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Sample records for baboons evolution comparee

  1. Papio Cranium from the Hominin-Bearing Site of Malapa: Implications for the Evolution of Modern Baboon Cranial Morphology and South African Plio-Pleistocene Biochronology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C Gilbert

    Full Text Available A new partial cranium (UW 88-886 of the Plio-Pleistocene baboon Papio angusticeps from Malapa is identified, described and discussed. UW 88-886 represents the only non-hominin primate yet recovered from Malapa and is important both in the context of baboon evolution as well as South African hominin site biochronology. The new specimen may represent the first appearance of modern baboon anatomy and coincides almost perfectly with molecular divergence date estimates for the origin of the modern P. hamadryas radiation. The fact that the Malapa specimen is dated between ~2.026-2.36 million years ago (Ma also has implications for the biochronology of other South African Plio-Pleistocene sites where P. angusticeps is found.

  2. The evolution of cervical mucus infrastructure in normal cyclic baboons (Papio anubis) and castrated females receiving hormonal supplies. A scanning electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrétien, F C

    1980-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope was used to study the evolution of the infrastructure of cervical mucus in normal cyclic baboons and in castrated animals treated with ovarian hormones for establishing an artificial cycle. In both groups, the results make conspicuous the progressive enlargement of the filamentous woof, which attains a maximum at midcycle and then decreases by degrees in the second part of the cycle. It was shown that the evolution of the framework is very similar during normal and artificial cycle, with only variations of slight amplitude. Moreover, the variations in the baboon mucus infrastructure closely resemble those described in the human. The results are briefly discussed in the light of known data. PMID:6770577

  3. Molecular evolution and expression profile of the chemerine encoding gene RARRES2 in baboon and chimpanzee

    OpenAIRE

    González-Alvarez, Rafael; Garza-Rodríguez, María d L; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Treviño Alvarado, Víctor M; Canales-Del-Castillo, Ricardo; Martínez-de-Villarreal, Laura E; Lugo-Trampe, Ángel; Tejero, María E; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E.; Rocha-Pizaña, María D R; Cole, Shelley A.; Reséndez-Pérez, Diana; Moises-Alvarez, Mario; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Hugo A. Barrera-Saldaña

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Chemerin, encoded by the retinoic acid receptor responder 2 (RARRES2) gene is an adipocytesecreted protein with autocrine/paracrine functions in adipose tissue, metabolism and inflammation with a recently described function in vascular tone regulation, liver, steatosis, etc. This molecule is believed to represent a critical endocrine signal linking obesity to diabetes. There are no data available regarding evolution of RARRES2 in non-human primates and great apes. Expressi...

  4. Genetic integration of molar cusp size variation in baboons

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Christina; BATES, ELIZABETH; Broughton, Elizabeth; Do, Nicholas T.; Fletcher, Zachary; Mahaney, Michael C.; Hlusko, Leslea J.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies of primate diversity and evolution rely on dental morphology for insight into diet, behavior, and phylogenetic relationships. Consequently, variation in molar cusp size has increasingly become a phenotype of interest. In 2007 we published a quantitative genetic analysis of mandibular molar cusp size variation in baboons. Those results provided more questions than answers, as the pattern of genetic integration did not fit predictions from odontogenesis. To follow up, we expanded o...

  5. Detective mice assess relatedness in baboons using olfactory cues.

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    Célérier, Aurélie; Huchard, Elise; Alvergne, Alexandra; Féjan, Delphine; Plard, Floriane; Cowlishaw, Guy; Raymond, Michel; Knapp, Leslie A; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The assessment of relatedness may be crucial in the evolution of socio-sexual behaviour, because it can be associated with fitness benefits mediated by both nepotism and inbreeding avoidance. In this context, one proposed mechanism for kin recognition is 'phenotype matching'; animals might compare phenotypic similarities between themselves and others in order to assess the probability that they are related. Among cues potentially used for kin discrimination, body odours constitute interesting candidates that have been poorly investigated in anthropoid primates so far, because of a mixture of theoretical considerations and methodological/experimental constraints. In this study, we used an indirect approach to examine the similarity in odour signals emitted by related individuals from a natural population of chacma baboons (Papio ursinus). For that purpose, we designed an innovative behavioural tool using mice olfactory abilities in a habituation-discrimination paradigm. We show that: (i) mice can detect odour differences between individuals of same sex and age class in another mammal species, and (ii) mice perceive a higher odour similarity between related baboons than between unrelated baboons. These results suggest that odours may play a role in both the signalling of individual characteristics and of relatedness among individuals in an anthropoid primate. The 'biological olfactometer' developed in this study offers new perspectives to the exploration of olfactory signals from a range of species. PMID:20400623

  6. Seed size selection by olive baboons.

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    Kunz, Britta Kerstin; Linsenmair, Karl Eduard

    2008-10-01

    Seed size is an important plant fitness trait that can influence several steps between fruiting and the establishment of a plant's offspring. Seed size varies considerably within many plant species, yet the relevance of the trait for intra-specific fruit choice by primates has received little attention. Primates may select certain seed sizes within a species for a number of reasons, e.g. to decrease indigestible seed load or increase pulp intake per fruit. Olive baboons (Papio anubis, Cercopithecidae) are known to select seed size in unripe and mature pods of Parkia biglobosa (Mimosaceae) differentially, so that pods with small seeds, and an intermediate seed number, contribute most to dispersal by baboons. We tested whether olive baboons likewise select for smaller ripe seeds within each of nine additional fruit species whose fruit pulp baboons commonly consume, and for larger seeds in one species in which baboons feed on the seeds. Species differed in fruit type and seed number per fruit. For five of these species, baboons dispersed seeds that were significantly smaller than seeds extracted manually from randomly collected fresh fruits. In contrast, for three species, baboons swallowed seeds that were significantly longer and/or wider than seeds from fresh fruits. In two species, sizes of ingested seeds and seeds from fresh fruits did not differ significantly. Baboons frequently spat out seeds of Drypetes floribunda (Euphorbiaceae) but not those of other plant species having seeds of equal size. Oral processing of D. floribunda seeds depended on seed size: seeds that were spat out were significantly larger and swallowed seeds smaller, than seeds from randomly collected fresh fruits. We argue that seed size selection in baboons is influenced, among other traits, by the amount of pulp rewarded per fruit relative to seed load, which is likely to vary with fruit and seed shape.

  7. Deep Learning of Orthographic Representations in Baboons

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Hannagan; Ziegler, Johannes C.; Stéphane Dufau; Joël Fagot; Jonathan Grainger

    2014-01-01

    What is the origin of our ability to learn orthographic knowledge? We use deep convolutional networks to emulate the primate's ventral visual stream and explore the recent finding that baboons can be trained to discriminate English words from nonwords [1]. The networks were exposed to the exact same sequence of stimuli and reinforcement signals as the baboons in the experiment, and learned to map real visual inputs (pixels) of letter strings onto binary word/nonword responses. We show that th...

  8. Epizootic pertussis focus of hamadryad baboons

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    A. Yu. Medkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The absence of an adequate experimental animal model makes difficult study of immunity against whooping cough and its pathogenesis. Experimental whooping cough reported by us earlier in pubescent non-human primates of the Old World was accompanied by specific clinical and laboratory marks in the absence of cough. The possibility of pertussis modelling while experimental whooping cough in impuberal hamadryad baboons was investigated. In the process of selection of monkeys for the further studies for perfecting of experimental model for pertussis research unexpectedly were detected specific pertussis antibodies in impuberal hamadryad baboons.The aim of the study: revealing of source of infection and transmission of pertussis to hamadryad baboons and investigation of response of antibody-positive impuberal hamadryad baboons to secondary contagion by B. pertussis bacteria while experimental infection.Results. 18 veterinary checked, somatically healthy hamadryad baboons of various gender managed in two neighboring cages. Specific pertussis IgM and IgG antibodies were found in blood serum of all the animals and one of the monkey keepers. By real-time PCR in nasopharyngeal swabs of the monkey keeper and three 7- and 9-month-old hamadryad baboons were registered single B. pertussis genom equivalents. Seropositive impuberal hamadryad baboons were experimentally challenged by virulent B. pertussis 475 strain. Quantity of B. pertussis genom equivalents and percentage of IgM and IgG antibodies in impuberal hamadryad baboons after experimental infection were detected. These results were comparable with such received after secondary experimental challenge of monkeys by B. pertussis. Humoral immuneresponse was characterized by booster effect and rapid B. pertussis elimination.Conclusion. The case of transmission of B.pertussis bacteria to hamadryad baboons by natural contagion and epizootic focus of pertussis in apery conditions

  9. Pleistocene aridification cycles shaped the contemporary genetic architecture of Southern African baboons.

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    Riashna Sithaldeen

    Full Text Available Plio-Pleistocene environmental change influenced the evolutionary history of many animal lineages in Africa, highlighting key roles for both climate and tectonics in the evolution of Africa's faunal diversity. Here, we explore diversification in the southern African chacma baboon Papio ursinus sensu lato and reveal a dominant role for increasingly arid landscapes during past glacial cycles in shaping contemporary genetic structure. Recent work on baboons (Papio spp. supports complex lineage structuring with a dominant pulse of diversification occurring 1-2Ma, and yet the link to palaeoenvironmental change remains largely untested. Phylogeographic reconstruction based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data supports a scenario where chacma baboon populations were likely restricted to refugia during periods of regional cooling and drying through the Late Pleistocene. The two lineages of chacma baboon, ursinus and griseipes, are strongly geographically structured, and demographic reconstruction together with spatial analysis of genetic variation point to possible climate-driven isolating events where baboons may have retreated to more optimum conditions during cooler, drier periods. Our analysis highlights a period of continuous population growth beginning in the Middle to Late Pleistocene in both the ursinus and the PG2 griseipes lineages. All three clades identified in the study then enter a state of declining population size (Nef through to the Holocene; this is particularly marked in the last 20,000 years, most likely coincident with the Last Glacial Maximum. The pattern recovered here conforms to expectations based on the dynamic regional climate trends in southern Africa through the Pleistocene and provides further support for complex patterns of diversification in the region's biodiversity.

  10. Social networks predict gut microbiome composition in wild baboons.

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    Tung, Jenny; Barreiro, Luis B; Burns, Michael B; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Lynch, Josh; Grieneisen, Laura E; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C; Blekhman, Ran; Archie, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Social relationships have profound effects on health in humans and other primates, but the mechanisms that explain this relationship are not well understood. Using shotgun metagenomic data from wild baboons, we found that social group membership and social network relationships predicted both the taxonomic structure of the gut microbiome and the structure of genes encoded by gut microbial species. Rates of interaction directly explained variation in the gut microbiome, even after controlling for diet, kinship, and shared environments. They therefore strongly implicate direct physical contact among social partners in the transmission of gut microbial species. We identified 51 socially structured taxa, which were significantly enriched for anaerobic and non-spore-forming lifestyles. Our results argue that social interactions are an important determinant of gut microbiome composition in natural animal populations-a relationship with important ramifications for understanding how social relationships influence health, as well as the evolution of group living.

  11. Animal models of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The preterm baboon models

    OpenAIRE

    Yoder, Bradley A.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the progress in improved neonatal care, particularly management of underdeveloped preterm lungs, has been aided by investigations of multiple animal models, including the neonatal baboon (Papio species). In this article we highlight how the preterm baboon model at both 140 and 125 days gestation (term equivalent 185 days) has advanced our understanding and management of the immature human infant with neonatal lung disease. Not only is the 125-day baboon model extremely relevant to the...

  12. Preweaning food intake influences the adiposity of young adult baboons.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, D. S.; Bertrand, H A; McMahan, C.A.; McGill, H. C.; Carey, K D; Masoro, E J

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that preweaning nutrition influences adult fat cell number and adiposity was tested in baboons. Newborn baboons were fed Similac formulas with caloric densities of 40.5 kcal (underfed), 67.5 kcal (fed normally), and 94.5 kcal (overfed) per 100 g formula. From weaning (16 wk) until necropsy at 5 yr of age all baboons were fed the same diet. At necropsy, fat cell number and fat cell size in 10 fat depots were measured. Female baboons overfed as infants had markedly greater fat de...

  13. Analysis of prostate-specific antigen transcripts in chimpanzees, cynomolgus monkeys, baboons, and African green monkeys.

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    James N Mubiru

    Full Text Available The function of prostate-specific antigen (PSA is to liquefy the semen coagulum so that the released sperm can fuse with the ovum. Fifteen spliced variants of the PSA gene have been reported in humans, but little is known about alternative splicing in nonhuman primates. Positive selection has been reported in sex- and reproductive-related genes from sea urchins to Drosophila to humans; however, there are few studies of adaptive evolution of the PSA gene. Here, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR product cloning and sequencing, we study PSA transcript variant heterogeneity in the prostates of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis, and African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops. Six PSA variants were identified in the chimpanzee prostate, but only two variants were found in cynomolgus monkeys, baboons, and African green monkeys. In the chimpanzee the full-length transcript is expressed at the same magnitude as the transcripts that retain intron 3. We have found previously unidentified splice variants of the PSA gene, some of which might be linked to disease conditions. Selection on the PSA gene was studied in 11 primate species by computational methods using the sequences reported here for African green monkey, cynomolgus monkey, baboon, and chimpanzee and other sequences available in public databases. A codon-based analysis (dN/dS of the PSA gene identified potential adaptive evolution at five residue sites (Arg45, Lys70, Gln144, Pro189, and Thr203.

  14. Deep learning of orthographic representations in baboons.

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    Hannagan, Thomas; Ziegler, Johannes C; Dufau, Stéphane; Fagot, Joël; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    What is the origin of our ability to learn orthographic knowledge? We use deep convolutional networks to emulate the primate's ventral visual stream and explore the recent finding that baboons can be trained to discriminate English words from nonwords. The networks were exposed to the exact same sequence of stimuli and reinforcement signals as the baboons in the experiment, and learned to map real visual inputs (pixels) of letter strings onto binary word/nonword responses. We show that the networks' highest levels of representations were indeed sensitive to letter combinations as postulated in our previous research. The model also captured the key empirical findings, such as generalization to novel words, along with some intriguing inter-individual differences. The present work shows the merits of deep learning networks that can simulate the whole processing chain all the way from the visual input to the response while allowing researchers to analyze the complex representations that emerge during the learning process.

  15. Deep learning of orthographic representations in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannagan, Thomas; Ziegler, Johannes C; Dufau, Stéphane; Fagot, Joël; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    What is the origin of our ability to learn orthographic knowledge? We use deep convolutional networks to emulate the primate's ventral visual stream and explore the recent finding that baboons can be trained to discriminate English words from nonwords. The networks were exposed to the exact same sequence of stimuli and reinforcement signals as the baboons in the experiment, and learned to map real visual inputs (pixels) of letter strings onto binary word/nonword responses. We show that the networks' highest levels of representations were indeed sensitive to letter combinations as postulated in our previous research. The model also captured the key empirical findings, such as generalization to novel words, along with some intriguing inter-individual differences. The present work shows the merits of deep learning networks that can simulate the whole processing chain all the way from the visual input to the response while allowing researchers to analyze the complex representations that emerge during the learning process. PMID:24416300

  16. Deep learning of orthographic representations in baboons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hannagan

    Full Text Available What is the origin of our ability to learn orthographic knowledge? We use deep convolutional networks to emulate the primate's ventral visual stream and explore the recent finding that baboons can be trained to discriminate English words from nonwords. The networks were exposed to the exact same sequence of stimuli and reinforcement signals as the baboons in the experiment, and learned to map real visual inputs (pixels of letter strings onto binary word/nonword responses. We show that the networks' highest levels of representations were indeed sensitive to letter combinations as postulated in our previous research. The model also captured the key empirical findings, such as generalization to novel words, along with some intriguing inter-individual differences. The present work shows the merits of deep learning networks that can simulate the whole processing chain all the way from the visual input to the response while allowing researchers to analyze the complex representations that emerge during the learning process.

  17. Deep Learning of Orthographic Representations in Baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannagan, Thomas; Ziegler, Johannes C.; Dufau, Stéphane; Fagot, Joël; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    What is the origin of our ability to learn orthographic knowledge? We use deep convolutional networks to emulate the primate's ventral visual stream and explore the recent finding that baboons can be trained to discriminate English words from nonwords [1]. The networks were exposed to the exact same sequence of stimuli and reinforcement signals as the baboons in the experiment, and learned to map real visual inputs (pixels) of letter strings onto binary word/nonword responses. We show that the networks' highest levels of representations were indeed sensitive to letter combinations as postulated in our previous research. The model also captured the key empirical findings, such as generalization to novel words, along with some intriguing inter-individual differences. The present work shows the merits of deep learning networks that can simulate the whole processing chain all the way from the visual input to the response while allowing researchers to analyze the complex representations that emerge during the learning process. PMID:24416300

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Doguera baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Doguera baboon Papio anubis Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Primate Papio_anub...is_L.png Papio_anubis_NL.png Papio_anubis_S.png Papio_anubis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=NL http://...biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=NS ...

  19. Renal histopathology of a baboon model with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon-Choles, Hernan; Abboud, Hanna E; Lee, Shuko; Shade, Robert E; Rice, Karen S; Carey, K Dee; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Barnes, Jeffrey L

    2012-10-01

    Naturally occurring type 2 diabetes has been found in a colony of baboons. Ongoing characterization of the baboon colony maintained at the Southwest National Primate Research Center has revealed a significant range of glucose sensitivity with some animals clearly diabetic.   Seven baboons, four with diabetes and three without diabetes, underwent histopathological investigation. Three diabetic animals were diagnosed using fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1C, and intravenous glucose tolerance test, and a fourth one was known to have hyperglycemia. One control baboon and three baboons with diabetes had microalbuminuria. On kidney biopsy, diabetic baboons had thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix expansion compared to controls. Immunohistochemistry showed the diabetic animals had increased mesangial expression of cellular fibronectin ED-A. Two diabetic animals with microalbuminuria had evidence of mesangiolysis with the formation of an early nodule. One diabetic animal had a Kimmestiel-Wilson nodule. We conclude that the baboon represents a useful primate model of diabetes and nephropathy that resembles the nephropathy associated with type 2 diabetes in humans.

  20. Microscopic anatomy of the baboon (Papio hamadryas) adrenal medulla.

    OpenAIRE

    al-Lami, F; Carmichael, S W

    1991-01-01

    Adrenal medullas of 2 baboons perfused with formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde and tannic acid were studied by light and electron microscopy. Tissues were postfixed in OsO4. This procedure allows identification of noradrenaline cells on the basis of a selective reaction of glutaraldehyde with noradrenaline vesicles. As positive control for noradrenaline cells, similarly treated mouse adrenal medullas were also examined. Light microscopic examination of thick sections of baboon medullas did not show ...

  1. Feto-placental adaptations to maternal obesity in the baboon

    OpenAIRE

    Farley, Darren; Tejero, Maria E; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Higgins, Paul B.; Cox, Laura; Werner, Sherry L.; Jenkins, Susan L.; Li, Cun; Choi, Jaehyek; Dick, Edward J.; Hubbard, Gene B.; Frost, Patrice; Dudley, Donald D.; Ballesteros, Brandon; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-01-01

    Maternal obesity is present in 20–34% of pregnant women and has been associated with both intrauterine growth restriction and large-for-gestational age fetuses. While fetal and placental functions have been extensively studied in the baboon, no data are available on the effect of maternal obesity on placental structure and function in this species. We hypothesize that maternal obesity in the baboon is associated with a maternal inflammatory state and induces structural and functional changes ...

  2. Wild chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) remember single foraging episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noser, Rahel; Byrne, Richard W

    2015-07-01

    Understanding animal episodic-like memory is important for tracing the evolution of the human mind. However, our knowledge about the existence and nature of episodic-like memory in non-human primates is minimal. We observed the behaviour of a wild male chacma baboon faced with a trade-off between protecting his stationary group from aggressive extra-group males and foraging among five out-of-sight platforms. These contained high-priority food at a time of natural food shortage. In 10 morning and eight evening trials, the male spontaneously visited the platforms in five and four different sequences, respectively. In addition, he interrupted foraging sequences at virtually any point on eight occasions, returning to the group for up to 2 h. He then visited some or all of the remaining platforms and prevented revisits to already depleted ones, apparently based on his memory for the previous foraging episode about food value, location, and time. Efficient use of memory allowed him to keep minimal time absent from his group while keeping food intake high. These findings support the idea that episodic-like memory offers an all-purpose solution to a wide variety of problems that require flexible, quick, yet precise decisions in situations arising from competition for food and mates in wild primates. PMID:25833223

  3. [Grooming and group structure in hamadryas baboons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The results of 3-year observation on coral living hamadryas baboons transported from natural habitat in Tuapse reservation have been presented. Despite of the fact that grooming between males and females accounted for 73% of total cases of grooming in adult individual pairs, only the relationships of males with high-ranked females of their harems fully corresponded to a star-shaped sociogram. The high-ranked females were not different from all the other females either according to a total number of grooming cases with their female partners or according to a proportion of a performed and received grooming. Grooming between the related females was noted predominantly in the cases when they belonged to the same harem. Grooming between the related males accounted for 59% of all the cases of grooming between the male partners.

  4. Metabolism of endogenous surfactant in premature baboons and effect of prenatal corticosteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, JEH; Carnielli, VP; Seidner, [No Value; Ikegami, M; Wattimena, JLD; Sauer, PJJ; Jobe, AH; Zimmermann, LJI

    1999-01-01

    We studied the synthesis of surfactant and the effect of prenatal betamethasone treatment in vivo in very preterm baboons. Ten pregnant baboons were randomized to receive either betamethasone (beta) or saline (control) 48 and 24 h before preterm delivery. The newborn baboons were intubated, treated

  5. What baboons can (not) tell us about natural language grammars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletiek, Fenna H; Fitz, Hartmut; Bocanegra, Bruno R

    2016-06-01

    Rey et al. (2012) present data from a study with baboons that they interpret in support of the idea that center-embedded structures in human language have their origin in low level memory mechanisms and associative learning. Critically, the authors claim that the baboons showed a behavioral preference that is consistent with center-embedded sequences over other types of sequences. We argue that the baboons' response patterns suggest that two mechanisms are involved: first, they can be trained to associate a particular response with a particular stimulus, and, second, when faced with two conditioned stimuli in a row, they respond to the most recent one first, copying behavior they had been rewarded for during training. Although Rey et al. (2012) 'experiment shows that the baboons' behavior is driven by low level mechanisms, it is not clear how the animal behavior reported, bears on the phenomenon of Center Embedded structures in human syntax. Hence, (1) natural language syntax may indeed have been shaped by low level mechanisms, and (2) the baboons' behavior is driven by low level stimulus response learning, as Rey et al. propose. But is the second evidence for the first? We will discuss in what ways this study can and cannot give evidential value for explaining the origin of Center Embedded recursion in human grammar. More generally, their study provokes an interesting reflection on the use of animal studies in order to understand features of the human linguistic system. PMID:26026382

  6. The Baboon (Papio spp. as a Model of Human Ebola Virus Infection

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    Gary L.White

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Baboons are susceptible to natural Ebola virus (EBOV infection and share 96% genetic homology with humans. Despite these characteristics, baboons have rarely been utilized as experimental models of human EBOV infection to evaluate the efficacy of prophylactics and therapeutics in the United States. This review will summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of EBOV infection in baboons compared to EBOV infection in humans and other Old World nonhuman primates. In addition, we will discuss how closely the baboon model recapitulates human EBOV infection. We will also review some of the housing requirements and behavioral attributes of baboons compared to other Old World nonhuman primates. Due to the lack of data available on the pathogenesis of Marburg virus (MARV infection in baboons, discussion of the pathogenesis of MARV infection in baboons will be limited.

  7. Plutonium gastrointestinal absorption by adults baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium was investigated in baboons after ingestion of plutonium solution (oxidation states III; IV; V; VI), and plutonium incorporated in soya bean and winkles. We studied the effects of oxidation state and ingested mass for masses ranging from 0.35 μg to 51.6 x 10+3 μg (4 x 10-2 to 7776 μg of plutonium per kg of body weight). No clear increase in plutonium retention was shown for concentrations of plutonium smaller than 1 μg/kg. From 1 μg/kg to 1 mg/kg no effects of mass or oxidation state was observed and the mean fractional retention value was 10-4. For ingested masses higher than 1 mg/kg the fractional retention values respectively increased for Pu(V) and Pu(III) to (0.9 + 0.2) x 10-2 and (7.4+ 4.1) x 10-4 of the ingested mass. This increase might be due to the weak hydrolysis of these oxidation states which would increase gastrointestinal absorption by decrease of hydroxide formation. The fraction of plutonium retained after ingestion of soya bean was (3.0 + 0.5) x 10-4 about 3 fold higher than the value for 238 Pu nitrate solution. No clear increase in plutonium retention was shown after ingestion of winkles containing 238 Pu. In conclusion, except for high masses of ingested Pu, the retention of which could reach 1% of the ingested dose, our results show that the gastrointestinal transfer factor of 10-4 proposed by ICRP for gastrointestinal absorption of soluble form of Pu is acceptable, but 10-3 would provide better safety margin

  8. Inherently analog quantity representations in olive baboons (Papio anubis

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    Allison M Barnard

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Strong evidence indicates that non-human primates possess a numerical representation system, but the inherent nature of that system is still debated. Two cognitive mechanisms have been proposed to account for non-human primate numerical performance: (1 a discrete object-file system limited to quantities <4, and (2 an analog system which represents quantities comparatively but is limited by the ratio between two quantities. To test the underlying nature of non-human primate quantification, we asked eight experiment -naive olive baboons (Papio anubis to discriminate between number pairs containing small (<4, large (>4, or span (small vs. large numbers of food items presented simultaneously or sequentially. The prediction from the object-file hypothesis is that baboons will only accurately choose the larger quantity in small pairs, but not large or span pairs. Conversely, the analog system predicts that baboons will be successful with all numbers, and that success will be dependent on numerical ratio. We found that baboons successfully discriminated all pair types at above chance levels. In addition, performance significantly correlated with the ratio between the numerical values. Although performance was better for simultaneous trials than sequential trials, evidence favoring analog numerical representation emerged from both conditions, and was present even in the first exposure to number pairs. Together, these data favor the interpretation that a single, coherent analog representation system underlies spontaneous quantitative abilities in primates.

  9. Predation as a determinant of minimum group size in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettridge, Caroline M; Dunbar, R I M

    2012-01-01

    Predation risk places a pressure on animals to adopt mechanisms by which they reduce their individual risk of being preyed on. However, a consensus on methods of determining predation risk has yet to be reached. One of the most widespread ways in which animals respond to predation risk is by living in groups. Minimum permissible group size is the smallest group size that animals are able to live in, given the habitat-specific predation risk they face. We explore ways in which predation risk can be measured and analyse its effect on minimum observed group size in baboons. Using data on predator density, habitat composition and baboon body size, we investigate the impact of the components of predation risk on baboon group size, and derive an equation that best predicts minimum group size. Minimum group size in baboons is related to predator density and female body mass. Both of these elements can, in turn, be estimated from environmental variables. These findings present support for the argument that group living in primates is a response to predation risk and offer potentially new ways of investigating carnivore and primate ecology. PMID:23363593

  10. An economic analysis of "demand" for food in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltin, R W

    1991-11-01

    Responding of 6 adult male baboons (Papio c. anubis) was maintained under a fixed-ratio schedule of food reinforcement during daily 22-hr experimental sessions. Completion of the ratio requirement resulted in the delivery of a single 1-g food pellet; supplemental feeding was limited to a daily fruit ration. Ratio values were increased on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays according to the following schedule: 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 96, 128. Responding under each ratio value was examined four times. Under the Fixed-Ratio 2 conditions, food intake ranged between 300 and 600 g. Ratios were increased for each baboon until food intake decreased to about 100 g (20% to 30% of Fixed-Ratio 2 intake). Increasing the response cost increased total time responding and total daily responding in all baboons, but this increase in responding was not sufficient to maintain stable food intake. Baboons responded between 90 and 180 min per day. The highest running response rates were observed under the Fixed-Ratio 2 and Fixed-Ratio 4 schedules. Running rate was similar across the larger ratio values (greater than Fixed-Ratio 8) but was lower than that observed under the Fixed-Ratio 2 and Fixed-Ratio 4 schedules. Similar results were observed the four times that each fixed-ratio value was tested. Intake as a function of cost was analyzed by fitting data to the nonlinear equation proposed by Hursh, Raslear, Shurtleff, Bauman, and Simmons (1988) for "demand" functions. Demand for food was inelastic over most of the ratio values until food intake decreased to 15% to 55% of baseline. The results indicate that demand functions are appropriate for the study of food intake in baboons, but also caution that intake at the cost when demand shifts from inelastic to elastic and its relationship to maximal intake should also be included in analyses of demand for a commodity. PMID:1774538

  11. Metabolism of endogenous surfactant in premature baboons and effect of prenatal corticosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Bunt, Jan Erik; Carnielli, Virgilio; Seidner, S.R.; Ikegami, M; Wattimena, Josias; Sauer, Pieter; Jobe, Alan; Zimmermann, Luc

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the synthesis of surfactant and the effect of prenatal betamethasone treatment in vivo in very preterm baboons. Ten pregnant baboons were randomized to receive either betamethasone (beta) or saline (control) 48 and 24 h before preterm delivery. The newborn baboons were intubated, treated with surfactant, and ventilated for 6 d. They received a 24-h infusion with the stable isotope [U-(13)C]glucose as precursor for the synthesis of palmitic acid in surfactant phosphatidy...

  12. Baboon Model of Generalized Epilepsy: Continuous Intracranial Video-EEG Monitoring with Subdural Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Salinas, Felipe S.; Leland, M Michelle; Caron, Jean-Louis; Hanes, Martha A.; Knape, Koyle D.; Xie, Dongbin; Williams, Jeff T.

    2012-01-01

    The baboon provides a natural non-human primate model for photosensitive, generalized epilepsy. This study describes an implantation procedure for the placement of subdural grid and strip electrodes for continuous video-EEG monitoring in the epileptic baboon to evaluate the generation and propagation of ictal and interictal epileptic discharges. Subdural grid, strip and depth electrodes were implanted in six baboons, targeting brain regions that were activated in functional neuroimaging studi...

  13. Electroejaculated Baboon (Papio anubis) Sperm Requires a Higher Dosage of Pentoxifylline to Enhance Motility

    OpenAIRE

    Cseh, Sandor; Chan, Philip J.; Corselli, Johannah; Bailey, Leonard L.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Sperm collected by electroejaculation often showpoor motility. The objective was to determine whether theaddition of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, pentoxifylline,would stimulate electroejaculated baboon sperm motility.

  14. Gastrointestinal transfer of neptunium (V) in newborn baboons: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure gastrointestinal neptunium absorption, baboons aged from 17 hours to 26 days were gavaged with an oral dose of 0.002 ug/kg of neptunium-239 nitrate. Absorption ranged from 3.71 to 0.113 per cent of the gavaged dose which was, 88 to 3 times higher than the values for adults. This range was reduced to 41 to 3 when doubtful results were discarded because of possible lung contamination. Absorption was expressed in terms of retention per animal at killing since collection of urine and faeces from neonates was not possible. For the same animals the skeleton/liver ratio of the neptunium burden rose continuously in the 26 dav-old baboon and reached twice the mean adult value

  15. Focused grooming networks and stress alleviation in wild female baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Roman M; Crockford, Catherine; Lehmann, Julia; Whitten, Patricia L; Seyfarth, Robert M; Cheney, Dorothy L

    2008-06-01

    We examine the relationship between glucocorticoid (GC) levels and grooming behavior in wild female baboons during a period of instability in the alpha male rank position. All females' GC levels rose significantly at the onset of the unstable period, though levels in females who were at lower risk of infanticide began to decrease sooner in the following weeks. Three factors suggest that females relied on a focused grooming network as a coping mechanism to alleviate stress. First, all females' grooming networks became less diverse in the weeks following the initial upheaval. Second, females whose grooming had already focused on a few predictable partners showed a less dramatic rise in GC levels than females whose grooming network had been more diverse. Third, females who contracted their grooming network the most experienced a greater decrease in GC levels in the following week. We conclude that close bonds with a few preferred partners allow female baboons to alleviate the stress associated with social instability.

  16. Feeding, ranging and social organisation of the Guinea baboon

    OpenAIRE

    Sharman, Martin John

    1982-01-01

    Before this study, the Guinea or Western baboon, Papio papio, was almost unknown in its natural environment. This thesis reports a nineteen-month field study of two troops of P. papio carried out in south-eastern Senegal. The monkeys were followed on foot, and aspects of their feeding, ranging and social behaviour were recorded. The troops were censused whenever possible. Both study groups, and other troops in the area, were found to be unusually large by comparison with other known troop...

  17. Cross-placental transfer of 2434Cm in the baboon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adult female baboon was injected with 1.36 μCi 2434Cm approximately four months after the onset of pregnancy. Forty-five days subsequent to the injection, the fetus was delivered by Caesarean section and the individual organs assayed for their 2434Cm contents. The soft tissues, placenta and skeleton were found to contain 0.03, 1.11, and 0.42% respectively of the mother's body burden

  18. Baboon feeding ecology informs the dietary niche of Paranthropus boisei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele A Macho

    Full Text Available Hominins are generally considered eclectic omnivores like baboons, but recent isotope studies call into question the generalist status of some hominins. Paranthropus boisei and Australopithecus bahrelghazali derived 75%-80% of their tissues' δ(13C from C4 sources, i.e. mainly low-quality foods like grasses and sedges. Here I consider the energetics of P. boisei and the nutritional value of C4 foods, taking into account scaling issues between the volume of food consumed and body mass, and P. boisei's food preference as inferred from dento-cranial morphology. Underlying the models are empirical data for Papio cynocephalus dietary ecology. Paranthropus boisei only needed to spend some 37%-42% of its daily feeding time (conservative estimate on C4 sources to meet 80% of its daily requirements of calories, and all its requirements for protein. The energetic requirements of 2-4 times the basal metabolic rate (BMR common to mammals could therefore have been met within a 6-hour feeding/foraging day. The findings highlight the high nutritional yield of many C4 foods eaten by baboons (and presumably hominins, explain the evolutionary success of P. boisei, and indicate that P. boisei was probably a generalist like other hominins. The diet proposed is consistent with the species' derived morphology and unique microwear textures. Finally, the results highlight the importance of baboon/hominin hand in food acquisition and preparation.

  19. Antelope Predation by Nigerian Forest Baboons: Ecological and Behavioural Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Volker; Lowe, Adriana; Jesus, Gonçalo; Alberts, Nienke; Bouquet, Yaëlle; Inglis, David M; Petersdorf, Megan; van Riel, Eelco; Thompson, James; Ross, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Baboons are well studied in savannah but less so in more closed habitats. We investigated predation on mammals by olive baboons (Papio anubis) at a geographical and climatic outlier, Gashaka Gumti National Park (Nigeria), the wettest and most forested site so far studied. Despite abundant wildlife, meat eating was rare and selective. Over 16 years, baboons killed 7 bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus) and 3 red-flanked duiker (Cephalophus rufilatus), mostly still-lying 'parked' infants. Taking observation time into account, this is 1 predation per group every 3.3 months - far lower than at other sites. Some features of meat eating resemble those elsewhere; predation is opportunistic, adult males monopolize most prey, a targeted killing bite is lacking and begging or active sharing is absent. Carcass owners employ evasive tactics, as meat is often competed over, but satiated owners may tolerate others taking meat. Other features are unusual; this is only the second study site with predation records for bushbuck and the only one for red-flanked duiker. The atypical prey and rarity of eating mammals probably reflects the difficulty of acquiring prey animals when vegetation cover is dense. Our data support the general prediction of the socioecological model that environments shape behavioural patterns, while acknowledging their intraspecific or intrageneric plasticity. PMID:27287424

  20. Metabolism of endogenous surfactant in premature baboons and effect of prenatal corticosteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.H. Bunt (Jan Erik); V.P. Carnielli (Virgilio); S.R. Seidner; M. Ikegami; J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); P.J.J. Sauer (Pieter); A.H. Jobe (Alan); L.J.I. Zimmermann (Luc)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the synthesis of surfactant and the effect of prenatal betamethasone treatment in vivo in very preterm baboons. Ten pregnant baboons were randomized to receive either betamethasone (beta) or saline (control) 48 and 24 h before preterm delivery. Th

  1. Upper limit of cerebral blood flow autoregulation in experimental renovascular hypertension in the baboon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgaard, S; Jones, J V; MacKenzie, E T;

    1975-01-01

    The effect of arterial hypertension on cerebral blood flow was studied by the intracarotid 133Xe clearance method in baboons. The arterial blood pressure was raised in gradual steps with angiotensin. Baboons with renal hypertension of 8-12 weeks duration were studied along with normotensive baboons....... In initially normotensive baboons, cerebral blood flow remained constant until the mean arterial blood pressure had risen to the range of 140 to 154 mm Hg; thereafter cerebral blood flow increased with each rise in mean arterial blood pressure. In the chronically hypertensive baboons, cerebral blood flow...... remained constant until the mean arterial blood pressure had been elevated to the range of 155 to 169 mm Hg. Thus, in chronic hypertension it appears that there are adaptive changes in the cerebral circulation which may help to protect the brain from further increases in arterial blood pressure....

  2. Efficacy of fenbendazole and milbemycin oxime for treating baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) infected with Trichuris trichiura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Mason V; Wolf, Roman F; Carey, David W; Garrett, Jennifer Jane; Briscoe, Heather A

    2007-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of fenbendazole (FBZ) and milbemycin oxime (MO) in the treatment of baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) with naturally acquired Trichuris trichiura infection by comparing fecal egg count reduction (FECR) tests. We assigned 7 baboons, each singly housed and confirmed infected with T. trichiura, to treatment groups of FBZ (n=3) or MO (n=3), or as a control (n=1). All (100%) baboons that received FBZ stopped shedding T. trichiura eggs within 6 d of treatment, and fecal egg counts remained negative at 65 d after treatment. Although the number of T. trichiura eggs shed per gram of feces from 2 (67%) baboons decreased significantly after the second treatment with MO, this regimen never totally eliminated eggs of T. trichiura. The results of our study indicate that FBZ was more effective for treating baboons with T. trichiura than was MO.

  3. 5-Azacytidine stimulates fetal hemoglobin synthesis in anemic baboons.

    OpenAIRE

    DESIMONE, J.; Heller, P; Hall, L; Zwiers, D

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to stimulate Hb F synthesis in baboons by means other than erythropoietic stress, we considered the possibility that an agent that inhibits methylation of CpG sequences in DNA may be effective. 5-Azacytidine, a cytosine analogue that cannot be methylated, is such an agent. Animals whose packed red cell volume was maintained at approximately 20% by bleeding were given 10 daily intravenous injections of the drug (6 mg/kg) in 12 days. Hb F levels in these animals started to increas...

  4. Mechanisms of xenogeneic baboon platelet aggregation and phagocytosis by porcine liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Baboons receiving xenogeneic livers from wild type and transgenic pigs survive less than 10 days. One of the major issues is the early development of profound thrombocytopenia that results in fatal hemorrhage. Histological examination of xenotransplanted livers has shown baboon platelet activation, phagocytosis and sequestration within the sinusoids. In order to study the mechanisms of platelet consumption in liver xenotransplantation, we have developed an in vitro system to examine the interaction between pig endothelial cells with baboon platelets and to thereby identify molecular mechanisms and therapies. METHODS: Fresh pig hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal and aortic endothelial cells were isolated by collagenase digestion of livers and processing of aortae from GTKO and Gal+ MGH-miniature swine. These primary cell cultures were then tested for the differential ability to induce baboon or pig platelet aggregation. Phagocytosis was evaluated by direct observation of CFSE labeled-platelets, which are incubated with endothelial cells under confocal light microscopy. Aurintricarboxylic acid (GpIb antagonist blocking interactions with von Willebrand factor/vWF, eptifibatide (Gp IIb/IIIa antagonist, and anti-Mac-1 Ab (anti-α(Mβ(2 integrin Ab were tested for the ability to inhibit phagocytosis. RESULTS: None of the pig cells induced aggregation or phagocytosis of porcine platelets. However, pig hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal and aortic endothelial cells (GTKO and Gal+ all induced moderate aggregation of baboon platelets. Importantly, pig liver sinusoidal endothelial cells efficiently phagocytosed baboon platelets, while pig aortic endothelial cells and hepatocytes had minimal effects on platelet numbers. Anti-MAC-1 Ab, aurintricarboxylic acid or eptifibatide, significantly decreased baboon platelet phagocytosis by pig liver endothelial cells (P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Although pig hepatocytes and aortic endothelial cells directly caused

  5. GROUP DECISIONS. Shared decision-making drives collective movement in wild baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandburg-Peshkin, Ariana; Farine, Damien R; Couzin, Iain D; Crofoot, Margaret C

    2015-06-19

    Conflicts of interest about where to go and what to do are a primary challenge of group living. However, it remains unclear how consensus is achieved in stable groups with stratified social relationships. Tracking wild baboons with a high-resolution global positioning system and analyzing their movements relative to one another reveals that a process of shared decision-making governs baboon movement. Rather than preferentially following dominant individuals, baboons are more likely to follow when multiple initiators agree. When conflicts arise over the direction of movement, baboons choose one direction over the other when the angle between them is large, but they compromise if it is not. These results are consistent with models of collective motion, suggesting that democratic collective action emerging from simple rules is widespread, even in complex, socially stratified societies.

  6. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine half-life and pool size measurements in premature baboons developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Janssen; V.P. Carnielli (Virgilio); P.E. Cogo (Paola); S.R. Seidner; I.H.I. Luijendijk; J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); A.H. Jobe (Alan); L.J.I. Zimmermann (Luc)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBecause minimal information is available about surfactant metabolism in bronchopulmonary dysplasia, we measured half-lives and pool sizes of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in very preterm baboons recovering from respiratory distress syndrome and developing bronchopulmon

  7. Voxel-based morphometry in epileptic baboons: Parallels to human juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, C Ákos; Salinas, Felipe S

    2016-08-01

    The epileptic baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE), closely resembling juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Due to functional neuroimaging and pathological differences between epileptic (SZ+) and asymptomatic control (CTL) baboons, we expected structural differences in gray matter concentration (GMC) using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Standard anatomical (MP-RAGE) MRI scans using a 3T Siemens TIM Trio (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) were available in 107 baboons (67 females; mean age 16±6years) with documented clinical histories and scalp-electroencephalography (EEG) results. For neuroimaging, baboons were anesthetized with isoflurane 1% (1-1.5 MAC) and paralyzed with vecuronium (0.1-0.3mg/kg). Data processing and analysis were performed using FSL's VBM toolbox. GMC was compared between CTL and SZ+ baboons, epileptic baboons with interictal epileptic discharges on scalp EEG (SZ+/IED+), asymptomatic baboons with abnormal EEGs (SZ-/IED+), and IED+ baboons with (IED+/PS+) and without (IED+/PS-) photosensitivity, and the subgroups amongst themselves. Age and gender related changes in gray matter volumes were also included as confound regressors in the VBM analyses of each animal group. Significant increases in GMC were noted in the SZ+/IED+ subgroup compared to the CTL group, including bilaterally in the frontopolar, orbitofrontal and anterolateral temporal cortices, while decreases in GMC were noted in the right more than left primary visual cortices and in the specific nuclei of the thalamus, including reticular, anterior and medial dorsal nuclei. No significant differences were noted otherwise, except that SZ+/IED+ baboons demonstrated increased GMC in the globus pallidae bilaterally compared to the SZ-/IED+ group. Similar to human studies of JME, the epileptic baboons demonstrated GMC decreases in the thalami and occipital cortices, suggesting secondary injury due to chronic epilepsy. Cortical GMC, on the other hand, was increased

  8. Patent ductus arteriosus ligation alters pulmonary gene expression in preterm baboons

    OpenAIRE

    Waleh, Nahid; McCurnin, Donald C.; Yoder, Bradley A.; Shaul, Philip W.; Clyman, Ronald I.

    2011-01-01

    Ibuprofen-induced ductus closure improves pulmonary mechanics and increases alveolar surface area in premature baboons compared with baboons with a persistent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Ibuprofen-treatment has no effect on the expression of genes that regulate pulmonary inflammation but does increase the expression of alpha-ENaC (the transepithelial sodium channel that is critical for alveolar water clearance). Although ligation eliminates the PDA, it does not improve pulmonary mechanics...

  9. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine half-life and pool size measurements in premature baboons developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, D.J.; Carnielli, Virgilio; Cogo, Paola; Seidner, S.R.; Luijendijk, I.H.I.; Wattimena, Josias; Jobe, Alan; Zimmermann, Luc

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBecause minimal information is available about surfactant metabolism in bronchopulmonary dysplasia, we measured half-lives and pool sizes of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in very preterm baboons recovering from respiratory distress syndrome and developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia, using stable isotopes, radioactive isotopes, and direct pool size measurements. Eight ventilated premature baboons received (2)H-DPPC (dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine) on d 5 of life, and radioactive ...

  10. Social environment influences the relationship between genotype and gene expression in wild baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runcie, Daniel E; Wiedmann, Ralph T; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Wray, Gregory A; Alberts, Susan C; Tung, Jenny

    2013-05-19

    Variation in the social environment can have profound effects on survival and reproduction in wild social mammals. However, we know little about the degree to which these effects are influenced by genetic differences among individuals, and conversely, the degree to which social environmental variation mediates genetic reaction norms. To better understand these relationships, we investigated the potential for dominance rank, social connectedness and group size to modify the effects of genetic variation on gene expression in the wild baboons of the Amboseli basin. We found evidence for a number of gene-environment interactions (GEIs) associated with variation in the social environment, encompassing social environments experienced in adulthood as well as persistent effects of early life social environment. Social connectedness, maternal dominance rank and group size all interacted with genotype to influence gene expression in at least one sex, and either in early life or in adulthood. These results suggest that social and behavioural variation, akin to other factors such as age and sex, can impact the genotype-phenotype relationship. We conclude that GEIs mediated by the social environment are important in the evolution and maintenance of individual differences in wild social mammals, including individual differences in responses to social stressors.

  11. DSCR9 gene simultaneous expression in placental, testicular and renal tissues from baboon (papio hamadryas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Sanchez Irám

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2002 Takamatsu and co-workers described the human DSCR9 gene and observed that it was transcriptionally active in human testicular tissue, but no protein was identified as a product of this transcript. Similar results were obtained in chimpanzee tissue. This gene has not been detected in species other than primates, suggesting that DSCR9 is exclusively found in these mammals. Results We report evidence of DSCR9 expression in placenta, testis and kidney of baboon (Papio hamadryas. We used primers specific for DSCR9 to amplify transcripts through reverse transcription (RT coupled to polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Furthermore, PCR was used to amplify the complete DSCR9 gene from genomic DNA from three baboons. We amplified and sequenced five overlapping segments that were assembled into the 3284 bp baboon DSCR9 gene, including the putative promoter and the entire transcriptional unit (5'-UTR, CDS and 3'-UTR. Conclusions The baboon DSCR9 gene is highly similar to the human counterpart. The isolated transcripts from baboon tissues (placenta, testis and kidney of three different baboons correspond to the human orthologous gene.

  12. A pacific culture among wild baboons: its emergence and transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Sapolsky

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Reports exist of transmission of culture in nonhuman primates. We examine this in a troop of savanna baboons studied since 1978. During the mid-1980s, half of the males died from tuberculosis; because of circumstances of the outbreak, it was more aggressive males who died, leaving a cohort of atypically unaggressive survivors. A decade later, these behavioral patterns persisted. Males leave their natal troops at adolescence; by the mid-1990s, no males remained who had resided in the troop a decade before. Thus, critically, the troop's unique culture was being adopted by new males joining the troop. We describe (a features of this culture in the behavior of males, including high rates of grooming and affiliation with females and a "relaxed" dominance hierarchy; (b physiological measures suggesting less stress among low-ranking males; (c models explaining transmission of this culture; and (d data testing these models, centered around treatment of transfer males by resident females.

  13. Fetal hemoglobin reactivation in baboon and man: a short perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, D; DeSimone, J; Heller, P

    1993-01-01

    Present concepts of the mechanism of reactivation of synthesis of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) in the adult under conditions of erythropoietic stress are briefly reviewed. Since HbF can be considered an effective natural antisickling agent, the reactivation of its synthesis in patients with sickle cell anemia as a desirable therapeutic goal has been extensively explored since the discovery in 1982 that 5-azacytidine increases HbF levels in the baboon. Hydroxyurea (HU) has become the most widely used agent, although its effectiveness in increasing HbF levels and the number of F cells is highly variable. Recent investigations are cited showing that other agents such as butyrate, and the addition of recombinant hemopoietic growth factors, such as erythropoietin and stem cell factor, especially in combination with HU, offer important therapeutic possibilities. Transacting nuclear proteins are briefly discussed as possibly having a future role in the efforts of stimulating gamma-chain synthesis. PMID:7677951

  14. Categorization does not promote symmetry in Guinea baboons (Papio papio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medam, Tiphaine; Marzouki, Yousri; Montant, Marie; Fagot, Joël

    2016-09-01

    Humans have the capacity to use stimuli interchangeably by forming equivalence classes, and this ability seems to be supported by our language system. According to Sidman and Tailby (Conditional discrimination vs. matching to sample: an expansion of the testing paradigm. J Exp Anal Behav 37:5-22, 1982), the formation of equivalence classes require that three relations are derived among the class members, and past experiments have shown that one of these relations, i.e., symmetry, corresponding to the ability to reverse a relation (if A → B, then B → A), is extremely difficult to obtain in non-human animals. Because language development and the ability to form equivalence classes both co-occur in children with an increased ability to form categories, the current study tested the idea that category learning might promote symmetry in a nonhuman primate species. In Experiment 1, twelve Guinea baboons (Papio papio) were trained to associate 60 pictures of bears and 60 pictures of cars to two category labels, before being tested in symmetry trials. In Experiment 2, symmetry was trained and tested by reversing the association order between labels and pictures, using a new set of stimuli. In both experiments, the baboons successfully demonstrated category discrimination, but had only a weak (though significant) tendency to respond in accordance with symmetry during test trials. Altogether, our results confirm that symmetry is inherently difficult in non-human animals. We discuss possible explanations for such a limitation and give reasons for thinking that the effects of categorization on symmetry should be further investigated. PMID:27278368

  15. Metabolism and Disposition of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (“Ecstasy”) in Baboons after Oral Administration: Comparison with Humans Reveals Marked Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Melanie; Goodwin, Amy K.; Ator, Nancy A; McCann, Una D.; Ricaurte, George A.

    2011-01-01

    The baboon is potentially an attractive animal for modeling 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) effects in humans. Baboons self-administer MDMA, are susceptible to MDMA neurotoxicity, and are suitable for positron emission tomography, the method most often used to probe for MDMA neurotoxicity in humans. Because pharmacokinetic equivalence is a key feature of a good predictive animal model, we compared the pharmacokinetics of MDMA in baboons and humans. Baboons were trained to orally cons...

  16. Modeling the effective connectivity of the visual network in healthy and photosensitive, epileptic baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ákos Szabó, C; Salinas, Felipe S; Li, Karl; Franklin, Crystal; Leland, M Michelle; Fox, Peter T; Laird, Angela R; Narayana, Shalini

    2016-05-01

    The baboon provides a model of photosensitive, generalized epilepsy. This study compares cerebral blood flow responses during intermittent light stimulation (ILS) between photosensitive (PS) and healthy control (CTL) baboons using H 2 (15) O-PET. We examined effective connectivity associated with visual stimulation in both groups using structural equation modeling (SEM). Eight PS and six CTL baboons, matched for age, gender and weight, were classified on the basis of scalp EEG findings performed during the neuroimaging studies. Five H 2 (15) O-PET studies were acquired alternating between resting and activation (ILS at 25 Hz) scans. PET images were acquired in 3D mode and co-registered with MRI. SEM demonstrated differences in neural connectivity between PS and CTL groups during ILS that were not previously identified using traditional activation analyses. First-level pathways consisted of similar posterior-to-anterior projections in both groups. While second-level pathways were mainly lateralized to the left hemisphere in the CTL group, they consisted of bilateral anterior-to-posterior projections in the PS baboons. Third- and fourth-level pathways were only evident in PS baboons. This is the first functional neuroimaging study used to model the photoparoxysmal response (PPR) using a primate model of photosensitive, generalized epilepsy. Evidence of increased interhemispheric connectivity and bidirectional feedback loops in the PS baboons represents electrophysiological synchronization associated with the generation of epileptic discharges. PS baboons demonstrated decreased model stability compared to controls, which may be attributed to greater variability in the driving response or PPRs, or to the influence of regions not included in the model. PMID:25749860

  17. Sex differences in the acoustic structure of vowel-like grunt vocalizations in baboons and their perceptual discrimination by baboon listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendall, Drew; Owren, Michael J.; Weerts, Elise; Hienz, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    This study quantifies sex differences in the acoustic structure of vowel-like grunt vocalizations in baboons (Papio spp.) and tests the basic perceptual discriminability of these differences to baboon listeners. Acoustic analyses were performed on 1028 grunts recorded from 27 adult baboons (11 males and 16 females) in southern Africa, focusing specifically on the fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies. The mean F0 and the mean frequencies of the first three formants were all significantly lower in males than they were in females, more dramatically so for F0. Experiments using standard psychophysical procedures subsequently tested the discriminability of adult male and adult female grunts. After learning to discriminate the grunt of one male from that of one female, five baboon subjects subsequently generalized this discrimination both to new call tokens from the same individuals and to grunts from novel males and females. These results are discussed in the context of both the possible vocal anatomical basis for sex differences in call structure and the potential perceptual mechanisms involved in their processing by listeners, particularly as these relate to analogous issues in human speech production and perception.

  18. Spontaneous disc degeneration in the baboon model: magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platenberg, R C; Hubbard, G B; Ehler, W J; Hixson, C J

    2001-10-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of disability in humans. The baboon model is an excellent natural disease model to study comparable human disease, because baboons are relatively large (adult males 20-26 kg, adult females 12-17 kg), long-lived (30-45 years), well defined, easy to use, and closely related to humans. Published investigations with plain radiographs of disc degeneration in baboons indicated vertebral anatomy and changes that were remarkably similar to those seen in humans, and it would be valuable to determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluation would be useful methods for studying the model, as MRI allows multi-planar visualization of tissues without the use of intravenous contrast and it is superior for evaluating disc hydration, annulus tears, and herniations. The thoracolumbar junctions from 47 randomly selected baboons, ranging in age from 2 weeks to 34 years, were evaluated with MRI and histopathology. Excellent correlation with MRI was observed for changes in disc desiccation, height, and age (P discs seen by MRI were in baboons 14 years of age or older.

  19. Comparing responses of four ungulate species to playbacks of baboon alarm calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Dawn M; Bergman, Thore J; Cheney, Dorothy L; Nicholson, James R; Seyfarth, Robert M

    2010-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that a wide range of animals can recognize and respond appropriately to calls produced by other species. Social learning has been implicated as a possible mechanism by which heterospecific call recognition might develop. To examine whether familiarity and/or shared vulnerability with the calling species might influence the ability of sympatric species to distinguish heterospecific alarm calls, we tested whether four ungulate species (impala: Aepyceros melampus; tsessebe: Damaliscus lunatus; zebra: Equus burchelli; wildebeest: Connochaetes taurinus) could distinguish baboon (Papio hamadryas ursinus) alarm calls from other loud baboon calls produced during intra-specific aggressive interactions ('contest' calls). Overall, subjects' responses were stronger following playback of alarm calls than contest calls. Of the species tested, impala showed the strongest responses and the greatest difference in composite response scores, suggesting they were best able to differentiate call types. Compared with the other ungulate species, impala are the most frequent associates of baboons. Moreover, like baboons, they are susceptible to both lion and leopard attacks, whereas leopards rarely take the larger ungulates. Although it seems possible that high rates of association and/or shared vulnerability may influence impala's greater ability to distinguish among baboon call types, our results point to a stronger influence of familiarity. Ours is the first study to compare such abilities among several community members with variable natural histories, and we discuss future experiments that would more systematically examine development of these skills in young ungulates.

  20. Schistosoma mansoni: parasitology and immunology of baboons vaccinated with irradiated cryopreserved schistosomula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were vaccinated with γ-irradiated (500 Gy) cryopreserved Puerto Rican strain schistosomula of S. mansoni. Protection against heterologous, normal Kenyan Strain S. mansoni challenge infection was erratic and partial; and two putative correlates of immunity, reduced worm fecundity and change in worm location (anterior shift) were not observed. However, immunization of baboons with this vaccine resulted in a stimulated immune system. Both cellular and humoral anamnesis were demonstrable in vaccinated-challenged baboons. Schistosome infection-associated IgM hypergammaglobulinemia was also greatly reduced in vaccinated-challenged baboons. However IgG antibodies to adult, egg, and cercarial antigens were increased after challenge infection in preimmunized baboons. Vaccination appears to have resulted in a redirection of the immune system into anti-parasite channels, but this more specific immune response was insufficient to confer good protection against challenge infection in this experiment. The dampening effect of the vaccine on the hypergammaglobulinemia of schistosomiasis is another candidate for a possible ''anti-pathogenesis'' effect of irradiated schistosome larval vaccines. (author)

  1. Bomb-spike dating of a mummified baboon in Ludwig Cave, Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodgins Greg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1982 a mummified adult female baboon was discovered on a ledge in Ludwig Cave in Namibia. A toe bone was removed for dating in July 1995. AMS radiocarbon dating of bone collagen, tendon, and skin indicates a post-modern age. Application of the atomic bomb-spike calibration curve suggests death in late 1977 and an age at death of around 19 years. Baboons roost in the cave and the mummified female, along with a mummified juvenile male discovered in 2002 and three rotting corpses discovered in 1995, were probably chased by other baboons or by leopards down a ca. 6 m drop during the rainy season, and were unable to climb the steep and very slippery slope to escape. The large number of baboons trapped in the cave in less than 20 years, and mummification of two individuals on dry, dusty ledges in the cave, may explain why large numbers of baboon skeletons have been discovered in ancient bone breccias (up to 4 Ma old in a number of caves throughout Southern Africa.

  2. Schistosoma mansoni: parasitology and immunology of baboons vaccinated with irradiated cryopreserved schistosomula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damian, R.T.; Powell, M.R.; Roberts, M.L. (Georgia Univ., Athens (USA). Dept. of Zoology); Clark, J.D. (Georgia Univ., Athens (USA). Lab. Animal Medicine); Stirewalt, M.A.; Lewis, F.A. (Biomedical Research Inst., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1985-06-01

    Young baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were vaccinated with ..gamma..-irradiated (500 Gy) cryopreserved Puerto Rican strain schistosomula of S. mansoni. Protection against heterologous, normal Kenyan Strain S. mansoni challenge infection was erratic and partial; and two putative correlates of immunity, reduced worm fecundity and change in worm location (anterior shift) were not observed. However, immunization of baboons with this vaccine resulted in a stimulated immune system. Both cellular and humoral anamnesis were demonstrable in vaccinated-challenged baboons. Schistosome infection-associated IgM hypergammaglobulinemia was also greatly reduced in vaccinated-challenged baboons. However IgG antibodies to adult, egg, and cercarial antigens were increased after challenge infection in preimmunized baboons. Vaccination appears to have resulted in a redirection of the immune system into anti-parasite channels, but this more specific immune response was insufficient to confer good protection against challenge infection in this experiment. The dampening effect of the vaccine on the hypergammaglobulinemia of schistosomiasis is another candidate for a possible ''anti-pathogenesis'' effect of irradiated schistosome larval vaccines.

  3. Human infants and baboons show the same pattern of handedness for a communicative gesture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Meunier

    Full Text Available To test the role of gestures in the origin of language, we studied hand preferences for grasping or pointing to objects at several spatial positions in human infants and adult baboons. If the roots of language are indeed in gestural communication, we expect that human infants and baboons will present a comparable difference in their pattern of laterality according to task: both should be more right-hand/left-hemisphere specialized when communicating by pointing than when simply grasping objects. Our study is the first to test both human infants and baboons on the same communicative task. Our results show remarkable convergence in the distribution of the two species' hand biases on the two kinds of tasks: In both human infants and baboons, right-hand preference was significantly stronger for the communicative task than for grasping objects. Our findings support the hypothesis that left-lateralized language may be derived from a gestural communication system that was present in the common ancestor of baboons and humans.

  4. New data on the toxicity and translocation of inhaled 239PuO2 in baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1973-1974, baboons were exposed to a polydispersed aerosol of 239PuO2, prepared at 10000C, at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique in France. The data published in 1978 for these baboons were used by Bair et al (1980), for comparison with those obtained in beagles exposed to 239PuO2 at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, USA. Since our 1978 publication, 8 baboons have died or were killed by euthanasia when moribund, and 11 were still alive when the present report was drafted. Two of the eight baboons died of lung squamous cell carcinoma at 2171 and 2528 days respectively. The remaining 6 died of fibrosis, interstitial pneumonia or diseases unrelated to Pu toxicity. The relationship observed in the eight baboons between initial lung burden and survival time shows that their lifespan was longer than expected from the data curve based on the findings for the first 1000 days. However, this increased survival time was not observed if the lifespan was expressed as a function of the average lung burden. (author)

  5. Comparison of acute mortality in baboons and dogs after inhalation of 239PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from experiments with baboons were compared with those from experiments with dogs to determine the relative sensitivity of the two species to acute mortality from inhaled 239PuO2. To assure a valid comparison of data developed at two laboratories, methodology differences were minimized by establishing a common pool of raw data, using the same computer programs to analyze the data, and standardizing assumptions regarding the calculation of radiation doses to lungs. Several comparison methods were used involving variations in estimating different parameters such as the concentration of plutonium in the lungs. Although nearly all comparisons suggested baboons were slightly more sensitive, none of the methods for comparing the relationship between dose and survival time showed consistently significant differences between baboons and dogs. Although the baboons were physiologically and morphologically immature when exposed to plutonium, whereas the dogs were mature, it was concluded that adult baboons and dogs are similarly sensitive to the acute effects of inhaled 239PuO2. Since only acute mortality was considered in this comparison, the results do not apply to possible late effects caused by much lower levels of plutonium than were used in these experiments

  6. S110, a novel decitabine dinucleotide, increases fetal hemoglobin levels in baboons (P. anubis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banzon Virryan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S110 is a novel dinucleoside analog that could have advantages over existing DNA methyltransferase (DNMT inhibitors such as decitabine. A potential therapeutic role for S110 is to increase fetal hemoglobin (HbF levels to treat β-hemoglobinopathies. In these experiments the effect of S110 on HbF levels in baboons and its ability to reduce DNA methylation of the γ-globin gene promoter in vivo were evaluated. Methods The effect of S110 on HbF and γ-globin promoter DNA methylation was examined in cultured human erythroid progenitors and in vivo in the baboon pre-clinical model. S110 pharmacokinetics was also examined in the baboon model. Results S110 increased HbF and reduced DNA methylation of the γ-globin promoter in human erythroid progenitors and in baboons when administered subcutaneously. Pharmacokinetic analysis was consistent with rapid conversion of S110 into the deoxycytosine analog decitabine that binds and depletes DNA. Conclusion S110 is rapidly converted into decitabine, hypomethylates DNA, and induces HbF in cultured human erythroid progenitors and the baboon pre-clinical model.

  7. Olfactomedin-like 3 (OLFML3) gene expression in baboon and human ocular tissues: cornea, lens, uvea and retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iràm Pablo; Garza-Rodríguez, Maria Lourdes; Mohamed-Noriega, Karim; Voruganti, Venkata Saroja; Tejero, Maria Elizabeth; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Ibave, Diana Cristina Perez; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E.; Mohamed-Noriega, Jibran; Martinez-Fierro, Margarita L; Reséndez-Pérez, Diana; Cole, Shelley A; Cavazos-Adame, Humberto; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Mohamed-Hamsho, Jesús; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Background Olfactomedin-like is a polyfunctional polymeric glycoprotein. This family has at least four members. One member of this family is OLFML3, which is preferentially expressed in placenta but is also detected in other adult tissues including the liver and heart. However, the orthologous rat gene is expressed in the iris, sclera, trabecular meshwork, retina, and optic nerve. Methods OLFML3 amplification was performed by RT-PCR from human and baboon ocular tissues. The products were cloned and sequenced. Results We report OFML3 expression in human and baboon eye. The full CDS has 1221 bp, from which a OFR of 406 amino acid was obtained. The baboon OLFML3 gene nucleotidic sequence has 98%, and amino acidic 99% similarity with humans. Conclusions OLFML3 expression in human and baboon ocular tissues and its high similarity make the baboon a powerful model to deduce the physiological and/or metabolic function of this protein in the eye. PMID:23398349

  8. A non-Levy random walk in chacma baboons: what does it mean?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Sueur

    Full Text Available The Lévy walk is found from amoebas to humans and has been described as the optimal strategy for food research. Recent results, however, have generated controversy about this conclusion since animals also display alternatives to the Lévy walk such as the Brownian walk or mental maps and because movement patterns found in some species only seem to depend on food patches distribution. Here I show that movement patterns of chacma baboons do not follow a Lévy walk but a Brownian process. Moreover this Brownian walk is not the main process responsible for movement patterns of baboons. Findings about their speed and trajectories show that baboons use metal maps and memory to find resources. Thus the Brownian process found in this species appears to be more dependent on the environment or might be an alternative when known food patches are depleted and when animals have to find new resources.

  9. Male-driven grooming bouts in mixed-sex dyads of Kinda baboons (Papio kindae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyher, Anna H; Phillips-Conroy, Jane E; Fourrier, Marc S; Jolly, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the Central African Kinda baboon (Papio kindae) is not well documented. Having previously noted distinctive grooming behavior in several Kinda baboon populations, we investigated the topic more systematically in the Kafue National Park, Zambia. We recorded the duration and details of male-female dyadic interactions (approaches, withdrawals and time spent grooming) in the early morning and late afternoon. Such interactions were more often initiated by the male and terminated by the female partner. The male groomed the female more often, and longer, than she groomed him, regardless of the female's reproductive state or the presence of an infant. The bias towards male grooming was stronger in morning than evening interactions. These behaviors, whose function is not immediately obvious, and which are unlike those previously reported in baboons, further exemplify the distinctiveness of the taxon.

  10. Effects of pharmacological manipulations on "demand" for food by baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltin, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    In a study examining the effects of pharmacological manipulations on "demand" for food, responding of six adult male baboons (Papio c. anubis) was maintained under a fixed-ratio schedule of food reinforcement during daily 22h experimental sessions. Increasing the response requirement decreased daily food intake. Administration of anorectic drugs (amphetamine, fenfluramine, diethylpropion, phenmetrazine, phenylpropanolamine and mazindol) produced parallel dose-dependent downward shifts in responding at all response costs. In contrast, administration of the anxiolytic, diazepam, produced parallel dose-dependent upward shifts in responding at all response costs. Oral phencyclidine decreased intake during the first 8h of the session, but compensatory feeding later in the day eliminated this effect. Changes in pellet intake were fitted to a theoretical equation derived by Hursh et al. (1988) to describe changes in demand for a commodity. When responding increases as a result of increasing cost, demand is said to be inelastic, but when responding decreases as a result of increasing cost, demand is said to be elastic. Administration of anorectic drugs, while decreasing maximal intake at minimal cost, had no effect on the elasticity of demand for food. Similarly, diazepam increased maximal intake at minimal cost without affecting the elasticity of demand for food. The effect of anorectic drugs differs from the previously reported effects of caloric substitutes which increase the elasticity of demand for food. Thus, anorectic drugs do not function as caloric substitutes, in an economic sense, for food. PMID:11224228

  11. Bomb-spike dating of a mummified baboon in Ludwig Cave, Namibia

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgins Greg; Brook George A.; Marais Eugene

    2007-01-01

    In 1982 a mummified adult female baboon was discovered on a ledge in Ludwig Cave in Namibia. A toe bone was removed for dating in July 1995. AMS radiocarbon dating of bone collagen, tendon, and skin indicates a post-modern age. Application of the atomic bomb-spike calibration curve suggests death in late 1977 and an age at death of around 19 years. Baboons roost in the cave and the mummified female, along with a mummified juvenile male discovered in 2002 and three rotting corpses discovered i...

  12. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Knauf

    Full Text Available The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum, yaws (ssp. pertenue, and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90% baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560 versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7. Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication

  13. Inferential reasoning and modality dependent discrimination learning in olive baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Vanessa; Fischer, Julia

    2009-08-01

    Apes use inferential reasoning by exclusion to locate food both in the visual and auditory domain. To test whether olive baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis) show similar abilities as the apes object choice experiments with differing information about food located in 1 of 2 cups were conducted in the visual and auditory modality. Although all baboons (N = 7) were able to locate the reward when they had previously seen it, they failed to make use of auditory cues or arbitrary acoustic signals. When only partial information was given (i.e., only 1 cup was opened) 4 of the baboons were apparently able to infer the location of the reward by reasoning, whereas the other 3 may have adopted an alternative strategy ("avoid the empty cup"). In addition, 3 of the baboons were able to use arbitrary visual markers to locate the food reward. The results suggest that inferential reasoning is not restricted to apes but is shared with Old World monkeys. Furthermore, they also highlight some important differences in the processing of auditory versus visual information in operant conditioning settings.

  14. The average baboon brain: MRI templates and tissue probability maps from 89 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Scott A; Marie, Damien; Roth, Muriel; Lacoste, Romain; Nazarian, Bruno; Bertello, Alice; Coulon, Olivier; Anton, Jean-Luc; Meguerditchian, Adrien

    2016-05-15

    The baboon (Papio) brain is a remarkable model for investigating the brain. The current work aimed at creating a population-average baboon (Papio anubis) brain template and its left/right hemisphere symmetric version from a large sample of T1-weighted magnetic resonance images collected from 89 individuals. Averaging the prior probability maps output during the segmentation of each individual also produced the first baboon brain tissue probability maps for gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. The templates and the tissue probability maps were created using state-of-the-art, freely available software tools and are being made freely and publicly available: http://www.nitrc.org/projects/haiko89/ or http://lpc.univ-amu.fr/spip.php?article589. It is hoped that these images will aid neuroimaging research of the baboon by, for example, providing a modern, high quality normalization target and accompanying standardized coordinate system as well as probabilistic priors that can be used during tissue segmentation. PMID:26975558

  15. Methoxychlor and its metabolites inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupesh K; Aberdeen, Graham; Babus, Janice K; Albrecht, Eugene D; Flaws, Jodi A

    2007-08-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC), an organochlorine pesticide, inhibits growth and induces atresia of antral follicles in rodents. MXC metabolites, mono-OH MXC (mono-OH) and bis-OH MXC (HPTE), are thought to be more toxic than the parent compound. Although studies have examined effects of MXC in rodents, few studies have evaluated the effects of MXC in primates. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that MXC, mono-OH, and HPTE inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles were isolated from adult baboon ovaries and cultured with vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide; DMSO), MXC (1-100 micro g/ml), mono-OH (0.1-10 micro g/ml), or HPTE (0.1-10 micro g/ml) for 96 hr. Growth was monitored at 24 hr intervals. After culture, follicles were processed for histological evaluation of atresia. MXC, mono-OH, and HPTE significantly inhibited follicular growth and increased atresia compared to DMSO. Moreover, the adverse effects of MXC and its metabolites on growth and atresia in baboon antral follicles were observed at lower (100-fold) doses than those causing similar effects in rodents. These data suggest that MXC and its metabolites inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles, and that primate follicles are more sensitive to MXC than rodent follicles.

  16. A tethering system for direct measurement of cardiovascular function in the caged baboon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    A device suitable for the continuous measurement of physiological activity in large, conscious monkeys has permitted the direct recording of systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate in caged baboons. The device comprises a lightweight fiberglass backpack, retained in place on the baboon by a thoracic elastic band and shoulder straps, and a flexible stainless steel tether connecting the pack to an electrocannular slip-ring in the top center of the baboon's cage. A chronically indwelling arterial catheter inserted retrograde into the abdominal aorta via the internal iliac artery and connected to a small pressure transducer on the pack provides direct measurement of blood pressure and heart rate. Body fluids can be sampled or drugs administered via an indwelling catheter in the inferior vena cava. Electrical and fluid connections between the fiberglass pack and recording and infusion equipment located outside the cage pass through the flexible tether and remain protected from the subject. The reliability of the tethering system has been demonstrated in physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral experiments with baboons.

  17. Carbon-11 labelled ketamine-synthesis, distribution in mice and PET studies in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiue, C.-Y.; Vallabhahosula, Shankar; Wolf, Alfred P.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Schlyer, David J.; Arnett, Carroll D.; Zhou Yiguo

    1997-02-01

    No-carrier-added (NCA)[{sup 11}C]({+-})-ketamine (2a) and its enantiomers (+)-2b and (-)-2c were synthesized by methylation of the corresponding norketamine (1a-c) with [{sup 11}C]H{sub 3}I in an overall radiochemical yield of 20% (EOB) with specific activities of 0.35-0.45 Ci/{mu}mole at EOB in a synthesis time of 40 min from EOB. Compound 2a was metabolized rapidly in mouse brain and labeled metabolites appeared in baboon plasma. PET studies of compounds 2a-c in a baboon showed that influx of compounds 2a-c into the brain was high for the first few min but radioactivity then declined rapidly. Although the retention of radioactivity in the baboon striatum was not significantly different for 2a-c 20 min post-injection, graphical analysis of time-activity data for each enantiomer and for the racemate in baboon striatum suggested that (+)-ketamine may interact with receptors slightly more effectively than its (-)-enantiomer or racemate. However, due to its rapid metabolism in the brain and a similar uptake in the striatum and cerebellum, [{sup 11}C]ketamine may not be an ideal tracer for studying NMDA receptor with PET.

  18. Sarcoglycan complex in masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles of baboons: an immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cutroneo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The sarcoglycan complex consists of a group of single-pass transmembrane glycoproteins that are essential to maintain the integrity of muscle membranes. Any mutation in each sarcoglycan gene causes a series of recessive autosomal dystrophin-positive muscular dystrophies. Negative fibres for sarcoglycans have never been found in healthy humans and animals. In this study, we have investigated whether the social ranking has an influence on the expression of sarcoglycans in the skeletal muscles of healthy baboons. Biopsies of masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles were processed for confocal immunohistochemical detection of sarcoglycans. Our findings showed that baboons from different social rankings exhibited different sarcoglycan expression profiles. While in dominant baboons almost all muscles were stained for sarcoglycans, only 55% of muscle fibres showed a significant staining. This different expression pattern is likely to be due to the living conditions of these primates. Sarcoglycans which play a key role in muscle activity by controlling contractile forces may influence the phenotype of muscle fibres, thus determining an adaptation to functional conditions. We hypothesize that this intraspecies variation reflects an epigenetic modification of the muscular protein network that allows baboons to adapt progressively to a different social status.

  19. Rank and grooming reciprocity among females in a mixed-sex group of captive hamadryas baboons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leinfelder, I.; Vries, Han de; Deleu, R.; Nelissen, M.

    2001-01-01

    In a mixed-sex, captive group of hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas hamadryas) we investigated whether female grooming relationships are affected by their dominance ranks. Seyfarths [1977] grooming for support model and Barrett et al.s [1999] biological market model both predict that in primate grou

  20. Road and Street Centerlines, Baboon Peak, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'Baboon Peak'. The extent of these data...

  1. Experimental infections of baboons (Papio spp. and vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops with Trichinella zimbabwensis and successful treatment with ivermectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mukaratirwa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Trichinella zimbabwensis infections were established in three baboons (Papios p.and four vervet monkeys (Cercopithecuase thiops and the clinical-pathological manifestations assessed. The infected animals showed clinical signs ranging from fever, diarrhoea, periorbitaol edema and muscular pain in varying degrees. One baboon became blind due to the infection. Levels of creatinine phosphokinase and lactated ehydrogenase increased to reach a peak on Day 42 post-infection(pifor both baboons and monkeys. Blood parameters such as packed cell volume, levels of red blood cells and white blood cells did not change significantly from the normal ranges except for the levels of eosinophils which peaked above the normal ranges at Day 28 and 56 pi in baboons and at Day 56 pi in monkeys.

  2. Brucella papionis sp. nov., isolated from baboons (Papio spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatmore, Adrian M; Davison, Nicholas; Cloeckaert, Axel; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Zygmunt, Michel S; Brew, Simon D; Perrett, Lorraine L; Koylass, Mark S; Vergnaud, Gilles; Quance, Christine; Scholz, Holger C; Dick, Edward J; Hubbard, Gene; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E

    2014-12-01

    Two Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming coccoid bacteria (strains F8/08-60(T) and F8/08-61) isolated from clinical specimens obtained from baboons (Papio spp.) that had delivered stillborn offspring were subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, both strains, which possessed identical sequences, were assigned to the genus Brucella. This placement was confirmed by extended multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), where both strains possessed identical sequences, and whole-genome sequencing of a representative isolate. All of the above analyses suggested that the two strains represent a novel lineage within the genus Brucella. The strains also possessed a unique profile when subjected to the phenotyping approach classically used to separate species of the genus Brucella, reacting only with Brucella A monospecific antiserum, being sensitive to the dyes thionin and fuchsin, being lysed by bacteriophage Wb, Bk2 and Fi phage at routine test dilution (RTD) but only partially sensitive to bacteriophage Tb, and with no requirement for CO2 and no production of H2S but strong urease activity. Biochemical profiling revealed a pattern of enzyme activity and metabolic capabilities distinct from existing species of the genus Brucella. Molecular analysis of the omp2 locus genes showed that both strains had a novel combination of two highly similar omp2b gene copies. The two strains shared a unique fingerprint profile of the multiple-copy Brucella-specific element IS711. Like MLSA, a multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) showed that the isolates clustered together very closely, but represent a distinct group within the genus Brucella. Isolates F8/08-60(T) and F8/08-61 could be distinguished clearly from all known species of the genus Brucella and their biovars by both phenotypic and molecular properties. Therefore, by applying the species concept for the genus Brucella suggested by the ICSP

  3. Fetal baboon sex specific outcomes in adipocyte differentiation at 0.9 gestation in response to moderate maternal nutrient reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Tchoukalova, Yourka D.; Krishnapuram, Rashmi; White, Ursula A.; Burk, David; Fang, Xiaobing; Nijland, Mark J.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate in vitro adipocyte differentiation in baboon fetuses in response to reduced maternal nutrition. Design Cross-sectional comparison of adipocyte differentiation in normally grown fetuses and fetuses of pregnant baboons fed 70% control global diet from 30 days of pregnancy to term. Subjects Control (CTR) fetuses of ad libitum fed mothers (5 females and 5 males) and fetuses of mothers fed the 70% global diet eaten by CTR (MNR, 5 females and 5 males). The expression of gen...

  4. Histological changes in the penis of the Chacma baboon--a model to study aging penile vascular impotence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornman, M S; du Plessis, D J; Ligthelm, A J; van Tonder, H J

    1985-01-01

    Light and scanning electron microscopy was performed on the penes of Chacma baboons to establish their suitability as animal model for studying vascular impotence. Analogous aging penile vascular changes were found in man, and a fibrous trabeculopathy with intertrabecular senechiae was demonstrated. Considering the corresponding changes, the Chacma baboon could thus be regarded suitable for studying the pathophysiology of aging penile vascular changes. PMID:3981618

  5. Cortisol responses to immobilization with Telazol or ketamine in baboons (Papio cynocephalus/anubis) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Bentson, K L; Capitanio, J P; Mendoza, S P

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of Telazol on cortisol or of anesthetic agents on immunological measures, and reports of ketamine's effect on cortisol are inconsistent. We measured effects of Telazol, ketamine and blood sampling on cortisol in male rhesus macaques and male savannah baboons. We also obtained leukocyte counts in the macaques. In macaques, Telazol reduced cortisol in the morning but not in the afternoon; ketamine had no effect on cortisol in these animals. In baboons, cortis...

  6. Hunting, food subsidies, and mesopredator release: the dynamics of crop-raiding baboons in a managed landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, RA; Ryan, SJ; Brashares, JS; Johnson, LR

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of protected areas or parks has become an important tool for wildlife conservation. However, frequent occurrences of human-wildlife conflict at the edges of these parks can undermine their conservation goals. Many African protected areas have experienced concurrent declines of apex predators alongside increases in both baboon abundance and the density of humans living near the park boundary. Baboons then take excursions outside of the park to raid crops for food, conflicting...

  7. Convergent evolution in primates and an insectivore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffelli, Dario; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-04-16

    The cardiovascular risk factor apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) has a puzzling distribution among mammals, its presence being limited to a subset of primates and a member of the insectivore lineage, the hedgehog. To explore the evolutionary history of apo(a), we performed extensive genomic sequence comparisons of multiple species with and without an apo(a) gene product, such as human, baboon, hedgehog, lemurand mouse. This analysis indicated that apo(a) arose independently in a subset of primates, including baboon and human, and an insectivore, the hedgehog, and was not simply lost by species lacking it. The similar structural domains shared by the hedgehog and primate apo(a) indicate that they were formed by a unique molecular mechanism involving the convergent evolution of paralogous genes in these distantspecies.

  8. Mitochondrial genome analyses suggest multiple Trichuris species in humans, baboons, and pigs from different geographical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawash, Mohamed B. F.; Andersen, Lee O.; Gasser, Robin B.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The whipworms Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis are two parasitic nematodes of humans and pigs, respectively. Although whipworms in human and non-human primates historically have been referred to as T. trichiura, recent reports suggest that several Trichuris spp. are found...... in primates. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We sequenced and annotated complete mitochondrial genomes of Trichuris recovered from a human in Uganda, an olive baboon in the US, a hamadryas baboon in Denmark, and two pigs from Denmark and Uganda. Comparative analyses using other published mitochondrial genomes...... of Trichuris recovered from a human and a porcine host in China and from a françois' leaf-monkey (China) were performed, including phylogenetic analyses and pairwise genetic and amino acid distances. Genetic and protein distances between human Trichuris in Uganda and China were high (~19% and 15%, respectively...

  9. The Ontogeny of the Endocrine Pancreas in the Fetal/Newborn Baboon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Amy R.; Blanco, Cynthia L.; Perego, Carla; Finzi, Giovanna; La Rosa, Stefano; Capella, Carlo; Guardado-Mendoza, Rodolfo; Casiraghi, Francesca; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Johnson, Marney; Dick, Edward J.; Folli, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Background Erratic regulation of glucose metabolism including hyperglycemia is a common condition of premature infants and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Objective To examine histological and ultra-structural differences in the endocrine pancreas in fetal (throughout gestation) and neonatal baboons. Methods Twelve fetal baboons were delivered at 125 days (d) gestational age (GA), 140dGA, or 175dGA. Eight animals were delivered at term (185dGA); half were fed for 5d. Seventy-three non-diabetic adult baboons were used for comparison. Pancreatic tissue was studied utilizing light microscopy, confocal imaging and electron microscopy. Results The fetal and neonatal endocrine pancreas islet architecture became more organized as GA advanced. The percent areas of α-β-δ-cell type were similar within each fetal and newborn GA (NS), but were higher than the adults (P<0.05) regardless of GA. The ratio of β-cells within the islet (whole and core) increased with gestation (P<0.01). Neonatal baboons who survived for 5 days (feeding), had a 2.5-fold increase in pancreas weight compared to their counterparts euthanized at birth (P=0.01). Endocrine cells were found amongst exocrine ductal and acinar cells in 125,140 and 175dGA fetuses. Subpopulation of cells that co-expressed trypsin and glucagon/insulin show the presence of cells with mixed endo-exocrine lineage in fetuses. Conclusions The fetal endocrine pancreas has no prevalence of a of α-β-δ-cell type with larger endocrine cell percent areas than adults. Cells with mixed endocrine/exocrine phenotype occur during fetal development. Developmental differences may play a role in glucose homeostasis during the neonatal period and may have long term implications. PMID:22723715

  10. Influence of Age, Reproductive Cycling Status, and Menstruation on the Vaginal Microbiome in Baboons (Papio anubis)

    OpenAIRE

    UCHIHASHI, M.; BERGIN, I. L.; BASSIS, C. M.; HASHWAY, S. A.; Chai, D.; Bell, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The vaginal microbiome is believed to influence host health by providing protection from pathogens and influencing reproductive outcomes such as fertility and gestational length. In humans, age-associated declines in diversity of the vaginal microbiome occur in puberty and persist into adulthood. Additionally, menstruation has been associated with decreased microbial community stability. Adult female baboons, like other non-human primates (NHPs), have a different and highly diverse vaginal mi...

  11. Sex-Dependent Cognitive Performance in Baboon Offspring Following Maternal Caloric Restriction in Pregnancy and Lactation

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUEZ, Jesse S.; Bartlett, Thad Q; Keenan, Kathryn E.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Nijland, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    In humans a suboptimal diet during development has negative outcomes in offspring. We investigated the behavioral outcomes in baboons born to mothers undergoing moderate maternal nutrient restriction (MNR). Maternal nutrient restriction mothers (n = 7) were fed 70% of food eaten by controls (CTR, n = 12) fed ad libitum throughout gestation and lactation. At 3.3 ± 0.2 (mean ± standard error of the mean [SEM]) years of age offspring (controls: female [FC, n = 8], male [MC, n = 4]; nutrient rest...

  12. Microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes in the olive baboon (papio anabis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1975-01-01

    1.1. The activity of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes—azo reductase, nitroreductase, p-hydroxylation, N-demethylation, O-demethylation, NADPH cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome P P-450—in the olive baboon are lower than in other animal species, e.g. mouse, rat, guinea-pig. 2. 2. The level ...... and beta-glucuronidase is present more in the lysosomal than in the microsomal fraction....

  13. Treponema pallidum infection in the wild baboons of East Africa: distribution and genetic characterization of the strains responsible.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin N Harper

    Full Text Available It has been known for decades that wild baboons are naturally infected with Treponema pallidum, the bacterium that causes the diseases syphilis (subsp. pallidum, yaws (subsp. pertenue, and bejel (subsp. endemicum in humans. Recently, a form of T. pallidum infection associated with severe genital lesions has been described in wild baboons at Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. In this study, we investigated ten additional sites in Tanzania and Kenya using a combination of macroscopic observation and serology, in order to determine whether the infection was present in each area. In addition, we obtained genetic sequence data from six polymorphic regions using T. pallidum strains collected from baboons at two different Tanzanian sites. We report that lesions consistent with T. pallidum infection were present at four of the five Tanzanian sites examined, and serology was used to confirm treponemal infection at three of these. By contrast, no signs of treponemal infection were observed at the six Kenyan sites, and serology indicated T. pallidum was present at only one of them. A survey of sexually mature baboons at Lake Manyara National Park in 2006 carried out as part of this study indicated that roughly ten percent displayed T. pallidum-associated lesions severe enough to cause major structural damage to the genitalia. Finally, we found that T. pallidum strains from Lake Manyara National Park and Serengeti National Park were genetically distinct, and a phylogeny suggested that baboon strains may have diverged prior to the clade containing human strains. We conclude that T. pallidum infection associated with genital lesions appears to be common in the wild baboons of the regions studied in Tanzania. Further study is needed to elucidate the infection's transmission mode, its associated morbidity and mortality, and the relationship between baboon and human strains.

  14. Mental maps in chacma baboons (Papio ursinus): using inter-group encounters as a natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noser, Rahel; Byrne, Richard W

    2007-07-01

    Encounters between groups of wild chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) can be viewed as a natural experiment to investigate the nature of these primates' mental representations of large-scale space. During a 16-month field study in a high population density habitat we recorded the foraging routes and the most important resources of a group of 25 individuals. Also, we estimated the locations of additional baboon groups relative to the study group. Routes were less linear, travel speed was higher, and inter-resource distances were larger when other groups were present within 500 m of the focal group; thus, the study group avoided others by taking detours. We predicted that evasive manoeuvres would be characteristic of different possible orientation mechanisms, and compared them with our observations. We analysed 34 evasive manoeuvres in detail. In an area that lacked prominent landmarks, detours were small; larger detours occurred when resources were directly visible, or in the vicinity of a hill offering conspicuous landmarks. In areas without prominent landmarks, detours were along familiar routes and waiting bouts of up to 60 min occurred; on one occasion the study group aborted their entire day's journey. We discuss these findings in the light of time and energy costs and suggest that the baboons lack the ability to compute Euclidean relations among locations, but use network maps to find their way to out-of-sight locations.

  15. Efficacy of fenbendazole formulated in a commercial primate diet for treating specific pathogen-free baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) infected with Trichuris trichiura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Mason V; Wolf, Roman F; Clingenpeel, Lindsay C; Doan, Sandra K; Jones, Amy N; Gray, Kristene M

    2008-11-01

    Trichuris trichiura is a common intestinal nematode parasite of captive baboons. We evaluated the efficacy of fenbendazole formulated in a commercial primate diet (FBZ-PD) for treating specific pathogen-free (SPF) baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) naturally infected with Trichuris trichiura. Twenty-nine baboons, housed indoors in 3 separate rooms, were fed FBZ-PD for 5 d, whereas 4 baboons housed in another isolated area served as untreated controls. The efficacy of FBZ-PD was measured as reduction in the number of T. trichiura eggs in host feces after treatment as determined by quantitative fecal flotation examination. All baboons that received FBZ-PD stopped shedding T. trichiura eggs by 7 d after initiation of treatment, and remained negative until at least 119 d after treatment. However, eggs of T. trichiura were present in the feces of 3 (10.3%) experimental baboons at 154 d after treatment. Untreated control baboons shed T. trichiura eggs throughout the entire study. Our results indicate that FBZ-PD was efficacious for treating SPF baboons infected with T. trichiura.

  16. Follow up of infection of chacma baboons with inoculum containing a and non-a genotypes of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marina Baptista; Anna Kramvis; Saffie Jammeh; Jocelyn Naicker; Jacqueline S.Galpin; Michael C.Kew

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether one genotype (A or non-A genotypes of HBV) predominated over the other during the course of HBV infection.METHODS: Four baboons were inoculated with HBV. DNA was extracted from serum obtained at monthly intervals postinoculation for 52 weeks and HBV DNA was amplified using primers specific for the core region containing an insert characteristic of genotype A (nt 2 354-2 359, numbering from the EcoRI site). The amplicons were cloned into PCRScriptTM and a minimum of 15 clones per time point were sequenced in both directions.RESULTS: Both genotypes persisted for the entire followup period of 52 weeks. Genotype non-A predominated in two baboons and genotype A in one baboon. Neither genotype predominated in the fourth baboon, as shown at a 5 % level of testing.CONCLUSION: No conclusions concerning the dominance of either genotype or the natural progression or replication rates of HBV could be drawn because the pattern of the genotypes found may have been caused by sampling fluctuations at the time of DNA extraction and cloning as a result of the very low viral loads in the baboon sera.

  17. Establishment and Characterization of Baboon Embryonic Stem Cell Lines An Old World Primate Model for Regeneration and Transplantation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simerly, Calvin R.; Navara, Christopher S.; Castro, Carlos A.; Turpin, Janet C.; Redinger, Carrie J.; Mich-Basso, Jocelyn D.; Jacoby, Ethan S.; Grund, Kevin J.; McFarland, David A.; Oliver, Stacie L.; Ben-Yehudah, Ahmi; Carlisle, Diane L.; Frost, Patricia; Penedo, Cecilia; Hewitson, Laura; Schatten, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Here we have developed protocols using the baboon as a complementary alternative Old World Primate to rhesus and other macaques which have severe limitations in their availability. Baboons are not limited as research resources, they are evolutionarily closer to humans and the multiple generations of pedigreed colonies which display complex human disease phenotypes all support their further optimization an invaluable primate model. Since neither baboon assisted reproductive technologies nor baboon embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been reported, here we describe the first derivations and characterization of baboon ESC lines from IVF-generated blastocysts. Two ESCs lines (BabESC-4 and BabESC-15) display ESC morphology, express pluripotency markers (Oct-4, hTert, Nanog, Sox-2, Rex-1, TRA1–60, TRA1–81), and maintain stable euploid female karyotypes with parentage confirmed independently. They have been grown continuously for >430 and 290 days, respectively. Teratomas from both lines have all three germ layers. Availabilities of these BabESCs represent another important resource for stem cell biologists. PMID:19393591

  18. Body composition and cardiometabolic disease risk factors in captive baboons (Papio hamadryas sp.): sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Paul B; Rodriguez, Perla J; Voruganti, V Saroja; Mattern, Vicki; Bastarrachea, Raul A; Rice, Karen; Raabe, Timothy; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2014-01-01

    Baboons (Papio hamadryas sp.) exhibit significant sexual dimorphism in body size. Sexual dimorphism is also exhibited in a number of circulating factors associated with risk of cardiometabolic disease. We investigated whether sexual dimorphism in body size and composition underlie these differences. We examined data from 28 male and 24 female outdoor group-housed young adult baboons enrolled in a longitudinal observational study of cardiometabolic disease risk factors. Animals were sedated with ketamine HCl (10 mg/kg) before undergoing venous blood draws, basic body measurements, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry body composition scans. Percentage glycated hemoglobin A1c (%HbA1c ) was measured in whole blood. Serum samples were analyzed for glucose, insulin, C-peptide, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride concentrations. Males were heavier and had greater body length and lean tissue mass than females. Females had a greater body fat percentage relative to males (10.8 ± 6.4 vs. 6.9 ± 4.0, P = 0.01). Although C-peptide, fasting glucose, and %HbA1c did not differ between the sexes, females had greater fasting insulin and triglyceride compared to their male counterparts. Insulin and percentage body fat were significantly correlated in males (r = 0.61, P = 0.001) and to a lesser extent in females (r = 0.43, P = 0.04). Overall, relations between adiposity and fasting insulin and fasting triglyceride were stronger in males. After accounting for differences in percentage body fat, fasting insulin and triglyceride were no longer statistically different between males and females. Despite stronger correlations between relative adiposity and insulin and triglyceride in males, the higher fasting insulin and triglyceride of female baboons may be underlain by their greater relative body fat masses.

  19. Dynamic testing of old and young baboon cortical bone with numerical validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocron, S.; Nicolella, D.; Nicholls, A. E.; Bredbenner, T.; Havill, L.

    2012-08-01

    Cortical bone tensile mechanical properties at quasistatic and high rates (˜300s-1) were determined ex vivo using the right femurs of 12 female baboons, (Papio hamadryas spp.) from the Texas Biomedical Research Institute/Southwest National Primate Research Center in San Antonio, Texas. The animals were divided into two age groups: a young age group (6.63 ± 0.6 years) and an old age group (26.96 ± 1.3 years). Seven specimens per group were monotonically loaded to failure to determine their mechanical properties. The quasistatic strength of the bone for the old group was just a little (but not significantly) lower than the young group. High strain rate tests performed with the Hopkinson bar indicate that baboon bone from the older group was significantly weaker under impact loads than that from the younger group. This observation is particularly important due to the similarities between baboon and human bone tissue. Typical strain rates for these tests ranged from 130s-1 to 250s-1. A full-size 3-D simulation of the Hopkinson bar test was performed to confirm that the bone specimen was under stress equilibrium and to evaluate the consistency of the modulus and strength inferred from the tests. Simulations were performed in which the modulus, strength and failure strain were varied to see the sensitivity of the results. Additionally, simplified simulations were performed to estimate the strain rate environment of a femur during a fall at an impact velocity of 5 m/s, similar to a free fall velocity from a height of 1.3 meters. The simulations confirm that strain rates obtained in the Hopkinson bar are relevant because they are similar to those expected inr such a fall.

  20. Baboon alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes: phenotypic changes in liver following chronic consumption of alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R S; VandeBerg, J L

    1987-01-01

    According to the nomenclature of Vallee and Bazzone [1983] for mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isozymes, baboon ADHs comprise three major classes of activity, which were distinguished according to the following properties: Class I ADHs. These isozymes exhibited low-Km characteristics with ethanol as substrate, high isoelectric points (8.5-9.3), and sensitivity to 5 mM 4-methyl pyrazole inhibition, and were the major liver (ADH-2) and kidney (ADH-1) isozymes in the baboon. Class II ADHs. These isozymes showed high-Km values for ethanol, neutral isoelectric points (7.7 for the liver ADH-4 [pi-ADH] and 7.2 for the major stomach ADH [ADH-3], respectively), and were insensitive to inhibition with 5 mM 4-methyl pyrazole. Class III ADH. This enzyme was characterized by its inactivity with ethanol as substrate (up to 0.5 M), insensitivity to 4-methyl pyrazole inhibition, preference for medium-chain-length alcohols as substrate (trans-2-hexen-1-ol was routinely used in this study), and an isoelectric point (6.5) similar to that of the human liver chi-ADH (pI 6.4). Major activity variation of the liver pi-ADH (ADH-4) isozyme was observed among the 114 liver samples examined, with 34 percent exhibiting a null (or low-activity) phenotype. An electrophoretic variant phenotype for the major class II stomach isozyme (ADH-3) was also found in the population studied. The baboon was used as a model for studying alcohol-induced changes in liver ADH phenotype following chronic alcohol consumption. Prepuberal male baboons were pair-fed nutritionally adequate liquid diets containing ethanol (50 percent of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrates, and liver ADH isozyme patterns from biopsy samples were monitored for 20 weeks. Dramatic decreases in class II liver ADH activity (ADH-4, or pi-ADH) were observed within 4 weeks after the start of alcohol feeding, and a shift in liver class I isozymes was found during the later stages of alcohol consumption. These changes during chronic

  1. Monkey Management: Using Spatial Ecology to Understand the Extent and Severity of Human-Baboon Conflict in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Justin. O'Riain

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Conflict with humans poses one of the greatest threats to the persistence and survival of all wildlife. In the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, human-baboon conflict levels remain high despite substantial investment by conservation authorities in a variety of mitigation measures. Here we explore how spatial ecology can inform wildlife managers on the extent and severity of both current and projected human-baboon conflict. We apply conservative and generous densities--2.3 and 5.9 baboons/km2--to hypothetical landscape management scenarios to estimate whether the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus population in the Cape Peninsula is currently overabundant. We correlate conflict indices with spatial variables to explain intertroop differences in conflict levels. We investigate how an understanding of key elements of baboon ecology, including sleeping-site characteristics and intertroop territoriality, can direct management efforts and mitigate conflict. Our findings suggest that the current population of 475 baboons is below even the most conservative density estimate and that the area could potentially sustain up to 799 baboons. Conflict levels correlated positively with the loss of access to low-lying land through habitat transformation (Pearson r = 0.77, p = 0.015, n = 9 troops, and negatively with the distance of sleeping sites from the urban edge (Pearson r = 0.81, p = 0.001, n = 9 troops. Despite the availability of suitable sleeping sites elsewhere, more than half of all troops slept

  2. Comparison of common platelet receptors between the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus) and human for use in pre-clinical human-targeted anti-platelet studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse van Rensburg, Walter J

    2016-06-01

    Anti-platelet agents play a central part in the treatment and prevention of acute thrombotic events. Discriminating animal models are needed for the development of novel agents. The chacma baboon has been extensively used as a model to evaluate anti-platelet agents. However, limited data exist to prove the translatability of this species to humans. We aimed to determine the suitability of the chacma baboon in preclinical human targeted GPIIb/IIIa, GPIbα and P2Y12 studies. Light-transmission platelet aggregometry (LTA), whole blood impedance aggregometry, receptor number quantification and genomic DNA sequencing were performed. Baboon ADP and arachidonic acid-induced LTA aggregation results differed significantly from human values, even at increased concentrations. LTA ristocetin-induced agglutination was comparable between species, but baboon platelets needed twice the concentration of ristocetin to elicit a similar response. Citrated baboon blood had significantly less aggregation than humans when evaluated with impedance aggregometry. However, hirudinised baboon whole blood gave similar aggregation as humans at the same agonist concentrations. GPIIb, GPIIIa and GPIbα numbers were significantly more on the baboon platelets. None of the amino acids deemed vital for receptor function, ligand binding or receptor inhibition, were radically different between the species. However, a conservative change in a calcium-binding region of GPIIb may render the baboon platelets more sensitive to calcium-binding agents. The chacma baboon may be used for the evaluation of human-targeted GPIIb/IIIa-, GPIbα- and P2Y12-inhibiting agents. However, the best anticoagulant, optimal agonist concentrations, increase in receptor number and sequence differences must be considered for any future studies. PMID:26559117

  3. Schistosoma mansoni heat shock protein 70 elicits an early humoral immune response in S. mansoni infected baboons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminia Y Kanamura

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to search for DNA recombinant Schistosoma mansoni proteins responsible for eliciting an antibody response from the host at a very early phase after infection. A S. mansoni adult worm cDNA expression library was screened using pooled sera from baboons with four weeks of infection. Based on their specific reactivity with the S. mansoni infected sera and no reactivity when tested against the pre-infection sera from the same baboons, four clones were selected for further studies. Sequence analysis revealed that they were homologous to the S. mansoni heat shock protein 70 (hsp70. The insert sizes of the four selected clones varied from 1150 to 2006 bp. The preliminary characterization for antibody reactivity against a panel of baboon sera showed that the longest clone was the most reactive, eight out of eight acute and three out of four chronic sera reacting positively to this clone. The shortest clone was the least reactive. Our results suggest that the S. mansoni hsp70 elicits an early and strong antibody response in baboons and that antibodies to this protein can be detected in chronically infected animals. Therefore S. mansoni hsp70 may be a valid target for immunodiagnosis. However further studies are needed to identify the portion of the hsp70 that best fits the requirements for a valuable diagnostic antigen.

  4. A survey of gastrointestinal parasites of olive baboons (Papio anubis) in human settlement areas of Mole National Park, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sadie J; Brashares, Justin S; Walsh, Chesley; Milbers, Katherine; Kilroy, Cailean; Chapman, Colin A

    2012-08-01

    Fecal samples from 55 free-ranging olive baboons (Papio anubis) in Mole National Park, Ghana, were collected 22 June-7 July 2008 and analyzed for gastrointestinal parasites. This is the first survey of baboon gastrointestinal parasites in Ghana and provides baseline data for this area. Ninety-three percent of samples were infected, leaving 7% with no parasites observed. Of those infected, there was a 76% prevalence of strongyles, 53% Strongyloides spp., 11% Abbreviata caucasica , 62% prevalence of Balantidium coli (trophozoites and cysts identified), 4% Entomeba hystolytica/dispar, and 47% unidentified protozoan parasites. Of the strongyle infections, 9% were identified as Oesophagostamum sp. One sample contained an unidentified spirurid nematode that resembled Gongylonema sp. Mole has a mixed forest-savanna habitat, and baboons frequently range into human areas, which makes them subject to parasites from each habitat and multiple sources of exposure. We found a high prevalence of nematode parasites, consistent with a wet or cooler forest environment, or high rates of fecal contamination. The presence of Strongyloides sp., E. hystolitica/dispar, and B. coli suggest potential public health risk from baboons, but molecular identification of these parasites, and documentation of their presence in local human populations, would be necessary to confirm zoonotic transmission. PMID:22300265

  5. Both Nearest Neighbours and Long-term Affiliates Predict Individual Locations During Collective Movement in Wild Baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farine, Damien R; Strandburg-Peshkin, Ariana; Berger-Wolf, Tanya; Ziebart, Brian; Brugere, Ivan; Li, Jia; Crofoot, Margaret C

    2016-01-01

    In many animal societies, groups of individuals form stable social units that are shaped by well-delineated dominance hierarchies and a range of affiliative relationships. How do socially complex groups maintain cohesion and achieve collective movement? Using high-resolution GPS tracking of members of a wild baboon troop, we test whether collective movement in stable social groups is governed by interactions among local neighbours (commonly found in groups with largely anonymous memberships), social affiliates, and/or by individuals paying attention to global group structure. We construct candidate movement prediction models and evaluate their ability to predict the future trajectory of focal individuals. We find that baboon movements are best predicted by 4 to 6 neighbours. While these are generally individuals' nearest neighbours, we find that baboons have distinct preferences for particular neighbours, and that these social affiliates best predict individual location at longer time scales (>10 minutes). Our results support existing theoretical and empirical studies highlighting the importance of local rules in driving collective outcomes, such as collective departures, in primates. We extend previous studies by elucidating the rules that maintain cohesion in baboons 'on the move', as well as the different temporal scales of social interactions that are at play. PMID:27292778

  6. Both Nearest Neighbours and Long-term Affiliates Predict Individual Locations During Collective Movement in Wild Baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farine, Damien R.; Strandburg-Peshkin, Ariana; Berger-Wolf, Tanya; Ziebart, Brian; Brugere, Ivan; Li, Jia; Crofoot, Margaret C.

    2016-01-01

    In many animal societies, groups of individuals form stable social units that are shaped by well-delineated dominance hierarchies and a range of affiliative relationships. How do socially complex groups maintain cohesion and achieve collective movement? Using high-resolution GPS tracking of members of a wild baboon troop, we test whether collective movement in stable social groups is governed by interactions among local neighbours (commonly found in groups with largely anonymous memberships), social affiliates, and/or by individuals paying attention to global group structure. We construct candidate movement prediction models and evaluate their ability to predict the future trajectory of focal individuals. We find that baboon movements are best predicted by 4 to 6 neighbours. While these are generally individuals’ nearest neighbours, we find that baboons have distinct preferences for particular neighbours, and that these social affiliates best predict individual location at longer time scales (>10 minutes). Our results support existing theoretical and empirical studies highlighting the importance of local rules in driving collective outcomes, such as collective departures, in primates. We extend previous studies by elucidating the rules that maintain cohesion in baboons ‘on the move’, as well as the different temporal scales of social interactions that are at play. PMID:27292778

  7. Temporal dynamics of gene expression in the lung in a baboon model of E. coli sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Hua

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial invasion during sepsis induces disregulated systemic responses that could lead to fatal lung failure. The purpose of this study was to relate the temporal dynamics of gene expression to the pathophysiological changes in the lung during the first and second stages of E. coli sepsis in baboons. Results Using human oligonucleotide microarrays, we have explored the temporal changes of gene expression in the lung of baboons challenged with sublethal doses of E. coli. Temporal expression pattern and biological significance of the differentially expressed genes were explored using clustering and pathway analysis software. Expression of selected genes was validated by real-time PCR. Cytokine levels in tissue and plasma were assayed by multiplex ELISA. Changes in lung ultrastructure were visualized by electron microscopy. We found that genes involved in primary inflammation, innate immune response, and apoptosis peaked at 2 hrs. Inflammatory and immune response genes that function in the stimulation of monocytes, natural killer and T-cells, and in the modulation of cell adhesion peaked at 8 hrs, while genes involved in wound healing and functional recovery were upregulated at 24 hrs. Conclusion The analysis of gene expression modulation in response to sepsis provides the baseline information that is crucial for the understanding of the pathophysiology of systemic inflammation and may facilitate the development of future approaches for sepsis therapy.

  8. Localization of /sup 3/H-estradiol in the reproductive organs of male and female baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaker, F.J.; Sheridan, P.J.

    1982-05-01

    The uptake and retention of radiolabeled estradiol by both the male and female reproductive organs were examined in the baboon. Two male and two female baboons were injected intracardially with 1 microgram/kg body weight of /sup 3/H-estradiol and two animals, one male and one female, were injected with both labeled and 100 micrograms/kg body weight of unlabeled estradiol. One and a half hours after the injections, the animals were sacrificed and the uterus, cervix, vagina, oviduct, seminal vesicles, and prostate gland were removed and processed for autoradiography. The stratified squamous epithelia of the cervix and vagina demonstrated a light uptake of the label in the germinative, but not in the superficial cell layers. The columnar cells lining the oviduct and uterine glands were labeled, whereas the luminal epithelium of the uterus and the glandular epithelia of the seminal vesicles and prostate gland did not sequester the tritiated steroid. The interstitial cells of all the organs studied demonstrated a moderate to heavy uptake of the radioactivity, whereas the smooth muscle cells were lightly labeled except in the vagina, in which these cells displayed a moderate number of silver grains.

  9. Effects of food availability on serum insulin and lipid concentrations in free-ranging baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemnitz, Joseph W; Sapolsky, Robert M; Altmann, Jeanne; Muruthi, Philip; Mott, Glen E; Stefanick, Marcia L

    2002-05-01

    The relationship between food availability and metabolic physiology was studied in groups of free-ranging baboons (Papio spp.) living in the Amboseli National Park and the Masai Mara National Reserve of Kenya. Three groups subsisted entirely on natural forage, while two other groups lived near tourist facilities and often consumed food wastes from these lodges. The refuse provided a very accessible food source with relatively high caloric density. Consumption of the refuse was associated with reduced locomotion. Sexually mature individuals from all five groups were sedated surreptitiously in the early morning and blood samples were collected. Compared to animals foraging exclusively in the wild, animals that supplemented their diet with the refuse items had two- to threefold elevations in serum insulin concentrations, as well as increased total cholesterol (C), HDL-C, and VLDL+LDL-C levels. No sex differences in physiological measures were observed except in body mass. Elevated serum insulin, and cholesterol and lipoprotein concentrations influence the development of cardiovascular disease and have been shown to be subject to dietary manipulation and exercise under controlled conditions. The present results suggest potentially deleterious effects of a highly accessible, calorically dense food source, and associated reduction of physical activity for baboons living in an otherwise natural environment.

  10. Canine length in wild male baboons: maturation, aging and social dominance rank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbany, Jordi; Tung, Jenny; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Canines represent an essential component of the dentition for any heterodont mammal. In primates, like many other mammals, canines are frequently used as weapons. Hence, tooth size and wear may have significant implications for fighting ability, and consequently for social dominance rank, reproductive success, and fitness. We evaluated sources of variance in canine growth and length in a well-studied wild primate population because of the potential importance of canines for male reproductive success in many primates. Specifically, we measured maxillary canine length in 80 wild male baboons (aged 5.04-20.45 years) from the Amboseli ecosystem in southern Kenya, and examined its relationship with maturation, age, and social dominance rank. In our analysis of maturation, we compared food-enhanced baboons (those that fed part time at a refuse pit associated with a tourist lodge) with wild-feeding males, and found that food-enhanced males achieved long canines earlier than wild-feeding males. Among adult males, canine length decreased with age because of tooth wear. We found some evidence that, after controlling for age, longer canines were associated with higher adult dominance rank (accounting for 9% of the variance in rank), but only among relatively high-ranking males. This result supports the idea that social rank, and thus reproductive success and fitness, may depend in part on fighting ability mediated by canine size.

  11. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: Comparison with radiolabeled microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). The authors conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress

  12. Canine length in wild male baboons: maturation, aging and social dominance rank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Galbany

    Full Text Available Canines represent an essential component of the dentition for any heterodont mammal. In primates, like many other mammals, canines are frequently used as weapons. Hence, tooth size and wear may have significant implications for fighting ability, and consequently for social dominance rank, reproductive success, and fitness. We evaluated sources of variance in canine growth and length in a well-studied wild primate population because of the potential importance of canines for male reproductive success in many primates. Specifically, we measured maxillary canine length in 80 wild male baboons (aged 5.04-20.45 years from the Amboseli ecosystem in southern Kenya, and examined its relationship with maturation, age, and social dominance rank. In our analysis of maturation, we compared food-enhanced baboons (those that fed part time at a refuse pit associated with a tourist lodge with wild-feeding males, and found that food-enhanced males achieved long canines earlier than wild-feeding males. Among adult males, canine length decreased with age because of tooth wear. We found some evidence that, after controlling for age, longer canines were associated with higher adult dominance rank (accounting for 9% of the variance in rank, but only among relatively high-ranking males. This result supports the idea that social rank, and thus reproductive success and fitness, may depend in part on fighting ability mediated by canine size.

  13. Evidence for varying social strategies across the day in chacma baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sick, Claudia; Carter, Alecia J; Marshall, Harry H; Knapp, Leslie A; Dabelsteen, Torben; Cowlishaw, Guy

    2014-07-01

    Strong social bonds can make an important contribution to individual fitness, but we still have only a limited understanding of the temporal period relevant to the adjustment of social relationships. While there is growing recognition of the importance of strong bonds that persist for years, social relationships can also vary over weeks and months, suggesting that social strategies may be optimized over shorter timescales. Using biological market theory as a framework, we explore whether temporal variation in the benefits of social relationships might be sufficient to generate daily adjustments of social strategies in wild baboons. Data on grooming, one measure of social relationships, were collected from 60 chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) across two troops over a six month period. Our analyses suggest that social strategies can show diurnal variation, with subordinates preferentially grooming more dominant individuals earlier in the day compared with later in the day. These findings indicate that group-living animals may optimize certain elements of their social strategies over relatively short time periods.

  14. Evaluation of Reproduction and Raising Offspring in a Nursery-Reared SPF Baboon (Papio hamadryas anubis) Colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUDDA, MADELINE L.; ELY, JOHN J.; DOAN, SANDRA; CHAVEZ-SUAREZ, MARIA; WHITE, GARY L.; WOLF, ROMAN F.

    2014-01-01

    Baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis) of a conventional breeding colony were nursery-reared to create a specific pathogen-free (SPF) baboon breeding program. Because the founding generations were nursery-reared until two years of age, it was suspected that the SPF baboons would exhibit increased reproductive challenges as adults. Mothering behavior was of interest, because SPF females were not exposed to parental role models during the nursery-rearing process. We compared reproductive data from the SPF baboon breeding program during its first 10 years with data from age-matched baboons during the same period from an established, genetically-similar conventional breeding colony. We also evaluated records documenting mother-infant behaviors within the SPF colony. The average age of menarche in SPF females was 3.3 years. The overall live birth rate of both SPF and conventional females was approximately 90%, with no difference in pregnancy outcome between the two colonies. The average age at first conception for SPF females was earlier (4.2 years) than that of the conventional females (4.7 years). In both colonies, primiparous females were more likely to abort than multiparous females. Similarly, primiparous females were more likely to lose their infants to death or human intervention. A mothering score system was developed in the SPF colony to facilitate intervention of poor mother-infant relationships. Records revealed 70% of SPF mothers were able to raise one or more of their infants successfully to at least 180 days of age, which did not differ from conventional mothers. SPF females returned to postpartum estrus 27 days sooner on average than the conventional females, independent of dam age. The nursery-rearing process used for recruitment into the SPF colony therefore did not have an adverse effect on reproduction or rearing offspring. PMID:23440922

  15. Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6-O-[{sup 11}C]methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galynker, Igor; Schlyer, David J.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Gatley, S. John; MacGregor, Robert R.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Holland, M. J.; Brodie, Jonathan; Simon, Eric; Wolf, Alfred P

    1996-04-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[{sup 11}C]methyl]buprenorphine ([{sup 11}C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution of radioactivity in baboon brain determined with PET was striatum > thalamus > cingulate gyrus > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > occipital cortex > cerebellum. This distribution corresponded to opiate receptor density and to previously published data (37). The tracer uptake in adult female baboons showed no significant variation in serial scans in the same baboon with no intervention in the same scanning session. HPLC analysis of baboon plasma showed the presence of labeled metabolites with 92% {+-} 2.2% and 43% {+-} 14.4% of the intact tracer remaining at 5 and 30 min, respectively. Naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, administered 30-40 min after tracer injection at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg i.v., reduced [{sup 11}C]BPN binding in thalamus, striatum, cingulate gyrus, and frontal cortex to values 0.25 to 0.60 of that with no intervention. There were minimal (< 15%) effects on cerebellum. Naloxone treatment significantly reduced the slope of the Patlak plot in receptor-containing regions. These results demonstrate that [{sup 11}C]BPN can be displaced by naloxone in vivo, and they affirm the feasibility of using this tracer and displacement methodology for short-term kinetics studies with PET. Mouse tissue distribution data were used to estimate the radiation dosimetry to humans. The critical organ was the small intestine, with a radiation dose estimate to humans of 117 nrad/mCi.

  16. Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6-O-[11C]methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[11C]methyl]buprenorphine ([11C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution of radioactivity in baboon brain determined with PET was striatum > thalamus > cingulate gyrus > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > occipital cortex > cerebellum. This distribution corresponded to opiate receptor density and to previously published data (37). The tracer uptake in adult female baboons showed no significant variation in serial scans in the same baboon with no intervention in the same scanning session. HPLC analysis of baboon plasma showed the presence of labeled metabolites with 92% ± 2.2% and 43% ± 14.4% of the intact tracer remaining at 5 and 30 min, respectively. Naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, administered 30-40 min after tracer injection at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg i.v., reduced [11C]BPN binding in thalamus, striatum, cingulate gyrus, and frontal cortex to values 0.25 to 0.60 of that with no intervention. There were minimal (11C]BPN can be displaced by naloxone in vivo, and they affirm the feasibility of using this tracer and displacement methodology for short-term kinetics studies with PET. Mouse tissue distribution data were used to estimate the radiation dosimetry to humans. The critical organ was the small intestine, with a radiation dose estimate to humans of 117 nrad/mCi

  17. Predictive models of insulin resistance derived from simple morphometric and biochemical indices related to obesity and the metabolic syndrome in baboons

    OpenAIRE

    Bastarrachea Raúl A; Davalli Alberto; Casiraghi Francesca; Sorice GianPio; Tejero M Elizabeth; Leland M Michelle; Lopez-Alvarenga Juan C; Guardado-Mendoza Rodolfo; Gastaldelli Amalia; Chavez Alberto O; Comuzzie Anthony G; DeFronzo Ralph A; Folli Franco

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-human primates are valuable models for the study of insulin resistance and human obesity. In baboons, insulin sensitivity levels can be evaluated directly with the euglycemic clamp and is highly predicted by adiposity, metabolic markers of obesity and impaired glucose metabolism (i.e. percent body fat by DXA and HbA1c). However, a simple method to screen and identify obese insulin resistant baboons for inclusion in interventional studies is not available. Methods We st...

  18. Anti-GaL IgG antibodies in sera of newborn humans and baboons and its significance in pig xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minanov, O P; Itescu, S; Neethling, F A; Morgenthau, A S; Kwiatkowski, P; Cooper, D K; Michler, R E

    1997-01-27

    We have previously demonstrated that hyperacute rejection does not occur in a pig-to-newborn baboon heart transplant model, presumably because of low levels of cytotoxic antipig antibodies present in the serum of newborn baboons. Cytotoxic antipig antibodies are primarily directed to alpha-1,3-galactosyl (alpha Gal) residues on endothelial cell surface structures Twenty-one full-term humans and 5 full-term baboons were tested for complement mediated lysis (CML) of pig kidney (PK-15) cells and anti-alpha Gal activity with an ELISA using BSA-conjugated alpha Gal residues as target. To evaluate the significance of the anti-alpha Gal titers in vivo 5 newborn baboons underwent heterotopic pig cardiac xenotransplantation. Six of 21 human samples and 1 of 5 baboon samples demonstrated significant cytotoxicity to PK-15 cells. Twelve of 21 newborn humans had anti-alpha Gal IgG antibodies at titers of 1:80 or greater. None of the samples had anti-alpha Gal IgM. In newborn baboons, 1 of 5 sera had anti-alpha Gal IgG antibodies at titers greater than 1:80 and none of these samples had anti-alpha Gal IgM. Xenografts survived for an average of 3.6 days, even in the baboon with high anti-alpha Gal IgG titers. Analysis of the explanted grafts showed minimal evidence of complement-mediated hyperacute rejection (HAR), but prominent mononuclear cell infiltrates. In serum tested posttransplant there was an induced anti-alpha Gal response with cytotoxicity against PK-15 cells. These results show that anti-alpha Gal IgM is absent in newborn human and baboon sera, allowing pig grafts to avoid HAR. However, the presence of anti-alpha Gal IgG may be associated with mononuclear cell infiltration of the xenograft and its subsequent rejection. PMID:9020315

  19. Effect of alcohol on internally deposited Am-241 in the baboon: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of ethyl alcohol in enhancing the excretion of Am-241 from the baboon has been tested. Alcohol enhances Am-241 excretion via the fecal route by a factor of about 2.5. However, there is a corresponding increase in fecal volume, and no significant change in the concentration of the nuclide in the feces. Other cathartics tested caused increased fecal volumes with no change in amount of activity excreted leading to a decreased concentration of the nuclide in the feces. Alcohol is not as effective as DTPA in removing Am-241 from the body. Preliminary results suggest that alcohol has little or no enhancement effect on the decorporation capability of DTPA

  20. Nicotine Blocks Brain Estrogen Synthase (Aromatase): In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography Studies in Female Baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A.; Biegon, A.; Kim, S.-W.; Logan, J.; Hooker, J.M.; Muench, L.; Fowler, J.S.

    2010-01-12

    Cigarette smoking and nicotine have complex effects on human physiology and behavior, including some effects similar to those elicited by inhibition of aromatase, the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. We report the first in vivo primate study to determine whether there is a direct effect of nicotine administration on brain aromatase. Brain aromatase availability was examined with positron emission tomography and the selective aromatase inhibitor [{sup 11}C]vorozole in six baboons before and after exposure to IV nicotine at .015 and .03 mg/kg. Nicotine administration produced significant, dose-dependent reductions in [{sup 11}C]vorozole binding. The amygdala and preoptic area showed the largest reductions. Plasma levels of nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine were similar to those found in cigarette smokers. Nicotine interacts in vivo with primate brain aromatase in regions involved in mood, aggression, and sexual behavior.

  1. Cortical hypometabolism and its recovery following nucleus basalis lesions in baboons: a PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyosawa, M.; Pappata, S.; Duverger, D.; Riche, D.; Cambon, H.; Mazoyer, B.; Samson, Y.; Crouzel, C.; Naquet, R.; MacKenzie, E.T.

    1987-12-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured serially with positron emission tomography and (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose in five baboons with stereotactic electrocoagulation of the left nucleus basalis of Meynert (NbM). Four days after lesion, a significant metabolic depression was present in the ipsilateral cerebral cortex, most marked in the frontotemporal region, and which recovered progressively within 6-13 weeks. These data demonstrate that adaptive mechanisms efficiently compensate for the cortical metabolic effects of NbM-lesion-induced cholinergic deafferentation. Moreover, unilateral NbM lesions also induced a transient reduction in contralateral cortical metabolic rate, the mechanisms of which are discussed. Explanation of these effects of cholinergic deafferentation in the primate could further our understanding of the metabolic deficits observed in dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

  2. Effect of immobilization on the EEG of the baboon. Comparison with telemetry results from unrestricted animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, J.; Collomb, H.

    1980-01-01

    The EEG of the baboon was studied under two very different sets of conditions: 37 were totally immobolized while 12 were studied in their free movements with 4 channel telemetry. For the immobilzed, 3 stages were described: (1) activation, record desynchronized; (2) rest with 13-15 cm/sec rhythm, like the human alpha rhythm stage but with eyes open or closed; (3)relaxation with a decrease in 13-15 rhythm and the appearance of 5-7 cm/sec theta waves, eyelids closed, animal apparently sleeping. For the free animals the rest stage appeared when the animal's attention was not directed anywhere and there was no relaxation stage. It is concluded that the EEG pattern of the immobilized animal that was described as the "relaxation" stage really represents a special functional state which one must distinguish clearly from the physiological stages of sleep.

  3. The baboon (Papio anubis extracranial carotid artery: An anatomical guide for endovascular experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laufer Ilya

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As novel endovascular strategies are developed for treating neurological disease, there is an increasing need to evaluate these techniques in relevant preclinical models. The use of non-human primates is especially critical given their structural and physiological homology with humans. In order to conduct primate endovascular studies, a comprehensive understanding of the carotid anatomy is necessary. We therefore performed a detailed examination of the vessel lengths, lumen diameters and angles of origin of the baboon extracranial carotid system. Methods We characterized the extracranial carotid system often male baboons (Papio anubis, range 15.1–28.4 kg by early post-mortem dissection. Photographic documentation of vessel lengths, lumen diameters, and angles of origin were measured for each segment of the carotid bilaterally. Results The common carotid arteries averaged 94.7 ± 1.7 mm (left and 87.1 ± 1.6 mm (right in length. The average minimal common carotid lumen diameters were 3.0 ± 0.3 mm (left and 2.9 ± 0.2 mm (right. Each animal had a common brachiocephalic artery arising from the aorta which bifurcated into the left common carotid artery and right braciocephalic artery after 21.5 ± 1.6 mm. The vascular anatomy was found to be consistent among animals despite a wide range of animal weights. Conclusions The consistency in the Papio anubis extracranial carotid system may promote the use of this species in the preclinical investigation of neuro-interventional therapies.

  4. Nnuclear uptake and retention of a synthetic progestin in the cardiovascular system of the baboon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has long been known that there is a sexual dimorphism in the incidence of coronary heart disease. This observation, together with more recent reports of increased cardiovascular disease associated with the use of oral contraceptives, led to a search for steroid receptors in the cardiovascular system. In this study the nuclear uptake and retention of a synthetic progestin was examined in the cardiovascular system of the baboons. Long term oophorectomized baboons were primed with estradiol benzoate for 3 days before the experiment (50 micrograms/kg, im) and adrenalectomized 2 days before the experiment. On the day of the experiment, the animals were injected under anesthesia with 2.5 micrograms/kg BW [3H]ORG 2058 (16 alpha-ethyl-21-hydroxy-19-nor-[6,7-3H]pregn-4-ene-3,20-dione) or with [3H] ORG 2058 plus a 1000-fold excess of unlabeled progesterone (control). One hour after the injection, the animals were rapidly exsanguinated, and parts of the cardiovascular system were removed and processed for autoradiography. Localization of the synthetic progestin was found in nuclei of between 25-75% of all smooth muscle cells of the media of all arteries examined and to a lesser extent in the nuclei of the fibroblasts and others cells of the adventitia. Localization of the synthetic progestin in the heart was limited to approximately 1% of the myocardial cells and less than 5% of interstitial cell nuclei. The pattern of localization found differs from that for estrogen and androgen and suggests the possible presence of estrogen-independent progesterone receptors in smooth muscle cells of the media of the aorta and coronary arteries

  5. Nnuclear uptake and retention of a synthetic progestin in the cardiovascular system of the baboon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, P.J.; McGill, H.C. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    It has long been known that there is a sexual dimorphism in the incidence of coronary heart disease. This observation, together with more recent reports of increased cardiovascular disease associated with the use of oral contraceptives, led to a search for steroid receptors in the cardiovascular system. In this study the nuclear uptake and retention of a synthetic progestin was examined in the cardiovascular system of the baboons. Long term oophorectomized baboons were primed with estradiol benzoate for 3 days before the experiment (50 micrograms/kg, im) and adrenalectomized 2 days before the experiment. On the day of the experiment, the animals were injected under anesthesia with 2.5 micrograms/kg BW (/sup 3/H)ORG 2058 (16 alpha-ethyl-21-hydroxy-19-nor-(6,7-/sup 3/H)pregn-4-ene-3,20-dione) or with (/sup 3/H) ORG 2058 plus a 1000-fold excess of unlabeled progesterone (control). One hour after the injection, the animals were rapidly exsanguinated, and parts of the cardiovascular system were removed and processed for autoradiography. Localization of the synthetic progestin was found in nuclei of between 25-75% of all smooth muscle cells of the media of all arteries examined and to a lesser extent in the nuclei of the fibroblasts and others cells of the adventitia. Localization of the synthetic progestin in the heart was limited to approximately 1% of the myocardial cells and less than 5% of interstitial cell nuclei. The pattern of localization found differs from that for estrogen and androgen and suggests the possible presence of estrogen-independent progesterone receptors in smooth muscle cells of the media of the aorta and coronary arteries.

  6. White monkey syndrome and presumptive copper deficiency in wild savannah baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, A Catherine; Gesquiere, Laurence R; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne

    2011-11-01

    In immature wild savannah baboons (Papio cynocephalus), we observed symptoms consistent with copper (Cu) deficiency and, more specifically, with a disorder referred to as white monkey syndrome (WMS) in laboratory primates. The objectives of this study were to characterize this pathology, and test three hypotheses that (1) Cu deficiency may have been induced by zinc (Zn) toxicity, (2) it may have been induced by molybdenum (Mo) toxicity, and (3) cumulative rainfall during the perinatal period and particularly during gestation is an ecological factor distinguishing infants afflicted with WMS from non-WMS infants. During 2001-2009, we observed 22 instances of WMS out of a total 377 live births in the study population. Visible symptoms exhibited by WMS infants included whitening of the animal's fur and/or impaired mobility characterized by an apparent "stiffening" of the hindlimbs. Occurrence of WMS did not vary significantly by gender. However, among individuals that survived at least 180 days, WMS males had a significantly lower survivorship probability than non-WMS males. Zn/Cu ratios assessed from hair samples of adult female baboons were higher in females who had produced at least one WMS offspring relative to females who had not had a WMS offspring. This was true even when the hair sample was collected long after the birth of the female's afflicted infant. We consider this potentially indicative of a robust tendency for low Cu levels induced by elevated Zn intake in some individuals. No significant differences of Mo/Cu ratios were observed. Cumulative rainfall during gestation (∼179 days) was 50% lower for WMS infants relative to non-WMS infants. In contrast, rainfall for the two classes of infants did not differ in the 180 days before conception or in the 180 days following birth. This finding highlights the importance of prenatal ecological conditions in healthy fetal development with regard to WMS.

  7. Paternity alone does not predict long-term investment in juveniles by male baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovice, Liza R; Heesen, Marlies; Di Fiore, Anthony; Seyfarth, Robert M; Cheney, Dorothy L

    2009-08-01

    Adult male chacma baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus) form preferential associations, or friendships, with particular lactating females. Males exhibit high levels of affiliative contact with their friends' infants and defend them from potentially infanticidal attacks (Palombit et al. 1997). Little is known about males' associations with juveniles once they have passed the period of infanticidal risk. We conducted an observational, experimental, and genetic study of adult male and juvenile chacma baboons in the Moremi Reserve, Botswana. We identified preferential associations between males and juveniles and used behavioral data and a playback experiment to explore whether those associations have potential fitness benefits for juveniles. We determined whether males preferentially invest in care of their own offspring. We also determined how often males invest in care of their former friends' offspring. The majority of juveniles exhibited preferential associations with one or two males, who had almost always been their mother's friend during infancy. However, in only a subset of these relationships was the male the actual father, in part because many fathers died or disappeared before their offspring were weaned. Male caretakers intervened on behalf of their juvenile associates in social conflicts more often than they intervened on behalf of unconnected juveniles, and they did not appear to differentiate between genetic offspring and unrelated associates. Playbacks of juveniles' distress calls elicited a stronger response from their caretakers than from control males. Chacma males may provide care to unrelated offspring of former friends because the costs associated with such care are low compared with the potentially high fitness costs of refusing aid to a juvenile who is a possible offspring.

  8. Interaction of SR 33557 with skeletal muscle calcium channel blocker receptors in the baboon: characterization of its binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure for the isolation of primate skeletal microsomal membranes was initiated. Membranes exhibited specific enzymatic markers such as 5'-nucleotidase, Ca2+,Mg(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase and an ATP-dependent calcium uptake. Baboon skeletal microsomes bound specifically with high-affinity potent Ca2+ channel blockers such as dihydropyridine, phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine derivatives. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding assays with [3H](+)-PN 200-110, [3H](-)-desmethoxyverapamil [( 3H](-)-D888) and [3H]-d-cis-dilitiazem were consistent with a single class of binding sites for the three radioligands. The pharmacological profile of SR 33557, an original compound with calcium antagonist properties, was investigated using radioligand binding studies. SR 33557 totally inhibited the specific binding of the three main classes of Ca2+ channel effectors and interacted allosterically with them. In addition, SR 33557 bound with high affinity to a homogeneous population of binding sites in baboon skeletal muscle

  9. Olive baboons, Papio anubis, adjust their visual and auditory intentional gestures to the visual attention of others

    OpenAIRE

    Bourjade, Marie; Meguerditchian, Adrien; Maille, Audrey; Gaunet, Florence; Vauclair, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    International audience Although nonhuman primates' gestural communication is often considered to be a likely precursor of human language, the intentional properties in this communicative system have not yet been entirely elucidated. In particular, little is known about the intentional nature of monkeys' gestural signalling and related social understanding. We investigated whether olive baboons can (1) adjust their requesting gestures to the visual attention of the experimenter with special...

  10. Predictive models of insulin resistance derived from simple morphometric and biochemical indices related to obesity and the metabolic syndrome in baboons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastarrachea Raúl A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-human primates are valuable models for the study of insulin resistance and human obesity. In baboons, insulin sensitivity levels can be evaluated directly with the euglycemic clamp and is highly predicted by adiposity, metabolic markers of obesity and impaired glucose metabolism (i.e. percent body fat by DXA and HbA1c. However, a simple method to screen and identify obese insulin resistant baboons for inclusion in interventional studies is not available. Methods We studied a population of twenty baboons with the euglycemic clamp technique to characterize a population of obese nondiabetic, insulin resistant baboons, and used a multivariate linear regression analysis (adjusted for gender to test different predictive models of insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose uptake = Rd using abdominal circumference and fasting plasma insulin. Alternatively, we tested in a separate baboon population (n = 159, a simpler model based on body weight and fasting plasma glucose to predict the whole-body insulin sensitivity (Rd/SSPI derived from the clamp. Results In the first model, abdominal circumference explained 59% of total insulin mediated glucose uptake (Rd. A second model, which included fasting plasma insulin (log transformed and abdominal circumference, explained 64% of Rd. Finally, the model using body weight and fasting plasma glucose explained 51% of Rd/SSPI. Interestingly, we found that percent body fat was directly correlated with the adipocyte insulin resistance index (r = 0.755, p Conclusion In baboons, simple morphometric measurements of adiposity/obesity, (i.e. abdominal circumference, plus baseline markers of glucose/lipid metabolism, (i.e. fasting plasma glucose and insulin provide a feasible method to screen and identify overweight/obese insulin resistant baboons for inclusion in interventional studies aimed to study human obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  11. Predictive models of insulin resistance derived from simple morphometric and biochemical indices related to obesity and the metabolic syndrome in baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Alberto O; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Guardado-Mendoza, Rodolfo; Lopez-Alvarenga, Juan C; Leland, M Michelle; Tejero, M Elizabeth; Sorice, GianPio; Casiraghi, Francesca; Davalli, Alberto; Bastarrachea, Raúl A; Comuzzie, Anthony G; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Folli, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Background Non-human primates are valuable models for the study of insulin resistance and human obesity. In baboons, insulin sensitivity levels can be evaluated directly with the euglycemic clamp and is highly predicted by adiposity, metabolic markers of obesity and impaired glucose metabolism (i.e. percent body fat by DXA and HbA1c). However, a simple method to screen and identify obese insulin resistant baboons for inclusion in interventional studies is not available. Methods We studied a population of twenty baboons with the euglycemic clamp technique to characterize a population of obese nondiabetic, insulin resistant baboons, and used a multivariate linear regression analysis (adjusted for gender) to test different predictive models of insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose uptake = Rd) using abdominal circumference and fasting plasma insulin. Alternatively, we tested in a separate baboon population (n = 159), a simpler model based on body weight and fasting plasma glucose to predict the whole-body insulin sensitivity (Rd/SSPI) derived from the clamp. Results In the first model, abdominal circumference explained 59% of total insulin mediated glucose uptake (Rd). A second model, which included fasting plasma insulin (log transformed) and abdominal circumference, explained 64% of Rd. Finally, the model using body weight and fasting plasma glucose explained 51% of Rd/SSPI. Interestingly, we found that percent body fat was directly correlated with the adipocyte insulin resistance index (r = 0.755, p < 0.0001). Conclusion In baboons, simple morphometric measurements of adiposity/obesity, (i.e. abdominal circumference), plus baseline markers of glucose/lipid metabolism, (i.e. fasting plasma glucose and insulin) provide a feasible method to screen and identify overweight/obese insulin resistant baboons for inclusion in interventional studies aimed to study human obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:19389241

  12. Hunting, food subsidies, and mesopredator release: the dynamics of crop-raiding baboons in a managed landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel A; Ryan, Sadie J; Brashares, Justin S; Johnson, Leah R

    2016-04-01

    The establishment of protected areas or parks has become an important tool for wildlife conservation. However, frequent occurrences of human-wildlife conflict at the edges of these parks can undermine their conservation goals. Many African protected areas have experienced concurrent declines of apex predators alongside increases in both baboon abundance and the density of humans living near the park boundary. Baboons then take excursions outside of the park to raid crops for food, conflicting with the human population. We model the interactions of mesopredators (baboons), apex predators, and shared prey in the park to analyze how four components affect the proportion of time that mesopredators choose to crop-raid: (1) the presence of apex predators; (2) nutritional quality of the crops; (3) mesopredator "shyness" about leaving the park; and (4) human hunting of mesopredators. We predict that the presence of apex predators in the park is the most effective method for controlling mesopredator abundance, and hence significantly reduces their impact on crops. Human hunting of mesopredators is less effective as it only occurs during crop-raiding excursions. Furthermore, making crops less attractive, for instance by planting crops further from the park boundary or farming less nutritional crops, can reduce the amount of time mesopredators crop-raid. PMID:27220211

  13. Compared study of the local structure of alteration products of SON 68 glass and natural gels; Etude comparee de la structure locale des produits d'alteration du verre SON 68 et de gels naturels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrin, E

    2000-07-01

    This study is a contribution in the understanding of the long time behavior of alteration products of the glass SON 68, used to simulate the nuclear glass R7T7. The local structure around Zirconium and iron has been probed using X-ray absorption spectroscopy in altered surface layer of glass SON 68. Alteration products of this glass have been prepared for short (3 hours to 7 days) and long (17 months) time, using various indexes of saturation for the leaching solution with respect to the Si content of the glass (from 0 to 90 %). The evolution of the local structure around Fe has also been studied in recent and old natural ferric gels. Zr, Fe- L{sub 2,3} XANES and Zr, Fe-K EXAFS spectroscopies have shown that, in the pristine glass, these elements are connected to the polymeric network. Zr is found in an environment close to that of a zircon-silicate containing Na and Ca. Trivalent Fe is a network former. The leached layer of glass SON 68 is constituted of poorly ordered Zr-and Fe-(oxi-hydr)oxides that may have been formed by a mechanism of dissolution/precipitation; a relict phase with the same Zr local structure as that observed in the pristine glass, probably obtained thanks to in-situ solid condensation. The structural characteristics of the leached layer are observed from the first steps of alteration for Zr and Fe. Conversely to Fe, the structural status of Zr depends on the leaching kinetic as well as the contents of Ca and Si in the solid. Fe-K EXAFS results in recent natural ferri-hydrides present a clear structural similarity with that determined in glass SON 68 leached products. The study of old paleosols (between 1,800 and 200,000 years) has demonstrated the long time stability of ferric gels, although an increase of medium range order around Fe is seen. (author)

  14. Sex differences in inhibitory control in socially-housed baboons (Papio papio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacreuse, Agnès; Gullstrand, Julie; Fagot, Joël

    2016-10-01

    Inhibitory control is an important component of executive function. An emerging literature in humans suggests that inhibitory control is sexually dimorphic and modulated by sex steroids, but evidence for such a link in nonhuman animals is scarce. In this study, we examined the effects of menstrual cycle and biological sex on response inhibition, as measured by a Stop-Signal task, in the baboon (Papio papio). The monkeys (n=13) were socially-housed, with voluntary access to multiple touchscreen computerized stations. The task required monkeys to inhibit prepotent responses (touching a target, "Go" trials) following the appearance of a visual stop signal on 25% of the trials ("Stop" trials). The cognitive data, consisting of computerized records of the monkeys' performance on the Stop-Signal task over a year of testing, were matched to records of female sexual swellings. Same-day menstrual and cognitive data were available for 5 females, aged 5-18 years. These data were compared to those of 8 males (5-14 years old) performing the Stop-Signal task over the same time period. Contrary to our hypothesis, performance on the task was not significantly affected by the phase (ovulatory vs. luteal) of the cycle in females. However, males were slower than females on Go trials and were less efficient in inhibiting responses on Stop trials. Slower responses in males were indicative of a speed-accuracy trade-off, as overall accuracy was also better in males than in females. Analyses of trial history indicated that males did not speed as much as females following a successful Go trial, but did not differ from females in post-error slowing or post-inhibiting responses. Overall, the data show that biological sex modulates Stop-Signal performance in the baboon, with males exhibiting slower response execution overall, less efficient inhibition, but greater accuracy than females. This pattern of sex differences may reflect motivational sex differences in which males emphasize accuracy

  15. Segmental pancreatic allograft survival in baboons treated with combined irradiation and cyclosporine: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Laker, L.; Els, D.; Weideman, A.; Wolfe-Coote, S.; van der Merwe, E.A.

    1985-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of cyclosporine (CS) alone, total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) alone, and CS in combination with total body irradiation (TBI) in suppressing segmental pancreatic allograft rejection in totally pancreatectomized outbred chacma baboons. The administration of CS 25 mg/kg/day and 50 mg/ kg/day resulted in mean graft survival of 21.5 days and 24.5 days, respectively. CS 85 mg/kg/day resulted in median graft survival of 9 days. There was a wide daily fluctuation of CS serum trough levels exhibited between primates receiving the same oral dose. TBI in excess of 300 rads resulted in irreversible bone marrow suppression. Modest results were achieved in recipients of TBI-76 rads (38 x 2 rads), with median graft survival of 21 days, results not different from recipients treated with CS. TLI recipients of 600 rads (150 x 4 rads) resulted in median pancreatic graft survival of 16 days. TBI together with oral CS administration exhibited no synergistic or additive effect and a single peroperative donor-specific blood transfusion did not enhance pancreatic allograft survival in this model. However, of 10 primates receiving TBI 100 rads (50 x 2 rads) and CS 25 mg/kg/day administered orally indefinitely, four remained normoglycemic for more than 60 days. TBI 100 rads (50 x 2 rads) together with oral and parenteral CS resulted in necrotizing enterocolitis in four of six recipients.

  16. Whole body [{sup 11}C]-dihydrotetrabenazine imaging of baboons: biodistribution and human radiation dosimetry estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, Rajan [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Harris, Paul; Leibel, Rudolph [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Simpson, Norman; Parsey, Ramin [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Van Heertum, Ronald [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Mann, J.J. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 abundance quantified using the radiotracer [{sup 11}C]-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has been used to study diagnosis and pathogenesis of dementia and psychiatric disorders in humans. In addition, it may be a surrogate marker for insulin-producing pancreatic beta cell mass, useful for longitudinal measurements using positron emission tomography to track progression of autoimmune diabetes. To support the feasibility of long-term repeated administrations, we estimate the biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ in humans. Five baboon studies were acquired using a Siemens ECAT camera. After transmission scanning, 165-210 MBq of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ were injected, and dynamic whole body emission scans were conducted. Time-activity data were used to obtain residence times and estimate absorbed radiation dose according to the MIRD model. Most of the injected tracer localized to the liver and the lungs, followed by the intestines, brain, and kidneys. The highest estimated absorbed radiation dose was in the stomach wall. The largest radiation dose from [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ is to the stomach wall. This dose estimate, as well as the radiation dose to other radiosensitive organs, must be considered in evaluating the risks of multiple administrations. (orig.)

  17. Crowding increases salivary cortisol but not self-directed behavior in captive baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Brandon L; Reeder, DeeAnn M; Judge, Peter G

    2015-04-01

    Reduced space can lead to crowding in social animals. Crowding increases the risk of agonistic interactions that, in turn, may require additional physiological defensive coping mechanisms affecting health. To determine the stress induced from increased social density in a group of nineteen baboons living in an indoor/outdoor enclosure, saliva cortisol levels and rates of anxiety-related behavior were analyzed across two unique crowding episodes. Initially, mean salivary cortisol levels when animals were restricted to their indoor quarters were compared to those when they also had access to their larger outdoor enclosure. Then, mean cortisol levels were compared before, during, and after two distinct crowding periods of long and short duration. Crowding resulted in significantly elevated cortisol during crowding periods compared to non-crowded periods. Cortisol levels returned to baseline following two crowding episodes contrasting in their length and ambient climate conditions. These cortisol elevations indicate greater metabolic costs of maintaining homeostasis under social stress resulting from reduced space. Self-directed behavior, conversely, was not reliably elevated during crowding. Results suggest that the potential for negative social interactions, and/or the uncertainty associated with social threat can cause physiological stress responses detected by salivary cortisol. Self-directed behavioral measures of stress may constitute inadequate indicators of social stress in colony-housed monkeys or represent subjective emotional arousal unrelated to hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis activation.

  18. Genetically-engineered pig-to-baboon liver xenotransplantation: histopathology of xenografts and native organs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcin Ekser

    Full Text Available Orthotopic liver transplantation was carried out in baboons using wild-type (WT, n = 1 or genetically-engineered pigs (α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout, GTKO, n = 1; GTKO pigs transgenic for human CD46, n = 7 and a clinically-acceptable immunosuppressive regimen. Biopsies were obtained from the WT pig liver pre-Tx and at 30 min, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h post-transplantation. Biopsies of genetically-engineered livers were obtained pre-Tx, 2 h after reperfusion and at necropsy (4-7 days after transplantation. Tissues were examined by light, confocal, and electron microscopy. All major native organs were also examined. The WT pig liver underwent hyperacute rejection. After genetically-engineered pig liver transplantation, hyperacute rejection did not occur. Survival was limited to 4-7 days due to repeated spontaneous bleeding in the liver and native organs (as a result of profound thrombocytopenia which necessitated euthanasia. At 2 h, graft histology was largely normal. At necropsy, genetically-engineered pig livers showed hemorrhagic necrosis, platelet aggregation, platelet-fibrin thrombi, monocyte/macrophage margination mainly in liver sinusoids, and vascular endothelial cell hypertrophy, confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry showed minimal deposition of IgM, and almost absence of IgG, C3, C4d, C5b-9, and of a cellular infiltrate, suggesting that neither antibody- nor cell-mediated rejection played a major role.

  19. Behavioural processes in social context: female abductions, male herding and female grooming in hamadryas baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Pablo; Colmenares, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    The formation of bonds between strangers is an event that occurs routinely in many social animals, including humans, and, as social bonds in general, they affect the individuals' welfare and biological fitness. The present study was motivated by an interest in the behavioural processes that drive bond formation in a social context of hostility, in which the incumbent partners vary greatly in physical power and reproductive interests, a situation in which individuals of many group-living species find themselves often throughout their lives. We focused on the quantitative analysis of female abductions via male aggressive herding in a nonhuman primate, the hamadryas baboon, in which intersexual bonds are known to be strong. We tested three hypotheses informed by sexual conflict/sexual coercion theory (male herding-as-conditioning and female grooming-as-appeasement) and by socioecological theory (unit size and female competition). The results supported the predictions: males resorted to coercive tactics (aggressive herding) with abducted females, and abducted females elevated the amount of grooming directed at their new unit males; in fact, they escaped from the otherwise negative effect of unit size on female-to-male grooming. These findings reveal that conflicts of interest are natural ingredients underpinning social bonds and that resorting to coercive aggression may be an option especially when partners differ greatly in their physical power. PMID:22391051

  20. Whole body [11C]-dihydrotetrabenazine imaging of baboons: biodistribution and human radiation dosimetry estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 abundance quantified using the radiotracer [11C]-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has been used to study diagnosis and pathogenesis of dementia and psychiatric disorders in humans. In addition, it may be a surrogate marker for insulin-producing pancreatic beta cell mass, useful for longitudinal measurements using positron emission tomography to track progression of autoimmune diabetes. To support the feasibility of long-term repeated administrations, we estimate the biodistribution and dosimetry of [11C]-DTBZ in humans. Five baboon studies were acquired using a Siemens ECAT camera. After transmission scanning, 165-210 MBq of [11C]-DTBZ were injected, and dynamic whole body emission scans were conducted. Time-activity data were used to obtain residence times and estimate absorbed radiation dose according to the MIRD model. Most of the injected tracer localized to the liver and the lungs, followed by the intestines, brain, and kidneys. The highest estimated absorbed radiation dose was in the stomach wall. The largest radiation dose from [11C]-DTBZ is to the stomach wall. This dose estimate, as well as the radiation dose to other radiosensitive organs, must be considered in evaluating the risks of multiple administrations. (orig.)

  1. Behavioural processes in social context: female abductions, male herding and female grooming in hamadryas baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Pablo; Colmenares, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    The formation of bonds between strangers is an event that occurs routinely in many social animals, including humans, and, as social bonds in general, they affect the individuals' welfare and biological fitness. The present study was motivated by an interest in the behavioural processes that drive bond formation in a social context of hostility, in which the incumbent partners vary greatly in physical power and reproductive interests, a situation in which individuals of many group-living species find themselves often throughout their lives. We focused on the quantitative analysis of female abductions via male aggressive herding in a nonhuman primate, the hamadryas baboon, in which intersexual bonds are known to be strong. We tested three hypotheses informed by sexual conflict/sexual coercion theory (male herding-as-conditioning and female grooming-as-appeasement) and by socioecological theory (unit size and female competition). The results supported the predictions: males resorted to coercive tactics (aggressive herding) with abducted females, and abducted females elevated the amount of grooming directed at their new unit males; in fact, they escaped from the otherwise negative effect of unit size on female-to-male grooming. These findings reveal that conflicts of interest are natural ingredients underpinning social bonds and that resorting to coercive aggression may be an option especially when partners differ greatly in their physical power.

  2. Changes in gene expression associated with reproductive maturation in wild female baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Courtney C; Tung, Jenny; Wray, Gregory A; Alberts, Susan C

    2012-01-01

    Changes in gene expression during development play an important role in shaping morphological and behavioral differences, including between humans and nonhuman primates. Although many of the most striking developmental changes occur during early development, reproductive maturation represents another critical window in primate life history. However, this process is difficult to study at the molecular level in natural primate populations. Here, we took advantage of ovarian samples made available through an unusual episode of human-wildlife conflict to identify genes that are important in this process. Specifically, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to compare genome-wide gene expression patterns in the ovarian tissue of juvenile and adult female baboons from Amboseli National Park, Kenya. We combined this information with prior evidence of selection occurring on two primate lineages (human and chimpanzee). We found that in cases in which genes were both differentially expressed over the course of ovarian maturation and also linked to lineage-specific selection this selective signature was much more likely to occur in regulatory regions than in coding regions. These results suggest that adaptive change in the development of the primate ovary may be largely driven at the mechanistic level by selection on gene regulation, potentially in relationship to the physiology or timing of female reproductive maturation. PMID:22155733

  3. The LSD1 inhibitor RN-1 recapitulates the fetal pattern of hemoglobin synthesis in baboons (P. anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Angela; Vaitkus, Kestis; Ibanez, Vinzon; Ruiz, Maria Armila; Jagadeeswaran, Ramasamy; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Cui, Shuaiying; Engel, James D; DeSimone, Joseph; Lavelle, Donald

    2016-06-01

    Increased fetal hemoglobin levels lessen the severity of symptoms and increase the lifespan of patients with sickle cell disease. Hydroxyurea, the only drug currently approved for the treatment of sickle cell disease, is not effective in a large proportion of patients and therefore new pharmacological agents that increase fetal hemoglobin levels have long been sought. Recent studies identifying LSD-1 as a repressor of γ-globin expression led to experiments demonstrating that the LSD-1 inhibitor RN-1 increased γ-globin expression in the sickle cell mouse model. Because the arrangement and developmental stage-specific expression pattern of the β-like globin genes is highly conserved between man and baboon, the baboon model remains the best predictor of activity of fetal hemoglobin-inducing agents in man. In this report, we demonstrate that RN-1 increases γ-globin synthesis, fetal hemoglobin, and F cells to high levels in both anemic and non-anemic baboons with activity comparable to decitabine, the most potent fetal hemoglobin-inducing agent known. RN-1 not only restores high levels of fetal hemoglobin but causes the individual 5' Iγ- and 3' Vγ-globin chains to be synthesized in the ratio characteristic of fetal development. Increased fetal hemoglobin was associated with increased levels of acetylated Histone H3, H3K4Me2, H3K4Me3, and RNA polymerase II at the γ-globin gene, and diminished γ-globin promoter DNA methylation. RN-1 is likely to induce clinically relevant levels of fetal hemoglobin in patients with sickle cell disease, although careful titration of the dose may be required to minimize myelotoxicity. PMID:26858356

  4. UniPron is A Fully Effective Non-hormonal Reversible Contraceptive in Baboon Model(Papio Anubis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jael A.Obiero; Maureen N.Mburu; Benson M.Ndung'u; Kenneth K.Waititu; Isaac Mulei; Idle O.Farah; Peter G.Mwethera

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety and efficacy of UniPron as a reversible contraceptive.Methods Vaginal swabs were obtained before and after UniPron administration.cultured onto appropriate culture media and bacteria identification was done based on type of media used,Gram stain reactions,colony morphology and biochemical tests.Vaginal biopsy tissues were processed using paraffin wax method,stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined under light microscopy to determine the effect of the product on vaginal tissues.The effect of UniPron on sperm was examined by mixing the product with electroejaculated spermatozoa in vitro at different concentrations.For efficacy studies,male baboons of proven fertility were mated with UniPron treated or untreated females of proven fertility during the fertile stages.Results All the five females(100%)that were treated with UniPron did not conceive and they regained total fertitity when the treatment was stopped while all the controls conceived.At a concentration of 40%,UniPron completely immobilized spermatozoa in an in-vitro system.UniPron mechanism of action was by lowering the vaginal pH and on application in baboon,the pH was lowered for at least 3 h after which it went back to normal.Conclusions As we plan for a study to test UniPron as a microbicide to prevent STIs including HIV,our current study has established that this novel product is effective in contraception and harmless to vaginal tissues and vaginal microbial flora in a baboon model(Papio anubis).

  5. Behavioral Effects and Pharmacokinetics of (±)-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) after Intragastric Administration to Baboons

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Amy K.; Mueller, Melanie; Shell, Courtney D.; Ricaurte, George A.; Ator, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    (±)-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “Ecstasy”) is a popular drug of abuse. We aimed to characterize the behavioral effects of intragastric MDMA in a species closely related to humans and to relate behavioral effects to plasma MDMA and metabolite concentrations. Single doses of MDMA (0.32–7.8 mg/kg) were administered via an intragastric catheter to adult male baboons (N = 4). Effects of MDMA on food-maintained responding were assessed over a 20-hour period, whereas untrained behaviors...

  6. Susceptibility of pine stands to bark stripping by chacma Papio ursinus baboons in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    C.A.T. KATSVANGA, L. JIMU, J.F. MUPANGWA, D. ZINNER

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the susceptibility, intensity and distribution of pine trees to bark stripping by chacma baboons Papio ursinus in three plantations in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe. The number of plots/ha, stripped trees/plot and stripped trees/ha was recorded during the pre-rainy, rainy and post-rainy seasons from August 2006 to May 2007. During data collection, altitude, aspect, season and other site predictor variables (e.g., roads and fire traces, water points, ...

  7. Distribution of androgen receptor in microdissected brain areas of the female baboon (Papio cynocephalus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, R J; Roselli, C E; Resko, J A

    1988-03-29

    We measured androgen receptors in the brain and pituitary of 4 female baboons (Papio cynocephalus) by the in vitro binding of methyltrienolone (R1881) to cytosols from 17 brain subregions as well as anterior and posterior pituitaries. High levels of AR were detected in anterior (22.1 +/- 7.1 (S.E.M.) fmol/mg protein) and posterior pituitary (12.6 +/- 3.3 fmol/mg protein). In brain tissue, the highest androgen receptor levels were found in the infundibular nucleus/median eminence (9.4 +/- 2.3 fmol/mg protein), ventromedial nucleus (6.3 +/- 1.7 fmol/mg protein) and periventricular area (4.9 +/- 1.3 fmol/mg protein). Saturation analysis of anterior pituitary and brain tissue (pool of hypothalamic, preoptic area, amygdala and septum remaining after microdissection of brain nuclei) showed that [3H]R1881 binds to the androgen receptor with high specificity and affinity (Kd = 1.25 x 10(-10) M, 0.45 x 10(-10) M, in anterior pituitary and HPA cytosol, respectively). Serum testosterone levels were low in all animals (0.59 +/- 0.26 ng/ml). With these data we described the quantitative distribution of androgen receptor in the pituitary and in specific brain nuclei in a species of nonhuman primate. The distribution is similar in many respects to that described in the male rat and the data suggest a conservation of androgen receptor distribution across species. PMID:3259151

  8. Haplotypes in the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene cluster affect plasma lipids in both humans and baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qian-fei; Liu, Xin; O' Connell, Jeff; Peng, Ze; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rainwater, David L.; VandeBerg, John L.; Rubin, Edward M.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-15

    Genetic studies in non-human primates serve as a potential strategy for identifying genomic intervals where polymorphisms impact upon human disease-related phenotypes. It remains unclear, however, whether independently arising polymorphisms in orthologous regions of non-human primates leads to similar variation in a quantitative trait found in both species. To explore this paradigm, we studied a baboon apolipoprotein gene cluster (APOA1/C3/A4/A5) for which the human gene orthologs have well established roles in influencing plasma HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Our extensive polymorphism analysis of this 68 kb gene cluster in 96 pedigreed baboons identified several haplotype blocks each with limited diversity, consistent with haplotype findings in humans. To determine whether baboons, like humans, also have particular haplotypes associated with lipid phenotypes, we genotyped 634 well characterized baboons using 16 haplotype tagging SNPs. Genetic analysis of single SNPs, as well as haplotypes, revealed an association of APOA5 and APOC3 variants with HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, respectively. Thus, independent variation in orthologous genomic intervals does associate with similar quantitative lipid traits in both species, supporting the possibility of uncovering human QTL genes in a highly controlled non-human primate model.

  9. Contrast of Hand Preferences between Communicative Gestures and Non-Communicative Actions in Baboons: Implications for the Origins of Hemispheric Specialization for Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguerditchian, Adrien; Vauclair, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Gestural communication is a modality considered in the literature as a candidate for determining the ancestral prerequisites of the emergence of human language. As reported in captive chimpanzees and human children, a study in captive baboons revealed that a communicative gesture elicits stronger degree of right-hand bias than non-communicative…

  10. In vivo imaging of brain aromatase in female baboons: [11C]vorozole kinetics and effect of the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareto, Deborah; Biegon, Anat; Alexoff, David; Carter, Pauline; Shea, Coreen; Muench, Lisa; Xu, Youwen; Fowler, Joanna S; Kim, Sunny W; Logan, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the brain distribution of the enzyme aromatase in the female baboon with positron emission tomography and the tracer [11C]vorozole using three different quantification methods for estimating the total distribution volume (V(T)): a graphical method, compartment modeling, and a tissue to plasma ratio. The graphical model and the compartment modeling gave similar estimates to the data and similar values (correlation R  =  .988; p  =  .0001). [11C]Vorozole shows a rapid uptake by the brain followed by a relatively constant accumulation, suggesting the possibility of using the tissue to plasma ratio as an estimate of V(T). The highest uptake of [11C]vorozole in the baboon brain was measured in the amygdala, followed by the preoptic area and hypothalamus, basal ganglia, and cortical areas. Pretreatment studies with vorozole or letrozole showed a generalized decrease in brain accumulation and V(T). The results suggested that the physiologic changes in gonadal hormone levels accompanying the menstrual cycle had a significant effect on brain aromatase V(T).

  11. In vivo regulation of hepatic LDL receptor mRNA in the baboon. Differential effects of saturated and unsaturated fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J C; McGill, H C; Carey, K D; Getz, G S

    1987-05-25

    The effects of diets enriched with cholesterol and different fats upon plasma lipoproteins and hepatic low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mRNA levels were studied in a group of 18 normal baboons. Animals were fed diets containing 1% cholesterol and 25% fat as either coconut oil, peanut oil, or olive oil for a period of 20 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, beta-lipoprotein (LDL + very low density lipoprotein) cholesterol, apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein A-I were measured in samples obtained at 4-week intervals. All three diet groups demonstrated a statistically significant increase in plasma cholesterol as compared to base line throughout the experiment. Hepatic LDL receptor (LDL-R) mRNA levels were quantified by dot blot hybridization in serial liver biopsies. Animals fed saturated fat sustained a significant reduction in hepatic LDL-R mRNA as compared to those fed either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat. A strong negative correlation between LDL-R mRNA and plasma total cholesterol (r = -0.71), HDL cholesterol (r = -0.76), and plasma apo A-I (r = -0.77) was observed only in those animals fed coconut oil. Weak negative correlations between LDL-R mRNA and other plasma parameters did not achieve statistical significance. We conclude that saturated and unsaturated oils may influence plasma cholesterol levels in part through differential effects on LDL receptor biosynthesis in baboons.

  12. Particle deposition in a child respiratory tract model: in vivo regional deposition of fine and ultrafine aerosols in baboons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Albuquerque-Silva

    Full Text Available To relate exposure to adverse health effects, it is necessary to know where particles in the submicron range deposit in the respiratory tract. The possibly higher vulnerability of children requires specific inhalation studies. However, radio-aerosol deposition experiments involving children are rare because of ethical restrictions related to radiation exposure. Thus, an in vivo study was conducted using three baboons as a child respiratory tract model to assess regional deposition patterns (thoracic region vs. extrathoracic region of radioactive polydisperse aerosols ([d16-d84], equal to [0.15 µm-0.5 µm], [0.25 µm-1 µm], or [1 µm-9 µm]. Results clearly demonstrated that aerosol deposition within the thoracic region and the extrathoraic region varied substantially according to particle size. High deposition in the extrathoracic region was observed for the [1 µm-9 µm] aerosol (72% ± 17%. The [0.15 µm-0.5 µm] aerosol was associated almost exclusively with thoracic region deposition (84% ± 4%. Airborne particles in the range of [0.25 µm-1 µm] showed an intermediate deposition pattern, with 49% ± 8% in the extrathoracic region and 51% ± 8% in the thoracic region. Finally, comparison of baboon and human inhalation experiments for the [1 µm-9 µm] aerosol showed similar regional deposition, leading to the conclusion that regional deposition is species-independent for this airborne particle sizes.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatto)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Grover, GScott; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 {+-} 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 {+-} 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 {+-} 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  14. Gated blood pool SPECT and phase analysis to assess simulated Wolff-Parkingson-White syndrome in the baboon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assesses the diagnostic potential of a tomographic technique with phase analysis to detect premature electroventricular contraction patterns simulated by pacing in the baboon. The data of gated SPECT were analysed by backprojection of the Fourier coefficients, followed by angulation and integration to thick slices of the entire ventricular mass yielding separate ventricular contraction patterns in three perpendicular views. Electrodes were implanted in each baboon: at the sinu-atrial node; posterior, left ventricular; anterior left ventricular; on the left and the right lateral ventricular walls. The atrium was stimulated throughout at a fixed rate. Subsequent ventricular stimuli followed during the QRS complex, such to invoke the appearance of pre-excitation QRS morphology. The first points of activation (FPA) from this algorithm were correctly detected for the RV, for the anterior and posterior sites, although the latter two manifested first points in the RV. LV pacing manifested also as a FPA in the RV, but was followed by a true subsequent point in the LV. (orig.)

  15. Activation of the baboon fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis at midgestation by estrogen-induced changes in placental corticosteroid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepe, G.J.; Waddell, B.J.; Albrecht, E.D. (Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk (USA))

    1990-12-01

    We have hypothesized that the change in placental cortisol (F)-cortisone (E) metabolism induced by estrogen late in gestation is important to activation of the baboon fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, culminating in the ontogenesis of de novo F secretion by the fetal adrenal. The present study tested this hypothesis in vivo by comparing the proportion of F in the fetus derived via maternal and fetal production on day 100 (n = 7; term = day 184) and day 165 (n = 4) in untreated baboons and on day 100 in baboons (n = 9) in which 50-mg pellets of androstenedione were implanted sc in the mother in increasing numbers (i.e. two on day 70, four on day 78, six on day 86, and eight on day 94) to increase placental estrogen production. Maternal, uterine, and umbilical venous samples were collected during constant maternal infusion (120 min) of (3H)F/(14C)E, endogenous and radiolabeled F/E content was determined, and corticosteroid dynamics were quantified. The MCR and peripheral interconversion of F and E as well as the production rate of F were unaltered in the mother. However, at midgestation, androstenedione increased (P less than 0.05) estrogen by 62% and altered transuterofeto placental F-E metabolism from preferential reduction of E to preferential oxidation of F, a pattern similar to that at term. In untreated baboons, on day 100 none of the F in the fetus was due to fetal production, whereas by day 165, 49 +/- 6% was of fetal origin. In animals treated with androstenedione at midgestation, 22 +/- 4% of fetal F was derived de novo within the fetus. Thus, production of F by the fetus was negligible on day 100, increased near term in association with an increase in transplacental oxidation of F to E, and was induced at midgestation in baboons in which placental F-E metabolism was altered by an increase in estrogen production.

  16. Evaluation of 6-([{sup 18}F]fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide for PET imaging of histone deacetylase in the baboon brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Alicia E. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)], E-mail: areid@bnl.gov; Hooker, Jacob; Shumay, Elena; Logan, Jean; Shea, Colleen; Kim, Sung Won [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Collins, Shanika [School of Science, Health and Technology Medgar Evers College, Brooklyn, NY 11225 (United States); Xu Youwen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Volkow, Nora [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Introduction: Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes involved in epigenetic modifications that shift the balance toward chromatin condensation and silencing of gene expression. Here, we evaluate the utility of 6-([{sup 18}F]fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide ([{sup 18}F]FAHA) for positron emission tomography imaging of HDAC activity in the baboon brain. For this purpose, we assessed its in vivo biodistribution, sensitivity to HDAC inhibition, metabolic stability and the distribution of the putative metabolite [{sup 18}F]fluoroacetate ([{sup 18}F]FAC). Methods: [{sup 18}F]FAHA and its metabolite [{sup 18}F]FAC were prepared, and their in vivo biodistribution and pharmacokinetics were determined in baboons. [{sup 18}F]FAHA metabolism and its sensitivity to HDAC inhibition using suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) were assessed in arterial plasma and by in vitro incubation studies. The chemical form of F-18 in rodent brain was assessed by ex vivo studies. Distribution volumes for [{sup 18}F]FAHA in the brain were derived. Results: [{sup 18}F]FAHA was rapidly metabolized to [{sup 18}F]FAC, and both labeled compounds entered the brain. [{sup 18}F]FAHA exhibited regional differences in brain uptake and kinetics. In contrast, [{sup 18}F]FAC showed little variation in regional brain uptake and kinetics. A kinetic analysis that takes into account the uptake of peripherally produced [{sup 18}F]FAC indicated that SAHA inhibited binding of [{sup 18}F]FAHA in the baboon brain dose-dependently. In vitro studies demonstrated SAHA-sensitive metabolism of [{sup 18}F]FAHA to [{sup 18}F]FAC within the cell and diffusion of [{sup 18}F]FAC out of the cell. All radioactivity in brain homogenate from rodents was [{sup 18}F]FAC at 7 min postinjection of [{sup 18}F]FAHA. Conclusion: The rapid metabolism of [{sup 18}F]FAHA to [{sup 18}F]FAC in the periphery complicates the quantitative analysis of HDAC in the brain. However, dose-dependent blocking studies with SAHA and kinetic modeling

  17. Evaluation of 6-([18F]fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide for PET imaging of histone deacetylase in the baboon brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes involved in epigenetic modifications that shift the balance toward chromatin condensation and silencing of gene expression. Here, we evaluate the utility of 6-([18F]fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide ([18F]FAHA) for positron emission tomography imaging of HDAC activity in the baboon brain. For this purpose, we assessed its in vivo biodistribution, sensitivity to HDAC inhibition, metabolic stability and the distribution of the putative metabolite [18F]fluoroacetate ([18F]FAC). Methods: [18F]FAHA and its metabolite [18F]FAC were prepared, and their in vivo biodistribution and pharmacokinetics were determined in baboons. [18F]FAHA metabolism and its sensitivity to HDAC inhibition using suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) were assessed in arterial plasma and by in vitro incubation studies. The chemical form of F-18 in rodent brain was assessed by ex vivo studies. Distribution volumes for [18F]FAHA in the brain were derived. Results: [18F]FAHA was rapidly metabolized to [18F]FAC, and both labeled compounds entered the brain. [18F]FAHA exhibited regional differences in brain uptake and kinetics. In contrast, [18F]FAC showed little variation in regional brain uptake and kinetics. A kinetic analysis that takes into account the uptake of peripherally produced [18F]FAC indicated that SAHA inhibited binding of [18F]FAHA in the baboon brain dose-dependently. In vitro studies demonstrated SAHA-sensitive metabolism of [18F]FAHA to [18F]FAC within the cell and diffusion of [18F]FAC out of the cell. All radioactivity in brain homogenate from rodents was [18F]FAC at 7 min postinjection of [18F]FAHA. Conclusion: The rapid metabolism of [18F]FAHA to [18F]FAC in the periphery complicates the quantitative analysis of HDAC in the brain. However, dose-dependent blocking studies with SAHA and kinetic modeling indicated that a specific interaction of [18F]FAHA in the brain was observed. Validating the nature of this interaction as HDAC

  18. A cocktail of humanized anti-pertussis toxin antibodies limits disease in murine and baboon models of whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Annalee W; Wagner, Ellen K; Laber, Joshua R; Goodfield, Laura L; Smallridge, William E; Harvill, Eric T; Papin, James F; Wolf, Roman F; Padlan, Eduardo A; Bristol, Andy; Kaleko, Michael; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread vaccination, pertussis rates are rising in industrialized countries and remain high worldwide. With no specific therapeutics to treat disease, pertussis continues to cause considerable infant morbidity and mortality. The pertussis toxin is a major contributor to disease, responsible for local and systemic effects including leukocytosis and immunosuppression. We humanized two murine monoclonal antibodies that neutralize pertussis toxin and expressed them as human immunoglobulin G1 molecules with no loss of affinity or in vitro neutralization activity. When administered prophylactically to mice as a binary cocktail, antibody treatment completely mitigated the Bordetella pertussis-induced rise in white blood cell counts and decreased bacterial colonization. When administered therapeutically to baboons, antibody-treated, but not untreated control animals, experienced a blunted rise in white blood cell counts and accelerated bacterial clearance rates. These preliminary findings support further investigation into the use of these antibodies to treat human neonatal pertussis in conjunction with antibiotics and supportive care.

  19. Study of brain uptake of etorphine, in vivo in the Baboon Papio-Papio, by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study in vivo opiate receptors in brain, etorphine, a morphine-like drug was labelled with 11C. Etorphine possesses an extremely high affinity for specific opiate binding sites. It passes easily through the blood-brain barrier. The brain pharmacokinetics of 11C-etorphine was studied in vivo in the Baboon Papio-Papio, by positron emission tomography. 11C-etorphine concentration reached its maximum two minutes after intravenous injection and then decreased rapidly. In some experiments, cyprenorphine, a morphine antagonist, was injected subsequently in order to study the displacement of the radioactive ligand from brain structures. Hepato-biliary and blood pharmacokinetics of 11C-etorphine were also studied

  20. Baboons' hand preference resists to spatial factors for a communicative gesture but not for a simple manipulative action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourjade, Marie; Meunier, Hélène; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Vauclair, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    Olive baboons (Papio anubis) do acquire and use intentional requesting gestures in experimental contexts. Individual's hand preference for these gestures is consistent with that observed for typical communicative gestures, but not for manipulative actions. Here, we examine whether the strength of hand preference may also be a good marker of hemispheric specialization for communicative gestures, hence differing from the strength of hand preference for manipulative actions. We compared the consistency of individuals' hand preference with regard to the variation in space of either (i) a communicative partner or (ii) a food item to grasp using a controlled set-up. We report more consistent hand preference for communicative gestures than for grasping actions. Established hand preference in the midline was stronger for gesturing than for grasping and allowed to predict the consistency of hand preference across positions. We found no significant relation between the direction of hand preference and the task.

  1. Behavioral effects and pharmacokinetics of (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) after intragastric administration to baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Amy K; Mueller, Melanie; Shell, Courtney D; Ricaurte, George A; Ator, Nancy A

    2013-06-01

    (±)-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is a popular drug of abuse. We aimed to characterize the behavioral effects of intragastric MDMA in a species closely related to humans and to relate behavioral effects to plasma MDMA and metabolite concentrations. Single doses of MDMA (0.32-7.8 mg/kg) were administered via an intragastric catheter to adult male baboons (N = 4). Effects of MDMA on food-maintained responding were assessed over a 20-hour period, whereas untrained behaviors and fine-motor coordination were characterized every 30 minutes until 3 hours postadministration. Levels of MDMA and metabolites in plasma were measured in the same animals (n = 3) after dosing on a separate occasion. MDMA decreased food-maintained responding over the 20-hour period, and systematic behavioral observations revealed increased frequency of bruxism as the dose of MDMA was increased. Drug blood level determinations showed no MDMA after the lower doses of MDMA tested (0.32-1.0 mg/kg) and modest levels after higher MDMA doses (3.2-7.8 mg/kg). High levels of 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (HHMA) were detected after all doses of MDMA, suggesting extensive first-pass metabolism of MDMA in the baboon. The present results demonstrate that MDMA administered via an intragastric catheter produced behavioral effects that have also been reported in humans. Similar to humans, blood levels of MDMA after oral administration may not be predictive of the behavioral effects of MDMA. Metabolites, particularly HHMA, may play a significant role in the behavioral effects of MDMA.

  2. The influence of long chain polyunsaturate supplementation on docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid in baboon neonate central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkadi-Nagy Eszter A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA are major components of the cerebral cortex and visual system, where they play a critical role in neural development. We quantitatively mapped fatty acids in 26 regions of the four-week-old breastfed baboon CNS, and studied the influence of dietary DHA and ARA supplementation and prematurity on CNS DHA and ARA concentrations. Methods Baboons were randomized into a breastfed (B and four formula-fed groups: term, no DHA/ARA (T-; term, DHA/ARA supplemented (T+; preterm, no DHA/ARA (P-; preterm and DHA/ARA supplemented (P+. At four weeks adjusted age, brains were dissected and total fatty acids analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Results DHA and ARA are rich in many more structures than previously reported. They are most concentrated in structures local to the brain stem and diencephalon, particularly the basal ganglia, limbic regions, thalamus and midbrain, and comparatively lower in white matter. Dietary supplementation increased DHA in all structures but had little influence on ARA concentrations. Supplementation restored DHA concentrations to levels of breastfed neonates in all regions except the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Prematurity per se did not exert a strong influence on DHA or ARA concentrations. Conclusion 1 DHA and ARA are found in high concentration throughout the primate CNS, particularly in gray matter such as basal ganglia; 2 DHA concentrations drop across most CNS structures in neonates consuming formulas with no DHA, but ARA levels are relatively immune to ARA in the diet; 3 supplementation of infant formula is effective at restoring DHA concentration in structures other than the cerebral cortex. These results will be useful as a guide to future investigations of CNS function in the absence of dietary DHA and ARA.

  3. Parasitological, Hematological and Biochemical Characteristics of a Model of Hyper-microfilariaemic Loiasis (Loa loa in the Baboon (Papio anubis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Wanji

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Loiasis, a filarial infection caused by Loa loa usually thought to cause relatively minor morbidity, can cause serious and often fatal reactions in patients carrying very high levels of circulating Loa loa microfilariae (mf following administration of microfilaricidal drugs. An experimental model of this condition would greatly aid the definition of the optimal management of this important clinical presentation.Fifteen baboons (Papio anubis were infected with 600 infective larvae (L3 isolated from Chrysops vector flies. Animals were observed for any clinical changes; blood samples were collected every 1-2 months for 22 months, and analysed for parasitological, hematological and biochemical profiles using standard techniques. All animals became patent but remained clinically normal throughout the study. The parasitological pre-patent period was between 4-8 months, with a majority (60% of animals becoming patent by 5 months post infection (MPI; all animals were patent by 8 MPI. Microfilarial loads increased steadily in all animals and reached a peak at 18 MPI. By 10 MPI >70% of animals had mf >8,000 mf/mL, and at 18 MPI >70% of animals had mf >30,000 mf/mL with 50% of these animals with mf >50,000 mf/mL. Absolute eosinophil, creatinine, Ca2+ and K+ levels were generally above normal values (NV. Positive associations were seen between microfilariaemia and eosinophilia, Hb, Ca2+, and gamma-GT values, whilst significant negative associations were seen between microfilariaemia and potassium, glucose and mononuclear leukocyte levels.Infection of splenectomised baboons with L. loa can induce levels of circulating microfilariae, and corresponding haematological profiles, which parallel those seen in those humans in danger of the severe post-microfilariacide clinical responses. Utilization of this experimental model could contribute to the improved management of the loiasis related adverse responses in humans.

  4. Antibody to E- and L-selectin does not prevent lung injury or mortality in septic baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraway, M S; Welty-Wolf, K E; Kantrow, S P; Huang, Y C; Simonson, S G; Que, L G; Kishimoto, T K; Piantadosi, C A

    1998-03-01

    Recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) through upregulation of cellular adhesion molecules is a proposed mechanism of injury in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that pretreatment of baboons with a monoclonal antibody to human E- and L-selectin (EL-246) during sepsis would decrease PMN influx into tissues and result in less organ injury during gram-negative sepsis. We studied 14 anesthetized, ventilated adult baboons; six animals received 1 mg/kg of EL-246 before infusion of an LD100 of live Escherichia coli and six received the E. coli infusion without antibody therapy. Two other animals received 1 mg/kg of EL-246 intravenously without an infusion of bacteria. Intermittent measurements were made of circulatory pressures, cardiac output, urine output, arterial blood gases, ventilation:perfusion ratio (VA/Q), and hematologic status. The experiments were ended at 48 h or at the time of death. Tissues were harvested for pathology and biochemical measurements. The E. coli infusions were associated with a hyperdynamic state, pulmonary hypertension, systemic hypotension, decreased urine output (UOP), and metabolic acidosis. The antibody partly blocked PMN migration, but there were few significant physiologic or biochemical differences between the EL-246-treated and untreated animals. In the antibody-treated animals, UOP was decreased, metabolic acidosis was worsened, and median survival time was decreased significantly. We conclude that treatment with an antibody to E- and L-selectin in gram-negative sepsis does not improve gas exchange or protect against lung injury, and is associated with decreased survival time in primates.

  5. Susceptibility of pine stands to bark stripping by chacma Papio ursinus baboons in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A.T. KATSVANGA, L. JIMU, J.F. MUPANGWA, D. ZINNER

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the susceptibility, intensity and distribution of pine trees to bark stripping by chacma baboons Papio ursinus in three plantations in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe. The number of plots/ha, stripped trees/plot and stripped trees/ha was recorded during the pre-rainy, rainy and post-rainy seasons from August 2006 to May 2007. During data collection, altitude, aspect, season and other site predictor variables (e.g., roads and fire traces, water points, indigenous vegetation conservation areas, crop fields, human settlements, wattle scrubs, rocky areas, open grasslands, earlier stripped sites and roost sites were recorded for each plot in association with selected predictor variables within plantation estates. Data on the number of stripped plots/ha, stripped trees/plot and stripped trees/ha were analysed as dependent variables using the Generalised Linear Model (GLM through SPSS version 15 (2006 to determine which predictor variables were significantly related to bark stripping. Differences between means were tested using Bonferroni tests with a 5% level of significance. Our findings show that bark stripping of pine trees by baboons occurred at all altitudes and aspects. Overall, the number of bark stripped trees/ha did not significantly vary by season. The number of bark stripped plots/ha was lower during the pre-rainy season than the rainy season, whereas the number of bark stripped trees/plot was higher during the pre-rainy than the rainy season. Bark stripping of pines occurred more often in the vicinities of areas with abundant food and water [Current Zoology 55 (6: 389 –395, 2009].

  6. Investigation of the retention and distribution of americium-241 in the baboon and the enhanced removal of americium-241 from the body by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed to study the metabolism and distribution of intravenously administered 241Am in the adult and juvenile baboon; in addition, decorporation therapy using Na3-CaDTPA was performed on selected baboons to assess the efficacy of this drug in removing systemic burdens of 241Am from this primate species. Determination of the kinetics of 241Am was accomplished principally by in vivo methodologies and by radiochemical analysis of 241Am activity of biological material. The use of Na3-CaDTPA as a therapeutic agent for the removal of 241Am from the body proved to be an effective form of treatment in the case of early administration. (U.S.)

  7. Genetic variations in the beta-tubulin gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 region of Trichuris species from man and baboons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina Vicky Alstrup; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Olsen, Annette;

    2013-01-01

    The whipworm Trichuris trichiura has been estimated to infect 604 -- 795 million people worldwide. The current control strategy against trichuriasis using the benzimidazoles (BZs) albendazole (400 mg) or mebendazole (500 mg) as single-dose treatment is not satisfactory. The occurrence of single...... of this study was to investigate whether these SNPs were present in the beta-tubulin gene of Trichuris spp. from humans and baboons. As a secondary objective, the degree of identity between T. trichiura from humans and Trichuris spp. from baboons was evaluated based on the beta-tubulin gene and the internal...... nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in codons 167, 198 or 200 of the beta-tubulin gene has been reported to convey BZ-resistance in intestinal nematodes of veterinary importance. It was hypothesised that the low susceptibility of T. trichiura to BZ could be due to a natural occurrence of such SNPs. The aim...

  8. Pancreatic islet amyloidosis, β-cell apoptosis, and α-cell proliferation are determinants of islet remodeling in type-2 diabetic baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardado-Mendoza, Rodolfo; Davalli, Alberto M.; Chavez, Alberto O.; Hubbard, Gene B.; Dick, Edward J.; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Tene-Perez, Carlos E.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Hart, John; Perego, Carla; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Tejero, Maria Elizabeth; Finzi, Giovanna; Placidi, Claudia; La Rosa, Stefano; Capella, Carlo; Halff, Glenn; Gastaldelli, Amalia; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Folli, Franco

    2009-01-01

    β-Cell dysfunction is an important factor in the development of hyperglycemia of type-2 diabetes mellitus, and pancreatic islet amyloidosis (IA) has been postulated to be one of the main contributors to impaired insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of IA with metabolic parameters and its effect on islets of Langerhans remodeling and relative endocrine-cell volume in baboons. We sequenced the amylin peptide, determined the fibrillogenic propensities, and evaluated pancreatic histology, clinical and biochemical characteristics, and endocrine cell proliferation and apoptosis in 150 baboons with different metabolic status. Amylin sequence in the baboon was 92% similar to humans and showed superimposable fibrillogenic propensities. IA severity correlated with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (r = 0.662, P < 0.001) and HbA1c (r = 0.726, P < 0.001), as well as with free fatty acid, glucagon values, decreased homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) insulin resistance, and HOMA-B. IA severity was associated with a decreased relative β-cell volume, and increased relative α-cell volume and hyperglucagonemia. These results strongly support the concept that IA and β-cell apoptosis in concert with α-cell proliferation and hypertrophy are key determinants of islets of Langerhans “dysfunctional remodeling” and hyperglycemia in the baboon, a nonhuman primate model of type-2 diabetes mellitus. The most important determinants of IA were age and FPG (R2 = 0.519, P < 0.0001), and different FPG levels were sensitive and specific to predict IA severity. Finally, a predictive model for islet amyloid severity was generated with age and FPG as required variables. PMID:19666551

  9. Clinical manifestation and aetiology of a genital associated disease in Olive baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis) at Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Knauf, Sascha

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate a genitally associated disease and to describe its clinical manifestation and aetiology in baboons at Lake Manyara National Park in the United Republic of Tanzania. Lake Manyara National Park is located in the northern part of the country, 160 km northwest of the Mt. Kilimanjaro. It is among the smallest protected areas, but belongs to the extended ecosystem of the Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara and Tarangire National Park. The...

  10. The influence of baboon predation and time in water on germination and early establishment of Opuntia stricta (Australian pest pear in the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.D. Lotter

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The alien invader weed, Opuntia stricta Haw (family Cactaceae, is seriously threatening biodiversity in veld habitats of the Kruger National Park. Basic biological and ecological information on the establishment, growth and reproduction of the species is necessary for the development of effective strategies for its control. The rapid spread of the plant is apparently mainly due to seed dispersal by baboon (Papio ursinus. Sixty percent of seed taken from baboon faeces resulted in seedlings that established. Although palatability criteria for ripe fruit were more favourable than for unripe or medium-ripe fruit, seed from fruit at all three degrees of ripeness germinated equally well, and seedling establishment was similar. Despite their lower acidity, as well as higher total soluble sugar content and pH, cladodes are not subject to herbivory to near the extent that ripe fruit are. Freshly collected seed kept in Sabie River water showed significantly better germination/emergence after seven days submersion (83 than at 14 or 28 days (52 and 66 , respectively. Results suggest that seed dispersal of the species by animals, principally baboon, is an important cause of rapidly expanding infestations, and that dissipation in water will intensify the problem. Current findings should contribute toward the development of long-term weed management strategies aimed at con- tainment/eradication of the weed.

  11. Differential regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 and -2 by insulin in the baboon (Papio anubis endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazleabas Asgerally T

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of insulin on expression and synthesis of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 in the baboon endometrium in vitro. Methods Baboon endometrial explants collected from cycling, ovariectomized, steroid-treated, simulated-pregnant and pregnant animals were cultured for 48 h in the presence or absence of insulin, with or without estradiol, progesterone and hCG. Results Insulin clearly inhibited IGFBP-1 production and mRNA expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas IGFBP-2 synthesis was not significantly affected. The inhibitory effects of insulin on IGFBP-1 were more evident in explants of non-pregnant tissue or tissue away from the implantation site. In the absence of insulin, synthesis of IGFBP-1 was induced in explants with low levels of de novo synthesis whereas IGFBP-2 synthesis was inhibited. This effect was potentiated by steroids and hCG in the explant cultures. Conclusion Insulin differentially regulates endometrial IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 secretion in the baboon.

  12. [{sup 11}C]d-threo-Methylphenidate, a new radiotracer for the dopamine transporter. Characterization in baboon and human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    dl-threo Methylphenidate (MP, Ritalin) is a psychostimulant drug which binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT). We evaluated [{sup 11}C]d-threo-methylphenidate ([{sup 11}C]d-MP), the more active enantiomer, as a radiotracer for the DAT in baboons and human brain. Stereoselectivity, saturability and pharmacological specificity and reproducibility were examined. Stereoselectivity was examined in baboons by comparing [{sup 11C}]d-MP,[{sup 11}C]l-MP and [{sup 11}C]dl-MP. Unlabeled MP was used to assess the reversibility and saturability of the binding. GBR 12909,{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester ({beta}-CIT), tomoxetine and citalopram were used to assess the specificity of the binding. The ratios between the radioactivity in the striatum to that in cerebellum (ST/CB) were 3.3,2.2 and 1.1 for [{sup 11}C]d-MP,[{sup 11}C]dl-MP and [{sup 11}C]l-MP respectively. Most of the striatal binding of [{sup 11}C]d-threo-MP was displaced by injection of nonradioactive MP demonstrating reversibility. Pretreatment with MP (0.5 mg/kg), GBR12909 (1.5 mg/kg) or {beta}-CIT (0.3 mg/kg) reduced ST/CB by about 60% and the ratios of distribution volumes at the steady-state for the triatum to cerebellum (DV{sub st/}DV{sub cb}) by about 50%. Pretreatment with tomoxetine (3.0 mg/kg) or citalopram (2.0 mg/kg), inhibitors of the norepinephrine and serotonin transporter, had no effect. Studies of [{sup 11}C]d-MP in the human brain showed highest uptake in basal ganglia with a half clearance time of about 60 minutes. Repeated studies in 6 normal human subjects showed differences in DV{sub st/}DV{sub cb} between -7% and 8%. MP pretreatment decreased BG but no cortical or cerebellar binding and reduced Bmax/Kd by 91%.

  13. Protective Effects of Resveratrol on TNF-α-Induced Endothelial Cytotoxicity in Baboon Femoral Arterial Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial injury induced by inflammatory factors plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial cell (EC apoptosis, proliferation, migration, and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM expression contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of resveratrol (0.1–100 μM on the proliferation, migration, and CAM expression of primary cultures of baboon arterial endothelial cells (BAECs. In addition, we tested its effects under normal conditions as well as under inflammatory conditions induced by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α administered either by cotreatment, pretreatment, or posttreatment. Immunocytochemistry, MTT, wound-healing, and flow cytometry assays were performed. The resveratrol treatment significantly enhanced BAEC proliferation and attenuated TNF-α-induced impairment of proliferation at the optimal doses of 1–50 µM. Resveratrol at a high dose (100 μM and TNF-α impaired BAEC migration, while low doses of resveratrol (1–50 μM attenuated TNF-α-induced impairment of BAEC migration. Moreover, resveratrol inhibited TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that the resveratrol protects BAECs after inflammatory stimulation as well as ameliorates inflammatory effects at low concentrations. Consequently, resveratrol should be considered as a candidate drug for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory vascular diseases.

  14. Acoustic correlates of caller identity and affect intensity in the vowel-like grunt vocalizations of baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendall, Drew

    2003-06-01

    Comparative, production-based research on animal vocalizations can allow assessments of continuity in vocal communication processes across species, including humans, and may aid in the development of general frameworks relating specific constitutional attributes of callers to acoustic-structural details of their vocal output. Analyses were undertaken on vowel-like baboon grunts to examine variation attributable to caller identity and the intensity of the affective state underlying call production. Six hundred six grunts from eight adult females were analyzed. Grunts derived from 128 bouts of calling in two behavioral contexts: concerted group movements and social interactions involving mothers and their young infants. Each context was subdivided into a high- and low-arousal condition. Thirteen acoustic features variously predicted to reflect variation in either caller identity or arousal intensity were measured for each grunt bout, including tempo-, source- and filter-related features. Grunt bouts were highly individually distinctive, differing in a variety of acoustic dimensions but with some indication that filter-related features contributed disproportionately to individual distinctiveness. In contrast, variation according to arousal condition was associated primarily with tempo- and source-related features, many matching those identified as vehicles of affect expression in other nonhuman primate species and in human speech and other nonverbal vocal signals.

  15. Mapping primary gyrogenesis during fetal development in primate brains: high-resolution in utero structural MRI study of fetal brain development in pregnant baboons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kochunov

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The global and regional changes in the fetal cerebral cortex in primates were mapped during primary gyrification (PG; weeks 17-25 of 26 weeks total gestation. Studying pregnant baboons using high-resolution MRI in utero, measurements included cerebral volume, cortical surface area, gyrification index and length and depth of ten primary cortical sulci. Seven normally developing fetuses were imaged in two animals longitudinally and sequentially. We compared these results to those on PG that from the ferret studies and analyzed them in the context of our recent studies of phylogenetics of cerebral gyrification. We observed that in both primates and non-primates, the cerebrum undergoes a very rapid transformation into the gyrencephalic state, subsequently accompanied by an accelerated growth in brain volume and cortical surface area. However, PG trends in baboons exhibited some critical differences from those observed in ferrets. For example, in baboons, the growth along the long (length axis of cortical sulci was unrelated to the growth along the short (depth axis and far outpaced it. Additionally, the correlation between the rate of growth along the short sulcal axis and heritability of sulcal depth was negative and approached significance (r=-0.60;p<.10, while the same trend for long axis was positive and not significant (p=0.3;p=0.40. These findings, in an animal that shares a highly orchestrated pattern of PG with humans, suggest that ontogenic processes that influence changes in sulcal length and depth are diverse and possibly driven by different factors in primates than in non-primates.

  16. Eight week exposure to a high sugar high fat diet results in adiposity gain and alterations in metabolic biomarkers in baboons (Papio hamadryas sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejero M Elizabeth

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Baboons (Papio hamadryas Sp. develop features of the cardiometabolic syndrome and represent a clinically-relevant animal model in which to study the aetiology of the disorder. To further evaluate the baboon as a model for the study of the cardiometabolic syndrome, we developed a high sugar high fat diet and hypothesized that it could be used to induce adiposity gain and affect associated circulating biomarkers. Methods We developed a diet enriched with monosaccharides and saturated fatty acids that was composed of solid and liquid energy sources. We provided a group of baboons (n = 9 ad libitum access to this diet for 8 weeks. Concurrently, a control group (n = 6 was maintained with ad libitum access to a low sugar low fat baseline diet and normal water for 8 weeks. Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and circulating metabolic biomarkers were measured using standard methodology before and after the 8 week study period. Results Neither body composition nor circulating biomarkers changed in the control group. Following the 8 weeks, the intervention group had a significant increase in fat mass (1.71 ± 0.98 vs. 3.23 ± 1.70 kg, p = 0.004, triglyceride (55 ± 13 vs. 109 ± 67 mg/dL, p = 0.006,, and leptin (1.19 ± 1.40 vs. 3.29 ± 2.32 ng/mL, p = 0.001 and a decline in adiponectin concentrations (33530 ± 9744 vs. 23330 ± 7863 ng/mL, p = 0.002. Percentage haemoglobin A1C (4.0 ± 0.3 vs. 6.0 ± 1.4, p = 0.002 also increased in the intervention group. Conclusions Our findings indicate that when exposed to a high sugar high fat diet, young adult male baboons develop increased body fat and triglyceride concentrations, altered adipokine concentrations, and evidence of altered glucose metabolism. Our findings are in keeping with observations in humans and further demonstrate the potential utility of this highly clinically-relevant animal model for studying diet-induced metabolic dysregulation.

  17. D-Tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone as a protective agent against testicular damage caused by cyclophosphamide in baboons.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, R W; Dowling, K J; Schally, A V

    1985-01-01

    Possible protective effects of the agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH (the D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone) against testicular damage caused by cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) were investigated in subhuman primates. Three adult male baboons (Papio anubis) were first subjected to normal semen evaluation by using electroejaculation. The average baseline count for the animals ranged from 95.7 X 10(6) to 585.7 X 10(6) sperm per ml with 90% normal forms and 85% motility with excellent...

  18. Influence of infant and juvenile diets on serum cholesterol, lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein concentrations in juvenile baboons (Papio sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, G E; McMahan, C A; Kelley, J L; Farley, C M; McGill, H C

    1982-11-01

    The long-term effects of infant diet (breast milk or formula containing 2, 30, or 60 mg/dl cholesterol) and subsequent dietary cholesterol (1 mg/kcal) and fat (saturated or unsaturated) on serum lipid and apolipoprotein concentrations were estimated using 82 juvenile baboons 4-6 years of age. A significant interaction of infant diet (breast vs formula) with type of fat (saturated vs unsaturated) at 4-6 years of age was observed on HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) concentrations. That is, animals breast-fed as infants had higher HDL cholesterol and apoA-I concentrations when fed unsaturated fat from weaning to 4-6 years of age than those fed saturated fat (77 vs 68 mg/dl). In contrast, animals fed formulas in infancy followed by a diet containing unsaturated fat had lower HDL cholesterol and apoA-I concentrations at 4-6 years of age than did those fed saturated fat (67 vs 78 mg/dl). However, breast feeding or feeding formulas containing various levels of cholesterol for 3 months during infancy did not result in statistically significant differences in total serum cholesterol, VLDL + LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apoB) concentrations. Dietary cholesterol after infancy significantly increased serum total cholesterol, VLDL + LDL and HDL cholesterol, apoA-I and apoB concentrations. All of these response variables also were higher in animals fed saturated fat compared to those fed unsaturated fat on the same level of cholesterol. At 4-6 years of age, regardless of diet, females had significantly higher serum VLDL + LDL cholesterol (57 vs 43 mg/dl) and apoB concentrations (39 vs 30 mg/dl) than did males.

  19. Revisiting Biomarkers of Total-Body and Partial-Body Exposure in a Baboon Model of Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Marco; Denis, Josiane; Grenier, Nancy; Arvers, Philippe; Foucher, Barbara; Desangles, François; Martigne, Patrick; Chaussard, Hervé; Drouet, Michel; Abend, Michael; Hérodin, Francis

    2015-01-01

    In case of a mass casualty radiation event, there is a need to distinguish total-body irradiation (TBI) and partial-body irradiation (PBI) to concentrate overwhelmed medical resources to the individuals that would develop an acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and need hematologic support (i.e., mostly TBI victims). To improve the identification and medical care of TBI versus PBI individuals, reliable biomarkers of exposure could be very useful. To investigate this issue, pairs of baboons (n = 18) were exposed to different situations of TBI and PBI corresponding to an equivalent of either 5 Gy 60Co gamma irradiation (5 Gy TBI; 7.5 Gy left hemibody/2.5 right hemibody TBI; 5.55 Gy 90% PBI; 6.25 Gy 80% PBI; 10 Gy 50% PBI, 15 Gy 30% PBI) or 2.5 Gy (2.5 Gy TBI; 5 Gy 50% PBI). More than fifty parameters were evaluated before and after irradiation at several time points up to 200 days. A partial least square discriminant analysis showed a good distinction of TBI from PBI situations that were equivalent to 5 Gy. Furthermore, all the animals were pooled in two groups, TBI (n = 6) and PBI (n = 12), for comparison using a logistic regression and a non parametric statistical test. Nine plasmatic biochemical markers and most of hematological parameters turned out to discriminate between TBI and PBI animals during the prodromal phase and the manifest illness phase. The most significant biomarkers were aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactico dehydrogenase, urea, Flt3-ligand, iron, C-reactive protein, absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the early period, and Flt3-ligand, iron, platelet count, hemoglobin, monocyte count, absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the ARS phase. These results suggest that heterogeneity could be distinguished within a range of 2.5 to 5 Gy TBI.

  20. Revisiting Biomarkers of Total-Body and Partial-Body Exposure in a Baboon Model of Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Valente

    Full Text Available In case of a mass casualty radiation event, there is a need to distinguish total-body irradiation (TBI and partial-body irradiation (PBI to concentrate overwhelmed medical resources to the individuals that would develop an acute radiation syndrome (ARS and need hematologic support (i.e., mostly TBI victims. To improve the identification and medical care of TBI versus PBI individuals, reliable biomarkers of exposure could be very useful. To investigate this issue, pairs of baboons (n = 18 were exposed to different situations of TBI and PBI corresponding to an equivalent of either 5 Gy 60Co gamma irradiation (5 Gy TBI; 7.5 Gy left hemibody/2.5 right hemibody TBI; 5.55 Gy 90% PBI; 6.25 Gy 80% PBI; 10 Gy 50% PBI, 15 Gy 30% PBI or 2.5 Gy (2.5 Gy TBI; 5 Gy 50% PBI. More than fifty parameters were evaluated before and after irradiation at several time points up to 200 days. A partial least square discriminant analysis showed a good distinction of TBI from PBI situations that were equivalent to 5 Gy. Furthermore, all the animals were pooled in two groups, TBI (n = 6 and PBI (n = 12, for comparison using a logistic regression and a non parametric statistical test. Nine plasmatic biochemical markers and most of hematological parameters turned out to discriminate between TBI and PBI animals during the prodromal phase and the manifest illness phase. The most significant biomarkers were aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactico dehydrogenase, urea, Flt3-ligand, iron, C-reactive protein, absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the early period, and Flt3-ligand, iron, platelet count, hemoglobin, monocyte count, absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the ARS phase. These results suggest that heterogeneity could be distinguished within a range of 2.5 to 5 Gy TBI.

  1. Short-term effects of high-dose khat on sperm parameters and reproductive hormonal levels in olive baboons (Papio anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachieo, Atunga; Kiraithe, Muthamia M; Spiessens, Carl; Chai, Daniel C; Kiulia, Nicholas M; D'Hooghe, Thomas M; Mwenda, Jason M

    2013-01-01

    The biological effects of khat (Catha edulis) on reproduction and fertility are inadequately investigated and controversial, hence we determined the effects of oral administration of high-dose khat on sperm parameters and male hormonal levels in olive baboons. In this study, 6 male baboons received a high dose of khat (500 g/week) during 1 month. Electroejaculation for sperm studies (concentration, motility and chromatin integrity) and plasma collection for hormonal analysis (testosterone, prolactin and cortisol) were done weekly during 1 month before and 1 month during khat administration as well as 2 weeks after the last dose of khat administration. Administration of khat extract induced a significant reduction in sperm motility (p = 0.008), sperm count (p = 0.041), sperm chromatin integrity (p = 0.0003), testosterone levels (p = 0.035) and prolactin levels (p = 0.0115), but not in cortisol levels and sperm volume (p > 0.05). The results suggest that high-dose khat decreases sperm quality and testosterone and hence may contribute to male infertility. PMID:23235136

  2. Short-term effects of high-dose khat on sperm parameters and reproductive hormonal levels in olive baboons (Papio anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachieo, Atunga; Kiraithe, Muthamia M; Spiessens, Carl; Chai, Daniel C; Kiulia, Nicholas M; D'Hooghe, Thomas M; Mwenda, Jason M

    2013-01-01

    The biological effects of khat (Catha edulis) on reproduction and fertility are inadequately investigated and controversial, hence we determined the effects of oral administration of high-dose khat on sperm parameters and male hormonal levels in olive baboons. In this study, 6 male baboons received a high dose of khat (500 g/week) during 1 month. Electroejaculation for sperm studies (concentration, motility and chromatin integrity) and plasma collection for hormonal analysis (testosterone, prolactin and cortisol) were done weekly during 1 month before and 1 month during khat administration as well as 2 weeks after the last dose of khat administration. Administration of khat extract induced a significant reduction in sperm motility (p = 0.008), sperm count (p = 0.041), sperm chromatin integrity (p = 0.0003), testosterone levels (p = 0.035) and prolactin levels (p = 0.0115), but not in cortisol levels and sperm volume (p > 0.05). The results suggest that high-dose khat decreases sperm quality and testosterone and hence may contribute to male infertility.

  3. Centre-embedded structures are a by-product of associative learning and working memory constraints: evidence from baboons (Papio Papio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Arnaud; Perruchet, Pierre; Fagot, Joël

    2012-04-01

    Influential theories have claimed that the ability for recursion forms the computational core of human language faculty distinguishing our communication system from that of other animals (Hauser, Chomsky, & Fitch, 2002). In the present study, we consider an alternative view on recursion by studying the contribution of associative and working memory processes. After an intensive paired-associate training with visual shapes, we observed that baboons spontaneously ordered their responses in keeping with a recursive, centre-embedded structure. This result suggests that the human ability for recursion might partly if not entirely originate from fundamental processing constraints already present in nonhuman primates and that the critical distinction between animal communication and human language should more likely be found in working memory capacities than in an ability to produce recursive structures per se. PMID:22225966

  4. Centre-embedded structures are a by-product of associative learning and working memory constraints: evidence from baboons (Papio Papio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Arnaud; Perruchet, Pierre; Fagot, Joël

    2012-04-01

    Influential theories have claimed that the ability for recursion forms the computational core of human language faculty distinguishing our communication system from that of other animals (Hauser, Chomsky, & Fitch, 2002). In the present study, we consider an alternative view on recursion by studying the contribution of associative and working memory processes. After an intensive paired-associate training with visual shapes, we observed that baboons spontaneously ordered their responses in keeping with a recursive, centre-embedded structure. This result suggests that the human ability for recursion might partly if not entirely originate from fundamental processing constraints already present in nonhuman primates and that the critical distinction between animal communication and human language should more likely be found in working memory capacities than in an ability to produce recursive structures per se.

  5. Influence of initial lung deposit on absorption parameters of Pu and am: application to (U, Pu)O2 powder after inhalation in the baboon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: In cases of contamination by inhalation, risk assessment would be performed taking into account recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Human Respiratory Tract Model (H.R.T.M.) described in Publication 66 (ICRP 66, 1994). The use of absorption parameter values specific to each component is recommended when available for dose calculation in order to provide a more realistic assessment of risk. The solubility of Pu and Am deposited in the respiratory tract after inhalation is a relevant parameter that can aid the identification of target organs. The aim of this study is to show the influence of the initial lung deposit (I.L.D.) on absorption parameters after inhalation of Mixed oxides (Mox) powder (7.14 % Pu w/w) in baboons. Daily urinary excretion of Pu/Am was measured for 3 months which allowed the estimation of the removal of the soluble fraction from lungs to blood and in particular a proportion of absorption parameters. Urinary excretion on 3 -month period were represented by biphasic curves which were directly reliable to physicochemical properties of compounds. Males baboon were exposed to I.L.D.: 40 to 860 kBq. Results obtained show that urinary excretions progress in the reverse order of I.L.D. Moreover, significant differences in the behaviour of Pu and Am were also observed in the target organs (liver and skeleton) and especially Am was more soluble than Pu for the compound studied. So, hypothesis of a more important dissolution of Am compare to Pu combines to a special affinity of Am for target organs seem to be involve. This result was very important in case of dismantling operation mainly in the usury of fuel since 241 Am is a filiation product of 241 Pu. In conclusion, this work contributes to support the usefulness of experimental data in radioprotection to estimate level of radiological exposition of worker. (authors)

  6. Patterns of gastro-intestinal parasites and commensals as an index of population and ecosystem health: the case of sympatric western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and guinea baboons (Papio hamadryas papio) at Fongoli, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Michaela E; Pruetz, Jill; Gillespie, Thomas R

    2011-02-01

    The exponential decline of great apes over the past 50 years has resulted in an urgent need for data to inform population viability assessment and conservation strategies. Health monitoring of remaining ape populations is an important component of this process. In support of this effort, we examined endoparasitic and commensal prevalence and richness as proxies of population health for western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and sympatric guinea baboons (Papio hamadryas papio) at Fongoli, Senegal, a site dominated by woodland-savanna at the northwestern extent of chimpanzees' geographic range. The small population size and extreme environmental pressures experienced by Fongoli chimpanzees make them particularly sensitive to the potential impact of pathogens. One hundred thirty-two chimpanzee and seventeen baboon fecal samples were processed using sodium nitrate floatation and fecal sedimentation to isolate helminth eggs, larvae, and protozoal cysts. Six nematodes (Physaloptera sp., Ascaris sp., Stronglyloides fuelleborni, Trichuris sp., an unidentified hookworm, and an unidentified larvated nematode), one cestode (Bertiella sp.), and five protozoans (Iodamoeba buetschlii, Entamoeba coli, Troglodytella abrassarti, Troglocorys cava, and an unidentified ciliate) were detected in chimpanzee fecal samples. Four nematodes (Necator sp., S. fuelleborni, Trichuris sp., and an unidentified hookworm sp.), two trematodes (Shistosoma mansoni and an unidentified fluke), and six protozoans (Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, E. coli, Chilomastix mesnili, Balantidium coli, T. abrassarti, and T. cava) were detected in baboon fecal samples. The low prevalence of pathogenic parasite species and high prevalence of symbiotic protozoa in Fongoli chimpanzees are indicative of good overall population health. However, the high prevalence of pathogenic parasites in baboons, who may serve as transport hosts, highlight the need for ongoing pathogen surveillance of the Fongoli chimpanzee

  7. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  8. Schumpeter's Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    reworking of his basic theory of economic evolution in Development from 1934, and this reworking was continued in Cycles from 1939. Here Schumpeter also tried to handle the statistical and historical evidence on the waveform evolution of the capitalist economy. Capitalism from 1942 modified the model...... originally developed his evolutionary research programme in Wesen from 1908 by studying the inherent limitations of Neoclassical Economics. He presented core results on economic evolution and sketched an extension evolutionary analysis to all social sciences in Entwicklung from 1912. He made a partial...... of economic evolution and added evolutionary contributions to other social sciences. History, which was published by his widow, was based on his evolutionary theory of the history of economic analysis. This sequential analysis of Schumpeter's six books demonstrates the progress he within his research...

  9. Baclofen effects on alcohol seeking, self-administration and extinction of seeking responses in a within-session design in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Angela N; Kaminski, Barbara J; Weerts, Elise M

    2014-01-01

    Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptor agonist, is currently under investigation as a potential treatment to prevent relapse to drinking in alcohol-dependent persons. In the current study, two groups of baboons were trained under a chained schedule of reinforcement (CSR), with three linked components, which were each correlated with different response requirements and cues. Fulfilling the requirement in the second link initiated the third link where either alcohol (n = 4) or a preferred non-alcoholic beverage (Tang, n = 5) was available for self-administration; failure to complete the response requirement in Link 2 ended the session (no access to alcohol or Tang). Seeking responses in Link 2 were used as indices of the motivational processes thought to be involved in relapse. The effects of baclofen (0.1-2.4 mg/kg) were examined under conditions with alcohol or Tang access and under extinction. Under the CSR, baclofen (1.8 and 2.4 mg/kg) significantly decreased (P extinction conditions, baclofen (1.8 and 2.4 mg/kg) facilitated extinction of responding for both alcohol and Tang, particularly during the first 10 minutes of extinction. Baclofen may be effective in reducing craving and alcohol drinking, although the facilitation of extinction and suppression of both alcohol and Tang self-administration by baclofen suggests these effects may be related to a more general suppression of consummatory and conditioned behaviors.

  10. Autologous cell therapy as a new approach to treatment of radiation-induced bone marrow aplasia: preliminary study in a baboon model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herodin, F.; Drouet, M. [Radiohematology Unit, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France)

    2002-07-01

    The sparing of viable hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells located in underexposed bone marrow territories associated with the relative radioresistance of certain stem cell populations is the rationale for autologous cell therapy consisting of ex vivo expansion of residual cells after collection postirradiation. The feasibility of this treatment mainly depends on time constraints and hematopoietic cell threshold. We showed in this study that in the absence of early-acting mobilizing agent administration, subliminar amounts of CD34{sup +} cells can be collected (1 x 10{sup 6} CD34{sup +} cells/100 mL bone marrow or for 1 L apheresis) from 6-Gy {gamma} globally irradiated baboons. Residual CD34{sup +} cells were successfully expanded in serum-free medium in the presence of antiapoptotic cytokine combination (stem cell factor + FLT-3 ligand + thrombopoietin + interleukin 3, 50 ng/mL each, i.e., 4F): K{sub CD34{sup +}} = x2.8 and x13.7 (n=2). Moreover, we demonstrated the short-term neutrophil engraftment potential of a low-size mixed expanded graft (1.5 x 10{sup 6} final CD34{sup +}cells/kg) issued from the coculture of unirradiated (20%) and 2.5-Gy in vitro irradiated (80%) CD34{sup +} cells on an allogeneic stromal cell layer in the presence of 4F. Further preclinical research needs to be performed to clearly establish this therapeutic approach that could be optimized by the early administration of antiapoptotic cytokines. (author)

  11. Effect of AGM and fetal liver-derived stromal cell lines on globin expression in adult baboon (P. anubis bone marrow-derived erythroid progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Lavelle

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that the erythroid micro-environment plays a role in regulation of globin gene expression during adult erythroid differentiation. Adult baboon bone marrow and human cord blood CD34+ progenitors were grown in methylcellulose, liquid media, and in co-culture with stromal cell lines derived from different developmental stages in identical media supporting erythroid differentiation to examine the effect of the micro-environment on globin gene expression. Adult progenitors express high levels of γ-globin in liquid and methylcellulose media but low, physiological levels in stromal cell co-cultures. In contrast, γ-globin expression remained high in cord blood progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures. Differences in γ-globin gene expression between adult progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures and liquid media required cell-cell contact and were associated with differences in rate of differentiation and γ-globin promoter DNA methylation. We conclude that γ-globin expression in adult-derived erythroid cells can be influenced by the micro-environment, suggesting new potential targets for HbF induction.

  12. Fecal microbial diversity and putative function in captive western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas) and binturongs (Arctictis binturong).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Erin A; Ashwell, Melissa; Lambert, Joanna E; Fellner, Vivek

    2014-11-01

    Microbial populations in the gastrointestinal tract contribute to host health and nutrition. Although gut microbial ecology is well studied in livestock and domestic animals, little is known of the endogenous populations inhabiting primates or carnivora. We characterized microbial populations in fecal cultures from gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas) and binturongs (Arctictis binturong) to compare the microbiomes associated with different gastrointestinal morphologies and different omnivorous feeding strategies. Each species was fed a distinct standardized diet for 2 weeks prior to fecal collection. All diets were formulated to reflect the species' feeding strategies in situ. Fresh fecal samples were pooled within species and used to inoculate in vitro batch cultures. Acetate, propionate, butyrate and valerate were measured after 24 h of incubation. Eubacterial DNA was extracted from individual fecal samples, pooled, and the cpn60 gene region was amplified and then sequenced to identify the major eubacterial constituents associated with each host species. Short chain fatty acids (P < 0.001) and methane (P < 0.001) were significantly different across species. Eubacterial profiles were consistent with fermentation data and suggest an increase in diversity with dietary fiber. PMID:25236539

  13. Characterisation of [11C]PR04.MZ in Papio anubis baboon: A selective high-affinity radioligand for quantitative imaging of the dopamine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-(4-fluorobut-2-yn-1-yl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4(prime)-tolyl)nortropane (PR04.MZ, 1) is a PET radioligand for the non-invasive exploration of the function of the cerebral dopamine transporter (DAT). A reliable automated process for routine production of the carbon-11 labelled analogue [11C]PR04.MZ ([11C]-1) has been developed using GMP compliant equipment. An adult female Papioanubis baboon was studied using a test-retest protocol with [11C]-1 in order to assess test-retest reliability, metabolism and CNS distribution profile of the tracer in non-human primates. Blood sampling was performed throughout the studies for determination of the free fraction in plasma (fP), plasma input functions and metabolic degradation of the radiotracer [11C]-1. Time-activity curves were derived for the putamen, the caudate nucleus, the ventral striatum, the midbrain and the cerebellum. Distribution volumes (VT) and non-displaceable binding potentials (BPND) for various brain regions and the blood were obtained from kinetic modelling. [11C]-1 shows promising results as aselective marker of the presynaptic dopamine transporter. With the reliable visualisation of the extra-striatal dopaminergic neurons and no indication on labelled metabolites, the tracer provides excellent potential for translation into man.

  14. Characterisation of [11C]PR04.MZ in Papio anubis baboon: A selective high-affinity radioligand for quantitative imaging of the dopamine transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riss P. J.; Fowler J.; Riss, P.J.; Hooker, J.M.; Shea, C.; Xu, Y.; Carter, P.; Warner, D.; Ferrari V.; Kim, S.W.; Aigbirhio, F.I.; Fowler, J.S.; Roesch, F.

    2011-10-25

    N-(4-fluorobut-2-yn-1-yl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4{prime}-tolyl)nortropane (PR04.MZ, 1) is a PET radioligand for the non-invasive exploration of the function of the cerebral dopamine transporter (DAT). A reliable automated process for routine production of the carbon-11 labelled analogue [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ ([{sup 11}C]-1) has been developed using GMP compliant equipment. An adult female Papioanubis baboon was studied using a test-retest protocol with [{sup 11}C]-1 in order to assess test-retest reliability, metabolism and CNS distribution profile of the tracer in non-human primates. Blood sampling was performed throughout the studies for determination of the free fraction in plasma (fP), plasma input functions and metabolic degradation of the radiotracer [{sup 11}C]-1. Time-activity curves were derived for the putamen, the caudate nucleus, the ventral striatum, the midbrain and the cerebellum. Distribution volumes (VT) and non-displaceable binding potentials (BPND) for various brain regions and the blood were obtained from kinetic modelling. [{sup 11}C]-1 shows promising results as aselective marker of the presynaptic dopamine transporter. With the reliable visualisation of the extra-striatal dopaminergic neurons and no indication on labelled metabolites, the tracer provides excellent potential for translation into man.

  15. Pitch (F0) and formant profiles of human vowels and vowel-like baboon grunts: The role of vocalizer body size and voice-acoustic allometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendall, Drew; Kollias, Sophie; Ney, Christina; Lloyd, Peter

    2005-02-01

    Key voice features-fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies-can vary extensively between individuals. Much of the variation can be traced to differences in the size of the larynx and vocal-tract cavities, but whether these differences in turn simply reflect differences in speaker body size (i.e., neutral vocal allometry) remains unclear. Quantitative analyses were therefore undertaken to test the relationship between speaker body size and voice F0 and formant frequencies for human vowels. To test the taxonomic generality of the relationships, the same analyses were conducted on the vowel-like grunts of baboons, whose phylogenetic proximity to humans and similar vocal production biology and voice acoustic patterns recommend them for such comparative research. For adults of both species, males were larger than females and had lower mean voice F0 and formant frequencies. However, beyond this, F0 variation did not track body-size variation between the sexes in either species, nor within sexes in humans. In humans, formant variation correlated significantly with speaker height but only in males and not in females. Implications for general vocal allometry are discussed as are implications for speech origins theories, and challenges to them, related to laryngeal position and vocal tract length. .

  16. The evolution of primate general and cultural intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Simon M; Hager, Yfke; Laland, Kevin N

    2011-04-12

    There are consistent individual differences in human intelligence, attributable to a single 'general intelligence' factor, g. The evolutionary basis of g and its links to social learning and culture remain controversial. Conflicting hypotheses regard primate cognition as divided into specialized, independently evolving modules versus a single general process. To assess how processes underlying culture relate to one another and other cognitive capacities, we compiled ecologically relevant cognitive measures from multiple domains, namely reported incidences of behavioural innovation, social learning, tool use, extractive foraging and tactical deception, in 62 primate species. All exhibited strong positive associations in principal component and factor analyses, after statistically controlling for multiple potential confounds. This highly correlated composite of cognitive traits suggests social, technical and ecological abilities have coevolved in primates, indicative of an across-species general intelligence that includes elements of cultural intelligence. Our composite species-level measure of general intelligence, 'primate g(S)', covaried with both brain volume and captive learning performance measures. Our findings question the independence of cognitive traits and do not support 'massive modularity' in primate cognition, nor an exclusively social model of primate intelligence. High general intelligence has independently evolved at least four times, with convergent evolution in capuchins, baboons, macaques and great apes.

  17. Stylistique comparee et enseignement SGAV (Comparative Stylistic and SGAV Teaching Methods)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavee, P.; Intravaia, P.

    1975-01-01

    The article presents an audio-visual teaching method for advanced students of Italian, in which major emphasis is placed on phonostylistic and semiotic factors: intonation and stress, rhythm, and gestures. A sample exercise is included. (CLK)

  18. Representing Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedin, Gry

    2012-01-01

    . This article discusses Willumsen's etching in the context of evolutionary theory, arguing that Willumsen is a rare example of an artist who not only let the theory of evolution fuel his artistic imagination, but also concerned himself with a core issue of the theory, namely to what extent it could be applied...

  19. Cepheid evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the phases of stellar evolution relevant to Cepheid variables of both Types I and II is presented. Type I Cepheids arise as a result of normal post-main sequence evolutionary behavior of many stars in the intermediate to massive range of stellar masses. In contrast, Type II Cepheids generally originate from low-mass stars of low metalicity which are undergoing post core helium-burning evolution. Despite great progress in the past two decades, uncertainties still remain in such areas as how to best model convective overshoot, semiconvection, stellar atmospheres, rotation, and binary evolution as well as uncertainties in important physical parameters such as the nuclear reaction rates, opacity, and mass loss rates. The potential effect of these uncertainties on stellar evolution models is discussed. Finally, comparisons between theoretical predictions and observations of Cepheid variables are presented for a number of cases. The results of these comparisons show both areas of agreement and disagreement with the latter result providing incentive for further research

  20. Comparative anatomical study of the leg's nerves of Cebus (barbed capuchins with baboons, chimpanzees and modern humans Estudo anatômico comparativo dos nervos da perna de Cebus (macaco-prego com babuínos, chimpanzés e humanos modernos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainá de Abreu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical comparative studies among the primates are important for the investigation of ethology, evolution, taxonomy, and comprehension of tools by hominoids. Especially the anatomical knowledge of Cebus contributes to conservation of the species, and to development of surgical procedures and clinical treatments of these animals, as they frequently are victims of automobile accidents. Recent anatomical studies came to a wrong conclusion regarding behavioral traits of Cebus, ascribed to few data available in previous literature. Therefore, to provide anatomical data and to support the other sciences related to anatomy, and to develop surgical and/or clinical procedures, we described the nerves of the legs of Cebus foccusing on their position and trajectory, as wll as innerved muscles, and compared these results with those of humans and other primates. Eight adult capuchin specimens were used for this study. The anatomical comparative study of the leg's nerves of Cebus demonstrated that, in general, structural organization of the nerves is similar among the four primates analyzed here (Cebus, chimpanzees, baboons and humans, which might be attributed to the fact that the all four primates have similar body structures. However, nerve trajectory and muscles innervation in Cebus was more similar to baboons.Os estudos anatômicos comparativos entre os primatas são importantes para pesquisas associadas com a etologia, evolução, taxonomia e compreensão dos usos de ferramentas pelos hominídeos. Especificamente, o conhecimento anatômico sobre Cebus contribui para sua própria conservação e para o desenvolvimento de procedimentos cirúrgicos e tratamentos clínicos destes animais, pois são frequentemente vítimas de acidentes automobilísticos. Recentemente, estudos sobre características comportamentais de Cebus indicaram conclusões erradas sobre sua anatomia, o que pode ser atribuído aos poucos dados disponíveis sobre a anatomia desses

  1. Early endothelial damage detected by circulating particles in baboons fed a diet high in simple carbohydrates in conjunction with saturated or unsaturated fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiang; Hodara, Vida; Meng, Qinghe; Voruganti, V Saroja; Rice, Karen; Michalek, Joel E; Comuzzie, Anthony G; VandeBerg, John L

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that high-fat diets cause blood vessel damage, however, assessing pathological effects accurately and efficiently is difficult. In this study, we measured particle levels of static endothelium (CD31+ and CD105+) and activated endothelium (CD62E+, CD54+ and CD106+) in plasma. We determined individual responses to two dietary regimens in two groups of baboons. One group (n = 10), was fed a diet high in simple carbohydrates and saturated fats (the HSF diet) and the other (n = 8) received a diet high in simple carbohydrates and unsaturated fats (the HUF diet). Plasma samples were collected at 0, 3, and 7 weeks. The percentages of CD31+ and CD62E+ particles were elevated at 3 weeks in animals fed either diet, but these elevations were statistically significant only in animals fed the HUF diet. Surprisingly, both percentages and counts of CD31+ particles were significantly lower at week 7 compared to week 0 and 3 in the HSF group. The median absolute counts of CD105+ particles were progressively elevated over time in the HSF group with a significant increase from week 0 to 7; the pattern was somewhat different for the HUF group with significant increase from week 3 to 7. The counts of CD54+ particles exhibited wide variation in both groups during the dietary challenge, while the median counts of CD106+ particles were significantly lower at week 3 than at week 0 and week 7. Endothelial particles exhibited time-dependent changes, suggesting they were behaving as quantifiable surrogates for the early detection of vascular damage caused by dietary factors.

  2. Community Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The continuous interest in the social network area contributes to the fast development of this field. The new possibilities of obtaining and storing data facilitate deeper analysis of the entire social network, extracted social groups and single individuals as well. One of the most interesting research topic is the network dynamics and dynamics of social groups in particular, it means analysis of group evolution over time. It is the natural step forward after social community extraction. Having communities extracted, appropriate knowledge and methods for dynamic analysis may be applied in order to identify changes as well as to predict the future of all or some selected groups. Furthermore, knowing the most probably change of a given group some additional steps may be performed in order to change this predicted future according to specific needs. Such ability would be a powerful tool in the hands of human resource managers, personnel recruitment, marketing, telecommunication companies, etc.

  3. Thought Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadrikov V.D.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The thought evolution is studied by historical reconstruction method that is based on the propositions of the theory of culturalhistorical determination of the psyche development, and the data of the morphological analysis and child development, and the conception of the psyche neuroontogenesis. The grounds for advisability of protothinking are presented. The protothinking is understood as the use of objective thought in cases of awareness absence. It is shown that protothinking is a form of transition from animal thinking to human speech. The particular attention is paid to the process of the word producing and thought generation in that process. The conditions of word producing as cooccurring acoustic pattern served for though expression are discussed. It is emphasized that a word is produced by a particular person. The historical development of the language and the specificity of this development are pointed out

  4. Synthesis and positron emission tomographic (PET) baboon studies of [{sup 11}C]methadone and R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]methandone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Methadone (MET) maintenance has been used successfully for many years in the rehabilitation of heroin addicts. MET, a typical m{mu}-opioid receptor agonist, exists as two enantiomers and is used clinically as the racemic mixture. However, R-(-)-MET has a 10-fold higher affinity for m{mu} receptors than S-(+)-MET (IC{sub 50}: 3.0 nM and 26.4 nM, respectively) and R-(-)-MET is almost entirely responsible for the therapeutic actions of the racemate. In order to examine the pharmacokinetics and stereoselectivity of the drug, we have synthesized both [{sup 11}C]MET and R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET. Preparing the precursor by one-step approach to the N-demethylated methadone was precluded as other investigators cited problems with intramolecular cyclization. Therefore, a four-step synthesis using MET (or R-(-)-MET) as starting material was required to obtain the precursor, followed by a two-step radiolabeling synthesis (N-methylation followed by oxidation) to obtain [{sup 11}C]MET (or R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET). Comparative PET studies in the same baboon showed peak striatal uptake was 0.022%/cc at 5 minutes with a half time of clearance from peak of 100 minutes for R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET and a peak uptake of 0.013%/cc with a half time of 90 min for [{sup 11}C]MET. R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET also showed a slower disappearance in plasma. Both tracers showed higher C-11 in basal ganglia (BG), thalamus and midbrain relative to the cerebellum (CB) and occipital cortex (OC) but the BG/OC ratio was higher for R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET (1.3 vs 1.1). Pretreatment with naloxone (1 mg/kg, iv) increased R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET uptake in all brain regions whereas unlabeled MET slightly increased C-11 clearance in BG, OC and CB. These initial results show higher brain concentration and specificity of the pharmacologically active enantiomer of methadone along with significant non-specific binding.

  5. Om religion og evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2011-01-01

    for kulturens kausale virkning på den menneskelige kognition og ikke mindst den hominine evolution. Ud fra, hvad vi ved om den menneskelige evolution, ses det, at den hominine evolution har en dybde, som sjældent medtænkes i teorier og hypoteser om den menneskelige evolution. Den menneskelige evolution er...

  6. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumareja, Dulce Trinidad

    2013-01-01

    Requirements evolution is a generally known problem in software development. Requirements are known to change all throughout a system's lifecycle. Nevertheless, requirements evolution is a poorly understood phenomenon. Most studies on requirements evolution focus on changes to written specifications

  7. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important ...

  8. [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999, a new radioligand to study the dopamine transporter with PET: characterization in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, W.; Schollhorn, M.A.; Valette, H.; Dolle, F.; Bottlaender, M. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, DRM/DSV, 91 - Orsay (France); Chalon, S.; Garreau, L.; Emond, P.; Guilloteau, D. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U619, 37 - Tours (France); Deloye, J.B. [Cyclopharma, 63 - Clermont Ferrand (France)

    2008-02-15

    The dopamine transporter (D.A.T.) is the main regulator of the synaptic concentration of dopamine in the brain and plays a key role in many neurological and psychiatric diseases. The goal of the study was to characterize the properties of [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 in baboons. Regional brain distribution was examined in vitro by autoradiographic studies on brain sections and in vivo by PET. Results of in vitro autoradiographic studies were in agreement with the localisation of the D.A.T. and revealed high level of [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 binding in the putamen and caudate, moderate level in the midbrain, and low level in the cortex and cerebellum. In PET study, the time course of the concentration of [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 in different regions of the brain showed that the highest accumulation of [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 was observed in the striatum with a peak uptake at 50 min (maximum = 5.7 {+-} 1.7 and 4.7 {+-}1.0% I.D./100 ml in putamen and caudate nucleus respectively, n 5). The radioactivity uptake peaked at 8 min in the midbrain (2.3 {+-} 1.2% I.D./100 ml) and decreased rapidly as a function of time. The lowest uptake was observed in the cortex (0.62 {+-}0.1 % I.D./100 ml, at 50 min) and in the cerebellum (0.44 {+-} 0.08% I.D./100 ml, at 50 min). In the test retest studies (n = 3) the variability of the uptake was 5% in the putamen and 6% in the caudate. Following HPLC analysis of plasma samples, [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 was rapidly metabolized. Unchanged [{sup 18}F]L.B.T.-999 accounted for around 21% and 7% of the radioactivity at 30 and 120 min post-injection respectively. The region to cerebellum radioactivity ratio was calculated. This ratio reached a maximum at 110 min post injection (22.1 {+-} 4.6 and 18.8 {+-} 2.1 in the putamen and the caudate respectively) and remained stable during the time of the PET scan (4 h). This ratio was 4.21 {+-} 0.92, 2.0 {+-} 0.3 and 1.6 {+-} 0.2 in the midbrain, thalamus, and cortical structure at 110 min post-injection. Binding

  9. Evolution & Diversity in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Lorentz C.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes recent findings that help in understanding how evolution has brought about the diversity of plant life that presently exists. Discusses basic concepts of evolution, diversity and classification, the three-line hypothesis of plant evolution, the origin of fungi, and the geologic time table. Included are 31 references. (CW)

  10. Differential evolution in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Qing, Anyong

    2010-01-01

    Differential evolution has proven itself a very simple while very powerful stochastic global optimizer. It has been applied to solve problems in many scientific and engineering fields. This book focuses on applications of differential evolution in electromagnetics to showcase its achievement and capability in solving synthesis and design problems in electromagnetics.Topics covered in this book include:*A comprehensive up-to-date literature survey on differential evolution*A systematic description of differential evolution*A topical review on applications of differential evolution in electromag

  11. Evolution of the antiretroviral restriction factor TRIMCyp in Old World primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Dietrich

    Full Text Available The retroviral restriction factor TRIMCyp, which is a fusion protein derived from the TRIM5 gene, blocks replication at a post-entry step. Among Old World primates, TRIMCyp has been found in four species of Asian macaques, but not in African monkeys. To further define the evolutionary origin of Old World TRIMCyp, we examined two species of baboons (genus Papio and three additional macaque species, including M. sylvanus, which is the only macaque species found outside Asia, and represents the earliest diverging branch of the macaque lineage. None of four P. cynocephalus anubis, one P. hamadryas, and 36 M. sylvanus had either TRIMCyp mRNA or the genetic features required for its expression. M. sylvanus genomic sequences indicated that the lack of TRIMCyp in this species was not due to genetic homogeneity among specimens studied and revealed the existence of four TRIM5α alleles, all distinct from M. mulatta and Papio counterparts. Together with existing data on macaque evolution, our findings indicate that TRIMCyp evolved in the ancestors of Asian macaques approximately 5-6 million years before present (ybp, likely as a result of a retroviral threat. TRIMCyp then became fixed in the M. nemestrina lineage after it diverged from M. nigra, approximately 2 million ybp. The macaque lineage is unique among primates studied so far due to the presence and diversity of both TRIM5 and TRIMCyp restriction factors. Studies of these antiviral proteins may provide valuable information about natural antiviral mechanisms, and give further insight into the factors that shaped the evolution of macaque species.

  12. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  13. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Pumareja, Dulce Trinidad

    2013-01-01

    Requirements evolution is a generally known problem in software development. Requirements are known to change all throughout a system's lifecycle. Nevertheless, requirements evolution is a poorly understood phenomenon. Most studies on requirements evolution focus on changes to written specifications and on software architecture and design. Usually, the focus is when the software is under development. Little is known about how requirements evolve when software is put into use. Groupware is an ...

  14. Creationism and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Quintelier, Katinka; Blancke, Stefaan

    2009-01-01

    In Tower of Babel, Robert Pennock wrote that “defenders of evolution would help their case immeasurably if they would reassure their audience that morality, purpose, and meaning are not lost by accepting the truth of evolution.” We first consider the thesis that the creationists’ movement exploits moral concerns to spread its ideas against the theory of evolution. We analyze their arguments and possible reasons why they are easily accepted. Creationists usually empl...

  15. Software architecture evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barais, Olivier; Le Meur, Anne-Francoise; Duchien, Laurence;

    2008-01-01

    Software architectures must frequently evolve to cope with changing requirements, and this evolution often implies integrating new concerns. Unfortunately, when the new concerns are crosscutting, existing architecture description languages provide little or no support for this kind of evolution...... one particular framework named Tran SAT, which addresses the above problems of software architecture evolution. Tran SAT provides a new element in the software architecture descriptions language, called an architectural aspect, for describing new concerns and their integration into an existing...

  16. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  17. Museums teach evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Judy; Evans, E Margaret

    2007-06-01

    Natural history museums play a significant role in educating the general public about evolution. This article describes Explore Evolution, one of the largest evolution education projects funded by the National Science Foundation. A group of regional museums from the Midwestern United States worked with leading evolutionary scientists to create multiple permanent exhibit galleries and a curriculum book for youth. This program invites the public to experience current evolutionary research on organisms that range in size from HIV to whales. Learning research is being conducted on museum visitors to understand how they reason about evolution and to determine what influences the process of conceptual change.

  18. Evolution of Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chu Chih; Chen, I Ju

    2010-01-01

    The contrast between social constructivism and cognitive constructivism are depicted in different ways in many studies. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the evolution of constructivism and put a focus on social constructivism from the perception of Vygotsky. This study provides a general idea of the evolution of constructivism for people…

  19. Evolution: Theory or Dogma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, William V.

    In this paper the author examines the question of whether evolution is a theory or a dogma. He refutes the contention that there is a monolithic scientific conspiracy to present evolution as dogma and suggests that his own presentation might be more appropriately entitled "Creationism: Theory or Dogma." (PEB)

  20. Software evolution with XVCL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weishan; Jarzabek, Stan; Zhang, Hongyu;

    2004-01-01

    This chapter introduces software evolution with XVCL (XML-based Variant Configuration Language), which is an XML-based metaprogramming technique. As the software evolves, a large number of variants may arise, especially whtn such kinds of evolutions are related to multiple platforms as shown in o...

  1. Kognition, evolution og Bibel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Jørgen Lundager

    2012-01-01

    En opfordring til, at Bibelvidneskaberne oprienterer sig i retning af aktuelle teorier om bio-kulturel evolution (Merlin Donald, aksetids-teori hos fx Robert Bellah)......En opfordring til, at Bibelvidneskaberne oprienterer sig i retning af aktuelle teorier om bio-kulturel evolution (Merlin Donald, aksetids-teori hos fx Robert Bellah)...

  2. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  3. Framing Evolution Discussion Intellectually

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Cook, Kristin; Buck, Gayle A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how a first-year biology teacher facilitates a series of whole-class discussions about evolution during the implementation of a problem-based unit. A communicative theoretical perspective is adopted wherein evolution discussions are viewed as social events that the teacher can frame intellectually (i.e., present or organize as…

  4. Evolution for Young Victorians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightman, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Evolution was a difficult topic to tackle when writing books for the young in the wake of the controversies over Darwin's "Origin of Species." Authors who wrote about evolution for the young experimented with different ways of making the complex concepts of evolutionary theory accessible and less controversial. Many authors depicted presented…

  5. Introduction: Understanding Legal Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Heine (Klaus)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In recent years, the study of legal evolution has become more systematic, and there have emerged various approaches to the study of legal evolution. However, until now, there has been no consensus as to which of these approaches is the most appropriate for the purposes

  6. India at the cross-roads of human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, R; Chauhan, P

    2009-11-01

    The Indian palaeoanthropological record, although patchy at the moment, is improving rapidly with every new find. This broad review attempts to provide an account of (a) the Late Miocene fossil apes and their gradual disappearance due to ecological shift from forest dominated to grassland dominated ecosystem around 9-8 Ma ago, (b) the Pliocene immigration/evolution of possible hominids and associated fauna, (c) the Pleistocene record of fossil hominins, associated fauna and artifacts, and (d) the Holocene time of permanent settlements and the genetic data from various human cultural groups within India. Around 13 Ma ago (late Middle Miocene) Siwalik forests saw the emergence of an orangutan-like primate Sivapithecus. By 8 Ma, this genus disappeared from the Siwalik region as its habitat started shrinking due to increased aridity influenced by global cooling and monsoon intensification. A contemporary and a close relative of Sivapithecus, Gigantopithecus (Indopithecus), the largest ape that ever-lived, made its first appearance at around 9 Ma. Other smaller primates that were pene-contemporaneous with these apes were Pliopithecus (Dendropithecus), Indraloris, Sivaladapis and Palaeotupia. The Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene witnessed northern hemisphere glaciations, followed by the spread of arid conditions on a global scale, setting the stage for hominids to explore "Savanahastan". With the prominent expansion of grassland environments from East Africa to China and Indonesia in the Pliocene, monkeys and baboons dispersed into the Indian subcontinent from Africa along with other mammals. Though debated, there are several claims of the presence of early hominins in this part of the world during the Late Pliocene, based primarily on the recovery of Palaeolithic tools. Fossils of our own ancestor and one of the first globe-trotters, early Homo erectus, has been documented from the Early Pleistocene of East Africa, Western Asia and Southeast Asia, thus indirectly

  7. How Can Evolution Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard A; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2016-02-01

    The theory of evolution links random variation and selection to incremental adaptation. In a different intellectual domain, learning theory links incremental adaptation (e.g., from positive and/or negative reinforcement) to intelligent behaviour. Specifically, learning theory explains how incremental adaptation can acquire knowledge from past experience and use it to direct future behaviours toward favourable outcomes. Until recently such cognitive learning seemed irrelevant to the 'uninformed' process of evolution. In our opinion, however, new results formally linking evolutionary processes to the principles of learning might provide solutions to several evolutionary puzzles - the evolution of evolvability, the evolution of ecological organisation, and evolutionary transitions in individuality. If so, the ability for evolution to learn might explain how it produces such apparently intelligent designs. PMID:26705684

  8. How Can Evolution Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard A; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2016-02-01

    The theory of evolution links random variation and selection to incremental adaptation. In a different intellectual domain, learning theory links incremental adaptation (e.g., from positive and/or negative reinforcement) to intelligent behaviour. Specifically, learning theory explains how incremental adaptation can acquire knowledge from past experience and use it to direct future behaviours toward favourable outcomes. Until recently such cognitive learning seemed irrelevant to the 'uninformed' process of evolution. In our opinion, however, new results formally linking evolutionary processes to the principles of learning might provide solutions to several evolutionary puzzles - the evolution of evolvability, the evolution of ecological organisation, and evolutionary transitions in individuality. If so, the ability for evolution to learn might explain how it produces such apparently intelligent designs.

  9. Chemical evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    The term “chemical evolution of galaxies” refers to the evolution of abundances of chemical species in galaxies, which is due to nuclear processes occurring in stars and to gas flows into and out of galaxies. This book deals with the chemical evolution of galaxies of all morphological types (ellipticals, spirals and irregulars) and stresses the importance of the star formation histories in determining the properties of stellar populations in different galaxies. The topic is approached in a didactical and logical manner via galaxy evolution models which are compared with observational results obtained in the last two decades: The reader is given an introduction to the concept of chemical abundances and learns about the main stellar populations in our Galaxy as well as about the classification of galaxy types and their main observables. In the core of the book, the construction and solution of chemical evolution models are discussed in detail, followed by descriptions and interpretations of observations of ...

  10. Dual phase evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Green, David G; Abbass, Hussein A

    2014-01-01

    This book explains how dual phase evolution operates in all these settings and provides a detailed treatment of the subject. The authors discuss the theoretical foundations for the theory, how it relates to other phase transition phenomena and its advantages in evolutionary computation and complex adaptive systems. The book provides methods and techniques to use this concept for problem solving. Dual phase evolution concerns systems that evolve via repeated phase shifts in the connectivity of their elements. It occurs in vast range of settings, including natural systems (species evolution, landscape ecology, geomorphology), socio-economic systems (social networks) and in artificial systems (annealing, evolutionary computing).

  11. Evolution of science I: Evolution of Mind

    CERN Document Server

    Vahia, M N

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system and particularly the brain was designed to control the life cycle of a living being. With increasing size and sophistication, in mammals, the brain became capable of exercising significant control over life. In Homo Sapiens the brain became significantly powerful and capable of comprehension beyond survival needs with visualisation, formal thought and long term memory. Here we trace the rise of the powers of the brains of the Homo Sapiens and its capability of three comprehending the three spatial dimensions as well as time. By tracing the evolution of technology over the last millennium and particularly the late arrival of astronomy to discuss the evolution of the formal thinking process in humans. In a follow up paper we will trace the extensive use of this new faculty by humans to comprehend the working of the universe.

  12. Chemical evolution and life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaterre Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In research on the origins of life, the concept of “chemical evolution” aims at explaining the transition from non-living matter to living matter. There is however strong disagreement when it comes to defining this concept more precisely, and in particular with reference to a chemical form of Darwinian evolution: for some, chemical evolution is nothing but Darwinian evolution applied to chemical systems before life appeared; yet, for others, it is the type of evolution that happened before natural selection took place, the latter being the birthmark of living systems. In this contribution, I review the arguments defended by each side and show how both views presuppose a dichotomous definition of “life”.

  13. Evolution, epigenetics and cooperation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Bateson

    2014-04-01

    Explanations for biological evolution in terms of changes in gene frequencies refer to outcomes rather than process. Integrating epigenetic studies with older evolutionary theories has drawn attention to the ways in which evolution occurs. Adaptation at the level of the gene is givingway to adaptation at the level of the organism and higher-order assemblages of organisms. These ideas impact on the theories of how cooperation might have evolved. Two of the theories, i.e. that cooperating individuals are genetically related or that they cooperate for self-interested reasons, have been accepted for a long time. The idea that adaptation takes place at the level of groups is much more controversial. However, bringing together studies of development with those of evolution is taking away much of the heat in the debate about the evolution of group behaviour.

  14. Evolution of massive stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of stars with masses larger than 15 sun masses is reviewed. These stars have large convective cores and lose a substantial fraction of their matter by stellar wind. The treatment of convection and the parameterisation of the stellar wind mass loss are analysed within the context of existing disagreements between theory and observation. The evolution of massive close binaries and the origin of Wolf-Rayet Stars and X-ray binaries is also sketched. (author)

  15. Controlled quantum evolutions

    OpenAIRE

    Petroni, Nicola Cufaro; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the non stationary solutions of the evolution (Fokker-Planck) equations associated to either stationary or non stationary quantum states by the stochastic mechanics. For the excited stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields we explicitely discuss the exact solutions for the HO case. Moreover the possibility of modifying the original potentials in order to implement arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations is discussed with respec...

  16. Evolution, museums and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadden, Bruce J

    2008-11-01

    Visitors to natural history museums have an incomplete understanding of evolution. Although they are relatively knowledgeable about fossils and geological time, they have a poor understanding of natural selection. Museums in the 21st century can effectively increase public understanding of evolution through interactive displays, novel content (e.g. genomics), engaging videos and cyberexhibits that communicate to a broad spectrum of society, both within the exhibit halls as well as outside the museum.

  17. Equivolumetric Evolution of Planar Curves

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We present the equivolumetric evolution of planar curves, which is a new type of curvature dependent evolution for a flame propagation model. This evolution reflects the nonlinear contribution of the curvature of the front to the flame propagation speed. We also present some numerical results of the equivolumetric evolution using the level set method.

  18. The theory of evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Bazaluk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The book The Theory of Evolution: from the Space Vacuum to Neural Ensembles and Moving Forward, an edition of 100 copies, was published in Russian language, in December 2014 in Kiev. Its Russian version is here: http://en.bazaluk.com/journals.html. Introduction, Chapter 10 and Conclusion published in English for the first time. Since 2004 author have been researching in the field of theory of Evolution, Big History. The book was written on the base of analysis of more than 2000 primary sources of this research topic. The volume is 90,000 words (with Reference. The book is for a wide range of professionals, from students to professors and researchers working in the fields of: philosophical anthropology, philosophy, Big History, cosmology, biology, neuroscience and etc. In the book, the author defines the evolution as continuous and nonlinear complication of the structure of matter, the types of interaction and environments; analyzes existing in modern science and philosophy approaches to the research of the process of evolution, degree of development of the factors and causes of evolution. Unifying interdisciplinary researches of evolution in cosmology, biology, neuroscience and philosophy, the author presents his vision of the model of «Evolving Matter», which allows us to consider not only the laws of transition of space vacuum in neural ensembles but also to see our Universe as a complication, heterogeneous organization. Interdisciplinary amount of information on the theory of evolution is systematized and a new method of world perception is proposed in the book.

  19. Evolution: from cosmogenesis to biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume contains the material of an interdisciplinary evolution symposium. The purpose was to shed some light on possible connections between steps of evolution of matter on different levels of organisation. The topics involved are as follow: cosmogenesis; galactic and stellar evolution; formation and evolution of the solar system; global atmospheric and tectonic changes of Earth; viral evolution; phylogeny and evolution of terrestrial life; evolution of neural system; hominization. The material also includes some discussions of the underlying phenomena and laws of nature. (author)

  20. THE EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, Donald

    2011-01-01

    This paper asserts that while culture does change, it does not evolve. In anthropology the explanation for the evolution of the non-biological aspects of the human condition has relied on the paradigm of cultural evolution. This paper argues that non-biological evolution is better explained in terms of the evolution of social organization. It also rejects the materialist bias that dominates the explanations for why and how evolution takes place. Instead it argues that human agents play a larg...

  1. The Evolution of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Martin A.; Krakauer, David C.

    1999-07-01

    The emergence of language was a defining moment in the evolution of modern humans. It was an innovation that changed radically the character of human society. Here, we provide an approach to language evolution based on evolutionary game theory. We explore the ways in which protolanguages can evolve in a nonlinguistic society and how specific signals can become associated with specific objects. We assume that early in the evolution of language, errors in signaling and perception would be common. We model the probability of misunderstanding a signal and show that this limits the number of objects that can be described by a protolanguage. This "error limit" is not overcome by employing more sounds but by combining a small set of more easily distinguishable sounds into words. The process of "word formation" enables a language to encode an essentially unlimited number of objects. Next, we analyze how words can be combined into sentences and specify the conditions for the evolution of very simple grammatical rules. We argue that grammar originated as a simplified rule system that evolved by natural selection to reduce mistakes in communication. Our theory provides a systematic approach for thinking about the origin and evolution of human language.

  2. NLO JIMWLK evolution unabridged

    CERN Document Server

    Kovner, Alex; Mulian, Yair

    2014-01-01

    In Ref. [1] we presented the JIMWLK Hamiltonian for high energy evolution of QCD amplitudes at the next-to-leading order accuracy in $\\alpha_s$. In the present paper we provide details of our original derivation, which was not reported in [1], and provide the Hamiltonian in the form appropriate for action on color singlet as well as color nonsinglet states. The rapidity evolution of the quark dipole generated by this Hamiltonian is computed and compared with the corresponding result of Balitsky and Chirilli [2]. We then establish the equivalence between the NLO JIMWLK Hamiltonian and the NLO version of the Balitsky's hierarchy [3], which includes action on nonsinglet combinations of Wilson lines. Finally, we present complete evolution equation for three-quark Wilson loop operator, thus extending the results of Grabovsky [4].

  3. Evolution and Christian Faith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughgarden, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    My recent book, Evolution and Christian Faith explores how evolutionary biology can be portrayed from the religious perspective of Christianity. The principal metaphors for evolutionary biology---differential success at breeding and random mutation, probably originate with the dawn of agriculture and clearly occur in the Bible. The central narrative of evolutionary biology can be presented using Biblical passages, providing an account of evolution that is inherently friendly to a Christian perspective. Still, evolutionary biology is far from complete, and problematic areas pertain to species in which the concept of an individual is poorly defined, and to species in which the expression of gender and sexuality depart from Darwin's sexual-selection templates. The present- day controversy in the US about teaching evolution in the schools provides an opportunity to engage the public about science education.

  4. Lossless Conditional Schema Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Guttorm; Bøhlen, Michael Hanspeter

    2003-01-01

    The paper considers conditional schema evolution, where schema changes change the schema of the tuples that satisfy the change condition. When the schema of a relation change some tuples may no longer fit the current schema. Handling the mismatch between the intended schema of tuples and the reco......The paper considers conditional schema evolution, where schema changes change the schema of the tuples that satisfy the change condition. When the schema of a relation change some tuples may no longer fit the current schema. Handling the mismatch between the intended schema of tuples...... and the recorded schema of tuples is at the core of a DBMS that supports schema evolution. We propose to keep track of schema mismatches at the level of individual tuples, and prove that conditionally evolving schemas, in contrast to current commercial database systems, are lossless when the schema evolves...

  5. Education and Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermitslev, Hans Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Herbert Spencer’s ideas were first introduced to a Scandinavian audience in the early 1870s when the Danish philosopher Harald Høffding published and lectured on his evolutionary philosophy. At this time, Høffding also played an important role in disseminating Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution...... and in discussing the philosophical consequences of an evolutionary worldview. In the late 1870s and 1880s several of Spencer’s works were translated into Danish and Swedish and he became a household name among liberal intellectuals who primarily discussed his views on education and evolution. His most influential...... known foreign thinkers in the general public at the time of his death in 1903. Moreover, in the decades around 1900 Spencer’s thoughts on education were part of the curricula at many colleges of education. Spencer’s ideas on evolution and education were thus widely circulated and positively received...

  6. Dynamics of secular evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2012-01-01

    The text of lectures to the 2011 Tenerife Winter School. The School's theme was "Secular Evolution of Galaxies" and my task was to present the underlying stellar-dynamical theory. Other lecturers were speaking on the role of bars and chemical evolution, so these topics are avoided here. We start with an account of the connections between isolating integrals, quasiperiodicity and angle-action variables - these variables played a unifying role throughout the lectures. This leads on to the phenomenon of resonant trapping and how this can lead to chaos in cuspy potentials and phase-space mixing in slowly evolving potentials. Surfaces of section and frequency analysis are introduced as diagnostics of phase-space structure. Real galactic potentials include a fluctuating part that drives the system towards unattainable thermal equilibrium. Two-body encounters are only one source of fluctuations, and all fluctuations will drive similar evolution. We derive the orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck equation and relations that ...

  7. Boussinesq evolution equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Schaffer, H.; Madsen, Per A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the possibility of using methods and ideas from time domain Boussinesq formulations in the corresponding frequency domain formulations. We term such frequency domain models "evolution equations". First, we demonstrate that the numerical efficiency of the deterministic...... Boussinesq evolution equations of Madsen and Sorensen [Madsen, P.A., Sorensen, O.R., 1993. Bound waves and triad interactions in shallow water. Ocean Eng. 20 359-388] can be improved by using Fast Fourier Transforms to evaluate the nonlinear terms. For a practical example of irregular waves propagating over...... a submerged bar, it is demonstrated that evolution equations utilising FFT can be solved around 100 times faster than the corresponding time domain model. Use of FFT provides an efficient bridge between the frequency domain and the time domain. We utilise this by adapting the surface roller model for wave...

  8. Cultural evolution and personalization

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, Ning; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    In social sciences, there is currently no consensus on the mechanism for cultural evolution. The evolution of first names of newborn babies offers a remarkable example for the researches in the field. Here we perform statistical analyses on over 100 years of data in the United States. We focus in particular on how the frequency-rank distribution and inequality of baby names change over time. We propose a stochastic model where name choice is determined by personalized preference and social influence. Remarkably, variations on the strength of personalized preference can account satisfactorily for the observed empirical features. Therefore, we claim that personalization drives cultural evolution, at least in the example of baby names.

  9. TMDs: Evolution, modeling, precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Alesio Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The factorization theorem for qT spectra in Drell-Yan processes, boson production and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering allows for the determination of the non-perturbative parts of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. Here we discuss the fit of Drell-Yan and Z-production data using the transverse momentum dependent formalism and the resummation of the evolution kernel. We find a good theoretical stability of the results and a final χ2/points ≲ 1. We show how the fixing of the non-perturbative pieces of the evolution can be used to make predictions at present and future colliders.

  10. Emergence and Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bullwinkle, Tammy J; Ibba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    ancestor and as such they provide insights into the evolution and development of the extant genetic code. Although the aaRSs have long been viewed as a highly conserved group of enzymes, findings within the last couple of decades have started to demonstrate how diverse and versatile these enzymes really...... are. Beyond their central role in translation, aaRSs and their numerous homologs have evolved a wide array of alternative functions both inside and outside translation. Current understanding of the emergence of the aaRSs, and their subsequent evolution into a functionally diverse enzyme family...

  11. Evolution and social epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Akihiro

    2015-11-01

    Evolutionary biology, which aims to explain the dynamic process of shaping the diversity of life, has not yet significantly affected thinking in social epidemiology. Current challenges in social epidemiology include understanding how social exposures can affect our biology, explaining the dynamics of society and health, and designing better interventions that are mindful of the impact of exposures during critical periods. I review how evolutionary concepts and tools, such as fitness gradient in cultural evolution, evolutionary game theory, and contemporary evolution in cancer, can provide helpful insights regarding social epidemiology.

  12. Evolution of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayhoff, M. O.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of proteins from living organisms are dealt with. The structure of proteins is first discussed; the variation in this structure from one biological group to another is illustrated by the first halves of the sequences of cytochrome c, and a phylogenetic tree is derived from the cytochrome c data. The relative geological times associated with the events of this tree are discussed. Errors which occur in the duplication of cells during the evolutionary process are examined. Particular attention is given to evolution of mutant proteins, globins, ferredoxin, and transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNA's). Finally, a general outline of biological evolution is presented.

  13. The theory of evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Bazaluk

    2015-01-01

    The book The Theory of Evolution: from the Space Vacuum to Neural Ensembles and Moving Forward, an edition of 100 copies, was published in Russian language, in December 2014 in Kiev. Its Russian version is here: http://en.bazaluk.com/journals.html. Introduction, Chapter 10 and Conclusion published in English for the first time. Since 2004 author have been researching in the field of theory of Evolution, Big History. The book was written on the base of analysis of more than 2000 primary so...

  14. Controlled quantum evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Petroni, N C; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F; Petroni, Nicola Cufaro; Martino, Salvatore De; Siena, Silvio De; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the non stationary solutions of the evolution (Fokker-Planck) equations associated to either stationary or non stationary quantum states by the stochastic mechanics. For the excited stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields we explicitely discuss the exact solutions for the HO case. Moreover the possibility of modifying the original potentials in order to implement arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations is discussed with respect to both possible models for quantum measurements and applications to the control of particle beams in accelerators.

  15. TMDs: Evolution, modeling, precision

    CERN Document Server

    D'Alesio, Umberto; Melis, Stefano; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2014-01-01

    The factorization theorem for $q_T$ spectra in Drell-Yan processes, boson production and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering allows for the determination of the non-perturbative parts of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. Here we discuss the fit of Drell-Yan and $Z$-production data using the transverse momentum dependent formalism and the resummation of the evolution kernel. We find a good theoretical stability of the results and a final $\\chi^2/{\\rm points}\\lesssim 1$. We show how the fixing of the non-perturbative pieces of the evolution can be used to make predictions at present and future colliders.

  16. Overview of TMD Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Daniël

    2016-02-01

    Transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) appear in many scattering processes at high energy, from the semi-inclusive DIS experiments at a few GeV to the Higgs transverse momentum distribution at the LHC. Predictions for TMD observables crucially depend on TMD factorization, which in turn determines the TMD evolution of the observables with energy. In this contribution to SPIN2014 TMD factorization is outlined, including a discussion of the treatment of the nonperturbative region, followed by a summary of results on TMD evolution, mostly applied to azimuthal asymmetries.

  17. Overview of TMD evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Boer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) appear in many scattering processes at high energy, from the semi-inclusive DIS experiments at a few GeV to the Higgs transverse momentum distribution at the LHC. Predictions for TMD observables crucially depend on TMD factorization, which in turn determines the TMD evolution of the observables with energy. In this contribution to SPIN2014 TMD factorization is outlined, including a discussion of the treatment of the nonperturbative region, followed by a summary of results on TMD evolution, mostly applied to azimuthal asymmetries.

  18. Software Architecture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  19. Evolution of Clinical Enzymology

    OpenAIRE

    Büttner, J

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of clinical enzymology is discussed in relation to the history of general enzymology and clinical chemistry. The discussion is limited to the period from 1835 (definition of catalysis by Berzelius) to 1935 (description of the optical test by Warburg). In conclusion, a general account is given of the introduction of the concept of quantitative enzyme activity determination into clinical medicine.

  20. Evolution of market heuristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Anufriev; C.H. Hommes

    2012-01-01

    The time evolution of aggregate economic variables, such as stock prices, is affected by market expectations of individual investors. Neoclassical economic theory assumes that individuals form expectations rationally, thus forcing prices to track economic fundamentals and leading to an efficient all

  1. Evolution Perception with Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to find out how the teacher candidates who graduated from the Faculty of Theology and study in pedagogical formation program perceive the theory of evolution. Having a descriptive characteristic, this research is conducted with 63 Faculty of Theology graduate teacher candidates of which 36 is women and 27 is…

  2. Evolution of subsidiary competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler Asmussen, Christian; Pedersen, Torben; Dhanaraj, Charles

    of competitive advantage of nations, we hypothesize the contingencies under which heterogeneity in host environments influences subsidiary competence configuration. We test our model with data from more than 2,000 subsidiaries in seven Western European countries. Our results provide new insights on the evolution...

  3. Lossless conditional schema evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Guttorm; Böhlen, Michael

    2004-01-01

    of a DBMS that supports schema evolution. We propose to keep track of schema mismatches at the level of individual tuples, and prove that evolving schemas with conditional schema changes, in contrast to database systems relying on data migration, are lossless when the schema evolves. The lossless property...

  4. Evolution in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Mike; Duggan, Adrienne; McGregor, Deb

    2014-01-01

    Evolution and inheritance appear in the new National Science Curriculum for England, which comes into effect from September 2014. In the curriculum documents, it is expected that pupils in year 6 (ages 10-11) should be taught to: (1) recognise that living things have changed over time; (2) recognise that living things produce offspring of the same…

  5. On Multiobjective Evolution Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, E; Elettreby, M. F.

    2004-01-01

    Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) phenomena could have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. The Bak-Sneppen (BS) model is a simple and robust model of biological evolution that exhibits punctuated equilibrium behavior. Here we will introduce random version of BS model. Also we generalize the single objective BS model to a multiobjective one.

  6. On Multiobjective Evolution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, E.; Elettreby, M. F.

    Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) phenomena could have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. The Bak-Sneppen (BS) model is a simple and robust model of biological evolution that exhibits punctuated equilibrium behavior. Here, we will introduce random version of BS model. We also generalize the single objective BS model to a multiobjective one.

  7. Evolution Through Architectural Reconciliation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Guelfi, Nicolas; Perrouin, Gilles

    2005-01-01

    One of the possible scenarios in a system evolution cycle, is to translate an emergent set of new requirements into software architecture design and subsequently to update the system implementation. In this paper, we argue that this form of forward engineering, even though addresses the new system r

  8. Evolution 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Casper; Bek-Thomsen, Jakob; Clasen, Mathias;

    2013-01-01

    Studies in the history of science and education have documented that the reception and understanding of evolutionary theory is highly contingent on local factors such as school systems, cultural traditions, religious beliefs, and language. This has important implications for teaching evolution in...

  9. Evolution of lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, David

    2014-10-01

    Present-day evolutionary theory, modern synthesis and evo-devo, appear to explain evolution. There remain however several points of contention. These include: biological time, direction, macroevolution verses microevolution, ageing and the extent of internal as opposed to external mediation. A new theoretical model for the control of biological time in vertebrates/bilaterians is introduced. Rather than biological time being controlled solely by a molecular cascade domino effect, it is suggested there is also an intracellular oscillatory clock. This clock (life's timekeeper) is synchronised across all cells in an organism and runs at a constant frequency throughout life. Slower frequencies extend lifespan, increase body/brain size and advance behaviour. They also create a time void which could aid additional evolutionary change. Faster frequencies shorten lifespan, reduce body/brain size and diminish behaviour. They are therefore less likely to mediate evolution in vertebrates/mammals. It is concluded that in vertebrates, especially mammals, there is a direction in evolution towards longer lifespan/advanced behaviour. Lifespan extension could equate with macroevolution and subsequent modifications with microevolution. As life's timekeeper controls the rate of ageing it constitutes a new genetic theory of ageing. Finally, as lifespan extension is internally mediated, this suggests a major role for internal mediation in evolution. PMID:24992233

  10. EVOLUTION OF INSURANCE DEFINITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gorb

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the evolution of the concept of insurance from the earliest forms to contemporary ones is shown. The development of insurance in Ukraine is demonstrated. A review of transformation of the insurance concept is presented in tabular form.

  11. Early cellular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the evolutionary developments that occurred subsequent to the origin of ancestral cells. Microbial physiology and ecology are potential sharp tools for shaping concepts of microbial evolution. Some popular unjustified assumptions are discussed. It is considered that certain principles derived mainly from the advances of molecular biology can be used to order the natural groups (genera) of extant prokaryotes and their patterns phylogenetically.

  12. Evolution and the Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, William V.

    1973-01-01

    Some court cases and legislative bills have been filed in states to legalize the use of the creationist view (of life forms on earth) in biology textbooks superseding the organic theory of evolution. The law has not yet accepted the religious viewpoint. (PS)

  13. Darwinism: Evolution or Revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Niles R.

    1989-01-01

    Maintains that Darwin's theory of evolution was more than a science versus religion debate; rather it was a revolutionary concept that influenced numerous social and political ideologies and movements throughout western history. Traces the impact of Darwin's work historically, utilizing a holistic approach. (RW)

  14. Evolution of housing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob, C.; Mohammadi, S.; Geraedts, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    ‘Perfection means something is complete and stands still and what stands still doesn’t change or evolve and is automatically dead. Everything in the universe changes, evolution implies that the creation is not complete hence the possibility of evolving’ (Osho, 1985). Our society and economy are cons

  15. Evolution of rhizobium symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, Op den R.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of rhizobium symbiosis is studied from several points of view in this thesis. The ultimate goal of the combined approaches is to unravel the genetic constrains of the symbiotic interaction. To this end the legume rhizobium symbiosis is studied in model plant species from the Papilionoi

  16. Punctuated evolution of population genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Reuveni, Eli

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis I apply population genetics methods and genotype-phenotype mapping to show that evolution has more discrete rather than linear pace and that this finding may reconcile between two evolution theories (punctuated equilibrium and phyletic gradualism)

  17. Hardware Evolution of Control Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, David; Steincamp, Jim; Corder, Eric; King, Ken; Ferguson, M. I.; Dutton, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of closed-loop motor speed controllers implemented on the JPL FPTA2 is presented. The response of evolved controller to sinusoidal commands, controller reconfiguration for fault tolerance,and hardware evolution are described.

  18. Animal evolution: trilobites on speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    A new study quantifies rates of morphological and molecular evolution for arthropods during the critical Cambrian explosion. Both morphological and molecular evolution are accelerated--but not so much to break any speed limits. PMID:24112983

  19. Evolution of Brain and Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenemann, P. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of language and the evolution of the brain are tightly interlinked. Language evolution represents a special kind of adaptation, in part because language is a complex behavior (as opposed to a physical feature) but also because changes are adaptive only to the extent that they increase either one's understanding of others, or one's…

  20. Expanding the Understanding of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Originally designed for K-12 teachers, the Understanding Evolution (UE) Web site ("www.understandingevolution.org") is a one-stop shop for all of a teacher's evolution education needs, with lesson plans, teaching tips, lists of common evolution misconceptions, and much more. However, during the past five years, the UE project team learned that…

  1. Fla. Panel's Evolution Vote Hailed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on how the compromise hammered out in Florida recently over the treatment of evolution in the state's science classrooms is winning praise from scientists and educators. The new science standards will refer to evolution as the "scientific theory of evolution." These changes will replace more-general language in the previous…

  2. Evolution of clustered storage

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Van de Vyvre, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The session actually featured two presentations: * Evolution of clustered storage by Lance Hukill, Quantum Corporation * ALICE DAQ - Usage of a Cluster-File System: Quantum StorNext by Pierre Vande Vyvre, CERN-PH the second one prepared at short notice by Pierre (thanks!) to present how the Quantum technologies are being used in the ALICE experiment. The abstract to Mr Hukill's follows. Clustered Storage is a technology that is driven by business and mission applications. The evolution of Clustered Storage solutions starts first at the alignment between End-users needs and Industry trends: * Push-and-Pull between managing for today versus planning for tomorrow * Breaking down the real business problems to the core applications * Commoditization of clients, servers, and target devices * Interchangeability, Interoperability, Remote Access, Centralized control * Oh, and yes, there is a budget and the "real world" to deal with This presentation will talk through these needs and trends, and then ask the question, ...

  3. Spectral evolution of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fourth workshop organised by the Advanced School of Astronomy addresses the specific problems of galaxy and star formation processes, topics of uncertainty and controversy to which IRAS observations may give novel perspectives. The properties of stellar populations in the local group of galaxies are discussed. Several lectures deal with the fundamentals of the theory of spectral and photometrical evolution of stellar populations, and with recent developments in the theory of stellar structure, a necessary step to model and understand galactic evolution. Other lectures are concerned with empirical population syntheses and problems related to the UV spectra of elliptical and SO galaxies. The properties of galaxies at large lookback times and the search of primeval objects are also considered. (Auth.)

  4. Managing Software Process Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book focuses on the design, development, management, governance and application of evolving software processes that are aligned with changing business objectives, such as expansion to new domains or shifting to global production. In the context of an evolving business world, it examines...... the complete software process lifecycle, from the initial definition of a product to its systematic improvement. In doing so, it addresses difficult problems, such as how to implement processes in highly regulated domains or where to find a suitable notation system for documenting processes, and provides...... essential insights and tips to help readers manage process evolutions. And last but not least, it provides a wealth of examples and cases on how to deal with software evolution in practice. Reflecting these topics, the book is divided into three parts. Part 1 focuses on software business transformation...

  5. Evolution with Drifting Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Kanade, Varun; Vaughan, Jennifer Wortman

    2010-01-01

    We consider the question of the stability of evolutionary algorithms to gradual changes, or drift, in the target concept. We define an algorithm to be resistant to drift if, for some inverse polynomial drift rate in the target function, it converges to accuracy 1 -- \\epsilon , with polynomial resources, and then stays within that accuracy indefinitely, except with probability \\epsilon , at any one time. We show that every evolution algorithm, in the sense of Valiant (2007; 2009), can be converted using the Correlational Query technique of Feldman (2008), into such a drift resistant algorithm. For certain evolutionary algorithms, such as for Boolean conjunctions, we give bounds on the rates of drift that they can resist. We develop some new evolution algorithms that are resistant to significant drift. In particular, we give an algorithm for evolving linear separators over the spherically symmetric distribution that is resistant to a drift rate of O(\\epsilon /n), and another algorithm over the more general prod...

  6. Evolution of energy structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the big inertia and long time constants of energy systems, their long-time behaviour is mainly determined by their present day state and by the trends of their recent evolution. For this reason, it is of prime importance to foresee the evolution of the different energy production sources which may play an important role in the future. A status of the world energy consumption and production is made first using the energy statistics of the IEA. Then, using the trends observed since 1973, the consequences of a simple extrapolation of these trends is examined. Finally, the scenarios of forecasting of energy structures, like those supplied by the International institute for applied systems analysis (IIASA) are discussed. (J.S.)

  7. QCD Evolution Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the QCD Evolution 2015 Workshop which was held 26–30 May, 2015 at Jefferson Lab, Newport News, Virginia, USA. The workshop is a continuation of a series of workshops held during four consecutive years 2011, 2012, 2013 at Jefferson Lab, and in 2014 in Santa Fe, NM. With the rapid developments in our understanding of the evolution of parton distributions including low-x, TMDs, GPDs, higher-twist correlation functions, and the associated progress in perturbative QCD, lattice QCD and effective field theory techniques we look forward with great enthusiasm to the 2015 meeting. A special attention was also paid to participation of experimentalists as the topics discussed are of immediate importance for the JLab 12 experimental program and a future Electron Ion Collider.

  8. The evolution of helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R.; Wen, C. Y.; Lorente, S.; Bejan, A.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we show that during their half-century history, helicopters have been evolving into geometrically similar architectures with surprisingly sharp correlations between dimensions, performance, and body size. For example, proportionalities emerge between body size, engine size, and the fuel load. Furthermore, the engine efficiency increases with the engine size, and the propeller radius is roughly the same as the length scale of the whole body. These trends are in accord with the constructal law, which accounts for the engine efficiency trend and the proportionality between "motor" size and body size in animals and vehicles. These body-size effects are qualitatively the same as those uncovered earlier for the evolution of aircraft. The present study adds to this theoretical body of research the evolutionary design of all technologies [A. Bejan, The Physics of Life: The Evolution of Everything (St. Martin's Press, New York, 2016)].

  9. Anatomy of Scientific Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Jinhyuk; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-01-01

    The quest for historically impactful science and technology provides invaluable insight into the innovation dynamics of human society, yet many studies are limited to qualitative and small-scale approaches. Here, we investigate scientific evolution through systematic analysis of a massive corpus of digitized English texts between 1800 and 2008. Our analysis reveals remarkable predictability for long-prevailing scientific concepts based on the levels of their prior usage. Interestingly, once a threshold of early adoption rates is passed even slightly, scientific concepts can exhibit sudden leaps in their eventual lifetimes. We developed a mechanistic model to account for such results, indicating that slowly-but-commonly adopted science and technology surprisingly tend to have higher innate strength than fast-and-commonly adopted ones. The model prediction for disciplines other than science was also well verified. Our approach sheds light on unbiased and quantitative analysis of scientific evolution in society,...

  10. Environment and Protostellar Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yichen

    2014-01-01

    Even today in our Galaxy, stars form from gas cores in a variety of environments, which may affect the properties of resulting star and planetary systems. Here we study the role of pressure, parameterized via ambient clump mass surface density, on protostellar evolution and appearance, focussing on low-mass, Sun-like stars and considering a range of conditions from relatively low pressure filaments in Taurus, to intermediate pressures of cluster-forming clumps like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), to very high pressures that may be found in the densest Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) or in the Galactic Center (GC). We present unified analytic and numerical models for collapse of prestellar cores, accretion disks, protostellar evolution and bipolar outflows, coupled to radiative transfer (RT) calculations and a simple astrochemical model to predict CO gas phase abundances. Prestellar cores in high pressure environments are smaller and denser and thus collapse with higher accretion rates and efficiencies, resulting...

  11. Evolution of Business Models

    OpenAIRE

    Antero, Michelle C.; Hedman, Jonas; Henningsson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The ERP industry has undergone dramatic changes over the past decades due to changing market demands, thereby creating new challenges and opportunities, which have to be managed by ERP vendors. This paper inquires into the necessary evolution of business models in a technology-intensive industry (e.g., develop new offerings, engage in partnerships, and the utilize new sales channels). This paper draws from strategy process perspective to develop an evolutionary business model (EBM...

  12. Entrepreneurship, Evolution and Geography

    OpenAIRE

    STAM, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is a fundamental driver of economic evolution. It is also a distinctly spatially uneven process, and thus an important explanation of the uneven economic development of regions and nations. Not surprisingly, entrepreneurship is a key element of evolutionary economics (Schumpeter 1934; Witt 1998; Grebel et al. 2003; Metcalfe 2004; Grebel 2007) and has been recognized as an important element in explaining (regional) economic development (Acs and Armington 2004; Audretsch et al....

  13. How evolution guides complexity

    OpenAIRE

    LARRY S. YAEGER

    2009-01-01

    Long-standing debates about the role of natural selection in the growth of biological complexity over geological time scales are difficult to resolve from the paleobiological record. Using an evolutionary model—a computational ecosystem subjected to natural selection—we investigate evolutionary trends in an information-theoretic measure of the complexity of the neural dynamics of artificial agents inhabiting the model. Our results suggest that evolution always guides complexity change, just n...

  14. Evolution and Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, S. Moss; Alves, Domingos; Martins, J. S. Sa

    2000-01-01

    The idea of this review is to connect the different models of evolution to those of biological ageing through Darwin's theory. We start with the Eigen model of quasispecies for microevolution, then introduce the Bak-Sneppen model for macroevolution and, finally, present the Penna model for biological ageing and some of its most important results. We also explore the concept of coevolution using this model.

  15. Evolution of Social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hellmann, Tim; Staudigl, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Modeling the evolution of networks is central to our understanding of modern large communication systems, such as theWorld-Wide-Web, as well as economic and social networks. The research on social and economic networks is truly interdisciplinary and the number of modeling strategies and concepts is enormous. In this survey we present some modeling approaches, covering classical random graph models and game-theoretic models, which may be used to provide a unified framework to model and analyze...

  16. Galactic Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, B K; Renda, A; Kawata, D; Lee, H; Gibson, Brad K.; Fenner, Yeshe; Renda, Agostino; Kawata, Daisuke; Lee, Hyun-chul

    2003-01-01

    The primary present-day observables upon which theories of galaxy evolution are based are a system's morphology, dynamics, colour, and chemistry. Individually, each provides an important constraint to any given model; in concert, the four represent a fundamental (intractable) boundary condition for chemodynamical simulations. We review the current state-of-the-art semi-analytical and chemodynamical models for the Milky Way, emphasising the strengths and weaknesses of both approaches.

  17. New unified evolution equation

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jyh-Liong; Li, Hsiang-nan

    1998-01-01

    We propose a new unified evolution equation for parton distribution functions appropriate for both large and small Bjorken variables $x$, which is an improved version of the Ciafaloni-Catani-Fiorani-Marchesini equation. In this new equation the cancellation of soft divergences between virtual and real gluon emissions is explicit without introducing infrared cutoffs, next-to-leading contributions to the Sudakov resummation can be included systematically. It is shown that the new equation reduc...

  18. Software evolution and maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathy, Priyadarshi

    2014-01-01

    Software Evolution and Maintenance: A Practitioner's Approach is an accessible textbook for students and professionals, which collates the advances in software development and provides the most current models and techniques in maintenance.Explains two maintenance standards: IEEE/EIA 1219 and ISO/IEC14764Discusses several commercial reverse and domain engineering toolkitsSlides for instructors are available onlineInformation is based on the IEEE SWEBOK (Software Engineering Body of Knowledge)

  19. Evolution of the tapetum.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Ivan R; Yuen, Carlton K; Buyukmihci, Nedim C.; Blankenship, Thomas N.; Fitzgerald, Paul G

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review, contrast, and compare current known tapetal mechanisms and review the implications for the evolution of the tapetum. METHODS: Ocular specimens of representative fish in key piscine families, including Acipenseridae, Cyprinidae, Chacidae; the reptilian family Crocodylidae; the mammalian family Felidae; and the Lepidopteran family Sphingidae were reviewed and compared histologically. All known varieties of tapeta were examined and classified and compared to the known cladogr...

  20. Evolution and public health

    OpenAIRE

    Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2009-01-01

    Evolution and its elements of natural selection, population migration, genetic drift, and founder effects have shaped the world in which we practice public health. Human cultures and technologies have modified life on this planet and have coevolved with myriad other species, including microorganisms; plant and animal sources of food; invertebrate vectors of disease; and intermediate hosts among birds, mammals, and nonhuman primates. Molecular mechanisms of differential resistance or susceptib...

  1. Deciphering orogenic evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Rolland, Yan; Lardeaux, Jean-Marc; Jolivet, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering orogenic evolution requires the integration of a growing number of geological and geophysical techniques on various spatial and temporal scales. Contrasting visions of mountain building and lithospheric deformation have been proposed in recent years. These models depend on the respective roles assigned to the mantle, the crust or the sediments. This article summarizes the contents of the Special Issue dedicated to 'Geodynamics and Orogenesis' following the 'Réunion previous termde...

  2. The Evolution of Cyberinsurance

    OpenAIRE

    Ruperto P. Majuca; Yurcik, William; Jay P. Kesan

    2006-01-01

    Cyberinsurance is a powerful tool to align market incentives toward improving Internet security. We trace the evolution of cyberinsurance from traditional insurance policies to early cyber-risk insurance policies to current comprehensive cyberinsurance products. We find that increasing Internet security risk in combination with the need for compliance with recent corporate legislation has contributed significantly to the demand for cyberinsurance. Cyberinsurance policies have become more comp...

  3. Reconstructing human evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalli-Sforza, M

    1999-01-01

    One can reconstruct human evolution using modern genetic data and models based on the mathematical theory of evolution and its four major factors : mutation, natural selection, statistical fluctuations in finite populations (random genetic drift), and migration. Archaeology gives some help on the major dates and events of the process. Chances of studying ancient DNA are very limited but there have been a few successful results. Studying DNA instead of proteins, as was done until a few years ago, and in particular the DNA of mitochondria and of the Y chromosome which are transmitted, respectively, by the maternal line and the paternal line, has greatly simplified the analysis. It is now possible to carry the analysis on individuals, while earlier studies were of necessity based on populations. Also the evolution of ÒcultureÓ (i.e. what we learn from others), in particular that of languages, gives some help and can be greatly enlightened by genetic studies. Even though it is largely based on mechanisms of mut...

  4. Darwinian Evolution and Fractals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Paul H.

    2009-05-01

    Did nature's beauty emerge by chance or was it intelligently designed? Richard Dawkins asserts that evolution is blind aimless chance. Michael Behe believes, on the contrary, that the first cell was intelligently designed. The scientific evidence is that nature's creativity arises from the interplay between chance AND design (laws). Darwin's ``Origin of the Species,'' published 150 years ago in 1859, characterized evolution as the interplay between variations (symbolized by dice) and the natural selection law (design). This is evident in recent discoveries in DNA, Madelbrot's Fractal Geometry of Nature, and the success of the genetic design algorithm. Algorithms for generating fractals have the same interplay between randomness and law as evolution. Fractal statistics, which are not completely random, characterize such phenomena such as fluctuations in the stock market, the Nile River, rainfall, and tree rings. As chaos theorist Joseph Ford put it: God plays dice, but the dice are loaded. Thus Darwin, in discovering the evolutionary interplay between variations and natural selection, was throwing God's dice!

  5. Frost evolution in tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review was carried out on the physical and thermal mechanisms of permafrost evaluation in soils and uranium tailings. The primary mechanism controlling permafrost evolution is conductive heat transfer with the latent heat of fusion of water being liberated as phase change occurs. Depending on the soil properties and freezing rate, pore water can be expelled from the frost front or pore water can migrate towards the frost front. Solute redistribution may occur as the frost front penetrates into the soil. The rate of frost penetration is a function of the thermal properties of the tailings and the climatic conditions. Computer modelling programmes capable of modelling permafrost evolution were reviewed. The GEOTHERM programme was selected as being the most appropriate for this study. The GEOTHERM programme uses the finite element method of thermal analysis. The ground surface temperature is determined by solving the energy balance equations a the ground surface. The GEOTHERM programme was used to simulate the permafrost evolution in the Key Lake Mine tailings located in north central Saskatchewan. The analyses indicated that the existing frozen zones in the tailing pond will eventually thaw if an average snow depth covers the tailings. Hundreds of years are required to thaw the tailings. If minimal snow cover is present the extent of the frozen zone in the tailings will increase

  6. Evolution of segmented strings

    CERN Document Server

    Gubser, Steven S

    2016-01-01

    I explain how to evolve segmented strings in de Sitter and anti-de Sitter spaces of any dimension in terms of forward-directed null displacements. The evolution is described entirely in terms of discrete hops which do not require a continuum spacetime. Moreover, the evolution rule is purely algebraic, so it can be defined not only on ordinary real de Sitter and anti-de Sitter, but also on the rational points of the quadratic equations that define these spaces. For three-dimensional anti-de Sitter space, a simpler evolution rule is possible that descends from the Wess-Zumino-Witten equations of motion. In this case, one may replace three-dimensional anti-de Sitter space by a non-compact discrete subgroup of SL(2,R) whose structure is related to the Pell equation. A discrete version of the BTZ black hole can be constructed as a quotient of this subgroup. This discrete black hole avoids the firewall paradox by a curious mechanism: even for large black holes, there are no points inside the horizon until one reach...

  7. Anmeldelse af Evolution, Literature and Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2011-01-01

    Diskussion af basisproblemer i evolutionær fiktionsteori med udgangspunkt i en anmeldelse af Evolution, Literature and Film......Diskussion af basisproblemer i evolutionær fiktionsteori med udgangspunkt i en anmeldelse af Evolution, Literature and Film...

  8. The Functional Anatomy of the Carpometacarpal Complex in Anthropoids and Its Implications for the Evolution of the Hominoid Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Michael S; Simpson, Scott W; Lovejoy, C Owen

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we described several features of the carpometacarpal joints in extant large-bodied apes that are likely adaptations to the functional demands of vertical climbing and suspension. We observed that all hominids, including modern humans and the 4.4-million-year-old hominid Ardipithecus ramidus, lacked these features. Here, we assess the uniqueness of these features in a large sample of monkey, ape, and human hands. These new data provide additional insights into the functional adaptations and evolution of the anthropoid hand. Our survey highlights a series of anatomical adaptations that restrict motion between the second and third metacarpals (MC2 and MC3) and their associated carpals in extant apes, achieved via joint reorganization and novel energy dissipation mechanisms. Their hamate-MC4 and -MC5 joint surface morphologies suggest limited mobility, at least in Pan. Gibbons and spider monkeys have several characters (angled MC3, complex capitate-MC3 joint topography, variably present capitate-MC3 ligaments) that suggest functional convergence in response to suspensory locomotion. Baboons have carpometacarpal morphology suggesting flexion/extension at these joints beyond that observed in most other Old World monkeys, probably as an energy dissipating mechanism minimizing collision forces during terrestrial locomotion. All hominids lack these specializations of the extant great apes, suggesting that vertical climbing was never a central feature of our ancestral locomotor repertoire. Furthermore, the reinforced carpometacarpus of vertically climbing African apes was likely appropriated for knuckle-walking in concert with other novel potential energy dissipating mechanisms. The most parsimonious explanation of the structural similarity of these carpometacarpal specializations in great apes is that they evolved independently. PMID:26916787

  9. Evolution and human sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory.

  10. Evolution before genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasas Vera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our current understanding of evolution is so tightly linked to template-dependent replication of DNA and RNA molecules that the old idea from Oparin of a self-reproducing 'garbage bag' ('coacervate' of chemicals that predated fully-fledged cell-like entities seems to be farfetched to most scientists today. However, this is exactly the kind of scheme we propose for how Darwinian evolution could have occurred prior to template replication. Results We cannot confirm previous claims that autocatalytic sets of organic polymer molecules could undergo evolution in any interesting sense by themselves. While we and others have previously imagined inhibition would result in selectability, we found that it produced multiple attractors in an autocatalytic set that cannot be selected for. Instead, we discovered that if general conditions are satisfied, the accumulation of adaptations in chemical reaction networks can occur. These conditions are the existence of rare reactions producing viable cores (analogous to a genotype, that sustains a molecular periphery (analogous to a phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that only when a chemical reaction network consists of many such viable cores, can it be evolvable. When many cores are enclosed in a compartment there is competition between cores within the same compartment, and when there are many compartments, there is between-compartment competition due to the phenotypic effects of cores and their periphery at the compartment level. Acquisition of cores by rare chemical events, and loss of cores at division, allows macromutation, limited heredity and selectability, thus explaining how a poor man's natural selection could have operated prior to genetic templates. This is the only demonstration to date of a mechanism by which pre-template accumulation of adaptation could occur. Reviewers This article was reviewed by William Martin and Eugene Koonin.

  11. Microphysics evolution and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A few general features of microscopics evolution and their relationship with microscopics methodology are briefly surveyed. Several pluri-disciplinary and interdisciplinary aspects of microscopics research are also discussed in the present scientific context. The need for an equilibrium between individual tendencies and collective constraints required by team work, already formulated thirty years ago by Frederic Joliot, is particularly stressed in the present conjuncture of Nuclear Research favouring very large team projects and discouraging individual initiatives. The increasing importance of the science of science (due to their multiple social, economical, ecological aspects) and the stronger competition between national and international tendencies of scientific (and technical) cooperation are also discussed. (author)

  12. Evolution in the Multiverse

    CERN Document Server

    Standish, R K

    2000-01-01

    In the {\\em Many Worlds Interpretation} of quantum mechanics, the range of possible worlds (or histories) provides variation, and the Anthropic Principle is a selective principle analogous to natural selection. When looked on in this way, the ``process'' by which the laws and constants of physics is determined not too different from the process that gave rise to our current biodiversity, i.e. Darwinian evolution. This has implications for the fields of SETI and Artificial Life, which are based on a philosophy of the inevitability of life.

  13. Requirements Evolution for Dwellings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Giuşcă

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available At a certain point of society evolution appears, due to an aberrant culture, more actually due to a subculture, one point occurred during the development of society, due to an aberrant culture, an exacerbated resources consumption, exaggerated, extravagant, that generates waste. Were produced objects without value having a small using importance, it appears whim, unnecessary, kitsch or groundless products. There was an exaggerated consumption even for fundamental or existential needs fulfilment. In our days in superstores the market basket is fill out and that goes to indigestion, obesity, diabetes, excess medicines, cardiac crisis and finally nothingness.

  14. Chemical evolution of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial conditions are probably set by results of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBNS) without intervening complications affecting the composition of visible matter so that extrapolation of observed abundances to BBNS products seems fairly secure. Primordial helium and deuterium abundances deduced in this way place upper and lower limits on baryonic density implying that both baryonic and non-baryonic dark matter exist and predicting no more than 3 neutrino flavours as recently confirmed in accelerator experiments. The validity of simple galactic chemical evolution models assumed in extrapolating back to the Big Bang is examined in the light of the frequency distribution of iron or oxygen abundances in the Galactic halo, bulge and disk. (orig.)

  15. Gas evolution from spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas evolution from spherical solids or liquids where no convective processes are active is analyzed. Three problem classes are considered: (1) constant concentration boundary, (2) Henry's law (first order) boundary, and (3) Sieverts' law (second order) boundary. General expressions are derived for dimensionless times and transport parameters appropriate to each of the classes considered. However, in the second order case, the non-linearities of the problem require the presence of explicit dimensional variables in the solution. Sample problems are solved to illustrate the method. 5 refs., 4 figs

  16. String Evolution with Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, C.J.A.P.(Centro de Astrofísica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, Porto, 4150-762, Portugal); Shellard, E. P. S.

    1995-01-01

    We study the effects of friction on the scaling evolution of string networks in condensed matter and cosmological contexts. We derive a generalized `one-scale' model with the string correlation length $L$ and velocity $v$ as dynamical variables. In non-relativistic systems, we obtain a well-known $L\\propto t^{1/2}$ law, showing that loop production is important. For electroweak cosmic strings, we show transient damped epoch scaling with $L\\propto t^{5/4}$ (or, in the matter era, $L\\propto t^{...

  17. Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, A.B.; Varela Gasque, Ana Sofia; Dionigi, F.;

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is growing in significance as society begins to rely more on renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. Thus, research on designing new, inexpensive, and abundant HER catalysts is important. Here, we describe how a simple experiment...... catalysts based on this. Suited for upper-level high school and first-year university students, this exercise involves using a basic two-cell electrochemical setup to test multiple electrode materials as catalysts at one applied potential, and then constructing a volcano curve with the resulting currents...

  18. A new evolution equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new evolution equation is proposed for the gluon density relevant (GLR) for the region of small xB. It generalizes the GLR equation and allows deeper penetration in dense parton systems than the GLR equation does. This generalization consists of taking shadowing effects more comprehensively into account by including multi gluon correlations, and allowing for an arbitrary initial gluon distribution in a hadron. We solve the new equation for fixed αs. It is found that the effects of multi gluon correlations on the deep-inelastic structure function are small. (author) 15 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Concrete Chemical Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.H. Tang

    1998-07-31

    The objectives of this analysis are to discuss and evaluate testing results that were performed for the M&O by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) to evaluate the potential long-term evolution of organic admixtures in cementitious materials at elevated temperatures. The testing was designed to help provide a basis for a determination by the Performance Assessment group (PA) of the long-term acceptability and longevity of cementitious materials for repository use. The main purpose of the testing was to assess the evolution of gases (especially CO{sub 2}) from hydrated cement paste at elevated temperatures and to determine the impact on alkalinity, i.e., the pH value of cement paste pore solution. This information in turn can be used as scoping information to determine if further tests of this nature are needed to support PA. As part of this discussion and evaluation of the PSU results, an assessment of alkalinity in a ''cementitious repository'' and an evaluation of organic materials are presented.

  20. Stellar Structure and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenhahn, Rudolf; Weiss, Achim

    2013-01-01

    This long-awaited second edition of the classical textbook on Stellar Structure and Evolution by Kippenhahn and Weigert is a thoroughly revised version of the original text. Taking into account modern observational constraints as well as additional physical effects such as mass loss and diffusion, Achim Weiss and Rudolf Kippenhahn have succeeded in bringing the book up to the state-of-the-art with respect to both the presentation of stellar physics and the presentation and interpretation of current sophisticated stellar models. The well-received and proven pedagogical approach of the first edition has been retained. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of the physics of the stellar interior and the underlying fundamental processes and parameters. The models developed to explain the stability, dynamics and evolution of the stars are presented and great care is taken to detail the various stages in a star’s life. Just as the first edition, which remained a standard work for more than 20 years after its...

  1. The Evolution of Photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Review was written by Engelbert Broda, an Austrian Chemist and Physicist, on February the 10th 1976. The merits of the inductive and the deductive approach in tracing the pathways of evolution are discussed. Using the latter approach, it is concluded that photosynthesis followed fermentation as a method of obtaining energy-rich compounds, especially ATP. Photosynthesis probably arose by utilization of membranes for bioenergetic processes. Originally photosynthesis served photophosphorylation (ATP production), later reducing power was also made, either by open-ended, light-powered, electron flow or driven by ATP; ultimate electron donors were at first hydrogen or sulfur compounds, and later water, the last-named capability Was acquired by prokaryotic algae the earliest plants, similar to the recent blue-greens. When free oxygen entered the atmosphere for the first time, various forms of respiration (oxidative phosphorylation) became possible. Mechanistically, respiration evolved from photosynthesis (‘conversion hypotheses’). Prokaryotic algae are probably the ancestors of the chloroplasts in the eukaryotes, In the evolution of the eukaryotes, not much change in the basic processes of photosynthesis occurred.(author)

  2. Evolution of Oxygenic Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Woodward W.; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E.

    2016-06-01

    The origin of oxygenic photosynthesis was the most important metabolic innovation in Earth history. It allowed life to generate energy and reducing power directly from sunlight and water, freeing it from the limited resources of geochemically derived reductants. This greatly increased global primary productivity and restructured ecosystems. The release of O2 as an end product of water oxidation led to the rise of oxygen, which dramatically altered the redox state of Earth's atmosphere and oceans and permanently changed all major biogeochemical cycles. Furthermore, the biological availability of O2 allowed for the evolution of aerobic respiration and novel biosynthetic pathways, facilitating much of the richness we associate with modern biology, including complex multicellularity. Here we critically review and synthesize information from the geological and biological records for the origin and evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Data from both of these archives illustrate that this metabolism first appeared in early Paleoproterozoic time and, despite its biogeochemical prominence, is a relatively late invention in the context of our planet's history.

  3. The soliton stars evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, I; Bednarek, Ilona; Manka, Ryszard

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of a soliton star filled with fermions is studied in the framework of general relativity. Such a system can be described by the surface tension $\\sigma$, the bag constant $B$, and the fermion number density affects the spacetime inside the soliton. Whether it is described by Friedman or de Sitter metric depends on the prevailing parameter. The whole spacetime is devided by the surface of the soliton into the false vacuum region inside the soliton and the true vacuum region outside, the latter being described by the Schwarzschild line element. The aim of this paper is to study the equations of motion of the domain wall in two cases. In the first case the de Sitter metric describes the interior in the first case, and in the second case it is replaced by the Friedman metric. In both of them the Schwarzschild metric is outside the soliton. From the analysis of obtained equations one can draw conclusions concerning further evolution of a soliton star.

  4. Evolution of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 87 papers divided into 8 chapters. The chapter Bipolar outflows and star formations contains papers on optical and infrared observations of young bipolar outflow objects and the theory thereof, and on observations of cometary nebulae. The chapter Masers and early stellar evolution discusses molecular masers and star forming regions. The following chapter contains papers on initial mass function and star formation rates in galaxies. The chapter Clusters and star formation contains data on OB associations and open star clusters, their development and observations, CO and H2 in our galaxy, the four vector model of radio emission and an atlas of the wavelength dependence of ultraviolet extinction in the Galaxy. The most voluminous is the chapter Evolution of galaxies. It contains papers on the theories of the physical and chemodynamic development of galaxies of different types, rotation research and rotation velocities of galaxies and their arms, and on mathematical and laboratory models of morphological development. Chapter seven contains papers dealing with active extragalactic objects, quasars and active galactic nuclei. The last chapter discusses cosmological models, the theory of the inflationary universe, and presents an interpretation of the central void and X-ray background. (M.D.). 299 figs., 48 tabs., 1651 refs

  5. Evolution of stellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stellar systems of which the evolution will be considered in this thesis, are either galaxies, which contain about 1011 stars, or binary systems, which consist of only two stars. It is seen that binary systems can give us some insight into the relative age of the nucleus of M31. The positive correlation between the metal content of a galaxy and its mass, first noted for elliptical galaxies, seems to be a general property of galaxies of all types. The observed increase of metallicity with galaxy mass is too large to be accounted for by differences in the evolutionary stage of galaxies. To explain the observed correlation it is proposed that a relatively larger proportion of massive stars is formed in more massive galaxies. The physical basis is that the formation of massive stars seems to be tied to the enhanced gas-dynamical activity in more massive galaxies. A specific aspect of the production of heavy elements by massive stars is investigated in some detail. In 1979 a cluster of 18 point X-ray sources within 400 pc of the centre of M31 was detected with the Einstein satellite. This is a remarkable result since no equivalent of this cluster has been observed in the nucleus of our own Galaxy, which otherwise is very similar to that of M31. An explanation for this phenomenon is proposed, suggesting that X-ray binaries are the products of the long-term evolution of nova systems. (Auth.)

  6. Ultrastructure, macromolecules, and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Lawrence S

    1981-01-01

    Thus far in the history of biology, two, and only two, fundamental principles have come to light that pervade and unify the entire science-the cell theory and the concept of evolution. While it is true that recently opened fields of inves­ tigation have given rise to several generalizations of wide impact, such as the universality of DNA and the energetic dynamics of ecology, closer inspection reveals them to be part and parcel of either of the first two mentioned. Because in the final analysis energy can act upon an organism solely at the cellular level, its effects may be perceived basically to represent one facet of cell me­ tabolism. Similarly, because the DNA theory centers upon the means by which cells build proteins and reproduce themselves, it too proves to be only one more, even though an exciting, aspect of the cell theory. In fact, if the matter is given closer scrutiny, evolution itself can be viewed as being a fundamental portion of the cell concept, for its effects arise only as a consequence ...

  7. Student Visual Communication of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Cook, Kristin

    2016-05-01

    Despite growing recognition of the importance of visual representations to science education, previous research has given attention mostly to verbal modalities of evolution instruction. Visual aspects of classroom learning of evolution are yet to be systematically examined by science educators. The present study attends to this issue by exploring the types of evolutionary imagery deployed by secondary students. Our visual design analysis revealed that students resorted to two larger categories of images when visually communicating evolution: spatial metaphors (images that provided a spatio-temporal account of human evolution as a metaphorical "walk" across time and space) and symbolic representations ("icons of evolution" such as personal portraits of Charles Darwin that simply evoked evolutionary theory rather than metaphorically conveying its conceptual contents). It is argued that students need opportunities to collaboratively critique evolutionary imagery and to extend their visual perception of evolution beyond dominant images.

  8. Plant domestication slows pest evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Martin M; Lochab, Amaneet K; Turley, Nash E; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural practices such as breeding resistant varieties and pesticide use can cause rapid evolution of pest species, but it remains unknown how plant domestication itself impacts pest contemporary evolution. Using experimental evolution on a comparative phylogenetic scale, we compared the evolutionary dynamics of a globally important economic pest - the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) - growing on 34 plant taxa, represented by 17 crop species and their wild relatives. Domestication slowed aphid evolution by 13.5%, maintained 10.4% greater aphid genotypic diversity and 5.6% higher genotypic richness. The direction of evolution (i.e. which genotypes increased in frequency) differed among independent domestication events but was correlated with specific plant traits. Individual-based simulation models suggested that domestication affects aphid evolution directly by reducing the strength of selection and indirectly by increasing aphid density and thus weakening genetic drift. Our results suggest that phenotypic changes during domestication can alter pest evolutionary dynamics.

  9. Toward Documentation of Program Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestdam, Thomas; Nørmark, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    The documentation of a program often falls behind the evolution of the program source files. When this happens it may be attractive to shift the documentation mode from updating the documentation to documenting the evolution of the program. This paper describes tools that support the documentation...... of program evolution. The tools are refinements of the Elucidative Programming tools, which in turn are inspired from Literate Programming tools. The version-aware Elucidative Programming tools are able to process a set of program source files in different versions together with unversioned documentation...... files. The paper introduces a set of fine grained program evolution steps, which are supported directly by the documentation tools. The automatic discovery of the fine grained program evolution steps makes up a platform for documenting coarse grained and more high-level program evolution steps...

  10. Conservative Evolution, Sustainability, and Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Náray-Szabó, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    In his article "Conservative Evolution, Sustainability, and Culture" Gábor Náray-Szabó argues that evolution is conservative in the sense that throughout the history of the universe old constructs like elementary particles, amino acids, and living cells remained conserved while the world evolved/evolves in complexity. A similar process can be observed in cultural evolution as components of society and culture continue to evolve. Considering the increasing pressure on natural resources by mate...

  11. Humboldt, Baer und die Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schmuck

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wie hielt es Alexander von Humboldt mit der Evolution? Dieser Frage geht Thomas Schmuck nach, denn es erscheint ihm auffällig, dass sich Humboldt in seinem umfangreichen Werk kaum zu Fragen der Evolution äußert. An den wenigen Passagen, in denen Humboldt evolutive Themen aufgriff, distanzierte er sich in vorsichtiger Skepsis von nicht durch Empirie gestützten Spekulationen.

  12. Tracing Cultural Evolution Through Memetics

    OpenAIRE

    Tiktik Dewi Sartika

    2004-01-01

    Viewing human being, as a part of evolution process is still a controversial issue for some people, in fact the evolution runs. As a sociocultural entity, human being has distinctive characters in its evolution process. A Theory inherited from Darwin may have only been able to answer how a simple unit such genes evolve to such complex animal like human. Yet, how among those complex animals interact, communicate, and replicate idea in so forth formed a such self-organized sociocultural complex...

  13. Nuclear Shell Structure Evolution Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhengda; Wang, Xiaobin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaochun

    2012-01-01

    The Self-similar-structure shell model (SSM) comes from the evolution of the conventional shell model (SM) and keeps the energy level of SM single particle harmonic oscillation motion. In SM, single particle motion is the positive harmonic oscillation and in SSM, the single particle motion is the negative harmonic oscillation. In this paper a nuclear evolution equation (NEE) is proposed. NEE describes the nuclear evolution process from gas state to liquid state and reveals the relations among...

  14. Evolution algebras and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Jianjun Paul

    2008-01-01

    Behind genetics and Markov chains, there is an intrinsic algebraic structure. It is defined as a type of new algebra: as evolution algebra. This concept lies between algebras and dynamical systems. Algebraically, evolution algebras are non-associative Banach algebras; dynamically, they represent discrete dynamical systems. Evolution algebras have many connections with other mathematical fields including graph theory, group theory, stochastic processes, dynamical systems, knot theory, 3-manifolds, and the study of the Ihara-Selberg zeta function. In this volume the foundation of evolution algebra theory and applications in non-Mendelian genetics and Markov chains is developed, with pointers to some further research topics.

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: Guinea baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available o_papio_L.png Papio_papio_NL.png Papio_papio_S.png Papio_papio_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: hamadryas baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te Papio_hamadryas_L.png Papio_hamadryas_NL.png Papio_hamadryas_S.png Papio_hamadryas_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio...+hamadryas&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&...t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=186 ...

  17. Micro-droplet based directed evolution outperforms conventional laboratory evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjostrom, Staffan L.; Huang, Mingtao; Nielsen, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    We present droplet adaptive laboratory evolution (DrALE), a directed evolution method used to improve industrial enzyme producing microorganisms for e.g. feedstock digestion. DrALE is based linking a desired phenotype to growth rate allowing only desired cells to proliferate. Single cells...... a whole-genome mutated library of yeast cells for α-amylase activity....

  18. Evolution of Flat Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şt. Vasiliu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Roofs are constructive subassembles that are located at the top of buildings, which toghether with perimetral walls and some elements of the infrastructure belongs to the subsystem elements that close the building. Roofs must meet resistance requirements to mechanical action, thermal insulating, waterproofing and acoustic, fire resistance, durability, economy and aesthetics. The man saw the need to build roofs from the oldest ancient times. Even if the design of buildings has an empirical character, are known and are preserved until today constructions that are made in antiquity, by the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans with architectural achievements, worthy of admiration and in present time. General composition of civil construction has been influenced throughout the evolution of construction history by the level of production forces and properties of building materials available in every historical epoch. For over five millennia, building materials were stone, wood and ceramic products (concrete was used by theRomans only as filling material.

  19. Evolution of biological information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, T D

    2000-07-15

    How do genetic systems gain information by evolutionary processes? Answering this question precisely requires a robust, quantitative measure of information. Fortunately, 50 years ago Claude Shannon defined information as a decrease in the uncertainty of a receiver. For molecular systems, uncertainty is closely related to entropy and hence has clear connections to the Second Law of Thermodynamics. These aspects of information theory have allowed the development of a straightforward and practical method of measuring information in genetic control systems. Here this method is used to observe information gain in the binding sites for an artificial 'protein' in a computer simulation of evolution. The simulation begins with zero information and, as in naturally occurring genetic systems, the information measured in the fully evolved binding sites is close to that needed to locate the sites in the genome. The transition is rapid, demonstrating that information gain can occur by punctuated equilibrium. PMID:10908337

  20. Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Marcel A

    2013-01-01

    Genomic studies have provided a refined understanding of the genetic diversity within the Mycobacterium genus, and more specifically within Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These results have informed a new perspective on the macro- and micro-evolution of the tubercle bacillus. In the first step, a M. kansasii-like opportunistic pathogen acquired new genes, through horizontal gene transfer, that enabled it to better exploit an intracellular niche and ultimately evolve into a professional pathogen. In the second step, different subspecies and strains of the M. tuberculosis complex emerged through mutation and deletion of unnecessary DNA. Understanding the differences between M. tuberculosis and related less pathogenic mycobacteria is expected to reveal key bacterial virulence mechanisms and provide opportunities to understand host resistance to mycobacterial infection. Understanding differences within the M. tuberculosis complex and the evolutionary forces shaping these differences is important for investigating the basis of its success as both a symbiont and a pathogen.

  1. Natural Evolution Strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Wierstra, Daan; Glasmachers, Tobias; Sun, Yi; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents Natural Evolution Strategies (NES), a recent family of algorithms that constitute a more principled approach to black-box optimization than established evolutionary algorithms. NES maintains a parameterized distribution on the set of solution candidates, and the natural gradient is used to update the distribution's parameters in the direction of higher expected fitness. We introduce a collection of techniques that address issues of convergence, robustness, sample complexity, computational complexity and sensitivity to hyperparameters. This paper explores a number of implementations of the NES family, ranging from general-purpose multi-variate normal distributions to heavy-tailed and separable distributions tailored towards global optimization and search in high dimensional spaces, respectively. Experimental results show best published performance on various standard benchmarks, as well as competitive performance on others.

  2. Monitoring Evolution at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, P; Murphy, S; Pigueiras, L; Santos, M

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two years, the operation of the CERN Data Centres went through significant changes with the introduction of new mechanisms for hardware procurement, new services for cloud provisioning and configuration management, among other improvements. These changes resulted in an increase of resources being operated in a more dynamic environment. Today, the CERN Data Centres provide over 11000 multi-core processor servers, 130 PB disk servers, 100 PB tape robots, and 150 high performance tape drives. To cope with these developments, an evolution of the data centre monitoring tools was also required. This modernisation was based on a number of guiding rules: sustain the increase of resources, adapt to the new dynamic nature of the data centres, make monitoring data easier to share, give more flexibility to Service Managers on how they publish and consume monitoring metrics and logs, establish a common repository of monitoring data, optimise the handling of monitoring notifications, and replace the previous ...

  3. Influenza Differentiation and Evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study is to do a very wide analysis of HA, NA and M influenza gene segments to find short nucleotide regions, which differentiate between strains (i.e. H1, H2, ... etc.), hosts, geographic regions, time when sequence was found and combination of time and region using a simple methodology. Finding regions differentiating between strains has as its goal the construction of a Luminex microarray which will allow quick and efficient strain recognition. Discovery for the other splitting factors could shed light on structures significant for host specificity and on the history of influenza evolution. A large number of places in the HA, NA and M gene segments were found that can differentiate between hosts, regions, time and combination of time and region. Also very good differentiation between different Hx strains can be seen. We link one of our findings to a proposed stochastic model of creation of viral phylogenetic trees. (authors)

  4. Evolution of Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antero, Michelle C.; Hedman, Jonas; Henningsson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The ERP industry has undergone dramatic changes over the past decades due to changing market demands, thereby creating new challenges and opportunities, which have to be managed by ERP vendors. This paper inquires into the necessary evolution of business models in a technology-intensive industry (e.......g., develop new offerings, engage in partnerships, and the utilize new sales channels). This paper draws from strategy process perspective to develop an evolutionary business model (EBM) framework that explains the components and processes involved. The framework is then applied to a longitudinal case study...... of SAP to explain how its success in a technology-intensive industry hinges on its ability to reconfigure its business model. The paper contributes to the extant literature on business models in two ways: first, by identifying and explaining the need for an evolutionary perspective; and second...

  5. Explaining Poverty Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Mohammad Azhar; Jones, Edward Samuel;

    Measuring poverty remains a complex and contentious issue. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa where poverty rates are higher, information bases typically weaker, and the underlying determinants of welfare relatively volatile. This paper employs recently collected data on household...... consumption in Mozambique to examine the evolution of consumption poverty with focus on the period 2002/03 to 2008/09. The paper contributes in four areas. First, the period in question was characterized by major movements in international commodity prices. Mozambique provides an illuminating case study...... of the implications of these world commodity price changes for living standards of poor people. Second, a novel ‘backcasting’ approach using a computable general equilibrium model of Mozambique, linked to a poverty module is introduced. Third, the backcasting approach is also employed to rigorously examine...

  6. Manufacturing network evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Farooq, Sami; Johansen, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper examines the effect of changes at the manufacturing plant level on other plants in the manufacturing network and also investigates the role of manufacturing plants on the evolution of a manufacturing network. Design/methodology/approach –The research questions are developed...... by identifying the gaps in the reviewed literature. The paper is based on three case studies undertaken in Danish manufacturing companies to explore in detail their manufacturing plants and networks. The cases provide a sound basis for developing the research questions and explaining the interaction between...... different manufacturing plants in the network and their impact on network transformation. Findings – The paper highlights the dominant role of manufacturing plants in the continuously changing shape of a manufacturing network. The paper demonstrates that a product or process change at one manufacturing...

  7. [Metalworking industry management evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the evolution drivers of the management systems in the metalworking industry, mainly characterized as "automotive", starting with the "mass production" model, followed for the development of Italian industry in the '50. Through the socio-economic changes of the '90/10, the metalworking plants were deeply restructured with the introduction of computers in the production systems, and then with the first global benchmarks such as the "lean production", towards the needed operational flexibility to respond to the market dynamics. Plants change radically, company networks become real, ICT services are fundamental elements for the integration. These trends help visualizing a new "Factory of the Future" for the years 2020/30, where the competition will be based on the socio-economical, technological and environmental factors included in the "Competitive Sustainable Manufacturing" paradigm. PMID:22073665

  8. Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Kentaro; Reddy, Naveen; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.

    2016-07-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the current status of observational and computational studies on galaxy formation and evolution. In particular, a joint analysis of star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and metallicities of galaxies throughout cosmic time can shed light on the processes by which galaxies build up their stellar mass and enrich the environment with heavy elements. Comparison of such observations and the results of numerical simulations can give us insights on the physical importance of various feedback effects by supernovae and active galactic nuclei. In Sect. 1, we first discuss the primary methods used to deduce the SFRs, stellar masses, and (primarily) gas-phase metallicities in high-redshift galaxies. Then, we show how these quantities are related to each other and evolve with time. In Sect. 2, we further examine the distribution of SFRs in galaxies following the `Main Sequence' paradigm. We show how the so-called `starbursts' display higher specific SFRs and SF efficiencies by an order of magnitude. We use this to devise a simple description of the evolution of the star-forming galaxy population since z ˜3 that can successfully reproduce some of the observed statistics in the infrared (IR) wavelength. We also discuss the properties of molecular gas. In Sect. 3, we highlight some of the recent studies of high-redshift galaxy formation using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We discuss the physical properties of simulated galaxies such as luminosity function and escape fraction of ionizing photons, which are important statistics for reionization of the Universe. In particular the escape fraction of ionizing photons has large uncertainties, and studying gamma-ray bursts (which is the main topic of this conference) can also set observational constraints on this uncertain physical parameter as well as cosmic star formation rate density.

  9. Chemical Evolution in Omega Centauri

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Verne V.

    2003-01-01

    The globular cluster Omega Centauri displays evidence of a complex star formation history and peculiar internal chemical evolution, setting it apart from essentially all other globular clusters of the Milky Way. In this review we discuss the nature of the chemical evolution that has occurred within Omega Cen and attempt to construct a simple scenario to explain its chemistry.

  10. Prolegomenon to patterns in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Stuart A

    2014-09-01

    Despite Darwin, we remain children of Newton and dream of a grand theory that is epistemologically complete and would allow prediction of the evolution of the biosphere. The main purpose of this article is to show that this dream is false, and bears on studying patterns of evolution. To do so, I must justify the use of the word "function" in biology, when physics has only happenings. The concept of "function" lifts biology irreducibly above physics, for as we shall see, we cannot prestate the ever new biological functions that arise and constitute the very phase space of evolution. Hence, we cannot mathematize the detailed becoming of the biosphere, nor write differential equations for functional variables we do not know ahead of time, nor integrate those equations, so no laws "entail" evolution. The dream of a grand theory fails. In place of entailing laws, I propose a post-entailing law explanatory framework in which Actuals arise in evolution that constitute new boundary conditions that are enabling constraints that create new, typically unprestatable, adjacent possible opportunities for further evolution, in which new Actuals arise, in a persistent becoming. Evolution flows into a typically unprestatable succession of adjacent possibles. Given the concept of function, the concept of functional closure of an organism making a living in its world becomes central. Implications for patterns in evolution include historical reconstruction, and statistical laws such as the distribution of extinction events, or species per genus, and the use of formal cause, not efficient cause, laws.

  11. Evolution of the TOR Pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.J.P. van; Zwartkruis, F.J.; Bos, J.L.; Snel, B.

    2011-01-01

    The TOR kinase is a major regulator of growth in eukaryotes. Many components of the TOR pathway are implicated in cancer and metabolic diseases in humans. Analysis of the evolution of TOR and its pathway may provide fundamental insight into the evolution of growth regulation in eukaryotes and provid

  12. Evolution & the Cesarean Section Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution." This was the title of an essay by geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky writing in 1973. Many causes have been given for the increased Cesarean section rate in developed countries, but biologic evolution has not been one of them. The C-section rate will continue to rise, because the…

  13. Surface Evolution during MBE Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, C.; Orr, B. G.

    The evolution of surfaces grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is an interesting scientific issue as well as an important technological concern. In this review article we examine surface evolution during film growth from several different points of view. Experimental, simulational and analytical descriptions of the process are discussed.

  14. Major transitions in human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Robert A; Martin, Lawrence; Mirazón Lahr, Marta; Stringer, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Evolutionary problems are often considered in terms of 'origins', and research in human evolution seen as a search for human origins. However, evolution, including human evolution, is a process of transitions from one state to another, and so questions are best put in terms of understanding the nature of those transitions. This paper discusses how the contributions to the themed issue 'Major transitions in human evolution' throw light on the pattern of change in hominin evolution. Four questions are addressed: (1) Is there a major divide between early (australopithecine) and later (Homo) evolution? (2) Does the pattern of change fit a model of short transformations, or gradual evolution? (3) Why is the role of Africa so prominent? (4) How are different aspects of adaptation-genes, phenotypes and behaviour-integrated across the transitions? The importance of developing technologies and approaches and the enduring role of fieldwork are emphasized.This article is part of the themed issue 'Major transitions in human evolution'. PMID:27298461

  15. Two Level Parallel Grammatical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ošmera, Pavel

    This paper describes a Two Level Parallel Grammatical Evolution (TLPGE) that can evolve complete programs using a variable length linear genome to govern the mapping of a Backus Naur Form grammar definition. To increase the efficiency of Grammatical Evolution (GE) the influence of backward processing was tested and a second level with differential evolution was added. The significance of backward coding (BC) and the comparison with standard coding of GEs is presented. The new method is based on parallel grammatical evolution (PGE) with a backward processing algorithm, which is further extended with a differential evolution algorithm. Thus a two-level optimization method was formed in attempt to take advantage of the benefits of both original methods and avoid their difficulties. Both methods used are discussed and the architecture of their combination is described. Also application is discussed and results on a real-word application are described.

  16. Evolution of the Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, David; Engel, Michael S.

    2005-05-01

    This book chronicles the complete evolutionary history of insects--their living diversity and relationships as well as 400 million years of fossils. Introductory sections cover the living species diversity of insects, methods of reconstructing evolutionary relationships, basic insect structure, and the diverse modes of insect fossilization and major fossil deposits. Major sections then explore the relationships and evolution of each order of hexapods. The volume also chronicles major episodes in the evolutionary history of insects from their modest beginnings in the Devonian and the origin of wings hundreds of millions of years before pterosaurs and birds to the impact of mass extinctions and the explosive radiation of angiosperms on insects, and how they evolved into the most complex societies in nature. Whereas other volumes focus on either living species or fossils, this is the first comprehensive synthesis of all aspects of insect evolution. Illustrated with 955 photo- and electron- micrographs, drawings, diagrams, and field photos, many in full color and virtually all of them original, this reference will appeal to anyone engaged with insect diversity--professional entomologists and students, insect and fossil collectors, and naturalists. David Grimaldi and Michael S. Engel have collectively published over 200 scientific articles and monographs on the relationships and fossil record of insects, including 10 articles in the journals Science, Nature, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. David Grimaldi is curator in the Division of Invertebrate Zoology, American Museum of Natural History and adjunct professor at Cornell University, Columbia University, and the City University of New York. David Grimaldi has traveled in 40 countries on 6 continents, collecting and studying recent species of insects and conducting fossil excavations. He is the author of Amber: Window to the Past (Abrams, 2003). Michael S. Engel is an assistant professor in the

  17. Mercury's core evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  18. Radio source evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Perucho, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Baldwin (1982) wrote that "the distribution of sources in the radio luminosity, P, overall physical size, D, diagram" could be considered as "the radio astronomer's H-R diagram". However, unlike the case of stars, not only the intrinsic properties of the jets, but also those of the host galaxy and the intergalactic medium are relevant to explain the evolutionary tracks of radio radio sources. In this contribution I review the current status of our understanding of the evolution of radio sources from a theoretical and numerical perspective, using the P-D diagram as a framework. An excess of compact (linear size < 10 kpc) sources could be explained by low-power jets being decelerated within the host galaxy, as shown by recent numerical simulations. These decelerated jets could also explain the population of the radio sources that have been recently classified as FR0. I will discuss the possible tracks that radio sources may follow within this diagram, and some of the physical processes that can explain the d...

  19. Evolution and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary medicine is a new field whose goal is to incorporate an evolutionary perspective into medical education, research, and practice. Evolutionary biologists and physicians have traditionally been concerned with different problems and have developed different ways of approaching and understanding biological phenomena. Evolutionary biologists analyze the properties of populations and the ways in which populations change over time, while physicians focus on the care of their individual patients. Evolutionists are concerned with the ultimate causes of biological phenomena, causes that operated during the phylogenetic history of a species, while physicians and biomedical scientists have been more interested in proximate causes, causes that operate during the ontogeny and life of an individual. Evolutionary medicine is based on the belief that an integration of these complementary views of biological phenomena will improve our understanding of health and disease. This essay reviews the theory of evolution by natural selection, as it was developed by Darwin and as it is now understood by evolutionary biologists. It emphasizes the importance of variation and selection, points out the differences between evolutionary fitness and health, and discusses some of the reasons why our evolutionary heritage has left us vulnerable to disease.

  20. Molecular Cloud Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    I describe the scenario of molecular cloud (MC) evolution that has emerged over the past decade or so. MCs can start out as cold atomic clouds formed by compressive motions in the warm neutral medium (WNM) of galaxies. Such motions can be driven by large-scale instabilities, or by local turbulence. The compressions induce a phase transition to the cold neutral medium (CNM) to form growing cold atomic clouds, which in their early stages may constitute thin CNM sheets. Several dynamical instabilities soon destabilize a cloud, rendering it turbulent. For solar neighborhood conditions, a cloud is coincidentally expected to become molecular, magnetically supercritical, and gravitationally dominated at roughly the same column density, $N \\sim 1.5 \\times 10^21 \\psc \\approx 10 \\Msun$ pc$^{-2}$. At this point, the cloud begins to contract gravitationally. However, before its global collapse is completed ($\\sim 10^7$ yr later), the nonlinear density fluctuations within the cloud, which have shorter local free-fall time...

  1. Ascovirus and its Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Wen Cheng; Xiu-Feng Wan; Jianli Xue; Richard C. Moore

    2007-01-01

    Ascoviruses, iridoviruses, asfarviruses and poxviruses are all cytoplasmic DNA viruses. The evolutionary origins of cytoplasmic DNA viruses have never been fully addressed. Morphological, genetic and molecular data were used to test if all four cytoplasmic virus families (Ascoviridae, Iridoviridae, Asfarviridae, and Poxvirirdae) evolved from nuclear replicating baculoviruses and how the four virus groups are related. Molecular phylogenetic analyses using DNA polymerase predicted that cytoplasmic DNA viruses might have evolved from nuclear replicating baculoviruses, and that poxviruses and asfarviruses share a common ancestor with iridoviruses. These three cytoplasmic viruses again shared a common ancestor with ascoviruses. Morphological and genetic data predicted the same evolutionary trend as molecular data predicted. A genome sequence comparison showed that ascoviruses have more baculovirus protein homologues than do iridoviruses, which suggested that ascoviruses have evolved from baculoviruses and iridoviruses evolved from ascoviruses. Poxviruses showed genetic and morphological similarity to other cytoplamic viruses, such as ascoviruses, suggesting it has undergone reticulate evolution via hybridization, recombination and lateral gene transfer with other viruses. Within the ascovirus family, we tested if molecular phylogenetic analyses agree with biological inference; that is, ascovirus had an evolutionary trend of increasing genome size, expanding host range and widening tissue tropism for these viruses. Both molecular and biological data predicted this evolutionary trend. The phylogenetic relationship among the four species of ascovirus was predicted to be that TnAV-2 and HvAV-3 shared a common ancestor with SfAV-1 and the three virus species again shared a common ancestor with DpAV-4.

  2. Evolution of galaxy habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobat, R.; Hong, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    We combine a semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution with constraints on circumstellar habitable zones and the distribution of terrestrial planets in order to probe the suitability of galaxies of different mass and type to host habitable planets, and how it evolves with time. We find that the fraction of stars with terrestrial planets in their habitable zone (known as habitability) depends only weakly on galaxy mass, with a maximum around 4 × 1010M⊙. We estimate that 0.7% of all stars in Milky Way-type galaxies to host a terrestrial planet within their habitable zone, consistent with the value derived from Kepler observations. On the other hand, the habitability of passive galaxies is slightly but systematically higher, unless we assume an unrealistically high sensitivity of planets to supernovae. We find that the overall habitability of galaxies has not changed significantly in the last ~8 Gyr, with most of the habitable planets in local disk galaxies having formed ~1.5 Gyr before our own solar system. Finally, we expect that ~1.4 ×109 planets similar to present-day Earth have existed so far in our galaxy.

  3. Freud and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharbert, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    The essay analyzes the influence of evolutionary thought in the work of Sigmund Freud. Based on Freud's initial occupation as a neuro-anatomist and physiologist certain aspects stemming from the history of nature and developmental biological reasoning that played a role in his endeavours to find a new basis for medical psychology will be pointed out. These considerations are to be regarded as prolegomena of the task to reread Freud once again, and in doing so avoiding the verdict that holds his neuro-anatomic and comparative-morphological works as simply "pre-analytic." In fact, the time seems ripe to reconsider in a new context particularly those evolutionary, medical, and cultural-scientific elements in Freud's work that appear inconsistent at first sight. The substantial thesis is that Freud, given the fact that he was trained in comparative anatomy and physiology in the tradition of Johannes Müller, had the capability of synthesizing elements of this new point of view with the findings and interrogations concerning developmental history and the theory of evolution. More over, this was perceived not merely metaphoric, as he himself stressed it (Freud 1999, XIII, 99), but in the sense of Ubertragung, that inscribed terms and methods deriving from the given field into the realm of psychology. The moving force behind this particular Ubertragung came from a dynamically-neurological perception of the soul that emerged in France since 1800, which Freud came to know trough the late work of Charcot.

  4. Monitoring Evolution at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, P.; Fiorini, B.; Murphy, S.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past two years, the operation of the CERN Data Centres went through significant changes with the introduction of new mechanisms for hardware procurement, new services for cloud provisioning and configuration management, among other improvements. These changes resulted in an increase of resources being operated in a more dynamic environment. Today, the CERN Data Centres provide over 11000 multi-core processor servers, 130 PB disk servers, 100 PB tape robots, and 150 high performance tape drives. To cope with these developments, an evolution of the data centre monitoring tools was also required. This modernisation was based on a number of guiding rules: sustain the increase of resources, adapt to the new dynamic nature of the data centres, make monitoring data easier to share, give more flexibility to Service Managers on how they publish and consume monitoring metrics and logs, establish a common repository of monitoring data, optimise the handling of monitoring notifications, and replace the previous toolset by new open source technologies with large adoption and community support. This contribution describes how these improvements were delivered, present the architecture and technologies of the new monitoring tools, and review the experience of its production deployment.

  5. Evolution of coalitionary killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrangham, R W

    1999-01-01

    Warfare has traditionally been considered unique to humans. It has, therefore, often been explained as deriving from features that are unique to humans, such as the possession of weapons or the adoption of a patriarchal ideology. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that coalitional killing of adults in neighboring groups also occurs regularly in other species, including wolves and chimpanzees. This implies that selection can favor components of intergroup aggression important to human warfare, including lethal raiding. Here I present the principal adaptive hypothesis for explaining the species distribution of intergroup coalitional killing. This is the "imbalance-of-power hypothesis," which suggests that coalitional killing is the expression of a drive for dominance over neighbors. Two conditions are proposed to be both necessary and sufficient to account for coalitional killing of neighbors: (1) a state of intergroup hostility; (2) sufficient imbalances of power between parties that one party can attack the other with impunity. Under these conditions, it is suggested, selection favors the tendency to hunt and kill rivals when the costs are sufficiently low. The imbalance-of-power hypothesis has been criticized on a variety of empirical and theoretical grounds which are discussed. To be further tested, studies of the proximate determinants of aggression are needed. However, current evidence supports the hypothesis that selection has favored a hunt-and-kill propensity in chimpanzees and humans, and that coalitional killing has a long history in the evolution of both species. PMID:10601982

  6. Evolution of optogenetic microdevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Rajas P.; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Walder, Ken; Berk, Michael; Tye, Susannah J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Implementation of optogenetic techniques is a recent addition to the neuroscientists’ preclinical research arsenal, helping to expose the intricate connectivity of the brain and allowing for on-demand direct modulation of specific neural pathways. Developing an optogenetic system requires thorough investigation of the optogenetic technique and of previously fabricated devices, which this review accommodates. Many experiments utilize bench-top systems that are bulky, expensive, and necessitate tethering to the animal. However, these bench-top systems can make use of power-demanding technologies, such as concurrent electrical recording. Newer portable microdevices and implantable systems carried by freely moving animals are being fabricated that take advantage of wireless energy harvesting to power a system and allow for natural movements that are vital for behavioral testing and analysis. An investigation of the evolution of tethered, portable, and implantable optogenetic microdevices is presented, and an analysis of benefits and detriments of each system, including optical power output, device dimensions, electrode width, and weight is given. Opsins, light sources, and optical fiber coupling are also discussed to optimize device parameters and maximize efficiency from the light source to the fiber, respectively. These attributes are important considerations when designing and developing improved optogenetic microdevices. PMID:26158015

  7. The evolution of programs

    CERN Document Server

    Dershowitz, Nachum

    1983-01-01

    -Ecclesiastes 12:12 Programs are invariably subjected to many rorms or transrormation. After an initial version of a program has been designed and developed, it undergoes debugging and certification. In addition, most long-lived pro­ grams have a liCe-cycle that includes modifications to meet amended specifications and extensions for expanded capabilities. Such evolution­ ary aspects of programming are the topic of this monograph. We present rormal methods for manipulating programs and illustrate their applica­ tion with numerous examples. Such methods could be incorporated in semi-automated programming environments, where they would serve to ease the burden on the programmer. We begin by describing a method whereby a given program that achieves one goal can be modified to achieve a different goal or a pro­ gram that computes wrong results can be debugged to achieve the 2 Preface intended results. The abstraction of a set of cognate programs to obtain a program schema, and the instantiation of abstract sc...

  8. SRP reactor safety evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Plant reactors have operated for over 100 reactor years without an incident of significant consequence to on or off-site personnel. The reactor safety posture incorporates a conservative, failure-tolerant design; extensive administrative controls carried out through detailed operating and emergency written procedures; and multiple engineered safety systems backed by comprehensive safety analyses, adapting through the years as operating experience, changes in reactor operational modes, equipment modernization, and experience in the nuclear power industry suggested. Independent technical reviews and audits as well as a strong organizational structure also contribute to the defense-in-depth safety posture. A complete review of safety history would discuss all of the above contributors and the interplay of roles. This report, however, is limited to evolution of the engineered safety features and some of the supporting analyses. The discussion of safety history is divided into finite periods of operating history for preservation of historical perspective and ease of understanding by the reader. Programs in progress are also included. The accident at Three Mile Island was assessed for its safety implications to SRP operation. Resulting recommendations and their current status are discussed separately at the end of the report. 16 refs., 3 figs

  9. Evolution of optogenetic microdevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Rajas P; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Walder, Ken; Berk, Michael; Tye, Susannah J

    2015-07-01

    Implementation of optogenetic techniques is a recent addition to the neuroscientists' preclinical research arsenal, helping to expose the intricate connectivity of the brain and allowing for on-demand direct modulation of specific neural pathways. Developing an optogenetic system requires thorough investigation of the optogenetic technique and of previously fabricated devices, which this review accommodates. Many experiments utilize bench-top systems that are bulky, expensive, and necessitate tethering to the animal. However, these bench-top systems can make use of power-demanding technologies, such as concurrent electrical recording. Newer portable microdevices and implantable systems carried by freely moving animals are being fabricated that take advantage of wireless energy harvesting to power a system and allow for natural movements that are vital for behavioral testing and analysis. An investigation of the evolution of tethered, portable, and implantable optogenetic microdevices is presented, and an analysis of benefits and detriments of each system, including optical power output, device dimensions, electrode width, and weight is given. Opsins, light sources, and optical fiber coupling are also discussed to optimize device parameters and maximize efficiency from the light source to the fiber, respectively. These attributes are important considerations when designing and developing improved optogenetic microdevices. PMID:26158015

  10. Sponsorship in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, M K

    1990-09-01

    Sponsorship appears to be evolving from an original model in which the sponsoring religious institute related to its facilities in a manner resembling a family business, to a model of sponsorship akin to a franchise, to a ministerial partnership. Factors leading to this evolution include tremendous changes within the religious institute itself, including decreases in the number of members and financial stability. Changes within healthcare itself--such as greater competition and declining revenues-have forced hospitals to diversify. One result of these developments has been a radical change in the "rules" of the game. Historically independent entities--hospitals, sponsors, physicians--now have to value interdependence and mutuality. In the family-run model the family (sponsor) had special privileges, as though they "owned" the business. When the number of family members dropped below that necessary to govern, administer, and staff the institute's facilities, they began to move away from the family model to the franchise model, which has more open communication, greater input to decision making by non-family members, and a shift in the family's attention from actual operations to oversight and accountability. Eventually, the franchise model began to give way to the ministerial partnership, characterized by mutuality. Both family and others have roles not only in carrying out the mission, but in actually shaping and forming it. PMID:10106131

  11. Extraterrestrial civilizations: Problems of their evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskov, L. V.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of finding extraterrestrial civilizations and establishing contact with them is directly related to the problem of their evolution. Possible patterns in this evolution and the stages in the evolution of extraterrestrial civilizations are examined.

  12. Statistical limitations on molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovsky, Leonid I

    2002-06-01

    Complexity of functions evolving in an evolution process are expected to be limited by the time length of an evolution process among other factors. This paper outlines a general method of deriving function-complexity limitations based on mathematical statistics and independent from details of a biological or genetic mechanism of the evolution of the function. Limitations on the emergence of life are derived, these limitations indicate a possibility of a very fast evolution and are consistent with "RNA world" hypothesis. The discussed method is general and can be used to characterize evolution of more specific biological organism functions and relate functions to genetic structures. The derived general limitations indicate that a co-evolution of multiple functions and species could be a slow process, whereas an evolution of a specific function might proceed very fast, so that no trace of intermediate forms (species) is preserved in fossil records of phenotype or DNA structure; this is consistent with a picture of "punctuated equilibrium". PMID:12023805

  13. The Evolution of Tidal Debris

    CERN Document Server

    Mihos, C

    2004-01-01

    Galaxy interactions expel a significant amount of stars and gas into the surrounding environment. I review the formation and evolution of the tidal debris spawned during these collisions, and describe how this evolution depends on the large scale environment in which the galaxies live. In addition to acting as a long-lived tracer of the interaction history of galaxies, the evolution of this material -- on both large scales and small -- has important ramifications for galactic recycling processes, the feeding of the intracluster light and intracluster medium within galaxy clusters, and the delayed formation of galactic disks and dwarf galaxies.

  14. Discovering evolution equations with applications

    CERN Document Server

    McKibben, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Most existing books on evolution equations tend either to cover a particular class of equations in too much depth for beginners or focus on a very specific research direction. Thus, the field can be daunting for newcomers to the field who need access to preliminary material and behind-the-scenes detail. Taking an applications-oriented, conversational approach, Discovering Evolution Equations with Applications: Volume 2-Stochastic Equations provides an introductory understanding of stochastic evolution equations. The text begins with hands-on introductions to the essentials of real and stochast

  15. The Evolution of Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    One can study communications by using Shannon's (1948) mathematical theory of communication. In social communications, however, the channels are not "fixed", but themselves subject to change. Communication systems change by communicating information to related communication systems; co-variation among systems if repeated over time, can lead to co-evolution. Conditions for stabilization of higher-order systems are specifiable: segmentation, stratification, differentiation, reflection, and self-organization can be distinguished in terms of developmental stages of increasingly complex networks. In addition to natural and cultural evolution, a condition for the artificial evolution of communication systems can be specified.

  16. Landscape evolution of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, S.S.R.; Sugden, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    The relative roles of fluvial versus glacial processes in shaping the landscape of Antarctica have been debated since the expeditions of Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton in the early years of the 20th century. Here we build a synthesis of Antarctic landscape evolution based on the geomorphology of passive continental margins and former northern mid-latitude Pleistocene ice sheets. What makes Antarctica so interesting is that the terrestrial landscape retains elements of a record of change that extends back to the Oligocene. Thus there is the potential to link conditions on land with those in the oceans and atmosphere as the world switched from a greenhouse to a glacial world and the Antarctic ice sheet evolved to its present state. In common with other continental fragments of Gondwana there is a fluvial signature to the landscape in the form of the coastal erosion surfaces and escarpments, incised river valleys, and a continent-wide network of river basins. A selective superimposed glacial signature reflects the presence or absence of ice at the pressure melting point. Earliest continental-scale ice sheets formed around 34 Ma, growing from local ice caps centered on mountain massifs, and featured phases of ice-sheet expansion and contraction. These ice masses were most likely cold-based over uplands and warm-based across lowlands and near their margins. For 20 million years ice sheets fluctuated on Croll-Milankovitch frequencies. At ~14 Ma the ice sheet expanded to its maximum and deepened a preexisting radial array of troughs selectively through the coastal mountains and eroded the continental

  17. Evolution of rhinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluskar, S K

    2008-06-01

    The study of the nose is as old as civilisation. Various conditions affecting its structure and function has been documented in Edwin Smith Papyrus in hieroglyphic script, an Egyptian writing system of the mid -4th Millennium BC.The major contribution for the complete reconstruction of the nose originated in India by Sushruta in around 600 BC. Writing in Sanskrit in the form of verses he described in detail the technique of total reconstruction, which is still being practiced today as Indian Rhinoplasty. This surgical reconstruction paved the way to modern plastic surgery in Europe and United States in 18th century. Sushruta contributed not only to the plastic surgery of the nose, but described entire philosophy of Head and Neck and other surgery as well. Other notable contributors were Greek physicians, Hippocrate and Galen, and at the birth of the Christianity, Celsus wrote eight books of medical encyclopaedia, which described various conditions affecting nose.Septal and Sinus surgery, in comparison to rhinoplasty did not develop until 17th century. Septal surgery began with total septectomy, sub mucous resection by Killian & Freer in early 20th century and later septoplasty by Cottle in middle of 20th century.Sinus surgery probably originated in Egypt, where instruments were used to remove brain through the ethmoid sinuses as part of the mummification process. In 18th century, empyema of the maxillary sinus was drained through the tooth socket or anterior wall of the sinus, which lead to the evolution of radical procedures of removal of mucous membrane and inferior meatal antrostomy. In the late 20th century, improved understanding of the mucociliary mechanism described by Prof. Messerklinger and Nasal Endoscopy described by Prof. Draf with the development of fibre optics and CT imaging, heralded a new era, which evolved in functional endoscopic sinus surgery. New technology further enhanced the scope of endoscope being used "around and beyond" the nose. PMID

  18. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galax...

  19. Social evolution: reciprocity there is.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborsky, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The theory of cooperation predicts that altruism can be established by reciprocity, yet empirical evidence from nature is contentious. Increasingly though, experimental results from social vertebrates challenge the nearly exclusive explanatory power of relatedness for the evolution of cooperation.

  20. Genes and human brain evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Geschwind, Daniel H.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2012-01-01

    Several genes were duplicated during human evolution. It seems that one such duplication gave rise to a gene that may have helped to make human brains bigger and more adaptable than those of our ancestors.

  1. Tracking Tumor Evolution through Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Mitch

    2016-04-01

    A recent study suggests that many cancers undergo neutral evolution, with all key mutations present at the start of malignancy. New mutations acquired along the way don't confer any advantages on tumor cells.

  2. Red supergiants and stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ekström, Sylvia; Meynet, Georges; Groh, Jose; Granada, Anahí

    2013-01-01

    We review the significant role played by red supergiants (RSGs) in stellar populations, and some challenges and questions they raise for theoretical stellar evolution. We present how metallicity and rotation modify the way stars go to the red part of the Hertzsprung- Russell diagram or come back from it, and how RSGs might keep a trace of their main-sequence evolution. We compare theoretical popu- lation ratios with observed ones.

  3. Evolution Strategies in Optimization Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, Pedro A F

    2007-01-01

    Evolution Strategies are inspired in biology and part of a larger research field known as Evolutionary Algorithms. Those strategies perform a random search in the space of admissible functions, aiming to optimize some given objective function. We show that simple evolution strategies are a useful tool in optimal control, permitting to obtain, in an efficient way, good approximations to the solutions of some recent and challenging optimal control problems.

  4. Incremental Evolution with Minimal Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Urzelai, J.; Floreano, D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes an evolutionary algorithm based on a statistical representation of populations of individuals. Experiments on robot navigation and on numerical fitness functions are presented in order to measure the performance of the algorithm compared to traditional genetic algorithms. Results show that the method is suitable for onboard online evolution because it requires low amount of memory resources. Furthermore, it allows for incremental evolution in dynamic environments in order...

  5. Symmetry and topology in evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains papers of an interdisciplinary symposium on evolution. The aim of this symposium, held in Budapest, Hungary, 28-29 May 1991, was to clear the role of symmetry and topology at different levels of the evolutionary processes. 21 papers were presented, their topics included evolution of the Universe, symmetry of elementary particles, asymmetry of the Earth, symmetry and asymmetry of biomolecules, symmetry and topology of lining objects, human asymmetry etc. (R.P.)

  6. Protein evolution on rugged landscapes.

    OpenAIRE

    Macken, C A; Perelson, A S

    1989-01-01

    We analyze a mathematical model of protein evolution in which the evolutionary process is viewed as hill-climbing on a random fitness landscape. In studying the structure of such landscapes, we note that a large number of local optima exist, and we calculate the time and number of mutational changes until a protein gets trapped at a local optimum. Such a hill-climbing process may underlie the evolution of antibody molecules by somatic hypermutation.

  7. Web evolution and Web Science

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Wendy; Tiropanis, Thanassis

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the evolution of the World Wide Web as a network of networks and discusses the emergence of Web Science as an interdisciplinary area that can provide us with insights on how the Web developed, and how it has affected and is affected by society. Through its different stages of evolution, the Web has gradually changed from a technological network of documents to a network where documents, data, people and organisations are interlinked in various and often unexpected ways. It...

  8. Punctuated Equilibrium in Software Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Gorshenev, A. A.; Pis'mak, Yu. M.

    2003-01-01

    The approach based on paradigm of self-organized criticality proposed for experimental investigation and theoretical modelling of software evolution. The dynamics of modifications studied for three free, open source programs Mozilla, Free-BSD and Emacs using the data from version control systems. Scaling laws typical for the self-organization criticality found. The model of software evolution presenting the natural selection principle is proposed. The results of numerical and analytical inves...

  9. Evolution of the European region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem on geochronological study of the European region is covered. The most ancient age values are determined by U-Pb methods by zircones from paragneisses. The model of evolution, being in agreement with the data obtained by U-Pb and Rb-Sr methods, is considered. The history of the Schwarzwald development is typical for the continent as a whole. The diagram of evolution of primary 87Sr/86Sr for orthogneisses and granites in France is given

  10. Major transitions in human evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Robert A.; Martin, Lawrence; Mirazón Lahr, Marta; Stringer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary problems are often considered in terms of ‘origins', and research in human evolution seen as a search for human origins. However, evolution, including human evolution, is a process of transitions from one state to another, and so questions are best put in terms of understanding the nature of those transitions. This paper discusses how the contributions to the themed issue ‘Major transitions in human evolution’ throw light on the pattern of change in hominin evolution. Four questions are addressed: (1) Is there a major divide between early (australopithecine) and later (Homo) evolution? (2) Does the pattern of change fit a model of short transformations, or gradual evolution? (3) Why is the role of Africa so prominent? (4) How are different aspects of adaptation—genes, phenotypes and behaviour—integrated across the transitions? The importance of developing technologies and approaches and the enduring role of fieldwork are emphasized. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Major transitions in human evolution’. PMID:27298461

  11. The pace of cultural evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Perreault

    Full Text Available Today, humans inhabit most of the world's terrestrial habitats. This observation has been explained by the fact that we possess a secondary inheritance mechanism, culture, in addition to a genetic system. Because it is assumed that cultural evolution occurs faster than biological evolution, humans can adapt to new ecosystems more rapidly than other animals. This assumption, however, has never been tested empirically. Here, I compare rates of change in human technologies to rates of change in animal morphologies. I find that rates of cultural evolution are inversely correlated with the time interval over which they are measured, which is similar to what is known for biological rates. This correlation explains why the pace of cultural evolution appears faster when measured over recent time periods, where time intervals are often shorter. Controlling for the correlation between rates and time intervals, I show that (1 cultural evolution is faster than biological evolution; (2 this effect holds true even when the generation time of species is controlled for; and (3 culture allows us to evolve over short time scales, which are normally accessible only to short-lived species, while at the same time allowing for us to enjoy the benefits of having a long life history.

  12. Evolution of plant senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Mike

    2009-07-01

    characteristics of senescence-related genes allow a framework to be constructed of decisive events in the evolution of the senescence syndrome of modern land-plants. Combining phylogenetic, comparative sequence, gene expression and morphogenetic information leads to the conclusion that biochemical, cellular, integrative and adaptive systems were progressively added to the ancient primary core process of senescence as the evolving plant encountered new environmental and developmental contexts.

  13. Comparative assessment of supervision and decision-making procedures regarding sustainable development; Evaluation comparee de methodes de controle et de decision en matiere de developpement durable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlevaro, F.; Garbely, M.; Genoud, S.

    2002-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a study made on the possibilities of establishing a system of indicators that allows the monitoring of sustainable development and its effects, as stipulated in the Agenda 21. The report presents the findings of the study on criteria and indicators for sustainability in the energy area. The challenge posed by the synthesis of information from a system of indicators is discussed and four general approaches are proposed, compared and tested for the monitoring of sustainability in the energy area. These include the calculation of a composite index from several indicators, a similar process that uses statistical methods of dimensional reduction, methods for the measurement of productivity loaned from economics and a method for decision-making using multiple criteria. Examples for the four approaches are given and experience gained in their use - partly in other countries and in United Nations agencies - is discussed.

  14. Radiography of scoliosis: comparative dosimetry between conventional technique and digital fluorography; Radiographie des scolioses: dosimetrie comparee entre la technique conventionnelle et la fluorographie numerique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorincour, G.; Paris, M.; Aschero, A.; Bourliere, B.; Devred, P.; Petit, P. [Hopital Timone-Enfants, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, 13 - Marseille (France); Barrau, K.; Auquier, P. [Faculte de Medecine de Marseille, Service de Sante Publique, 13 - Marseille (France); Waultier, S.; Bourrelly, M.; Mundler, O. [Hopital Timone-Enfants, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France); Viehweger, E.; Jouve, J.L.; Bollini, G. [Hopital Timone-Enfants, Service de Chirurgie Orthopedique, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2007-03-15

    Objective. Compare the irradiation delivered in conventional radiography and digital radiography by image intensifier during a scoliosis workup. Patients and Methods. Our prospective randomized study included 105 patients, all of whom were identified according to socio-demographic parameters as well as criteria evaluating the quality of the full front spinal x-ray at PA incidence. The entry dose at the scapula and the exit dose in inter-orbital, thyroid, mammary, and hypo-gastric projection was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results. The results of 71 girls and 28 boys, aged a mean 13.8 years with a mean weight of 47 kg were analyzed. At equal image quality, the entry dose was not significantly different between the two techniques; the mean exit dose reduction was 64% during digital acquisition. This reduction involved the inter-orbital (162%), mammary (43%), and thyroid (309%) regions. However, this system is more irradiating in the hypo-gastric region (34%). Conclusion. The dosimetric evaluation of the different imaging techniques used to explore the entirety of the spine should be part of radiologists' quality standard used to document their work and their choices. (authors)

  15. Vers un nouveau manuel de stylistique comparee du francais et de l'anglais (Toward a New Comparative Style Manual for French and English).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingstone, Basil

    1989-01-01

    The features necessary in an introductory course on translation are described, and the standard text for this kind of course is evaluated with reference to two critical accounts of it. Differences in general structure between the standard text and one in preparation and some theories needing modification are examined. (Author/MSE)

  16. RECRUTEMENT DES CIVELLES (ANGUILLA ANGUILLA SUR LA COTE MEDITERRANEENNE FRANÇAISE : ANALYSE COMPAREE DES CARACTERISTIQUES BIOMETRIQUES ET PIGMENTAIRES DES SAISONS 1974-75 ET 2000-01.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEFEBVRE F.

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Une campagne d’échantillonnage des civelles Anguilla anguilla a été menée de novembre 2000 à mai 2001 au grau de la Fourcade (Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer, côte méditerranéenne française. Des civelles ont été capturées sur toute la période d’échantillonnage, mais les maxima d’abondance se situent en janvier-février et, dans une moindre mesure, en avril. Afin d’optimiser le recrutement dans les lagunes littorales intérieures, la mesure de gestion proposée est donc de favoriser l’ouverture des martelières au milieu de l’hiver. Le suivi des proportions mensuelles des différents stades pigmentaires (de V A à VI A4 permet de conclure à un vieillissement généralisé des civelles en recrutement de novembre à mars, puis à l’arrivée d’un deuxième flux de civelles jeunes en avril. Parallèlement, il est observé une diminution très nette des masses et des longueurs moyennes mensuelles, et ce, même en ne considérant qu’un stade pigmentaire donné (en l’occurrence V B. Ces résultats sur l’évolution des caractéristiques biométriques et pigmentaires sont en accord avec les deux séries de travaux déjà menés sur la façade méditerranéenne française (années 30 et 70, ainsi qu’avec les données publiées en différents points de la façade atlantique. L’analyse comparée de ces données avec celles issues de la dernière étude en date sur la côte méditerranéenne française (Bages-Sigean, Languedoc-Roussillon, campagne 1974-75 ; LECOMTE-FINIGER, 1976 montre une composition pigmentaire mensuelle totalement différente, et révèle une diminution significative de la longueur des civelles, de l’ordre de 5 % en 25 ans.

  17. Student Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Klein, Vanessa A.; Ghosh, Rajlakshmi; Eibel, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is fundamental to biology and scientific literacy, but teaching high school evolution is often difficult. Evolution teachers face several challenges including limited content knowledge, personal conflicts with evolution, expectations of resistance, concerns about students' conflicts with religion, and curricular constraints. Evolution…

  18. Cyanobacterial evolution during the Precambrian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirrmeister, Bettina E.; Sanchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Wacey, David

    2016-07-01

    Life on Earth has existed for at least 3.5 billion years. Yet, relatively little is known of its evolution during the first two billion years, due to the scarceness and generally poor preservation of fossilized biological material. Cyanobacteria, formerly known as blue green algae were among the first crown Eubacteria to evolve and for more than 2.5 billion years they have strongly influenced Earth's biosphere. Being the only organism where oxygenic photosynthesis has originated, they have oxygenated Earth's atmosphere and hydrosphere, triggered the evolution of plants -being ancestral to chloroplasts- and enabled the evolution of complex life based on aerobic respiration. Having such a strong impact on early life, one might expect that the evolutionary success of this group may also have triggered further biosphere changes during early Earth history. However, very little is known about the early evolution of this phylum and ongoing debates about cyanobacterial fossils, biomarkers and molecular clock analyses highlight the difficulties in this field of research. Although phylogenomic analyses have provided promising glimpses into the early evolution of cyanobacteria, estimated divergence ages are often very uncertain, because of vague and insufficient tree-calibrations. Results of molecular clock analyses are intrinsically tied to these prior calibration points, hence improving calibrations will enable more precise divergence time estimations. Here we provide a review of previously described Precambrian microfossils, biomarkers and geochemical markers that inform upon the early evolution of cyanobacteria. Future research in micropalaeontology will require novel analyses and imaging techniques to improve taxonomic affiliation of many Precambrian microfossils. Consequently, a better understanding of early cyanobacterial evolution will not only allow for a more specific calibration of cyanobacterial and eubacterial phylogenies, but also provide new dates for the tree

  19. Musical emotions: Functions, origins, evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2010-03-01

    Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in

  20. Understanding Collateral Evolution in Linux Device Drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padioleau, Yoann; Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Muller, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    no tools to help in this process, collateral evolution is thus time consuming and error prone.In this paper, we present a qualitative and quantitative assessment of collateral evolution in Linux device driver code. We provide a taxonomy of evolutions and collateral evolutions, and use an automated patch......-analysis tool that we have developed to measure the number of evolutions and collateral evolutions that affect device drivers between Linux versions 2.2 and 2.6. In particular, we find that from one version of Linux to the next, collateral evolutions can account for up to 35% of the lines modified in such code....

  1. JPSS CGS Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN, which includes the Earth Observing System [EOS]), Metop for the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), Coriolis/WindSat for the DoD, as well as research activities of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The CGS architecture is evolving over the next few years for several key reasons: 1. "Operationalizing" Suomi NPP, which had originally been intended as a risk reduction mission 2. Leveraging lessons learned to date in multi-mission support 3. Taking advantage of newer, more reliable and efficient technologies 4. Satisfying new requirements and constraints due to the continually evolving budgetary environment Three key aspects of the CGS architecture are being prototyped as part of the path to improve operations in the 2015 timeframe. First, the front end architecture for mission data transport is being re-architected to improve reliability and address the incorporation of new ground stations. Second, the IDPS is undergoing a decoupling process to enhance its flexibility and modularity for supporting an array of potential new missions beyond those listed above. Finally, a solution for complete situational awareness across the CGS is being developed, to facilitate quicker and more efficient identification and resolution of system anomalies. This paper discusses the evolution of the CGS architecture to address these future mission needs.

  2. Planetary evolution and habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohn, T.

    2008-09-01

    Planetary habitability is usually thought to require water on (or near) the surface, a magnetic field to protect life against cosmic radiation, and transport mechanisms for nutrients. A magnetic field also serves to protect an existing atmosphere against erosion by the solar wind and thus helps to stabilize the presence of water and habitability. Magnetic fields are generated in the cores of the terrestrial planets and thus habitability is linked to the evolution of the interior. Moreover, the interior is a potential source and sink for water and CO2 and may interact with the surface and atmosphere reservoirs through volcanic activity and recycling. On the Earth, water is stabilized by complex interactions between the atmosphere, the biosphere, the oceans, the crust, and the deep interior. On geological timescales, the anorganic CO2 cycle is most important. The most efficient known mechanism for recycling is plate tectonics. Plate tectonics is known to operate, at present, only on the Earth, although Mars may have had a phase of plate tectonics as may have Venus. Single-plate tectonics associated with stagnant lid convection can transfer water and CO2 from the interior but a simple recycling mechanism is lacking for this tectonic style. Stagnant lid convection will evolve to thicken the lid and increasingly frustrate volcanic activity and degassing. (This can keep the interior from running completely dry.) Plate tectonics supports the generation of magnetic fields by effectively cooling the deep interior. In addition, plate tectonics rejuvenates nutrients on the surface and generates granitic cratons. For Venus it is likely that a present-day magnetic field would require plate tectonics to operate. The chemistry of the Martian core likely precludes the growth of an inner core and thus a present-day dynamo. An early field is possible for both planets even with stagnant lid convection but the dynamos will have operated less than about a billion years on Mars and a

  3. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Hans P; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-05-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Teaching evolution: challenging religious preconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, Eric C; Kondrick, Linda C

    2008-08-01

    Teaching college students about the nature of science should not be a controversial exercise. College students are expected to distinguish between astronomy and astrology, chemistry and alchemy, evolution and creationism. In practice, however, the conflict between creationism and the nature of science may create controversy in the classroom, even walkouts, when the subject of evolution is raised. The authors have grappled with the meaning of such behaviors. They surveyed 538 students in a public, liberal arts college. Pre/post course surveys were analyzed to track changes in student responses to questions that were either consistent or inconsistent with the Theory of Evolution after a semester of instruction in a college biology or zoology course in which evolution was taught. Many students who were initially undecided about issues regarding evolution had shifted in their viewpoints by the end of the course. It was found that more education about the evidence for and the mechanics of evolutionary processes did not necessarily move students toward a scientific viewpoint. The authors also discovered a "wedge" effect among students who were undecided about questions pertaining to human ancestry at the beginning of the course. About half of these students shifted to a scientific viewpoint at the end of the course; the other half shifted toward agreement with statements consistent with creationism. PMID:21669781

  5. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Hans P.; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R.; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  6. Oxygen and Early Animal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, S.

    2012-12-01

    It is often hypothesized that the rise of animals was triggered by an increase in O2 levels in the atmosphere and oceans. However, this hypothesis is remarkably difficult to test, because the timing of animal divergences is poorly resolved, the physiology of early animals is often unknown, estimates of past pO2 levels come with large error bars, and causal relationships between oxygenation and animal evolution are difficult to establish. Nonetheless, existing phylogenetic, paleontological, and geochemical data indicate that the evolution of macroscopic animals and motile macrometazoans with energetically expensive lifestyles may be temporally coupled with ocean oxygenation events in the Ediacaran Period. Thus, it is plausible that ocean oxygenation may have been a limiting factor in the early evolution of macroscopic, complex, and metabolically aggressive animals (particularly bilaterian animals). However, ocean oxygenation and animal evolution were likely engaged in two-way interactions: Ediacaran oxygenation may have initially lifted a physiological barrier for the evolution of animal size, motility, and active lifestyles, but subsequent animal diversification in the Paleozoic may have also changed oceanic redox structures. Viewed in a broader context, the early evolutionary history of animals was contingent upon a series of events, including genetic preparation (developmental genetics), environmental facilitation (oceanic oxygenation), and ecological escalation (Cambrian explosion), but the rise of animals to ecological importance also had important geobiological impacts on oceanic redox structures, sedimentary fabrics, and global geochemical cycles.

  7. Evolution of rapid nerve conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelfranco, Ann M; Hartline, Daniel K

    2016-06-15

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses is a priority for organisms needing to react quickly to events in their environment. While myelin may be viewed as the crowning innovation bringing about rapid conduction, the evolution of rapid communication mechanisms, including those refined and enhanced in the evolution of myelin, has much deeper roots. In this review, a sequence is traced starting with diffusional communication, followed by transport-facilitated communication, the rise of electrical signaling modalities, the invention of voltage-gated channels and "all-or-none" impulses, the emergence of elongate nerve axons specialized for communication and their fine-tuning to enhance impulse conduction speeds. Finally within the evolution of myelin itself, several innovations have arisen and have been interactively refined for speed enhancement, including the addition and sealing of layers, their limitation by space availability, and the optimization of key parameters: channel density, lengths of exposed nodes and lengths of internodes. We finish by suggesting several design principles that appear to govern the evolution of rapid conduction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26879248

  8. A new paradigma on the plant evolution: from a natural evolution to an artificial evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennici, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    After evidencing the great importance of plants for animals and humans in consequence of the photosynthesis, several considerations on plant evolution are made. One of the peculiar characteristics of the plant is the sessile property, due especially to the cell wall. This factor, principally, strengthened by the photosynthetic process, determined the particular developmental pattern of the plant, which is characterized by the continuous formation of new organs. The plant immobility, although negative for its survival, has been, in great part, overcome by the acquisition of the capacity of adaptation (plasticity) to the environmental stresses and changes, and the establishment of more adapted genotypes. This capacity to react to the external signals induced Trewavas to speak of "plant intelligence". The plant movement incapacity and the evolution of the sexual reproduction system were strongly correlated. In this context, the evolution of the flower in the Angiosperms has been particularly important to allow the male gamete to fertilize the immobile female gamete. Moreover, the formation of fruit and seed greatly improved the dispersal and conservation of the progeny in the environment. With the flower, mechanisms to favour the outcrossing among different individuals appeared, which are essential to increase the genetic variability and, then, the plant evolution itself. Although the Angiosperms seem highly evolved, the plant evolution is not surely finished, because many reported morpho-physiological processes may be still considered susceptible of further improvement. In the last years the relationships among humans, plants and environment are becoming closer and closer. This is due to the use of the DNA recombinant techniques with the aim to modify artificially plant characters. Therefore, the risk of a plant evolution strongly directed towards practical or commercial objectives, or "an artificial evolution", may be hypothesized. PMID:15889339

  9. A new paradigma on the plant evolution: from a natural evolution to an artificial evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennici, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    After evidencing the great importance of plants for animals and humans in consequence of the photosynthesis, several considerations on plant evolution are made. One of the peculiar characteristics of the plant is the sessile property, due especially to the cell wall. This factor, principally, strengthened by the photosynthetic process, determined the particular developmental pattern of the plant, which is characterized by the continuous formation of new organs. The plant immobility, although negative for its survival, has been, in great part, overcome by the acquisition of the capacity of adaptation (plasticity) to the environmental stresses and changes, and the establishment of more adapted genotypes. This capacity to react to the external signals induced Trewavas to speak of "plant intelligence". The plant movement incapacity and the evolution of the sexual reproduction system were strongly correlated. In this context, the evolution of the flower in the Angiosperms has been particularly important to allow the male gamete to fertilize the immobile female gamete. Moreover, the formation of fruit and seed greatly improved the dispersal and conservation of the progeny in the environment. With the flower, mechanisms to favour the outcrossing among different individuals appeared, which are essential to increase the genetic variability and, then, the plant evolution itself. Although the Angiosperms seem highly evolved, the plant evolution is not surely finished, because many reported morpho-physiological processes may be still considered susceptible of further improvement. In the last years the relationships among humans, plants and environment are becoming closer and closer. This is due to the use of the DNA recombinant techniques with the aim to modify artificially plant characters. Therefore, the risk of a plant evolution strongly directed towards practical or commercial objectives, or "an artificial evolution", may be hypothesized.

  10. Scale evolution of gluon TMDPDFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echevarria Miguel G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By applying the effective field theory machinery we factorize the transverse momentum spectrum of Higgs boson production, where the main hadronic quantities are the gluon transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDPDFs. We properly define those quantities, showing explicitly, in the case of an unpolarized hadron, that they are free from rapidity divergences, and extract their evolution properties. It turns out that the evolution for all eight (un-polarized leading-twist gluon TMDPDFs is driven by the same evolution kernel, for which we derive the necessary ingredients to obtain a resummation of large logarithms at next-tonext-to-leading-logarithmic accuracy. We make predictions for the contribution of linearly polarized gluons to the Higgs boson qT -spectrum.

  11. Tensor Networks for Entanglement Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meznaric, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    The intuitiveness of the tensor network graphical language is becoming well known through its use in numerical simulations using methods from tensor network algorithms. Recent times have also seen rapid progress in developing equations of motion to predict the time evolution of quantum entanglement [Nature Physics, 4(\\textbf{4}):99, 2008]. Here we cast these recent results into a tensor network framework and in doing so, construct a theory which exposes the topological equivalence of the evolution of a family of entanglement monotones in arbitrary dimensions. This unification was accomplished by tailoring a form of channel state duality through the interpretation of graphical tensor network rewrite rules. The introduction of tensor network methods to the theory of entanglement evolution opens the door to apply methods from the rapidly evolving area known as tensor network states.

  12. The Chemodynamical Evolution of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Brad K.; Kawata, Daisuke; Brook, Chris B.; Connors, Tim W.

    GCD+ (Galactic Chemodynamics Plus) is a soon-to-be publically available N-body/SPH code being developed at Swinburne University for modeling the formation and evolution of galaxies within a cosmological framework. A sophisticated chemical evolution module as been incorporated within GCD+ making use of the latest stellar yields on the market; a self-consistent treatment of energy feedback from Type Ia and II supernovae (relaxing the instantaneous recycling approximation) cooling and star formation is standard within GCD+. Spatially resolved synthetic maps can be generated ranging from stellar populations to the hot and warm X-ray emitting properties of clusters. We will demonstrate GCD+'s application to simulating the 7-dimensional phase space (position velocity chemistry) distribution of the oldest stars in the Milky Way in addition to its seemless predictive power in regards to spatial and temporal evolution of the age-metallicty relationship metallicity distribution functions and the disruption of the Magellanic System

  13. Scale evolution of gluon TMDPDFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, Miguel G.; Kasemets, Tomas; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    By applying the effective field theory machinery we factorize the transverse momentum spectrum of Higgs boson production, where the main hadronic quantities are the gluon transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDPDFs). We properly define those quantities, showing explicitly, in the case of an unpolarized hadron, that they are free from rapidity divergences, and extract their evolution properties. It turns out that the evolution for all eight (un-)polarized leading-twist gluon TMDPDFs is driven by the same evolution kernel, for which we derive the necessary ingredients to obtain a resummation of large logarithms at next-tonext-to-leading-logarithmic accuracy. We make predictions for the contribution of linearly polarized gluons to the Higgs boson qT -spectrum.

  14. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sellwood, J A

    2013-01-01

    Disk galaxies evolve over time through processes that may rearrange both the radial mass profile and the metallicity distribution within the disk. This review of such slow changes is largely, though not entirely, restricted to internally-driven processes that can be distinguished from evolution driven by galaxy interactions. It both describes our current understanding of disk evolution, and identifies areas where more work is needed. Stellar disks are heated through spiral scattering, which increases random motion components in the plane, while molecular clouds redirect some fraction of the random energy into vertical motion. The recently discovered process of radial migration at the corotation resonance of a transient spiral mode does not alter the underlying structure of the disk, since it neither heats the disk nor causes it to spread, but it does have a profound effect on the expected distribution of metallicities among the disk stars. Bars in disks are believed to be major drivers of secular evolution th...

  15. Institutional Evolution and Corporate Boards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Victor Zitian; Hobdari, Bersant; Sun, Pei;

    2014-01-01

    We argue that corporate boards are a dynamic repository of human- and social capital in response to external institutional evolution. Theoretically, integrating institutional economics, agency theory and resource dependence theory, we explain that evolution of market-, legal- and political...... institutions restructures the particular context in which board members play their two primary roles: monitoring the CEO on behalf of the shareholders, suggested by the agency theory, and supporting the CEO by providing resources, knowledge and information, suggested by the resource dependence theory......, since the board changes are typically proposed by the block shareholders, whose motivation for doing so is closely associated with a corporation’s financial performance, we further argue that financial performance is a key moderator of the relationships between institutional evolution and changes...

  16. Extinction Events Can Accelerate Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate...... evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending...... computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific...

  17. Statistical features of quantum evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudhir R Jain

    2009-08-01

    It is shown that the integral of the uncertainty of energy with respect to time is independent of the particular Hamiltonian of the quantum system for an arbitrary pseudo-unitary (and hence $\\mathcal{PT}$ -) quantum evolution. The result generalizes the time– energy uncertainty principle for pseudo-unitary quantum evolutions. Further, employing random matrix theory developed for pseudo-Hermitian systems, time correlation functions are studied in the framework of linear response theory. The results given here provide a quantum brachistochrone problem where the system will evolve in a thermodynamic environment with spectral complexity that can be modelled by random matrix theory.

  18. ABC model and floral evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guisheng; MENG Zheng; KONG Hongzhi; CHEN Zhiduan; LU Anming

    2003-01-01

    The paper introduces the classical ABC model of floral development and thereafter ABCD, ABCDE and quartet models, and presents achievements in the studies on floral evolution such as the improved understanding on the relationship of reproductive organs between gnetophytes and angiosperms, new results in perianth evolution and identified homology of floral organs between dicots and monocots. The evo-devo studies on plant taxa at different evolutionary levels are useful to better understanding the homology of floral organs, and to clarifying the mysteries of the origin and subsequent diversification of flowers.

  19. The middle way of evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Tam

    2012-01-01

    This essay provides a critical review of two recent books on evolution: Richard Dawkins’ The Greatest Show on Earth, and Jerry Coyne’s Why Evolution is True, as well as a critique of mainstream evolutionary theory and of natural selection. I also suggest a generalization of sexual selection theory that acknowledges mind as pervasive in nature. Natural selection, as the primary theory of how biological change occurs, must be carefully framed to avoid the long-standing “tautology problem” and m...

  20. Punctuated equilibrium in software evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshenev, A A; Pis'mak, Yu M

    2004-12-01

    An approach based on the paradigm of self-organized criticality is proposed for experimental investigation and theoretical modeling of software evolution. The dynamics of modifications is studied for three free, open source programs MOZILLA, FREE-BSD, and EMACS using the data from version control systems. Scaling laws typical for self-organized criticality found. A model of software evolution presenting the natural selection principle is proposed. Results of numerical and analytical investigation of the model are presented. They are in good agreement with data collected for real-world software. PMID:15697556

  1. Explaining the Evolution of Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Azhar; Jones, Edward Samuel;

    2012-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive approach for analyzing the evolution of poverty using Mozambique as a case study. Bringing together data from disparate sources, we develop a novel “back-casting” framework that links a dynamic computable general equilibrium model to a micro-simulation poverty module....... This framework provides a new approach to explaining and decomposing the evolution of poverty, as well as to examining rigorously the coherence between poverty, economic growth, and inequality outcomes. Finally, various simple but useful and rarely-applied approaches to considering regional changes in poverty...

  2. Phenomenological implementations of TMD evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Boglione, M; Melis, S; Prokudin, A

    2014-01-01

    Although the theoretical set-up of TMD evolution appears to be well established, its phenomenological implementations still require special attention, particularly as far as the interplay between perturbative and non-perturbative contributions is concerned. These issues have been extensively studied in Drell-Yan processes, where they seem to be reasonably under control. Instead, applying the same prescriptions and methodologies to Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic (SIDIS) processes is, at present, far from obvious. Some of the controversies related to the applications of TMD Evolution to SIDIS processes will be discussed with practical examples, exploring different kinematical configurations of SIDIS experiments.

  3. Phenomenological implementations of TMD evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boglione, Mariaelena [University of Turin, Torino, Italy; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jose Osvaldo [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Melis, Stefano [European Centre for Theoretical Studies; Prokudin, Alexey [JLAB

    2015-03-01

    Although the theoretical set-up of TMD evolution appears to be well established, its phenomenological implementations still require special attention, particularly as far as the interplay between perturbative and non-perturbative contributions is concerned. These issues have been extensively studied in Drell-Yan processes, where they seem to be reasonably under control. Instead, applying the same prescriptions and methodologies to Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic (SIDIS) processes is, at present, far from obvious. Some of the controversies related to the applications of TMD Evolution to SIDIS processes will be discussed with practical examples, exploring different kinematical configurations of SIDIS experiments.

  4. Origins and Evolution of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Martin, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Part I. What Is Life?: 1. Problems raised by a definition of life M. Morange; 2. Some remarks about uses of cosmological anthropic 'principles' D. Lambert; 3. Minimal cell: the biologist point of view C. Brochier-Armanet; 4. Minimal cell: the computer scientist point of view H. Bersini; 5. Origins of life: computing and simulation approaches B. Billoud; Part II. Astronomical and Geophysical Context of the Emergence of Life: 6. Organic molecules in interstellar medium C. Ceccarelli and C. Cernicharo; 7. Cosmochemical evolution and the origin of life: insights from meteorites S. Pizzarello; 8. Astronomical constraints on the emergence of life M. Gounelle and T. Montmerle; 9. Formation of habitable planets J. Chambers; 10. The concept of galactic habitable zone N. Prantzos; 11. The young Sun and its influence on planetary atmospheres M. Güdel and J. Kasting; 12. Climates of the Earth G. Ramstein; Part III. Role of Water in the Emergence of Life: 13. Liquid water: a necessary condition to all forms of life K. Bartik, G. Bruylants, E. Locci and J. Reisse; 14. The role of water in the formation and evolution of planets T. Encrenaz; 15. Water on Mars J. P. Bibring; Part IV. From Non-Living Systems to Life: 16. Energetic constraints on prebiotic pathways: application to the emergence of translation R. Pascal and L. Boiteau; 17. Comparative genomics and early cell evolution A. Lazcano; 18. Origin and evolution of metabolisms J. Peretó; Part V. Mechanisms for Life Evolution: 19. Molecular phylogeny: inferring the patterns of evolution E. Douzery; 20. Horizontal gene transfer: mechanisms and evolutionary consequences D. Moreira; 21. The role of symbiosis in eukaryotic evolution A. Latorre, A. Durbán, A. Moya and J. Peretó; Part VI. Life in Extreme Conditions: 22. Life in extreme conditions: Deinococcus radiodurans, an organism able to survive prolonged desiccation and high doses of ionising radiation S. Sommer and M. Toueille; 23. Molecular effects of UV and ionizing

  5. Evolution for everyone: how to increase acceptance of, interest in, and knowledge about evolution.

    OpenAIRE

    David Sloan Wilson

    2005-01-01

    A success story about teaching evolution: when presented as unthreatening, explanatory, and useful, evolution can be easily appreciated by most people, regardless of their religious and political beliefs or prior knowledge of evolution.

  6. Evolution for Everyone: How to Increase Acceptance of, Interest in, and Knowledge about Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, David Sloan

    2005-01-01

    A success story about teaching evolution: when presented as unthreatening, explanatory, and useful, evolution can be easily appreciated by most people, regardless of their religious and political beliefs or prior knowledge of evolution.

  7. Evolution and Nucleosynthesis of Very Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschi, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, after a brief introduction and overview of stellar evolution, we discuss the evolution and nucleosynthesis of very massive stars (VMS: M>100 solar masses) in the context of recent stellar evolution model calculations. This chapter covers the following aspects: general properties, evolution of surface properties, late central evolution, and nucleosynthesis including their dependence on metallicity, mass loss and rotation. Since very massive stars have very large convective cores during the main-sequence phase, their evolution is not so much affected by rotational mixing, but more by mass loss through stellar winds. Their evolution is never far from a homogeneous evolution even without rotational mixing. All VMS at metallicities close to solar end their life as WC(-WO) type Wolf-Rayet stars. Due to very important mass loss through stellar winds, these stars may have luminosities during the advanced phases of their evolution similar to stars with initial masses between 60 and 120 solar masses. A...

  8. Can evolution be directional without being teleological?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, George R

    2016-08-01

    Convergent evolution reveals to us that the number of possibilities available for contingent events is limited, that historically contingent evolution is constrained to occur within a finite number of limited pathways, and that contingent evolution is thus probabilistic and predictable. That is, the phenomenon of convergence proves that truly contingent evolutionary processes can repeatedly produce the same, or very similar, organic designs in nature and that evolution is directional in these cases. For this reason it is argued in this paper that evolution can be directional without being teleological, and that the dichotomy that evolution must either be directionless and unpredictable or directional and predetermined (teleological) is false. PMID:26754619

  9. Dynamics of DNA in vitro evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Yang; Xili Liu; Chunbo Lou; Qi Ouyang

    2009-01-01

    In vitro evolution has become a very important research area in recent years. From a practical point of view, it provides a powerful and reliable tool for engineering functional molecules (DNA, RNA or proteins) in reasonably short periods of time. From a theoretical point of view, since in vitro evolution is analogous to natural evolution in many respects, the study of the dynamic details of in vitro evolution may provide some instructive insights into the process of evolution. In this review, we summarize current theoretical and exper-imental studies, including several efforts made by our group, on the dynamics of DNA in vitro evolution.

  10. The middle way of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Tam

    2012-09-01

    THIS ESSAY PROVIDES A CRITICAL REVIEW OF TWO RECENT BOOKS ON EVOLUTION: Richard Dawkins' The Greatest Show on Earth, and Jerry Coyne's Why Evolution is True, as well as a critique of mainstream evolutionary theory and of natural selection. I also suggest a generalization of sexual selection theory that acknowledges mind as pervasive in nature. Natural selection, as the primary theory of how biological change occurs, must be carefully framed to avoid the long-standing "tautology problem" and must also be modified to more explicitly include the role of mind in evolution. A propensity approach to natural selection, in which "expected fitness" is utilized rather than "fitness," can save natural selection from tautology. But to be a productive theory, natural selection theory should be placed alongside sexual selection - which is explicitly agentic/intentional - as a twin force, but also placed alongside purely endogenous factors such as genetic drift. This framing is contrary to the normal convention that often groups all of these factors under the rubric of "natural selection." I suggest some approaches for improving modern evolutionary theory, including a "generalized sexual selection," a panpsychist extension of Darwin's theory of sexual selection that explicitly recognizes the role of mind at all levels of nature and which may play the part of a general theory of evolution better than natural selection theory. PMID:23181154

  11. Dynamic Evolution of Squeezing Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhi-Long; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2016-08-01

    By virtue of the coherent state representation and solving Riccati equation we derive dynamic evolution operator for maintaining squeezing, i.e., we demonstrate that the final state keeps squeezing when the initial state is a squeezed vacuum state. The number-phase squeezing maintenance mechanism is also studied.

  12. Visual assessment of software evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voinea, Lucian; Lukkien, Johan; Telea, Alexandru

    2007-01-01

    Configuration management tools have become well and widely accepted by the software industry. Software Configuration Management (SCM) systems hold minute information about the entire evolution of complex software systems and thus represent a good source for process accounting and auditing. However,

  13. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galaxies. I will show how, from these comparisons, one can derive important constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis and galaxy formation mechanisms. Most of the concepts described in this lecture can be found in the monograph by Matteucci (2012).

  14. Data Communications - A Continuing Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asten, Kenneth J.

    In order to build a framework in which to discuss the evolution of data communications, the three main components of a basic data transmission system (source, medium and data sink) are considered to see what has happened in each area since 1960. This somewhat oversimplified basic approach is taken in order to avoid the confusing terminology and…

  15. The Evolution of Learning Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, John; Garcia y Robertson, Rodrigo

    This paper introduces seven principles of learning, enduring over the last five centuries of psychological thought, to discuss the evolution of the "Biophyche" (the brain in action) in the development of humans and other large organisms. It describes the conditioning theories of Darwin, Pavlov, and Thorndike and critically reviews the twentieth…

  16. The Evolution of Scientific Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Siggaard; Ricard, Lykke Margot; Vendelø, Morten Thanning

    The Evolution of Scientific Knowledge aims to reach a unique understanding of science with the help of economic and sociological theories. They use institutional and evolutionary theories and the sociological theories draw from the type of work on social studies of science that have, in recent...

  17. On evolution of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the model of evolution of the Universe, in which Big Bang is an explosion of the photon superstar. The inflationary epoch is not necessary in the model. The model describes the basic observable phenomena: expansion of the Universe with acceleration, homogeneity and isotropy, absence of an antimatter, almost flat metrics

  18. Adaptive evolution in ecological communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M Turcotte

    Full Text Available Understanding how natural selection drives evolution is a key challenge in evolutionary biology. Most studies of adaptation focus on how a single environmental factor, such as increased temperature, affects evolution within a single species. The biological relevance of these experiments is limited because nature is infinitely more complex. Most species are embedded within communities containing many species that interact with one another and the physical environment. To understand the evolutionary significance of such ecological complexity, experiments must test the evolutionary impact of interactions among multiple species during adaptation. Here we highlight an experiment that manipulates species composition and tracks evolutionary responses within each species, while testing for the mechanisms by which species interact and adapt to their environment. We also discuss limitations of previous studies of adaptive evolution and emphasize how an experimental evolution approach can circumvent such shortcomings. Understanding how community composition acts as a selective force will improve our ability to predict how species adapt to natural and human-induced environmental change.

  19. Landscape evolution by subglacial quarrying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Sofie Vej; Egholm, D.L.; Iverson, Neal R.

    In glacial landscape evolution models, subglacial erosion rates are often related to basal sliding or ice discharge by a power-law. This relation can be justified for bedrock abrasion because rock debris transported in the basal ice drives the erosion. However, a simple relation between rates...

  20. Nonlinear Evolution of Ferroelectric Domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeiLU; Dai-NingFANG; 等

    1997-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of ferroelectric domains is investigated in the paper and amodel is proposed which can be applied to numerical computation.Numerical results show that the model can accurately predict some nonlinear behavior and consist with those experimental results.

  1. Statistical Approach to Gene Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S; Chakrabarti, J; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Kanner, William A.; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2001-01-01

    The evolution in coding DNA sequences brings new flexibility and freedom to the codon words, even as the underlying nucleotides get significantly ordered. These curious contra-rules of gene organisation are observed from the distribution of words and the second moments of the nucleotide letters. These statistical data give us the physics behind the classification of bacteria.

  2. Metabolic Acceleration in Human Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isler, Karin

    2016-07-12

    Humans stand out among other primates by an unusual combination of a very large brain and high fertility. Pontzer et al. (2016a) present new data on daily energy expenditure in great apes and show that the metabolic rate increased during human evolution. PMID:27411003

  3. Linear evolution of sandwave packets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, P.C.; Blondeaux, P.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Vittori, G.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate how a local topographic disturbance of a flat seabed may become morphodynamically active, according to the linear instability mechanism which gives rise to sandwave formation. The seabed evolution follows from a Fourier integral, which can generally not be evaluated in closed form. As

  4. Glasma Evolution in Partonic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarenko, A V

    2010-01-01

    We examine a scenario of the abelianized Glasma evolution with accounting for back-reaction of partonic medium in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We announce that such a generalization leads to the instabilities and the presence of negative color conductivity in the system.

  5. Investigating Evolution with Living Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessman, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes two investigative labs that use live plants to illustrate important biological principles, include quantitative analysis, and require very little equipment. Each lab is adaptable to a variety of class sizes, course contents, and student backgrounds. Topics include the evolution of flower size in Mimulus and pollination of Brassicas. (DDR)

  6. Adaptive evolution of molecular phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Torsten; Nourmohammad, Armita; Lässig, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Molecular phenotypes link genomic information with organismic functions, fitness, and evolution. Quantitative traits are complex phenotypes that depend on multiple genomic loci. In this paper, we study the adaptive evolution of a quantitative trait under time-dependent selection, which arises from environmental changes or through fitness interactions with other co-evolving phenotypes. We analyze a model of trait evolution under mutations and genetic drift in a single-peak fitness seascape. The fitness peak performs a constrained random walk in the trait amplitude, which determines the time-dependent trait optimum in a given population. We derive analytical expressions for the distribution of the time-dependent trait divergence between populations and of the trait diversity within populations. Based on this solution, we develop a method to infer adaptive evolution of quantitative traits. Specifically, we show that the ratio of the average trait divergence and the diversity is a universal function of evolutionary time, which predicts the stabilizing strength and the driving rate of the fitness seascape. From an information-theoretic point of view, this function measures the macro-evolutionary entropy in a population ensemble, which determines the predictability of the evolutionary process. Our solution also quantifies two key characteristics of adapting populations: the cumulative fitness flux, which measures the total amount of adaptation, and the adaptive load, which is the fitness cost due to a population's lag behind the fitness peak.

  7. The evolution of combinatorial phonology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Willem; de Boer, Bart

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental, universal property of human language is that its phonology is combinatorial. That is, one can identify a set of basic, distinct units (phonemes, syllables) that can be productively combined in many different ways. In this paper, we develop a methodological framework based on evolution

  8. Gas Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woitke, Peter; Dent, Bill; Thi, Wing-Fai; Sibthorpe, Bruce; Rice, Ken; Williams, Jonathan; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Brown, Joanna; Kamp, Inga; Pascucci, Ilaria; Alexander, Richard; Roberge, Aki

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes a Splinter Session at the Cool Stars XV conference in St. Andrews with 3 review and 4 contributed talks. The speakers have discussed various approaches to understand the structure and evolution of the gas component in protoplanetary disks. These ranged from observational spec

  9. The Semiosic Evolution of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olteanu, Alin

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of biosemiotics has revealed the achievement of knowledge and the development of science to be the results of the semiosis of all life forms, including those commonly regarded as cultural constructs. Education is thus a semiosic structure to which evolution itself has adapted, while learning is the semiotic phenomenon that…

  10. The middle way of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Tam

    2012-09-01

    THIS ESSAY PROVIDES A CRITICAL REVIEW OF TWO RECENT BOOKS ON EVOLUTION: Richard Dawkins' The Greatest Show on Earth, and Jerry Coyne's Why Evolution is True, as well as a critique of mainstream evolutionary theory and of natural selection. I also suggest a generalization of sexual selection theory that acknowledges mind as pervasive in nature. Natural selection, as the primary theory of how biological change occurs, must be carefully framed to avoid the long-standing "tautology problem" and must also be modified to more explicitly include the role of mind in evolution. A propensity approach to natural selection, in which "expected fitness" is utilized rather than "fitness," can save natural selection from tautology. But to be a productive theory, natural selection theory should be placed alongside sexual selection - which is explicitly agentic/intentional - as a twin force, but also placed alongside purely endogenous factors such as genetic drift. This framing is contrary to the normal convention that often groups all of these factors under the rubric of "natural selection." I suggest some approaches for improving modern evolutionary theory, including a "generalized sexual selection," a panpsychist extension of Darwin's theory of sexual selection that explicitly recognizes the role of mind at all levels of nature and which may play the part of a general theory of evolution better than natural selection theory.

  11. Accepting Evolution or Discarding Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpes, Donald K.; Peramas, Mary M.

    2006-01-01

    Challenging basic principles of constitutional law, advocates of intelligent design are undermining educators' ability to teach evolution in their science classrooms. Because US Supreme Court rulings now prohibit creationist accounts of the origin of life in schools, arguments favoring divine intervention, known as intelligent design, have emerged…

  12. Evolution of energy structures; Evolution des structures energetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nifenecker, H. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2005-07-01

    Because of the big inertia and long time constants of energy systems, their long-time behaviour is mainly determined by their present day state and by the trends of their recent evolution. For this reason, it is of prime importance to foresee the evolution of the different energy production sources which may play an important role in the future. A status of the world energy consumption and production is made first using the energy statistics of the IEA. Then, using the trends observed since 1973, the consequences of a simple extrapolation of these trends is examined. Finally, the scenarios of forecasting of energy structures, like those supplied by the International institute for applied systems analysis (IIASA) are discussed. (J.S.)

  13. Orchid flowers: evolution and molecular development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Frederiksen, Signe Elisabeth

    2002-01-01

    MADS-box genes, ABS model, Orchid flower evolution, Gene expression in orchid flowers, in situ PCR......MADS-box genes, ABS model, Orchid flower evolution, Gene expression in orchid flowers, in situ PCR...

  14. Baboon Papio ursinus ranging patterns and troop size relative to bark stripping in the Chimanimani Pine Plantations of Zimbabwe%津巴布韦奇马尼马尼人工松林中狒狒分布型和结群大小与树木剥皮的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.GWENZI; C.A.T.KATSVANGA; G.T.NGORIMA; J.F.MUPANGWA; S.VALINTINE

    2007-01-01

    本研究调查了人工松林中狒狒结群大小和家区面积与树木剥皮率的关系.于2003年9月至2004年8月间每月对每个狒狒结群进行5天观察,采用足迹计数法统计狒狒结群大小,对不同结群狒狒家区内具有新旧剥皮的树木数进行统计,以方差分析和回归分析狒狒结群大小和家区面积与树木剥皮之间的关系.结果表明:定居和访问松林的狒狒结群分布型不受结群和家区大小的影响而与季节有关.树木剥皮与狒狒结群大小和家区面积均无相关性,特别是雨季更是如此,揭示狒狒对树木剥皮不是对食物和水源短缺的反应.树木剥皮具有很大的月份间变异,与狒狒群定居和访问利用松林亦无相关.树木剥皮率与狒狒结群大小的关系说明树木剥皮是由于狒狒结群中少数个体的偶然剥皮行为造成的.%Baboon Papio ursinus troop and home range sizes in relation to bark stripping were investigated in pine plantations. Group size assessments were made using the track and count method. For bark stripping assessments, the number of trees with old and fresh lesions was recorded within the troops home range. The observations were done 5 days/month/troop over one year from September 2003 to August 2004. Regression and analysis of variance tests were used to establish relationships between bark stripping and home range and troop sizes. Findings showed that ranging patterns of pine plantation resident and plantation visiting baboon troops are neither influenced by troop size nor home range, but by seasonality. Bark stripping is neither a function of home range nor troop size and is more prevalent during the rainy season indicating that it is not a response to food and water scarcity. There is great variability in bark stripping by month. Bark stripping is not dependent on whether the troops are plantation-resident or plantation visiting. Based on the ratios of stripped trees and stripping troop sizes, it

  15. Domain shuffling and the evolution of vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashima, Takeshi; Kawashima, Shuichi; Tanaka, Chisaki; Murai, Miho; Yoneda, Masahiko; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Kanehisa, Minoru; Satoh, Nori; Wada, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of vertebrates has included a number of important events: the development of cartilage, the immune system, and complicated craniofacial structures. Here, we examine domain shuffling as one of the mechanisms that contributes novel genetic material required for vertebrate evolution. We mapped domain-shuffling events during the evolution of deuterostomes with a focus on how domain shuffling contributed to the evolution of vertebrate- and chordate-specific characteristics. We identi...

  16. Heterochronic genes in plant evolution and development

    OpenAIRE

    Geuten, Koen; Coenen, Heleen

    2013-01-01

    Evolution of morphology includes evolutionary shifts of developmental processes in space or in time. Heterochronic evolution is defined as a temporal shift. The concept of heterochrony has been very rewarding to investigators of both animal and plant developmental evolution, because it has strong explanatory power when trying to understand morphological diversity. While for animals, extensive literature on heterochrony developed along with the field of evolution of development, in plants the ...

  17. Florida Teachers' Attitudes about Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Samantha R.; Meisels, Gerry G.

    2010-01-01

    A survey of Florida teachers reveals many differences in comfort level with teaching evolution according to the state's science teaching standards, general attitudes and beliefs about evolution, and the extent to which teachers are criticized, censured, disparaged, or reprehended for their beliefs about the teaching of evolution.

  18. Darwin and Mendel: Evolution and Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzo, Nelio; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have shown that students' understanding of evolution is low and some sort of historical approach would be necessary in order to allow students to understand the theory of evolution. It is common to present Mendelian genetics to high school students prior to Biological Evolution, having in mind historical and epistemological…

  19. Investigating Human Evolution Using Digital Imaging & Craniometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Human evolution is an important and intriguing area of biology. The significance of evolution as a component of biology curricula, at all levels, can not be overstated; the need to make the most of opportunities to effectively educate students in evolution as a central and unifying realm of biology is paramount. Developing engaging laboratory or…

  20. The Evolution and Development of the Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Clement; Auffray, Charles; Blin, Alex H.; Chaline, Jean; Crane, Louis; Durt, Thomas; Ekstig, Borje; Fairlamb, Horace; Greben, Jan; Hengeveld, Rob; Heylighen, Francis; Akkerhuis, Gerard Jagers op; Longo, Giuseppe; Lori, Nicolas F.; Noble, Denis

    2009-01-01

    This document is the Special Issue of the First International Conference on the Evolution and Development of the Universe (EDU 2008). Please refer to the preface and introduction for more details on the contributions. Keywords: acceleration, artificial cosmogenesis, artificial life, Big Bang, Big History, biological evolution, biological universe, biology, causality, classical vacuum energy, complex systems, complexity, computational universe, conscious evolution, cosmological artificial sele...

  1. Undermining Evolution: Where State Standards Go Wrong

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Educator, 2012

    2012-01-01

    While many states are handling evolution better today than in the past, anti-evolution pressures continue to threaten state science standards. In April 2012, for example, Tennessee passed a law that enables teachers to bring anti-evolution materials into the classroom without being challenged by administrators. This law is similar to the Science…

  2. Machine learning for evolution strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces numerous algorithmic hybridizations between both worlds that show how machine learning can improve and support evolution strategies. The set of methods comprises covariance matrix estimation, meta-modeling of fitness and constraint functions, dimensionality reduction for search and visualization of high-dimensional optimization processes, and clustering-based niching. After giving an introduction to evolution strategies and machine learning, the book builds the bridge between both worlds with an algorithmic and experimental perspective. Experiments mostly employ a (1+1)-ES and are implemented in Python using the machine learning library scikit-learn. The examples are conducted on typical benchmark problems illustrating algorithmic concepts and their experimental behavior. The book closes with a discussion of related lines of research.

  3. Automatic schema evolution in Root

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROOT version 3 (spring 2001) supports automatic class schema evolution. In addition this version also produces files that are self-describing. This is achieved by storing in each file a record with the description of all the persistent classes in the file. Being self-describing guarantees that a file can always be read later, its structure browsed and objects inspected, also when the library with the compiled code of these classes is missing. The schema evolution mechanism supports the frequent case when multiple data sets generated with many different class versions must be analyzed in the same session. ROOT supports the automatic generation of C++ code describing the data objects in a file

  4. Orbital Evolution of 4179 Toutatis

    CERN Document Server

    Siregar, Suryadi

    2013-01-01

    Asteroid 1934 CT;1989 AC, well known as 4179 Toutatis, is an Apollo and Mars-crosser asteroid with a chaotic orbit produced by a 3:1 resonance with Jupiter and a 1:4 resonance with the Earth, and frequent close approaches to the Earth. It is listed as a potential hazardous object (PHA). The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of 4179 Toutatis to be ejected from the Solar System. This paper presents an orbital evolution of 4179 Toutatis in time interval of ~300 kyr. Investigation of its orbital evolution is conducted by using the Mercury subroutine package, where the gravitational perturbations of eight major planets in the Solar System are considered. Over very short time scales (~300 kyr) relative to the Solar System life time (~10 Gyr), the asteroid 4179 Toutatis gave an example of chaotic motion that can cause asteroid to move outward and may be followed by escaping from the Solar System.

  5. Life and evolution as physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    What is evolution and why does it exist in the biological, geophysical and technological realms - in short, everywhere? Why is there a time direction - a time arrow - in the changes we know are happening every moment and everywhere? Why is the present different than the past? These are questions of physics, about everything, not just biology. The answer is that nothing lives, flows and moves unless it is driven by power. Physics sheds light on the natural engines that produce the power destroyed by the flows, and on the free morphing that leads to flow architectures naturally and universally. There is a unifying tendency across all domains to evolve into flow configurations that provide greater access for movement. This tendency is expressed as the constructal law of evolutionary flow organization everywhere. Here I illustrate how this law of physics accounts for and unites the life and evolution phenomena throughout nature, animate and inanimate. PMID:27489579

  6. Cosmological Evolution of Linear Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Basilakos, S; Basilakos, Spyros; Plionis, Manolis

    2000-01-01

    Using linear perturbation theory and the Friedmann-Lemaitre solutions of the cosmological field equations, we derive analytically a second-order differential equation for the evolution of the linear bias factor, b(z), between the background matter and a mass-tracer fluctuation field. We find b(z) to be a strongly dependent function of redshift in all cosmological models. Comparing our analytical solution with the semi-analytic model of Mo & White, which utilises the Press-Schechter formalism and the gravitationally induced evolution of clustering, we find an extremely good agreement even at large redshifts, once we normalize to the same bias value at two different epochs, one of which is the present. Furthermore, our analytic b(z) function agrees well with the outcome of N-body simulations even up to large redshifts.

  7. Historical Evolution of Spatial Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical evolution and cross-cultural differences in spatial abilities are analyzed. Spatial abilities have been found to be significantly associated with the complexity of geographical conditions and survival demands. Although impaired spatial cognition is found in cases of, exclusively or predominantly, right hemisphere pathology, it is proposed that this asymmetry may depend on the degree of training in spatial abilities. It is further proposed that spatial cognition might have evolved in a parallel way with cultural evolution and environmental demands. Contemporary city humans might be using spatial abilities in some new, conceptual tasks that did not exist in prehistoric times: mathematics, reading, writing, mechanics, music, etc. Cross-cultural analysis of spatial abilities in different human groups, normalization of neuropsychological testing instruments, and clinical observations of spatial ability disturbances in people with different cultural backgrounds and various spatial requirements, are required to construct a neuropsychological theory of brain organization of spatial cognition.

  8. Evolution of active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Merloni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    [Abriged] Supermassive black holes (SMBH) lurk in the nuclei of most massive galaxies, perhaps in all of them. The tight observed scaling relations between SMBH masses and structural properties of their host spheroids likely indicate that the processes fostering the growth of both components are physically linked, despite the many orders of magnitude difference in their physical size. This chapter discusses how we constrain the evolution of SMBH, probed by their actively growing phases, when they shine as active galactic nuclei (AGN) with luminosities often in excess of that of the entire stellar population of their host galaxies. Following loosely the chronological developments of the field, we begin by discussing early evolutionary studies, when AGN represented beacons of light probing the most distant reaches of the universe and were used as tracers of the large scale structure. This early study turned into AGN "Demography", once it was realized that the strong evolution (in luminosity, number density) of ...

  9. Automatic Schema Evolution in Root

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ReneBrun; FonsRademakers

    2001-01-01

    ROOT version 3(spring 2001) supports automatic class schema evolution.In addition this version also produces files that are self-describing.This is achieved by storing in each file a record with the description of all the persistent classes in the file.Being self-describing guarantees that a file can always be read later,its structure browsed and objects inspected.also when the library with the compiled code of these classes is missing The schema evolution mechanism supports the frequent case when multiple data sets generated with many different class versions must be analyzed in the same session.ROOT supports the automatic generation of C++ code describing the data objects in a file.

  10. Evolution of Chinese airport network

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jun; Du, Wen-Bo; Cai, Kai-Quan

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid development of economy and the accelerated globalization process, the aviation industry plays more and more critical role in today's world, in both developed and developing countries. As the infrastructure of aviation industry, the airport network is one of the most important indicators of economic growth. In this paper, we investigate the evolution of Chinese airport network (CAN) via complex network theory. It is found that although the topology of CAN remains steady during the past several years, there are many dynamic switchings inside the network, which changes the relative relevance of airports and airlines. Moreover, we investigate the evolution of traffic flow (passengers and cargoes) on CAN. It is found that the traffic keeps growing in an exponential form and it has evident seasonal fluctuations. We also found that cargo traffic and passenger traffic are positively related but the correlations are quite different for different kinds of cities.

  11. Shell Evolutions and Nuclear Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorlin O.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last 30 years, and more specifically during the last 10 years, many experiments have been carried out worldwide using different techniques to study the shell evolution of nuclei far from stability. What seemed not conceivable some decades ago became rather common: all known magic numbers that are present in the valley of stability disappear far from stability and are replaced by new ones at the drip line. By gathering selected experimental results, beautifully consistent pictures emerge, that very likely take root in the properties of the nuclear forces.The present manuscript describes some of these discoveries and proposes an intuitive understanding of these shell evolutions derived from observations. Extrapolations to yet unstudied regions, as where the explosive r-process nucleosynthesis occurs, are proposed. Some remaining challenges and puzzling questions are also addressed.

  12. Five Misunderstandings About Cultural Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Joseph; Boyd, Robert; Richerson, Peter J

    2008-06-01

    Recent debates about memetics have revealed some widespread misunderstandings about Darwinian approaches to cultural evolution. Drawing from these debates, this paper disputes five common claims: (1) mental representations are rarely discrete, and therefore models that assume discrete, gene-like particles (i.e., replicators) are useless; (2) replicators are necessary for cumulative, adaptive evolution; (3) content-dependent psychological biases are the only important processes that affect the spread of cultural representations; (4) the "cultural fitness" of a mental representation can be inferred from its successful transmission; and (5) selective forces only matter if the sources of variation are random. We close by sketching the outlines of a unified evolutionary science of culture. PMID:26181460

  13. Shell Evolutions and Nuclear Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Sorlin, O

    2014-01-01

    During the last 30 years, and more specifically during the last 10 years, many experiments have been carried out worldwide using different techniques to study the shell evolution of nuclei far from stability. What seemed not conceivable some decades ago became rather common: all known magic numbers that are present in the valley of stability disappear far from stability and are replaced by new ones at the drip line. By gathering selected experimental results, beautifully consistent pictures emerge, that very likely take root in the properties of the nuclear forces.The present manuscript describes some of these discoveries and proposes an intuitive understanding of these shell evolutions derived from observations. Extrapolations to yet unstudied regions, as where the explosive r-process nucleosynthesis occurs, are proposed. Some remaining challenges and puzzling questions are also addressed.

  14. Analysis of the Science and Technology Preservice Teachers' Opinions on Teaching Evolution and Theory of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töman, Ufuk; Karatas, Faik Özgür; Çimer, Sabiha Odabasi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate of science and technology teachers' opinions about the theory of evolution and the evolution teaching. The aim of this study, we investigate of science and technology teachers' opinions about the theory of evolution and the evolution teaching. This study is a descriptive study. Open-ended questions were used to…

  15. Evolution of massive black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Volonteri, Marta

    2007-01-01

    Supermassive black holes are nowadays believed to reside in most local galaxies. Accretion of gas and black hole mergers play a fundamental role in determining the two parameters defining a black hole: mass and spin. I briefly review here some of the physical processes that are conducive to the evolution of the massive black hole population. I'll discuss black hole formation processes that are likely to place at early cosmic epochs, and how massive black hole evolve in a hierarchical Universe...

  16. The Evolution of Breast Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Allen; Maxwell, G Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Breast augmentation remains one of the most common procedures performed in the United States. However, shape, feel, safety, and longevity of the implants remain important areas of research. The data provided by manufacturers show the safety and efficacy of these medical devices. Clinicians should strive to provide ongoing data and sound science to continue to improve clinical outcomes in the future. This article explores the evolution of breast implants with special emphasis on the advancement of silicone implants.

  17. Visual assessment of software evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Voinea, Lucian; Lukkien, Johan; Telea, Alexandru

    2007-01-01

    Configuration management tools have become well and widely accepted by the software industry. Software Configuration Management (SCM) systems hold minute information about the entire evolution of complex software systems and thus represent a good source for process accounting and auditing. However, it is still difficult to use the entire spectrum of information such tools maintain. Currently, significant effort is being done in the direction of mining this kind of software repositories for ex...

  18. The evolution of reciprocal sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Jim

    1984-01-01

    Genetical models of the evolution of reciprocal altruism (as distinct from cooperation, mutualism, or nepotism) have difficulty explaining the initial establishment of an altruist gene in a selfish deme. Though potential mechanisms have been suggested, there is an alternative: much "altruistic" behavior may in fact be purely selfish in origin and consequently reciprocity need not be invoked to provide a selective benefit to the actor. _Sharing_ and _helping_ are fundamentally different behavi...

  19. Emerging principles of regulatory evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Prud'homme, Benjamin; Gompel, Nicolas; Carroll, Sean B.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms governing the evolution of morphology is a major challenge in biology. Because most animals share a conserved repertoire of body-building and -patterning genes, morphological diversity appears to evolve primarily through changes in the deployment of these genes during development. The complex expression patterns of developmentally regulated genes are typically controlled by numerous independent cis-regulatory elements (CREs). It has been prop...

  20. The Evolution of Perforator Flaps

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Farah N.; Spiegel, Aldona J.

    2006-01-01

    Perforator flaps have recently become ubiquitous in the field of plastic surgery. To understand and appreciate their unique nature, it is necessary to compare and contrast them with the development of other types of flaps. A complete yet abridged version of the history of flap surgery is presented in this article. Beginning with Sushruta's Indian cheek flap method for nasal reconstruction, a trip through time and space is taken to highlight the milestones leading to the evolution of the perfo...

  1. The evolution of manufacturing SPECIES

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, James Scott; Rose-Anderssen, Christen; Ridgway, Keith; Böttinger, Fabian; Michen, Marcus; Agyapong-Kodua, Kwabena; Brencsics, Ivan; Nemeth, Istvan; Krain, Roland

    2013-01-01

    This research aims to develop hierarchical and cladistic classifications of manufacturing system evolution, incorporating evolving and interacting product, process and production system features. The objectives then are to systematically organise manufacturing systems and their characteristics in classifications Forty-six candidate species of manufacturing systems have been identified and organised in a 4th generation hierarchical classification with 14 'genera', 6 'families' 3 'orders' and 1...

  2. Dynamical Evolution of Barred Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Athanassoula, E

    2005-01-01

    Angular momentum redistribution within barred galaxies drives their dynamical evolution. Angular momentum is emitted mainly by near-resonant material in the bar region and absorbed by resonant material mainly in the outer disc and in the halo. This exchange determines the strength of the bar, the decrease of its pattern speed, as well as its morphology. If the galaxy has also a gaseous component and/or a companion or satellite, then these also take part in the angular momentum exchange. Durin...

  3. The Evolution of Individualistic Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Ross

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available It is generally recognized that descriptive and normative individualism are logically independent theses. This paper defends the stronger view that recognition of the falsehood of descriptive individualism is crucial to understanding the evolutionary and developmental basis of normative individualism. The argument given for this is not analytic; rather, it is based on empirical generalizations about the evolution of markets with specialized labor, about the nature of information processing in large markets, and about the socialization of human children.

  4. Viral diseases and human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Leal Élcio de Souza; Zanotto Paolo Marinho de Andrade

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish l...

  5. Causal evolution of wave packets

    CERN Document Server

    Eckstein, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from the optimal transport theory adapted to the relativistic setting we formulate the principle of a causal flow of probability and apply it in the wave packet formalism. We demonstrate that whereas the Dirac system is causal, the relativistic-Schr\\"odinger Hamiltonian impels a superluminal evolution of probabilities. We quantify the causality breakdown in the latter system and argue that, in contrast to the popular viewpoint, it is not related to the localisation properties of the states.

  6. Unified derivation of evolution equations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hsiang-nan

    1998-01-01

    We derive the evolution equations of parton distribution functions appropriate in different kinematic regions in a unified and simple way using the resummation technique. They include the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi equation for large momentum transfer $Q$, the Balitskii-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov equation for a small Bjorken variable $x$, and the Ciafaloni-Catani-Fiorani-Marchesini equation which embodies the above two equations. The relation among these equations is explored, and p...

  7. A New Unified Evolution Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jyh-Liong

    1998-01-01

    WE propose a new unified evolution equation for parton distribution functions appropriate for both large and small Bjorken x. Compared with the Ciafaloni- Catani-Fiorani-Marchesini equation, the cancellation of soft poles between virtual and real gluon emissions is made explicitly without introducing infrared cutoffs, next-to-leading contributions to the Sudakov resummation can be included systematically, and the scales of the running coupling constants are determined unambiguously.

  8. Controlled quantum evolutions and transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Petroni, N. Cufaro; Martino, S; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F.

    1999-01-01

    We study the nonstationary solutions of Fokker-Planck equations associated to either stationary or nonstationary quantum states. In particular we discuss the stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields. We introduce a technique that allows to realize arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations, to account for controlled quantum transitions. The method is illustrated by presenting the detailed treatment of the transition probabilities and of the controlling time-depend...

  9. THE EVOLUTION OF MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

    OpenAIRE

    Delia MANEA

    2012-01-01

    The technological and organizational changes that have occurred in recent years, led to the apparition and then to continuous changes in managerial accounting, requiring the reconsideration of the existing informational system, so that it will contain all the information that managers need in order to make economic decisions. This paper aims to present the most important events that have marked the evolution of managerial accounting from its occurrence until today, and some courses of action ...

  10. Hominid evolution: genetics versus memetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    The last few million years on planet Earth have witnessed two remarkable phases of hominid development, starting with a phase of biological evolution characterized by rather rapid increase of the size of the brain. This has been followed by a phase of even more rapid technological evolution and concomitant expansion of the size of the population that began when our own particular ‘sapiens’ species emerged, just a few hundred thousand years ago. The present investigation exploits the analogy between the neo-Darwinian genetic evolution mechanism governing the first phase, and the memetic evolution mechanism governing the second phase. From the outset of the latter until very recently - about the year 2000 - the growth of the global population N was roughly governed by an equation of the form dN/Ndt=N/T*, in which T* is a coefficient introduced (in 1960) by von Foerster, who evaluated it empirically as about 200 000 million years. It is shown here how the value of this hitherto mysterious timescale governing the memetic phase is explicable in terms of what happened in the preceding genetic phase. The outcome is that the order of magnitude of the Foerster timescale can be accounted for as the product of the relevant (human) generation timescale, about 20 years, with the number of bits of information in the genome, of the order of 10 000 million. Whereas the origin of our ‘homo’ genus may well have involved an evolutionary hard step, it transpires that the emergence of our particular ‘sapiens’ species was rather an automatic process.

  11. Temperature evolution during dissipative collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Maharaj; G Govender; M Govender

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of a radiating sphere evolving into a final static configuration described by the interior Schwarzschild solution. The temperature profiles of this particular model are obtained within the framework of causal thermodynamics. The overall temperature evolution is enhanced by contributions from the temperature gradient induced by perturbations as well as relaxational effects within the stellar core.

  12. The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED)

    OpenAIRE

    Liberles, David A; Schreiber, David R.; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Chamberlin, Stephen G.; Steven A Benner

    2001-01-01

    Background The Master Catalog is a collection of evolutionary families, including multiple sequence alignments, phylogenetic trees and reconstructed ancestral sequences, for all protein-sequence modules encoded by genes in GenBank. It can therefore support large-scale genomic surveys, of which we present here The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED). In TAED, potential examples of positive adaptation are identified by high values for the normalized ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotid...

  13. Evolution of democracy in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Mukesh K.

    The emphasis of this thesis is to build an intuitive and robust GIS (Geographic Information systems) Tool which will give a survey on the evolution of democracy in European countries. The user can know about the evolution of the democratic histories of these countries by just clicking on them on the map. The information is provided in separate HTML pages which will give information about start of revolution, transition to democracy, current legislature, women's status in the country etc. There are two separate web pages for each country- one shows the detailed explanation on how democracy evolved in diff. countries and another page contains a timeline which holds key events of the evolution. The tool has been developed in JAVA. For the European map MOJO (Map Objects Java Objects) is used. MOJO is developed by ESRI. The major features shown on the European map were designed using MOJO. MOJO made it easy to incorporate the statistical data with these features. The user interface, as well as the language was intentionally kept simple and easy to use, to broaden the potential audience. To keep the user engaged, key aspects are explained using HTML pages. The idea is that users can view the timeline to get a quick overview and can go through the other html page to learn about things in more detail.

  14. Early evolution stage of AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Labiano, A.; Siemiginowska, A.; Guainazzi, M.; Gawroński, M.

    2015-03-01

    Radio sources are divided into two distinct morphological groups of objects: Fanaroff-Riley type I and type II sources. There is a relatively sharp luminosity boundary between these at low frequency. The nature of the FR division is still an open issue, as are the details of the evolutionary process in which younger and smaller GHz-peaked spectrum (GPS) and compact steep spectrum (CSS) sources become large-scale radio structures. It is still unclear whether FRII objects evolve to become FRIs, or whether a division has already occurred amongst CSS sources and some of these then become FRIs and some FRIIs. We explored evolution scenarios of AGNs using new radio, optical and X-ray data of unstudied so far Low Luminosity Compact (LLC) sources. We suggest that the determining factors of the further evolution of compact radio objects could occur at subgalactic (or even nuclear) scales, or they could be related to the radio jet - interstellar medium (ISM) interactions and evolution. Our studies show that the evolutionary track could be related to the interaction, strength of the radio source and excitation levels of the ionized gas instead of the radio morphology of the young radio source.

  15. Computer simulations of prebiotic evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abkevich, V.I.; Gutin, A.M.; Shakhnovich, E.I. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper is a review of our previous work on the field of possible ways of prebiotic evolution. We propose an algorithm providing sequences of model proteins with rapid folding into a given native conformation. Thermodynamical analysis shows that the increase in speed is matched by an increase in stability: the evolved sequences are much more stable in their native conformation than the initial random sequence. We discuss a possible origin of the first biopolymers, having stable unique structure. We suggest that at the prebiotic stage of evolution, long organic polymers had to be compact in order to avoid hydrolysis and had to be soluble and thus must not be exceedingly hydrophobic. We present an algorithm that generates such sequences of model proteins. The evolved sequences turn out to have a stable unique structure, into which they quickly fold. This result illustrates the idea that the unique three-dimensional native structure of first biopolymers could have evolved as a side effect of a nonspecific physico-chemical factors acting at the prebiotic stage of evolution. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Shell evolutions and nuclear forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combining all experimental discoveries, some remarkable and general shell evolutions can be observed in the chart of nuclides. In the present contribution, the striking analogy between the behavior of the harmonic oscillator gaps N=8, 20 and 40 from the valley of stability to more neutron-rich regions is presented in section 2. The onset of deformation through intruder configurations at N=20 is depicted in section 3 using two recent experimental studies on the 34Si and 32Mg isotones. Section 4 proposes to study the evolution of the neutron single particle energies of the neutron d3/2, f7/2 and p3/2 orbitals between which the N=20 and N=28 gaps are formed. The underlying nuclear forces leading to the disappearance of the N=20 shell gap and the swapping between the f7/2 and p3/2 orbit is described. Section 5 shows that a hierarchy in the nuclear forces is responsible for these drastic shell evolutions. A generalization of this mechanism to other regions of the chart of nuclides (around 60Ca, below 78Ni and below 132Sn where the r-process nucleosynthesis occurs) is also proposed

  17. Leopard predation and primate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberbühler, Klaus; Jenny, David

    2002-12-01

    Although predation is an important driving force of natural selection its effects on primate evolution are still not well understood, mainly because little is known about the hunting behaviour of the primates' various predators. Here, we present data on the hunting behaviour of the leopard (Panthera pardus), a major primate predator in the Tai; forest of Ivory Coast and elsewhere. Radio-tracking data showed that forest leopards primarily hunt for monkeys on the ground during the day. Faecal analyses confirmed that primates accounted for a large proportion of the leopards' diet and revealed in detail the predation pressure exerted on the eight different monkey and one chimpanzee species. We related the species-specific predation rates to various morphological, behavioural and demographic traits that are usually considered adaptations to predation (body size, group size, group composition, reproductive behaviour, and use of forest strata). Leopard predation was most reliably associated with density, suggesting that leopards hunt primates according to abundance. Contrary to predictions, leopard predation rates were not negatively, but positively, related to body size, group size and the number of males per group, suggesting that predation by leopards did not drive the evolution of these traits in the predicted way. We discuss these findings in light of some recent experimental data and suggest that the principal effect of leopard predation has been on primates' cognitive evolution. PMID:12473487

  18. Copper proteomes, phylogenetics and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaria, Leonardo; Bertini, Ivano; Williams, Robert J P

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of our study of the connection between the changing environment and the changing use of particular elements in organisms in the course of their combined evolution (Decaria, Bertini and Williams, Metallomics, 2010, 2, 706). Here we treat the changes in copper proteins in historically the same increasingly oxidising environmental conditions. The study is a bioinformatic analysis of the types and the numbers of copper domains of proteins from 435 DNA sequences of a wide range of organisms available in NCBI, using the method developed by Andreini, Bertini and Rosato in Accounts of Chemical Research 2009, 42, 1471. The copper domains of greatest interest are found predominantly in copper chaperones, homeostatic proteins and redox enzymes mainly used outside the cytoplasm which are in themselves somewhat diverse. The multiplicity of these proteins is strongly marked. The contrasting use of the iron and heme iron proteins in oxidations, mostly in the cytoplasm, is compared with them and with activity of zinc fingers during evolution. It is shown that evolution is a coordinated development of the chemistry of elements with use of novel and multiple copies of their proteins as their availability rises in the environment.

  19. Cosmic evolution, life and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the most basic problems confronting science are those regarding the origin of the universe, the origin of life and the origin of man. This general overview starts (1) with a brief introduction addressed primarily to the Cyril Ponnamperuma Memorial. Then, the thesis is presented that the appearance of life and intelligence on our planet can be understood as the result of a number of cosmic and biological evolutionary processes, including (2) the stellar thermonuclear synthesis of the biogenic elements other than hydrogen (C, N, O, P and S), their dispersal into space, and their combination into circumstellar and interstellar molecules. (3) The formation of the Solar System and the Earth-Moon System. (4) The role of comets and carbonaceous chondrites in contributing organic matter to the primitive Earth. (5) The prebiotics synthesis of amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, fatty acids, and other biochemical monomers. (6) The prebiotic condensation reactions leading to the synthesis of oligomers such as oligonucleotides and oligopeptides, with replicative and catalytic activities. (7) The synthesis of amphiphilic lipids, and their self-assembly into liposomes with bi-layered membranes. (8) The formation of protocellular structures. (9) The activation of protocells into a functioning Darwin's ancestral cell. (10) Early evolution of life. (11) The K-T boundary event and the disappearance of dinosaurs. (12) Evolution of hominids leading to Homo sapiens. (13) The rapid development of civilization. (14) The exploration of the Solar System. (15) Life beyond our planetary system. (16) Epilogue. Peace from cosmic evolution? (Abstract only)

  20. Mainstreaming Caenorhabditis elegans in experimental evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jeremy C; Cutter, Asher D

    2014-03-01

    Experimental evolution provides a powerful manipulative tool for probing evolutionary process and mechanism. As this approach to hypothesis testing has taken purchase in biology, so too has the number of experimental systems that use it, each with its own unique strengths and weaknesses. The depth of biological knowledge about Caenorhabditis nematodes, combined with their laboratory tractability, positions them well for exploiting experimental evolution in animal systems to understand deep questions in evolution and ecology, as well as in molecular genetics and systems biology. To date, Caenorhabditis elegans and related species have proved themselves in experimental evolution studies of the process of mutation, host-pathogen coevolution, mating system evolution and life-history theory. Yet these organisms are not broadly recognized for their utility for evolution experiments and remain underexploited. Here, we outline this experimental evolution work undertaken so far in Caenorhabditis, detail simple methodological tricks that can be exploited and identify research areas that are ripe for future discovery.