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Sample records for babcock and wilcox test reactor

  1. Standard technical specifications for Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors. Revision 4. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Babcock and Wilcox Pressurized Water Reactors (BandW-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process. The BandW-STS provide applicants with model specifications to be used in formulation plant-specific technical specifications required by 10 CFR Part 50, Section 50.36, which set forth the specific characteristics of the facility and the conditions for its operation that are required to provide adequate protection to the health and safety of the public. This document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  2. Standard technical specifications for Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standard Technical Specification (STS) has been structured for the broadest possible use on B and W NSSS plants currently being reviewed for an Operating License. Two separate and discrete containment specification sections are provided for each of the following containment types: Atmospheric, and Dual. Optional specifications are provided for those features and systems which may be included in individual plant designs but are not generic in their scope of application. Alternate specifications are provided in a limited number of cases to cover situations where alternate specification requirements are necessary on a generic basis because of design differences. The format of the STS addresses the categories required by 10 CFR 50 and consists of six sections covering the areas of: Definitions, Safety Limits and Limiting Safety System Settings, Limiting Conditions for Operation, Surveillance Requirements, Design Features, and Administrative Controls

  3. Standard technical specifications for Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Standard Technical Specification (STS) has been structured for the broadest possible use on B and W NSSS plants currently being reviewed for an Operating License. Two separate and discrete containment specification sections are provided for each of the following containment types: Atmospheric and Dual. Optional specifications are provided for those features and systems which may be included in individual plant designs but are not generic in their scope of application. Alternate specifications are provided in a limited number of cases to cover situations where alternate specification requirements are necessary on a generic basis because of design differences. This revision of STS does not typically include requirements which may be added or revised as a result of the NRC staff's further review of the Three Mile Island incident

  4. Standard Technical Specifications, Babcock and Wilcox Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) plants and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) based on the B ampersand W Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council. The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for developing improved plant-specific technical specifications by individual nuclear power plant licensees. This volume contains sections 3.4--3.9 which cover: Reactor coolant systems, emergency core cooling systems, containment systems, plant systems, electrical power systems, refueling operations

  5. Thermal-hydraulic research plan for Babcock and Wilcox plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a plan for thermal-hydraulic research for Babcock and Wilcox designed reactor systems. It describes the technical issues, regulatory needs, and the research necessary to address these needs. The plan also discusses the relationship between current and proposed research, and provides a tentative schedule to complete the required work

  6. Production of leu high density fuels at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large number of fuel elements of all types are produced for both international and domestic customers by Nuclear Fuel Division of Babcock and Wilcox. A brief history of the division, included previous and present research reactor fuel element fabrication experience is discussed. The manufacturing facilities are briefly described. The fabrication of LEU fuels and economic analysis of the production are included. (A.J.)

  7. Babcock and Wilcox Canada steam generators past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steam generators in all of the domestic CANDU Plants, and most of the foreign CANDU plants, were supplied by Babcock and Wilcox Canada, either on their own or in co-operation with local manufacturers. More than 200 steam generators have been supplied. In addition, Babcock and Wilcox Canada has taken the technology which evolved out of the CANDU steam generators and has adapted the technology to supply of replacement steam generators for PWR's. There is enough history and operating experience, plus laboratory experience, to point to the future directions which will be taken in steam generator design. This paper documents the steam generators which have been supplied, the experience in operation and maintenance, what has worked and not worked, and how the design, materials, and operating and maintenance philosophy have evolved. The paper also looks at future requirements in the market, and the continuing research and product development going on at Babcock and Wilcox to address the future steam generator requirements. (author)

  8. LWRWIMS analysis of Babcock and Wilcox LWR fuel storage experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes very briefly an analysis of a series of critical experiments made by Babcock and Wilcox to study the relative importance on fuel storage reactivity of assembly spacing and various types of absorber. LWRWIMS in its standard design mode of calculation was used for the analysis. The results demonstrate that even the simplest options in LWRWIMS produce eigenvalues which are a very useful check of the Monte Carlo calculations normally made for criticality clearances. An appendix examines some of the eigenvalue trends in more detail. (author)

  9. Safety Evaluation Report related to Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group Plant Reassessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 1 to the ''Safety Evaluation Report (SER) Related to the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (BWOG's) Plant Reassessment Program'' has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This supplement contains the NRC staff's evaluation of the BWOG reassessment of the integrated control system/non-nuclear instrumentation system, the emergency feedwater initiation and control system, reactor trip initiating events, several additional open items identified in the SER, and BWOG comments on the SER

  10. Benchmarking of flowtran with Mark-22 mockup flow excursion test data from Babcock ampersand Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Version 16.2 of the FLOWTRAN code with a Savannah River Site (SRS) working criterion (St=0.00455) for the onset of significant void (OSV) was benchmarked against power and flow excursion data derived from tests at the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Alliance Research Center test facility. This document presents analyses which show that FLOWTRAN accurately predicts the mockup test assembly thermal-hydraulic behavior during the steady state and LOCA transient conditions, and that FLOWTRAN with a Savannah River Site (SRS) working limits criterion (St=0.00455) conservatively predicts the OFI power

  11. Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford retrievable storage from Babcock and Wilcox, Leechburg, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report characterizes, as far as possible, the solid radioactive wastes generated by Babcock and Wilcox's Park Township Plutonium Facility near Leechburg, Pennsylvania that were sent to retrievable storage at the Hanford Site. Solid waste as defined in this document is any containerized or self-contained material that has been declared waste. The objective is a description of characteristics of solid wastes that are or will be managed by the Restoration and Upgrades Program; gaseous or liquid effluents are discussed only at a summary level This characterization is of particular interest in the planning of transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval operations, including the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility, because Babcock and Wilcox generated greater than 2.5 percent of the total volume of TRU waste currently stored at the Hanford Site

  12. Safety evaluation report related to Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group Plant Reassessment Program: [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the accident of Three Mile Island, Unit 2, nuclear power plant owners made a number of improvements to their nuclear facilities. Despite these improvements, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff is concerned that the number and complexity of events at Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) nuclear plants have not decreased as expected. This concern was reinforced by the June 9, 1985 total-loss-of-feedwater event at Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station and the December 26, 1985 overcooling transient at Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station. By letter dated January 24, 1986, the Executive Director for Operations (EDO) informed the Chairman of the B and W Owners Group (BWOG) that a number of recent events at B and W-designed reactors have led the NRC staff to conclude that the basic requirements for B and W reactors need to be reexamined. In its February 13, 1986 response to the EDO's letter, the BWOG committed to lead an effort to define concerns relative to reducing the frequency of reactor trips and the complexity of post-trip response in B and W plants. The BWOG submitted a description of the B and W program entitled ''Safety and Performance Improvement Program'' (BAW-1919) on May 15, 1986. Five revisions to BAW-1919 have also been submitted. The NRC staff has reviewed BAW-1919 and its revisions and presents its evaluation in this report. 2 figs., 34 tabs

  13. Comparison of licensing activities for operating plants designed by Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a comparison of a number of licensing activities for the operating Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) plants with emphasis on Rancho Seco. The factors selected were a comparison of staff resources expended in FY84, active licensing action reviews, implementation of NUREG-0737 modifications, exemptions to regulations, SALP reports, enforcement actions, and Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The eight licensed operating plants examined are as follows: Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 (ANO-1), Crystal River Unit 3, Davis Besse, Oconee Units 1, 2, and 3, Rancho Seco, and Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1)

  14. Babcock and Wilcox Owners' Group program: Trip reduction and transient response improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985, the average trip frequency for the industry was 4.3 trips per plant per year while Babcock ampersand Wilcox (B ampersand W)-designed plants had 4.5 trips. In early 1986, the B ampersand W Owners' Group (B ampersand WOG) established goals to reduce trip frequency and improve posttrip transient response. Through the recommendations of the B ampersand WOG Trip Reduction and Transient Response Improvement Program (TR/TRIP) and other utility initiatives, the trip frequency for the B ampersand WOG plants has been on a progressive downward trend and has been consistently below the industry average since 1986. The successful results in trip reduction for the B ampersand WOG plants are shown. The B ampersand WOG has implemented several programs that have resulted in fewer trips per plant. This success can be attributed to the following: (1) a comprehensive program to evaluate each trip and transient for root-cause determination, define corrective actions, share information, and peer reviews; (2) a broad program to review systems and components that contribute to trips and transients, identify specific recommendations to correct deficiencies, utility commitment to implementation, conduct internal monitoring and indirectly exert peer pressure; (3) an awareness of the goals at all levels in the organization coupled with strong executive-level involvement; and (4) timely implementation of recommendations

  15. An aerial radiological survey of the Babcock and Wilcox Nuclear Facilities and surrounding area, Lynchburg, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from July 18 through July 25, 1988, over a 41-square-kilometer (16-square-mile) area surrounding the Babcock and Wilcox nuclear facilities located near Lynchburg, Virginia. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) with line spacings of 91 meters (300 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 8 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). A search of the data for man-made radiation sources revealed the presence of three areas of high count rates in the survey area. Spectra accumulated over the main plant showed the presence of cobalt-60 (60Co) and cesium-137 (137Cs). A second area near the main plant indicated the presence of uranium-235 (235U). Protactinium-234m (234mPa) and 60Co Were detected over a building to the east of the main plant. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries in support of the aerial data

  16. Standard technical specifications: Babcock and Wilcox plants. Volume 3, Revision 1: Bases (Sections 3.4--3.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Babcock and Wilcox Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  17. Comparison of implementation of selected TMI action plan requirements on operating plants designed by Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the results of a study conducted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff to compare the degree to which eight Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) designed licensed nuclear power plants have complied with the requirements in NUREG-0737, Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements. The eight licensed operating plants examined are as follows: Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 (ANO-1), Crystal River Unit 3, Davis Besse, Oconee Units 1, 2, and 3, Rancho Seco, and Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1). The purpose of this audit was to establish the progress of the TMI-1 licensee, General Public Utilities (GPU) Nuclear Corporation, in completing the long-term requirements in NUREG-0737 relative to the other B and W licensees examined

  18. Modeling operator actions during a small break loss-of-coolant accident in a Babcock and Wilcox nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small break loss-of-accident (SBLOCA) in a typical Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) nuclear power plant was modeled using RELAP5/MOD3. This work was performed as part of the United States Regulatory Commission's (USNRC) Code, Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU) study. The break was initiated by severing one high pressure injection (HPI) line at the cold leg. Thus, the small break was further aggravated by reduced HPI flow. Comparisons between scoping runs with minimal operator action, and full operator action, clearly showed that the operator plays a key role in recovering the plant. Operator actions were modeled based on the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) and the Technical Bases Document for the EOPs. The sequence of operator actions modeled here is only one of several possibilities. Different sequences of operator actions are possible for a given accident because of the subjective decisions the operator must make when determining the status of the plant, hence, which branch of the EOP to follow. To assess the credibility of the modeled operator actions, these actions and results of the simulated accident scenario were presented to operator examiners who are familiar with B ampersand W nuclear power plants. They agreed that, in general, the modeled operator actions conform to the requirements set forth in the EOPs and are therefore plausible. This paper presents the method for modeling the operator actions and discusses the simulated accident scenario from the viewpoint of operator actions

  19. Babcock and Wilcox Safety Anaysis Report (B-SAR-205). Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the BW-205 standard reactor with a plant output of 1295 and 1200 MW(e) is described. The reactor is arranged in two closed coolant loops connected in parallel to the reactor vessel, and is controlled by a coordinated combination of chemical shim and mechanical control rods. The coolant serves as a neutron moderator, reflector, and solvent for the soluble boron used in chemical shim reactivity control. The fuel elements consist of slightly enriched UO2 pellets enclosed in zircaloy tubes

  20. Compact Process Development at Babcock & Wilcox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Shaber; Jeffrey Phillips

    2012-03-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of compaction trials have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel at packing fractions exceeding 46% by volume. Results from these trials are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operable using nuclear fuel materials. Final process testing is in progress to certify the process for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts in 2012.

  1. Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-02-01

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a detailed description of the design, analyses, and testing programs for the BR-100 cask. The BR-100 is a Type B(U) cask designed for transport by rail or barge. This report presents the preliminary analyses and tests which have been performed for the BR-100 and outlines the confirmatory analyses and tests which will be performed.

  2. Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a detailed description of the design, analyses, and testing programs for the BR-100 cask. The BR-100 is a Type B(U) cask designed for transport by rail or barge. This report presents the preliminary analyses and tests which have been performed for the BR-100 and outlines the confirmatory analyses and tests which will be performed

  3. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs

  4. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. Estimate of airborne release of plutonium from Babcock and Wilcox plant as a result of severe wind hazard and earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, J.; Schwendiman, L.C.; Ayer, J.E.

    1978-10-01

    As part of an interdisciplinary study to evaluate the potential radiological consequences of wind hazard and earthquake upon existing commercial mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants, the potential mass airborne releases of plutonium (source terms) from such events are estimated. The estimated souce terms are based upon the fraction of enclosures damaged to three levels of severity (crush, puncture penetrate, and loss of external filter, in order of decreasing severity), called damage ratio, and the airborne release if all enclosures suffered that level of damage. The discussion of damage scenarios and source terms is divided into wind hazard and earthquake scenarios in order of increasing severity. The largest airborne releases from the building were for cases involving the catastrophic collapse of the roof over the major production areas--wind hazard at 110 mph and earthquakes with peak ground accelerations of 0.20 to 0.29 g. Wind hazards at higher air velocities and earthquakes with higher ground acceleration do not result in significantly greater source terms. The source terms were calculated as additional mass of respirable particles released with time up to 4 days; and, under these assumptions, approximately 98% of the mass of material of concern is made airborne from 2 h to 4 days after the event. The overall building source terms from the damage scenarios evaluated are shown in a table. The contribution of individual areas to the overall building source term is presented in order of increasing severity for wind hazard and earthquake.

  6. Replacement steam generators for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock and Wilcox Canada has developed an Advanced Series steam generator for PWR Systems. This design incorporates all of the features that have contributed to the successful CANDU steam generator performance. This paper presents an overview of the design features and how the overall design relates to the requirements of a PWR reactor system

  7. Reactor internals design/analysis for normal, upset, and faulted conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical procedures used by Babcock and Wilcox to demonstrate the structural integrity of the 205-FA reactor internals are described. Analytical results are presented and compared to ASME Code allowable limits for Normal, Upset, and Faulted conditions. The particular faulted condition considered is a simultaneous loss-of-coolant accident and safe shutdown earthquake. The operating basis earthquake is addressed as an Upset condition

  8. Multiloop integral system test (MIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multiloop integral system test (MIST) was part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox-designed plants. MIST was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral system facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST and two other supporting facilities were specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the once-through integral system (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and the other facilities will be used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The individual tests are described in detail in Volumes 2 through 8 and Volume 11, and are summarized in Volume 1. Inter-group comparisons are addressed in this document, Volume 9. These comparisons are grouped as follows: mapping versus SBLOCA transients, SBLOCA, pump effects, and the effects of noncondensible gases. Appendix A provides an index and description of the microfiched plots for each test, which are enclosed with the corresponding Volumes 2 through 8. 147 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Report of the Bulletins and Orders Task Force. Volume II. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appendices include: Office of Inspection and Enforcement bulletins; NRR status report on feedwater transients in BWR plants; orders on Babcock and Wilcox Company plants; letters lifting orders; letters issuing auxiliary feedwater system requirements; letter to licensees of all operating reactors, dated October 30, 1979 concerning short-term lessons learned requirements; and letters approving guidelines for preparation of small-break LOCA operating procedures

  10. Advanced test reactor. Testing capabilities and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner 'lobes' to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. In 2007 the US Department of Energy designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and plants for the NSUF. (author)

  11. Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST): MIST Facility Functional Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST) is part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox designed plants. MIST is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST was specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the Once Through Integral System (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and OTIS are used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The MIST Functional Specification documents as-built design features, dimensions, instrumentation, and test approach. It also presents the scaling basis for the facility and serves to define the scope of work for the facility design and construction. 13 refs., 112 figs., 38 tabs

  12. Reactor Simulator Integration and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfield, M. P.; Webster, K. L.; Pearson, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator (RxSim) test loop was designed and built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing were to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V because the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This Technical Memorandum summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained, which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature, indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  13. Nuclear plant-aging research on reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the rsults of a review of the Reactor Trip System (RTS) and the Engineered Safety Feature Actuating System (ESFAS) operating experiences reported in Licensee Event Reports (LER)s, the Nuclear Power Experience data base, Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, and plant maintenance records. Our purpose is to evaluate the potential significance of aging, including cycling, trips, and testing as contributors to degradation of the RTS and ESFAS. Tables are presented that show the percentage of events for RTS and ESFAS classified by cause, components, and subcomponents for each of the Nuclear Steam Supply System vendors. A representative Babcock and Wilcox plant was selected for detailed study. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research guidelines were followed in performing the detailed study that identified materials susceptible to aging, stressors, environmental factors, and failure modes for the RTS and ESFAS as generic instrumentation and control systems. Functional indicators of degradation are listed, testing requirements evaluated, and regulatory issues discussed

  14. Development and testing of a diagnostic system for intelligen distributed control at EBR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic system is under development for demonstration of Intelligent Distributed Control at the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR--II). In the first phase of the project a diagnostic system is being developed for the EBR-II steam plant based on the DISYS expert systems approach. Current testing uses recorded plant data and data from simulated plant faults. The dynamical simulation of the EBR-II steam plant uses the Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) Modular Modeling System (MMS). At EBR-II the diagnostic system operates in the UNIX workstation and receives live plant data from the plant Data Acquisition System (DAS). Future work will seek implementation of the steam plant diagnostic in a distributed manner using UNIX based computers and Bailey microprocessor-based control system. 10 refs., 6 figs

  15. Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo: the role of downward pumping and the equatorward propagation of activity

    OpenAIRE

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Cameron, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The key elements of the Babcock-Leighton dynamo are the generation of poloidal field through the decay of tilted bipolar active regions and the generation of toroidal field through the observed differential rotation. There are two classes of Babcock-Leighton models: flux transport dynamos where an equatorward flow at the bottom of the convection zone (CZ) causes the equatorial propagation of the butterfly wings, and dynamo waves where the radial shear and the $\\alpha$ effect act in conjunctio...

  16. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, B.A.

    1995-03-15

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock & Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing.

  17. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of hign-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing

  18. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  19. The simulation of thermohydraulic phenomena in a pressurized water reactor primary loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, M

    1987-01-01

    Several important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena essential to nuclear power reactor safety were investigated. Scaling and modeling laws for pressurized water reactors are reviewed and a new scaling approach focusing on the overall loop behavior is presented. Scaling criteria for one- and two-phase natural circulation are developed, as well as a simplified model describing the first phase of a small break loss of coolant accident. Reactor vessel vent valve effects are included in the analysis of steady one-phase natural circulation flow. Two new dimensionless numbers, which uniquely describe one-phase flow in natural circulation loops, were deduced and are discussed. A scaled model of the primary loop of a typical Babcock and Wilcox reactor was designed, built, and tested. The particular prototype modeled was the TMI unit 2 reactor. The electrically heated, stainless steel model operates at a maximum pressure of 300 psig and has a maximum heat input of 188 kW. The model is about 4 times smaller in height than the prototype reactor, with a nominal volume scale of 1:500. Experiments were conducted establishing subcooled natural circulation in the model loop. Both steady flow and power transients were investigated.

  20. The simulation of thermohydraulic phenomena in a pressurized water reactor primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena essential to nuclear power reactor safety were investigated. Scaling and modeling laws for pressurized water reactors are reviewed and a new scaling approach focusing on the overall loop behavior is presented. Scaling criteria for one- and two-phase natural circulation are developed, as well as a simplified model describing the first phase of a small break loss of coolant accident. Reactor vessel vent valve effects are included in the analysis of steady one-phase natural circulation flow. Two new dimensionless numbers, which uniquely describe one-phase flow in natural circulation loops, were deduced and are discussed. A scaled model of the primary loop of a typical Babcock and Wilcox reactor was designed, built, and tested. The particular prototype modeled was the TMI unit 2 reactor. The electrically heated, stainless steel model operates at a maximum pressure of 300 psig and has a maximum heat input of 188 kW. The model is about 4 times smaller in height than the prototype reactor, with a nominal volume scale of 1:500. Experiments were conducted establishing subcooled natural circulation in the model loop. Both steady flow and power transients were investigated

  1. Preliminary study of uranium favorability of the Wilcox and Claiborne Groups (Eocene) in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbert, W.P.; Templain, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Rocks of the Wilcox and Claiborne Groups crop out in the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain and are represented by a series of sands and shales which reflect oscillation of the strandline. The Wilcox Group (lower Eocene), usually undifferentiated in Texas, consists of very fine sands and clays and abundant lignite. The Claiborne Group (middle Eocene) comprises, in ascending order, Carrizo Sand, Reklaw Formation (clay), Queen City Sand, Weches Formation (clay), Sparta Sand, Cook Mountain Formation (clay), and Yegua Formation (sand). Fluvial systems of the Wilcox and Claiborne Groups exist in east Texas and trend perpendicular to the present coastline. In central Texas, sand bodies are parallel to the present coastline and are strand-plain, barrier-bar systems. Since the time of deposition of the Queen City Sand, a significant fluvial sand buildup occurred in the area of the present Rio Grande embayment where the marine clays pinch out. Known occurrences of mineral matter in the Wilcox and Claiborne (up to the Yegua) are limited to lignite (particularly in the Wilcox), cannel coal in the upper Claiborne, and hydrocarbons throughout. No uranium mineralization is known, and no uranium is likely to be discovered in the Claiborne and Wilcox. Approximately 50 surface samples and many gamma-ray logs showed no significant anomalies. The sands are very good potential host rocks, but no uranium source was discovered. During deposition of the Wilcox and Claiborne Groups, there was no volcanism to serve as a source of uranium (as with the prolific occurrences in the younger rocks of south Texas); also, Precambrian crystalline rocks in the Llano uplift were not exposed.

  2. Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo: the role of downward pumping and the equatorward propagation of activity

    CERN Document Server

    Karak, Bidya Binay

    2016-01-01

    The key elements of the Babcock-Leighton dynamo are the generation of poloidal field through the decay of tilted bipolar active regions and the generation of toroidal field through the observed differential rotation. There are two classes of Babcock-Leighton models: flux transport dynamos where an equatorward flow at the bottom of the convection zone (CZ) is responsible for the equatorial propagation of the butterfly wings, and dynamo waves where the radial gradient of differential rotation and the $\\alpha$ effect act in conjunction to produce the equatorial propagation. Here we investigate the role of downward magnetic pumping near the surface using a kinematic Babcock-Leighton model. We find that the pumping causes the poloidal field to become predominately radial in the near-surface shear layer. This allows the negative radial shear in the near-surface layer to effectively act on the radial field to produce a toroidal field. Consequently, we observe a clear equatorward migration of the toroidal field at lo...

  3. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculations and data comparisons for MIST [Multi-Loop Integral System Test] small-break loss-of-coolant accidents with scaled 10 cm2 and 50 cm2 breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the Integral System Test (IST) program initiated in June 1983 for the purpose of providing integral system test data on specific issues/phenomena relevant to post-small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs), loss of feedwater and other transients in Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) plant designs. The Multi-Loop Integral System Test (MIST) facility is the largest single component in the IST program. MIST is a 2 x 4 (2 hot legs and steam generators, 4 cold legs and reactor-coolant pumps) representation of lowered-loop reactor systems of the B and W design. It is a full-height, full-pressure facility with 1/817 power and volume scaling. Two other experimental facilities are included in the IST program: test loops at the University of Maryland, College Park, and at Stanford Research Institute. The objective of the IST tests is to generate high-quality experimental data to be used for assessing thermal-hydraulic safety computer codes. Efforts are underway at Los Alamos to assess TRAC-PF1/MOD1 against data from each of the IST facilities. Calculations and data comparisons for TRAC-PF1/MOD1 assessment have been completed for two transients run in the MIST facility. These are the MIST nominal test. Test 3109AA, a scaled 10 cm2 SBLOCA and Test 320201, a scaled 50 cm2 SBLOCA. Only MIST assessment results are presented in this paper

  4. Spent fuel working group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a memo dated 19 August 1993, Secretary O'Leary assigned the Office of Environment, Safety and Health the primary responsibility to identify, characterize, and assess the safety, health, and environmental vulnerabilities of the DOE's existing storage conditions and facilities for the storage of irradiated reactor fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. This volume is divided into three major sections. Section 1 contains the Working Group Assessment Team reports on the following facilities: Hanford Site, INEL, SRS, Oak Ridge Site, West Valley Site, LANL, BNL, Sandia, General Atomics (San Diego), Babcock ampersand Wilcox (Lynchburg Technology Center), and ANL. Section 2 contains the Vulnerability Development Forms from most of these sites. Section 3 contains the documents used by the Working Group in implementing this initiative

  5. Wilcox Group Apparent Thickness, Gulf Coast (wlcxthkg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Apparent Wilcox Group thickness maps are contoured from location and top information derived from the Petroleum Information (PI) Wells database. The Wilcox...

  6. Annular Flow Distribution test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) Annular Flow Distribution testing for the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). The objective of the Annular Flow Distribution Test Program is to characterize the flow distribution between annular coolant channels for the Mark-22 fuel assembly with the bottom fitting insert (BFI) in place. Flow rate measurements for each annular channel were obtained by establishing ''hydraulic similarity'' between an instrumented fuel assembly with the BFI removed and a ''reference'' fuel assembly with the BFI installed. Empirical correlations of annular flow rates were generated for a range of boundary conditions

  7. Magnetic flux transport and the sun's dipole moment - New twists to the Babcock-Leighton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms that give rise to the sun's large-scale poloidal magnetic field are explored in the framework of the Babcock-Leighton (BL) model. It is shown that there are in general two quite distinct contributions to the generation of the 'alpha effect': the first is associated with the axial tilts of the bipolar magnetic regions as they erupt at the surface, while the second arises through the interaction between diffusion and flow as the magnetic flux is dispersed over the surface. The general relationship between flux transport and the BL dynamo is discussed.

  8. TREAT [Transient Reactor Test Facility] reactor control rod scram system simulations and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air cylinders moving heavy components (100 to 300 lbs) at high speeds (above 300 in/sec) present a formidable end-cushion-shock problem. With no speed control, the moving components can reach over 600 in/sec if the air cylinder has a 5 ft stroke. This paper presents an overview of a successful upgrade modification to an existing reactor control rod drive design using a computer model to simulate the modified system performance for system design analysis. This design uses a high speed air cylinder to rapidly insert control rods (278 lb moved 5 ft in less than 300 msec) to scram an air-cooled test reactor. Included is information about the computer models developed to simulate high-speed air cylinder operation and a unique new speed control and end cushion design. A patent application is pending with the US Patent ampersand Trade Mark Office for this system (DOE case number S-68,622). The evolution of the design, from computer simulations thru operational testing in a test stand (simulating in-reactor operating conditions) to installation and use in the reactor, is also described. 6 figs

  9. New Sensors for Irradiation Testing at Materials and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhanced instrumentation, capable of providing real-time measurements of parameters during fuels and material irradiations, is required to support irradiation testing requested by US nuclear research programs. For example, several research programs funded by the US Department of Energy (US DOE) are emphasizing the use of first principle models to characterize the performance of fuels and materials. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time data are essential to demonstrate the performance of these new fuels and materials during irradiation testing. Furthermore, sensors that obtain such data in US MTRs, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), must be miniature, reliable, and able to withstand high fluxes and high temperatures. Depending on program requirements, sensors may need to obtain data in inert gas, pressurized water, or liquid metal environments. To address these needs, INL has developed and deployed several new sensors to support irradiation testing in US DOE programs. The paper identifies the sensors currently available to support higher flux US MTR irradiations. Recent results and products from sensor research and development are highlighted. In particular, progress in deploying enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting temperature, elongation, and thermal conductivity is emphasized. Finally, initial results from research to evaluate the viability of ultrasonic and fiber optic technologies for irradiation testing are summarized. (author)

  10. Test reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Development Program created a need for engineering testing of fuels and materials. The Engineering Test Reactors were developed around the world in response to this demand. The design of the test reactors proved to be different from that of power reactors, carrying the fuel elements closer to the threshold of failure, requiring more responsive instrumentation, more rapid control element action, and inherent self-limiting behavior under accident conditions. The design of the experimental facilities to exploit these reactors evolved a new, specialized, branch of engineering, requiring a very high-lvel scientific and engineering team, established a meticulous concern with reliability, the provision for recovery from their own failures, and detailed attention to possible interactions with the test reactors. This paper presents this technology commencing with the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) through the Fast Flux Test Facility, some of the unique experimental facilities developed to exploit them, but discusses only cursorily the experiments performed, since sample preparation and sample analyses were, and to some extent still are, either classified or proprietary. The Nuclear Engineering literature is filled with this information

  11. Organic petrology and coalbed gas content, Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene), northern Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, P.C.; Warwick, P.D.; Breland, F.C.

    2007-01-01

    Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene) coal and carbonaceous shale samples collected from four coalbed methane test wells in northern Louisiana were characterized through an integrated analytical program. Organic petrographic analyses, gas desorption and adsorption isotherm measurements, and proximate-ultimate analyses were conducted to provide insight into conditions of peat deposition and the relationships between coal composition, rank, and coalbed gas storage characteristics. The results of petrographic analyses indicate that woody precursor materials were more abundant in stratigraphically higher coal zones in one of the CBM wells, consistent with progradation of a deltaic depositional system (Holly Springs delta complex) into the Gulf of Mexico during the Paleocene-Eocene. Comparison of petrographic analyses with gas desorption measurements suggests that there is not a direct relationship between coal type (sensu maceral composition) and coalbed gas storage. Moisture, as a function of coal rank (lignite-subbituminous A), exhibits an inverse relationship with measured gas content. This result may be due to higher moisture content competing for adsorption space with coalbed gas in shallower, lower rank samples. Shallower ( 600??m) coal samples containing less moisture range from under- to oversaturated with respect to their CH4 adsorption capacity.

  12. Development, utilization, and future prospects of materials test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor radiation affects the chemical and physical properties of materials. These changes can be very drastic in certain cases. Special test reactors have therefore been built since the 1950's and specific skills were developed to expose materials specimens to the precise irradiation conditions required. Materials testing reactors are those research reactor facilities which are designed and operated predominantly for studies into radiation damage. About a dozen plants in European communities (EC) Member States and in the US can be identified in this category, with 5 to 100 MW fission power and neutron fluxes between 5 x 1013 and 1015 cm-2s-1. The paper elaborates common aspects of development, utilization, and future prospects of US and EC materials testing reactors, and indicates the most significant differences

  13. Reactor numerical simulation and hydraulic test research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L. S. [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Beijing (China)

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, the computer hardware was improved on the numerical simulation on flow field in the reactor. In our laboratory, we usually use the Pro/e or UG commercial software. After completed topology geometry, ICEM-CFD is used to get mesh for computation. Exact geometrical similarity is maintained between the main flow paths of the model and the prototype, with the exception of the core simulation design of the fuel assemblies. The drive line system is composed of drive mechanism, guide bush assembly, fuel assembly and control rod assembly, and fitted with the rod level indicator and drive mechanism power device.

  14. Status and future plan of Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooling tank typed reactor. JMTR has been used for fuel and material irradiation studies for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. Since the JMTR is connected with hot laboratory through the canal, re-irradiation tests can conduct easily by safety and quick transportation of irradiation samples. First criticality was achieved in March 1968, and operation was stopped from August, 2006 for the refurbishment. The reactor facilities are refurbished during four years from the beginning of FY 2007, and necessary examination and work are carrying out on schedule. The renewed and upgraded JMTR will start from FY 2011 and operate for a period of about 20 years (until around FY 2030). The usability improvement of the JMTR, such as higher reactor available factor, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussing as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  15. Improving the proliferation resistance of research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elimination, or substantial reduction, of the trade in highly enriched fuel elements for research and test reactors would significantly reduce the proliferation risk associated with the current potential for diversion of these materials. To this end, it is the long-term goal of U.S. policy to fuel all new and existing research and test reactors with uranium of less than 20% enrichment (but substantially greater than natural) excepting, perhaps, only a small number of high-power, high-performance, reactors. The U.S. development program for enrichment reduction in research and test reactor designs currently using 90-93% enriched uranium is based on the practical criterion that enrichment reduction should not cause significant flux performance (flux per unit power) or burnup performance degradation relative to the unmodified reactor design. A program is now beginning in the U.S. to develop the necessary fuel technology, but several years of work will be needed. Accordingly, as an immediate interim step, the U.S. is proposing to convert existing research and test reactors (and new designs) from the use of 90-93% enriched fuel to the use of 30-45% enriched fuel wherever this can be done without unacceptable reactor performance degradation

  16. Technical and economic studies of small reactors for supply of electricity and steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiewak, I.; Klepper, O. H.; Fuller, L. C.

    1977-02-01

    Several years ago conventional opinion held that nuclear power plants must be very large to be competitive with fossil fuels. This situation has changed markedly in most countries within recent years, as oil and gas supplies have become more scarce and costly. Studies have been carried out for several nuclear steam supply systems in the small and intermediate size range. Detail studies are reported of the Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG), a 365 MW(th) pressurized water reactor being developed by Babcock and Wilcox, as applied to industrial energy needs. Both conventional and barge-mounted nuclear steam supply systems are considered. Conceptual studies have been started of pressurized and boiling water reactors in the range of 1000 MW(th), which are envisioned for utility operation for supply of electric power and steam. Design studies of a 500 MW(th) high temperature reactor are also reported. The small reactors are expected to have higher unit costs than the large commercial plants, but to have compensating advantages in higher plant availability, shorter construction schedule, and greater siting flexibility. Studies are also reported of power cycle parameters and cost allocations for extraction of steam from steam turbine plants. This steam could be used for industrial energy, district heating, or desalination.

  17. Technical and economic studies of small reactors for supply of electricity and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several years ago conventional opinion held that nuclear power plants must be very large to be competitive with fossil fuels. This situation has changed markedly in most countries within recent years, as oil and gas supplies have become more scarce and costly. Studies have been carried out for several nuclear steam supply systems in the small and intermediate size range. Detail studies are reported of the Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG), a 365 MW(th) pressurized water reactor being developed by Babcock and Wilcox, as applied to industrial energy needs. Both conventional and barge-mounted nuclear steam supply systems are considered. Conceptual studies have been started of pressurized and boiling water reactors in the range of 1000 MW(th), which are envisioned for utility operation for supply of electric power and steam. Design studies of a 500 MW(th) high temperature reactor are also reported. The small reactors are expected to have higher unit costs than the large commercial plants, but to have compensating advantages in higher plant availability, shorter construction schedule, and greater siting flexibility. Studies are also reported of power cycle parameters and cost allocations for extraction of steam from steam turbine plants. This steam could be used for industrial energy, district heating, or desalination

  18. FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (“AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C “green” microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led

  19. Irradiation testing of miniature fuel plates for the RERTR program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senn, R.L.; Martin, M.M.

    1981-07-01

    An irradiation test facility, which provides a test bed for irradiating a variety of miniature fuel plates (miniplates) for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, has been placed into operation. These tests screen various candidate fuel materials on their suitability for replacing the highly enriched uranium fuel materials currently used by the world's test and research reactors with a lower enrichment fuel material, without significantly degrading reactor operating characteristics and power levels. The use of low uranium enrichment of about 20% /sup 235/U in place of highly enriched fuel for these reactors would reduce the potential for /sup 235/U diversion. The irradiation test facility, designated as HFED, is operating in core position E-7 in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR), a 30-MW water-moderated reactor. The miniplates will achieve burnups of up to approx. 2.2 x 10/sup 27/ fissions/m/sup 3/ of fuel.

  20. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris{o} National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  1. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris oe National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  2. Present status and future perspective of research and test reactors in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Osamu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Kaieda, Keisuke

    1999-08-01

    Since 1957, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has constructed several research and test reactors to fulfil a major role in the study of nuclear energy and fundamental research. At present, four reactors, the Japan Research Reactor No. 3 and No. 4 (JRR-3M and JRR-4 respectively), the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), are in operation, and a new High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) has reached first criticality and is waiting for the power-up test. This paper introduce these reactors and describe their present operational status. The recent tendency of utilization and future perspectives are also reported. (author)

  3. Improving the proliferation resistance of research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elimination, or substantial reduction, of the trade in unirradiated highly-enriched fuel elements for research and test reactors would significantly reduce the proliferation risk associated with the current potential for diversion of these materials. To this end, it is the long-term goal of U.S. policy to fuel all new and existing research and test reactors with uranium of less-than-20% enrichment (but substantially greater than natural) excepting, perhaps, only a small number of high-power, high-performance, reactors. The U.S. development program for enrichment reduction in research and test reactor designs currently using 90-93% enriched uranium is based on the practical criterion that enrichment reduction should not cause significant flux performance (flux per unit power) or burnup performance degradation relative to the unmodified reactor design. To first order, this implies the requirement that the 235U loading in the reduced-enrichment fuel elements be the same as the 235U loading in the 90-93% enriched fuel elements. This can be accomplished by substitution of higher uranium density fuel technology for currently-used fuel technology in the fuel meat volume of the current fuel element design and/or by increasing the usable fuel meat volume. For research and test reactors of power greater than 5-10 megawatts, fuel technology does not currently exist that would permit enrichment reductions to below 20% utilizing this criterion. A program is now beginning in the U.S. to develop the necessary fuel technology. Currently-proven fuel technology is capable, however, of accommodating enrichment reductions to the 30-45% range (from 90-93%) for many reactors in the 5-50MW range. Accordingly the U.S. is proposing to convert existing reactors (and new designs) in the 5-50MW range from the use of highly-enriched fuel to the use of 30-45% enriched fuel, and reactors of less that about 5MW to less-than-20% enrichment, wherever this can be done without significant performance

  4. Interpretational Confounding Is Due to Misspecification, Not to Type of Indicator: Comment on Howell, Breivik, and Wilcox (2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    R. D. Howell, E. Breivik, and J. B. Wilcox (2007) have argued that causal (formative) indicators are inherently subject to interpretational confounding. That is, they have argued that using causal (formative) indicators leads the empirical meaning of a latent variable to be other than that assigned to it by a researcher. Their critique of causal…

  5. Natural convection test in Phenix reactor and associated CATHARE calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Phenix sodium cooled fast reactor started operation in 1973 and was stopped in 2009. Before the reactor was definitively stopped, final tests were performed, including a natural convection test in the primary circuit. One objective of this natural convection test in Phenix reactor is the qualification of plant dynamic codes as CATHARE code for future safety studies. The paper firstly describes the Phenix reactor primary circuit. The initial test conditions and the detailed transient scenario are presented. Then, the CATHARE modelling of the Phenix primary circuit is described. The whole transient scenario is calculated, including the nominal state, the steam generators dry out, the scram, the onset of natural convection in the primary circuit and the natural convection phases. The CATHARE calculations are compared to the Phenix measurements. A particular attention is paid to the significant decrease of the core power before the scram. Then, the evolution of main components inlet and outlet temperatures is compared. The need of coupling a system code with a CFD code to model the 3D behaviour of large pools is pointed out. This work is in progress. (author)

  6. Apparent Depth to the Wilcox Group, Gulf Coast (wlcxdpthg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The depth to top of the Wilcox Group is contoured from location and top information derived from the Petroleum Information (PI) Wells database. The depth to Wilcox...

  7. Preliminary Design Concept for a Reactor-internal CRDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Tae Wan; Choi, Suhn; Kim, Keung Koo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    A rod ejection accident may cause severer result in SMRs because SMRs have relatively high control rod reactivity worth compared with commercial nuclear reactors. Because this accident would be perfectly excluded by adopting a reactor-internal CRDM (Control Rod Drive Mechanism), many SMRs accept this concept. The first concept was provided by JAERI with the MRX reactor which uses an electric motor with a ball screw driveline. Babcock and Wilcox introduced the concept in an mPower reactor that adopts an electric motor with a roller screw driveline and hydraulic system, and Westinghouse Electric Co. proposes an internal Control Rod Drive in its SMR with an electric motor with a latch mechanism. In addition, several other applications have been reported thus far. The reactor-internal CRDM concept is now widely adopted in many SMR designs, and this concept may also be applied in an evolutionary reactor development. So the preliminary study is conducted based on the SMART CRDM design. A preliminary design concept for a reactor-internal CRDM was proposed and evaluated through an electromagnetic analysis. It was found that there is an optimum design for the motor housing, and the results may contribute to the realization a reactor-internal CRDM for an evolutionary reactor development. More detailed analysis results will be reported later.

  8. Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo: the role of downward pumping and the equatorward propagation of activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Cameron, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the role of downward magnetic pumping near the surface using a kinematic Babcock-Leighton model. We find that the pumping causes the poloidal field to become predominately radial in the near-surface shear layer. This allows the negative radial shear in the near-surface layer to effectively act on the radial field to produce a toroidal field. Consequently, we observe a clear equatorward migration of the toroidal field at low latitudes even when there is no meridional flow in the deep CZ. We show a case where the period of a dynamo wave solution is approximately 11 years. Flux transport models are also shown with periods close to 11 years. Both the dynamo wave and flux transport dynamo are thus able to reproduce some of the observed features of solar cycle. The main difference between the two types of dynamo is the value of $\\alpha$ required to produce dynamo action. In both types of dynamo, the surface meridional flow helps to advect and build the polar field in high latitudes, while in flux transport dynamo the equatorward flow near the bottom of CZ advects toroidal field to cause the equatorward migration in butterfly wings and this advection makes the dynamo easier by transporting strong toroidal field to low latitudes where $\\alpha$ effect works. Another conclusion of our study is that the magnetic pumping suppresses the diffusion of fields through the photospheric surface which helps to achieve the 11-year dynamo cycle at a moderately larger value of magnetic diffusivity than has previously been used.

  9. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

  10. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm3 was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed

  11. Fuels for research and test reactors, status review: July 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, D.

    1982-12-01

    A thorough review is provided on nuclear fuels for steady-state thermal research and test reactors. The review was conducted to provide a documented data base in support of recent advances in research and test reactor fuel development, manufacture, and demonstration in response to current US policy on availability of enriched uranium. The review covers current fabrication practice, fabrication development efforts, irradiation performance, and properties affecting fuel utilization, including thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, thermal expansion, corrosion, phase stability, mechanical properties, and fission-product release. The emphasis is on US activities, but major work in Europe and elsewhere is included. The standard fuel types discussed are the U-Al alloy, UZrH/sub x/, and UO/sub 2/ rod fuels. Among new fuels, those given major emphasis include H/sub 3/Si-Al dispersion and UO/sub 2/ caramel plate fuels.

  12. Fuels for research and test reactors, status review: July 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thorough review is provided on nuclear fuels for steady-state thermal research and test reactors. The review was conducted to provide a documented data base in support of recent advances in research and test reactor fuel development, manufacture, and demonstration in response to current US policy on availability of enriched uranium. The review covers current fabrication practice, fabrication development efforts, irradiation performance, and properties affecting fuel utilization, including thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, thermal expansion, corrosion, phase stability, mechanical properties, and fission-product release. The emphasis is on US activities, but major work in Europe and elsewhere is included. The standard fuel types discussed are the U-Al alloy, UZrH/sub x/, and UO2 rod fuels. Among new fuels, those given major emphasis include H3Si-Al dispersion and UO2 caramel plate fuels

  13. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer Lyons; Wade R. Marcum; Mark D. DeHart; Sean R. Morrell

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  14. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  15. Design and Status of RERTR Irradiation Tests in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Richard G. Ambrosek; Gray Chang; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2006-10-01

    Irradiation testing of U-Mo based fuels is the central component of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program fuel qualification plan. Several RERTR tests have recently been completed or are planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, ID. Four mini-plate experiments in various stages of completion are described in detail, including the irradiation test design, objectives, and irradiation conditions. Observations made during and after the in-reactor RERTR-7A experiment breach are summarized. The irradiation experiment design and planned irradiation conditions for full-size plate test are described. Progress toward element testing will be reviewed.

  16. Simulator for materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A real-time simulator for both reactor and irradiation facilities of a materials testing reactor, “Simulator of Materials Testing Reactors”, was developed for understanding reactor behavior and operational training in order to utilize it for nuclear human resource development and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of anticipated operational transients and accident conditions caused by the reactor and irradiation facilities. The development of the simulator was sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. This report summarizes the simulation components, hardware specification and operation procedure of the simulator. (author)

  17. Reactor Simulator Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenny L.; Pearson, Boise J.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator test loop (RxSim) was design & built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing was to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V since the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This paper summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump (ALIP) tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  18. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; K. Rule; M. Viola; M. Williams; R. Strykowsky

    1999-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling.

  19. A Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model with multi-cellular meridional circulation in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Belucz, Bernadett; Forgacs-Dajka, Emese

    2015-01-01

    Babcock-Leighton type solar dynamo models with single-celled meridional circulation are successful in reproducing many solar cycle features. Recent observations and theoretical models of meridional circulation do not indicate a single-celled flow pattern. We examine the role of complex multi-cellular circulation patterns in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes. We show from simulations that presence of a weak, second, high-latitude reverse cell speeds up the cycle and slightly enhances the poleward branch in butterfly diagram, whereas the presence of a second cell in depth reverses the tilt of butterfly wing to an anti-solar type. A butterfly diagram constructed from middle of convection zone yields a solar-like pattern, but this may be difficult to realize in the Sun because of magnetic buoyancy effects. Each of the above cases behaves similarly in higher and lower magnetic diffusivity regimes. However, our dynamo with a meridional circulation containing four cells in...

  20. Fracture toughness test methods and examples for fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the importance of the evaluation of fracture toughness in nuclear fusion reactor structural materials, and the fracture toughness evaluation methods that are used as the standards and their actual examples. It also discusses the problems involved in the standardized approach and the efforts for the technology improvement. To evaluate the material life under nuclear fusion reactor environment, fracture toughness measurement after neutron irradiation is indispensable. Due to a limitation in the irradiation area size of an irradiation reactor, and to avoid the temperature difference in a specimen, the size of the specimen is required to be minimized, which is different from the common standards. As for the size effect of the test specimen, toughness value tends to decrease when ligament length is 7 mm or below. The main problems and challenges are as follows. (1) As for the tendency that fracture toughness value decreases along with the miniaturization of the ligament length, it is necessary to elucidate the mechanism of size effects, and to develop the correction method for size effects. (2) As for the issues of the curve shape and application to irradiation time in the master curve method, it is necessary to review the data checking method and plastic constraint conditions for crack tip M = 30 that is stipulated in ASTM E1921, and to elucidate the material dependence of master curve shape. (A.O.)

  1. Reactor Testing and Qualification: Prioritized High-level Criticality Testing Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner; G. Harms; S. Bailey

    2011-09-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were tasked with reviewing possible criticality testing needs to support development of the fission surface power system reactor design. Reactor physics testing can provide significant information to aid in development of technologies associated with small, fast spectrum reactors that could be applied for non-terrestrial power systems, leading to eventual system qualification. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to assess the data and analyses required to design and build a space fission power system with high confidence that the system will perform as designed [Marcille, 2004a, 2004b; Weaver, 2007; Parry et al., 2008]. This report will provide a summary of previous critical tests and physics measurements that are potentially applicable to the current reactor design (both those that have been benchmarked and those not yet benchmarked), summarize recent studies of potential nuclear testing needs for space reactor development and their applicability to the current baseline fission surface power (FSP) system design, and provide an overview of a suite of tests (separate effects, sub-critical or critical) that could fill in the information database to improve the accuracy of physics modeling efforts as the FSP design is refined. Some recommendations for tasks that could be completed in the near term are also included. Specific recommendations on critical test configurations will be reserved until after the sensitivity analyses being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are completed (due August 2011).

  2. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    November 9--10, 1978, marked the first of what has become an annual event--the International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). The meeting brought together for the first time many people who became major program participants in later years. This first meeting emphasized fuel development, and it established the basis for all later meetings. Believing that the proceedings of this first meeting are important as a historical record of the beginning of the international RERTR effort. This report provides presentations and discussions of this original meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  3. High flux testing reactor Petten. Replacement of the reactor vessel and connected components. Overall report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project of replacing the HFR originated in 1974 when results of several research programmes confirmed severe neutron embrittlement of aluminium alloys suggesting a limited life of the existing facility. This report contains the detailed chronology of events concerning preparation and execution of the replacement. After a 14 months' outage the reactor resumed routine operation on 14th February, 1985. At the end of several years of planning and preparation the reconstruction proceded in the following steps: unloading of the old core, decay of short-lived radioactivity in December 1983, removal of the old tank and of its peripheral equipment in January-February 1984, segmentation and waste disposal of the removed components in March-April, decontamination of the pools, bottom penetration overhauling in May-June, installation of the new tank and other new components in July-September, testing and commissioning, including minor modifications in October-December, and, trials runs and start-up preparation in January-February 1985. The new HFR Petten features increased and improved experimental facilities. Among others the obsolete thermal columns was replaced by two high flux beam tubes. Moreover the new plant has been designed for future increases of reactor power and neutron fluxes. For the next three to four years the reactor has to cope with a large irradiation programme, claiming its capacity to nearly 100%

  4. The New US Public-Private Partnership to License and DeploySmall Modular Reactors, With Focus on The B and W mPower Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On December 16, 2011, The US Congress and the President approved new Fiscal Year 2012 funding for a Government - Industry cost shared program called 'Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Licensing Technical Support'. The new legislation appropriates $67 million in 2012 to provide licensing and first-of-a-kind engineering support for small modular reactor designs that can be deployed expeditiously. The legislation requires the Department of Energy to consider applications utilizing any small modular reactor technology. Competitive solicitations are likely to begin shortly and two or three SM R designs will be selected for U S Government support. Such support will likely accelerate deployment and operation of at least one such design by 2020. The Congressional language states that the Government portion of the program is expected to total $452 million over five years One of the candidates for this competition is the B and W mPower reactor being developed by Generation mPower, a company recently formed by the Babcock and Wilcox Company and Bechtel Power Corporation. This presentation will summarize the main features of this design, and explain why it meets the requirements for the Government program, and will be fully developed, licensed and deployed in the US within the next 8 years. Importantly, this design has many features that favor its introduction and use in smaller countries with critical needs for future electric generation capacity, with arid conditions that may require air cooled condensers, and with potential need for a desalination component of the new energy source. The relatively small capacity of the modules (e.g. 320 MWe for an initial two unit plant) will require much lower initial capital investment, as compared to the very large investment of $4 to $6 billion required for the newer 1100 to 1400 MWe plants now being constructed in China, France, Finland, Korea, the US, and the United Arab Emirates

  5. Spent fuel working group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each Site Team, consisting of M ampersand O contractor and Operations Office personnel, performed data collection and identified ES ampersand H concerns relative to RINM storage by preparing responses to the detailed question set for each storage facility at the site. These responses formed the basis for the Site Team reports. These reports are contained in this volume and are from the following facilities: Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site, Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, West Valley Demonstration Project Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, General Atomics, San Diego, Babcock ampersand Wilcox, Lynchburg Technical Center, Argonne National Laboratory - East, Naval Reactors Facilities, Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory, EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies, Ohio, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Battelle Columbus Laboratory. This volume also contains information received from the sites that were not visited. These sites include the Naval Reactor Facility at the INEL, EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies, The Catholic University of America, Rocky Flats Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, Energy Technology Engineering Center, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Information received through the Chicago Operations Office for University Reactors, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Battelle Columbus Laboratory is also included. Materials contained in this volume consist of information, data and site documents. They are unedited

  6. Electrical system regulations of the IEA-R1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Jose Roberto de; Madi Filho, Tufic, E-mail: jrmello@ipen.br, E-mail: tmfilho@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The IEA-R1 reactor of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP), is a research reactor open pool type, designed and built by the U.S. firm Babcock and Wilcox, having, as coolant and moderator, deionized light water and beryllium and graphite, as reflectors. Until about 1988, the reactor safety systems received power from only one source of energy. As an example, it may be cited the control desk that was powered only by the vital electrical system 220V, which, in case the electricity fails, is powered by the generator group: no-break 220V. In the years 1989 and 1990, a reform of the electrical system upgrading to increase the reactor power and, also, to meet the technical standards of the ABNT (Associacao Brasileira de Normas Tecnicas) was carried out. This work has the objective of showing the relationship between the electric power system and the IEA-R1 reactor security. Also, it demonstrates that, should some electrical power interruption occur, during the reactor operation, this occurrence would not start an accident event. (author)

  7. The RERTR [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor] program:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results and new developments which ocurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U3Si2-Al and U3Si-Al fuels was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U3Si2-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm3 was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40 % average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission 99Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of U.S. university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U3Si-Al with 19.75 % enrichment and U3Si2-Al with 45 % enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR program. (Author)

  8. Reactor Simulator Testing Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Test Objectives Summary: a) Verify operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation & control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. b) Examine cooling & heat regeneration performance of the cold trap purification. c) Test the ALIP pump at voltages beyond 120V to see if the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s can be obtained in the RxSim. Testing Highlights: a) Gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively for operations (NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain). b) Instrumentation & Control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings and ramped within prescribed constraints. It effectively interacted with reactor simulator control model and defaulted back to temperature control mode if the transient fluctuations didn't dampen. c) Cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the minimum temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. d) ALIP produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  9. Valve inlet fluid conditions for pressurizer safety and relief valves for B and W 177-FA and 205-FA plants. Final report. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartin, L.R.; Winks, R.W.; Merchent, J.W.; Brandt, R.T.

    1982-12-01

    The overpressurization transients for the Babcock and Wilcox Company's 177- and 205-FA units are reviewed to determine the range of fluid conditions expected at the inlet of pressurizer safety and relief valves. The final Safety Analysis Report, extended high-pressure injection, and cold overpressurization events are considered. The results of this review, presented in the form of tables and graphs, provide input to the PWR utilities in their justification that the fluid conditions under which their valve designs were tested as part of the EPRI PWR Safety and Relief Valve Test Program are representative of those expected in their unit(s).

  10. Program plan for decontamination and decommissioning the Materials Testing Reactor at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discussion is presented of a program plan developed for the dismantling of the Materials Testing Reactor located in the Testing Reactor Area (TRA) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are the scope of work, dismantling problems resulting from the nature of construction of the MTR, and a program plan for physically dismantling the reactor

  11. SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This semiannual technical progress report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the prime contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors, and supporting national laboratories during the first half of the government fiscal year (GFY) 1993. SPI's subcontractors and supporting national laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements, and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics, and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The point design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

  12. SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

  13. Similarity Analysis for Reactor Flow Distribution Test and Its Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Soon Joon; Ha, Jung Hui [Heungdeok IT Valley, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Taehoo; Han, Ji Woong [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The newly derived dimensionless groups are slightly different from Hetsroni's. Reynolds number, relative wall roughness, and Euler don't appear, instead, friction factor appears newly. In order to conserve friction factor Reynolds number and relative wall roughness should be conserved. Since the effect of Reynolds number in high range is small, and since the scaled model is far smaller than prototype the conservation of friction factor is easily obtained by making the model wall just smooth. It is much easier to implement the test design than Hetsroni's because the Reynolds number and relative wall roughness do not appear explicitly. In case that there is no free surface within the interested domain of the reactor, the gravity is of second importance, and in this case the pressure drops should be compensated for in order to compare them between prototype and model. The gravity head compensated pressure drop is directly same to the measured value by a differential pressure transmitter. In order to conserve the gravity effect Froude number should be conserved. In pool type SFR (Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor) there exists liquid level difference, and if the level difference is desired to be conserved, the Froude number should be conserved. Euler number, which represents pressure terms in momentum equation, should be well conserved according to Hetsroni's approach. It is not a wrong statement, but it should be noted that Euler number is NOT an independent variable BUT a dependent variable according to Hong et al. It means that if all the geometrical similarity and the dimensionless numbers are conserved, Euler number is automatically conserved. So Euler number need not be considered in case that the perfect geometrical similarity is kept. However, even in case that the geometrical similarity is not conserved, it possible to conserved the velocity field similarity by just conserve Euler number. It gives tolerance to the engineer who designs the test

  14. Similarity Analysis for Reactor Flow Distribution Test and Its Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newly derived dimensionless groups are slightly different from Hetsroni's. Reynolds number, relative wall roughness, and Euler don't appear, instead, friction factor appears newly. In order to conserve friction factor Reynolds number and relative wall roughness should be conserved. Since the effect of Reynolds number in high range is small, and since the scaled model is far smaller than prototype the conservation of friction factor is easily obtained by making the model wall just smooth. It is much easier to implement the test design than Hetsroni's because the Reynolds number and relative wall roughness do not appear explicitly. In case that there is no free surface within the interested domain of the reactor, the gravity is of second importance, and in this case the pressure drops should be compensated for in order to compare them between prototype and model. The gravity head compensated pressure drop is directly same to the measured value by a differential pressure transmitter. In order to conserve the gravity effect Froude number should be conserved. In pool type SFR (Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor) there exists liquid level difference, and if the level difference is desired to be conserved, the Froude number should be conserved. Euler number, which represents pressure terms in momentum equation, should be well conserved according to Hetsroni's approach. It is not a wrong statement, but it should be noted that Euler number is NOT an independent variable BUT a dependent variable according to Hong et al. It means that if all the geometrical similarity and the dimensionless numbers are conserved, Euler number is automatically conserved. So Euler number need not be considered in case that the perfect geometrical similarity is kept. However, even in case that the geometrical similarity is not conserved, it possible to conserved the velocity field similarity by just conserve Euler number. It gives tolerance to the engineer who designs the test

  15. Development and verification test of integral reactor major components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual designs for SG, MCP, CEDM to be installed in the integral reactor SMART were developed. Three-dimensional CAD models for the major components were developed to visualize the design concepts. Once-through helical steam generator was conceptually designed for SMART. Canned motor pump was adopted in the conceptual design of MCP. Linear pulse motor type and ballscrew type CEDM, which have fine control capabilities were studied for adoption in SMART. In parallel with the structural design, the electro-magnetic design was performed for the sizing motors and electro-magnet. Prototypes for the CEDM and MCP sub-assemblies were developed and tested to verify the performance. The impeller design procedure and the computer program to analyze the dynamic characteristics of MCP rotor shaft were developed. The design concepts of SG, MCP, CEDM were also invetigated for the fabricability

  16. Development and verification test of integral reactor major components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. I.; Kim, Y. W.; Kim, J. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The conceptual designs for SG, MCP, CEDM to be installed in the integral reactor SMART were developed. Three-dimensional CAD models for the major components were developed to visualize the design concepts. Once-through helical steam generator was conceptually designed for SMART. Canned motor pump was adopted in the conceptual design of MCP. Linear pulse motor type and ballscrew type CEDM, which have fine control capabilities were studied for adoption in SMART. In parallel with the structural design, the electro-magnetic design was performed for the sizing motors and electro-magnet. Prototypes for the CEDM and MCP sub-assemblies were developed and tested to verify the performance. The impeller design procedure and the computer program to analyze the dynamic characteristics of MCP rotor shaft were developed. The design concepts of SG, MCP, CEDM were also invetigated for the fabricability.

  17. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  18. Advances in sodium technology, testing and diagnostics of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains a selection of 29 papers from three international specialists' meetings: the CMEA conference ''Control and measuring instruments and diagnostic systems of fast reactors'' held in the GDR in April 1983; the IAEA conference on nuclear power experience held in Austria in September 1982; and the conference ''Problems of technology and corrosion in sodium coolant and protective gas'' held in the GDR in April 1977. Three papers on operating experience with Soviet fast reactors and their safety have a general character; they are followed up by three papers on sodium technology. Five papers deal with the diagnostics of fast sodium cooled reactors and nine papers are devoted to the diagnostics of steam generators. Eight papers relate to detectors for the diagnostics of fast reactors. Safety regulations for work with alkali metals are added. (A.K.)

  19. FASTER test reactor preconceptual design report summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The FASTER reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  20. FASTER test reactor preconceptual design report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FASTER reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  1. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 2000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 2000C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented

  2. CERCA LEU fuel assemblies testing in Maria Reactor - safety analysis summary and testing program scope.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pytel, K.; Mieleszczenko, W.; Lechniak, J.; Moldysz, A.; Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.; Marcinkowska, A.; Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Institute of Atomic Energy (Poland)

    2010-03-01

    The presented paper contains neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (for steady and unsteady states) calculation results prepared to support annex to Safety Analysis Report for MARIA reactor in order to obtain approval for program of testing low-enriched uranium (LEU) lead test fuel assemblies (LTFA) manufactured by CERCA. This includes presentation of the limits and operational constraints to be in effect during the fuel testing investigations. Also, the scope of testing program (which began in August 2009), including additional measurements and monitoring procedures, is described.

  3. Comparative Investigation of River Water Quality by OWQI, NSFWQI and Wilcox Indexes (Case study: the Talar River – IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darvishi Gholamreza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rivers are considered as one of the main resources of water supply for various applications such as agricultural, drinking and industrial purposes. Also, these resources are used as a place for discharge of sewages, industrial wastewater and agricultural drainage. Regarding the fact that each river has a certain capacity for acceptance of pollutants, nowadays qualitative and environmental investigations of these resources are proposed. In this study, qualitative investigation of the Talar river was done according to Oregon Water Quality Index (OWQI, National Sanitation Foundation Water Quality Index (NSFWQI and Wilcox indicators during 2011–2012 years at upstream, midstream and downstream of the river in two periods of wet and dry seasons. According to the results of OWQI, all of the values at 3 stations and both periods are placed at very bad quality category and the water is not acceptable for drinking purposes. According to NSFWQI, the best condition was related to the upstream station at wet season period (58, medium quality and the worst condition was related to the downstream in wet season period (46, very bad quality. Also the results of Wilcox showed that in both periods of wet season and dry season, the water quality is getting better from upstream station to the downstream station, and according to the index classification, the downstream water quality has shown good quality and it is suitable for agriculture.

  4. INITIAL IRRADIATION OF THE FIRST ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION EXPERIMENT IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2007-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  5. RERTR-2004: International meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral and poster presentations of the Meeting covered the following topics: National and international programs related to Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR); development of new fuel types, testing, fabrication, modelling; studies of reactor cores conversion from highly enriched to low enriched fuel, including licensing; new and converted reactors; spent fuel management including storage and transportation; production of Molybdenum 99 under converted core conditions

  6. Operation and maintenance experience with control rod and their drive mechanisms of fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explains the functional and construction features of Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) and control rod used in Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) which is a 40 MWt loop type sodium cooled fast reactor. It discusses all safety related incidents and failures encountered during its service in reactor, the solutions evolved and modifications carried out to prevent recurrence. It also details the maintenance activities and periodical surveillance carried out. The results of a reliability analysis done are also discussed. (author)

  7. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  8. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 12th meeting was attended by 113 participants coming from 21 countries and from EURATOM and IAEA.42 reports were presented orally within 10 sessions dealing with 5 main topics: 1) programs(5); 2) fuels(12); 3) reactor conversions(17); 5) high performance neutron sources(4); 5) others(4). (HP)

  9. Refurbish research and test reactors corresponding to global age of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This special article featured arguments for refurbishment of research and test reactors corresponding to global age of nuclear energy, based on the report: 'Investigation of research facilities necessary for future joint usage' issued by the special committee of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) in September 2010. It consisted of six papers titled as 'Introduction-establishment of AESJ special committee for investigation', 'State of research and test reactors in Japan', 'State of overseas research and test reactors', 'Needs analysis for research and test reactors', 'Proposal of AESJ special committee' and 'Summary and future issues'. In order to develop human resources and promote research and development needed in global age of nuclear energy, research and test reactors would be refurbished as an Asian regional center of excellence. (T. Tanaka)

  10. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection.

  11. Static and dynamic performance tests of nuclear powered ship Mutsu reactor (report on nuclear ship Mutsu power-up tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ochiai, Masa-aki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tanaka, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kimio; Yao, Toshiaki; Kamai, Satoshi; Kitamura, Toshikatsu

    1992-08-01

    The power-up tests of the Mutsu reactor were performed from March 29th 1990 to December 14th. The tests were divided into six phases: The tests Phase 0 and Phase 1 were done in the state that the ship was moored at the quay of Sekinehama port in March and April; The tests Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4, and Phase 5 were done on the Pacific Ocean from July to December. Present report describes the test results on the static and dynamic plant performance. On static plant performance tests, there are 13 test items including measurements of primary system heat balance at low and high power levels, a virgin run of feed water pump with SG steam, a change-over test of steam supply of auxiliary boiler to SG. On the dynamic plant performance, there are 11 test items including a test of reactor power auto-control system, a test of main feed water auto-control system, a test of small load variation, a load increasing test, a turbine trip test, tests of ahead and astern maneuvering, a test of single loop operation, and a reactor scram test. The reactor power for each item`s test was increased step by step from zero power to the goal of rated power of 100 %, 36 MWt. In order to confirm proper reactor system performance, criteria were laid down for the static and dynamic tests: for example, (1) reactor scram shall not occur, (2) pressurizer relief valve and steam generator safety valve shall not work, and (3) after the transients reactor systems shall become the steady state without manual adjustment of the reactor control system. The test results satisfied these criteria and some of test data showed that reactor had much more margin in any performance for design. It is verified, therefore, that the Mutsu reactor systems have adequate performances as a marine reactor and that one is capable to respond smoothly and safely to the load of ship`s demand. (author).

  12. Static and dynamic performance tests of nuclear powered ship Mutsu reactor (report on nuclear ship Mutsu power-up tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ochiai, Masa-aki (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment); Tanaka, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kimio; Yao, Toshiaki; Kamai, Satoshi; Kitamura, Toshikatsu.

    1992-08-01

    The power-up tests of the Mutsu reactor were performed from March 29th 1990 to December 14th. The tests were divided into six phases: The tests Phase 0 and Phase 1 were done in the state that the ship was moored at the quay of Sekinehama port in March and April; The tests Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4, and Phase 5 were done on the Pacific Ocean from July to December. Present report describes the test results on the static and dynamic plant performance. On static plant performance tests, there are 13 test items including measurements of primary system heat balance at low and high power levels, a virgin run of feed water pump with SG steam, a change-over test of steam supply of auxiliary boiler to SG. On the dynamic plant performance, there are 11 test items including a test of reactor power auto-control system, a test of main feed water auto-control system, a test of small load variation, a load increasing test, a turbine trip test, tests of ahead and astern maneuvering, a test of single loop operation, and a reactor scram test. The reactor power for each item's test was increased step by step from zero power to the goal of rated power of 100 %, 36 MWt. In order to confirm proper reactor system performance, criteria were laid down for the static and dynamic tests: for example, (1) reactor scram shall not occur, (2) pressurizer relief valve and steam generator safety valve shall not work, and (3) after the transients reactor systems shall become the steady state without manual adjustment of the reactor control system. The test results satisfied these criteria and some of test data showed that reactor had much more margin in any performance for design. It is verified, therefore, that the Mutsu reactor systems have adequate performances as a marine reactor and that one is capable to respond smoothly and safely to the load of ship's demand. (author).

  13. Interview with Professor Mark Wilcox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Mark Wilcox speaks to Georgia Patey, Commissioning Editor: Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist and Head of Microbiology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals (Leeds, UK), the Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds (Leeds, UK), and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile and the Head of the UK C. difficile Reference Laboratory for Public Health England (PHE). He was the Director of Infection Prevention (4 years), Infection Control Doctor (8 years) and Clinical Director of Pathology (6 years) at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals. He is Chair of PHE's Rapid Review Panel (reviews utility of infection prevention and control products for National Health Service), Deputy Chair of the UK Department of Health's Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection Committee and a member of PHE's HCAI/AR Programme Board. He is a member of UK/European/US working groups on C. difficile infection. He has provided clinical advice as part of the FDA/EMA submissions for the approval of multiple novel antimicrobial agents. He heads a healthcare-associated infection research team at University of Leeds, comprising approximately 30 doctors, scientists and nurses; projects include multiple aspects of C. difficile infection, diagnostics, antimicrobial resistance and the clinical development of new antimicrobial agents. He has authored more than 400 publications, and is the coeditor of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (5th/6th/7th Editions, 15 December 2007). PMID:27494150

  14. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  15. Application of non-destructive testing and in-service inspections to research reactors and preparation of ISI programme and manual for WWR-C research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report gives a review on the results of application of non-destructive testing and in-service inspections to WWR-C reactors in different countries. The major problems related to reactor safety and the procedure of inspection techniques are investigated to collect the experience gained from this type of reactors. Exchangeable experience in solving common problems in similar reactors play an important role in the effectiveness of their rehabilitation programmes. 9 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Proceedings of the 1984 international meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors. Base technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 40 papers were presented at this RERTR Meeting during the following sessions: Status of RERTR programs and licensing procedures; LEU fuel element development; fuel fabrication and testing; economics; mixed reactor cores; and applications, i.e. neutronics and thermal hydraulics design of upgraded reactors, with new LEU fuel, fuel cycle studies, feasibility and safety analyses

  17. The Status and Development Potential of Plate-Type Fuels for Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, D.

    1979-03-01

    Recent U.S. Department of State action to restrict the shipment and use of highly enriched uranium for research and test reactors has renewed fuel development activity. The objective of these development activities is to increase the total uranium loading in the fuel meat so that enrichment reduction can be accomplished without significant performance penalties. This report characterizes the status and the potential for development of the currently utilized plate-type fuels for research and test reactors. The report also characterizes the newer high-density fuels which could be utilized in these reactors and indicates the impact of the utilization of both the new and current fuels on enrichment reduction.

  18. Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The design of the first experiment (designated AGR-1) was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the test train as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in September 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and is serving as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed and the status of the experiment is provided.

  19. Development of research reactor simulator and its application to dynamic test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a real-time simulator for 'High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO), and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator into a dynamic test-bed (DTB) to test the functions and dynamic control performance of reactor regulating system (RRS) in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The software includes a mathematical model that implements plant dynamics in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface module. The developed research reactor simulators are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by actual RRS cabinet, and was interfaced using a hard-wired and network-based interface. RRS cabinet generates control signals for reactor power control based on the various feedback signals from DTB, and the DTB runs plant dynamics based on the RRS control signals. Thus the Hardware-In-the-Loop Simulation between RRS and the emulated plant (DTB) has been implemented and tested in this configuration. The test result shows that the developed DTB and actual RRS cabinet works together simultaneously resulting in quite good dynamic control performances. (author)

  20. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Appendix G: Commercial design and technology evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    A technology evaluation of five coal gasifier systems (Koppers-Totzek, Texaco, Babcock and Wilcox, Lurgi and BGC/Lurgi) and procedures and criteria for evaluating competitive commercial coal gasification designs is presented. The technology evaluation is based upon the plant designs and cost estimates developed by the BDM-Mittelhauser team.

  1. Requirements, needs, and concepts for a new broad-application test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a variety of reasons, including (a) the increasing demands of the 1990s regulatory environment, (b) limited existing test capactiy and capability to satisfy projected future testing missions, and (c) an expected increasing need for nuclear information to support development of advanced reactors, there is a need for requirements and preliminary concepts for a new broad-application test reactor (BATR). These requirements must include consideration not only for a broad range of projected testing missions but also for current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements. The requirements will form the basis for development and assessment of preconceptual reactor designs and lead to the identification of key technologies to support the government's long-term strategic and programmatic planning. This paper outlines the need for a new BATR and suggests a few preliminary reactor concepts that can meet that need

  2. Research and developments on nondestructive testing in fabrications of fast breeder reactor structural components in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and developments (R and D) have been conducted on the nondestructive testing techniques necessary for the construction of fast breeder reactor (FBR). Radiographic tests have been made on tube-tube plate welds and small-diameter tube welds, etc. Ultrasonic tests have been conducted on austenitic stainless steel welds. In the penetrant tests and magnetic particle tests, the investigations have been performed on the effects of various test factors on the test results

  3. Proceedings of the international meeting on reduced enrichment for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Meeting was to exchange and discuss the most up-to-date information on the progress of various programs related to research and test reactor core conversion from high enriched uranium to lower enriched uranium. The papers presented during the Meeting were divided into 9 sessions and one round able discussion which concluded the Meeting. The Sessions were: Program, Fuel Development, Fuel Fabrication, Irradiation testing, Safety Analysis, Special Reactor Conversion, Reactor Design, Critical Experiments, and Reprocessing and Spent Fuel Storage. Thus, topics of this Meeting were of a very wide range that was expected to result in information exchange valuable for all the participants in the RERTR program

  4. Proceedings of the international meeting on development, fabrication and application of reduced enrichment fuels for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the papers presented in the following areas: (1) Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program Status; (2) Fuel Development; (3) Fuel Demonstrations; (4) General Topics; and (5) Specific Reactor Applications

  5. Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors. Proceedings of the XIV international meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apart from the progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program the national programs of Indonesia, Japan and China were presented. The major events, findings, and activities of 1991 are reviewed with a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program had achieved by the end of 1990 in collaboration with its many international partners. The RERTR program, has concentrated its efforts on technology transfer and implementation activities consistent with the guidance received from the Department of Energy at the end of 1990. A number of presentations were devoted to development of new fuel uranium silicide fuel elements, fuel irradiation testing and reactor core conversions from highly enriched (HEU) to slightly enriched uranium (LEU). Calculations and measurements of converted reactor core parameters were shown related to safety test and analysis. Fuel cycle issue were discussed as well. One should note that a significant number of papers were devoted to Indonesian GA SIWABESSY reactor core conversion and related topics

  6. Design and Laboratory Evaluation of Future Elongation and Diameter Measurements at the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; J. C. Crepeau; S. Solstad

    2015-07-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. In order to accurately predict these changes, real-time data must be obtained under prototypic irradiation conditions for model development and validation. To provide such data, researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) are developing several instrumented test rigs to obtain data real-time from specimens irradiated in well-controlled pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop and evaluate prototype test rigs that rely on Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) in laboratory settings. Although similar LVDT-based test rigs have been deployed in lower flux Materials Testing Reactors (MTRs), this effort is unique because it relies on robust LVDTs that can withstand higher temperatures and higher fluxes than often found in other MTR irradiations. Specifically, the test rigs are designed for detecting changes in length and diameter of specimens irradiated in ATR PWR loops. Once implemented, these test rigs will provide ATR users with unique capabilities that are sorely needed to obtain measurements such as elongation caused by thermal expansion and/or creep loading and diameter changes associated with fuel and cladding swelling, pellet-clad interaction, and crud buildup.

  7. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the Advanced Test Reactor Remote Monitoring and Management Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR; TRA-670), which is located in the ATR Complex at Idaho National Laboratory, was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, assessments are continuing. These assessments intend to identify areas to provide defense–in-depth and improve safety for ATR. One of the assessments performed by an independent group of nuclear industry experts recommended that a remote accident management capability be provided. The report stated that: 'contemporary practice in commercial power reactors is to provide a remote shutdown station or stations to allow shutdown of the reactor and management of long-term cooling of the reactor (i.e., management of reactivity, inventory, and cooling) should the main control room be disabled (e.g., due to a fire in the control room or affecting the control room).' This project will install remote reactor monitoring and management capabilities for ATR. Remote capabilities will allow for post scram reactor management and monitoring in the event the main Reactor Control Room (RCR) must be evacuated.

  8. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the Advanced Test Reactor Remote Monitoring and Management Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohachek, Randolph Charles [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR; TRA-670), which is located in the ATR Complex at Idaho National Laboratory, was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, assessments are continuing. These assessments intend to identify areas to provide defense–in-depth and improve safety for ATR. One of the assessments performed by an independent group of nuclear industry experts recommended that a remote accident management capability be provided. The report stated that: “contemporary practice in commercial power reactors is to provide a remote shutdown station or stations to allow shutdown of the reactor and management of long-term cooling of the reactor (i.e., management of reactivity, inventory, and cooling) should the main control room be disabled (e.g., due to a fire in the control room or affecting the control room).” This project will install remote reactor monitoring and management capabilities for ATR. Remote capabilities will allow for post scram reactor management and monitoring in the event the main Reactor Control Room (RCR) must be evacuated.

  9. Research and Test Reactor Conversion to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel: Technical and Programmatic Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program - the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) - in 1978 to develop the technology necessary to reduce the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel in research reactors by converting them to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. In 2004, the reactor conversion program became the driving pilar of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), a program established by the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration. The overall GTRI objectives are the conversion, removal or protection of vunerable civilian radiological and nuclear material. As part of the GTRI, the Conversion Program has accelerated the schedules and plans for conversion of additional research reactors operating with HEU. This paper provides an update on the progress made since 2007 and describes current technical challenges that the program faces. (author)

  10. Handbook of materials testing reactors and ancillary hot laboratories in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Handbook is to make available to those interested in 'in-pile' irradiation experiments important data on Materials Testing Reactors in operation in the European Community. Only thermal reactors having a power output of more than 5 MW(th) are taken into consideration. In particular, detailed technical information is given on the experimental irradiation facilities of the reactors, their specialized irradiation devices (loops and instrumented capsules), and the associated hot cell facilities for post-irradiation examination of samples

  11. Production test PTA-002, increased graphite temperature limit -- B, C and D Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, A.

    1965-12-17

    The fundamental objective of the graphite temperature limit is to prevent excessive oxidation of the graphite moderator blocks with carbon dioxide and water vapor in the reactor atmosphere. Laboratory tests have shown that 10% uniform oxidation of graphite results in a loss in strength of approximately 50%. Production Test IP-725 was conducted at F Reactor for a period of six months at graphite temperatures approximately 50 and 100 C higher than the present graphite temperature limit of 650 C. The results from the F Reactor test suggest that an increase in the graphite temperature limit from 650 C to 700 C is technically feasible from the standpoint of oxidation of the graphite moderator with CO{sub 2}. Any significant additional increase was shown to lead to excessively high oxidation rates and is therefore not considered feasible. The objective of this test, therefore, is to extend the higher temperature investigations to B, C, and D Reactors. For the duration of this test, the graphite temperature limit will be increased from 650 C and 700 C, corresponding to an increase in the graphite stringer temperature limit from 735 C to 790 C. The test is expected to last for approximately six months but may be terminated early on any or all the reactors.

  12. Warm Water Oxidation Verification - Scoping and Stirred Reactor Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-15

    Scoping tests to evaluate the effects of agitation and pH adjustment on simulant sludge agglomeration and uranium metal oxidation at {approx}95 C were performed under Test Instructions(a,b) and as per sections 5.1 and 5.2 of this Test Plan prepared by AREVA. (c) The thermal testing occurred during the week of October 4-9, 2010. The results are reported here. For this testing, two uranium-containing simulant sludge types were evaluated: (1) a full uranium-containing K West (KW) container sludge simulant consisting of nine predominant sludge components; (2) a 50:50 uranium-mole basis mixture of uraninite [U(IV)] and metaschoepite [U(VI)]. This scoping study was conducted in support of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Phase 2 technology evaluation for the treatment and packaging of K-Basin sludge. The STP is managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy. Warm water ({approx}95 C) oxidation of sludge, followed by immobilization, has been proposed by AREVA and is one of the alternative flowsheets being considered to convert uranium metal to UO{sub 2} and eliminate H{sub 2} generation during final sludge disposition. Preliminary assessments of warm water oxidation have been conducted, and several issues have been identified that can best be evaluated through laboratory testing. The scoping evaluation documented here was specifically focused on the issue of the potential formation of high strength sludge agglomerates at the proposed 95 C process operating temperature. Prior hydrothermal tests conducted at 185 C produced significant physiochemical changes to genuine sludge, including the formation of monolithic concretions/agglomerates that exhibited shear strengths in excess of 100 kPa (Delegard et al. 2007).

  13. Factory acceptance of the compressor skids at Samifi-Babcock. All pictures show the second stage compressor skid.

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Perinic

    2001-01-01

    Most recent pictures taken during the factory acceptance of the compressor skids at Samifi-Babcock. All pictures show the second stage compressor skid. Picture two was taken during the leak tests and shows all the pockets around flanges and valves.

  14. The Jules Horowitz Reactor - A new High Performance European Material Testing Reactor open to International Users Present Status and Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iracane, Daniel; Bignan, Gilles [CEA Atomic Energy Commission Saclay Batiment 121- 91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Lindbaeck, Jan-Erik; Blomgren, Jan [VATTENFALL AB Nuclear Power Jaemtlandsgatan 99 SE-16287 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    The development of sustainable nuclear energy requires R and D on fuel and material behaviour under irradiation with a high level of performance in order to meet the needs and challenges for the benefit of industry, research and public bodies. These stakes require a sustainable and secured access to an up-to-date high performance Material Testing Reactor. Following a broad survey within the European Research Area, the international community agreed that the need for Material Test Reactors in support of nuclear power plant safety and operation will continue in the context of sustainable nuclear energy. The Jules Horowitz Reactor project (JHR) copes with this context. JHR is designed as a user facility addressing the needs of the international community. This means: - flexibility with irradiation loops able to reproduce a large variation in operation conditions of different power reactor technologies, - high flux capacity to address Generations II, III, and IV needs. JHR is designed, built and operated as an international user facility because: - Given the maturity and globalization of the industry, domestic tools have no more the required level of economic and technical efficiency. Meanwhile, countries with nuclear energy need an access to high performance irradiation experimental capabilities to support technical skill and guarantee the competitiveness and safety of nuclear energy. - Many research items related to safety or public policy (waste management, etc.) require international cooperation to share costs and benefits of resulting consensus. JHR design is optimised for offering high performance material and fuel irradiation capability for the coming decades. This project is driven and funded by an international consortium gathering vendors, utilities and public stakeholders. This consortium has been set up in March 2007 when the construction began. The construction is in progress and the start of operation is scheduled for 2014. The JHR is a research

  15. Design and fabrication of irradiation testing capsule for research reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Kim, Bong Goo; Park, Seung Jae; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Oh, Jong Myeong; Choi, Myeong Hwan; Lee, Byung Chul; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Dae Jong; Chun, Young Bum; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Recently, the demand of research reactors is increasing because there are many ageing research reactors in the world. Also, the production of radioisotope related with the medical purpose is very important. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is designing and licensing for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) and new type research reactor for export which will be constructed in Amman, Jordan and Busan, Korea, respectively. Thus, It is expected that more research reactors will be designed and constructed by KAERI. To design the research reactor, the irradiation performance and behavior of core structure material are necessary. However, the irradiation behavior of these materials is not yet investigated. Therefore, the irradiation performance must be verified by irradiation test. 11M 20K and 11M 21K irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated to conduct the irradiation test for some candidate core materials, Zircaloy 4, beryllium, and graphite, at HANARO. In this paper, the design and fabrication features of 11M 20K and 11M 21K were discussed.

  16. Design and present status of high-temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy commission (JAEC) decided to construct the high-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in 1987 for establishing and upgrading the basic technologies for advanced HTGRs and serving an irradiation test facility for research in high temperature technologies. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled test reactor with thermal output of 30MW and inlet and maximum outlet coolant temperature of 395 C and 950 C respectively. Construction started in March 1991 at Oarai site of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), with its first criticality at the end of 1997 to be followed after a series of functional tests of half a year. Fabrication of reactor pressure vessel, an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), gas circulators and other main cooling components has been finished in their factories and installed to the site in 1994. At present, the construction of HTTR reactor building and installation of containment vessel, main and auxiliary cooling systems, etc. are almost completed. This paper describes design of the HTTR reactor cooling system, control system and present status of the HTTR construction

  17. Design of Seismic Test Rig for Control Rod Drive Mechanism of Jordan Research and Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jongoh; Kim, Gyeongho; Yoo, Yeonsik; Cho, Yeonggarp; Kim, Jong In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The reactor assembly is submerged in a reactor pool filled with water and its reactivity is controlled by locations of four control absorber rods(CARs) inside the reactor assembly. Each CAR is driven by a stepping motor installed at the top of the reactor pool and they are connected to each other by a tie rod and an electromagnet. The CARs scram the reactor by de-energizing the electromagnet in the event of a safe shutdown earthquake(SSE). Therefore, the safety function of the control rod drive mechanism(CRDM) which consists of a drive assembly, tie rod and CARs is to drop the CAR into the core within an appropriate time in case of the SSE. As well known, the operability for complex equipment such as the CRDM during an earthquake is very hard to be demonstrated by analysis and should be verified through tests. One of them simulates the reactor assembly and the guide tube of the CAR, and the other one does the pool wall where the drive assembly is installed. In this paper, design of the latter test rig and how the test is performed are presented. Initial design of the seismic test rig and excitation table had its first natural frequency at 16.3Hz and could not represent the environment where the CRDM was installed. Therefore, experimental modal analyses were performed and an FE model for the test rig and table was obtained and tuned based on the experimental results. Using the FE model, the design of the test rig and table was modified in order to have higher natural frequency than the cutoff frequency. The goal was achieved by changing its center of gravity and the stiffness of its sliding bearings.

  18. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  19. 3D Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Hazra, Gopal; Karak, Bidya Binay; Teweldebirhan, Kinfe; Upton, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    We present results from the new STABLE (Surface flux Transport and Babcock Leighton) Dynamo Model. STABLE is a 3D Babcock-Leighton/Flux Transport dynamo model in which the source of poloidal field is the explicit emergence, distortion, and dispersal of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). In this talk I will discuss initial results with axisymmetric flow fields, focusing on the operation of the model, the general features of the cyclic solutions, and the challenge of achieving supercritical dynamo solutions using only the Babcock-Leighton source term. Then I will present dynamo simulations that include 3D convective flow fields based on the observed velocity power spectrum inferred from photospheric Dopplergrams. I'll use these simulations to assess how the explicit transport and amplification of fields by surface convection influences the operation of the dynamo. I will also discuss the role of surface magnetic fields in regulating the subsurface toroidal flux budget.

  20. Development of Research Reactor Simulator and Its Application to Dynamic Test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed HANARO and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) real-time simulator for operating staff training. The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator as a dynamic test-bed to test the reactor regulating system in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator configuration is divided into hardware and software. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The simulator software is divided into three major parts: a mathematical modeling module, which executes the plant dynamic modeling program in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface (HMI) module. The developed research reactors are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by a hardware controller and the simulator and target controller were interfaced with a hard-wired and network-based interface

  1. Cold Model Study and Commercial Test on Novel Vapor-Liquid Distributor of Hydroprocessing Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shaobing; Zhang Zhanzhu; Wu Defei; Guo Qingming

    2007-01-01

    A novel vapor-liquid distributor was developed on the basis of sufficient study on the existing distributors applied in hydroprocessing reactors.The cold model test data showed that the fluid distribution performance of the novel vapor-liquid distributor was evidently better than the traditional one.Commercial tests of the new distributor were carried out in the 300 kt/a gas oil hydrotreating reactor at SINOPEC Changling Branch Company,showing that the new vapor-liquid distributor could improve the fluid distribution,promote the hydrotreating efficiency and lead to better performance than the traditional one.

  2. A Solar Dynamo Model Driven by Mean-Field Alpha and Babcock-Leighton Sources: Fluctuations, Grand-Minima-Maxima and Hemispheric Asymmetry in Sunspot Cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Passos, D; Hazra, S; Lopes, I

    2013-01-01

    Extreme solar activity fluctuations and the occurrence of solar grand minima and maxima episodes, are well established, observed features of the solar cycle. Nevertheless, such extreme activity fluctuations and the dynamics of the solar cycle during Maunder minima-like episodes remain ill-understood. We explore the origin of such extreme solar activity fluctuations and the role of dual poloidal field sources, namely the Babcock-Leighton mechanism and the mean-field alpha effect in the dynamics of the solar cycle. We mainly concentrate on entry and recovery from grand minima episodes such as the Maunder minimum and the dynamics of the solar cycle. We use a kinematic solar dynamo model with a novel set-up in which stochastic perturbations force two distinct poloidal field alpha effects. We explore different regimes of operation of these poloidal sources with distinct operating thresholds, to identify the importance of each. The perturbations are implemented independently in both hemispheres which allows one to ...

  3. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). FY1999-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    The HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) with the thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850/950 degC is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which uses coated fuel particle, graphite for core components, and helium gas for primary coolant. The HTTR, which locates at the south-west area of 50,000 m{sup 2} in the Oarai Research Establishment, had been constructed since 1991 before accomplishing the first criticality on November 10, 1998. Rise to power tests of the HTTR started in September, 1999 and the rated thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850 degC was attained in December 2001. JAERI received the certificate of pre-operation test, that is, the commissioning license for the HTTR in March 2002. This report summarizes operation, tests, maintenance, radiation control, and construction of components and facilities for the HTTR as well as R and Ds on HTGRs from FY1999 to 2001. (author)

  4. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  5. Evaluating and planning the radioactive waste options for dismantling the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, K.; Scott, J.; Larson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a kind tritium fusion research reactor, and is planned to be decommissioned within the next several years. This is the largest fusion reactor in the world and as a result of deuterium-tritum reactions is tritium contaminated and activated from 14 Mev neutrons. This presents many unusual challenges when dismantling, packaging and disposing its components and ancillary systems. Special containers are being designed to accommodate the vacuum vessel, neutral beams, and tritium delivery and processing systems. A team of experienced professionals performed a detailed field study to evaluate the requirements and appropriate methods for packaging the radioactive materials. This team focused on several current and innovative methods for waste minimization that provides the oppurtunmost cost effective manner to package and dispose of the waste. This study also produces a functional time-phased schedule which conjoins the waste volume, weight, costs and container requirements with the detailed project activity schedule for the entire project scope. This study and project will be the first demonstration of the decommissioning of a tritium fusion test reactor. The radioactive waste disposal aspects of this project are instrumental in demonstrating the viability of a fusion power reactor with regard to its environmental impact and ultimate success.

  6. International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project. IRPhE Handbook - 2015 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    performed at 50 reactor facilities. To be published as approved benchmarks the experiments must be evaluated against agreed technical criteria and reviewed by the IRPhE Technical Review Group. A total of 139 of the 143 evaluations are published as approved benchmarks. The remaining four evaluations are published as draft documents only. New to the handbook are benchmark specifications for selected measurements from the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Spectral Shift Reactor Lattice Experiment that was performed to study the nuclear properties of rod lattices moderated by D2O-H2O mixtures. The International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments was prepared by a working party comprised of experienced reactor physics personnel from Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, P.R. of China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States of America

  7. Analysis and Down Select of Flow Passages for Thermal Hydraulic Testing of a SNAP Derived Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroy, T. J.; Sadasivan, P.; Masterson, S.

    2007-01-01

    As past of the Vision for Space Exploration, man will return to the moon. To enable safe and productive time on the lunar surface will require adequate power resources. To provide the needed power and to give mission planners all landing site possibilities, including a permanently dark crater, a nuclear reactor provides the most options. Designed to be l00kWt providing approx. 25kWe this power plants would be very effective in delivering dependable, site non-specific power to crews or robotic missions on the lunar surface. An affordable reference reactor based upon the successful SNAP program of the 1960's and early 1970's has been designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory that will meet such a requirement. Considering current funding, environmental, and schedule limitations this lunar surface power reactor will be tested using non-nuclear simulators to simulate the heat from fission reactions. Currently a 25kWe surface power SNAP derivative reactor is in the early process of design and testing with collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Glenn Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Sandia National Laboratory to ensure that this new design is affordable and can be tested using non-nuclear methods as have proven so effective in the past. This paper will discuss the study and down selection of a flow passage concept for a approx. 25kWe lunar surface power reactor. Several different flow passages designs were evaluated using computational fluid dynamics to determine pressure drop and a structural assessment to consider thermal and stress of the passage walls. The reactor design basis conditions are discussed followed by passage problem setup and results for each concept. A recommendation for passage design is made with rationale for selection.

  8. Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately

  9. Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately.

  10. A simulated test of physical starting and reactor physics on zero power facility of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core neutron economics has been verified through experiments conducted at a zero power reactor with baffles of various thickness. A simulated test of physical starting of Qinshan PWR has been introduced. The feasibility and safety of the programme are verified. The research provides a valuable foundation for developing physical starting programme

  11. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turboalternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  12. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  13. Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Raymond W.

    2012-07-30

    This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

  14. Problems and future plan on material development of beryllium in materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium has been utilized as a moderator and/or reflector in a number of material testing reactors. The attractive nuclear properties of beryllium are its low atomic number, low atomic weight, low parasitic capture cross section for thermal neutrons, readiness to part with one of its own neutrons, and good neutron elastic scattering characteristics. However, it is difficult to reprocess irradiated beryllium because of high induced radioactivity. Disposal has also been difficult because of toxicity issues and special nuclear material controls. In this paper, problems and future plans of beryllium technology are introduced for nuclear reactors. (author)

  15. Review of Savannah River Site K Reactor inservice inspection and testing restart program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inservice inspection (ISI) and inservice testing (IST) programs are used at commercial nuclear power plants to monitor the pressure boundary integrity and operability of components in important safety-related systems. The Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Defense Programs (DP) operates a Category A (> 20 MW thermal) production reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This report represents an evaluation of the ISI and IST practices proposed for restart of SRS K Reactor as compared, where applicable, to current ISI/IST activities of commercial nuclear power facilities

  16. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

  17. Proceedings of the 1990 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global effort to reduce, and possibly, eliminate the international traffic in highly-enriched uranium caused by its use in research reactors requires extensive cooperation and free exchange of information among all participants. To foster this free exchange of information, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the thirteenth of a series which began in 1978. The common effort brought together, past, a large number of specialists from many countries. On hundred twenty-three participants from 26 countries, including scientists, reactor operators, and personnel from commercial fuel suppliers, research centers, and government organizations, convened in Newport, Rhode Island to discuss their results, their activities, and their plans relative to converting research reactors to low-enriched fuels. As more and more reactors convert to the use of low-enriched uranium, the emphasis of our effort has begun to shift from research and development to tasks more directly related to implementation of the new fuels and technologies that have been developed, and to refinements of those fuels and technologies. It is appropriate, for this reason, that the emphasis of this meeting was placed on safety and on conversion experiences. This individual papers in this report have been cataloged separately

  18. Proceedings of the 1990 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The global effort to reduce, and possibly, eliminate the international traffic in highly-enriched uranium caused by its use in research reactors requires extensive cooperation and free exchange of information among all participants. To foster this free exchange of information, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the thirteenth of a series which began in 1978. The common effort brought together, past, a large number of specialists from many countries. On hundred twenty-three participants from 26 countries, including scientists, reactor operators, and personnel from commercial fuel suppliers, research centers, and government organizations, convened in Newport, Rhode Island to discuss their results, their activities, and their plans relative to converting research reactors to low-enriched fuels. As more and more reactors convert to the use of low-enriched uranium, the emphasis of our effort has begun to shift from research and development to tasks more directly related to implementation of the new fuels and technologies that have been developed, and to refinements of those fuels and technologies. It is appropriate, for this reason, that the emphasis of this meeting was placed on safety and on conversion experiences. This individual papers in this report have been cataloged separately.

  19. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Human Factors, Controls, and Statistics; Smith, James A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Fuel Performance and Design; Jewell, James Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Fuel Performance and Design

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  20. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  1. Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years there has been an unstable supply of the critical diagnostic medical isotope 99Tc. Several concepts and designs have been proposed to produce 99Mo the parent nuclide of 99Tc, at a commercial scale sufficient to stabilize the world supply. This work lays out a testing and experiment plan for a proposed 2 MW open pool reactor fueled by Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) 99Mo targets. The experiments and tests necessary to support licensing of the reactor design are described and how these experiments and tests will help establish the safe operating envelop for a medical isotope production reactor is discussed. The experiments and tests will facilitate a focused and efficient licensing process in order to bring on line a needed production reactor dedicated to supplying medical isotopes. The Target Fuel Isotope Reactor (TFIR) design calls for an active core region that is approximately 40 cm in diameter and 40 cm in fuel height. It contains up to 150 cylindrical, 1-cm diameter, LEU oxide fuel pins clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy), in an annular hexagonal array on a ∼2.0 cm pitch surrounded, radially, by a graphite or a Be reflector. The reactor is similar to U.S. university reactors in power, hardware, and safety/control systems. Fuel/target pin fabrication is based on existing light water reactor fuel fabrication processes. However, as part of licensing process, experiments must be conducted to confirm analytical predictions of steady-state power and accident conditions. The experiment and test plan will be conducted in phases and will utilize existing facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories. The first phase is to validate the predicted reactor core neutronics at delayed critical, zero power and very low power. This will be accomplished by using the Sandia Critical Experiment (CX) platform. A full scale TFIR core will be built in the CX and delayed critical measurements will be taken. For low power experiments, fuel

  2. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form

  3. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

  4. Thermal simulations and tests in the development of a helmet transport spent fuel elements Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel from research reactors was designed by a group of researchers to improve the capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the reactors operated in the region. Two half-scale models for MTR fuel were constructed and tested so far and a third one for both MTR and TRIGA fuels will be constructed and tested next. Four test campaigns have been carried out, covering both normal and hypothetical accident conditions of transportation. The thermal test is part of the requirements for the qualification of transportation packages for nuclear reactors spent fuel elements. In this paper both the numerical modelling and experimental thermal tests performed are presented and discussed. The cask is briefly described as well as the finite element model developed and the main adopted hypotheses for the thermal phenomena. The results of both numerical runs and experimental tests are discussed as a tool to validate the thermal modelling. The impact limiters, attached to the cask for protection, were not modelled. (author)

  5. A study on fast reactor core mechanics by an ex-reactor test and comparisons with calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents and discusses the results of core bowing experiments performed with an ex-reactor rig holding a half hexagon array of 22 sub-assemblies (S/As) simulating the Japanese DFBR conditions and the comparisons of the measured results with calculations by individually developed codes--ARKAS, RAINBOW, SANBOW. The main conclusions of this study are (1) interwrapper loads and S/A displacements within the array were measured at selected positions for a series of five tests simulating the DFBR core bowing modes, (2) the overall comparison between the non-friction calculation and measurement showed good agreement for loads, displacements and their directions, and (3) validation of the friction algorithm has also been carried out and further improvement of the agreement was obtained

  6. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  7. A premature demise for RERTR [Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors programme]?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common commitment from France, Belgium, Germany and the US to eliminate highly enriched uranium from their research reactors is needed to help guard against this material falling into the wrong hands. In the US, an essential part of this commitment would be rekindling the weakened Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors programme (RERTR). This is an American initiative to develop low-enrichment uranium fuel for research reactors that have previously required weapons-usable material. Underway since 1978 at Argonne National Laboratory, RERTR has achieved some impressive results: the development of higher density, low enriched fuels that are suitable for use at over 90% of the world's research reactors; a net reduction of US exports of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from the annual 700kg levels in the late 1970s to a 1990 level of just over 100kg; the encouragement of international scientific co-operation aimed at developing new fuels and facilitating the conversion of existing reactors to these fuels. However, in recent years, the US commitment to RERTR has been declining -budgets have fallen and advanced fuel development work has terminated. (author)

  8. Design, Testing and Modeling of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System for AHTRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Quiping [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Sun, Xiaodong [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Chtistensen, Richard [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Blue, Thomas [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Yoder, Graydon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-08

    The principal objective of this research is to test and model the heat transfer performance and reliability of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) for AHTRs. In addition, component testing of fluidic diodes is to be performed to examine the performance and viability of several existing fluidic diode designs. An extensive database related to the thermal performance of the heat exchangers involved will be obtained, which will be used to benchmark a computer code for the DRACS design and to evaluate and improve, if needed, existing heat transfer models of interest. The database will also be valuable for assessing the viability of the DRACS concept and benchmarking any related computer codes in the future. The experience of making a liquid fluoride salt test facility available, with lessons learned, will greatly benefit the development of the Fluoride Salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) and eventually the AHTR programs.

  9. Design, Testing and Modeling of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System for AHTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of this research is to test and model the heat transfer performance and reliability of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) for AHTRs. In addition, component testing of fluidic diodes is to be performed to examine the performance and viability of several existing fluidic diode designs. An extensive database related to the thermal performance of the heat exchangers involved will be obtained, which will be used to benchmark a computer code for the DRACS design and to evaluate and improve, if needed, existing heat transfer models of interest. The database will also be valuable for assessing the viability of the DRACS concept and benchmarking any related computer codes in the future. The experience of making a liquid fluoride salt test facility available, with lessons learned, will greatly benefit the development of the Fluoride Salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) and eventually the AHTR programs.

  10. RIA and LOCA simulating tests on experimental fuel elements in TRIGA MT reactor of INR Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the main objectives of Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), Pitesti R and D Program is to investigate thermal and mechanical behaviour of fuel elements, thresholds and mechanisms of cladding failure during RIA and LOCA tests. Dual core TRIGA Material Testing Reactor of INR Pitesti (TRIGA SS MTR and TRIGA ACPR) is utilized extensively for studies of fuel behaviour under normal and postulated accident condition. A total of 39 test fuel elements have been irradiated in the TRIGA Annular Core Pulse Reactor (TRIGA ACPR) of INR Pitesti under RIA conditions. The ACPR tests program is still in progress and new experiments are foreseen to be performed in the following period. The test fuel elements are instrumented with CrAl thermocouples for cladding surface temperature measurement and every test fuel element has a pressure sensor for the internal pressure measurement. An experimental database of fuel behaviour parameters including fission - gas release, sheath strain, power - burnup history, etc. has been obtained using in-pile measurements and PIE results of test fuel elements irradiated in the TRIGA Steady State Material Testing Reactor (TRIGA SS MTR) of INR Pitesti. More than 100 test fuel elements have been irradiated in TRIGA SS MTR in different power history conditions. LOCA simulating tests are planned to be performed in C2 LOCA tests capsule and in Loop A of TRIGA SS MTR of INR Pitesti. The LOCA tests in capsule C2 are instrumented to measure fuel, sheath and coolant temperature, internal element and coolant pressure during the entire irradiation period. In the second phase of the experiment the C2 capsule will be connected to the sweep gas system with the on-line gamma ray spectrometer included. RIA type tests are planned in C6 capsule of TRIGA ACPR on test fuel elements with pre-hydrided claddings in order to investigate the influence of the precipitated hydride on fuel element cladding failure at high burnups in RIA conditions. This paper

  11. Obituary: Horace Welcome Babcock, 1912-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Arthur Harris

    2003-12-01

    Horace Welcome Babcock died in Santa Barbara, California on 29 August 2003, fifteen days short of his ninety-first birthday. An acclaimed authority on solar and stellar magnetism and the originator of ingenious advances in astronomical instrumentation in his earlier career, he served as Director of Mount Wilson and Palomar (later Hale) Observatories from 1964 until his retirement in 1978. The founding of the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Las Campanas Observatory in Chile was the culmination of his directorship. Horace was born in Pasadena California on 13 September 1912, the only child of Harold Delos Babcock and Mary G. Henderson. His father, an electrical engineer and physicist by training, had been hired by George Ellery Hale to work at the recently founded Mount Wilson Solar Observatory beginning in 1909. Thus Horace spent much of his boyhood on Mount Wilson in the company of astronomers. Horace developed an early interest in astronomy, worked as a volunteer solar observer at Mount Wilson and published his first paper in 1932, with his father. He was fascinated by fine mechanisms and by optical and electrical instruments. After graduating from Caltech with a degree in structural engineering in 1934, he earned his PhD in astronomy at Lick Observatory in 1938. His dissertation provided the first measurement of the rotational velocity curve and a derivation of the mass-to-luminosity ratio for M31; this work is still cited in reviews of the study of ``dark matter." Horace served as a research assistant at Lick Observatory (1938 39) and an Instructor at the University of Chicago's McDonald and Yerkes Observatories (1939--41) under Otto Struve. He undertook radar-related wartime electronics work at the MIT Radiation Laboratory (1941 42) and then worked on aircraft rocket launchers as part of the Caltech Rocket Project (1942 45). This project brought him into contact with Ira S. Bowen, head of the project's Photographic Division. Impressed with his knowledge of

  12. Plutonium recycle test reactor characterization activities and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Report contains results of PRTR core and associated structures characterization performed in January and February of 1997. Radiation survey data are presented, along with recommendations for stabilization activities before transitioning to a decontamination and decommissioning function. Recommendations are also made about handling the waste generated by the stabilization activities, and actions suggested by the Decontamination and Decommissioning organization

  13. Procedures and techniques for the management of experimental fuels from research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost all countries that have undertaken fuel development programs for power, research or military reactors have experimental and exotic fuels, either stored at the original research reactors where they have been tested or at some away-from-reactor storage facility. These spent fuel liabilities cannot follow the standard treatment recognized for modern power reactor fuels. They include experimental and exotic fuels ranging from liquids to coated spheres and in configurations ranging from full test assemblies to post irradiation examination specimens set in resin. This document contains an overview of the extent of the problem of managing experimental and exotic fuels from research and test reactors and an expert evaluation of the overall situation in countries which participated in the meeting

  14. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts are presented for each of the papers included in the data base concerning RERTR programs and licensing; fuel development; plate-type fuel fabrication; fuel demonstration; economics; mixed cores; and applications

  15. Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for Supercritical Water Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water cooled reactor concept which uses water pressurized above its thermodynamic critical pressure as the reactor coolant. This concept offers high thermal efficiencies and a simplified reactor system, and is hence expected to help to improve economic competitiveness. Various kinds of SCWR concepts have been developed, with varying combinations of reactor type (pressure vessel or pressure tube) and core spectrum (thermal, fast or mixed). There is great interest in both developing and developed countries in the research and development (R&D) and conceptual design of SCWRs. Considering the high interest shown in a number of Member States, the IAEA established in 2008 the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermo-hydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs. The aim was to foster international collaboration in the R&D of SCWRs in support of Member States’ efforts and under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department’s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR) and Heavy Water Reactors (TWG-HWR). The two key objectives of the CRP were to establish accurate databases on the thermohydraulics of supercritical pressure fluids and to test analysis methods for SCWR thermohydraulic behaviour to identify code development needs. In total, 16 institutes from nine Member States and two international organizations were involved in the CRP. The thermohydraulics phenomena investigated in the CRP included heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of supercritical pressure fluids, development of new heat transfer prediction methods, critical flow during depressurization from supercritical conditions, flow stability and natural circulation in supercritical pressure systems. Two code testing benchmark exercises were performed for steady state heat transfer and flow stability in a heated channel. The CRP was completed with the planned outputs in

  16. Operating the Advanced Test Reactor in today's economic and regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, is the US Department of Energy's largest and most versatile test reactor. Base programs at ATR are planned well into the 21st century. The ATR and support facilities along with an overview of current programs will be reviewed, but the main focus of the presentation will be on the impact that today's economic and regulatory concerns have had on the operation of this test reactor. Today's economic and regulatory concerns have demanded more work be completed at lower cost while increasing the margin of safety. By the beginning of the 1990 s, federal budgets for research generally and particularly for nuclear research had decreased dramatically. Many national needs continued to require testing in the ATR; but demanded lower cost, increased efficiency, improved performance, and an increased margin of safety. At the same time budgets were decreasing, there was an increase in regulatory compliance activity. The new standards imposed higher margins of safety. The new era of greater openness and higher safety standards complemented research demands to work safer, smarter and more efficiently. Several changes were made at the ATR to meet the demands of the sponsors and public. Such changes included some workforce reductions, securing additional program sponsors, upgrading some facilities, dismantling other facilities, and implementing new safety programs. (author)

  17. A Numerical Model of Deuterium and Oxygen-18 Diffusion in the Confined Lower Wilcox Aquifer of the Lower Mississippi Valley (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currens, B. J.; Sawyer, A. H.; Fryar, A. E.; Parris, T. M.; Zhu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Deuterium and oxygen-18 are routinely used with noble gases and radioisotopes (e.g., 2H, 14C, 36Cl) to infer climate during groundwater recharge. However, diffusion of 2H and 18O between a confined aquifer and bounding aquitards could alter total isotope concentrations and the inferred temperature during recharge if groundwater flow is sufficiently slow. Hendry and Schwartz (WRR 24(10), 1988) explained anomalous 2H and 18O enrichment in the Milk River aquifer of Alberta by analytically modeling isotope diffusion between the lower bounding aquitard and the aquifer. Haile (PhD dissertation, U. Kentucky, 2011) inferred the same mechanism to explain 2H and 18O enrichment along a flowpath in the confined Lower Wilcox aquifer of the northern Gulf Coastal Plain in Missouri and Arkansas. Based on the geologic and hydraulic properties of the Lower Wilcox aquifer, a numerical model has been constructed to determine how diffusion may influence 2H and 18O concentrations in regional aquifers with residence times on the order of 104 to 105 years. The model combines solutions for a 1D forward-in-time, finite-difference groundwater flow equation with an explicit-implicit Crank-Nicholson algorithm for advection and diffusion to solve for flow velocity and isotope concentration. Initial results are consistent with the analytical solution of Hendry and Schwartz (1988), indicating diffusion as a means of isotopic enrichment along regional groundwater flowpaths.

  18. Standard review plan for the review and evaluation of emergency plans for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a Standard Review Plan to assure that complete and uniform reviews are made of research and test reactor radiological emergency plans. The report is organized under ten planning standards which correspond to the guidance criteria in American National Standard ANSI/ANS 15.16 - 1982 as endorsed by Revision 1 to Regulatory Guide 2.6. The applicability of the items under each planning standard is indicated by subdivisions of the steady-state thermal power levels at which the reactors are licensed to operate. Standard emergency classes and example action levels for research and test reactors which should initiate these classes are given in an Appendix. The content of the emergency plan is as follows: the emergency plan addresses the necessary provisions for coping with radiological emergencies. Activation of the emergency plan is in response to the emergency action levels. In addition to addressing those severe emergencies that will fall within one of the standard emergency classes, the plan also discusses the necessary provisions to deal with radiological emergencies of lesser severity that can occur within the operations boundary. The emergency plan allows for emergency personnel to deviate from actions described in the plan for unusual or unanticipated conditions

  19. Model test on interaction of reactor building and soil. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical and experimental studies on the effects of dynamic interaction between structures and soil have been carried out in recent years. Most of the dynamic tests, however, have been conducted using comparatively small-scale models. In order to evaluate the effects of soil-structure interaction for rigid structure such as reactor building, a series of tests, including forced vibration test and earthquake observations, was carried out. Large-scale models constructed on an actual soil were used. These tests included forced vibration tests on individual foundations, on foundations with superstructures, on cross interaction through the soil between adjacent structures. Tests on the embedded effects of foundation, on artificial ground-shaking, on large amplitude excitation, and aging effects in soil properties were performed. This paper describes the results of forced vibration tests and analyses of cross interaction through the soil between adjacent structures

  20. Neutronic tests and reactivity balance in the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Rose Mary Gomes do Prado; Souza, Luiz Claudio Andrade, E-mail: souzarm@cdtn.br, E-mail: lcas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the 2014 neutronic tests performed on CDTN's TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor. Such tests are performed annually, as prescribed by the Safety Analysis Report. The three control rods, Regulating, Shim and Safety, were calibrated and their worth determined to be 0.52 $, 3.08 $ and 2.78 $, respectively. The Shim rod takes 0.44 s to shutdown the reactor and the Safety rod 0.48 s. The maximum reactivity insertion rates are 48 pcm/s by the Shim rod and 46 pcm/s by the Safety rod. Total reactivity excess is 1.88 $. The temperature reactivity coefficient determined is -0.94 cent/deg C. A reactivity insertion of 0.71 $ is necessary in order to achieve the licensed maximum reactor power of 100 kW. Reactivity losses due to xenon poisoning, after operating for 8 h at maximum power, is 0.20 $, and the insertion of a void tube in the Central Thimble corresponds to 0.22 $. A significant amount of reactivity is required to overcome the temperature effect and allow the reactor to operate at full power for extended periods of time. Given all these reactivity losses, a new fuel element should soon be added to the core in order to increase the reactivity excess. Adding this new fuel element to the C ring and moving the element withdrawn from that position to the F ring, replacing a graphite dummy element, would increase 45.5 cents in the reactivity excess worth. Calculations and experimental results will be used to optimize a new core configuration for the reactor. (author)

  1. Safety research program of LWR fuels and materials using the Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power up-rates, burn-up extension and long term operation enable us to utilize Light Water Reactors efficiently. This will have the fuels and structural materials exposed to severe operational condition for a longer period, which can affect their integrity. Continuous researches for solving irradiation-related issues on the fuels for high-duty uses and the plant aging are essential in order to realize the up-graded uses of LWR safely. Japanese regulator has decided to install new irradiation test facilities in the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). For the fuels tests, transient tests facility is being constructed for the power transient tests of new design BWR fuels. For the materials tests, the irradiation test loops under well controlled environment simulating BWR water chemistry condition and a large irradiation capsule, which can accommodate 1 inch-thickness compact tension specimens in an inert gas environment, are being prepared for the researches on stress corrosion cracking and irradiation embrittlement, respectively. These fuels and materials irradiation tests will be started in 2011 after refurbishment of JMTR. (author)

  2. An investigation of integral facility scaling and data relation methods (Integral System Test Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integral Systems Test (IST) Program was initiated in 1982 by government and industry to provide information needed to help resolve issues raised by the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. Three different integral test facilities, each scaled to a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) design nuclear steam supply system, will ultimately contribute data to meet the objectives of the program. Each of the facilities was designed using different scaling methodologies, and each has different operating capabilities, such as maximum operating pressure and core power. The overall scaling of each facility is examined in this report, and local scaling is analyzed to demonstrate potential similarities and dissimilarities in facility response relative to expected plant responses. The scaling relationships are used to show how local thermal-hydraulic phenomena in each facility can be compared to each other or to expected plant behavior. The concept of an equilibrium plot is used to show how the global response of each facility can be related for a specific small break loss-of-coolant transient. Potential complications that may arise as a consequence of the facility scaling or facility limitations are enumerated. The potential use of dimensionless groupings for relating and specifying experiments is discussed. Finally, some specific experiments and conditions are proposed for the purpose of simplifying interfacility comparison of test results

  3. Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; De Leon, Gerardo I. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Fetterly, Caitlin N. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Ramos, Jorge A. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-02-01

    Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental

  4. 2007 international meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Abstracts and available papers presented at the meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Meeting papers discuss research and test reactor fuel performance, manufacturing and testing. Some of the main topics are: conversion from HEU to LEU in different reactors and corresponding problems and activities; flux performance and core lifetime analysis with HEU and LEU fuels; physics and safety characteristics; measurement of gamma field parameters in core with LEU fuel; nondestructive analysis of RERTR fuel; thermal hydraulic analysis; fuel interactions; transient analyses and thermal hydraulics for HEU and LEU cores; microstructure research reactor fuels; post irradiation analysis and performance; computer codes and other related problems

  5. High flux materials testing reactor HFR Petten. Characteristics of facilities and standard irradiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information is presented. Besides the nuclear data for the experiment positions short descriptions are given of the most important standard facilities for material irradiation and radionuclide production. One paragraph deals with the experimental set-ups for solid state and nuclear structure investigations. The information in this report refers to a core type, which is operational since March 1977. The numerical data compiled have been up-dated to June 1978

  6. Operating experience of Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is a 40 MWt / 13.2 MWe sodium cooled, loop type mixed carbide fuelled reactor. Its main aim is to gain experience in the design, construction and operation of fast reactors and to serve as an irradiation facility for development of fuel and structural material for future fast reactors. The reactor achieved first criticality in October 1985 with small indigenously designed and fabricated Mark I core (70% PuC-30% UC). The reactor power was subsequently raised in steps to 17.4 MWt by addition of Mark II fuel subassemblies (55% PuC-45% UC) and with the Mark I fuel operating at the designed linear heat rating of 400 W/cm. The turbo-generator was synchronized with the grid in July 1997. The achieved peak burn-up is 137 000 MWd/t so far without any fuel-clad failure. Presently the reactor is being operated at a nominal power of 15.7 MWt for irradiation of a test fuel subassembly of the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor, which is coming up at Kalpakkam. It is also planned to irradiate test subassemblies made of metallic fuel for future fast reactor program. Being a small reactor, all feed back coefficients of reactivity including void coefficient are negative and hence the reactor is inherently safe. This was confirmed by carrying out physics tests. The capability to remove decay heat under various incidental conditions including natural convection was demonstrated by carrying out engineering tests. Thermo couples are provided for on-line monitoring of fuel SA outlet temperature by dedicated real time computer and processed to generate trip signals for the reactor in case of power excursion, increase in clad hot spot temperature and subassembly flow blockage. All pipelines and capacities in primary main circuit are provided with segmented outer envelope to minimize and contain radioactive sodium leak while ensuring forced cooling through reactor to remove decay heat in case of failure of primary boundary. In secondary circuit, provision is

  7. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  8. Transients and safety testing of LMFBR fuel pins in the reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing of the behaviour of LMFBR fuel pins under operational transients has been performed in the reactor BR2 at S.C.K./C.E.N.-Mol (Belgium) since 1981 in the framework of the DEBENE programme ''SNR-Betriebstransienten-experimente''. A special purpose sodium loop, called ''VIC'', has therefore been developed to allow off-nominal and transient experiments on single fuel pins under realistic fast reactor operating conditions. Two basic types of tests can be run, either separately or simultaneously: fission power alteration, e.g. steady overpower runs, power cycling and fast transient overpower (TOP); mismatch of the sodium cooling, e.g. operation with reduced sodium flow and transient loss of flow (LOF). The loop allows the loading and testing of pre-irradiated fuel pins. In the field of safety oriented tests, the programme ''MOL 7 C'' investigates the LMFBR fuel element behaviour under locally blocked cooling conditions and the possible failure propagation. The work is jointly carried out by the Karlsruhe center KfK (FRG) and S.C.K./C.E.N.-Mol (Belgium). The related in-pile tests in the reactor BR2 have started in 1977 and are performed in a fully integrated sodium loop. The test section contains a 30-rod bundle with fresh or pre-irradiated fuel pins. A local porous blockage within the fuel bundle initiates severe local damage to the central rods. Important informations are obtained with respect to the problems of pin to pin propagation and the long term behaviour of a fuel subassembly with defect pins. The MOL 7 C loop system can also be used to run operational transients on a fuel bundle with representative fuel pins. The paper describes the irradiation devices VIC and MOL 7 C from their technological point of view and depicts their field of testing applications. Also the major experiments already performed and relevant irradiation data are reviewed

  9. Direct-Drive Gas-Cooled Reactor Power System: Concept and Preliminary Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S. A.; Lipinski, R. J.; Godfroy, T. J.; Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; VanDyke, M. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the concept and preliminary component testing of a gas-cooled, UN-fueled, pin-type reactor which uses He/Xe gas that goes directly into a recuperated Brayton system to produce electricity for nuclear electric propulsion. This Direct-Drive Gas-Cooled Reactor (DDG) is designed to be subcritical under water or wet- sand immersion in case of a launch accident. Because the gas-cooled reactor can directly drive the Brayton turbomachinery, it is possible to configure the system such that there are no external surfaces or pressure boundaries that are refractory metal, even though the gas delivered to the turbine is 1144 K. The He/Xe gas mixture is a good heat transport medium when flowing, and a good insulator when stagnant. Judicious use of stagnant cavities as insulating regions allows transport of the 1144-K gas while keeping all external surfaces below 900 K. At this temperature super-alloys (Hastelloy or Inconel) can be used instead of refractory metals. Super-alloys reduce the technology risk because they are easier to fabricate than refractory metals, we have a much more extensive knowledge base on their characteristics, and, because they have a greater resistance to oxidation, system testing is eased. The system is also relatively simple in its design: no additional coolant pumps, heat exchanger, or freeze-thaw systems are required. Key to success of this concept is a good knowledge of the heat transfer between the fuel pins and the gas, as well as the pressure drop through the system. This paper describes preliminary testing to obtain this key information, as well as experience in demonstrating electrically heated testing of simulated reactor components.

  10. Design and fabrication of sodium test facility for fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the promotion policy for energy research and development base construction plan (priority facility) of the Japanese government in FY2009 is 'to construct in Tsuruga City the research and development base for plant operation technology for the practical use of fast breeder reactor where researchers in and out of Japan gather, and to contribute to the development and revitalization of the region as the base with international characteristics.' In conformity to this purpose, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency built 'sodium engineering research facilities' in Tsuruga. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and installation of interior equipment that were carried out by Kawasaki Heavy Industries. 'Sodium engineering research facilities' are the test and research facilities to conduct research and development related to sodium, while reflecting the experiences of operation and maintenance of 'Monju,' which aims at the commercialization of fast reactor. The facilities specialize in the handling technology of sodium to meet the needs in and out of Japan, and were completed in June 2015. The facilities consist of six units including tank-loop test equipment, mini-loop test equipment, sodium purification and supply equipment, etc. For the tank-loop test equipment, a sodium transfer test of about 5.5 tons, and a subsequent comprehensive function test using sodium are scheduled. (A.O.)

  11. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG

  12. Equipment and piping for nuclear power plants, test and research reactors, and nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard concerns the primary and secondary circuits as well as the safety and protection equipment in nuclear power plants with PWR or LWGR type reactors. Rules for design, manufacturing, erection, operation, and maintenance of the reactors, steam generators, vessels, pumps and housings, and pressure pipes are provided

  13. Use and Storage of Test and Operations Data from the High Temperature Test Reactor Acquired by the US Government from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Gougar

    2010-02-01

    This document describes the use and storage of data from the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) acquired from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) by the U.S. Government for high temperature reactor research under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project.

  14. Correction to Wilcox et al. (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Reports an error in "How being busy can increase motivation and reduce task completion time" by Keith Wilcox, Juliano Laran, Andrew T. Stephen and Peter P. Zubcsek (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2016[Mar], Vol 110[3], 371-384). In the article, the affiliation of the author Andrew T. Stephen was incorrectly listed in the byline and the author note. The author is affiliated with the University of Oxford. The author note paragraph "Andrew T. Stephen is now at the University of Oxford" should have been omitted. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-11945-002.) This research tests the hypothesis that being busy increases motivation and reduces the time it takes to complete tasks for which people miss a deadline. This effect occurs because busy people tend to perceive that they are using their time effectively, which mitigates the sense of failure people have when they miss a task deadline. Studies 1 and 2 show that when people are busy, they are more motivated to complete a task after missing a deadline than those who are not busy, and that the perception that one is using time effectively mediates this effect. Studies 3 and 4 show that this process makes busy people more likely to complete real tasks than people who are not busy. Study 5 uses data from over half a million tasks submitted by thousands of users of a task management software application to show that busy people take less time to complete a task after they miss a deadline for completing it. The findings delineate the conditions under which being busy can mitigate the negative effects of missing a deadline and reduce the time it takes to complete tasks. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27176772

  15. The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) program: A progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1986-11-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1985, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1986 are reviewed. The second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was expanded and its irradiation continued. Postirradiation examinations of several of these miniplates and of six previously irradiated U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al full-size elements were completed with excellent results. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ is well under way and due for completion before the end of 1987. DOE removed an important barrier to conversions by announcing that the new LEU fuels will be accepted for reprocessing. New DOE prices for enrichment and reprocessing services were calculated to have minimal effect on HEU reactors, and to reduce by about 8 to 10% the total fuel cycle costs of LEU reactors. New program activities include preliminary feasibility studies of LEU use in DOE reactors, evaluation of the feasibility to use LEU targets for the production of fission-product /sup 99/Mo, and responsibility for coordinating safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors, as required by NRC. Achievement of the final program goals is projected for 1990. This progress could not have been achieved without close international cooperation, whose continuation and intensification are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR Program.

  16. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed

  17. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lumia, M E

    2002-01-01

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

  18. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.E. Lumia; C.A. Gentile

    2002-01-18

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

  19. The OECD Halden reactor project fuels testing programme: methods, selected results and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuels testing programme conducted in the Halden reactor (heavy boiling water reactor (HBWR)) is aimed at providing data for a mechanistic understanding of phenomena, which may affect fuel performance and safety parameters. The investigations focus on implications of high burnup and address thermal property changes, fission gas release as influenced by power level and operation mode, fuel swelling, and pellet-clad interaction. Relevant burnup levels (>50 MWd kg-1 U) are provided through long-term irradiation in the HBWR and through utilisation of re-instrumented fuel segments from commercial light water reactors (LWR). Both urania and MOX fuels are being studied regarding thermal behaviour, conductivity degradation, and aspects of fission gas release. Experiments are also conducted to assess the cladding creep behaviour at different stress levels and to establish the overpressure below which the combination of fuel swelling and cladding creep does not cause increasing fuel temperatures. Clad elongation measurements provide information on the strain during a power increase, the relaxation behaviour and the extent of a possible ratcheting effect during consecutive start-ups. Investigations foreseen in the programme period 2000-2002 include the behaviour of MOX and Gd-bearing fuel and other variants developed in conjunction with burnup extension programmes. Some LWR-irradiated fuel segments will undergo a burnup increase in the HBWR to exposures not yet achieved in LWRs, while others will be re-instrumented and tested for shorter durations

  20. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  1. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data

  2. Nondestructive testing of PWR type fuel rods by eddy currents and metrology in the OSIRIS reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Saclay Reactor Department has developed a nondestructive test bench, now installed above channel 1 of the OSIRIS reactor. As part of investigations into the dynamics of PWR fuel degradation, a number of fuel rods underwent metrological and eddy current inspection, after irradiation

  3. The development and the tests of the electrostatic probe for dust particle collection in thermonuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Voityuk, A. N.; Zakharov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Formation of dust particles in thermonuclear reactors can greatly affect the plasma parameters and lead to accumulation of tritium. The rates of formation and deposition of dust need to be measured, and the parameters of formation of dust particles and clusters need to be studied. A model of a device for collection of fine conductive particles capable of removing them from the reactor chamber for future research is proposed in this paper. The dust collector's operation is based on a principle of applied electrostatic field. The model was tested in different operating conditions: in vacuum, at the atmospheric pressure in the atmosphere of air and dry nitrogen. The experiments were conducted with a stationary system and with the dust collector in motion relative to the dusty surface. It is shown that, during the probe moving relative to the surface, it can remove up to 95% of fine tungsten particles with sizes ranging from 1 to 10 μm.

  4. Babcock Redux: An Ammendment of Babcock's Schematic of the Sun's Magnetic Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Ronald L; Sterling, Alphonse C

    2016-01-01

    We amend Babcock's original scenario for the global dynamo process that sustains the Sun's 22-year magnetic cycle. The amended scenario fits post-Babcock observed features of the magnetic activity cycle and convection zone, and is based on ideas of Spruit and Roberts (1983) about magnetic flux tubes in the convection zone. A sequence of four schematic cartoons lays out the proposed evolution of the global configuration of the magnetic field above, in, and at the bottom of the convection zone through sunspot Cycle 23 and into Cycle 24. Three key elements of the amended scenario are: (1) as the net following-polarity field from the sunspot-region omega-loop fields of an ongoing sunspot cycle is swept poleward to cancel and replace the opposite-polarity polar-cap field from the previous sunspot cycle, it remains connected to the ongoing sunspot cycle's toroidal source-field band at the bottom of the convection zone; (2) topological pumping by the convection zone's free convection keeps the horizontal extent of t...

  5. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor D-T modifications and operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, in support of the Department of Energy's proposal for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) D-T program. The objective of the proposed D-T program is to take the initial step in studying the effects of alpha particle heating and transport in a magnetic fusion device. These studies would enable the successful completion of the original TFTR program objectives, and would support the research and development needs of the Burning Plasma Experiment, BPX (formerly the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)) and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in the areas of alpha particle physics, tritium retention, alpha particle diagnostic development, and tritium handling

  6. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  7. Monitoring and Control Research Using a University Reactor and SBWR Test-Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing hybrid simulation capability of the Penn State Breazeale nuclear reactor was expanded to conduct research for monitoring, operations and control. Hybrid simulation in this context refers to the use of the physical time response of the research reactor as an input signal to a real-time simulation of power-reactor thermal-hydraulics which in-turn provides a feedback signal to the reactor through positioning of an experimental changeable reactivity device. An ECRD is an aluminum tube containing an absorber material that is positioned in the central themble of the reactor kinetics were used to expand the hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability to include out-of-phase stability characteristics observed in operating BWRs

  8. SP-100 nuclear space power reactor system hardware and testing progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SP-100 Space Reactor System was established by agencies of the US government as the system of choice to meet the nation's long lifetime, high reliability space power needs in the 10's to 100's of kWe power range. SP-100 is compatible with all power conversion technologies that can utilize reactor coolant temperatures ≤ 1,350 K. The technologies incorporated in SP-100 are directly applicable to earth orbiting satellites, planetary probes or surface power for commercial, military or civil missions. The most significant hardware and testing accomplishments that were made during the past year are reported in this summary paper, including fuel, fabrication technologies, control mechanisms, liquid metal pumps, lithium thaw behavior and characterization, and thermoelectric power conversion

  9. The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program: Progress and plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1987-01-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40% average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission /sup 99/Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U/sub 3/Si-Al with 19.75% enrichment and U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al with 45% enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR Program.

  10. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  11. The past, present, and future of test and research reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor physics calculations have been performed on research reactors since the first one was built 50 yr ago under the University of Chicago stadium. Since then, reactor physics calculations have evolved from Fermi-age theory calculations performed with slide rules to three-dimensional, continuous-energy, coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo computations performed with supercomputers and workstations. Such enormous progress in reactor physics leads us to believe that the next 50 year will be just as exciting. This paper reviews this transition from the past to the future

  12. The Jules Horowitz Reactor: A New European Material Test Reactor (MTR) Open to International Collaboration: Update Description and Focus on Modern Safety Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is a new Material Testing Reactor currently under construction at CEA Cadarache research centre in the south of France. It will represent a major Research Infrastructure for scientific studies dealing with material and fuel behaviour under irradiation (and is consequently identified for this purpose within various European road maps and forums; ESFRI, SNE-TP, etc.). The reactor will also be devoted to medical isotopes production. The reactor will perform R and D programs for the optimization of the present generation of NPP, support the development of the next generation of NPP (mainly LWR) and also offer irradiation capacities for future reactors. JHR is designed, built and will be operated as an international user-facility open to international collaboration. In order to comply with the evolution of safety requirements and to guarantee long term operations, the construction safety standards of JHR have been significantly improved compared to MTRs built in the 60s. The paper gives an up-to-date status of the construction and of the developments performed to build the future experimental capacity and is particularly focusing on the modern Safety approach used and its consequences on the design of the reactor. (author)

  13. Characterization and testing of materials for nuclear reactors. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear techniques in general and neutrons based methods in particular have played and will continue to play an important role in research in materials science and technology. Today the world is looking at nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as the main sources of energy supply for the future. Research reactors have played a key role in the development of nuclear technology. A materials development programme will thus play a major role in the design and development of new nuclear power plants, for the extension of the life of operating reactors as well as for fusion reactors. Against this background, the IAEA had organized a Technical Meeting on Development, Characterization and Testing of Materials - With Special Reference to the Energy Sector under the activity on specific applications of research reactors. The meeting was held in Vienna, May 29- June 2, 2006. There was also participation by experts in techniques, complementary to neutrons. The participants for the technical meeting were experts in the utilization of nuclear techniques namely the high flux and medium flux research reactors, fusion research and positron annihilation. They presented the design, development and utilization of the facilities at their respective centres for materials characterization with main focus on materials for nuclear energy, both fission and fusion. In core irradiation of materials, development of instrument for residual stress measurement in large and / or irradiated specimen, neutron radiography for inspection of irradiated fuel, work on oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels and SiC composites, relevant to future power systems were cited as application of nuclear techniques in fission reactors. The use of neutron scattering for helium bubbles in steel, application of positron annihilation to study helium bubbles in Cu, Ti-stabilized stainless steel and voidswelling studies etc. show that these techniques have an important role in the development of materials for energy

  14. Neutronics and thermal hydraulics modelling of the Harwell Materials Testing Reactors DIDO and PLUTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed 2-D cylindrical diffusion theory neutronics model is presented for the Harwell reactors DIDO and PLUTO, based on the WIMS-E program. The model for these highly asymmetric reactors allows for the presence of the various control systems, experimental rigs and fuel burnup. Comparisons made with measurements of burnup and of radial and axial flux distributions validate the approach. (author)

  15. Final Assembly and Initial Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. B. Grover

    2007-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing.1,2 The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the first experiment test train (designated AGR-1) as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment

  16. Design, implementation and cost-benefit analysis of a dynamic testing program in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic tests have been performed for many years in commercial pressurized and boiling water reactors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technological and economical feasibility of extending the current light water reactor testing procedures to both present and future liquid metal fast breeder reactors. A 38 node linearized, lumped parameter, EBR-II system model was developed. This model was analyzed to obtain the predicted system time and frequency response for reactivity perturbations, intermediate heat exchanger secondary inlet sodium temperature perturbation frequency response, and various system nodal frequency response sensitivities

  17. DT and DHe3 tokamak test reactor concepts using advanced, high field superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If practical high temperature superconducting ceramic magnets can be developed, there could be a significant impact on reactor design. Potential advantages include a simpler, more robust magnet design, the possibility of demountable superconducting toroidal field coils and reduced shielding requirements. The high temperature superconductors can also have very high critical fields and could provide super high field operation. This could substantially increase eta tau/sub E/ values, reduce β requirements, and improve prospects for ohmic heating to ignition. The combination of moderately high β and super high field could make DHe3 operation possible in a JET size tokamak. In this paper we discuss possibilities for test reactor designs using high temperature high field superconductors. An illustrative design has a field at the plasma of 15 T. This reduces the required β to less than 2% for DT operation. The required plasma current is 5 MA. For a reactor size of R0 = 3.4m and a = 0.6m, the neutron wall loading is 3.3 MW/m2 at β = 1.5% for DT operation and an equal amount of fusion power is produced at β = 10% for DHe3 operation. One possible mode of operation is to use ohmic heating to ignition in a DT plasma followed by thermal runaway to DHe3 temperatures. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  18. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  19. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Options Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Preliminary scoping calculations are being performed for a 100 MWt gas-cooled test reactor. The initial design uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to identify some reactor design features to investigate further. Current status of the effort is described.

  20. Progress of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program in 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1989-01-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1988, the major events, findings, and activities of 1989 are reviewed. The scope of the RERTR Program activities was curtailed, in 1989, by an unexpected legislative restriction which limited the ability of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency to adequately fund the program. Nevertheless, the thrust of the major planned program activities was maintained, and meaningful results were obtained in several areas of great significance for future work. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Proposal of world network on material testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishment of an international cooperation system of worldwide testing reactor network (world network) is proposed in order to achieve efficient facility utilization and provide high quality irradiation data by role sharing of irradiation tests with materials testing reactors in the world. As for the first step, mutual understanding among materials testing reactors is thought to be necessary. From this point, an international symposium on materials testing reactors (ISMTR) was held to construct the world network from 2008, and a common understanding of world network has begun to be shared. (author)

  2. Integrity assessment of research reactor fuel cladding and material testing using eddy current inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology to perform the integrity assessment of research reactors nuclear fuels cladding, such as those installed in IPR-Rl (TRIGA) and IEA-R1 (MTR), using nondestructive electromagnetic inspection (eddy current) is presented. This methodology is constituted by: the development of calibration reference standards, specific for each type of fuel; the development of special test probes; the recommendations for the inspection equipment calibration; the construction of voltage based evaluation curves and the inspection procedures developed for the characterization of detected flaws. The test probes development, specially those designed for the inspection of MTR fuels cladding, which present access difficulties due to the narrow gap between fuel plates (2,89 mm for IEAR-R1), constituted a challenge that demanded the introduction of unusual materials and constructive techniques. The operational performance of the developed resources, as well as the special operative characteristics of the test probes, such as their immunity to adjacent fuel plates interference and electrical resistivity changes of the fuels meat are experimentally demonstrated. The practical applicability of the developed methodology is verified in non radioactive environment, using a dummy MTR fuel element model, similar to an IEA-R1 reactor fuel element, produced and installed in IPEN, Sao Paulo. The efficacy of the proposed methodology was verified by the achieved results. (author)

  3. Supported Pd-Au Membrane Reactor for Hydrogen Production: Membrane Preparation, Characterization and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulianelli, Adolfo; Alavi, Marjan; Bagnato, Giuseppe; Liguori, Simona; Wilcox, Jennifer; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Eslamlouyan, Reza; Anzelmo, Bryce; Basile, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    A supported Pd-Au (Au 7wt%) membrane was produced by electroless plating deposition. Permeation tests were performed with pure gas (H₂, H₂, N₂, CO₂, CH₄) for long time operation. After around 400 h under testing, the composite Pd-Au membrane achieved steady state condition, with an H₂/N₂ ideal selectivity of around 500 at 420 °C and 50 kPa as transmembrane pressure, remaining stable up to 1100 h under operation. Afterwards, the membrane was allocated in a membrane reactor module for methane steam reforming reaction tests. As a preliminary application, at 420 °C, 300 kPa of reaction pressure, space velocity of 4100 h(-1), 40% methane conversion and 35% hydrogen recovery were reached using a commercial Ni/Al₂O₃ catalyst. Unfortunately, a severe coke deposition affected irreversibly the composite membrane, determining the loss of the hydrogen permeation characteristics of the supported Pd-Au membrane. PMID:27171067

  4. Model test on interaction of reactor building and soil-Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical studies of soil-structure interaction have progressed in recent years. At the same time, experimental studies to verify the theoretical results have been carried out energetically. These experimental studies, however, have been mostly conducted by means of vibration tests or earthquake observations individually. In order to investigate experimentally the effects of soil-structure interaction, it is desirable to carry both the forced vibration tests and the earthquake observations of the same models. To this end, the earthquake observations were conducted to obtain the dynamic behaviors of soil-reactor building system during earthquakes and to compare them with the results of the forced vibration tests. The results are described in this paper

  5. Results and Analysis of the Infrastructure Request for Information (DE-SOL-0008318)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, Brenden John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) released a request for information (RFI) (DE-SOL-0008318) for “University, National Laboratory, Industry and International Input on Potential Office of Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Investments” on April 13, 2015. DOE-NE solicited information on five specific types of capabilities as well as any others suggested by the community. The RFI proposal period closed on June 19, 2015. From the 26 responses, 34 individual proposals were extracted. Eighteen were associated with a DOE national laboratory, including Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was referenced in a proposal as a proposed capability location, although the proposal did not originate with ORNL. Five US universities submitted proposals (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pennsylvania State University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, University of Houston and the University of Michigan). Three industrial/commercial institutions submitted proposals (AREVA NP, Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)). Eight major themes emerged from the submissions as areas needing additional capability or support for existing capabilities. Two submissions supported multiple areas. The major themes are: Advanced Manufacturing (AM), High Performance Computing (HPC), Ion Irradiation with X-Ray Diagnostics (IIX), Ion Irradiation with TEM Visualization (IIT), Radiochemistry Laboratories (RCL), Test Reactors, Neutron Sources and Critical Facilities (RX) , Sample Preparation and Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) and Thermal-Hydraulics Test Facilities (THF).

  6. Status of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1987, the major events, findings and activities of 1988 are reviewed. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a formal and generic approval of the use of U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel in research and test reactors, with densities up to 4.8 g U/cmT. New significant findings from postirradiation examinations, from ion-beam irradiations, and from analytical modeling, have raised serious doubts about the potential of LEU U3Si-Al dispersion fuel for applications requiring very high uranium densities and high burnups (>6 g U/cmT, >50% burnup). As a result of these findings, the fuel development efforts have been redirected towards three new initiatives: (1) a systematic application of ion-beam irradiations to screen new materials; (2) application of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) procedures to produce U3Si2-Al plates with high uranium densities and thin uniform cladding; and (3) application of HIP procedures to produce plates with U3Si wires imbedded in an aluminum matrix, achieving stability, high uranium density, and thin uniform cladding. The new fuel concepts hold the promise of extraordinary performance potential and require approximately five years to develop.

  7. Laser-Ultrasonic Testing and its Applications to Nuclear Reactor Internals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, M.; Miura, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2008-02-01

    A new nondestructive testing technique for surface-breaking microcracks in nuclear reactor components based on laser-ultrasonics is developed. Surface acoustic wave generated by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and detected by frequency-stabilized long pulse laser coupled with confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to detect and size the cracks. A frequency-domain signal processing is developed to realize accurate sizing capability. The laser-ultrasonic testing allows the detection of surface-breaking microcrack having a depth of less than 0.1 mm, and the measurement of their depth with an accuracy of 0.2 mm when the depth exceeds 0.5 mm including stress corrosion cracking. The laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with laser peening system, which is another laser-based maintenance technology to improve surface stress, for inner surface of small diameter tube is developed. The generation laser in the laser-ultrasonic testing system can be identical to the laser source of the laser peening. As an example operation of the system, the system firstly works as the laser-ultrasonic testing mode and tests the inner surface of the tube. If no cracks are detected, the system then changes its work mode to the laser peening and improves surface stress to prevent crack initiation. The first nuclear industrial application of the laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with the laser peening was completed in Japanese nuclear power plant in December 2004.

  8. Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Experiences and Considerations With Irradiation Test Performance in an International Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MH Lane

    2006-02-15

    This letter forwards a compilation of knowledge gained regarding international interactions and issues associated with Project Prometheus. The following topics are discussed herein: (1) Assessment of international fast reactor capability and availability; (2) Japanese fast reactor (JOYO) contracting strategy; (3) NRPCT/Program Office international contract follow; (4) Completion of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contract for manufacture of reactor test components; (5) US/Japanese Departmental interactions and required Treaties and Agreements; and (6) Non-technical details--interactions and considerations.

  9. Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Experiences and Considerations With Irradiation Test Performance in an International Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This letter forwards a compilation of knowledge gained regarding international interactions and issues associated with Project Prometheus. The following topics are discussed herein: (1) Assessment of international fast reactor capability and availability; (2) Japanese fast reactor (JOYO) contracting strategy; (3) NRPCT/Program Office international contract follow; (4) Completion of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contract for manufacture of reactor test components; (5) US/Japanese Departmental interactions and required Treaties and Agreements; and (6) Non-technical details--interactions and considerations

  10. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 1000C to 7600C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. The insulation retained an acceptable degree of resiliency. However, some fiber damage was observed within both the high and low temperature insulation blankets. A thermal analysis was conducted to correlate the hot duct heat transfer results with those obtained from the analytical techniques used for the HTGR design using a computer thermal model representative of the duct and test setup. The thermal performance of the insulation, the temperature gradient through the structural components, the heating load to the cooling system and the permeation flow effect on heat transfer were verified. Exellent correlation between the experimental data and the analytical techniques were obtained

  11. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  12. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  13. Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

    2008-12-16

    The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an

  14. Proceedings of the 1994 international meeting on reduced enrichment for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting brought together participants in the international effort to minimize and eventually eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civilian nuclear programs. Papers cover the following topics: National programs; fuel cycle; nuclear fuels; analyses; advanced reactors; and reactor conversions. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion to the Energy Science and Technology Database

  15. Testing and Commissioning of a Multifunctional Tool for the Dismantling of the Activated Internals of the KNK Reactor Shaft - 13524

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor Facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype reactor to demonstrate the Fast Breeder Reactor Technology in Germany, was in operation from 1971 to 1991. The dismantling activities started in 1991. The project aim is the green field in 2020. Most of the reactor internals as well as the primary and secondary cooling loops are already dismantled. The total contaminated sodium inventory has already been disposed of. Only the high activated reactor vessel shielding structures are remaining. Due to the high dose rates these structures must be dismantled remotely. For the dismantling of the primary shielding of the reactor vessel, 12 stacked cast iron blocks with a total mass of 90 Mg and single masses up to 15.5 Mg, a remote-controlled multifunctional dismantling device (HWZ) was designed, manufactured and tested in a mock-up. After successful approval of the test sequences by the authorities, the HWZ was implemented into the reactor building containment for final assembling of the auxiliary equipment and subsequent hot commissioning in 2012. Dismantling of the primary shielding blocks is scheduled for early 2013. (authors)

  16. Testing and Commissioning of a Multifunctional Tool for the Dismantling of the Activated Internals of the KNK Reactor Shaft - 13524

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothschmitt, Stefan; Graf, Anja [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bauer, Stefan; Klute, Stefan; Koselowski, Eiko [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Am Taubenfeld 25/1, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Hendrich, Klaus [Ingenieurbuero Hendrich, Moerikeweg 14, 75015 Bretten (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor Facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype reactor to demonstrate the Fast Breeder Reactor Technology in Germany, was in operation from 1971 to 1991. The dismantling activities started in 1991. The project aim is the green field in 2020. Most of the reactor internals as well as the primary and secondary cooling loops are already dismantled. The total contaminated sodium inventory has already been disposed of. Only the high activated reactor vessel shielding structures are remaining. Due to the high dose rates these structures must be dismantled remotely. For the dismantling of the primary shielding of the reactor vessel, 12 stacked cast iron blocks with a total mass of 90 Mg and single masses up to 15.5 Mg, a remote-controlled multifunctional dismantling device (HWZ) was designed, manufactured and tested in a mock-up. After successful approval of the test sequences by the authorities, the HWZ was implemented into the reactor building containment for final assembling of the auxiliary equipment and subsequent hot commissioning in 2012. Dismantling of the primary shielding blocks is scheduled for early 2013. (authors)

  17. Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmann, Frank [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Lombaerde, Robert [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Moriconi, Franco [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Nelson, Albert [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Zenergy Power has successfully designed, built, tested, and installed in the US electrical grid a saturable reactor Fault Current Limiter. Beginning in 2007, first as SC Power Systems and from 2008 as Zenergy Power, Inc., ZP used DOE matching grant and ARRA funds to help refine the design of the saturated reactor fault current limiter. ZP ultimately perfected the design of the saturated reactor FCL to the point that ZP could reliably design a suitable FCL for most utility applications. Beginning with a very basic FCL design using 1G HTS for a coil housed in a LN2 cryostat for the DC bias magnet, the technology progressed to a commercial system that was offered for sale internationally. Substantial progress was made in two areas. First, the cryogenics cooling system progressed from a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen container housing the HTS coils to cryostats utilizing dry conduction cooling and reaching temperatures down to less than 20 degrees K. Large, round cryostats with warm bore diameters of 1.7 meters enabled the design of large tanks to hold the AC components. Second, the design of the AC part of the FCL was refined from a six legged spider design to a more compact and lighter design with better fault current limiting capability. Further refinement of the flux path and core shape led to an efficient saturated reactor design requiring less Ampere-turns to saturate the core. In conclusion, the development of the saturable reactor FCL led to a more efficient design not requiring HTS magnets and their associated peripheral equipment, which yielded a more economical product in line with the electric utility industry expectations. The original goal for the DOE funding of the ZP project Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters was to stimulate the HTS wire industry with, first 1G, then 2G, HTS wire applications. Over the approximately 5 years of ZP's product development program, the amount of HTS

  18. Melt-dilute treatment of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site is the U.S. Department of Energy's preferred site for return and treatment of all aluminum-base, spent, research and test reactor fuel assemblies. There are over 20,000 spent fuel assemblies now stored in different countries around the world, and by 2035 many will be returned to SRS for treatment and interim storage, in preparation for disposal in a geologic repository. The early fuel assemblies for research and test reactors were made using aluminum clad plates that were fabricated from highly enriched (93%) uranium-aluminum alloy. Later, powder metallurgical fabrication methods were developed to produce plate fuels with higher uranium contents using either uranium aluminide, uranium oxide or uranium silicide powders mixed with aluminum. Silicide fuel elements generally are fabricated with low enriched uranium containing less than 20% 2'35U. Following irradiation, the spent fuel assemblies are discharged from the reactor, and most assemblies have been stored in underwater pools, some since the early 1950's. A number of disposition options including direct/co-disposal and melt-dilute treatment were evaluated recently. The melt-dilute technique was identified as the preferred method for treatment of aluminum-base spent fuel. The technique consists of melting the spent fuel assembly and adding depleted uranium to the melt for isotopic dilution to 2'35U. Aluminum is added, if necessary, to produce a predetermined alloy composition. Additionally, neutron poisons may be added to the melt where they form solid solution phases or compounds with uranium and/or aluminum. Lowering the enrichment reduces both criticality and proliferation concerns for storage. Consolidation by melting also reduces the number of storage canisters. Laboratory and small-scale process demonstration using irradiated fuel is underway. Tests of the off gas absorption system have been initiated using both surrogate and irradiated RERTR mini fuel plates. An experimental L

  19. Conceptual design of the integral test loop (I): Reactor coolant system and secondary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Lee, Seong Je; Kwon, Tae Soon; Moon, Sang Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of the primary coolant system and the secondary system of the Integral Test Loop (ITL) which simulates overall thermal hydraulic phenomena of the primary system of a nuclear power plant during postulated accidents or transients. The design basis for the primary coolant system and secondary system is as follows ; Reference plant: Korean Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP), Height ratio : 1/1, Volume ratio : 1/200, Power scale : Max. 15% of the scaled nominal power, Temperature, Pressure : Real plant conditions. The primary coolant system includes a reactor vessel, which contains a core simulator, a steam generator, a reactor coolant pump simulator, a pressurizer and piping, which consists of two hot legs, four cold legs and four intermediate legs. The secondary system consists of s steam discharge system, a feedwater supply system and a steam condensing system. This conceptual design report describes general configuration of the reference plant, and major function and operation of each system of the plant. Also described is the design philosophy of each component and system of the ITL, and specified are the design criteria and technical specifications of each component and system of the ITL in the report. 17 refs., 43 figs., 51 tabs. (Author)

  20. Definition and Analysis of Heavy Water Reactor Benchmarks for Testing New Wims-D Libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of the IAEA-WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP). A group of heavy water reactor benchmarks have been selected for testing new WIMS-D libraries, including calculations with WIMSD5B program and the analysis of results.These benchmarks cover a wide variety of reactors and conditions, from fresh fuels to high burnup, and from natural to enriched uranium.Besides, each benchmark includes variations in lattice pitch and in coolants (normally heavy water and void).Multiplication factors with critical experimental bucklings and other parameters are calculated and compared with experimental reference values.The WIMS libraries used for the calculations were generated with basic data from JEF-2.2 Rev.3 (JEF) and ENDF/B-VI iNReleaseln 5 (E6) Results obtained with WIMS-86 (W86) library, included with WIMSD5B package, from Windfrith, UK with adjusted data, are included also, for showing the improvements obtained with the new -not adjusted- libraries.The calculations with WIMSD5B were made with two methods (input program options): PIJ (two-dimension collision probability method) and DSN (one-dimension Sn method, with homogenization of materials by ring).The general conclusions are: the library based on JEF data and the DSN meted give the best results, that in average are acceptable

  1. Standard Test Method for Application and Analysis of Helium Accumulation Fluence Monitors for Reactor Vessel Surveillance, E706 (IIIC)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the concept and use of helium accumulation for neutron fluence dosimetry for reactor vessel surveillance. Although this test method is directed toward applications in vessel surveillance, the concepts and techniques are equally applicable to the general field of neutron dosimetry. The various applications of this test method for reactor vessel surveillance are as follows: 1.1.1 Helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) capsules, 1.1.2 Unencapsulated, or cadmium or gadolinium covered, radiometric monitors (RM) and HAFM wires for helium analysis, 1.1.3 Charpy test block samples for helium accumulation, and 1.1.4 Reactor vessel (RV) wall samples for helium accumulation. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Jules Horowitz Reactor: a high performance material testing reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iracane, Daniel; Chaix, Pascal; Alamo, Ana

    2008-04-01

    The physical modelling of materials' behaviour under severe conditions is an indispensable element for developing future fission and fusion systems: screening, design, optimisation, processing, licensing, and lifetime assessment of a new generation of structure materials and fuels, which will withstand high fast neutron flux at high in-service temperatures with the production of elements like helium and hydrogen. JANNUS and other analytical experimental tools are developed for this objective. However, a purely analytical approach is not sufficient: there is a need for flexible experiments integrating higher scales and coupled phenomena and offering high quality measurements; these experiments are performed in material testing reactors (MTR). Moreover, complementary representative experiments are usually performed in prototypes or dedicated facilities such as IFMIF for fusion. Only such a consistent set of tools operating on a wide range of scales, can provide an actual prediction capability. A program such as the development of silicon carbide composites (600-1200 °C) illustrates this multiscale strategy. Facing the long term needs of experimental irradiations and the ageing of present MTRs, it was thought necessary to implement a new generation high performance MTR in Europe for supporting existing and future nuclear reactors. The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) project copes with this context. It is funded by an international consortium and will start operation in 2014. JHR will provide improved performances such as high neutron flux ( 10 n/cm/s above 0.1 MeV) in representative environments (coolant, pressure, temperature) with online monitoring of experimental parameters (including stress and strain control). Experimental devices designing, such as high dpa and small thermal gradients experiments, is now a key objective requiring a broad collaboration to put together present scientific state of art, end-users requirements and advanced instrumentation. To cite this

  3. ACRR [Annular Core Research Reactor] fission product release tests: ST-1 and ST-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two experiments (ST-1 and ST-2) have been performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACER) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) to obtain time-resolved data on the release of fission products from irradiated fuels under light water reactor (LWR) severe accident conditions. Both experiments were conducted in a highly reducing environment at maximum fuel temperatures of greater than 2400 K. These experiments were designed specifically to investigate the effect of increased total pressure on fission product release; ST-1 was performed at approximately 0.16 MPa and ST-2 was run at 1.9 MPa, whereas other parameters were matched as closely as possible. Release rate data were measured for Cs, I, Ba, Sr, Eu, Te, and U. The release rates were higher than predicted by existing codes for Ba, Sr, Eu, and U. Te release was very low, but Te did not appear to be sequestered by the zircaloy cladding; it was evenly distributed in the fuel. In addition, in posttest analysis a unique fuel morphology (fuel swelling) was observed which may have enhanced fission product release, especially in the high pressure test (ST-2). These data are compared with analytical results from the CORSOR correlation and the VICTORIA computer model. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Evaluation method and prediction result of fuel behavior during the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Yoshimuta, Shigeharu; Sato, Masashi; Saito, Kenji; Tobita, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Small amounts of additional failure of HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) fuel will occur during operation. In the safety design requirements for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) fuel, the additional failure fraction in the coating layers of the coated fuel particles is limited less than 0.2% through the full service period. The failure fraction should be know during the HTTR operation. Short-lived fission gases are released from the through-coatings-failed particles and contamination uranium in the fuel compact matrix since the coating layers can retain short-lived fission gases. Then fission gas concentration in the primary coolant reflects the failure fraction in the core. Based on fuel fabrication data (exposed uranium fractions and the SiC failure fractions) and the HTTR operating condition, the though-coatings-failure fraction and release fraction of {sup 88}Kr are analytically predicted. The results are as follows. (1) The intact particles will not fail by kernel migration, Pd-SiC corrosion and internal pressure, however, some of the as-fabricated SiC-failed particles will be the through-coatings-failed particles by the pressure vessel failure. (2) The release fraction of {sup 88}Kr, that will be determined mainly by the release from the contamination uranium in the fuel compact matrix, will be less than 10{sup -6} considering the additional through-coatings-failure fraction. (author)

  5. The Improvement of Plant Efficiency by Testing and Revising of the Reactor Thermal Power Calculation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the uncertainty of flow measurement mostly affects the result of reactor thermal power calculation, reactor power in most of Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs) is controlled by excore Nuclear Instrumentation System(NIS) based on SPPC which has less uncertainty of flow measurement by using venture-meter. Real time monitoring system for reactor thermal power of Kori unit 3 and 4 has been established since 1992, and plant efficiency was improved by detecting errors and revising the program in 2012 following the engineering judgement that reactor thermal power varies according to steam generator blowdown flow change, unit conversion constant, and thermal expansion coefficient, etc. The reactor thermal power calculation program for Kori unit 3 and 4 was developed in 1992 and operated for 20 years without any correction or revision. Based on the engineering judgement that reactor thermal power varies according to change of steam generator blowdown flow, we conducted a research and found a couple of errors in steam generator blowdown specific volume, unit conversion constants for differential pressure of main feed water inlet flow, and thermal expansion coefficient of venture-meter which measures main feed water flow for steam generator. By correcting the errors in reactor thermal power program, generator power increased by 3.2 MWe for two units, Kori 3 and 4. Considering recent capacity factor of the plant, additional net electricity of 26,434 MWh was produced annually

  6. Fuel irradiation test plan at the Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of high performance fuels, which enables burnup extension and high duty uses of light water reactors (LWRs) by means of power up rates and flexible operating cycles, is one of key technical issues for extending the uses for longer periods. Introduction of new design fuel rods with new cladding alloys and wider utilization of mixed oxide fuels is expected in Japan. Fuel irradiation tests for development and safety demonstration are quite important, in order to realize theses progress. Operational management on water chemistry, minimizing the long term degradation of reactor components, could have unfavorable influence on the integrity of the fuel rods. Japanese government and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency have decided to re new the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and to install new test rigs, in order to play an active role solving the issues on the development and the safety of the fuel and the plant aging. Fuel integrity under abnormal transient conditions will be investigated using a special capsule type test rig, which has its own power control system under simulated LWR cooling conditions. Water loops for simulation of high duty operation, e.g. high power, high burnup and high rod internal pressure conditions, are proposed for the development and safety examination of the high performance fuels. Combination of the JMTR tests with simulated reactivity initiated accident tests in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor and loss of coolant accident tests in hot laboratories would provide a comprehensive data for safety evaluation and design progress of the high performance fuels at extended burnups, covering from the normal to the accident conditions, including abnormal transients

  7. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D and D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D and D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget

  8. Status of the RERTR program: overview, progress and plans. [Reduced Enrighment Research and Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1985-01-01

    The status of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a summary of the accomplishments which the RERTR Program had achieved by the end of 1984 with its many international partners, emphasis is placed on the progress achieved during 1985 and on current plans and schedules. A new miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was fabricated and is well into irradiation. The whole-core ORR demonstration is scheduled to begin in November 1985, with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/. Altogether, 921 full-size test and prototype elements have been ordered for fabrication with reduced enrichment and the new technologies. Qualification of U/sub 3/Si-Al fuel with approx.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ is still projected for 1989. This progress could not have been achieved without the close international cooperation which has existed since the beginning, and whose continuation and intensification will be essential to the achievement of the long-term RERTR goals.

  9. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper presented in the following areas of interest: (1) fuel development; (2) post-irradiation examinations; (3) reprocessing; (4) thermite reaction; (5) fuel fabrication; (6) element tests; (7) core tests; (8) criticals; (9) shipping; and (10) reactors and methods

  10. TRIGA reactor dynamics: Frequency response tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the results of frequency response tests conducted on ITU TRIGA Reactor are presented. To conduct the experiments, a special 'micro control rod' and its submersible stepping-motor drive mechanism was designed and constructed. The experiments cover a frequency range of 0.002 - 2 Hz., and 0.02, 4, 200 kW nominal power levels. Zero-power and at-power reactivity to % power transfer functions are presented as gain, and phase shift vs. frequency diagrams. Low power response is in close agreement with the point reactor zero-power transfer function. Response at 200 kW is studied with the help of a Nyquist diagram, and found to be stable. An elaboration on the main features of the feedback mechanism is also given. Power to reactivity feedback was measured to be just about 1.5 cent / % power change. (authors)

  11. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

    2003-10-28

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

  12. Standard review plan for the review and evaluation of emergency plans for research and test reactors. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a Standard Review Plan for the guidance of the NRC staff to assure that complete and uniform reviews are made of research and test reactor emergency plans. The report is organized under ten planning standards which correspond to the guidance criteria in Draft II of ANSI/ANS 15.16 as endorsed by Revision 1 to Regulatory Guide 2.6. The applicability of the items under each planning standard is indicated by subdivisions of the steady state thermal power levels at which the reactors are licensed to operate. Standard emergency classes and example action levels for research and test reactors which should initiate these classes are given in an Appendix

  13. Tensile and impact testing of an HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] control rod follower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook a program to machine and test specimens from a control rod follower from the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Tensile and Charpy impact specimens were machined and tested from non-irradiated aluminum alloys in addition to irradiated 6061-T6 from the HFBR. The tensile test results on irradiated material showed a two-fold increase in tensile strength to a maximum of 100.6 ksi. The impact resistance of the irradiated material showed a six-fold decrease in values (3 in-lb average) compared to similar non-irradiated material. Fracture toughness (KI) specimens were tested on an unirradiated compositionally and dimensionally similar (to HFBR follower) 6061 T-6 material with Kmax values of 24.8 ± 1.0 Ksi√in (average) being obtained. The report concludes that the specimens produced during the program yielded reproducible and believable results and that proper quality assurance was provided throughout the program. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  14. C Reactor overbore test facility review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, P.A.; Nilson, R.

    1964-04-24

    In 1961, large-size, smooth-bore, Zircaloy process tubes were installed in C-Reactor graphite channels that had been enlarged to 2.275 inches. These tubes were installed to provide a test and demonstration facility for the concept of overboring as a means of securing significant improvement in the production capability of the reactors, After two years of facility operation, it is now appropriate to consider the extent to which original objectives have been achieved, to re-examine the original objectives, and to consider the best future use of this unique facility. This report presents the general results of such a review and re-examination in more detail.

  15. Transmission computer microtomography for nondestructive testing of fuel and reactor control means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for the X-ray transmission computerized microtomography with the defect resolution level up to some μm is developed relative to solving the problem on controlling the quality of the nuclear reactor fuel elements and regularity means. The solution of the problem on the nondestructive control of such objects conditioned the conduct of studies on characteristics of certain range of detectors of the X-ray radiation, organization of scanning principles with application of the laser interferometry principles and construction of the system for the measurement data procession. The performed studies led to the SAPR realization fro the problem-oriented computerized tomographs and the apparatus realization of the experimental version of such a device. The studies on the specially-produced test-samples with calibrated defects demonstrated the correctness of the approach to designing such facilities for the items nondestructive control in the nuclear engineering

  16. TRAC PF1/MOD1 calculations and data comparisons for mist feed and bleed and steam generator tube rupture experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebe, D.A.; Boyack, B.E.; Steiner, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the Integral System Test (IST) program initiated in June 1983 for the purpose of providing integral system test data on specific issues/phenomena relevant to post-small-break loss-of-coolant accidents, loss of feedwater and other transients in Babcock and Wilcox (BandW) plant designs. The Multi-Loop Integral System Test (MIST) facility is the largest single component in the IST program. MIST is a 2 /times/ 4 (two hot legs and steam generators (SGs), four cold legs and reactor coolant pumps) representation of lowered-loop reactor system of the BandW design. It is a full-height, full-pressure facility with 1/817 power and volume scaling. Two other integral experimental facilities are included in the IST program: test loops at the University of Maryland, College Park, and at SRI International (SRI-2). The objective of the IST tests is to generate high-quality experimental data to be used for assessing thermal-hydraulic safety computer codes. Efforts are under way at Los Alamos to assess TRAC-PF1/MOD1 against data from each of the IST facilities. Calculations and data comparisons for TRAC-PF1/MOD1 assessment are presented for two transients run in the MIST facility. These are MIST Test 330302, a feed and bleed test with delayed high-pressure injection; and Test 3404AA, an SG tube-rupture test with the affected SG isolated. Only MIST assessment results are presented in this paper. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculations completed to date for MIST tests are in reasonable agreement with the data from these tests. Reasonable agreement is defined as meaning that major trends are predicted correctly, although TRAC values are frequently outside the range of data uncertainty. We believe that correct conclusions will be reached if the code is used in similar applications despite minor code/model deficiencies. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. CO2 Absorption in a Lab-Scale Fixed Solid Bed Reactor: Modelling and Experimental Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gabbrielli

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The CO2 absorption in a lab-scale fixed solid bed reactor filled with different solid sorbents has been studied under different operative conditions regarding temperature (20-200°C and input gas composition (N2, O2, CO2, H2O at 1bar pressure. The gas leaving the reactor has been analysed to measure the CO2 and O2 concentrations and, consequently, to evaluate the overall CO2 removal efficiency. In order to study the influence of solid sorbent type (i.e. CaO, coal bottom ash, limestone and blast furnace slag and of mass and heat transfer processes on CO2 removal efficiency, a one-dimensional time dependent mathematical model of the reactor, which may be considered a Plug Flow Reactor, has been developed. The quality of the model has been confirmed using the experimental results.

  18. Final report on in-reactor tensile tests on OFHC - Copper and CuCrZr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N; Edwards, D.J.; Tähtinen, S.;

    2004-01-01

    of the combination of strain and radiation hardening, the rate of hardening in the plastic regime is found tobe enhanced. The rate of hardening, the maximum level of hardening and the magnitude of the total elongation achieved during an in-reactor test are found to depend strongly on the pre-yield dose level (i...... of uniaxial tensile tests on pure copper and a CuCrZr alloy in a fission reactor at 363 and 393K. In the following, we first describe the experiments and then present results illustrating the build up ofstress as a function of concurrently increasing strain and displacement dose level. Results on both pre...

  19. CNSS plant concept, capital cost, and multi-unit station economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) and the Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) have performed several studies over the last eight years related to small integral pressurized water reactors. These reactors include the 365 MWt (100 MWe) Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG) and the 1200 MWt Consolidated Nuclear Steam System (CNSS). The studies, mostly performed under contract to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have led to a 1250 MWt (400 MWe) Consolidated Nuclear Steam System (CNSS) plant concept, with unique design and cost features. This report contains an update of earlier studies of the CNSS reactor and balance-of-plant concept design, capital costs, and multi-unit plant economics incorporating recent design developments, improvements, and post-TMI-2 upgrades. The economic evaluation compares the total system economic impact of a phased, three stage 400 MWe CNSS implementation program, i.e., a three-unit station, to the installation of a single 1200 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) into a typical USA utility system

  20. High-density reduced-enrichment fuels for Research and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels have been conducted by the US RERTR Program in order to provide the technical means to reduce the enrichment of fuels for research and test reactors. The traditional aluminum dispersion fuel technology has been extended to include the highest practical loadings of uranium-aluminide (UAl/sub x/, 2.3 MgU/m3), uranium-oxide (U3O8, 3.2 MgU/m3), and uranium-silicide (U3Si2, 5.5 MgU/m3; U3Si, 7.0 MgU/m3) fuels. A third uranium-silicide alloy, U3SiAl (U + 3.5 wt % Si + 1.5 wt % Al) has been found to perform poorly at high burnup. Testing of miniature fuel plates and full-sized fuel elements is at an advanced stage for the highest loadings of the aluminide and oxide fuels and intermediate loadings of the silicide fuels, and good results have been obtained for low-enriched uranium. The data obtained to date are discussed. 1 reference, 3 figures, 1 table

  1. Potential of duplex fuel in prebreeder, breeder, and power reactor designs: tests and analyses (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual region fuel pellets, called duplex pellets, are comprised of an outer annular region of relatively high uranium fuel enrichment and a center pellet of fertile material with no enrichment. UO2 and ThO2 are the fissile and fertile materials of interest. Both prebreeders and breeders are discussed as are the performance advantages of duplex pellets over solid pellets in these two pressurized water reactor types. Advantages of duplex pellets for commercial reactor fuel rods are also discussed. Both irradiation test data and analytical results are used in comparisons. Manufacturing of duplex fuel is discussed

  2. Non-Destructive Testing of Reactor-Fuel, Target, and Control Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Savannah River Plant (a production facility of the United States Atomic Energy Commission), fuel, target, and control elements are non-destructively tested before and after irradiation in reactors. Design and performance of unique instruments - used for measuring physical soundness, nuclear properties, and dimensions - are described. A nickel thickness gauge, utilizing the Hall effect in a magnetic field, is used to measure the thickness of nickel layers on uncanned uranium cores. A similar instrument is used after cores have been diffusion bonded to aluminium cladding to determine that each core has a layer of residual nickel, and that the end cap is sufficiently thick. Ultrasonic instruments are used (1) to measure uranium grain size to determine whether the cores were properly heat-treated, and (2) to detect unbonded areas between cladding and core. The Nuclear Test Gauge (NTG), a small subcritical assembly of U235-A1 alloy slugs in an H2O-moderated lattice, is used to determine the fuel (U235) or absorber (Li6) content of reactor elements. These determinations, made from changes in neutron multiplication, have a 1-sigma precision of about ± 0.5% for fuel elements containing up to 250 g U235/ 30.5 cm (1 ft), and about ± 1% for target and control elements containing up to 4 g Li6/30.5 cm (1 ft). Compared to the more commonly used large.critical test pile, the NTG costs about 1/20 as much; measures fuel or absorber content in about one minute vs. ten minutes; and measures the axial distribution of fuel or absorber which the test pile cannot do. Irradiated fuel elements are measured under water with (1) differential transformers that can measure diameter and length to an accuracy of ± 0.05 cm (0.002 in), and (2) simple mechanical linkages with dial indicators above water that can measure inside diameter and warp. By keeping the elements submerged in water, personnel are shielded from radiation, and the elements do not undergo the dimensional changes that

  3. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  4. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  5. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called 'AGR-1,' graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on fuel

  6. Fabrication of Test Tubes for Coal Ash Corrosion Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.; Swindeman, R.W.; Wright, I.G.

    1999-05-11

    This paper deals with the fabrication of tube sections of four alloys for incorporating into test sections to be assembled by Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) for installation at Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant. The primary purpose of the installation was to determine the corrosion behavior of ten different alloys for flue gas corrosion. Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant is burning an Ohio coal containing approximately 3.4% S (dry basis) and approximately 0.4% alkali which causes chronic coal ash corrosion of the unit�s superheater tubing. The 2.5-in.-OD x 0.4in.-wall x 6-in-long sections of four alloys {type 304H coated with Fe3Al alloy FAS [developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)], 310 + Ta, modified 800H, and Thermie alloy} were fabricated at ORNL. Each alloy tubing was characterized in terms of chemical analysis and microstructure. The machined tubes of each of the alloys were inspected and shipped on time for incorporation into the test loop fabricated at B&W. Among the alloys fabricated, Thermie was the hardest to extrude and machine.

  7. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  8. Supported Pd-Au Membrane Reactor for Hydrogen Production: Membrane Preparation, Characterization and Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Iulianelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A supported Pd-Au (Au 7wt% membrane was produced by electroless plating deposition. Permeation tests were performed with pure gas (H2, H2, N2, CO2, CH4 for long time operation. After around 400 h under testing, the composite Pd-Au membrane achieved steady state condition, with an H2/N2 ideal selectivity of around 500 at 420 °C and 50 kPa as transmembrane pressure, remaining stable up to 1100 h under operation. Afterwards, the membrane was allocated in a membrane reactor module for methane steam reforming reaction tests. As a preliminary application, at 420 °C, 300 kPa of reaction pressure, space velocity of 4100 h−1, 40% methane conversion and 35% hydrogen recovery were reached using a commercial Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Unfortunately, a severe coke deposition affected irreversibly the composite membrane, determining the loss of the hydrogen permeation characteristics of the supported Pd-Au membrane.

  9. Management and storage of spent nuclear fuel at research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated fuel from research and test reactors has been stored at various facilities for several decades. As these facilities age and approach or exceed their original design lifetimes, there is mounting concern about closure of the fuel cycle and about the integrity of ageing fuels from the materials point of view as well as some concern about the loss of self-protection of the fuels as their activity decays. It is clear that an international effort is necessary to give these problems sufficient exposure and to ensure that work continues on appropriate solutions. The future of nuclear research, with its many benefits to mankind, is in jeopardy in some countries, especially countries without nuclear power programmes, because effective solutions for extended interim storage and final disposition of spent research reactor fuels are not yet available. An advisory Group meeting was convened in Vienna to consider a Database on the Management and Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Research and Test Reactors. Sixteen experts from sixteen different countries participated in the Advisory Group meeting and presented country reports, which together represent an overview of the technologies used in spent fuel management and storage at research and test reactors world-wide. The sixteen country reports together with the database summary are presented in this publication. Refs, figs, tabs

  10. Annual report of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center. FY 2007. April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), achieving the first criticality in March 1968, has been used to test the durability and integrity of reactor fuels and components, basic nuclear research, production of radioisotopes (RIs), and other purposes. The JMTR, however, was halted in August 2006 after its 165th cycle operation, and is currently undergoing partial renewal of the apparatus and installation of new irradiation equipment, aiming at restarting from 2011. In addition, to cope with strong requests from users to improve the usability of the JMTR, efforts are being made to increase reactor operating efficiency, shorten the turnaround time for obtaining results, and conduct other necessary tasks for the JMTR to recommence reoperation. The present report summarizes the activities carried out in 2007 for the refurbishment and restart of the JMTR. (author)

  11. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

  12. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results

  13. Development of operation and maintenance technology for HTGRs by using HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish the technical basis of HTGR (High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor), the long term high temperature operation using HTTR was carried out in the high temperature test operation mode during 50-day since January till March, 2010. It is necessary to establish the technical basis of operation and maintenance by demonstrating the stability of plant during long-term operation and the reliability of components and facilities special to HTGRs, in order to attain the stable supply of the high temperature heat to the planned heat utilization system of HTTR. Test data obtained in the operation were evaluated for the technical issues which were extracted before the operation. As the results, it was confirmed that the temperatures and flow rate of primary and secondary coolant were well controlled within sufficiently small deviation against the disturbance by the atmospheric temperature variation in daily. Stability and reliability of the components and facility special to HTGRs was demonstrated through the long term high temperature operation by evaluating the heat transfer performance of high temperature components, the stability performance of pressure control to compensate helium gas leak, the reliability of the dynamic components such as helium gas circulators, the performance of heat-up protection of radiation shielding. Through the long term high temperature operation of HTTR, the technical basis for the operation and maintenance technology of HTGRs was established

  14. Development of operation and maintenance technology for HTGRs by using HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Atsushi, E-mail: shimizu.atsushi35@jaea.go.jp [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kawamoto, Taiki [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Tochio, Daisuke [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Saito, Kenji; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Honma, Fumitaka; Furusawa, Takayuki; Saikusa, Akio [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Takada, Shoji [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Shinozaki, Masayuki [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    To establish the technical basis of HTGR (High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor), the long term high temperature operation using HTTR was carried out in the high temperature test operation mode during 50-day since January till March, 2010. It is necessary to establish the technical basis of operation and maintenance by demonstrating the stability of plant during long-term operation and the reliability of components and facilities special to HTGRs, in order to attain the stable supply of the high temperature heat to the planned heat utilization system of HTTR. Test data obtained in the operation were evaluated for the technical issues which were extracted before the operation. As the results, it was confirmed that the temperatures and flow rate of primary and secondary coolant were well controlled within sufficiently small deviation against the disturbance by the atmospheric temperature variation in daily. Stability and reliability of the components and facility special to HTGRs was demonstrated through the long term high temperature operation by evaluating the heat transfer performance of high temperature components, the stability performance of pressure control to compensate helium gas leak, the reliability of the dynamic components such as helium gas circulators, the performance of heat-up protection of radiation shielding. Through the long term high temperature operation of HTTR, the technical basis for the operation and maintenance technology of HTGRs was established.

  15. THE COMPONENT TEST FACILITY – A NATIONAL USER FACILITY FOR TESTING OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR) COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David S. Duncan; Vondell J. Balls; Stephanie L. Austad

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Projects require research, development, design, construction, and operation of a nuclear plant intended for both high-efficiency electricity production and high-temperature industrial applications, including hydrogen production. During the life cycle stages of an HTGR, plant systems, structures and components (SSCs) will be developed to support this reactor technology. To mitigate technical, schedule, and project risk associated with development of these SSCs, a large-scale test facility is required to support design verification and qualification prior to operational implementation. As a full-scale helium test facility, the Component Test facility (CTF) will provide prototype testing and qualification of heat transfer system components (e.g., Intermediate Heat Exchanger, valves, hot gas ducts), reactor internals, and hydrogen generation processing. It will perform confirmation tests for large-scale effects, validate component performance requirements, perform transient effects tests, and provide production demonstration of hydrogen and other high-temperature applications. Sponsored wholly or in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, the CTF will support NGNP and will also act as a National User Facility to support worldwide development of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technologies.

  16. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  17. UO2 and PuO2 utilization in high temperature engineering test reactor with helium coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Novitrian, Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Su'ud, Zaki

    2016-03-01

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is one of high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) types which has been developed by Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The HTTR is a graphite moderator, helium gas coolant, 30 MW thermal output and 950 °C outlet coolant temperature for high temperature test operation. Original HTTR uses UO2 fuel. In this study, we have evaluated the use of UO2 and PuO2 in form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in HTTR. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. The result shows that HTTR can obtain its criticality condition if the enrichment of 235U in loaded fuel is 18.0% or above.

  18. Proceedings of the international symposium on materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Materials Testing Reactors hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The symposium was held on July 16 to 17, 2008, at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA. This symposium was also held for the 40th anniversary ceremony of Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) from achieving its first criticality. The objective of the symposium is to exchange the information on current status, future plan and so on among each testing reactors for the purpose of mutual understanding. There were 138 participants from Argentina, Belgium, France, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Korea, the Russian Federation, Sweden, the United State, Vietnam and Japan. The symposium was divided into four technical sessions and three topical sessions. Technical sessions addressed the general topics of 'status and future plan of materials testing reactors', 'material development for research and testing reactors', irradiation technology (including PIE technology)' and 'utilization with materials testing reactors', and 21 presentations were made. Also the topical sessions addressed 'establishment of strategic partnership', 'management on re-operation work at reactor trouble' and 'basic technology for neutron irradiation tests in MTRs', and panel discussion was made. The 21 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion of research and test reactor cores from the use of high enrichment uranium to the use of low enrichment uranium depends on the cooperation of many research organizations, reactor operators, and government agencies. At a technical level, it involves almost all aspects of the fuel cycle, including fuel development, testing, shipping and reprocessing; experiment performance; economics; and safety and licensing aspects. The reactors involved and the conversion activities are distributed among approximately 25 countries, making this a subject which is best dealt with on an international basis. To foster direct communication in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the fifth of a series which began in 1978. The previous meetings were held at Argonne (International Meeting of Research Reactor Fuel Designers, Developers, and Fabricators, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 910, 1978), at Saclay (IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Research Reactor Core Conversions from HEU to LEU, Centre d'etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay, France, December 12-14, 1979), at Argonne (International Meeting on Development, Fabrication and Application of Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 12-14, 1980) and at Juelich (Seminar on Research Reactor Operation and Use, Juelich Nuclear Research Center, Juelich, F.R.G., September 48, 1981). Proceedings from the two most recent previous meetings were published as ANL/RERTR/TM-3 (CONF-801144) and IAEA-SR-77. The spirit of this meeting differs slightly from that of the previous meetings. The advances which have been made and the growing maturity of the effort have caused a gradual shift of emphasis away from those topics which dominated the floor during the first meetings, such as fuel and methods development, and towards topics which concern more

  20. Design criteria, production and total integrity assessment of fuels of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the design criteria, production and total integrity of the HTTR fuels for the safety design of the reactor. The fuels were designed so that they should not lose their integrity even though taking account of various kinds of possible deteriorations during reactor service. Sufficiently low values of initial (as-produced) fuel failure fractions have been achieved, and experience of fuel production is enough for full core loading. Results of the present assessment have shown that total integrity of the fuels will be maintained successfully in terms of coating failure of the fuel particles, thermal and mechanical performance of the fuel compacts, graphite sleeves and fuel assemblies. (author)

  1. Annual report of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center. FY 2008. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JMTR, one of the most high flux test reactors in the world, has been used for the irradiation experiments of fuels and materials related to LWRs, fundamental research and radioisotope productions. The JMTR was stopped at the beginning of August 2006 to conduct refurbishment works, and the reoperation will be planned from FY 2011. After reoperation, the JMTR will contribute to many fields, such as the lifetime extension of LWRs, expansion of industrial use, progress of science and technology. This report summarizes the activities on refurbishment works, development of new irradiation techniques, enhancement of reactor availability, etc. in FY 2008. (author)

  2. Dielectric Heaters for Testing Spacecraft Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, William Herbert; Bitteker, Leo; Godfroy, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A document proposes the development of radio-frequency-(RF)-driven dielectric heaters for non-nuclear thermal testing of the cores of nuclear-fission reactors for spacecraft. Like the electrical-resistance heaters used heretofore for such testing, the dielectric heaters would be inserted in the reactors in place of nuclear fuel rods. A typical heater according to the proposal would consist of a rod of lossy dielectric material sized and shaped like a fuel rod and containing an electrically conductive rod along its center line. Exploiting the dielectric loss mechanism that is usually considered a nuisance in other applications, an RF signal, typically at a frequency .50 MHz and an amplitude between 2 and 5 kV, would be applied to the central conductor to heat the dielectric material. The main advantage of the proposal is that the wiring needed for the RF dielectric heating would be simpler and easier to fabricate than is the wiring needed for resistance heating. In some applications, it might be possible to eliminate all heater wiring and, instead, beam the RF heating power into the dielectric rods from external antennas.

  3. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  4. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  5. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petry, S.F.

    1992-03-01

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart.

  6. The HTR-10 test reactor project and potential use of HTGR for non-electric application in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal is the dominant source of energy in China. This use of coal results in two significant problems for China; it is a major burden on the train, road and waterway transportation infrastructures and it is a significant source of environmental pollution. In order to ease the problems caused by the burning of coal and to help reduce the energy supply shortage in China, national policy has directed the development of nuclear power. This includes the erection of nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor types, specifically, the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The HTGR was chosen for its favorable safety features and its ability to provide high reactor outlet coolant temperatures for efficient power generation and high quality process heat for industrial applications. As the initial modular HTGR development activity within the Chinese High Technology Programme, a 10MW helium cooled test reactor is currently under construction on the site of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology northwest of Beijing. This plant features a pebble-bed helium cooled reactor with initial criticality anticipated in 1999. There will be two phases of high temperature heat utilization from the HTR-10. The first phase will utilize a reactor outlet temperature of 700 deg. C with a steam generator providing steam for a steam turbine cycle which works on an electrical/heat co-generation basis. The second phase is planned for a core outlet temperature of 900 deg. C to investigate a steam cycle/gas turbine combined cycle system with the gas turbine and the steam cycle being independently parallel in the secondary side of the plant. This paper provides a review of the technical design, licensing, safety and construction schedule for the HTR-10. It also addresses the potential uses of the HTGR for non-electric applications in China including process steam for the petrochemical industry, heavy oil recovery, coal conversion and

  7. Simulation and testing of a vertical organometallic vapor phase epitaxy reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, R. A.; Barmawi, M.; Mindara, J. Y.

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to design a single wafer vertical organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) reactor which gives a uniform deposition around the symmetry axis. The vertical reactor under the consideration consist of a diffuser and a system of coaxial cylinders to laminarize the flow which may lead to a uniform deposition without rotating the susceptor. The simulation shows that for a susceptor with a radius of 2.5 cm, a uniformity can be achieved in a region of a radius of 2 cm within 1% for certain operating condition. The result is compared with the experimental measurement of TiO2 deposition from TTIP.

  8. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wiffen, F.W. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Fusion Energy

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  9. Tower Shielding Reactor II design and operation report. Vol. 3. Assembling and testing of the control mechanism assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms that are operated to control the reactivity of the Tower Shielding Reactor II(TSR-II) are mounted on a Control Mechanism Housing (CMH) that is centered inside the reactor core. The information required to procure, fabricate, inspect, and assemble a CMH is contained in the ORNL engineering drawings listed in the appropriate sections. The components are fabricated and inspected from these drawings in accordance with a Quality Assurance Plan and a Manufacturing Plan. The material in this report describes the acceptance and performance tests of CMH subassemblies used ty the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) staff but it can also be used by personnel fabricating the components. This information which was developed and used before the advent of the formalized QA Program and Manufacturing Plans evolved during the fabrication and testing of the first five CMHs

  10. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Final conceptual design report. [Overall cost and scheduling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-02-01

    The TFTR is the first U.S. magnetic confinement device planned to demonstrate the fusion of D-T at reactor power levels. This report addresses the physics objectives and the engineering goals of the TFTR project. Technical, cost, and schedule aspects of the project are included. (MOW)

  11. Test and application of thermal neutron radiography facility at Xi'an pulsed reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Jun; Zhao Xiang Feng; Wang Dao Hua

    2002-01-01

    A thermal neutron radiography facility at Xi'an Pulsed Reactor is described as well as its characteristics and application. The experiment results show the inherent unsharpness of BAS ND is 0.15 mm. The efficient thermal neutron n/gamma ratio is lower in not only steady state configuration but also pulsing state configuration and it is improved using Pb filter

  12. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor RDAS and LPCIS Replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Korns

    2012-05-01

    The replacement of the ATR Control Complex's obsolete computer based Reactor Data Acquisition System (RDAS) and its safety-related Lobe Power Calculation and Indication System (LPCIS) software application is vitally important to ensure the ATR remains available to support this national mission. The RDAS supports safe operation of the reactor by providing 'real-time' plant status information (indications and alarms) for use by the reactor operators via the Console Display System (CDS). The RDAS is a computer support system that acquires analog and digital information from various reactor and reactor support systems. The RDAS information is used to display quadrant and lobe powers via a display interface more user friendly than that provided by the recorders and the Control Room upright panels. RDAS provides input to the Nuclear Engineering ATR Surveillance Data System (ASUDAS) for fuel burn-up analysis and the production of cycle data for experiment sponsors and the generation of the Core Safety Assurance Package (CSAP). RDAS also archives and provides for retrieval of historical plant data which may be used for event reconstruction, data analysis, training and safety analysis. The RDAS, LPCIS and ASUDAS need to be replaced with state-of-the-art technology in order to eliminate problems of aged computer systems, and difficulty in obtaining software upgrades, spare parts, and technical support. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project design did not lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification. The negative major modification determination is driven by the fact that the project requires a one-for-one equivalent replacement of existing systems that protects and maintains functional and operational requirements as credited in the safety basis.

  13. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  14. On applicability of plate and shell heat exchangers for steam generation in naval PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Luciano Ondir, E-mail: luciano.ondir@gmail.com; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Given emissions restrictions, nuclear propulsion may be an alternative. • Plate and shell heat exchangers (PSHE) are a mature technology on market. • PSHE are compact and could be used as steam generators. • Preliminary calculations to obtain a PWR for a large container ship are performed. • Results suggest PSHE improve overall compactness and cost. - Abstract: The pressure on reduction of gas emissions is going to raise the price of fossil fuels and an alternative to fossil fuels is nuclear energy. Naval reactors have some differences from stationary PWR because they have limitations on volume and weight, requiring compact solutions. On the other hand, a source of problems in naval reactors across history is the steam generation function. In order to reduce nuclear containment footprint, it is desirable to employ integral designs, which, however, poses complications and design constraints for recirculation type steam generators, being interesting to employ once through steam generators, whose historic at Babcock and Wilcox is better than recirculation steam generators. Plate and shell heat exchangers are a mature technology made available by many suppliers which allows heat exchange at high temperature and pressure. This work investigates the feasibility of the use of an array of welded plate heat exchangers of a material approved by ASME for pressure barrier (Ti-3Al-2.5V) in a hypothetical naval reactor. It was found it is feasible from thermal-hydraulic point of view and presents advantages over other steam generator designs.

  15. On applicability of plate and shell heat exchangers for steam generation in naval PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Given emissions restrictions, nuclear propulsion may be an alternative. • Plate and shell heat exchangers (PSHE) are a mature technology on market. • PSHE are compact and could be used as steam generators. • Preliminary calculations to obtain a PWR for a large container ship are performed. • Results suggest PSHE improve overall compactness and cost. - Abstract: The pressure on reduction of gas emissions is going to raise the price of fossil fuels and an alternative to fossil fuels is nuclear energy. Naval reactors have some differences from stationary PWR because they have limitations on volume and weight, requiring compact solutions. On the other hand, a source of problems in naval reactors across history is the steam generation function. In order to reduce nuclear containment footprint, it is desirable to employ integral designs, which, however, poses complications and design constraints for recirculation type steam generators, being interesting to employ once through steam generators, whose historic at Babcock and Wilcox is better than recirculation steam generators. Plate and shell heat exchangers are a mature technology made available by many suppliers which allows heat exchange at high temperature and pressure. This work investigates the feasibility of the use of an array of welded plate heat exchangers of a material approved by ASME for pressure barrier (Ti-3Al-2.5V) in a hypothetical naval reactor. It was found it is feasible from thermal-hydraulic point of view and presents advantages over other steam generator designs

  16. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented

  17. Proceedings of the 1978 international meeting on reduced enrichment for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    November 9-10, 1978, marked the first of what has become an annual event - the International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). The RERTR Program had been started only three months earlier, and the meeting brought together for the first time many people who became major program participants in later years. This first meeting emphasized fuel development, and while it established the basis for all later meetings, it was unique in several respects. It was a time of feeling each other out, and of sharing new ideas, concerns, and hopes. In the absence of an established precedent, a number of participants came with written papers while others made only verbal presentations. Informality added spice and special importance to the discussions at the end of each presentation and, especially, to the panel discussion at the end of the meeting. An important achievement was a consensus on near-, medium-, and long-term density goals for the various fuels. This consensus resulted in a list written on the blackboard at the end of the panel discussion, and reproduced on page 216, which outlined the goals of each fabricator. Luckily, both presentations and discussions were recorded on audio tape. These recordings were transcribed and used to complete the informal presentations and to append the discussions at the end of each presentation. Considerable effort was expended in clearing the transcribed papers and key discussions with the participants. A few issues could not be resolved quickly, and in the frantic rush of those early years, these proceedings were set aside. Believing that the proceedings of this first meeting are important as a historical record of the beginning of the international RERTR effort, we have recently dusted off the manuscript and finished our editing job

  18. Progress in design, research and development and testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting covered the following topics: Developments in design of safety-related heat removal components and systems for advanced water cooled reactors; status of test programmes on heat removal components and systems of new designs; range of validity and extrapolation of test results for the qualification of design/licensing computer models and codes for advanced water cooled reactors; future needs and trends in testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Tests of heat removal safety systems have been conducted by various groups supporting the design, testing and certification of advanced water cooled reactors. The Technical Committee concluded that the reported test results generally confirm the predicted performance features of the advanced designs. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Welcome address to the 26th international meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the IAEA has been a vigorous supporter of the RERTR programme since its inception. RERTR and the related fresh and spent fuel return efforts have gained new momentum with the launching of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) by U.S. Energy Secretary Abraham here in Vienna on May 25, 2004. All of the activities to be be discussed are included within the framework of the GTRI. The international programmes to qualify high density, LEU, dispersion fuels based on U-Mo alloys have run into unexpected technical difficulties that will delay qualification. A number of the presentations address the problems that have been encountered. At the same time, it is encouraging that the international resolve to reduce and eventually eliminate HEU in international commerce appears to have strengthened. In the past year, fresh HEU at research reactors in different countries have been returned to the country of origin. In all these examples, the return of the fresh fuel was accompanied by plans for conversion of existing reactors or design of new reactors to use LEU, as well as for the repatriation of spent research reactor fuel. The IAEA, particularly the Department of Technical Cooperation and my Department of Nuclear Energy has played an important role in implementing these fresh fuel return activities. In addition, several of the reactor conversion projects will be carried out under the auspices of IAEA technical cooperation projects and with important involvement of the Department of Nuclear Energy. The IAEA has also supported the repatriation of spent fuel to the country of original enrichment. The U.S. spent fuel acceptance programme has been operating for more than eight years, and was originally scheduled to terminate in 2006. Important announcements concerning the extension of the U.S. programme are expected. At the same time, the IAEA has been working hard with the U.S. and Russia to initiate the Russian research reactor spent fuel return programme. We are

  20. Modified ADM1 for modelling an UASB reactor laboratory plant treating starch wastewater and synthetic substrate load tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinken, L; Huber, M; Weichgrebe, D; Rosenwinkel, K-H

    2014-11-01

    A laboratory plant consisting of two UASB reactors was used for the treatment of industrial wastewater from the wheat starch industry. Several load tests were carried out with starch wastewater and the synthetic substrates glucose, acetate, cellulose, butyrate and propionate to observe the impact of changing loads on gas yield and effluent quality. The measurement data sets were used for calibration and validation of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). For a precise simulation of the detected glucose degradation during load tests with starch wastewater and glucose, it was necessary to incorporate the complete lactic acid fermentation into the ADM1, which contains the formation and degradation of lactate and a non-competitive inhibition function. The modelling results of both reactors based on the modified ADM1 confirm an accurate calculation of the produced gas and the effluent concentrations. Especially, the modelled lactate effluent concentrations for the load cases are similar to the measurements and justified by literature. PMID:25043796

  1. Development of the test facilities for the measurement of core flow and pressure distribution of SMART reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A design of SMART reactor has been developed, of which the primary system is composed of four internal circulation pumps, a core of 57 fuel assemblies, eight cassettes of steam generators, flow mixing head assemblies, and other internal structures. Since primary design features are very different from conventional reactors, the characteristics of flow and pressure distribution are expected to be different accordingly. In order to analyze the thermal margin and hydraulic design characteristics of SMART reactor, design quantification tests for flow and pressure distribution with a preservation of flow geometry are necessary. In the present study, the design feature of the test facility in order to investigate flow and pressure distribution, named “SCOP” is described. In order to preserve the flow distribution characteristics, the SCOP is linearly reduced with a scaling ratio of 1/5. The core flow rate of each fuel assembly is measured by a venturi meter attached in the lower part of the core simulator having a similarity of pressure drop for nominally scaled flow conditions. All the 57 core simulators and 8 S/G simulators are precisely calibrated in advance of assembling in test facilities. The major parameters in tests are pressures, differential pressures, and core flow distribution. (author)

  2. Design and evaluation of heat utilization systems for the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary focus of this CRP was to perform detailed investigation of the high temperature industrial processes that are attainable through incorporation of an HTGR, and for their possible demonstration in the HTTR. The HTGR has the capability to achieve a core outlet temperature approaching 1,000 deg. C in a safe and effective manner. These attributes, coupled with the offer by JAERI to utilize the HTTR, resulted in the initiation of this CRP by the IAEA. High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) utilizes a 30 MW(th) HTGR comprised of 30 fuel columns of hexagonal pin-in-pin graphite block type fuel elements. The fuel consists of UO2 TRISO coated particles with an enrichment of ∼ 6% wt. Relative to the demonstration of high temperature heat applications, the HTTR will be capable of producing 10 MW(th) of heat at 950 deg. C. However, the thermal power for these applications has the potential to be increased up to 30 MW(th) in the future, which may be required for demonstration of gas turbine system components. The HTTR reached initial criticality in November 1998. Initial operational plans includes a series of rise to power tests followed by tests to demonstrate the safety and operational characteristics of the HTTR. In addition to completion of the HTTR demonstration tests, it was recommended that the R and D be performed within the HTTR project. JAERI is encouraged to publicize the results of the HTTR tests and 'lessons learned' from their experiences including potential capabilities of the HTGR for heat applications. The next priority application was determined to be the generation of electricity through the use of the gas turbine. Application of the Brayton Cycle utilizing high temperature helium from a modular HTGR was chosen for development because of its projected benefits as an economic and efficient means for the production of electricity. Evaluation of the remaining high temperature heat utilization applications chosen for investigation resulted

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF FAULT-DIAGNOSIS ALGORITHMS FOR REACTOR PLANT SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grelle, Austin L.; Park, Young S.; Vilim, Richard B.

    2016-06-26

    Argonne National Laboratory is further developing fault diagnosis algorithms for use by the operator of a nuclear plant to aid in improved monitoring of overall plant condition and performance. The objective is better management of plant upsets through more timely, informed decisions on control actions with the ultimate goal of improved plant safety, production, and cost management. Integration of these algorithms with visual aids for operators is taking place through a collaboration under the concept of an operator advisory system. This is a software entity whose purpose is to manage and distill the enormous amount of information an operator must process to understand the plant state, particularly in off-normal situations, and how the state trajectory will unfold in time. The fault diagnosis algorithms were exhaustively tested using computer simulations of twenty different faults introduced into the chemical and volume control system (CVCS) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The algorithms are unique in that each new application to a facility requires providing only the piping and instrumentation diagram (PID) and no other plant-specific information; a subject-matter expert is not needed to install and maintain each instance of an application. The testing approach followed accepted procedures for verifying and validating software. It was shown that the code satisfies its functional requirement which is to accept sensor information, identify process variable trends based on this sensor information, and then to return an accurate diagnosis based on chains of rules related to these trends. The validation and verification exercise made use of GPASS, a one-dimensional systems code, for simulating CVCS operation. Plant components were failed and the code generated the resulting plant response. Parametric studies with respect to the severity of the fault, the richness of the plant sensor set, and the accuracy of sensors were performed as part of the validation

  4. Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors. Proceedings of the XVIII international meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost 50 papers presented were showing the status of the national programs related to conversion of research reactor cores from highly enriched (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel elements. Design of new fuel elements (uranium silicides) and safety related calculations were dealt with taking into account fuel cycle issues, meaning spent fuel storage and transportation. A number of presentations were devoted to Mo-99 production using LEU targets

  5. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Kremer, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  6. HFR irradiation testing of light water reactor (LWR) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information with emphasis on LWR fuel rod testing capabilities and hot cell investigation is presented. Additionally a summary of LWR fuel irradiation programmes performed and forthcoming programmes are described. Project management information and a list of publications pertaining to LWR fuel rod test programmes is given

  7. In-Research Reactor Tests for SCWR Fuel Verifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Supercritical water cooled reactors (SCWRs) are essentially light water reactors (LWRs) operating at higher pressure and temperature. The SCWRs achieve high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 35% efficiency for advanced LWRs) and are simpler plants as the need for many of the traditional LWR components is eliminated. The SCWRs build upon two proven technologies, the LWR and the supercritical coal-fired boiler. The main mission of the SCWR is production of low-cost electricity. Thus the SCWR is also suited for hydrogen generation with electrolysis, and can support the development of the hydrogen economy in the near term. In this paper, the SCWR fuel performance verification tests are reviewed. Based on this review results, in-research reactor verification tests to be performed in a fuel test loop through the international joint program are proposed. In addition, capsule tests and fuel test loop tests to be performed in HANARO are also proposed

  8. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors, nuclear heating reactors and critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1998, the NNSA organized to complete the nuclear safety review on the test loop in-reactor operation of the High-flux Engineering Experimental Reactor (HFEER) and the re-operation of the China Pulsed Reactor and the Uranium-water Criticality Facility. The NNSA conducted the nuclear safety review on the CP application of the China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) and the siting of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR), and carried out the construction supervision on HTR-10, and dealt with the event about the technological tube breakage of HWRR and other events

  9. The reactor core analysis code CITATION-1000VP for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor core analysis with full core model has been necessary for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) design. The CITATION-1000VP code has been developed to enable reactor core analysis of HTTR with full core model through extending the number of zones and meshes, and enhancing the calculation speed of CITATION code. This report describes the program changes for extending the number of zones and meshes, and for vectorization. The maximum number of zones and meshes becomes 999 and 500, respectively. The calculation speed is enhanced up to 21 times. (author)

  10. Radiation exposure: Cytogenetic tests. Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty test subjects who, either during or after the reactor accident of Chernobyl (26th April 1986), stayed at a building site at Shlobin 150 km away, were examined for spontaneously occurring as well as mitomycin C-induced Sister Chromatid Exchanges (SCE). The building site staff, who underwent a whole-body radionuclide count upon their return to Austria (June through September 1986), were used for the cytogenetic tests. The demonstration of the SCE was made from whole-blood cultures by the fluorescence/Giemse technique. At last 20 Metaphases of the 2nd mitotic cycle were evaluated per person. The radiation doses of the test subjects were calculated by adding the external exposure determined on the building site, the estimated thyroid dose through I-131, and the measured incorporation of Cs-134 and Cs-137. The subjects were divided into two groups for statistical analysis: One was a more exposed group (proven stay at Shlobin between 26th April and 31st May 1986, mostly working in the open air) and the other a less exposed group for comparison (staying at Shlobin from 1st Juni 1986 and working mainly indoors). (orig.)

  11. Startup of the FFTF sodium cooled reactor. [Acceptance Test Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redekopp, R.D.; Umek, A.M.

    1981-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, is a 3 Loop 400 MW(t) sodium cooled fast reactor with a primary mission to test fuels and materials for development of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). Bringing FFTF to a condition to accomplish this mission is the goal of the Acceptance Test Program (ATP). This program was the mechanism for achieving startup of the FFTF. Highlights of the ATP involving the system inerting, liquid metal and inerted cell testing and initial ascent to full power are discussed.

  12. Nondestructive testing of materials and components by computerized tomography with fast and thermal reactor neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of neutrons over a wide energy range with matter can be applied in computerized tomography (CT) to obtain nondestructive insight into objects, which is highly complementary to the information obtained by the classical method of X-ray tomography. Systematic tomography studies with thermal neutrons, fast neutrons of different spectral composition, and mixed neutron and gamma fields have been done in recent years. The experiments were performed at the Munich research reactor (Forschungsreaktor Munchen (FRM)) of the Technical University of Munich. Examples of CT measurements demonstrate the manifold possibilities of the interdisciplinary cooperation of neutron physics and materials research. IN this paper the necessary equipment and some specific problems in the processing of measured transmission rates for image reconstruction are described

  13. U-Si and U-Si-Al dispersion fuel alloy development for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the National Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is engaged in a fuel alloy development project. Fuel alloy powder prepared with low-enrichment uranium (235U) is dispersed in an aluminum matrix, and metallurgically roll-bonded within a clad of 6061 Al alloy. Miniplates with up to 55 vol.% fuel alloy (up to 7.0 grams total U per cm3) have been successfully fabricated. Fifty-five of these plates have been or are being irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Three fuel alloys have been used in the ANL miniplates: U3Si (U + 4 wt.% Si), U3Si2 (U + 7.5 wt.% Si), and 'U3SiAl' (U + 3.5 wt.% Si + 1.5 wt.% Al). All are candidates for permitting higher fuel loadings and thus lower enrichments of 235U than would be possible with either UAlx or U3O8, the current fuels for plate-type elements. As an adjunct to the development effort, ANL is engaged in the early stages of technology transfer with commercial fabricators of fuel elements for research reactors. Continuing effort also involves the development of a technology for full-size plate fabrication, and the irradiation of miniplates to a burnup of ∼90% 235U depletion. (author)

  14. Potential role of the Fast Flux Test Facility and the advanced test reactor in the U.S. tritium production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy is currently engaged in a dual-track strategy to develop an accelerator and a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as potential sources of tritium supply. New analysis of the production capabilities of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site argues for considering its inclusion in the tritium supply,system. The use of the FFTF (alone or together with the Advanced Test Reactor [ATR] at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) as an integral part of,a tritium production system would help (1) ensure supply by 2005, (2) provide additional time to resolve institutional and technical issues associated with the- dual-track strategy, and (3) reduce discounted total life-cycle'costs and near-tenn annual expenditures for accelerator-based systems. The FFRF would also provide a way to get an early start.on dispositioning surplus weapons-usable plutonium as well as provide a source of medical isotopes. Challenges Associated With the Dual-Track Strategy The Department's purchase of either a commercial reactor or reactor irradiation services faces challenging institutional issues associated with converting civilian reactors to defense uses. In addition, while the technical capabilities of the individual components of the accelerator have been proven, the entire system needs to be demonstrated and scaled upward to ensure that the components work together 1548 as a complete production system. These challenges create uncertainty over the ability of the du2a-track strategy to provide an assured tritium supply source by 2005. Because the earliest the accelerator could come on line is 2007, it would have to operate at maximum capacity for the first few years to regenerate the reserves lost through radioactive decay after 2005

  15. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  16. LARGE-SCALE MECURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY TESTING FOR LIGNITE-FIRED UTILITIES-OXIDATION SYSTEMS FOR WET FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Jeffrey S. Thompson

    2004-03-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a consortium-based effort directed toward resolving the mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. Specifically, the EERC team--the EERC, EPRI, URS, ADA-ES, Babcock & Wilcox, the North Dakota Industrial Commission, SaskPower, and the Mercury Task Force, which includes Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Otter Tail Power Company, Great River Energy, Texas Utilities (TXU), Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Minnkota Power Cooperative, BNI Coal Ltd., Dakota Westmoreland Corporation, and the North American Coal Company--has undertaken a project to significantly and cost-effectively oxidize elemental mercury in lignite combustion gases, followed by capture in a wet scrubber. This approach will be applicable to virtually every lignite utility in the United States and Canada and potentially impact subbituminous utilities. The oxidation process is proven at the pilot-scale and in short-term full-scale tests. Additional optimization is continuing on oxidation technologies, and this project focuses on longer-term full-scale testing. The lignite industry has been proactive in advancing the understanding of and identifying control options for Hg in lignite combustion flue gases. Approximately 1 year ago, the EERC and EPRI began a series of Hg-related discussions with the Mercury Task Force as well as utilities firing Texas and Saskatchewan lignites. This project is one of three being undertaken by the consortium to perform large-scale Hg control technology testing to address the specific needs and challenges to be met in controlling Hg from lignite-fired power plants. This project involves Hg oxidation upstream of a system equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The team involved in conducting the technical aspects of the project includes the EERC, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and ADA-ES. The host sites include Minnkota Power Cooperative Milton R. Young

  17. Fate of injected CO2 in the Wilcox Group, Louisiana, Gulf Coast Basin: Chemical and isotopic tracers of microbial-brine-rock-CO2 interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Warwick, Peter D.; Lee Zhi Yi, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    The “2800’ sandstone” of the Olla oil field is an oil and gas-producing reservoir in a coal-bearing interval of the Paleocene–Eocene Wilcox Group in north-central Louisiana, USA. In the 1980s, this producing unit was flooded with CO2 in an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project, leaving ∼30% of the injected CO2 in the 2800’ sandstone post-injection. This study utilizes isotopic and geochemical tracers from co-produced natural gas, oil and brine to determine the fate of the injected CO2, including the possibility of enhanced microbial conversion of CO2 to CH4 via methanogenesis. Stable carbon isotopes of CO2, CH4 and DIC, together with mol% CO2 show that 4 out of 17 wells sampled in the 2800’ sandstone are still producing injected CO2. The dominant fate of the injected CO2appears to be dissolution in formation fluids and gas-phase trapping. There is some isotopic and geochemical evidence for enhanced microbial methanogenesis in 2 samples; however, the CO2 spread unevenly throughout the reservoir, and thus cannot explain the elevated indicators for methanogenesis observed across the entire field. Vertical migration out of the target 2800’ sandstone reservoir is also apparent in 3 samples located stratigraphically above the target sand. Reservoirs comparable to the 2800’ sandstone, located along a 90-km transect, were also sampled to investigate regional trends in gas composition, brine chemistry and microbial activity. Microbial methane, likely sourced from biodegradation of organic substrates within the formation, was found in all oil fields sampled, while indicators of methanogenesis (e.g. high alkalinity, δ13C-CO2 and δ13C-DIC values) and oxidation of propane were greatest in the Olla Field, likely due to its more ideal environmental conditions (i.e. suitable range of pH, temperature, salinity, sulfate and iron concentrations).

  18. The ''CAMERA'' test facility in the OSIRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAMERA is an irradiation installation conceived to measure under neutronic flux and continuously the dimension variations of a fuel pencil of PWR reactors. The device, set in the periphery of the OSIRIS reactor, can receive new, preirradiated or reconstituted pencils. The principles of measurements is explained. Then, a brief description of the installation is given: in-pile part; out-of-pile part; connections. The technical characteristics of the installation are presented. A first qualification test of the installation under flux has been carried out at the end of the first semester 1984 in the OSIRIS reactor

  19. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.

    1983-07-01

    Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

  20. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies

  1. Reactor fault simulation at the closure of the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor: analysis of reactor transient tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The testing of fault transient analysis methods by direct simulation of fault sequences on a commercial reactor is clearly excluded on safety and economic grounds. The closure of the Windscale prototype advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) therefore offered a unique opportunity to test fault study methods under extreme conditions relatively unfettered by economic constraints, although subject to appropriate safety regulations. One aspect of these important experiments was a series of reactor transient tests. The objective of these reactor transients was to increase confidence in the fault study computer models used for commercial AGR safety assessment by extending their range of validation to cover large amplitude and fast transients in temperature, power and flow, relevant to CAGR faults, and well beyond the conditions achievable experimentally on commercial reactors. A large number of tests have now been simulated with the fault study code KINAGRAX. Agreement with measurement is very good and sensitivity studies show that such discrepancies as exist may be due largely to input data errors. It is concluded that KINAGRAX is able to predict steady state conditions and transient amplitudes in both power and temperature to within a few percent. (author)

  2. Entrained Flow Reactor Test of Potassium Capture by Kaolin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Guoliang; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao;

    2015-01-01

    In the present study a method to simulate the reaction between gaseous KCl and kaolin at suspension fired condition was developed using a pilot-scale entrained flow reactor (EFR). Kaolin was injected into the EFR for primary test of this method. By adding kaolin, KCl can effectively be captured......-bed reactor. The method using the EFR developed in this study will be applied for further systematic investigation of different additives....

  3. KTM Tokamak is prototype of X XI century reactor. Future International laboratory of thermonuclear materials testing and power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 29-31 May of 2000 the presentation of the joint Kazakhstan-Russian draft of Kazakhstan material-testing tokamak (KTM) was carried out. KTM tokamak is implementing by decision of the President and Government of Republic of Kazakhstan for supporting of the Kazakhstan participation in development of draft within framework of ITER fusion reactor construction. Scientific head of the project is Russian academician - Velikhov V. and Russian Research Center 'Kurchatovskij Institute' , General designers - Scientific Research Institute for Electrophysical Equipment after D. V. Efremov (Russian Federation) and Kazakh Research Inst. for Energy Industry (KazNIIEhnergoprom). Scientific part of the project is working out in National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan and Scientific Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics. KTM tokamak is experimental fusion device for materials testing study, as well as for designing of methods for protection of the reactor first wall, in-chamber elements and divertor planes, high frequency heat of antennas in energetic load regimes close to both the ITER and the future fusion energy reactors. KTM by it design presents spheric tokamak, which successfully combining advantages of the spheromaks (compactness) and the tokamaks (high plasma density). Now in the world there are similar operating spheric tokamaks: NSTX (USA), MAST (Great Britain), GLOBUS-M (Russian Federation). Principal peculiarity of KTM tokamak is existence of moving divertor device, which with help of manipulator allows to changing of examining samples without high vacuum disruption. Values of the thermal loads and fluences in the KTM are equal or higher than loads in operating tokamaks and correspond with ITER reactor loads. KTM tokamak will be the only mega-ampere device in the world with the aspect ratio A=2

  4. Hanford low-level waste process chemistry testing data package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) among the State of Washington Department of Ecology, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the cleanup of the Hanford Site was renegotiated. The revised agreement specifies vitrification as the encapsulation technology for low level waste (LLW). A demonstration, testing, and evaluation program underway at Westinghouse Hanford Company to identify the best overall melter-system technology available for vitrification of Hanford Site LLW to meet the TPA milestones. Phase I is a open-quotes proof of principleclose quotes test to demonstrate that a melter system can process a simulated highly alkaline, high nitrate/nitrite content aqueous LLW feed into a glass product of consistent quality. Seven melter vendors were selected for the Phase I evaluation: joule-heated melters from GTS Duratek, Incorporated (GDI); Envitco, Incorporated (EVI); Penberthy Electomelt, Incorporated (PEI); and Vectra Technologies, Incorporated (VTI); a gas-fired cyclone burner from Babcock ampersand Wilcox (BCW); a plasma torch-fired, cupola furnace from Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (WSTC); and an electric arc furnace with top-entering vertical carbon electrodes from the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM)

  5. Comparative Investigation of River Water Quality by OWQI, NSFWQI and Wilcox Indexes (Case study: the Talar River – IRAN)

    OpenAIRE

    Darvishi Gholamreza; Kootenaei Farshad Golbabaei; Ramezani Maedeh; Lotfi Eissa; Asgharnia Hosseinali

    2016-01-01

    Rivers are considered as one of the main resources of water supply for various applications such as agricultural, drinking and industrial purposes. Also, these resources are used as a place for discharge of sewages, industrial wastewater and agricultural drainage. Regarding the fact that each river has a certain capacity for acceptance of pollutants, nowadays qualitative and environmental investigations of these resources are proposed. In this study, qualitative investigation of the Talar riv...

  6. High intensity acoustic testing to determine structural fatigue life and to improve reliability in nuclear reactor and aerospace structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reviews some of the techniques in which high intensity acoustic testing is used in engineering practice. (a) In the nuclear engineering field the simulation of reactor noise due to the CO2 circulator and the use of strain gauges to obtain a response spectrum in order to predict the fatigue life of gas-cooled nuclear reactor structures where a 30 year lifespan is of paramount importance is described. (b) In the satellite field the simulation of the high intensity noise due to the launching rocket motors and the testing of the integrity of the satellite structure and the behaviour of the electronic control system when affected by high intensity acoustic excitation is discussed. The use of acoustic testing to improve the reliability before the launching of the satellite is also considered. (c) In the aircraft and rocket field the generation of high intensity noise to simulate boundary layer pressure fluctuation or turbulence of a flying object or aircraft at various speeds is considered. (Auth.)

  7. Standard Test Method for Application and Analysis of Solid State Track Recorder (SSTR) Monitors for Reactor Surveillance, E706(IIIB)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the use of solid-state track recorders (SSTRs) for neutron dosimetry in light-water reactor (LWR) applications. These applications extend from low neutron fluence to high neutron fluence, including high power pressure vessel surveillance and test reactor irradiations as well as low power benchmark field measurement. (1) This test method replaces Method E 418. This test method is more detailed and special attention is given to the use of state-of-the-art manual and automated track counting methods to attain high absolute accuracies. In-situ dosimetry in actual high fluence-high temperature LWR applications is emphasized. 1.2 This test method includes SSTR analysis by both manual and automated methods. To attain a desired accuracy, the track scanning method selected places limits on the allowable track density. Typically good results are obtained in the range of 5 to 800 000 tracks/cm2 and accurate results at higher track densities have been demonstrated for some cases. (2) Trac...

  8. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  9. Advanced Test Reactor Safety Basis Upgrade Lessons Learned Relative to Design Basis Verification and Safety Basis Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The reactor also provides other irradiation services such as radioisotope production. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). An audit conducted by the Department of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (DOE OA) raised concerns that design conditions at the ATR were not adequately analyzed in the safety analysis and that legacy design basis management practices had the potential to further impact safe operation of the facility.1 The concerns identified by the audit team, and issues raised during additional reviews performed by ATR safety analysts, were evaluated through the unreviewed safety question process resulting in shutdown of the ATR for more than three months while these concerns were resolved. Past management of the ATR safety basis, relative to facility design basis management and change control, led to concerns that discrepancies in the safety basis may have developed. Although not required by DOE orders or regulations, not performing design basis verification in conjunction with development of the 10 CFR 830 Subpart B upgraded safety basis allowed these potential weaknesses to be carried forward. Configuration management and a clear definition of the existing facility design basis have a direct relation to developing and maintaining a high quality safety basis which properly identifies and mitigates all hazards and postulated accident conditions. These relations and the impact of past safety basis management practices have been reviewed in order to identify lessons learned from the safety basis upgrade process and appropriate actions to resolve possible concerns with respect to the current ATR safety

  10. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace

  11. Visible-Light-Responsive Photocatalysis: Ag-Doped TiO2 Catalyst Development and Reactor Design Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Hintze, Paul E.; Meier, Anne; Shah, Malay G.; Devor, Robert W.; Surma, Jan M.; Maloney, Phillip R.; Bauer, Brint M.; Mazyck, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the alteration of titanium dioxide to become visible-light-responsive (VLR) has been a major focus in the field of photocatalysis. Currently, bare titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) reactors to provide adequate levels of ultraviolet light for catalyst activation; these mercury-containing lamps, however, hinder the use of this PCO technology in a spaceflight environment due to concerns over crew Hg exposure. VLR-TiO2 would allow for use of ambient visible solar radiation or highly efficient visible wavelength LEDs, both of which would make PCO approaches more efficient, flexible, economical, and safe. Over the past three years, Kennedy Space Center has developed a VLR Ag-doped TiO2 catalyst with a band gap of 2.72 eV and promising photocatalytic activity. Catalyst immobilization techniques, including incorporation of the catalyst into a sorbent material, were examined. Extensive modeling of a reactor test bed mimicking air duct work with throughput similar to that seen on the International Space Station was completed to determine optimal reactor design. A bench-scale reactor with the novel catalyst and high-efficiency blue LEDs was challenged with several common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in ISS cabin air to evaluate the system's ability to perform high-throughput trace contaminant removal. The ultimate goal for this testing was to determine if the unit would be useful in pre-heat exchanger operations to lessen condensed VOCs in recovered water thus lowering the burden of VOC removal for water purification systems.

  12. Development and testing of a recorder and controller for a microalgae culture reactor; Desarrollo y prueba de un registrador y controlador para un reactor de cultivo de microalgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, Wilson; Reyes, Jose Fernando; Bruijn, Johannes; Hernandez, Alejandro [Universidad de Concepcion, Chilan (Chile). Facultad de Ingenieria Agricola. Dept. de Mecanizacion y Energia], Emails: wesquive@udec.cl., jreyes@udec.cl., jdebruij@udec.cl., alehernandez@udec.cl

    2010-07-01

    An electronic system to monitor and control operational variables in a Raceway type of reactor for the culture of the Scenedesmus spinosus microalgae and later production for biodiesel and mitigating CO{sub 2} was developed and tested. The electronic system is constituted by a micro controller, a card reader SD, a card SD, a real-time clock, a power supply, a screen GLCD, a keyboard and a card for data acquisition, all implemented for 4-20 mA and 0-5 V output sensors. Temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and solar radiation were measured digitalized and saved every 10 minutes. These variables were digitalized and kept in the SD memory every 10 minutes. It was determined that the most favorable conditions for the proliferation of the culture are near pH neutral and a temperature of 30 deg C, existing a strong correlation between pH and the dissolved CO{sub 2} level. Using the digital outputs of temperature and pH of the microcontroller, the CO{sub 2} injection and the elimination of O{sub 2} were controlled to maintain an adequate environment for the development of the culture. (author)

  13. SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Volume 1. Integrated report. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    This burn test program was conducted during the period of August 1982 to February 1983 to demonstrate that Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) products can displace petroleum as a boiler fuel in oil- and gas-designed boilers. The test program was performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Three forms of SRC (pulverized SRC, a solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates, and a slurry of SRC and water) and No. 6 Fuel Oil were evaluated in the 700-hp (30 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hour) watertube, oil-designed boiler facility at PETC. The test program was managed by the International Coal Refining Company (ICRC) and sponsored by the Department of Energy. Other organizations were involved as necessary to provide the expertise required to execute the test program. This final report represents an integrated overview of the test program conducted at PETC. More detailed information with preliminary data can be obtained from separate reports prepared by PETC, Southern Research Institute, Wheelabrator-Frye, Babcock and Wilcox, and Combustion Engineering. These are presented as Annex Volumes A-F. 25 references, 41 figures, 15 tables.

  14. Spontaneous stabilization of HTGRs without reactor scram and core cooling—Safety demonstration tests using the HTTR: Loss of reactivity control and core cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi, E-mail: takamatsu.kuniyoshi@jaea.go.jp; Yan, Xing L.; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Sakaba, Nariaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) has superior safety characteristics; for example, an HTGR has a self-control system that uses only physical phenomena against various accidents. Moreover, the large heat capacity and low power density of the core result in very slow temperature transients. Therefore, an HTGR serves inherently safety features against loss of core cooling accidents such as the Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (TEPCO)’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) disaster. Herein we would like to demonstrate the inherent safety features using the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is the first HTGR in Japan with a thermal power of 30 MW and a maximum reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 °C; it was built at the Oarai Research and Development Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). In this study, an all-gas-circulator trip test was analyzed as a loss of forced cooling (LOFC) test with an initial reactor power of 9 MW to demonstrate LOFC accidents. The analytical results indicate that reactor power decreases from 9 MW to 0 MW owing to the negative reactivity feedback effect of the core, even if the reactor shutdown system is not activated. The total reactivity decreases for 2–3 h and then gradually increases in proportion to xenon reactivity; therefore, the HTTR achieves recritical after an elapsed time of 6–7 h, which is different from the elapsed time at reactor power peak occurrence. After the reactor power peak occurs, the total reactivity oscillates several times because of the negative reactivity feedback effect and gradually decreases to zero. Moreover, the new conclusions are as follows: the greater the amount of residual heat removed from the reactor core, the larger the stable reactor power after recriticality owing to the heat balance of the reactor system. The minimum reactor power and the reactor power peak occurrence are affected by the neutron source. The greater the

  15. Replacement steam generators for Calvert Cliffs, Oconee and future replacement design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the completion of steam generators presently being fabricated, a total of forty replacement steam generators will have been built for fourteen reactor units located at ten reactor sites. This represents approximately $1 billion of manufacture excluding installation costs. Replacement steam generator work began with the initiation of the Millstone 2 steam generator replacement program for Northeast Utilities in 1989. Manufacture is presently underway on replacement recirculating steam generators for Calvert Cliffs Units 1 and 2 plants of Constellation Nuclear (OEM Combustion Engineering) and the once-through steam generators for the Oconee 1, 2 and 3 plants of Duke Power (OEM Babcock and Wilcox). These two sites are the first and second respectively to have applied for and received approval for a life extension of 20 years beyond their original operating license. The application and granting of these license extensions reflects a major change in the nuclear industry over the recent past. The attitude to nuclear power has changed from a relatively defensive strategy to a much more optimistic agenda of utility reorganization, purchase of well performing older plants, replacement of aging components, plant refurbishment, and upgrades and applications for license extension. Possible new plants are also being considered. The paper discusses specific features, attributes, performance and operating experience with replacement steam generators (RSGs) both in service and under construction. Industry issues and design features applicable to future replacement steam generators are also reviewed. (author)

  16. Ultrasonic and eddy current testing of austenitic platings of reactor pressure vessels - qualification according the ENIQ method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the research project SR2318, which received funds from the Federal Radiation Protection Office (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz) and the BMU, the accuracy of eddy current and ultrasonic tests of austenitic platings on reactor pressure vessels was investigated. The results were evaluated with a view to qualification of combined ultrasonic and eddy current tests of platings and base materials on the one hand; on the other hand, a standard test procedure according to the ENIQ method (European Network of Inspection Qualification) is proposed which can serve as a basis for qualification of test procedures. Summarizing suggestions are made for updating the KTA 3201.4 regulation for recurrent inspections of platings. The results of research project SR 2351 are considered. (orig.)

  17. The decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of loss-of-fluid test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 2006, CH2M-WG Idaho completed the decontamination, decommissioning and demolition of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The 30-year-old research reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory site, posed significant challenges involving regulations governing the demolition of a historical facility, as well as worker safety issues associated with the removal of the reactor's domed structure. The LOFT facility was located at the west end of Test Area North (TAN), built in the 1950's to support the government's aircraft nuclear propulsion program. When President Kennedy cancelled the nuclear propulsion program in 1961, TAN began to host various other activities. The LOFT reactor became part of the new mission. The LOFT facility, constructed between 1965 and 1975, was a scaled-down version of a commercial pressurized water reactor. Its design allowed engineers, scientists, and operators to create or re-create loss-of-fluid accidents (reactor fuel meltdowns) under controlled conditions. The LOFT dome provided containment for a relatively small, mobile test reactor that was moved into and out of the facility on a railroad car. The dome was roughly 21 meters (70 feet) in diameter and 30 meters (98 feet) in height. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission received the results from the accident tests and incorporated the data into commercial reactor operating codes. The facility conducted 38 experiments, including several small loss-of-coolant experiments designed to simulate events such as the accident that occurred at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, before the LOFT facility was closed. Through formal survey and research, the LOFT facility was determined to be a DOE Signature Property, as defined by the 'INEEL Cultural Resource Management Plan', and thus eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the facility constituted an adverse effect on the historic property that required

  18. Equipment and piping for nuclear power plants, test and research reactors, and nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard provides rules for testing the following welding operations: welding of ferritic pearlitic steels, welding of corrosion resistant austenitic steels, welding of components made of corrosion resistant austenitic steels and ferritic pearlitic steels, build-up welding of groove faces, and build-up welding of corrosion protecting layers

  19. Contact method or automated immersion technique: possible application and limitations of ultrasonic testing in the fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium breeding blanket is the most important component of a thermonuclear reactor combining the protective function against plasma impact and heat exchange. The breeding blanket concept is based on the use of helium as coolant and beryllium pebbles as neutron multiplier. As structural material the low-activation ferritic-martensitic steel EUROFER (9Cr-W-V-T) is used. For quality assurance the components of the breeding blankets are tested using different non-destructive testing methods. The contact methodology applies the testing equipment VEO in combination of the 10 MHz array-wheel sensor of the ultrasonic phased array series. Immersion testing is performed using the automated facility KC 200 from GE Inspection technologies.

  20. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  1. Desludging of N Reactor fuel canisters: Analysis, Test, and data requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The N Reactor fuel is currently stored in canisters in the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins. In KE, the canisters have open tops; in KW, the cans have sealed lids, but are vented to release gases. Corrosion products have formed on exposed uranium metal fuel, on carbon steel basin component surfaces, and on aluminum alloy canister surfaces. Much of the corrosion product is retained on the corroding surfaces; however, large inventories of particulates have been released. Some of the corrosion product particulates form sludge on the basin floors; some particulates are retained within the canisters. The floor sludge inventories are much greater in the KE Basin than in the KW Basin because KE Basin operated longer and its water chemistry was less controlled. Another important factor is the absence of lids on the KE canisters, allowing uranium corrosion products to escape and water-borne species, principally iron oxides, to settle in the canisters. The inventories of corrosion products, including those released as particulates inside the canisters, are only beginning to be characterized for the closed canisters in KW Basin. The dominant species in the KE floor sludge are oxides of aluminum, iron, and uranium. A large fraction of the aluminum and uranium floor sludge particulates may have been released during a major fuel segregation campaign in the 1980s, when fuel was emptied from 4990 canisters. Handling and jarring of the fuel and aluminum canisters seems likely to have released particulates from the heavily corroded surfaces. Four candidate methods are discussed for dealing with canister sludge emerged in the N Reactor fuel path forward: place fuel in multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) without desludging; drill holes in canisters and drain; drill holes in canisters and flush with water; and remove sludge and repackage the fuel.

  2. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S.E. [Babcock & Wilcox, Alliance, OH (United States); Christy, C.E. [Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States); Heath, R.E. [FERMCO, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. The system designed in Phase I of this development program monitors gamma radiation using a subsurface cesium iodide scintillator coupled to above-ground detection electronics using optical waveguide. The radiation probe can be installed to depths up to 50 meters using cone penetrometer techniques, and requires no downhole electrical power. Multiplexing, data logging and analysis are performed at a central location. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics.

  3. Rolling Process Modeling Report. Finite-Element Model Validation and Parametric Study on various Rolling Process parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulami, Ayoub [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Paxton, Dean M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been investigating manufacturing processes for the uranium-10% molybdenum alloy plate-type fuel for high-performance research reactors in the United States. This work supports the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program. This report documents modeling results of PNNL’s efforts to perform finite-element simulations to predict roll-separating forces for various rolling mill geometries for PNNL, Babcock & Wilcox Co., Y-12 National Security Complex, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Idaho National Laboratory. The model developed and presented in a previous report has been subjected to further validation study using new sets of experimental data generated from a rolling mill at PNNL. Simulation results of both hot rolling and cold rolling of uranium-10% molybdenum coupons have been compared with experimental results. The model was used to predict roll-separating forces at different temperatures and reductions for five rolling mills within the National Nuclear Security Administration Fuel Fabrication Capability project. This report also presents initial results of a finite-element model microstructure-based approach to study the surface roughness at the interface between zirconium and uranium-10% molybdenum.

  4. Fabrication and integrity test preparation of HIP-joined W and ferritic-martensitic steel mockups for fusion reactor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Won; Shin, Kyu In; Kim, Suk Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Choi, Bo Guen; Moon, Se Youn; Hong, Bong Guen

    2014-10-01

    Tungsten (W) and ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) as armor and structural materials, respectively, are the major candidates for plasma-facing components (PFCs) such as the blanket first wall (BFW) and the divertor, in a fusion reactor. In the present study, three W/FMS mockups were successfully fabricated using a hot isostatic pressing (HIP, 900 °C, 100 MPa, 1.5 hrs) with a following post-HIP heat treatment (PHHT, tempering, 750 °C, 70 MPa, 2 hrs), and the W/FMS joining method was developed based on the ITER BFW and the test blanket module (TBM) development project from 2004 to the present. Using a 10-MHz-frequency flat-type probe to ultrasonically test of the joint, we found no defects in the fabricated mockups. For confirmation of the joint integrity, a high heat flux test will be performed up to the thermal lifetime of the mockup under the proper test conditions. These conditions were determined through a preliminary analysis with conventional codes such as ANSYS-CFX for thermal-hydraulic conditions considering the test facility, the Korea heat load test facility with an electron beam (KoHLT-EB), and its water coolant system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI).

  5. Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight particle fuel tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the next generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The final design phase has just been completed on the first experiment (AGR-1) in this series and the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation. This paper discusses the development of the experimental hardware and support system designs and the status of the experiment.

  6. Vibration tests on some models of PEC reactor core elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the aims of the experimental tests carried out at ISMES, within an agreement with the Department of Fast Reactors of ENEA, on some models of the elements of PEC Fast Nuclear Reactor Core in the frame of the activities for the seismic verification of the PEC core. The seismic verification is briefly described with particular attention to the problems arising from the shocks among the various elements during an earthquake, as well as the computer code used, the purpose and the techniques used to perform tests, some results and the first comparison between the theory and the experimental data

  7. Small Punch Test on Before and Post Irradiated Domestic Reactor Pressure Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Problems may be caused when applying the standard specimen to study the properties of irradiated reactor materials, because of its big dimension, e.g.: The inner temperature gradient of the specimen is high when irradiated, the radiation

  8. Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John B. Walter; Mark W. Drigert

    2007-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software.

  9. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E., E-mail: evsin@plasma.mephi.ru; Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  10. Test on the reactor with the intelligent extrapolation criticality device for physical startup experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Intelligent Extrapolation Criticality Device is used for automatic counting and automatic extrapolation during the criticality experiment on the reactor. Test must be performed on the zero-power reactor or other reactor before the Device is used. The paper describes the test situation and test results of the Device on the zero-power reactor. The test results show that the Device has the function of automatic counting and automatic extrapolation, the deviation of the extrapolation data is small, and it can satisfy the requirements of physical startup on the reactor. (author)

  11. Action Memorandum for Decommissioning the Engineering Test Reactor Complex under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared and released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessel. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface

  12. Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. B. Culp

    2007-01-26

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

  13. Evaluation of the performance of ultrasonic and eddy current testing of austenitic claddings of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the scope of this project, non-destructive testing methods were carried out on specimens with defects intentionally manufactured in the region of the cladding. The aim of these trials is an evaluation of the performance of ultrasonic and eddy current examinations of austenitic claddings of reactor pressure vessels. A review of the non-destructive testing of claddings showed that the majority of the investigations have been carried out on specimens with artificial defects (notches, holes). Therefore, for the realisation of this project MPA Stuttgart produced specimens with natural defects in the cladding. In detail these are specimens with intergranular stress-corrosion cracking, hot cracks and welding defects in the cladding as well as specimens with underclad cracks. The thickness of the specimens is about 150 mm (BWR-RPV), so that in addition to the testing from the ID (PWR, ultrasonic, eddy current) also the testing from the OD (BWR, ultrasonic) could be examined. The measurements show that most of the cladding defects can be detected with the standard ultrasonic test methods, however, in some cases generate only low echo amplitudes. Favourable results were obtained from the ID testing by means of a phased array probe, in particular in connection with the eddy current technique. Investigations on specimens containing defects not known to the inspection teams (blind tests), which will allow a further evaluation of the performance of non-destructive testing methods under realistic conditions, will be carried out in Phase II of the project. (orig.)

  14. Research reactors: design, safety requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two types of reactors: research reactors or power reactors. The difference between the research reactor and energy reactor is that the research reactor has working temperature and fuel less than the power reactor. The research reactors cooling uses light or heavy water and also research reactors need reflector of graphite or beryllium to reduce the loss of neutrons from the reactor core. Research reactors are used for research training as well as testing of materials and the production of radioisotopes for medical uses and for industrial application. The difference is also that the research reactor smaller in terms of capacity than that of power plant. Research reactors produce radioactive isotopes are not used for energy production, the power plant generates electrical energy. In the world there are more than 284 reactor research in 56 countries, operates as source of neutron for scientific research. Among the incidents related to nuclear reactors leak radiation partial reactor which took place in three mile island nuclear near pennsylvania in 1979, due to result of the loss of control of the fission reaction, which led to the explosion emitting hug amounts of radiation. However, there was control of radiation inside the building, and so no occurred then, another accident that lead to radiation leakage similar in nuclear power plant Chernobyl in Russia in 1986, has led to deaths of 4000 people and exposing hundreds of thousands to radiation, and can continue to be effect of harmful radiation to affect future generations. (author)

  15. [Radiation ecological environment in the Republic of Kazakhstan in the vicinity of the reactors and on the territory of the Semipalatinsk Test Site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D S

    2012-01-01

    The results of research into the environmental conditions in the regions of location of the pressurized water reactor WWR-K, fast neutron breeder BN-350 and on the territory of the Semipalatinsk Test Site are represented. The effects of the exposure to aerosol emissions from WWR-K and BN-350 reactors on the environment are summarized. We present some arguments in favor of the safe operation of fission reactors in compliance with the rules and norms of nuclear and radiation protection and the efficient disposal of radioactive waste on the territory of the Republic.

  16. The technology development for surveillance test of reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Sun Phil; Park, Day Young; Choi, Kwen Jai

    1997-12-01

    Benchmark test was performed in accordance with the requirement of US NRC Reg. Guide DG-1053 for Kori unit-1 in order to determine best-estimated fast neutron fluence irradiated into reactor vessel. Since the uncertainty of radiation analysis comes from the calculation error due to neutron cross-section data, reactor core geometrical dimension, core source, mesh density, angular expansion and convergence criteria, evaluation of calculational uncertainty due to analytical method was performed in accordance with the regulatory guide and the proof was performed for entire analysis by comparing the measurement value obtained by neutron dosimetry located in surveillance capsule. Best-estimated neutron fluence in reactor vessel was calculated by bias factor, neutron flux measurement value/calculational value, from reanalysis result from previous 1st through 4th surveillance testing and finally fluence prediction was performed for the end of reactor life and the entire period of plant life extension. Pressurized thermal shock analysis was performed in accordance with 10 CFR 50.61 using the result of neutron fluence analysis in order to predict the life of reactor vessel material and the criteria of safe operation for Kori unit 1 was reestablished. (author). 55 refs., 55 figs.

  17. Information retrieval system on reactor test methods and role of methodic information in planning of research in reactor material science field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of processing of methodic information which is systematized in form of an information retrieval system adapted for needs of researchers in material science field are represented. It permits to optimize planning of development and perfectioning the experimental base for reactor material science. (J.P.)

  18. Simulation and tests to individual and coupled models of the reactor vessel simulator and the recirculation system for the SUN-RAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present project, is continuation of the project presented in the congress SNM-2003. In this new phase of the project, they were carried out adaptive changes to the modeling and implementation of the module of the full superior of the core of the reactor, they were carried out those modeling of the generation of heat as well as of the energy transfer in the one fuel. These models present the main characteristics of the vessel of the one reactor and of the recirculation system, defined by the main phenomena that they intervene in the physical processes, in the previous version the simulation in real time it required of an extremely quick computer and without executing collateral processes. The tests are presented carried out to the different models belonging to the Simulator of the Reactor Vessel and the Recirculation system for the SUN-RAH (University Simulator of Nucleo electric with Boiling Water Reactor), as well as the results hurtled by this tests. In each section the executions of the tests and the corresponding analyses of results are shown for each pattern. Besides the above mentioned, the advantages presented by the Simulator of the reactor vessel and the recirculation system are pointed. (Author)

  19. Converting the Audience: A Conversation with Agnes Wilcox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Becky

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a conversation with Agnes Wilcox, Executive Director of Prison Performing Arts in St. Louis, Missouri, about Prison Performing Arts. Although the average person might balk at the notion of interacting with prison inmates, finding it intimidating, worrisome, or self-sacrificial, for Wilcox, Prison Performing Arts is a…

  20. Development and validation of a real-time synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT) system for in-service inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the program is to: 1) design, fabricate, and evaluate a real-time flaw detection and characterization system based on synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT) for inservice inspection (ISI) of all required light water reactors (LWR) components; 2) establish calibration and field test procedures; 3) demonstrate and validate the system through actual field reactor inspections; and 4) generate an engineering data base to support code acceptance of the real-time SAFT-UT technique. The program scope is defined by the following: 1) conduct laboratory tests to provide engineering data for defining SAFT-UT system performance; 2) complete the development of a special processor to make SAFT a real-time process for ISI application; and 3) fabricate and field test a fieldable real-time SAFT-UT system on nuclear reactor piping, nozzles and pressure vessels

  1. Development and laboratory testing of low Z refractory coatings for fusion reactor limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A materials development program for low Z (Z 4C e.g.) and the moderate Z (e.g., TiB2) coatings. Thermal fatigue testing has identified several candidate materials which can survice 1000, 3 kJ /cm2 pulses of electron beam heating. The development of prototype limiters of TiB2, TiC and B coated graphite for testing in the ORNL ISX-B tokamak is described

  2. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Jorge [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  3. A comparative study of the MONJU fast reactor physics tests with the ERANOS and JAEA code systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kageyama, T. [NESI Inc., Shiraki 2-1, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui, 919-1279 (Japan); Usami, S.; Nishi, H. [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency JAEA, Shiraki 1, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui, 919-1279 (Japan); Tommasi, J. [CEA, CE Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    MONJU is the prototype fast breeder reactor in Japan. Criticality and control rod worth measurements, performed as part of the MONJU fast reactor system start-up tests (1994), has been analyzed with the JAEA and ERANOS code systems. In spite of differences in the nuclear data and methods used in either system, the calculation results have been found to agree with each other, and with the measured values within the analysis accuracy. The library effect has also been checked (JENDL-3.2 and JEF-2.2 libraries both used with the JAEA code system). It has been found that the JENDL-3.2 library overestimates the criticality and also the control rod reactivity worth compared with the JEF-2.2 library. With regard to this difference, the contribution for all the nuclides has been checked by carrying out a sensitivity analysis. In criticality, Pu-239 v, Pu-239 fission, and Fe capture mainly showed a large contribution. It was clarified that the contribution of Fe was due to the difference between JENDL-3.2 and JEF-2.2. (authors)

  4. An evaluation of the B&W Owners Group BAW-10182 topical report: Justification for increasing the engineered safety features actuation system on-line test intervals. Technical evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.L.; Hansen, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    This Technical Evaluation Report provides an evaluation of the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (B&WOG) Technical Specifications Committee Topical Report BAW-10182, entitled, ``Justification for Increasing Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS) On-Line Test Intervals.`` This evaluation was performed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The BAW-10182 report presents justification for the extension of on-line test intervals from the existing one-month interval to a three-month interval for the ESFAS system. In the BAW-10182 report, the B&WOG stated that ``{hor_ellipsis}the B&WOG proposes to increase the ESFAS test interval from one to three months and concludes that the effect on plant risk is insignificant.`` The proposed extension was based upon risk-based [i.e., probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)] methods such as reliability block diagrams, uncertainty analyses, and time-dependent system availability analyses. This use of PRA methods requires a detailed evaluation to determine whether the chosen methods and their application are valid in the context of the proposed test interval extension. The results of the evaluation agreed that the effect on plant risk is small if the ESFAS test interval is extended to three months for the ESFAS designs that were evaluated.

  5. Research on reactor physics using the Japan Materials Testing Reactor Critical Facility (JMTRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JMTRC of 100 W was installed for the purpose of carrying out the basic experiment on the nuclear characteristics of reactors and the preceding test related to the operation plan of the Japan material testing reactor (JMTR, 50 MW). After the attainment of the initial criticality in October, 1965, for obtaining the reactor physics characteristics, criticality experiment was begun. The items of the criticality experiment were critical mass, control rod worth, reactor dynamic characteristic parameters, shutdown margin and so on, and these experimental data were effectively utilized for the safety evaluation in the operation of the JMTR. The preceding test using the JMTRC has been carried out for obtaining the nuclear characteristics of samples and the thermal characteristics estimated from those results by simulating the JMTR core. In August, 1983, the degree of fuel enrichment for the JMTRC was reduced to 45 % U-235, and various experiments usig the MEU core were carried out. In this paper, the criticality experiment using the MEU core and the experiment on the characteristics of lithium-containing pellets are reported. (K.I.)

  6. The decommissioning of the KEMA suspension test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the decommissioning of the KEMA Suspension Test Reactor (KSTR) is described. This reactor was a 1 MWth aqueous homo-geneous nuclear reactor in which a suspension of a mixed oxide UO2/ ThO2 in light water was circulated in a closed loop through a sphere-shaped core vessel. The reactor, located on KEMA premises, made 150 MW of heat during its critical periods. Dismantling of this reactor, with its many connected subsystems, meant the mastering of activated components which were also contaminated on inner surfaces caused by small fuel deposits (alpha contaminants) and fission products (beta, gamma contaminants). A description is given of the save removal of the fuel, the remote dismantling of systems and components and the disposal of steel scrap and other materials. Important features are the measures to be taken and provisions needed for safe handling, for the reduction of the radiation dose for the working team and the prevention of spreading of activity over the working area and the environment. It has been demonstrated that safe dismantling and disposal of such systems can be achieved. Experience gained at KEMA for the proper dismantling and for safety measures to be taken for workers and the environment can be made available for similar dismantling projects. A cost break-down is included in the report. (author). 22 refs.; 52 figs.; 12 tabs

  7. Further development of remote testing of submerged bolts and screws in reactors; Weiterentwicklung der ferngesteuerten Schrauben- und Stiftpruefung unter Wasser in Reaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, F.; Schirner, G.; Meier, R.; Wiesinger, W. [intelligeNDT Systems und Services, Erlangen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Since the eighties, intelligeNDT has been carrying out ultrasonic tests of bolts in reactor containments and pressure vessels both in Germany and abroad. The ultrasonic equipment used belonged to the SAPHIR/SAPHIRplus line. The recording and online evaluation software was adapted to the test requirements and optimized for high test rates and quality-assured documentation. As test manipulator, the 'SUSI' submarine by AREVA NP was used with good results. (orig.)

  8. Materials qualification testing for next generation nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, R.; Haehner, P. (European Commission, JRC Institute for Energy, Petten (Netherlands))

    2010-05-15

    The development of next generation, innovative nuclear fission reactors, needed to replace or supplement the current designs of nuclear reactors within the next say 30 years, critically depends on the availability of advanced structural and functional materials systems which must withstand extreme conditions: intense neuron irradiation, high temperatures, and potentially strongly corrosive coolant environments, in combination with complex loading states and cyclic loading histories. The mechanical performance and reliability of those materials depends on the service and off-normal conditions in whichever of the six candidate systems for Generation IV reactors, under the global Generation IV International Forum (GIF) agreement, they will be applied. This paper gives an overview of the suite of six selected reactor systems indicating where research on materials and structural integrity is still needed. Some of these reactor systems have been under study for many years whereas others are relatively new concepts but all still require a major expenditure of effort before they can be considered as realistic contenders. In particular the materials selection and component integrity for service will play a major role in a final successful design. Specific issues include: the endurance and stability with respect to creep, fatigue and fracture mechanics loading, the need for in situ environmental testing versus pre-exposure of materials and advanced structural-functional materials systems for specific applications. Using examples taken from research projects in which the authors' laboratory has participated, the materials qualification high temperature testing for three crucial components, reactor pressure vessel and piping, gas turbines and heat exchangers is described in some detail. Finally pointers are derived as to not only the scale of the remaining research needs but also the mechanisms which are planned to be followed in Europe, not to mention globally, to obtain

  9. Standard Guide for Benchmark Testing of Light Water Reactor Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers general approaches for benchmarking neutron transport calculations in light water reactor systems. A companion guide (Guide E2005) covers use of benchmark fields for testing neutron transport calculations and cross sections in well controlled environments. This guide covers experimental benchmarking of neutron fluence calculations (or calculations of other exposure parameters such as dpa) in more complex geometries relevant to reactor surveillance. Particular sections of the guide discuss: the use of well-characterized benchmark neutron fields to provide an indication of the accuracy of the calculational methods and nuclear data when applied to typical cases; and the use of plant specific measurements to indicate bias in individual plant calculations. Use of these two benchmark techniques will serve to limit plant-specific calculational uncertainty, and, when combined with analytical uncertainty estimates for the calculations, will provide uncertainty estimates for reactor fluences with ...

  10. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition

  11. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high

  12. Integrated leak rate test results of JOYO reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated leak rate tests of JOYO after the reactor coolant system had been filled with sodium have been performed two times since 1978 (February 1978 and December 1979). The tests were conducted with the in-containment sodium systems, primary argon cover gas system and air conditioning systems operating. Both the absolute pressure method and the reference chamber method were employed during the test. The results of both tests confirmed the functioning of the containment vessel, and leak rate limits were satisfied. In Addition, the adequancy of the test instrumentation system and the test method was demonstrated. Finally the plant conditions required to maintain reasonable accuracy for the leak rate testing of LMFBR were established. In this paper, the test conditions and the test results are described. (author)

  13. In-reactor experiments in fast breeder test reactor for assessment of core structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, India is a sodium cooled reactor with neutron flux level of the order of 1015 n/cm2/s and temperature of coolant in the range of 650-790K (380-520oC). This reactor is being used as a test bed for the development of fuel and structural materials required for Indian Fast Reactor Programme. FBTR is also used as a test facility to carry out accelerated irradiation tests on thermal reactor structural materials. In-reactor experiments on core structural materials are being carried out by subjecting prefabricated specimens to desired conditions of temperature and neutron fluence levels in FBTR. Non-instrumented irradiation capsules that can be loaded at any location of FBTR core are used for the experiments. Pressurised capsules of zirconium alloys have been developed and subjected to irradiation in FBTR to determine the irradiation creep rate of indigenously developed zirconium alloys (Zircaloy-2 and Zr-2.5%Nb alloy) for life assessment of pressure tubes of Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Technology development of pressurised capsules was carried out at IGCAR. These pressurised capsules were filled with argon and a small fraction of helium at a high pressure (5.0-6.5 MPa at room temperature) in such a way that the target stresses were attained in the walls of the pressurised capsules at the desired temperature of irradiation in the reactor. FBTR was operated at a low power of 8 MWt during this irradiation campaign to have an inlet temperature of about 579 K (306oC) which was close to the temperature of pressure tubes at full power in PHWR. Irradiation of thirty pressurised capsules was carried out in FBTR using six irradiation capsules for different durations (upto 79 days). The fluence levels attained by the pressurised capsules were up to 1.1 x 1021 n/cm2 (E> 1 MeV) at temperatures of 579 to 592 K. Post-irradiation increase in diameter of the pressurised

  14. Design of high temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is now underway to establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs and to conduct innovative basic research at high temperatures. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 850degC for rated operation and 950degC for high temperature test operation. It is planned to conduct various irradiation tests for fuels and materials, safety demonstration tests and nuclear heat application tests. JAERI received construction permit of HTTR reactor facility in February 1990 after 22 months of safety review. This report summarizes evaluation of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic characteristics, design outline of major systems and components, and also includes relating R and D result and safety evaluation. Criteria for judgment, selection of postulated events, major analytical conditions for anticipated operational occurrences and accidents, computer codes used in safety analysis and evaluation of each event are presented in the safety evaluation. (author)

  15. Performance-based improvement of the leakage rate test program for the reactor containment of HTTR. Adoption of revised test programs containing 'Type A, Type B and Type C tests'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor containment of HTTR is periodically tested to confirm leak-tight integrity by conducting overall integrated leakage rate tests, so-called 'Type A tests,' in accordance with a standard testing method provided in Japan Electric Association Code (JEAC) 4203. 'Type A test' is identified as a basic one for measuring whole leakage rates for reactor containments, it takes, however, much of cost and time of preparation, implementation and restoration of itself. Therefore, in order to upgrade the maintenance technology of HTTR, the containment leakage rate test program for HTTR was revised by adopting efficient and economical alternatives including Type B and Type C tests' which intend to measure leakage rates for containment penetrations and isolation valves, respectively. In JEAC4203-2004, following requirements are specified for adopting an alternative program: upward trend of the overall integrated leakage rate due to aging affection should not be recognized; performance criterion for combined leakage rate, that is a summation of local leakage rates evaluated by Type B and Type C tests and converted to whole leakage rates, should be established; the criterion of the combined leakage rate should be satisfied as well as of the overall integrated leakage rate; correlation between the overall integrated and combined leakage rates should be recognized. Considering the historical performances, policies of conforming to the forgoing requirements and of carrying out the revised test program were developed, which were accepted by the regulatory agency. This report presents an outline of the leakage rate tests for the reactor containment of HTTR, identifies practical issues of conventional Type A tests, and describes the conforming and implementing policies mentioned above. (author)

  16. Integral and Separate Effects Tests for Thermal Hydraulics Code Validation for Liquid-Salt Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per

    2012-10-30

    The objective of the 3-year project was to collect integral effects test (IET) data to validate the RELAP5-3D code and other thermal hydraulics codes for use in predicting the transient thermal hydraulics response of liquid salt cooled reactor systems, including integral transient response for forced and natural circulation operation. The reference system for the project is a modular, 900-MWth Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR), a specific type of Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR). Two experimental facilities were developed for thermal-hydraulic integral effects tests (IETs) and separate effects tests (SETs). The facilities use simulant fluids for the liquid fluoride salts, with very little distortion to the heat transfer and fluid dynamics behavior. The CIET Test Bay facility was designed, built, and operated. IET data for steady state and transient natural circulation was collected. SET data for convective heat transfer in pebble beds and straight channel geometries was collected. The facility continues to be operational and will be used for future experiments, and for component development. The CIET 2 facility is larger in scope, and its construction and operation has a longer timeline than the duration of this grant. The design for the CIET 2 facility has drawn heavily on the experience and data collected on the CIET Test Bay, and it was completed in parallel with operation of the CIET Test Bay. CIET 2 will demonstrate start-up and shut-down transients and control logic, in addition to LOFC and LOHS transients, and buoyant shut down rod operation during transients. Design of the CIET 2 Facility is complete, and engineering drawings have been submitted to an external vendor for outsourced quality controlled construction. CIET 2 construction and operation continue under another NEUP grant. IET data from both CIET facilities is to be used for validation of system codes used for FHR modeling, such as RELAP5-3D. A set of

  17. Experimental and numerical investigation of sub-cooled boiling, condensation, and void flashing in nuclear heating reactor test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes experimental and numerical investigations of sub-cooled boiling, condensation, and void flashing in the HRTL-5 test loop, which simulates the primary loop of a 5 MW nuclear heating reactor. A drift-flow model of two-phase with four governing equations was used, in which sub-cooled boiling, condensation, and void flashing have been taken into account. Based on the mathematical model, a program has been developed for analyzing the natural circulation system. As parameters, inlet sub-cooling, system pressure, and heat flux are varied. For comparison, some simplified models, which are designed to reveal the importance of sub-cooled boiling, condensation, flashing in the HRTL-5 test loop, are adopted in the program. The results show: (1) subcooled boiling, condensation, and void flashing may have great influence on the distribution of the void fraction and more intense at low system pressure; (2) the calculation of them is correlative and interactive other than independent; (3) for a system with short heated section, long riser, and low pressure, it is possible to reach 'boiling out of the core', where there is almost no void in the heated section, but much in the riser. (orig.)

  18. A State of Art Report on Technology Development of Irradiation Test and Irradiation Behavior for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Coated Particle Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coated particle fuel, Irradiation test of coated particle fuel in foreign countries are introduced in this report. Also reviewed are status of the study on irradiation performance of coated particle fuel, irradiation facilities for irradiation test of coated particle fuel in foreign countries and current status of irradiation test plan of coated particle fuel in foreign countries' research reactor, and preliminary feasibility is analyzed the irradiation test of coated particle fuel in HANARO

  19. Advanced Test Reactor Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  20. EURAC: the JRC proposal for an European fusion reactor materials test and development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last 7 years we examined the use of a Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) as an altenative European Option to FMIT. For an optimized spallation neutron source design we find now for the same beam power the following design parameters: - Linear Accelerator: 600 MeV, 6 m-A-proton beam on liquid lead target - irradiation parameters: 320 dpa/year in 20 cm3 or 274 dpa/year in 31.5 cm3 6 -1 sec-1 in order to simulate the Pulsed Mode of Tokamak Power Reactors. The deflected beam can be used for other experiments

  1. Neutronics, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Poland MARIA reactor for irradiation testing of LEU lead test fuel assemblies from CERCA : ANL independent verification results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-06-07

    The MARIA reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) in Swierk (30 km SE of Warsaw) in the Republic of Poland is considering conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA). The FA design in MARIA is rather unique; a suitable LEU FA has never been designed or tested. IAE has contracted with CERCA (the fuel supply portion of AREVA in France) to supply 2 lead test assemblies (LTA). The LTAs will be irradiated in MARIA to burnup level of at least 40% for both LTAs and to 60% for one LTA. IAE may decide to purchase additional LEU FAs for a full core conversion after the test irradiation. The Reactor Safety Committee within IAE and the National Atomic Energy Agency in Poland (PAA) must approve the LTA irradiation process. The approval will be based, in part, on IAE submitting revisions to portions of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) which are affected by the insertion of the LTAs. (A similar process will be required for the full core conversion to LEU fuel.) The analysis required was established during working meetings between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and IAE staff during August 2006, subsequent email correspondence, and subsequent staff visits. The analysis needs to consider the current high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and 4 core configurations containing 1 and 2 LEU LTAs in various core positions. Calculations have been performed at ANL in support of the LTA irradiation. These calculations are summarized in this report and include criticality, burn-up, neutronics parameters, steady-state thermal hydraulics, and postulated transients. These calculations have been performed at the request of the IAE staff, who are performing similar calculations to be used in their SAR amendment submittal to the PAA. The ANL analysis has been performed independently from that being performed by IAE and should only be used as one step in the verification process.

  2. Assessment of fuel integrity of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and its permissible design limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of integrity assessment of the HTTR fuel as a part of safety design of the reactor. Functions of individual coating layer of the coated fuel particles were investigated to clarify the characteristic properties of the HTTR fuel. Integrity of the fuel under normal operating conditions of HTTR was shown to be maintained through analyses on fuel failure and due to kernel migration (amoeba effect) and corrosion of the silicon carbide layer by palladium. The fuel integrity has been demonstrated by successful results of the irradiation performance tests. By considering the failure behavior of coated fuel particles, the permissible design limit of the fuel was determined such that the fuel temperature should not exceed 1600degC under abnormal transient conditions. The validity of the determination of the limit has been confirmed by results of heating experiments of coated fuel particles at extremely high temperature. (author)

  3. Heat Pipe Reactor Dynamic Response Tests: SAFE-100 Reactor Core Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2005-01-01

    The SAFE-I00a test article at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to simulate a variety of potential reactor transients; the SAFEl00a is a resistively heated, stainless-steel heat-pipe (HP)-reactor core segment, coupled to a gas-flow heat exchanger (HX). For these transients the core power was controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. This type of non-nuclear test is expected to provide reasonable approximation of reactor transient behavior because reactivity feedback is very simple in a compact fast reactor (simple, negative, and relatively monotonic temperature feedback, caused mostly by thermal expansion) and calculations show there are no significant reactivity effects associated with fluid in the HP (the worth of the entire inventory of Na in the core is .kinetics model was based on core thermal expansion via deflection measurements. It was found that core deflection was a strung function of how the SAFE-100 modules were fabricated and assembled (in terms of straightness, gaps, and other tolerances). To remove the added variable of how this particular core expands as compared to a different concept, it was decided to use a temperature based feedback model (based on several thermocouples placed throughout the core).

  4. Prevalence of latent eosinophilia among occupational gardeners at Babcock University, Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayodele Olushola Ilesanmi; Ginnikachi Jennifer Ekwe; Rosemary Isioma Ilesanmi; Damilola Temitope Ogundele; Jacob Kehinde Akintunde; Oluwasogo Adewole Olalubi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the level of eosinophils present in the blood and sputum samples, presumably as a result of continual occupational exposure to allergens while on duty, as gardeners at Babcock University, Nigeria. Methods: Haemocytometer and Olympus microscope were utilized to estimate eosino-phils population in 44 blood samples and 21 sputum samples respectively. Results: Relationship between the occurrence of eosinophil in blood and the exposure period among Babcock University gardeners had a positive correlation (r = + 0.08, t=4.55, P Conclusions: The nature and the gardening activities are not a risk factor that signifi-cantly affect eosinophil level but duration of exposure to allergens. However, all safety precautionary kits and wears should be enforced and embraced by the concerned occu-pational gardeners so as to avert and subvert its pre-disposing deleterious effect on them.

  5. Startup test results and model evaluation for the HEU to LEU conversion of the UMass-Lowell Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1 MW UMass-Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) switched from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in August 2000. Several months prior to conversion, a detailed physics study was undertaken to fully characterize the new LEU core, with focus on providing computational support for the actual startup and on estimating the radiation environment in the various experimental facilities in the new LEU-fueled core. During startup testing, a series of actual reactivity evaluations and thermal flux magnitude and distribution measurements were made. These startup tests not only established operability of the new core, they also allowed direct evaluation of the computational models and methods used to design and characterize the new LEU core. This paper highlights this evaluation by summarizing the overall startup test program and the computational methods in use at UMass-Lowell, and by providing a set of comparisons between the measurement results and the computational estimates. Although some differences were observed, it is apparent from the results presented that the overall computational methodology was quite satisfactory -- since the as-built system operates essentially as designed. (author)

  6. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4∼2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure

  7. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  8. Development and demonstration of an advanced extended-burnup fuel-assembly design incorporating urania-gadolinia. Second semi-annual progress report, October 1981-March 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, L W; Rombough, C T; Thornton, T A

    1982-08-01

    The Babcock and Wilcox Company, Duke Power Company, and the US Department of Energy are participating in an extended-burnup program for pressurized water reactors that will demonstrate an advanced fuel assembly design. This advanced fuel assembly will use a UO/sub 2/-Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ burnable-poison fuel mixture along with other state-of-the-art fuel performance and uranium utilization-enhancing design features that include annular pellets, annealed guide tubes, Zircaloy intermediate grids, and removable upper end fittings. Comparisons of the thermal properties of UO/sub 2/-Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ specimens containing 2.98, 5.66, and 8.50 wt % Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with UO/sub 2/ specimens showed that thermal conductivity is the only thermal parameter significantly affected by the addition of Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The milling steps used to prepare UO/sub 2/-Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ powder result in a powder that is more active than standard UO/sub 2/ powder. As a result, UO/sub 2/-Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ fuel has shown more variability than UO/sub 2/ fuel in as-sintered theoretical density and densification behavior. However, a poreforming material, added to the UO/sub 2/-Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ powder mixture before sintering, can be used to achieve the desired density. Measured results from critical experiments were compared with predicted data and confirmed the accuracy of the standard two-group diffusion theory model for predicting global and discrete UO/sub 2/-Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ effects when cross-section input is appropriately adjusted. The preliminary first two fuel cycles for lead test assemblies of the advanced design were developed. Irradiation of the lead test assemblies is scheduled to begin in 1983 in Duke Power Company's Oconee Unit 1. An intercalibrated movable incore detector system will be used to monitor the performance of the test assemblies during irradiation.

  9. New results from pulse tests in the CABRI reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, F.; Papin, J.; Haessler, M. [Institut de Proterction et de Surete Nucleaire, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    At the 21st and 22nd WRSM (1,2), the motivation and objectives of the French program on the behaviour of high burnup PWR fuel under RIA conditions in the CABRI test reactor has been presented. The major results of the three first tests of the test matrix were presented and in particular REP-Na1, which failed at an unexpected low level of fuel enthalpy, was exposed to the community of nuclear safety research. At this time, no final understanding was reached for the origin of the failure. This objective is reached now. Two further tests, REP-Na4 and 5, have been performed in 1995, they demonstrated a satisfactory and safe behaviour by resisting to the early phase of severe loading during the RIA pulse test. Further examination work and analytical testing is in progress and the next tests with MOX fuel are being prepared.

  10. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of

  11. Trends in large-scale testing of reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale tests of reactor structures have been conducted at Sandia National Laboratories since the late 1970s. This paper describes a number of different large-scale impact tests, pressurization tests of models of containment structures, and thermal-pressure tests of models of reactor pressure vessels. The advantages of large-scale testing are evident, but cost, in particular limits its use. As computer models have grown in size, such as number of degrees of freedom, the advent of computer graphics has made possible very realistic representation of results - results that may not accurately represent reality. A necessary condition to avoiding this pitfall is the validation of the analytical methods and underlying physical representations. Ironically, the immensely larger computer models sometimes increase the need for large-scale testing, because the modeling is applied to increasing more complex structural systems and/or more complex physical phenomena. Unfortunately, the cost of large-scale tests is a disadvantage that will likely severely limit similar testing in the future. International collaborations may provide the best mechanism for funding future programs with large-scale tests. (author)

  12. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform the tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. In the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished. In the second phase (2002.4∼2005.2), an optimized design of the ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) was established and the construction of the facility was almost completed. In the third phase (2005.3∼2007.2), the construction and commission tests of the ATLAS are to be completed and some first-phase tests are to be conducted

  13. Development and test of a space-reactor-core heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heat pipe designed to meet the heat transfer requirements of a 100-kW/sub e/ space nuclear power system has been developed and tested. General design requirements for the device included an operating temperature of 15000K with an evaporator radial flux density of 100 w/cm2. The total heat-pipe length of 2 m comprised an evaporator length of 0.3 m, a 1.2-m adiabatic section, and a condenser length of 0.5 m. A four-artery design employing screen arteries and distribution wicks was used with lithium serving as the working fluid. Molybdenum alloys were used for the screen materials and tube shell. Hafnium and zirconium gettering materials were used in connection with a pre-purified distilled lithium charge to ensure internal chemical compatibility. After initial performance verification, the 14.1-mm i.d. heat pipe was operated at 15 kW throughput at 15000K for 100 hours. No performance degradation was observed during the test

  14. Development and test of interphase friction model for reactor thermal-hydraulic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: In order to change the status that nuclear power software technology lags behind the foreign countries, the thermal-hydraulic safety analysis program COSINE is being developed. Purpose: To complete the solution of the hydraulics equation, a fully considered model of detailed vapor and liquid interphase friction was proposed. Methods: With reference to some mature interphase friction models, we developed the FORTRAN program for the model and designed appropriate numerical routines to test the model. And the RELAP5/Mod3.2 was applied to results comparison of the rationality and accuracy of the model. Results and Conclusion: The results show that the model is valid and the program can run normally. (authors)

  15. Reactor vessel integrity analysis based upon large scale test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fracture mechanics analysis of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel is discussed to illustrate the impact of knowledge gained by large scale testing on the demonstration of the integrity of such a vessel. The analysis must be able to predict crack initiation, arrest and reinitiation. The basis for the capability to make each prediction, including the large scale test information which is judged appropriate, is identified and the confidence in the applicability of the experimental data to a vessel is discussed. Where there is inadequate data to make a prediction with confidence or where there are apparently conflicting data, recommendations for future testing are presented. 15 refs., 6 figs.. 1 tab

  16. Experimental tests and qualification of analytical methods to address thermohydraulic phenomena in advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide there is considerable experience in nuclear power technology, especially in water cooled reactor technology. Of the operating plants, in September 1998, 346 were light water reactors (LWRs) totalling 306 GW(e) and 29 were heavy water reactors (HWRs) totalling 15 GW(e). The accumulated experience and lessons learned from these plants are being incorporated into new advanced reactor designs. Utility requirements documents have been formulated to guide these design activities by incorporating this experience, and results from research and development programmes, with the aim of reducing costs and licensing uncertainties by establishing the technical bases for the new designs. Common goals for advanced designs are high availability, user-friendly features, competitive economics and compliance with internationally recognized safety objectives. Large water cooled reactors with power outputs of 1300 MW(e) and above, which possess inherent safety characteristics (e.g. negative Doppler moderator temperature coefficients, and negative moderator void coefficient) and incorporate proven, active engineered systems to accomplish safety functions are being developed. Other designs with power outputs from, for example, 220 MW(e) up to about 1300 MW(e) which also possess inherent safety characteristics and which place more emphasis on utilization of passive safety systems are being developed. Passive systems are based on natural forces and phenomena such as natural convection and gravity, making safety functions less dependent on active systems and components like pumps and diesel generators. In some cases, further experimental tests for the thermohydraulic conditions of interest in advanced designs can provide improved understanding of the phenomena. Further, analytical methods to predict reactor thermohydraulic behaviour can be qualified for use by comparison with the experimental results. These activities should ultimately result in more economical designs. The

  17. RELAP5-3D version 4.0.3: installation and tests for applications to space reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Paulo D.C.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Borges, Eduardo M.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F., E-mail: plobo.a@uol.com.br, E-mail: fbraz@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: eduardo@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To attend the TERRA project (Tecnologia de Reatores Rapidos Avancados), currently conducted by the Nuclear Energy Division (ENU) of the IEAv, this work presents the RELAP5-3D, Version 4.0.3, prepared in July 12, 2012, also known as r3d403is, received recently by the IEAv from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This version of RELAP5-3D is configured for the International User Group source Code Group and is developed and maintained at the INL for the US Department of Energy. RELAP5-3D, the latest in the series of RELAP5 codes, is a highly generic code that, in addition to calculating the behavior of a reactor coolant system during a transient, can be used for simulation of a wide variety of hydraulic and thermal transients in both nuclear and nonnuclear systems involving mixtures of vapor, liquid, noncondensable gases, and nonvolatile solute. Enhancements include all features and models previously available in the ATHENA configuration version of the code which are as follows: addition of new work fluids and a magneto-hydrodynamic mode. Following the instructions from the README file, the RELAP5-3D, version 4.0.3 was installed creating the necessaries subdirectories, by using the LINUX platform and applying both Intel Fortran 95 and C-language compilers. Many input examples were executed and the same results were observed as compared to the received documentation. A sample of the Edwards-O'Brien test was evaluated to verify if the code could simulate a LOCA type accident properly. The test executed by the RELAP5-3D demonstrated good agreement with test data including a new output involving the mass flow during the test. (author)

  18. Acceptance test of graphite components in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HTTR is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor in Japan. It is a test reactor with thermal power of 30 MW and coolant outlet temperature of 950degC at maximum. To achieve high temperature coolant core internals were made of graphite and carbon materials due to their excellent thermal resistivity. After fabrication of graphite and carbon components at works they were installed in the HTTR, and now it is in the power up testing stage. Concerning the inspection standard of the graphite and carbon components, nondomestic standard exists as main components in the nuclear reactor. It is necessary, therefore, to prescribe the inspection standards for the HTTR graphite components. Many research and developments in relation to the inspection standard, e.g. in the research field of nondestructive examination of the graphite material, had been performed, and then the JAERI established the inspection standard. The acceptance test of the graphite and carbon components was carried out based on the inspection standard. This paper prescribes the outline of the established inspection standard. (author)

  19. Proceedings of the international meeting on development, fabrication, and application of Reduced Enrichment fuels for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Base technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international effort to develop new fuel materials and designs which will make it feasible to fuel research and test reactors throughout the world with low-enrichment uranium, instead of high-enrichment uranium, has made significant progress during the past year. This progress has taken place at research centers located in many different countries, and is of crucial interest to reactor operators and licensors whose geographical distribution is even more varied. It is appropriate, therefore, that international meetings be held periodically to foster direct communication among the specialists in this area. To achieve this purpose, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the third of a series which begun in 1978. The papers presented at this meeting were divided into sessions according to relevant subject: status of RERTR program and safety issues; development of new fuel types; testing of new fuel elements; specific reactor applications. These proceedings were edited by various members of the RERTR Program

  20. Application of non-destructive testing and in-service inspection to research reactors. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As per April 2001, 284 research reactors are currently in operation and 258 have been shut down, waiting for a decision whether to be refurbished or eventually decommissioned. In fact, more than half of all operating research reactors worldwide are over thirty years old and face concerns regarding ageing and obsolescence of equipment. Some of these reactors have been refurbished, so that the age in many cases is not a representative figure to identify degradation problems. These reactors are not only sharing common issues such as progressive ageing of their materials and components but also needs of assessment for taking decisions concerning their extension of operation or shutdown for refurbishment or decommissioning. Therefore, it is necessary to examine on a regular basis the structures, systems and components of the reactor facility for potential degradation to assess its effect on safety, on availability or to avoid high cost of repair or replacement. Part of this examination is carried out through the maintenance and periodic testing programme. The establishment and implementation of a programme of maintenance, periodic testing and inspection is a general requirement in the legal framework of the IAEA Member States to ensure the operational safety of their reactors. However, the scope and format of such a programme depends on the national practices of each country. The approach adopted in the IAEA Safety Standards for research reactors covers a broad spectrum of international practices, which include activities related to: (a) preventive and corrective maintenance of structures, systems and components; (b) periodic testing intended to ensure that operation remains within the established operational limits and conditions; and (c) special inspections pursuing various objectives and initiated by the operating organization or the regulatory body. These special inspections, which are performed using specific techniques such as those based on non

  1. A 3D Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Model

    CERN Document Server

    Miesch, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    We present a 3D kinematic solar dynamo model in which poloidal field is generated by the emergence and dispersal of tilted sunspot pairs (more generally Bipolar Magnetic Regions, or BMRs). The axisymmetric component of this model functions similarly to previous 2D Babcock-Leighton (BL) dynamo models that employ a double-ring prescription for poloidal field generation but we generalize this prescription into a 3D flux emergence algorithm that places BMRs on the surface in response to the dynamo-generated toroidal field. In this way, the model can be regarded as a unification of BL dynamo models (2D in radius/latitude) and surface flux transport models (2D in latitude/longitude) into a more self-consistent framework that captures the full 3D structure of the evolving magnetic field. The model reproduces some basic features of the solar cycle including an 11-yr periodicity, equatorward migration of toroidal flux in the deep convection zone, and poleward propagation of poloidal flux at the surface. The poleward-p...

  2. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  3. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  4. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  5. Comparing dynamic responses of recirculating and once-through steam generators for next generation LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper two types of steam generators are under consideration for next-generation (pressurized) light water reactors: a recirculating type and a once-through type. The steady-state and dynamic characteristics of these steam generators were compared to facilitate optimization of a particular reactor system design. To compare, the dynamic responses of the two types, as indicated by the feedwater flow, steam generator level, steam flow, steam pressure, steam enthalpy, primary-side pressure and cold-leg temperature, were assessed using Babcock and Wilcox's Modular Modeling System. The once-through steam generator showed a tremendous flexibility to produce superheated steam under diverse conditions (i.e., constant or variable steam throttle pressure and constant or variable average primary temperature) with excellent speed and accuracy in following the load demand. Since the primary and steam sides are closely coupled with the feedwater, the pressurizer should be sized liberally to lessen the sensitivity of the primary response to feedwater upsets and the reliability of the feedwater train should be enhanced. In contrast, the recirculating steam generator must be operated with variable steam throttle pressure and variable primary average temperature, and the speed and accuracy of following the load demand are not as good. While the recirculation provides an effective cushion for the primary and steam sides from feedwater upsets, it also amplifies the level response caused by upsets in steam pressure and feedwater temperature affecting the level controllability and moisture separation performance. The recirculating steam generator should be designed to incorporate features to improve level controllability by constant-inventory control strategy. Also to survive a reactor-coolant pump trip, the design with one reactor-coolant pump per loop should be considered

  6. Extended Storage for Research and Test Reactor Spent Fuel for 2006 and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, William Lon; Moore, K.M.; Shaber, Eric Lee; Mizia, Ronald Eugene

    1999-10-01

    This paper will examine issues associated with extended storage of a variety of spent nuclear fuels. Recent experiences at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Hanford sites will be described. Particular attention will be given to storage of damaged or degraded fuel. The first section will address a survey of corrosion experience regarding wet storage of spent nuclear fuel. The second section will examine issues associated with movement from wet to dry storage. This paper also examines technology development needs to support storage and ultimate disposition.

  7. A comparison of three self-tuning control algorithms developed for the Bristol-Babcock controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapp, P.A.

    1992-04-01

    A brief overview of adaptive control methods relating to the design of self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers is given. The methods discussed include gain scheduling, self-tuning, auto-tuning, and model-reference adaptive control systems. Several process identification and parameter adjustment methods are discussed. Characteristics of the two most common types of self-tuning controllers implemented by industry (i.e., pattern recognition and process identification) are summarized. The substance of the work is a comparison of three self-tuning proportional-plus-integral (STPI) control algorithms developed to work in conjunction with the Bristol-Babcock PID control module. The STPI control algorithms are based on closed-loop cycling theory, pattern recognition theory, and model-based theory. A brief theory of operation of these three STPI control algorithms is given. Details of the process simulations developed to test the STPI algorithms are given, including an integrating process, a first-order system, a second-order system, a system with initial inverse response, and a system with variable time constant and delay. The STPI algorithms` performance with regard to both setpoint changes and load disturbances is evaluated, and their robustness is compared. The dynamic effects of process deadtime and noise are also considered. Finally, the limitations of each of the STPI algorithms is discussed, some conclusions are drawn from the performance comparisons, and a few recommendations are made. 6 refs.

  8. A comparison of three self-tuning control algorithms developed for the Bristol-Babcock controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapp, P.A.

    1992-04-01

    A brief overview of adaptive control methods relating to the design of self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers is given. The methods discussed include gain scheduling, self-tuning, auto-tuning, and model-reference adaptive control systems. Several process identification and parameter adjustment methods are discussed. Characteristics of the two most common types of self-tuning controllers implemented by industry (i.e., pattern recognition and process identification) are summarized. The substance of the work is a comparison of three self-tuning proportional-plus-integral (STPI) control algorithms developed to work in conjunction with the Bristol-Babcock PID control module. The STPI control algorithms are based on closed-loop cycling theory, pattern recognition theory, and model-based theory. A brief theory of operation of these three STPI control algorithms is given. Details of the process simulations developed to test the STPI algorithms are given, including an integrating process, a first-order system, a second-order system, a system with initial inverse response, and a system with variable time constant and delay. The STPI algorithms' performance with regard to both setpoint changes and load disturbances is evaluated, and their robustness is compared. The dynamic effects of process deadtime and noise are also considered. Finally, the limitations of each of the STPI algorithms is discussed, some conclusions are drawn from the performance comparisons, and a few recommendations are made. 6 refs.

  9. Inductive testing of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Service Inspection of Reactor Pressure Vessels is mostly done with ultrasonics. Using special 2 crystal-probes good detectability is achieved for near surface defects. The problem is to detect closely spaced cracks, to decide if the defects are surface braking and, if not, to decide the remaining ligament. The purpose of this study is to investigate to what extent Eddy Current can solve these problems. Detecting surfacebreaking cracks and fields of cracks can be done using conventional Eddy Current techniques. Mapping of closely spaced cracks requires a small probe and a high frequency. Measurement of depths a larger probe, a lower frequency and knowledge of the crackfield since 2 closely spaced shallow cracks might be mistaken for one deep crack. Depths of singel cracks can be measured down to 7-8 mm. In closely spaced crackfields the depths can not be measured. The measurement is mostly based on amplitude. For not surface breaking defects the problem is to decide the ligament, i.e. the distance between surface and cracktip. To achieve good penetration a large probe, low frequency and high energy or pulsed energy is used. Ligament up to 4 mm can be measured with good accuracy. The measurements is mostly based on phase. Noise, which originates from rough surface, varied material structure and lift off, can be reduced using multi frequency mix, probe design and scanning pattern. (author)

  10. Reactor power cutback system test experience at YGN 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YGN 3 and 4 are the nuclear power plants having System 80 characteristics with a rated thermal output of 2815 MWth and a nominal net electrical output of 1040 MWe. YGN 3 achieved commercial operation on March 31, 1995 and YGN 4 completed Power Ascension Test (PAT) at 20%, 50%, 80% and 100% power by September 23, 1995. YGN 3 and 4 design incorporates the Reactor POwer Cutback System (RPCS) which reduces plant trips caused by Loss of Load (LOL)/ Turbine Trip and Loss of One Main Feedwater Pump (LOMFWP). The key design objective of the RPCS is to improve overall plant availability and performance, while minimizing challenges to the plant safety systems. The RPCS is designed to rapidly reduce reactor power by dropping preselected Control Element Assemblies (CEAs) while other NSSS control systems maintain process parameters within acceptable ranges. Extensive RPCS related tests performed during the initial startup of YGN 4 demonstrated that the RPCS can maintain the reactor on-line without opening primary or secondary safety valves and without actuating the Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS). It is expected that use of the RPCS at YGN will increase the overall availability of the units and reduce the number of challenges to plant safety systems

  11. Development of a simulator for design and test of power controllers in a TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a simulator that uses the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method to solve the model of the punctual kinetics of a nuclear research reactor type TRIGA. The simulator includes an algorithm of power control of the reactor based on the fuzzy logic, a friendly graphic interface which responds to the different user's petitions and that it shows numerical and graphically the results in real time. The user can modify the demanded power and to visualize the dynamic behavior of the one system. This simulator was developed in Visual Basic under an open architecture with which its will be prove different controllers for its analysis. (Author)

  12. Optimisation of safety parameters in fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Optimisation of safety parameters is an important aspect to be considered in the design of nuclear power plant and also becomes extremely important activity to be followed up during the commissioning and operating phases of the plant taking into account the operational feed back and review of incidental situations and available diversity and reliability. Otherwise, the spurious/ superfluous trips on the reactor besides affecting the availability of the plant, initiate plant transients causing stress for the plant equipment resulting in reduction of plant life. This activity has a significant role to play in attaining the maximum availability of the plant, without compromising safety. The study and evolution of optimisation process in fast breeder test reactor (FBTR); at Kalpakkam has been an interesting and rewarding experience

  13. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  14. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives

  15. The effect of aging upon CE and B and W control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of aging upon the Babcock and Wilcox and Combustion Engineering control rod drive systems has been evaluated as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Plant Aging Research program. Operating experience data for the 1980-1990 time period was reviewed to identify predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. These results, in conjunction with an assessment of component materials and operating environments, conclude that both systems are susceptible to age degradation. System failures have resulted in significant plant effects, including power reductions, plant shutdowns, scrams, and engineered safety feature actuation. Current industry inspection and maintenance practices were assessed. Some of these practices effectively address aging, while others do not

  16. Conceptual design study of a scyllac fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes a conceptual design study of a fusion test reactor based on the Scyllac toroidal theta-pinch approach to fusion. It is not the first attempt to describe the physics and technology required for demonstrating scientific feasibility of the approach, but it is the most complete design in the sense that the physics necessary to achieve the device goals is extrapolated from experimentally tested MHD theories of toroidal systems,and it uses technological systems whose engineering performance has been carefully calculated to ensure that they meet the machine requirements

  17. Conceptual design study of a scyllac fusion test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassen, K.I. (comp.)

    1975-07-01

    The report describes a conceptual design study of a fusion test reactor based on the Scyllac toroidal theta-pinch approach to fusion. It is not the first attempt to describe the physics and technology required for demonstrating scientific feasibility of the approach, but it is the most complete design in the sense that the physics necessary to achieve the device goals is extrapolated from experimentally tested MHD theories of toroidal systems,and it uses technological systems whose engineering performance has been carefully calculated to ensure that they meet the machine requirements.

  18. Final Physics Report for the Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a summary of the physics design work performed on the Engineering Test Reactor. The ETR presents computational difficulties not found in other reactors because of the large number of experimental holes in the core. The physics of the ETR depends strongly upon the contents of the in-core experimental facilities. In order to properly evaluate the reactor' taking into account the experiments in the core, multi-region, two-dimensional calculations are required. These calculations require the use of a large computer such as the Remington Rand Univac and are complex and expensive enough to warrant a five-stage program: 1. In the early stages of design, only preliminary two-dimensional calculations were performed .in order to obtain a rough idea of the general behavior of the reactor and its critical mass with tentative experiments in place. 2. A large amount of work was carried out in which the reactor was approximated as one with a uniform homogeneous core. With this model, detailed studies were carried out to investigate the feasibility and to obtain general design data on such points as the design and properties of the gray and black control rods, the design of the beryllium reflector, gamma and neutron heating, the use of burnable poisons, etc. In performing these calculations, use was made of the IBM 650 PROD code obtained from KAPL. 3. With stages 1 and 2 carried out, two-dimensional calculations of the core at start-up conditions were performed on the Univac computer. 4. Detailed two-dimensional calculations of the properties of the ETR with a proposed first set of experiments in place were carried out. 5. A series of nuclear tests were performed at the reactivity measurements facility at the MTR site in order to confirm the validity of the analytical techniques in physics analysis. In performing the two-dimensional Univac calculations, the MUG code developed by KAPL and the Cuthill code developed at the David Taylor Model Basin were utilized. In

  19. The Jules Horowitz reactor (JHR), a European material testing reactor (MTR), with extended experimental capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A.; Bergamaschi, Y.; Bouilloux, Y.; Bravo, X.; Guigon, B.; Rommens, M.; Tremodeux, P. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)]|[CEA Saclay Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is the European MTR (Material Testing Reactor) designed to provide, after 2010, the necessary knowledge for keeping the existing power plants in operation and to design innovative reactors types with new objectives such as: minimizing the radioactive waste production, taking into account additional safety requirements, preventing risks of nuclear proliferation... To achieve such an ambitious objective. The JHR is designed with a high flexibility in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and to be able to accommodate future requirements. The JHR will offer a wide range of performances and services in gathering, in a single site at Cadarache, all the necessary functionalities and facilities for an effective production of results: e.g. fuel fabrication laboratories, preparation of the instrumented devices, interpretation of the experiments, modelling. The JHR must rely on a top level scientific environment based on experts teams from CEA and EC and local universities. With a thermal flux of 7,4.10{sup 14} ncm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and a fast flux of 6,4.10{sup 14} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, it is possible to carry out irradiation experiments on materials and fuels whatever the reactor type considered. It will also be possible to carry out locally, fast neutron irradiation to achieve damage effect up to 25 dpa/year. (dpa = displacement per atom.) The study of the fuels behavior under accidental conditions, from analytical experiments, on a limited amount of irradiated fuel, is a major objective of the project. These oriented safety tests are possible by taking into account specific requirements in the design of the facility such as the tightness level of the containment building, the addition of an alpha hot cell and a laboratory for on line fission products measurement. (authors)

  20. Verification and Validation of the PLTEMP/ANL Code for Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Experimental and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalimullah, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Olson, Arne P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hanan, N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-04-07

    The document compiles in a single volume several verification and validation works done for the PLTEMP/ANL code during the years of its development and improvement. Some works that are available in the open literature are simply referenced at the outset, and are not included in the document. PLTEMP has been used in conversion safety analysis reports of several US and foreign research reactors that have been licensed and converted. A list of such reactors is given. Each chapter of the document deals with the verification or validation of a specific model. The model verification is usually done by comparing the code with hand calculation, Microsoft spreadsheet calculation, or Mathematica calculation. The model validation is done by comparing the code with experimental data or a more validated code like the RELAP5 code.

  1. Application of gamma scanning and neutron radiography methods to control fuel element state as tested in MR reactor loop channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma-scanning and neutron radiography methods are described used for non-destructive control of fuel elements after their test in the loop channels of MR reactor, and also the equipment utilized. The techniques and the results obtained while studying fuel elements using the above mentioned methods are provided. It is established that gamma-scanning method can only indicate the presence of defect in the continuity of the fuel element core without identifying its type whereas the advantage of neutron radiography method is in obtaining visual results. At the same time gamma-scanning method makes it possible to determine energy release on the length of fuel elements, to find the burn up fraction, to study the phenomenon of fusion products migration which is difficult or impossible with neutron radiography method. A conclusion is drawn that gamma-scanning and neutron radiography methods successfully supplement each other and make it possible to obtain important information on fuel state in the irradiated fuel elements

  2. Study of In-Pile test facility for fast reactor safety research: performance requirements and design features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a program and the main design features of a new in-pile safety facility SERAPH planned for future fast reactor safety research. The current status of R and D on technical developments in relation to the research objectives and performance requirements to the facility design is given

  3. Local transport barrier formation and relaxation in reverse-shear plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roles of turbulence stabilization by sheared ExB flow and Shafranov shift gradients are examined for Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)] enhanced reverse-shear (ERS) plasmas. Both effects in combination provide the basis of a positive-feedback model that predicts reinforced turbulence suppression with increasing pressure gradient. Local fluctuation behavior at the onset of ERS confinement is consistent with this framework. The power required for transitions into the ERS regime are lower when high power neutral beams are applied earlier in the current profile evolution, consistent with the suggestion that both effects play a role. Separation of the roles of ExB and Shafranov shift effects was performed by varying the ExB shear through changes in the toroidal velocity with nearly steady-state pressure profiles. Transport and fluctuation levels increase only when ExB shearing rates are driven below a critical value that is comparable to the fastest linear growth rates of the dominant instabilities. While a turbulence suppression criterion that involves the ratio of shearing to linear growth rates is in accord with many of these results, the existence of hidden dependencies of the criterion is suggested in experiments where the toroidal field was varied. The forward transition into the ERS regime has also been examined in strongly rotating plasmas. The power threshold is higher with unidirectional injection than with balance injection. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Development of large insulator rings for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses research and development leading to the manufacture of large ceramic insulator rings for the TFTR (TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor). Material applications, fabrication approach and testing activities are highlighted

  5. Sipping test update device for fuel elements cladding inspections in IPR-r1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.R.; Mesquita, A.Z.; Andrade, E.P.D.; Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: rrr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br, E-mail: edson@cdtn.br, E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    It is in progress at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN (Nuclear Technology Development Center), a research project that aims to investigate possible leaks in the fuel elements of the TRIGA reactor, located in this research center. This paper presents the final form of sipping test device for TRIGA reactor, and results of the first experiments setup. Mechanical support strength tests were made by knotting device on the crane, charged with water from the conventional water supply, and tests outside the reactor pool with the use of new non-irradiated fuel elements encapsulated in stainless steel, and available safe stored in this unit. It is expected that tests with graphite elements from reactor pool are done soon after and also the test experiment with the first fuel elements in service positioned in the B ring (central ring) of the reactor core in the coming months. (author)

  6. The 4th surveillance test and evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel material (capsule W) of Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-02-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Yonggwang unit 2 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 5.762E+18, 1.5391E+19, 3.5119E+19, and 4.2610E+19 n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement versus calculation, was 0.899 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 12.3% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.357E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 11th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.525E+19, 4.337E+19, 5.148E+19 and 5.960E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Yonggwang unit 2 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 48 refs., 35 figs., 42 tabs. (Author)

  7. The 4th surveillance test and evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel material (capsule W) of Younggwang nuclear power plant unit1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-08-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Yonggwang site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Yonggwang unit 1 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 5.555E+18, 1.662E+19, 3.358E+19, and 4.521E+19 n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement versus calculation, was 0.859 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 11.80% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.551E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 12th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.929E+19, 4.880E+19, 5.831E+19 and 6.782E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Yonggwang unit 1 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 4 refs., 41 figs., 35 tabs. (Author)

  8. Green County Nuclear Power Plant. License application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Green County reactor, a PWR to be supplied by Babcock and Wilcox, will be a baseload generating facility planned to provide for mass transit and other public agency electrical needs. The plant is scheduled for completion by 1983 and will have a generating capacity of about 1200 MW(e). (FS)

  9. Development of modern safe systems of work at the Imperial College Reactor Centre and their application to neutron detector testing and nuclear training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    safety hazards. For straight forward not especially hazardous tasks the risk assessment is sufficient to control the operation and provides all the information and instructions for the work to be carried out safely. Operations with a radiological risk, particularly those involving non classified workers in controlled areas have additional written controls in the form of a Written System of Work which goes into details of radiological hazards and safeguards and may involve hold points. The most hazardous tasks (both radiological and conventional) are controlled through the use of Permits to Work. In all cases, operations which involve the use of contractors, require careful assessment of the Contracting Organisation and their plans for the work (method statements etc.) to ensure that the contractors are suitably trained and experienced to do the work. These procedures have allowed the development of the facility requiring man access into a Controlled Area with an open beam tube where doses are maintained ALARP. The CONSORT reactor provides a facility for the calibration and periodic testing of neutron flux detectors (primarily fission chambers and ion chambers). The first case study outlines the detector testing programme which requires the use of a broad range of well thermalised neutron fluxes over eleven orders of magnitude. The facility in which these tests are carried out consists of a beam tube penetrating the graphite thermal column located immediately outside of the tank housing the reactor core. During testing, the detectors are manually loaded into and unloaded from the beam tube with the reactor operating at low power (up to 2kW). This process has been developed, assessed and controlled using the procedures described, in order to ensure that the doses are minimised and acceptable in line with the ALARP principle. On line testing of the detectors is carried out by the manufacturer's employees on site, and involves the control and supervision of these workers

  10. Design, fabrication, and testing of gadolinium-shielded metal fuel samples in the hydraulic tube of the high flux isotope reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of hydraulic rabbit capsules inserted into and ejected from the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during full power operation allows for precise control of the neutron fluence in fueled experiments. Rabbit capsules with strong thermal neutron absorbers must be used to screen out thermal neutrons, thereby reducing the heat generation rate while maintaining the fast neutron flux that produces displacement damage similar to fast reactor type conditions. However, rapid insertion and ejection of rabbit capsules containing a strong neutron absorber causes a reactivity response in the reactor that has the potential to engage the HFIR safety response system which could result in an unplanned shutdown. Therefore, a set of tests were performed to provide the data needed to establish limits on the reactivity worth that can be ejected from the hydraulic facility without causing a reactor shutdown. This paper will describe the design, operation, and results of the reactivity measurements undertaken to understand the reactor response to insertion of the gadolinium-lined rabbit capsules. (author)

  11. GPU v. B and W lawsuit review and its effect on TMI-1 (Docket 50-289)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    This report documents a review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff of the General Public Utilities Corporation, et al. v. the Babcock and Wilcox Company, et al. (GPU v. B and W) lawsuit record to assess whether any of the staff's previous conclusions or their principal bases presented at the Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) restart hearing, supporting restart of TMI-1, should be amended in light of the information contained in the lawsuit record. Details of the lawsuit record are provided in the appendices contained in Volume II of this report.

  12. GPU v. B and W lawsuit review and its effect on TMI-1 (Docket 50-289)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents a review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff of the General Public Utilities Corporation, et al. v. the Babcock and Wilcox Company, et al. (GPU v. B and W) lawsuit record to assess whether any of the staff's previous conclusions or their principal bases presented at the Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) restart hearing, supporting restart of TMI-1, should be amended in light of the information contained in the lawsuit record. Details of the lawsuit record are provided in the appendices contained in Volume II of this report

  13. Preventive and Predictive Maintenance, Warehousing of Spares, Periodic Testing and In-Service Inspection Activities at the Nigerian Research Reactor-1 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nigerian Research Reactor–1, or NIRR-1, is sited at Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. Activities on preventive or routine maintenance have been institutionalized since the commissioning of the reactor in February 2004. This has grossly reduced the rates of corrective maintenance activities and helped the reactor management a great deal in predicting failure rates of reactor components and other auxiliary units. Routine maintenance of systems and components are being carried out on a weekly, quarterly and annual basis based on manufacturer’s recommendations, which have been reviewed and improved over the years. The paper presents the implementation of maintenance activities in NIRR-1 from its initial criticality in 2004 till today and the new scheme for periodic testing and in-service-inspection developed after an IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors mission. The measures put in place are envisaged to reduce the negative impact of ageing on NIRR-1 and its auxiliary systems. (author)

  14. Local stability tests in Dresden 2 boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a local stability test performed at Dresden Unit 2 in May 1983 to determine the effect of a new fuel element design on local channel stability. This test was performed because the diameter of the new fuel rods increases the heat transfer coefficient, making the reactor more responsive and, thus, more susceptible to instabilities. After four of the new fuel elements with a 9 x 9 array of fuel rods were loaded into Dresden 2, the test was performed by inserting an adjacent control rod all the way in and then withdrawing it to its original position at maximum speed. At the moment of the test, reactor conditions were 52.7% power and 38.9% flow. Both the new 9 x 9 fuel elements and the standard 8 x 8 ones proved to be locally stable when operating at minimum pump speed at the beginning of cycle in Dresden 2, and no significant difference was found between the behavior of the two fuel types. Finally, Dresden 2 showed a high degree of stability during control rod and normal noise type perturbations

  15. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant steam generator: FEW tube test model post test examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Steam Generator Few Tube Test (FTT) is part of an extensive testing program being carried out in support of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) steam generator design. The testing of full-length seven-tube evaporator and three-tube superheater models of the CRBRP design was conducted to provide steady-state thermal/hydraulic performance data to full power per tube and to verify the absence of multi-year endurance problems. The problems encountered with the mechanical features of the FTT model design which led to premature test termination and the results of the post-test examination are described

  16. Examination on the safety criteria in safety assessment of fuel and core of the High Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) under abnormal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Shindo, Masami [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Shiozawa, Shusaku [and others

    1991-09-01

    The safety criteria of the fuel and the core of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was examined in order to assess the safety of the reactor at anticipated operational transients and at accidents. The safety criteria at the transients were decided as follows; the maximum fuel temperature shall not exceed 1600degC for the reactor core fuel, and it shall not exceed 2500degC for the fuel limit irradiation specimen, which is a fuel assembly with a graphite block and fuel elements for studying the fuel failure limit. On the other hand, the criteria for the accidents were decided so that (i) the fuel rod shall be held within the graphite block, and (ii) the support post and the post sheet shall maintain the strength enough to support the reactor core. Validity of the above criteria was ensured by the fuel behavior at representative abnormal events, namely, `abnormal events at the fuel limit irradiation test`, `rapid reactivity insertion events`, `air ingress accidents`, and `fuel assembly fall accidents`. (author).

  17. Examination on the safety criteria in safety assessment of fuel and core of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) under abnormal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety criteria of the fuel and the core of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was examined in order to assess the safety of the reactor at anticipated operational transients and at accidents. The safety criteria at the transients were decided as follows; the maximum fuel temperature shall not exceed 1600degC for the reactor core fuel, and it shall not exceed 2500degC for the fuel limit irradiation specimen, which is a fuel assembly with a graphite block and fuel elements for studying the fuel failure limit. On the other hand, the criteria for the accidents were decided so that (i) the fuel rod shall be held within the graphite block, and (ii) the support post and the post sheet shall maintain the strength enough to support the reactor core. Validity of the above criteria was ensured by the fuel behavior at representative abnormal events, namely, 'abnormal events at the fuel limit irradiation test', 'rapid reactivity insertion events', 'air ingress accidents', and 'fuel assembly fall accidents'. (author)

  18. In-reactor optical dosimetry in high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of fused silica core optical fibres to in-reactor dosimetry was demonstrated at elevated temperatures and a special irradiation rig was developed for realizing high-temperature optical dosimetry in a high-temperature test reactor (HTTR) at the Oarai Research Establishment of JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute). The paper will describe the present status of preparation for the high-temperature dosimetry in HTTR, utilising radiation-resistant optical fibres and radioluminescent materials. Temperature measurement with a high-speed response is the main target for the present optical dosimetry, which could be applied for monitoring transient behaviours of the HTTR. This could be realised by measuring the intensity of thermoluminescence and black body radiation in the infrared region. For monitoring reactor powers, optical measurements in the visible region are essential. At present, the measurement of the intensity of Cerenkov radiation is the most promising area of study. Other possibilities with radioluminescent materials having luminescent peaks in the visible region are under consideration. One of the candidates will be silica, which has a robust radioluminescent peak at 450 nm. (author)

  19. Computer Aided Analysis and Prototype Testing of an Improved Biogas Reactor For Biomass System

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jeremy (Zheng)

    2015-01-01

    International audience The alternative fuel resources substituting for conventional fuels are required due to less availability of fuel resources than demand in the market. A large amount of crude oil and petroleum products are required to be imported in many countries over the world. Also the environmental pollution is another serious problem when use petroleum products. Biogas, with the composition of 54.5% CH4, 39.5% CO2, and 6% other elements (i.e., H2, N2, H2S, and O2), is a clear gre...

  20. Coupled reactor kinetics and heat transfer model for heat pipe cooled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Houts, Michael

    2001-02-01

    Heat pipes are often proposed as cooling system components for small fission reactors. SAFE-300 and STAR-C are two reactor concepts that use heat pipes as an integral part of the cooling system. Heat pipes have been used in reactors to cool components within radiation tests (Deverall, 1973); however, no reactor has been built or tested that uses heat pipes solely as the primary cooling system. Heat pipe cooled reactors will likely require the development of a test reactor to determine the main differences in operational behavior from forced cooled reactors. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a systems code capable of modeling the coupling between the reactor kinetics and heat pipe controlled heat transport. Heat transport in heat pipe reactors is complex and highly system dependent. Nevertheless, in general terms it relies on heat flowing from the fuel pins through the heat pipe, to the heat exchanger, and then ultimately into the power conversion system and heat sink. A system model is described that is capable of modeling coupled reactor kinetics phenomena, heat transfer dynamics within the fuel pins, and the transient behavior of heat pipes (including the melting of the working fluid). This paper focuses primarily on the coupling effects caused by reactor feedback and compares the observations with forced cooled reactors. A number of reactor startup transients have been modeled, and issues such as power peaking, and power-to-flow mismatches, and loading transients were examined, including the possibility of heat flow from the heat exchanger back into the reactor. This system model is envisioned as a tool to be used for screening various heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, for designing and developing test facility requirements, for use in safety evaluations, and for developing test criteria for in-pile and out-of-pile test facilities. .

  1. Reactor Accident Analysis Methodology for the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulatory requirement to develop an upgraded safety basis for a DOE Nuclear Facility was realized in January 2001 by issuance of a revision to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 830 (10 CFR 830). Subpart B of 10 CFR 830, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' requires a contractor responsible for a DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to either submit by April 9, 2001 the existing safety basis which already meets the requirements of Subpart B, or to submit by April 10, 2003 an upgraded facility safety basis that meets the revised requirements. 10 CFR 830 identifies Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.70, ''Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' as a safe harbor methodology for preparation of a DOE reactor documented safety analysis (DSA). The regulation also allows for use of a graded approach. This report presents the methodology that was developed for preparing the reactor accident analysis portion of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) upgraded DSA. The methodology was approved by DOE for developing the ATRC safety basis as an appropriate application of a graded approach to the requirements of 10 CFR 830

  2. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  3. Production of medical radioisotope 153Sm in the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) through theoretical calculations and practical tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Production of 153Sm isotope by neutron activation in a nuclear reactor was studied. ► Optimal parameters for weight and irradiation time were found. ► This study led to an empirical correction factor (kf). ► Kf enhanced the production procedure of the 153Sm radioisotope. ► The results led to nearly 60% decrease in the amount of material used in the production process. - Abstract: The feasibility of producing 2000–3000 mCi 153Sm by irradiation of 152Sm in 5 MW TRR was studied via TRR core simulation. In this study the cross-section of 152Sm (n,γ) 153Sm reaction from ENDF/B library was used. The effective activation cross section for production of 153Sm is obtained using the neutron spectra in different irradiation channel of the core. The activity of the simulated samples is calculated using the obtained fluxes and cross sections. Then samples were prepared and irradiated under different conditions and fluxes. The final production’s specific activity was measured by the standard dose calibrator ISOMED 1010. By comparison of the theoretical calculations and actual measurements, an empirical correction factor (Kf) was obtained, which is helpful in production procedure of the 153Sm radioisotope. The optimal weight of the samples and irradiation time was studied according to the flux calculations based on the location of the sample and saturated activity calculation. In order to test the proposed conditions, samples were prepared and were irradiated under the proposed conditions. According to the compared results with the initial irradiation condition, the new proposed sample which weighed 4 mg of Sm2O3 is acceptable for the labeling, therefore this study led to nearly 60% decrease in the amount of material used in the production process

  4. SMORN-III benchmark test on reactor noise analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational benchmark test was performed in conjunction with the Third Specialists Meeting on Reactor Noise (SMORN-III) which was held in Tokyo, Japan in October 1981. This report summarizes the results of the test as well as the works made for preparation of the test. (author)

  5. LIGHT WATER REACTOR ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUELS IRRADIATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Laboratory; Barrett, Kristine Eloise [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) experiments is to test novel fuel and cladding concepts designed to replace the current zirconium alloy uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The objective of this Research and Development (R&D) is to develop novel ATF concepts that will be able to withstand loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period than the current fuel system while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, design basis, and beyond design basis events. It was necessary to design, analyze, and fabricate drop-in capsules to meet the requirements for testing under prototypic LWR temperatures in Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Three industry led teams and one DOE team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided fuel rodlet samples for their new concepts for ATR insertion in 2015. As-built projected temperature calculations were performed on the ATF capsules using the BISON fuel performance code. BISON is an application of INL’s Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), which is a massively parallel finite element based framework used to solve systems of fully coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Both 2D and 3D models were set up to examine cladding and fuel performance.

  6. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    • Provide an initial summary description of the design and its main attributes o Summarize the main Test Reactor attributes: reactor type, power, coolant, irradiation conditions (fast and thermal flux levels, number of test loops, positions and volumes), costs (project, operational), schedule and availability factor. o Identify secondary missions and power conversion options, if applicable. o Include statements on the envisioned attractiveness of the reactor type in relation to anticipated domestic and global irradiation services needs, citing past and current trends in reactor development and deployment. o Include statements on Test Reactor scalability (e.g. trade-off between size, power/flux levels and costs), prototypical conditions, overall technology maturity of the specific design and the general technology type. The intention is that this summary must be readable as a stand-alone section.

  7. Tests of Neutron Spectrum Calculations with the Help of Foil Measurements in a D2O and in an H2O-Moderated Reactor and in Reactor Shields of Concrete an Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foil measurements covering the fast, epithermal and thermal neutron energy regions have been made in the centre of the Swedish D2O-moderated reactor R1, in the pool reactor R2-0, and in different positions in reactor shields of iron, magnetite concrete and ordinary concrete. Neutron spectra have also been calculated for most of these positions, often with the help of a numerical integration of the Boltzmann equation. The measurements and the calculated spectra are presented

  8. COMPONENT TEST FACILITY (COMTEST) PHASE 1 ENGINEERING FOR 760C (1400F) ADVANCED ULTRASUPERCRITICAL (A-USC) STEAM GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzel, Paul

    2016-01-31

    The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) performed a Pre-Front End Engineering Design (Pre-FEED) of an A-USC steam superheater for a proposed component test program achieving 760C (1400F) steam temperature. This would lead to follow-on work in a Phase 2 and Phase 3 that would involve detail design, manufacturing, construction and operation of the ComTest. Phase 1 results have provided the engineering data necessary for proceeding to the next phase of ComTest. The steam generator superheater would subsequently supply the steam to an A-USC prototype intermediate pressure steam turbine. The ComTest program is important in that it will place functioning A-USC components in operation and in coordinated boiler and turbine service. It is also important to introduce the power plant operation and maintenance personnel to the level of skills required and provide the first background experience with hands-on training. The project will provide a means to exercise the complete supply chain events required in order to practice and perfect the process for A-USC power plant design, supply, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance. Representative participants will then be able to transfer knowledge and recommendations to the industry. ComTest is conceived in the manner of using a separate standalone plant facility that will not jeopardize the host facility or suffer from conflicting requirements in the host plant’s mission that could sacrifice the nickel alloy components and not achieve the testing goals. ComTest will utilize smaller quantities of the expensive materials and reduce the risk in the first operational practice for A-USC technology in the United States. Components at suitable scale in ComTest provide more assurance before putting them into practice in the full size A-USC demonstration plant.

  9. Fast Shutdown System tests in the Georgia Tech Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fast Shutdown System (FSS) is a new safety system design concept being considered for in installation in the Savannah River (SRS) production reactors. This system is expected to mitigate the consequences of a Design Basis Loss of Coolant Accident, and therefore allow higher operational power levels. A test of this system in the Georgia Tech Research Reactor is proposed to demonstrate the efficacy of this concept. Three tests will be conducted at full power (5MW) and one at low power (100kw). Two full power tests will be conducted with the FSS rod backfilled with one (1) atmosphere of He-4, and one with the rod evacuated. The low power conducted with the FSS rod evacuated. Neutron flux and pressure data will be collected with an independent data acquisition system (DAS). Safety issues associated with the performance of the Fast Shutdown System experiments are addressed in this report. The credible accident scenarios were analyzed using worst case scenarios to demonstrate that no significant nuclear or personnel safety hazards would result from the performance of the proposed experiments

  10. Light water reactor pressure isolation valve performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Light Water Reactor Valve Performance Testing Program was initiated by the NRC to evaluate leakage as an indication of valve condition, provide input to Section XI of the ASME Code, evaluate emission monitoring for condition and degradation and in-service inspection techniques. Six typical check and gate valves were purchased for testing at typical plant conditions (550F at 2250 psig) for an assumed number of cycles for a 40-year plant lifetime. Tests revealed that there were variances between the test results and the present statement of the Code; however, the testing was not conclusive. The life cycle tests showed that high tech acoustic emission can be utilized to trend small leaks, that specific motor signature measurement on gate valves can trend and indicate potential failure, and that in-service inspection techniques for check valves was shown to be both feasible and an excellent preventive maintenance indicator. Life cycle testing performed here did not cause large valve leakage typical of some plant operation. Other testing is required to fully understand the implication of these results and the required program to fully implement them. (author)

  11. Near term test plan using HTTR (high temperature engineering test reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Shoji, E-mail: takada.shoji@jaea.go.jp [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita, Oarai, Higashi-ibaraki, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Iigaki, Kazuhiko; Shinohara, Masanori; Tochio, Daisuke; Shimazaki, Yosuke; Ono, Masato; Yanagi, Shunki [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Japan); Nishihara, Tetsuo [Policy Department and Administration Department, JAEA (Japan); Fukaya, Yuji [HTGR Design Group, Small-Sized HTGR Research and Development Division, Nuclear Hydrogen and Heat Application Research Center, JAEA (Japan); Goto, Minoru [HTGR Safety Evaluation Group, Small-Sized HTGR Research and Development Division, Nuclear Hydrogen and Heat Application Research Center, JAEA (Japan); Tachibana, Yukio [HTGR Design Group, Small-Sized HTGR Research and Development Division, Nuclear Hydrogen and Heat Application Research Center, JAEA (Japan); Sawa, Kazuhiro [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    JAEA has carried out research and development to establish the technical basis of high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) using HTTR. In order to connect hydrogen production system to HTTR, it is necessary to ensure the stability of plant dynamics when the thermal-load of the system is lost. Thermal-load fluctuation test is planned to demonstrate the stable reactor dynamics and to gain the test data for validation of the plant dynamics code. It will be confirmed that the reactor become stable state during a part of removed heat at HTTR heat-sink is lost. A temperature coefficient of reactivity is one of the important parameters for core dynamics calculations for safety analysis, and changes with burnup because of variance of fuel compositions. Measurement of temperature coefficient of reactivity has been conducted by HTTR to confirm the validity of the calculated temperature coefficient of reactivity. A loss of forced cooling (LOFC) test using HTTR has been carried out to verify the inherent safety of HTGR under the condition of loss of forced cooling while the reactor shut-down system disabled.

  12. Functional and performance evaluation of 28 bar hot shutdown passive valve (HSPV) at integral test loop (ITL) for advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During reactor shutdown in advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR), core decay heat is removed by eight isolation condensers (IC) submerged in gravity driven water pool. Passive valves are provided on the down stream of each isolation condenser. On increase in steam drum pressure beyond a set value, these passive valves start opening and establish steam flow by natural circulation between the four steam drums and corresponding isolation condensers under hot shutdown and therefore they are termed as Hot Shut Down Passive Valves (HSPVs). The HSPV is a self acting type valve requiring no external energy, i.e. neither air nor electric supply for actuation. This feature makes the valve functioning independent of external systems such as compressed air supply or electric power supply, thereby providing inherent safety feature in line with reactor design philosophy. The high pressure and high temperature HSPV s for nuclear reactor use, are non-standard valves and therefore not manufactured by the valve industry worldwide. In the process of design and development of a prototype valve for AHWR, a 28 bar HSPV was configured and successfully tested at Integral Test Loop (ITL) at Engineering Hall No.7. During ten continuous experiments spread over 14 days, the HSPV has proved its functional capabilities and its intended use in decay heat removal system. The in-situ pressure setting and calibration aspect of HSPV has also been successfully established during these experiments. This report gives an insight into the HSPV's functional behavior and role in reactor decay heat removal system. The report not only provides the quantitative measure of performance for 28 bar HSPV in terms of valve characteristics, pressure controllability, linearity and hysteresis but also sets qualitative indicators for prototype 80 bar HSPV, being developed for AHWR. (author)

  13. Review of electricity supply failures and plant improvements over 25 years operation of the Harwell materials test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the on-site electrical power sources is described, operational experience is reported and shortcomings are identified. Disturbances in the external power supplies to the reactors are listed for the past 25 years and failure probabilities are derived from this historical data. The 132 kV overhead supply to the Harwell site is identified as the source of nearly 90% of the disturbances. (author)

  14. Entrained Flow Reactor Test of Potassium Capture by Kaolin

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guoliang; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Hao WU; Bøjer, Martin; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the present study a method to simulate the reaction between gaseous KCl and kaolin at suspension fired condition was developed using a pilot-scale entrained flow reactor (EFR). Kaolin was injected into the EFR for primary test of this method. By adding kaolin, KCl can effectively be captured, forming water-insoluble K-aluminosilicate. The amount of K captured by 1 g kaolin rose when increasing the molar ratio of K/Si in the reactant. Changing of reaction temperature from 1100 °C to 1300 °C...

  15. The Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been in operation since 1967 and mainly used to support U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) materials and fuels research programs. Irradiation capabilities of the ATR and post-irradiation examination capabilities of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were generally not being utilized by universities and other potential users due largely to a prohibitive pricing structure. While materials and fuels testing programs using the ATR continue to be needed for US DOE programs such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and Next Generation Nuclear Plant, US DOE recognized there was a national need to make these capabilities available to a broader user base. In April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). As a NSUF, most of the services associated with university experiment irradiation and post-irradiation examinations are provided free-of-charge. The US DOE is providing these services to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science, technology, and education and to encourage active university/industry/laboratory collaboration. The first full year of implementing the user facility concept was 2008 and it was a very successful year. The first university experiment pilot project was developed in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and began irradiation in the ATR in 2008. Lessons learned from this pilot program will be applied to future NSUF projects. Five other university experiments were also competitively selected in March 2008 from the initial solicitation for proposals. The NSUF now has a continually open process where universities can submit proposals as they are ready. Plans are to invest in new and upgraded capabilities at the ATR, post-irradiation examination capabilities at the INL, and in a new experiment assembly facility to further support the implementation of the user facility concept. Through a newly created Partnership Program

  16. RERTR program activities related to the development and application of new LEU fuels. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor; low-enriched uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1983-01-01

    The statue of the U.S. Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm/sup 3/ each year, from the current 1.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ to the 7.0 g U/cm/sup 3/ which will be reached in late 1988. The technical needs of research and test reactors for HEU exports are also forecasted to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years.

  17. Tests of a new CCD-camera based neutron radiography detector system at the reactor stations in Munich and Vienna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, E.; Pleinert, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Schillinger, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Koerner, S. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-09-01

    The performance of the new neutron radiography detector designed at PSI with a cooled high sensitive CCD-camera was investigated under real neutronic conditions at three beam ports of two reactor stations. Different converter screens were applied for which the sensitivity and the modulation transfer function (MTF) could be obtained. The results are very encouraging concerning the utilization of this detector system as standard tool at the radiography stations at the spallation source SINQ. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs.

  18. Experimental Plan and Irradiation Target Design for FeCrAl Embrittlement Screening Tests Conducted Using the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-26

    The objective of the FeCrAl embrittlement screening tests being conducted through the use of Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor is to provide data on the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties including radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement through systematic testing and analysis. Data developed on the mechanical properties will be supported by extensive microstructural evaluations to assist in the development of structure-property relationships and provide a sound, fundamental understanding of the performance of FeCrAl alloys in intense neutron radiation fields. Data and analysis developed as part of this effort will be used to assist in the determination of FeCrAl alloys as a viable material for commercial light water reactor (LWR) applications with a primary focus as an accident tolerant cladding.

  19. Experimental Plan and Irradiation Target Design for FeCrAl Embrittlement Screening Tests Conducted Using the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the FeCrAl embrittlement screening tests being conducted through the use of Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor is to provide data on the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties including radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement through systematic testing and analysis. Data developed on the mechanical properties will be supported by extensive microstructural evaluations to assist in the development of structure-property relationships and provide a sound, fundamental understanding of the performance of FeCrAl alloys in intense neutron radiation fields. Data and analysis developed as part of this effort will be used to assist in the determination of FeCrAl alloys as a viable material for commercial light water reactor (LWR) applications with a primary focus as an accident tolerant cladding.

  20. Design considerations of the irradiation test vehicle for the advanced test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    An irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being jointly developed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMIT) and the U.S. Fusion Program. The vehicle is intended for neutron irradiation testing of candidate structural materials, including vanadium-based alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low activation steels. It could possibly be used for U.S./Japanese collaboration in the Jupiter Program. The first test train is scheduled to be completed by September 1998. In this report, we present the functional requirements for the vehicle and a preliminary design that satisfies these requirements.

  1. Welding and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high safety requirements which must be demanded of the quality of the welded joints in reactor technique have so far not been fulfilled in all cases. The errors occuring have caused considerable loss of availability and high material costs. They were not, however, so serious that one need have feared any immediate danger to the personnel or to the environment. The safety devices of reactor plants were only called upon in a few cases and to these they responded perfectly. The intensive efforts to complete and improve the specifications are to contribute to that in future, the reactor plants can be counted even more so as one of the safest technical plants ever. (orig./LH)

  2. TREAT Reactor Control and Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main control algorithm of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Automatic Reactor Control System (ARCS) resides in Read Only Memory (ROM) and only experiment specific parameters are input via keyboard entry. Prior to executing an experiment, the software and hardware of the control computer is tested by a closed loop real-time simulation. Two computers with parallel processing are used for the reactor simulation and another computer is used for simulation of the control rod system. A monitor computer, used as a redundant diverse reactor protection channel, uses more conservative setpoints and reduces challenges to the Reactor Trip System (RTS). The RTS consists of triplicated hardwired channels with one out of three logic. The RTS is automatically tested by a digital Dedicated Microprocessor Tester (DMT) prior to the execution of an experiment. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. The influence of solar wind on extratropical cyclones – Part 1: Wilcox effect revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rybanský

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A sun-weather correlation, namely the link between solar magnetic sector boundary passage (SBP by the Earth and upper-level tropospheric vorticity area index (VAI, that was found by Wilcox et al. (1974 and shown to be statistically significant by Hines and Halevy (1977 is revisited. A minimum in the VAI one day after SBP followed by an increase a few days later was observed. Using the ECMWF ERA-40 re-analysis dataset for the original period from 1963 to 1973 and extending it to 2002, we have verified what has become known as the "Wilcox effect" for the Northern as well as the Southern Hemisphere winters. The effect persists through years of high and low volcanic aerosol loading except for the Northern Hemisphere at 500 mb, when the VAI minimum is weak during the low aerosol years after 1973, particularly for sector boundaries associated with south-to-north reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF BZ component. The "disappearance" of the Wilcox effect was found previously by Tinsley et al. (1994 who suggested that enhanced stratospheric volcanic aerosols and changes in air-earth current density are necessary conditions for the effect. The present results indicate that the Wilcox effect does not require high aerosol loading to be detected. The results are corroborated by a correlation with coronal holes where the fast solar wind originates. Ground-based measurements of the green coronal emission line (Fe XIV, 530.3 nm are used in the superposed epoch analysis keyed by the times of sector boundary passage to show a one-to-one correspondence between the mean VAI variations and coronal holes. The VAI is modulated by high-speed solar wind streams with a delay of 1–2 days. The Fourier spectra of VAI time series show peaks at periods similar to those found in the solar corona and solar wind time series. In the modulation of VAI by solar wind the IMF BZ seems to control the phase of the Wilcox effect and the depth of the VAI minimum. The

  4. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  5. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T. [Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  6. Environmental concerns regarding a materials test reactor fuel fabrication facility at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the industrial activities success, front to a more and more informed and demanding society and to a more and more competitive market demands an environmental administration policy which doesn't limit itself to assist the legislation but anticipate and prevent, in a responsible way, possible damages to the environment. One of the maim programs of the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research of the national Commission of Nuclear Energy located in Brazil, through the Center of Nuclear Fuel - CCN - is to manufacture MTR-type fuel elements using low-enrichment uranium (20 wt% 235U), to supply its IEA-RI research reactor. Integrated in this program, this work aims at well developing and assuring a methodology to implant an environment, health and safety policy, foreseeing its management with the use of detailed data reports and through the adoption of new tools for improving the management, in order to fulfil the applicable legislation and accomplish all the environmental, operational and works aspects. The applied methodology for the effluents management comprises different aspects, including the specific environmental legislation of a country, main available effluents treatment techniques, process flow analyses from raw materials and intakes to products, generated effluents, residuals and emissions. Data collections were accomplished for points gathering and tests characterization, classification and compatibility of the generated effluents and their eventual environmental impacts. This study aims to implant the Sustainable Concept in order to guarantee access to financial resources, allowing cost reduction, maximizing long-term profits, preventing and reducing environmental accident risks and stimulating both the attraction and the keeping of a motivated manpower. Work on this project has already started and, even though many technical actions have not still ended, the results have being extremely valuable. These results can already give to CCN

  7. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  8. Integrated infrastructure initiatives for material testing reactor innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The EU FP7 MTR+I3 project has initiated a durable cooperation between MTR operators. → Improvements in irradiation test device technology and instrumentation were achieved. → Professional training efforts were streamlined and best practices were exchanged. → A framework has been set up to coordinate and optimize the use of MTRs in the EU. - Abstract: The key goal of the European FP6 project MTR+I3 was to build a durable cooperation between Material Testing Reactor (MTR) operators and relevant laboratories that can maintain European leadership with updated capabilities and competences regarding reactor performances and irradiation technology. The MTR+I3 consortium was composed of 18 partners with a high level of expertise in irradiation-related services for all types of nuclear plants. This project covered activities that foster integration of the MTR community involved in designing, fabricating and operating irradiation devices through information exchange, know-how cross-fertilization, exchanges of interdisciplinary personnel, structuring of key-technology suppliers and professional training. The network produced best practice guidelines for selected irradiation activities. This project allowed to launch or to improve technical studies in various domains dealing with irradiation test device technology, experimental loop designs and instrumentation. Major results are illustrated in this paper. These concern in particular: on-line fuel power determination, neutron screen optimization, simulation of transmutation process, power transient systems, water chemistry and stress corrosion cracking, fission gas measurement, irradiation behaviour of electronic modules, mechanical loading under irradiation, high temperature gas loop technology, heavy liquid metal loop development and safety test instrumentation. One of the major benefits of this project is that, starting from a situation of fragmented resources in a strongly competitive sector, it has

  9. Replacement of shutdown cooling system and repair of reactor pressure vessel nozzle welds at NPP Forsmark unit 1 and unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant is located about 150 km north of Stockholm. The plant consists of three units with boiling water reactors. Unit 1 and Unit 2 were put into operation in 1981 and 1982, respectively. Both of these units are identical each having a capacity of 970 MW. Unit 3 was completed in 1985 and has a capacity of 1160 MW. In November 1998 Babcock Noell Nuclear was awarded the contract to replace the pipe-work of the two-sectioned Shutdown Cooling System 321 from the nozzles at the reactor pressure vessel to 10 meters outside the containment. Moreover, the inner and outer isolation valves including the penetrations had to be replaced. Finally, the repair of the RPV (reactor pressure vessel) connecting welds of the System 415 (Feed Water) and System 323 (Emergency Cooling) was to be performed. The work was carried out by a Babcock Noell Nuclear team integrating Swedish companies during the outages May/June 2000 in Forsmark 2 and August/September 2000 in Forsmark 1. In the Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2, 19 RPV nozzle connections were improved successfully. All relevant start-up deadlines could be kept. All new tools and manipulators met the stringent project requirements. The mockup qualification of the equipment and the special personnel training performed in advance proved that such challenging work can be managed despite limited preparation time and planned effectively in order to recognize and avoid possible risks. (authors)

  10. Integral test of neutron cross section data for future reactor materials through measurement and analysis of neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the cross section data for future reactor materials, such as molybdenum, niobium, titanium, lithium and fluorine, the angular neutron spectra in test piles of these materials or their chemical compounds have been measured in the energy range from a few keV to a few MeV by the linac time-of-flight method. The results have been compared with those theoretically calculated from the evaluated cross section data in such as JENDL-2 (or JENDL-1, JENDL-3PR1) and ENDF/B-IV. For both of molybdenum and niobium, it has been found that the energy distribution of inelastically scattered neutrons plays an important role in the analysis, and the JENDL library gives better predictions of spectrum shapes than ENDF/B-IV for both cases. In the case of niobium, however, it appears that the values of inelastic scattering cross section in JENDL-2 are too small around 2 MeV. It has been also found for niobium that the cross section data below 100 keV in ENDF/B-IV are inadequate. In a titanium pile, a discrepancy between the measured spectrum and the calculated one from ENDF/B-IV has been found in the energy range from about 60 keV to a few 100 keV. In order to investigate the cause of this discrepancy, the total cross sections for titanium have been measured by the transmission method. In the case of lithium, the discrepancy between the measured and calculated spectra is considerably reduced by adopting the angular distribution for 7Li from ENDF/B-IV above about 500 keV. In the case of fluorine, spatial distributions of neutrons and X-rays have been also measured in both piles by the activation method to estimate the influence of photoneutrons generated in the sample material on the neutron distribution, and it has been found that their influence below 1 MeV is not so large as is necessary to be taken into account for the present assessment. (J.P.N)

  11. Component Test Facility (Comtest) Phase 1 Engineering For 760°C (1400°F) Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC) Steam Generator Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzel, Paul [Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group, Inc., Barberton, OH (United States)

    2016-05-13

    The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) performed a Pre-Front End Engineering Design (Pre-FEED) of an A-USC steam superheater for a proposed component test program achieving 760°C (1400°F) steam temperature. This would lead to follow-on work in a Phase 2 and Phase 3 that would involve detail design, manufacturing, construction and operation of the ComTest. Phase 1 results have provided the engineering data necessary for proceeding to the next phase of ComTest. The steam generator superheater would subsequently supply the steam to an A-USC prototype intermediate pressure steam turbine. The ComTest program is important in that it will place functioning A-USC components in operation and in coordinated boiler and turbine service. It is also important to introduce the power plant operation and maintenance personnel to the level of skills required and provide the first background experience with hands-on training. The project will provide a means to exercise the complete supply chain events required in order to practice and perfect the process for A-USC power plant design, supply, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance. Representative participants will then be able to transfer knowledge and recommendations to the industry. ComTest is conceived in the manner of using a separate standalone plant facility that will not jeopardize the host facility or suffer from conflicting requirements in the host plant’s mission that could sacrifice the nickel alloy components and not achieve the testing goals. ComTest will utilize smaller quantities of the expensive materials and reduce the risk in the first operational practice for A-USC technology in the United States. Components at suitable scale in ComTest provide more assurance before putting them into practice in the full size A-USC demonstration plant.

  12. Comparison of counterpart test results with the VISTA-ITL and FESTA on SBLOCA scenarios for an integral type reactor SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counterpart test results were compared for small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) scenarios of shutdown cooling system (SCS) and pressurizer safety valve (PSV) line breaks for an integral type reactor SMART. As counter-part tests for an SBLOCA for the SMART design, two integral effect test facilities of VISTA-ITL and FESTA were used, and their results were compared to better understand the phenomena expected to occur in the SMART design. The initial and boundary conditions were appropriately provided for the tests, and the overall trend of the major thermal-hydraulic parameters showed reasonable results. Although there are minor differences between the tests results from VISTA-ITL and FESTA due to their different scales, it is considered that they provide reasonable thermal-hydraulic behaviors against SMART during the SBLOCA scenarios. Therefore, these two IET facilities, VISTA-ITL and FESTA, can be used together to simulate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the SMART design. (author)

  13. Experience with spent fuel storage at research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting held in Vienna, 5-8 July 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated fuel from research and test reactors has been stored at various facilities for several decades. As these facilities age and approach or exceed their original design lifetimes, there is mounting concern about closure of the fuel cycle and about the integrity of ageing fuels from the materials point of view as well as some concern about the loss of self-protection of the fuels as their activity decays. It is clear that an international effort is necessary to give these problems sufficient exposure and to ensure that work begins on appropriate solutions. To obtain an overall picture of the size and extent of these problems, an Advisory Group Meeting on Storage Experience with Spent Fuel from Research Reactors was convened in Vienna 5-8 July 1993, and attended by twelve participants and three observers representing thirteen different countries. These proceedings contain the country reports presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Reactor physics and economic aspects of the CANDU reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A history of the development of the CANDU system is given along with a fairly detailed description of the 600 MW(e) CANDU reactor. Reactor physics calculation methods are described, as well as comparisons between calculated reactor physics parameters and those measured in research and power reactors. An examination of the economics of CANDU in the Ontario Hydro system and a comparison between fossil fuelled and light water reactors is presented. Some physics, economics and resources aspects are given for both low enriched uranium and thorium-fuelled CANDU reactors. Finally the RβD program in Advanced Fuel Cycles is briefly described

  15. Completion summary for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2014-01-01

    organic compounds, stable isotopes, and radionuclides. Water samples from both wells indicated that concentrations of tritium, sulfate, and chromium were affected by wastewater disposal practices at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex. Most constituents in water from wells USGS 140 and USGS 141 had concentrations similar to concentrations in well USGS 136, which is upgradient from wells USGS 140 and USGS 141.

  16. Modeling the critical hydrogen concentration in the AECL test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen is added to a pressurized water reactor (PWR) to suppress radiolysis and maintain reducing conditions. The minimum hydrogen concentration needed to prevent radiolysis is referred to as the critical hydrogen concentration (CHC). The CHC was measured experimentally in the mid-1990s by Elliot and Stuart in a reactor loop at Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL), and was found to be approximately 0.5 scc/kg for typical PWR conditions. This value is well below industry-normal PWR operating levels near 40 scc/kg. Radiation chemistry models have also predicted a low CHC, even below the AECL experimental result. In the last few years some of the radiation chemical kinetic rate constants have been re-measured and G-values have been reassessed by Elliot and Bartels. These new data have been used in this work to revise the models and compare them with AECL experimental data. It is quite clear that the scavenging yields tabulated for high-LET radiolysis by Elliot and Bartels are not appropriate to use in the present context, where track-escape yields are needed to describe the homogeneous recombination kinetics in the mixed radiation field. In the absence of such data for high temperature PWR conditions, we have used the neutron G-values as fitting parameters. Even with this expedient, the model predicts at least a factor of two smaller CHC than was observed. We demonstrate that to recover the reported CHC result, the chemistry of ammonia impurity must be included. - Highlights: ► Hydrogen is added to nuclear reactor cooling loops to prevent radiolysis. ► Tests at AECL were carried out to determine the critical hydrogen concentration. ► Neutron radiolysis G-values need to be modified to understand the results. ► Ammonia impurity needs to be included for quantitative modeling.

  17. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to ∼9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS ∼6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored

  18. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosea, J.; Adler, J.H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D. [and others

    1994-09-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to {approx}9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS {approx}6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored.

  19. Benchmark Evaluation of Start-Up and Zero-Power Measurements at the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate six cold-critical and two warm-critical, zero-power measurements of the HTTR. Additional measurements of a fully-loaded subcritical configuration, core excess reactivity, shutdown margins, six isothermal temperature coefficients, and axial reaction-rate distributions were also evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments. Insufficient information is publicly available to develop finely-detailed models of the HTTR as much of the design information is still proprietary. However, the uncertainties in the benchmark models are judged to be of sufficient magnitude to encompass any biases and bias uncertainties incurred through the simplification process used to develop the benchmark models. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the impurity content of the various graphite blocks that comprise the HTTR. Monte Carlo calculations of keff are between approximately 0.9 % and 2.7 % greater than the benchmark values. Reevaluation of the HTTR models as additional information becomes available could improve the quality of this benchmark and possibly reduce the computational biases. High-quality characterization of graphite impurities would significantly improve the quality of the HTTR benchmark assessment. Simulation of the other reactor physics measurements are in good agreement with the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

  20. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    fulfill its mission that is to contribute in improving the quality of life of the Brazilian people. The nuclear fuel cycle is a series of steps involved in the production and use of fuel for nuclear reactors. The Laboratories of Chemistry and Environmental Diagnosis Center, CQMA, support the demand of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Program providing chemical characterization of uranium compounds and other related materials. In this period the Research Reactor Center (CRPq) concentrated efforts on improving equipment and systems to enable the IEA-R1 research reactor to operate at higher power, increasing the capacity of radioisotopes production, samples irradiation, tests and experiments. (author)

  1. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    contribute in improving the quality of life of the Brazilian people. The nuclear fuel cycle is a series of steps involved in the production and use of fuel for nuclear reactors. The Laboratories of Chemistry and Environmental Diagnosis Center, CQMA, support the demand of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Program providing chemical characterization of uranium compounds and other related materials. In this period the Research Reactor Center (CRPq) concentrated efforts on improving equipment and systems to enable the IEA-R1 research reactor to operate at higher power, increasing the capacity of radioisotopes production, samples irradiation, tests and experiments. (author)

  2. For a better estimation of gamma heating in nuclear material-testing reactors and associated devices. Status and work plan from calculation methods to nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information