 min (mean {+-} SD, n = 7), radiochemical yield (EOB) 36 {+-} 16%, radiochemical purity 99 {+-} 1%, and specific activity 5100 {+-} 2800 mCi/{mu}mol. Absorbed radiation doses were calculated from previously acquired human biodistribution data. The urinary bladder wall received the highest dose (0.099 mGy/MBq) for 4.8 h voiding interval and the effective dose equivalent was 0.015 mSv/MBq. After i.v. injection of [{sup 11}C]iomazenil in an adult baboon or healthy human volunteer, radioactivity accumulated in the cortex with time-activity curves in agreement with results obtained with [{sup 11}C]flumazenil PET and [{sup 123}I]iomazenil SPECT studies. The count rate was sufficient to obtain quantitative images up to 2 h post-injection with a 14 mCi injection. These results suggest that [{sup 11}C]iomazenil will be a useful agent for measuring benzodiazepine receptorsin vivo by positron emission tomography.

  12. Identification of a novel polyomavirus from vervet monkeys in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Ishii, Akihiro; Ogawa, Hirohito; Nakamura, Ichiro; Moonga, Ladslav; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Thomas, Yuka; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi; Orba, Yasuko

    2013-06-01

    To examine polyomavirus (PyV) infection in wildlife, we investigated the presence of PyVs in Zambia with permission from the Zambia Wildlife Authority. We analysed 200 DNA samples from the spleens and kidneys (n = 100 each) of yellow baboons and vervet monkeys (VMs) (n = 50 each). We detected seven PyV genome fragments in 200 DNA samples using a nested broad-spectrum PCR method, and identified five full-length viral genomes using an inverse PCR method. Phylogenetic analysis of virally encoded proteins revealed that four PyVs were closely related to either African green monkey PyV or simian agent 12. Only one virus detected from a VM spleen was found to be related, with relatively low nucleotide sequence identity (74 %), to the chimpanzee PyV, which shares 48 % nucleotide sequence identity with the human Merkel cell PyV identified from Merkel cell carcinoma. The obtained entire genome of this virus was 5157 bp and had large T- and small t-antigens, and VP1 and VP2 ORFs. This virus was tentatively named vervet monkey PyV 1 (VmPyV1) as a novel PyV. Comparison with other PyVs revealed that VmPyV1, like chimpanzee PyV, had a longer VP1 ORF. To examine whether the VmPyV1 genome could produce viral proteins in cultured cells, the whole genome was transfected into HEK293T cells. We detected VP1 protein expression in the transfected HEK293T cells by immunocytochemical and immunoblot analyses. Thus, we identified a novel PyV genome from VM spleen.

  13. The Functional Anatomy of the Carpometacarpal Complex in Anthropoids and Its Implications for the Evolution of the Hominoid Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Michael S; Simpson, Scott W; Lovejoy, C Owen

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we described several features of the carpometacarpal joints in extant large-bodied apes that are likely adaptations to the functional demands of vertical climbing and suspension. We observed that all hominids, including modern humans and the 4.4-million-year-old hominid Ardipithecus ramidus, lacked these features. Here, we assess the uniqueness of these features in a large sample of monkey, ape, and human hands. These new data provide additional insights into the functional adaptations and evolution of the anthropoid hand. Our survey highlights a series of anatomical adaptations that restrict motion between the second and third metacarpals (MC2 and MC3) and their associated carpals in extant apes, achieved via joint reorganization and novel energy dissipation mechanisms. Their hamate-MC4 and -MC5 joint surface morphologies suggest limited mobility, at least in Pan. Gibbons and spider monkeys have several characters (angled MC3, complex capitate-MC3 joint topography, variably present capitate-MC3 ligaments) that suggest functional convergence in response to suspensory locomotion. Baboons have carpometacarpal morphology suggesting flexion/extension at these joints beyond that observed in most other Old World monkeys, probably as an energy dissipating mechanism minimizing collision forces during terrestrial locomotion. All hominids lack these specializations of the extant great apes, suggesting that vertical climbing was never a central feature of our ancestral locomotor repertoire. Furthermore, the reinforced carpometacarpus of vertically climbing African apes was likely appropriated for knuckle-walking in concert with other novel potential energy dissipating mechanisms. The most parsimonious explanation of the structural similarity of these carpometacarpal specializations in great apes is that they evolved independently.

  14. Biomphalaria alexandrina in Egypt: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-El-Naga, Iman F

    2013-09-01

    The African species of Biomphalaria appeared as a result of the relatively recent west-to-east trans-Atlantic dispersal of the Biomphalaria glabrata-like taxon. In Egypt, Biomphalaria alexandrina is the intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni. Biomphalaria alexandrina originated in the area between Alexandria and Rosetta and has historically been confined to the Nile Delta. Schistosoma mansoni reached Egypt via infected slaves and baboons from the Land of Punt through migrations that occurred as early as the Vth Dynasty. The suggestion of the presence of Schistosoma mansoni infection in Lower Egypt during Pharaonic times is discussed despite the fact that that there is no evidence of such infection in Egyptian mummies. It is only recently that Biomphalaria alexandrina colonized the Egyptian Nile from the Delta to Lake Nasser. This change was likely due to the construction of huge water projects, the development of new water resources essential for land reclamation projects and the movement of refugees from the Suez Canal zone to the Delta and vice versa. The situation with respect to Biomphalaria in Egypt has become complicated in recent years by the detection of Biomphalaria glabrata and a hybrid between both species; however, follow-up studies have demonstrated the disappearance of such species within Egypt. The National Schistosoma Control Program has made great strides with respect to the eradication of schistosoma; however, there has unfortunately been a reemergence of Schistosoma mansoni resistant to praziquantel. There are numerous factors that may influence the prevalence of snails in Egypt, including the construction of water projects, the increase in reclaimed areas, global climate change and pollution. Thus, continued field studies in addition to the cooperation of several scientists are needed to obtain an accurate representation of the status of this species. In addition, the determination of the genome sequence for Biomphalaria alexandrina and the

  15. Nodule worm infection in humans and wild primates in Uganda: cryptic species in a newly identified region of human transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria R Ghai

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Soil-transmitted helminths (STHs are a major health concern in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Oesophagostomum infection is considered endemic to West Africa but has also been identified in Uganda, East Africa, among primates (including humans. However, the taxonomy and ecology of Oesophagostomum in Uganda have not been studied, except for in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, which are infected by both O. bifurcum and O. stephanostomum. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We studied Oesophagostomum in Uganda in a community of non-human primates that live in close proximity to humans. Prevalence estimates based on microscopy were lower than those based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR, indicating greater sensitivity of PCR. Prevalence varied among host species, with humans and red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus infected at lowest prevalence (25% and 41% by PCR, respectively, and chimpanzees, olive baboons (Papio anubis, and l'hoest monkeys (Cercopithecus lhoesti infected at highest prevalence (100% by PCR in all three species. Phylogenetic regression showed that primates travelling further and in smaller groups are at greatest risk of infection. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed three cryptic clades of Oesophagostomum that were not distinguishable based on morphological characteristics of their eggs. Of these, the clade with the greatest host range had not previously been described genetically. This novel clade infects humans, as well as five other species of primates. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple cryptic forms of Oesophagostomum circulate in the people and primates of western Uganda, and parasite clades differ in host range and cross-species transmission potential. Our results expand knowledge about human Oesophagostomum infection beyond the West African countries of Togo and Ghana, where the parasite is a known public health concern. Oesophagostomum infection in humans may be common throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and the transmission of

  16. Blind Digital Image Watermarking Robust Against Histogram Equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sadawarti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Piracy in the presence of internet and computers proves to be a biggest damage to the industry. Easy editing and copying of images yields a great damage to the owner as original images can be distributed through internet very easily. To reduce the piracy and duplicity of the digital multimedia files, digital watermarking technique is dominating over the other available techniques. There are certain methods or attacks which are used to damage the watermark. One of the major attacks is histogram equalization and reducing the number of histogram equalized levels. Thus, there is a need to develop a method so that the watermark can be protected after histogram equalization. Approach: A blind digital watermarking algorithm is presented which embed the watermark in frequency domain. Firstly, DWT is applied on the original image and then DCT on the 4×4 blocks to target the particular frequencies of the image for embedding the watermark which does not have more effect after histogram equalization. Also, to enhance the security of the watermark dual encryption technique is deployed. Results: Algorithm applied to four images which are Lena, Cameraman, Baboon and Peppers. The evaluation of the algorithm is calculated in terms of peak signal to noise ratio and non correlation. The results prove that the algorithm is robust to histogram equalization attack up to 2 grey levels. Conclusion/Recommendations: The developed algorithm proved its performance against histogram equalization but the algorithm can also be checked for the other attacks which can be addition of white noise, Gaussian noise, filtering.

  17. Relationship between humeral geometry and shoulder muscle power among suspensory, knuckle-walking, and digitigrade/palmigrade quadrupedal primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Takemoto, Hironori; Kuraoka, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Shoulder morphology is functionally related to different patterns of locomotion in primates. To investigate this we performed a quantitative analysis of the relationship between cortical bone thickness (Cbt) of the muscle/tendon attachment site on the humerus and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of the shoulder muscle in primates with different locomotory habits. The deltoid, subscapularis, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus were investigated. A chimpanzee, a gibbon, a baboon, two species of macaque, a lutong, a capuchin, and a squirrel monkey were included in the study. The total length of the humerus was measured and the values were converted into three-dimensional reconstructed data on a computer by computed tomography. The Cbt values were obtained from the volumes divided by the areas of the muscle/tendon attachment sites of the humerus by computer analysis. Muscle mass, muscle fascicle length, and muscle pennation angle were measured and PCSA was calculated using these parameters. A relatively high Cbt and small PCSA were characteristic of the gibbon. The gibbon's high Cbt suggests that passive tension in the muscle/tendon attachment site of suspensory primates (brachiators) may be greater than that of quadrupedal primates, whereas the relatively small PCSA indicates an association with a large amount of internal muscle fascia to endure the passive stress of brachiation. Although chimpanzees undertake some suspensory locomotion, the results for this species resemble those of the digitigrade/palmigrade quadrupedal primates rather than those of the suspensory primate. However, the deltoid and subscapularis in chimpanzee differ from those of the other primates and appear to be affected by the peculiar locomotion of knuckle-walking, i.e. the moment arm of forelimb in chimpanzees is relatively longer than that of digitigrade/palmigrade quadrupedal primates. Hence, a large PCSA in the deltoid and subscapularis may contribute to sustaining the body weight

  18. T3 may be a better agent than T4 in the critically ill hypothyroid patient: evaluation of transport across the blood-brain barrier in a primate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernow, B.; Burman, K.D.; Johnson, D.L.; McGuire, R.A.; O' Brian, J.T.; Wartofsky, L.; Georges, L.P.

    1983-02-01

    Thyroid hormone transport across the blood brain barrier in hypothyroid patients is clinically important yet poorly understood. To study this question, 200 micrograms of thyroxine (T4), 100 micrograms of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and 100 micrograms of 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine (reverse T3) were administered separately to 3 baboons, first iv and at a later date intrathecally (IT). Six animals were used. Three received the iv injections and three received the IT injections. In each of the 18 experiments, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum specimens were collected serially for 6 h after injection. Mean maximal elevations from baseline in CSF iodothyronine levels were 100 +/- 10 ng/dl after iv T4, 3921 +/- 293 ng/dl after iv T3 and 31 +/- 17 ng/dl after iv reverse T3. When given IT in the same dosages, the mean maximal increases in serum iodothyronine concentrations were: 1670 +/- 600 ng/dl for T4, 806 +/- 405 ng/dl for T3, and 210 +/- 43 ng/dl for reverse T3. In every animal studied, rapid bidirectional transfer of T3 from serum to CSF and CSF to serum occurred, whereas iv T4 resulted in delayed minimal increments in CSF T4 concentration. Isotopic experiments were also performed and the results analyzed using a kinetic model. When /sup 125/I-T3 was given iv, the equilibrium point in CSF was observed within 90 min with 1.7% of the administered dose/L able to be counted in CSF at any moment in time. When labeled T4 was given iv, only 0.6% of the administered dose/L was counted in CSF and the equilibrium point was not reached until 360 min. These data suggest: T4, T3, and reverse T3 are all capable of bidirectional transfer across the blood brain barrier, T3 may be a better agent than T4 in treating patients with myxedema coma because T3 crosses more rapidly and more completely from serum to CSF.

  19. Authigenic minerals related to carbon and sulfur biogeochemical cycling from deep-sea active methane seeps offshore South-West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, C.; Blanc-Valleron, M.; Demange, J.; Boudouma, O.; Pape, T.; Himmler, T.; Fekete, N.; Spiess, V.

    2011-12-01

    The South-West African continental margin is well known for occurrences of active methane-rich fluid seeps that are associated with seafloor pockmarks in a broad range of water depths, from the shelf to the deep basins. High gas flares in the water column, luxurious oases of benthic fauna, gas hydrate accumulations and diagenetic carbonate crusts have been observed at these seeps. During the M76/3a expedition of R/V METEOR (summer 2008) gravity cores recovered abundant authigenic carbonate concretions from five pockmarks of the South-West African margin including previously studied sites (Hydrate Hole, Worm Hole, Regab Pockmark) and two sites (Deep Hole, Baboon Cluster) newly discovered during the cruise. Carbonate concretions were mostly associated to sediments settled by seep-associated benthic macrofauna and bearing shallow gas hydrates. We present new results of the comprehensive analysis of the mineralogy and isotope geochemistry of the diagenetic carbonates sampled in the five pockmarks. The mineralogy of authigenic carbonates is dominated by magnesian calcite and aragonite, associated occasionally with dolomite. The oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of authigenic carbonates (+2.4 < δ18O % V-PDB < +6.2 ; -61.0 < δ13C % V-PDB < -40.1) indicate that microbial anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) was the main process controling carbonate precipitation within sub-seafloor sediments deposited from the glacial-time up to the present. The frequent occurrence of diagenetic gypsum crystals within the sediments demonstrates that bio-irrigation with oxygenated bottom water by the burrowing activity of benthic fauna caused the secondary oxidation of reduced sulfur (hydrogen sulfide and pyrite) that was produced by sulfate reducting bacteria as a by-product of AOM; during the sulfide oxidation process, the released acidity induced the partial dissolution of carbonates. Our results demonstrate also the strong link that existed between the carbon and sulfur cycles

  20. Properties of virion transactivator proteins encoded by primate cytomegaloviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Peter A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a betaherpesvirus that causes severe disease in situations where the immune system is immature or compromised. HCMV immediate early (IE gene expression is stimulated by the virion phosphoprotein pp71, encoded by open reading frame (ORF UL82, and this transactivation activity is important for the efficient initiation of viral replication. It is currently recognized that pp71 acts to overcome cellular intrinsic defences that otherwise block viral IE gene expression, and that interactions of pp71 with the cell proteins Daxx and ATRX are important for this function. A further property of pp71 is the ability to enable prolonged gene expression from quiescent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 genomes. Non-human primate cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of pp71, but there is currently no published information that addresses their effects on gene expression and modes of action. Results The UL82 homolog encoded by simian cytomegalovirus (SCMV, strain Colburn, was identified and cloned. This ORF, named S82, was cloned into an HSV-1 vector, as were those from baboon, rhesus monkey and chimpanzee cytomegaloviruses. The use of an HSV-1 vector enabled expression of the UL82 homologs in a range of cell types, and permitted investigation of their abilities to direct prolonged gene expression from quiescent genomes. The results show that all UL82 homologs activate gene expression, and that neither host cell type nor promoter target sequence has major effects on these activities. Surprisingly, the UL82 proteins specified by non-human primate cytomegaloviruses, unlike pp71, did not direct long term expression from quiescent HSV-1 genomes. In addition, significant differences were observed in the intranuclear localization of the UL82 homologs, and in their effects on Daxx. Strikingly, S82 mediated the release of Daxx from nuclear domain 10 substructures much more rapidly than pp71 or the other proteins tested. All

  1. In vivo evaluation in rats of [{sup 18}F]1-(2-fluoroethyl)-4-[(4-cyanophenoxy)methyl]piperidine as a potential radiotracer for PET assessment of CNS sigma-1 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterhouse, Rikki N. [Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States) and Neurobiology and Imaging Program, Department of Biological Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]. E-mail: rnw7@columbia.edu; Chang, Raymond C. [Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Neurobiology and Imaging Program, Department of Biological Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Zhao, Jun [Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Neurobiology and Imaging Program, Department of Biological Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Carambot, Patty E. [Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Neurobiology and Imaging Program, Department of Biological Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    Introduction: Sigma-1 receptors are expressed throughout the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and are implicated in several psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and depression. We have recently evaluated the high-affinity (K {sub D}=0.5{+-}0.2 nM, log P=2.9) sigma-1 receptor radiotracer [{sup 18}F]1-(3-fluoropropyl)-4-(4-cyanophenoxymethyl)piperidine, [{sup 18}F]FPS, in humans. In contrast to appropriate kinetics exhibited in baboon brain, in the human CNS, [{sup 18}F]FPS does not reach pseudoequilibrium by 4 h, supporting the development of a lower-affinity tracer [Waterhouse RN, Nobler MS, Chang RC, Zhou Y, Morales O, Kuwabara H, et al. First evaluation of the sigma-1 receptor radioligand [{sup 18}F]1-3-fluoropropyl-4-((4-cyanophenoxy)-methyl)piperidine ([{sup 18}F]FPS) in healthy humans. Neuroreceptor Mapping 2004, July 15-18th, Vancouver, BC Canada 2004]. We describe herein the in vivo evaluation in rats of [{sup 18}F]1-(2-fluoroethyl)-4-[(4-cyanophenoxy)methyl]piperidine ([{sup 18}F]SFE) (K {sub D}=5 nM, log P=2.4), a structurally similar, lower-affinity sigma-1 receptor radioligand. Methods: [{sup 18}F]SFE was synthesized (n=4) as previously described in good yield (54{+-}6% EOB), high specific activity (2.1{+-}0.6 Ci/{mu}mol EOS) and radiochemical purity (98{+-}1%) and evaluated in awake adult male rats. Results: Similar to [{sup 18}F]FPS, regional brain radioactivity concentrations [percentage of injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g), 15 min] for [{sup 18}F]SFE were highest in occipital cortex (1.86{+-}0.06 %ID/g) and frontal cortex (1.76{+-}0.38 %ID/g), and lowest in the hippocampus (1.01{+-}0.02%ID/g). Unlike [{sup 18}F]FPS, [{sup 18}F]SFE cleared from the brain with {approx}40% reduction in peak activity over a 90-min period. Metabolite analysis (1 h) revealed that [{sup 18}F]SFE was largely intact in the brain. Blocking studies showed a large degree (>80%) of saturable binding for [{sup 18}F]SFE in discrete brain regions. Conclusions

  2. 藏绵羊脂蛋白脂酶基因克隆及序列分析%Tibetan Sheep LPL Gene Clone and Bioinformatic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高思; 徐亚欧; 毛亮; 邵欢欢; 杨虎林; 舒浩国

    2011-01-01

    [目的]为深入研究藏绵羊肉用性能的遗传调控与营养代谢关系.[方法]利用RT-PCR和T-A克隆技术获得了藏绵羊LPL基因,并对其进行生物信息学分析.[结果]藏绵羊LPL编码基因全长1437 bp,编码478个氨基酸.将藏绵羊LPL基因及氨基酸序列分别与GenBank中公布的11种动物进行序列一致率比对,发现藏绵羊与所选动物的LPL基因序列一致率在84.6%-99.6%,LPL氨基酸序列一致率在88.8%-99.0%.藏绵羊与普通绵羊LPL基因存在6个位点核苷酸差异,其中有一个核苷酸位点的差异没有引起相应氨基酸的改变,其余5个住点核苷酸的不同都引起了氨基酸的差异.[结论]该研究可为了解LPL基因的演化关系及作用机理提供资料.%[ Objective ] The aim was to deeply study the relationship between the genetic regulation of meat performance of Tibetan sheep and nutrition and metabolism. [ Method ] The LPL coding gene of Tibetan sheep was cloned by reverse-translation PCR and T-A clone technology,then it was analyzed by Bioinformatics software. [ Result] The results showed that LPL gene of Tibetan sheep contained 1437 bp nucleotides and encoded 478 amino acids. The multiple sequence alignment such as Tibetan sheep, sheep, goat, cattle, yak, pig, dog, cat, baboon, orangutan, human, Norway rat and rattus showed that the total homologous rate of LPL gene was 84.6% - 99.6%, and the homologous rate of amino acids was 88.8% ~ 99.0%. Moreover,6 different nucleotides were foumd between Tibetan sheep and common sheep. One of these nucleotide was synonymous codon so that the amino acid which the synonymous codon encoded was identical between Tibetan sheep and common sheep,and the other five nucleotides which encoded different amino acids between Tibetan sheep and common sheep. [ Conclusion ] The study can provide reference for knowing the evolution relation of LPL gene and its mechanism of action.

  3. Spatio-temporal variation in prevalence of Rift Valley fever: a post-epidemic serum survey in cattle and wildlife in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Wesula Lwande

    2015-12-01

    there were no antibodies in zebras, baboons, vervet monkeys, or wildebeest. Conclusions: Diverse species in conservation areas are exposed to RVFV. RVFV exposure in buffalo may indicate distribution of the virus over wide geographical areas beyond known RVFV foci in Kenya. This finding calls for thorough studies on the epizootology of RVFV in specific wildlife species and locations.

  4. A Neutrophil Phenotype Model for Extracorporeal Treatment of Sepsis.

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    Alexander D Malkin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play a central role in eliminating bacterial pathogens, but may also contribute to end-organ damage in sepsis. Interleukin-8 (IL-8, a key modulator of neutrophil function, signals through neutrophil specific surface receptors CXCR-1 and CXCR-2. In this study a mechanistic computational model was used to evaluate and deploy an extracorporeal sepsis treatment which modulates CXCR-1/2 levels. First, a simplified mechanistic computational model of IL-8 mediated activation of CXCR-1/2 receptors was developed, containing 16 ODEs and 43 parameters. Receptor level dynamics and systemic parameters were coupled with multiple neutrophil phenotypes to generate dynamic populations of activated neutrophils which reduce pathogen load, and/or primed neutrophils which cause adverse tissue damage when misdirected. The mathematical model was calibrated using experimental data from baboons administered a two-hour infusion of E coli and followed for a maximum of 28 days. Ensembles of parameters were generated using a Bayesian parallel tempering approach to produce model fits that could recreate experimental outcomes. Stepwise logistic regression identified seven model parameters as key determinants of mortality. Sensitivity analysis showed that parameters controlling the level of killer cell neutrophils affected the overall systemic damage of individuals. To evaluate rescue strategies and provide probabilistic predictions of their impact on mortality, time of onset, duration, and capture efficacy of an extracorporeal device that modulated neutrophil phenotype were explored. Our findings suggest that interventions aiming to modulate phenotypic composition are time sensitive. When introduced between 3-6 hours of infection for a 72 hour duration, the survivor population increased from 31% to 40-80%. Treatment efficacy quickly diminishes if not introduced within 15 hours of infection. Significant harm is possible with treatment durations ranging from 5

  5. Differences in extinction of cue-maintained conditioned responses associated with self-administration: alcohol versus a non-alcoholic reinforcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtyn, August F.; Kaminski, Barbara J.; Wand, Gary S.; Weerts, Elise M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Stimuli paired with alcohol may evoke conditioned responses that influence consumption and relapse. Understanding extinction of conditioned responses for both alcohol and non-alcoholic reinforcers, and their relation to subsequent consumption, may be useful in identifying methods to maintain abstinence. Methods Nine baboons self-administered alcohol (n=4) or a non-alcoholic reinforcer (orange-flavored Tang®, n=5) under a three-component chained schedule of reinforcement (CSR). Each component was associated with distinct stimuli and response requirements, which modeled periods of anticipation (Component 1), seeking (Component 2), and consumption (Component 3). No behavioral contingencies were in effect during Component 1. Responses in Component 2, required to gain access to Component 3, provided indices of seeking behavior. Alcohol or Tang was available only in Component 3. Initial conditions parametrically manipulated the concentration of alcohol (2–6% w/v) or Tang (25–100%) that was available for self-administration. The breaking point (BP) of alcohol- and Tang-seeking responses at each of the concentrations was determined by adding a progressive ratio schedule to Component 2. Extinction of responding under stimulus conditions identical to those during baseline, but with no access to alcohol or Tang, was examined using across- and within-session extinction procedures. Results The BP for 2% w/v alcohol was lower than that for 4% and 6%, which were closely similar. For Tang, BPs increased as the concentration increased. When concentrations of alcohol and Tang were adjusted to produce comparable BPs, self-administration of Tang was higher when compared to alcohol; however, alcohol-related cues maintained higher BPs than Tang-related cues when only water was available for self-administration. Alcohol seeking and self-administration responses were more resistant to extinction than those for Tang. Conclusions Stimuli paired with alcohol or non

  6. Synergistic motor nerve fiber transfer between different nerves through the use of end-to-side coaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidhammer, R; Nógrádi, A; Szabó, A; Redl, H; Hausner, T; van der Nest, D G; Millesi, H

    2009-06-01

    End-to-end nerve repair is a widely used and successful experimental microsurgical technique via which a denervated nerve stump is supplied with reinnervating motor or sensory axons. On the other hand, questions are still raised as concerns the reliability and usefulness of the end-to-side coaptation technique. This study had the aim of the reinnervation of the denervated forearm flexor muscles in baboons through the use of an end-to-side coaptation technique and the synergistic action of the radial nerve. The median and ulnar nerves were transected, and the motor branch of the radial nerve supplying the extensor carpi radialis muscles (MBECR) was used as an axon donor for the denervated superficial forearm flexors. A nerve graft was connected to the axon donor nerve through end-to-side coaptation, while at the other end of the graft an end-to-end connection was established so as to reinnervate the motor branch of the forearm flexors. Electrophysiological investigations and functional tests indicated successful reinnervation of the forearm flexors and recovery of the flexor function. The axon counts in the nerve segments proximal (1038+/-172 S.E.M.) and distal (1050+/-116 S.E.M.) to the end-to-side coaptation site and in the nerve graft revealed that motor axon collaterals were given to the graft without the loss or appreciable misdirection of the axons in the MBECR nerve distal to the coaptation site. The nerve graft was found to contain varying, but satisfactory numbers of axons (269+/-59 S.E.M.) which induced morphological reinnervation of the end-plates in the flexor muscles. Accordingly, we have provided evidence that end-to-side coaptation can be a useful technique when no free donor nerve is available. This technique is able to induce limited, but still useful reinnervation for the flexor muscles, thereby producing a synergistic action of the flexor and extensor muscles which allows the hand to achieve a basic gripping function.

  7. Comparison of two I-123 labeled SPECT probes, for the dopamine transporter in non-human primate brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandelman, M.S.; Scanley, B.E.; Al-Tikrite, M.S. [Yale Univ., West Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    A comparative SPECT evaluation of the regional uptake of 28-carboisopropoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (IP-CIT) and 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) was performed to assess the improved specificity of IP-CIT over {beta}-CIT for the dopamine (DE) transporter, as shown previously by in vitro studies (n=10), ranging from 7 to 10 hours with 6.9 to 15 mCi injected dose, were completed in 3 baboons. Peripheral metabolism of the two ligands were similar The SPECT images utilized ROIs over striatum (which reflect DA transporters), midbrain (previously shown for {beta}-CIT to reflect primarily serotonin transporters), and the occipital lobe (a region of non-specific uptake). The time to peak specific striatal uptake (striatal minus occipital activity) was similar for IP-CIT and {beta}-CIT (377{plus_minus}60 and 410{plus_minus}60 min, respectively); whereas midbrain peak activity occurred at a significantly earlier time for IP-CIT (21{plus_minus}4 min) as compared to {beta}-CIT (60{plus_minus}17 min). At time of peak specific striatal activity, striatal to occipital ratios were 2.7+0.6 for IP-CIT and 7.6{plus_minus}0.7 for {beta}-CIT, and at time of peak midbrain activity, midbrain to occipital ratios were 1.1{plus_minus}0.1 for IP-CIT, and 1.7{plus_minus}0.2 for {beta}-CIT. At peak specific striatal time, normalized regional uptake values ({mu}Ci/cc per {mu}Ci injected dose per g body mass) for the striatum were 4.9{plus_minus}1.1 IP-CIT and 5.2{plus_minus}0.7 {beta}-CIT, whereas for the occipital lobe normalized regional uptake values were 1.9{plus_minus}0.4 IP-CIT and 0.7{plus_minus}0.2 for {beta}-CIT. Similar regional kinetics in the striatum were observed, as both ligands demonstrate comparable peak striatal uptake and time to peak.

  8. Synthesis of [{sup 18}F]Ro41-0960, a potent COMT inhibitor, for use in vivo mapping with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y.S.; Sugano, Y.; Gatley, S.J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMPT; EC 2.1.1.6) is one of the two major enzymes which metabolize the catecholamine neurotransmitters. It is distributed throughout the body and brain and is elevated in breast cancer tissue when it plays a role in estrogen metabolism. It is also an important molecular target in the development of drugs to treat Parkinson`s disease (PD). Because COMT regulates the concentration of important neurotransmitter amines such as dopamine, there is speculation that abnormalities in its activity may be associated with neurological, and psychiatric disorders. Ro41-9060(3,4-dihydroxy-5-nitro-2{prime}-fluorobenzophenone) is a potent, fluorine containing COMT inhibitor which has been reported to cross the blood brain barrier. It is structurally similar to Ro40-7592 which is currently undergoing clinical trials in PD. We report the synthesis of [{sup 18}F]Ro41-0960, for investigation for mapping COMT and for studies of COMT drugs. [{sup 18}F]Ro41-0960 was synthesized by the nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction with NCA [{sup 18}F] fluoride on a protected precursor (prepared via a five-step synthesis) followed by hydrolysis with HBr (synthesis time of 100 min; radiochemical yield of 5-7% (EOB)). Though Ro41-0960 has been reported to cross the blood brain barrier, PET studies in baboon demonstrated that an almost complete absence of the drug from the brain both at tracer doses and with the addition of unlabeled drug (1.5 mg/kg) at all times through a 90 min experimental interval. The plasma to brain ratios of F-18 average about 40:1. However, high uptake was observed in the kidneys and in other organs which are known to have high COMT. Studies in mice showed that at 30 min after injection of tracer, F-18 in kidneys was largely as [{sup 18}F]Ro-41-0960 and that it could be displaced with unlabeled Ro41-0960. These studies provide the first example of a positron emitter labeled COMT radiotracer.

  9. Frontal white matter hyperintensities, clasmatodendrosis and gliovascular abnormalities in ageing and post-stroke dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aiqing; Akinyemi, Rufus O; Hase, Yoshiki; Firbank, Michael J; Ndung'u, Michael N; Foster, Vincent; Craggs, Lucy J L; Washida, Kazuo; Okamoto, Yoko; Thomas, Alan J; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Allan, Louise M; Oakley, Arthur E; O'Brien, John T; Horsburgh, Karen; Ihara, Masafumi; Kalaria, Raj N

    2016-01-01

    -mortem brains from adult baboons with cerebral hypoperfusive injury, induced by occlusion of three major vessels supplying blood to the brain. Analysis of the frontal white matter in perfused brains from the animals surviving 1-28 days after occlusion revealed that the highest intensity of fibrinogen immunoreactivity was at 14 days. At this survival time point, we also noted strikingly similar redistribution of AQP4 and GFAP+ astrocytes transformed into clasmatodendrocytes. Our findings suggest novel associations between irreversible astrocyte injury and disruption of gliovascular interactions at the blood-brain barrier in the frontal white matter and cognitive impairment in elderly post-stroke survivors. We propose that clasmatodendrosis is another pathological substrate, linked to white matter hyperintensities and frontal white matter changes, which may contribute to post-stroke or small vessel disease dementia.

  10. Clinical trials and projected future of liver xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, J; Rao, A; Starzl, T

    1997-01-01

    The trial and error of the pioneering xenotransplant trials over the past three decades has defined the limitation of the species used. Success was tantalizingly close with the chimpanzee, baboon, and other primates. The use of more disparate species has been frustrated by the xenoantibody barrier. Future attempts at clinical xenotransplantation will be hampered by the consideration of the species of animals and the nature of the organs to be transplanted. On one hand, primate donors have the advantage of genetic similarity (and therefore potential compatibility) and less risk of immunologic loss. On the other hand, pig donors are more easily raised, are not sentient animals, and may be less likely to harbor transmissible disease. It is recognized that the success of xenotransplantation may very with different organs. Because it is relatively resistant to antibody-mediated rejection, the liver is the organ for which there is the greatest chance of long-term success. Consideration of using xenotransplants on a temporary basis, or as a "bridge" to permanent human transplantation, may allow clinical trials utilizing hearts or kidney xenografts. Issues on metabolic compatibility and infection risks cannot be accurately determined until routine success in clinical xenotransplantation occurs. Based on a limited experience, the conventional approaches to allotransplantation are unlikely to be successful in xenotransplantation. The avoidance of immediate xenograft destruction by hyperacute rejection, achieved using transgenic animals bearing human complement regulatory proteins or modulating the antigenic target on the donor organ, is the first step to successful xenotransplantation. The ability to achieve tolerance by establishing a state of bone marrow chimerism is the key to overcoming the long-term immunologic insults and avoiding the necessarily high doses of nonspecific immunosuppression that would otherwise be required and associated with a high risk of infections

  11. [Sodium and hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wardener, H E

    1996-09-01

    Over several million years the human race was programmed to eat a diet which contained about 15 mmol of sodium (1 g of sodium chloride) per day. It is only five to ten thousand years ago that we became addicted to salt. Today we eat about 150 mmol of sodium (9-12 g of salt) per day. It is now apparent that this sudden rise in sodium intake (in evolutionary terms) is the most likely cause for the rise in blood pressure with age that occurs in the majority of the world's population. Those which consume less than 60 mmol/day do not develop hypertension. The reason for the rise in sodium intake is not known but it is probable that an important stimulus was the discovery that meat could be preserved by immersion into a concentrated salt solution. This seemingly miraculous power endowed salt with such magical and medicinal qualities that it became a symbol of goodness and health. It was not until 1904 Ambard and Beaujard suggested that on the contrary dietary salt could be harmful and raise the blood pressure. At first the idea did not prosper and it continues to be opposed by a diminishing band. The accumulated evidence that sodium intake is related to the blood pressure in normal man and animals and in inherited forms of hypertension has been obtained from experimental manipulations and studies of human populations. The following observation links sodium and hypertension. An increase in sodium intakes raises the blood pressure of the normal rat, dog, rabbit, baboon, chimpanzee and man. Population studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between sodium intake and the customary rise in blood pressure with age. The development of hypertensive strains of rats has revealed that the primary genetic lesion which gives rise to hypertension resides in the kidney where it impairs the urinary excretion of sodium. There is similar but less convincing evidence in essential hypertension. The kidney in both essential hypertension and hypertensive strains of rats share a

  12. Use of a low-prime circuit for bloodless heart transplantation in xenotransplant of 5-7 kilogram primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, D; Olshove, V F; Weinstein, S; Davis, J T; Michler, R E

    2000-09-01

    There is a great effort to decrease blood product use during open-heart surgery in pediatrics. We were presented with a research challenge to accomplish heart xenotransplantation from donor cynomologous monkey (Macaca fascicularis) to recipient olive baboon (Papio anubis) of 5-7 kilograms without benefit of donor or banked blood products. The purpose of this study was to design and implement a practical, low-volume circuit to minimize hemodilution and avoid the use of blood products. A simple circuit was assembled using a low-volume oxygenator with hardshell venous reservoir, an 1/8-inch arterial line, an 1/4-inch venous line, and gravity drainage. Three xenotransplants were performed and evaluated. The mean recipient weights were 6.3 +/- 0.7 kg. Circuit prime volume was 228 +/- 5.8 mL, and bypass time was 85 +/- 6.7 min. Blood flow rates were 585 +/- 113 mL/min with postmembrane arterial line pressures of 344 +/- 81 mmHg, and patient mean arterial pressures (MAP) of 51.4 +/- 16.7 mmHg. Venous saturations were 63.7 +/- 8.0%. The hematocrit prebypass was 37.4 +/- 3.2, bypass 20.7 +/- 0.9, post-MUF 27.8 +/- 3.3, and 7 days postoperative 24.5 +/- 7.5%. Platelet count was 289 +/- 1.1 K/microL, 147 +/- 37.1 K/microL, and 322 +/- 292.7 K/microL prebypass, postbypass, and 7 days postoperative, respectively. Plasma-free hemoglobin prebypass was 7.5 +/- 4.4 mg/dL and postbypass 22.2 +/- 16.5 mg/dL with no noted hematuria during and after the procedure. All patients survived and were successfully weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with same day extubation. A low-prime circuit for bloodless heart surgery is possible. To achieve low reservoir levels, especially without the use of an arterial line filter (ALF), it is necessary to have a full armament of monitoring and alarm devices.

  13. Measurement of pulmonary flow reserve and pulmonary index of microcirculatory resistance for detection of pulmonary microvascular obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahn Ilsar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pulmonary microcirculation is the chief regulatory site for resistance in the pulmonary circuit. Despite pulmonary microvascular dysfunction being implicated in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary vascular conditions, there are currently no techniques for the specific assessment of pulmonary microvascular integrity in humans. Peak hyperemic flow assessment using thermodilution-derived mean transit-time (T(mn facilitate accurate coronary microcirculatory evaluation, but remain unvalidated in the lung circulation. Using a high primate model, we aimed to explore the use of T(mn as a surrogate of pulmonary blood flow for the purpose of measuring the novel indices Pulmonary Flow Reserve [PFR = (maximum hyperemic/(basal flow] and Pulmonary Index of Microcirculatory Resistance [PIMR = (maximum hyperemic distal pulmonary artery pressurex(maximum hyperemic T(mn]. Ultimately, we aimed to investigate the effect of progressive pulmonary microvascular obstruction on PFR and PIMR. METHODS AND RESULTS: Temperature- and pressure-sensor guidewires (TPSG were placed in segmental pulmonary arteries (SPA of 13 baboons and intravascular temperature measured. T(mn and hemodynamics were recorded at rest and following intra-SPA administration of the vasodilator agents adenosine (10-400 microg/kg/min and papaverine (3-24 mg. Temperature did not vary with intra-SPA sensor position (0.010+/-0.009 v 0.010+/-0.009 degrees C; distal v proximal; p = 0.1, supporting T(mn use in lung for the purpose of hemodynamic indices derivation. Adenosine (to 200 microg/kg/min & papaverine (to 24 mg induced dose-dependent flow augmentations (40+/-7% & 35+/-13% T(mn reductions v baseline, respectively; p<0.0001. PFR and PIMR were then calculated before and after progressive administration of ceramic microspheres into the SPA. Cumulative microsphere doses progressively reduced PFR (1.41+/-0.06, 1.26+/-0.19, 1.17+/-0.07 & 1.01+/-0.03; for 0, 10(4, 10(5 & 10(6 microspheres; p

  14. Temporalis function in anthropoids and strepsirrhines: an EMG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylander, William L; Wall, Christine E; Vinyard, Christopher J; Ross, Callum; Ravosa, Mathew R; Williams, Susan H; Johnson, Kirk R

    2005-09-01

    The major purpose of this study is to analyze anterior and posterior temporalis muscle force recruitment and firing patterns in various anthropoid and strepsirrhine primates. There are two specific goals for this project. First, we test the hypothesis that in addition to transversely directed muscle force, the evolution of symphyseal fusion in primates may also be linked to vertically directed balancing-side muscle force during chewing (Hylander et al. [2000] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 112:469-492). Second, we test the hypothesis of whether strepsirrhines retain the hypothesized primitive mammalian condition for the firing of the anterior temporalis, whereas anthropoids have the derived condition (Weijs [1994] Biomechanics of Feeding in Vertebrates; Berlin: Springer-Verlag, p. 282-320). Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the left and right anterior and posterior temporalis muscles were recorded and analyzed in baboons, macaques, owl monkeys, thick-tailed galagos, and ring-tailed lemurs. In addition, as we used the working-side superficial masseter as a reference muscle, we also recorded and analyzed EMG activity of the left and right superficial masseter in these primates. The data for the anterior temporalis provided no support for the hypothesis that symphyseal fusion in primates is linked to vertically directed jaw muscle forces during mastication. Thus, symphyseal fusion in primates is most likely mainly linked to the timing and recruitment of transversely directed forces from the balancing-side deep masseter (Hylander et al. [2000] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 112:469-492). In addition, our data demonstrate that the firing patterns for the working- and balancing-side anterior temporalis muscles are near identical in both strepsirrhines and anthropoids. Their working- and balancing-side anterior temporalis muscles fire asynchronously and reach peak activity during the power stroke. Similarly, their working- and balancing-side posterior temporalis muscles also fire

  15. Radiation dosimetry of N-([{sup 11}C]methyl)benperidol as determined by whole-body PET imaging of primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antenor-Dorsey, Jo A.V. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Laforest, Richard; Moerlein, Stephen M. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Videen, Tom O. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Perlmutter, Joel S. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Program in Physical Therapy, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2008-04-15

    N-([{sup 11}C]methyl)benperidol ([{sup 11}C]NMB) can be used for positron emission tomography (PET) measurements of D{sub 2}-like dopamine receptor binding in vivo. We report the absorbed radiation dosimetry of i.v.-administered {sup 11}C-NMB, a critical step before applying this radioligand to imaging studies in humans. Whole-body PET imaging with a CTI/Siemens ECAT 953B scanner was done in a male and a female baboon. After i.v. injection of 444-1221 MBq of {sup 11}C-NMB, sequential images taken from the head to the pelvis were collected for 3 h. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were identified that entirely encompassed small organs (whole brain, striatum, eyes, and myocardium). Large organs (liver, lungs, kidneys, lower large intestine, and urinary bladder) were sampled by drawing representative regions within the organ volume. Time-activity curves for each VOI were extracted from the PET, and organ residence times were calculated by analytical integration of a multi-exponential fit of the time-activity curves. Human radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and the standard human model. Highest retention was observed in the blood and liver, each with total residence times of 1.5 min. The highest absorbed radiation doses were to the heart (10.5 mGy/kBq) and kidney (9.19 mGy/kBq), making these the critical organs for [{sup 11}C]NMB. A heart absorption of 50 mGy would result from an injected dose of 4,762 MBq [{sup 11}C]NMB. Thus, this study suggests that up to 4,762 MBq of [{sup 11}C]NMB can be safely administered to human subjects for PET studies. Total body dose and effective dose for [{sup 11}C]NMB are 2.82 mGy/kBq and 3.7 mSv/kBq, respectively. (orig.)

  16. Cross-species analyses unravel the complexity of H3K27me3 and H4K20me3 in the context of neural stem progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T. Rhodes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem progenitor cells (NSPCs in the human subventricular zone (SVZ potentially contribute to lifelong neurogenesis, yet subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM contain NSPC signatures that highlight the importance of cell fate regulation. Among numerous regulatory mechanisms, the posttranslational methylations onto histone tails are crucial regulator of cell fate. The work presented here focuses on the role of 2 repressive chromatin marks trimethylations on histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3 and histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20me3 in the adult NSPC within the SVZ. To best model healthy human NSPCs as they exist in vivo for epigenetic profiling of H3K27me3 and H4K20me3, we used NSPCs isolated from the adult SVZ of baboon brain (Papio anubis with brain structure and genomic level similar to human. The putative role of H3K27me3 in normal NSPCs predominantly falls into the regulation of gene expression, cell cycle, and differentiation, whereas H4K20me3 is involved in DNA replication/repair, metabolism, and cell cycle. Using conditional knockout mouse models to diminish Ezh2 and Suv4-20h responsible for H3K27me3 and H4K20me3, respectively, we found that both repressive marks have irrefutable function for cell cycle regulation in the NSPC population. Although both EZH2/H3K27me3 and Suv4-20h/H4K20me3 have implication in cancers, our comparative genomics approach between healthy NSPCs and human GBM specimens revealed that substantial sets of genes enriched with H3K27me3 and H4K20me3 in the NSPCs are altered in the human GBM. In sum, our integrated analyses across species highlight important roles of H3K27me3 and H4K20me3 in normal and disease conditions in the context of NSPC.

  17. Investigation of cross-species translatability of pharmacological MRI in awake nonhuman primate - a buprenorphine challenge study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Seah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pharmacological MRI (phMRI is a neuroimaging technique where drug-induced hemodynamic responses can represent a pharmacodynamic biomarker to delineate underlying biological consequences of drug actions. In most preclinical studies, animals are anesthetized during image acquisition to minimize movement. However, it has been demonstrated anesthesia could attenuate basal neuronal activity, which can confound interpretation of drug-induced brain activation patterns. Significant efforts have been made to establish awake imaging in rodents and nonhuman primates (NHP. Whilst various platforms have been developed for imaging awake NHP, comparison and validation of phMRI data as translational biomarkers across species remain to be explored. METHODOLOGY: We have established an awake NHP imaging model that encompasses comprehensive acclimation procedures with a dedicated animal restrainer. Using a cerebral blood volume (CBV-based phMRI approach, we have determined differential responses of brain activation elicited by the systemic administration of buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg i.v., a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist, in the same animal under awake and anesthetized conditions. Additionally, region-of-interest analyses were performed to determine regional drug-induced CBV time-course data and corresponding area-under-curve (AUC values from brain areas with high density of µ-opioid receptors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In awake NHPs, group-level analyses revealed buprenorphine significantly activated brain regions including, thalamus, striatum, frontal and cingulate cortices (paired t-test, versus saline vehicle, p<0.05, n = 4. This observation is strikingly consistent with µ-opioid receptor distribution depicted by [6-O-[(11C]methyl]buprenorphine ([(11C]BPN positron emission tomography imaging study in baboons. Furthermore, our findings are consistent with previous buprenorphine phMRI studies in humans and conscious rats which collectively

  18. In vivo PET imaging of brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottlaender, M.; Valette, H.; Saba, W.; Schollhorn-Peyronneau, M.A.; Dolle, F.; Syrota, A. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system where they modulate a number of CNS functions including neurotransmitter release, cognitive function, anxiety, analgesia and control of cerebral blood flow. In the brain, a major subtype is composed of the {alpha}4{beta}2 subunit combination. Density of this subtype has been shown to be decreased in patients with neuro-degenerative disease such as Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease (AD and PD), and mutated receptors has been described in some familial epilepsy. Thus, in vivo mapping of the nicotinic nAChRs by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are of great interest to monitor the evolution of these pathologies and changes in the neuronal biochemistry induced by therapeutic agents. Recently, a new compound, 3-[2(S)-2-azetidinyl-methoxy]pyridine (A-85380) has been synthesised and labelled with fluorine-18, [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 (Dolle et al., 1999). The [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 has been shown to bind with high affinity t o nAChRs in vitro (Saba et al., 2004), and its toxicity was low and compatible with it s use at tracer dose in human PET studies (Valette, 2002). PET studies in baboons showed that, after in vivo administration of [ {sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 at a tracer dose, the distribution of the radioactivity in the brain reflect the distribution of the < 4R2 nAChRs. Competition and pre-blocking studies, using nicotinic agonists, confirm that the radiotracer binds specifically to the heteromeric nAChRs in the brain (Valette et al., 1999). The in vivo, characteristics of the [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-8538 0 combined with its low toxicity make possible the imaging of the nicotinic receptor s in human by PET (Bottlaender 2003). Studies were performed in healthy non-smoker volunteers to evaluate the brain kinetics of [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 and to assess the quantification of its nAChRs binding in the human brain with PET (Gallezot et a., 2005). The [{sup 18}F

  19. From playmate to employee:on the evolution of education%从玩伴到雇员:教育的演变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rudolf B. Schmerl

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of human beings over perhaps the last several million years , from a few scattered African apes into the billions of modern primates that populate the globe today , had to include the transmission of behaviors from older to younger individuals for the latter’s benefit. These behaviors included knowledge as well as skills, e.g., knowledge of what to eat and where to find it, of dangerous predators and how to avoid them , of relationships and status within the group and how to use them. Many of these behaviors remain observable today in interactions of young children with slightly older ones, as well as among the young of other social primates such as baboons. They are essentially educational methods still extant in varying degrees in modern societies. But as of about two hundred years ago, with the development of industrial processes, of the factory and ever-more sophisti-cated technology, education has evolved into interlocking economic as well as social enterprises whose main common purposes appear to be, for themselves, growth, and for the individuals they produce, employment. These objectives appear to have elicited far more consensus than the methods advocated for their achievement.%从少量散居的非洲猿到密布全球的数十亿灵长类动物,人类经历了数百万年的演化,在这一过程中,为了生存需要,年长个体不断将行为教授给年轻个体。这些行为既包括知识,也包括技能,例如进食方法、食物分布、凶残食肉动物种类和避险方法、人群内关系和地位以及如何对其进行利用。上述很多行为现今依旧可见,如在年幼儿童与略年长儿童的交往中,以及在其他年轻灵长类动物如狒狒间的交往中。这些是现代社会某种程度不可或缺的教育方法。然而,距今约200年前起,随着工业化时代的到来,工厂兴起,技术革新,教育演变成了联锁的经济和社会企业,教育的主要目的成

  20. Une nouvelle procédure d’expérimentation comportementale à l’interface entre les approches « Naturalistes » et « Généralistes » de la cognition du primate A new behavioral test procedure at the interface between “Naturalist” and “Generalist” approaches of primate cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Fagot

    2011-02-01

    test systems installed within the laboratory are opened and freely accessible from the enclosure. The monkeys (baboons in our research can voluntarily enter the test booth to participate to the research. This protocol has been fully developed, installed and validated in my laboratory during the last 3 years, and I present here the main results collected during that period. I (1 demonstrate that this approach allows the test of a large number of participants which participate to the research at a high frequency, (2 identify the main factors (age, day time, reinforcement rate, etc.. that affect their behavior in the tasks, (3 illustrate the effect of the test systems on the spontaneous behavior of the monkeys, and (4 briefly present two studies that used this method, in order to illustrate its potential for the Generalist and Naturalist research programs.

  1. The social structure and strategies of delphinids: predictions based on an ecological framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowans, Shannon; Würsig, Bernd; Karczmarski, Leszek

    2007-01-01

    Dolphins live in complex social groupings with a wide variety of social strategies. In this chapter we investigate the role that differing habitats and ecological conditions have played in the evolution of delphinid social strategies. We propose a conceptual framework for understanding natural patterns of delphinid social structure in which the spatial and temporal predictability of resources influences the ranging patterns of individuals and communities. The framework predicts that when resources are spatially and temporally predictable, dolphins should remain resident in relatively small areas. Predictable resources are often found in complex inshore environments where dolphins may hide from predators or avoid areas with high predator density. Additionally, available food resources may limit group size. Thus, we predict that there are few benefits to forming large groups and potentially many benefits to being solitary or in small groups. Males may be able to sequester solitary females, controlling mating opportunities. Observations of inshore populations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) and island-associated spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) seem to fit this pattern well, along with forest-dwelling African antelope and primates such as vervets (Cercopithicus aethiops), baboons (Papio sp.), macaques (Macaca sp.) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). In contrast, the framework predicts that when resources such as food are unpredictable, individuals must range further to find the necessary resources. Forming groups may be the only strategy available to avoid predation, especially in the open ocean. Larger home ranges are likely to support a greater number of individuals; however, prey is often sparsely distributed, which may act to reduce foraging competition. Cooperative foraging and herding of prey schools may be advantageous, potentially facilitating the formation of long-term bonds. Alternately, individuals may display many short-term affiliations