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Sample records for babcock and wilcox test reactor

  1. Transient response of Babcock and Wilcox-designed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On February 26, 1980, the Crystal River Unit No. 3 Nuclear Generating Plant, designed by the Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W), experienced an incident involving a malfunction in an instrumentation and control system power supply. Faced with the Crystal River Unit 3 incident and the apparently high frequency of such near similar types of transients in other B and W designed plants, a special Task Force was established within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation to provide an assessment of the apparent sensitivity of the B and W designed plants to such transients and the consequences of malfunctions and failures of the integrated control system and non-nuclear instrumentation. This report provides an assessment of these issues

  2. Experimental simulation of a small-scale Babcock and Wilcox reactor model: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the design, the instrumentation system, the data-acquisition system, and the testing of a small-scale, low pressure model of the cooling systems of a Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactor. This work is part of a larger program to address some of the safety issues in the B and W design. This test data are stored on data tapes; they are available to qualified requesters through EPRI. The primary use of these data is expected to be code verification and comparisons with results from other test facilities in the program

  3. Probabilistic analysis for the Babcock and Wilcox advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) design employs design features that will provide enhanced safety, reliability, and design margin over the current generation of commercial nuclear power plants. This paper presents a probabilistic analysis performed to provide early feedback to the designers to enhance the reliability of these systems. Feedback from the probabilistic analysis was used to improve the system design by incorporating the insights gained. The calculated core melt frequency for the ALWR design was better than the design targets since most of the features that dominate the risk profile in conventional pressurized water reactors (PWRs) were eliminated in the redesign for the ALWR

  4. Numerical simulation of natural circulation in a geometry simulating a Babcock and Wilcox type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors present the results of numerical calculations for natural circulation in the facility called Once-Through Integral System (OTIS) Test Facility simulating a Babcock and Wilcox type nuclear reactor. The OTIS test facility was constructed to represent the main features of a Babcok and Wilcox raised loop plant. The computer code adopted for the study is RETRAN-02. A small break LOCA is simulated, and a number of important physical variables are calculated and compared with test data. These variables are temperature, pressure, void fraction, mass flow rate and liquid level in the steam generator secondary side. The analysis conducted indicates that the RETRAN-02 calculated response agrees reasonably well with the measured system response. Figure 1 shows cold leg fluid temperature during a two-phase natural circulation transient. Complex phenomena such as flow oscillations due to void generation are calculated well with RETRAN-02. Hot and cold fluid mixing near the HPI injection port is also well represented using RETRAN-02. The results do indicate, however, the need to account for piping heat losses to accurately represent the detailed phenomena occurring in the hot leg

  5. Standard technical specifications for Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors. Revision 4. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Babcock and Wilcox Pressurized Water Reactors (BandW-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process. The BandW-STS provide applicants with model specifications to be used in formulation plant-specific technical specifications required by 10 CFR Part 50, Section 50.36, which set forth the specific characteristics of the facility and the conditions for its operation that are required to provide adequate protection to the health and safety of the public. This document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  6. Babcock and Wilcox experiments interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work consists of enlargement of critical experiments used for the pin power distribution calculation validation by the EDF industrial methodology. The Babcock and Wilcox critical experiments have measured the pin by pin radial power distribution in UO2 assemblies with and without glass or gadolinium absorber rods. The EDF scheme calculates two energy groups collapsed and homogenized neutron cross-sections and diffusion coefficients for the different pins types present in the mock-up, using the APOLLO2 cell code, based on the Pij collision probability modelling, fed with the 99 energy groups CEA93V6 data base library. These cross sections are then corrected by the HERMES transport-diffusion equivalence and used as entry data by the COCCINELLE core calculation code using finite difference method with one mesh for each calculation cell. The comparison between measured and calculated pin power values has confirmed the very satisfactory accuracy level of EDF industrial scheme for the treatment of assemblies without and with gadolinium pins. It exists a margin of improvement: the future calculation methodology currently under development will have the benefit of more accurate transport calculations for generating the two groups cross-sections used by the core diffusion code. (authors)

  7. Standard technical specifications for Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standard Technical Specification (STS) has been structured for the broadest possible use on B and W NSSS plants currently being reviewed for an Operating License. Two separate and discrete containment specification sections are provided for each of the following containment types: Atmospheric, and Dual. Optional specifications are provided for those features and systems which may be included in individual plant designs but are not generic in their scope of application. Alternate specifications are provided in a limited number of cases to cover situations where alternate specification requirements are necessary on a generic basis because of design differences. The format of the STS addresses the categories required by 10 CFR 50 and consists of six sections covering the areas of: Definitions, Safety Limits and Limiting Safety System Settings, Limiting Conditions for Operation, Surveillance Requirements, Design Features, and Administrative Controls

  8. Standard technical specifications for Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Standard Technical Specification (STS) has been structured for the broadest possible use on B and W NSSS plants currently being reviewed for an Operating License. Two separate and discrete containment specification sections are provided for each of the following containment types: Atmospheric and Dual. Optional specifications are provided for those features and systems which may be included in individual plant designs but are not generic in their scope of application. Alternate specifications are provided in a limited number of cases to cover situations where alternate specification requirements are necessary on a generic basis because of design differences. This revision of STS does not typically include requirements which may be added or revised as a result of the NRC staff's further review of the Three Mile Island incident

  9. Standard Technical Specifications, Babcock and Wilcox Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) plants and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) based on the B ampersand W Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council. The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for developing improved plant-specific technical specifications by individual nuclear power plant licensees. This volume contains sections 3.4--3.9 which cover: Reactor coolant systems, emergency core cooling systems, containment systems, plant systems, electrical power systems, refueling operations

  10. LEU silicide programs at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low enriched silicide development project at Babcock and Wilcox has matured into a production operation that has resulted in the completion of fuel elements for three research reactors; ORR, R-2 Studsvik and SAPHIR. Characteristic anomalies of silicide fuel which make the fabrication of fuel plates and elements more difficult than UAlx, have either been avoided, eliminated or significantly improved. One such anomaly is the reaction between uranium silicide fuel and aluminum matrix material. A detailed analysis was performed to characterize the extent of this reaction. Data suggests that a solid state diffusion of aluminum atoms into the uranium silicide lattice results in the formation of several intermediate Al-Si-U phases before forming a stable UAl4 phase

  11. Thermal-hydraulic research plan for Babcock and Wilcox plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a plan for thermal-hydraulic research for Babcock and Wilcox designed reactor systems. It describes the technical issues, regulatory needs, and the research necessary to address these needs. The plan also discusses the relationship between current and proposed research, and provides a tentative schedule to complete the required work

  12. Standard Technical Specifications, Babcock and Wilcox plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) Plants and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the B ampersand W Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. This document Volume 2, contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  13. Status of LEU programs at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the Low Enriched Programs being conducted at Babcock and Wilcox the primary effort has been to establish, from past LEU development work and current production technology, an efficient production process that maintains product quality for both LEU UAlx and U3Si2 elements. This effort has allowed the Babcock and Wilcox Company to successfully complete a second LEU production contract for the 2-MW Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan. Current U3Si2 contracts which include Standard and Control Elements for the Oak Ridge Reactor, SAPHIR Elements for the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research, silicide (U3Si2) powder for the Danish Riso National Laboratory and Elements for Sweden's R2 Reactor at Studsvik are being manufactured under the same guidelines of quality and efficiency improvements. The transition from developmental work to a production process for powder fabrication; compacting; plate and element fabrication along with inspection methods are highlighted within this report. (author)

  14. Production of leu high density fuels at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large number of fuel elements of all types are produced for both international and domestic customers by Nuclear Fuel Division of Babcock and Wilcox. A brief history of the division, included previous and present research reactor fuel element fabrication experience is discussed. The manufacturing facilities are briefly described. The fabrication of LEU fuels and economic analysis of the production are included. (A.J.)

  15. Shutdown decay heat removal analysis of a Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactor: Case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is one of six case studies for USI A-45 Decay Heat Removal (DHR) Requirements. The purpose of this study is to identify any potential vulnerabilities in the DHR systems of a typical Babcock and Wilcox PWR, to suggest possible modifications to improve the DHR capability, and to assess the value and impact of the most promising alternatives to the existing DHR systems. The systems analysis considered small LOCAs and transient internal initiating events, and seismic, fire, extreme wind, internal and external flood, and lightning external events. A full-scale systems analysis was performed with detailed fault trees and event trees including support system dependencies. The system analysis results were extrapolated into release categories using applicable past PRA phenomenological results and improved containment failure mode probabilities. Public consequences were estimated using site specific CRAC2 calculations. The Value-Impact (VI) analysis of possible alternatives considered both onsite and offsite impacts arriving at several risk measures such as averted population dose out to a 50-mile radius and dollars per person rem averted. Uncertainties in the VI analysis are discussed and the issues of feed and bleed and secondary blowdown are analyzed

  16. Babcock and Wilcox plate fabrication experience with uranium silicide spherical fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is written to present the fuel fabrication experience of Babcock and Wilcox using atomized spherical uranium silicide powder. The intent is to demonstrate the ability to fabricate fuel plates using spherical powder and to provide useful information proceeding into the next phase of work using this type of fuel. The limited quantity of resources- spherical powder and time, did not allow for much process optimizing in this work scope. However, the information contained within provides optimism for the future of spherical uranium silicide fuel plate fabrication at Babcock and Wilcox.The success of assembling fuel elements with spherical powder will enable Babcock and Wilcox to reduce overall costs to its customers while still maintaining our reputation for providing high quality research and test reactor products. (author)

  17. Status of LEU programs at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary focus of Babcock and Wilcox's Research and Test Reactor Fuel Element Facility (B and W-RTRFE) is to continuously improve its fabrication and inspection processes in order to provide the highest quality product available. Beginning with fuel powder production and progressing through final element inspection, all operations are continuously reviewed for potential improvement. In addition, B and W provides significant corporate R and D funding to further test and improve critical operations, inspections, and equipment. This total commitment to quality and integrity has led to B and W's success as a premier fabricator of plate fuel assemblies. The results of these recent production and development activities are highlighted in this report. (author)

  18. Assessment of thermal aging embrittlement of cast austenitic stainless steel components in the Babcock and Wilcox -designed PWR reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The currently operating Babcock and Wilcox (BW) designed pressurized water reactors (PWRs) were constructed during the late sixties and seventies. Some of the reactor internals components were fabricated from cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS). The selection of CASS for the internals components was made to expedite the construction schedule by reducing machining and allowing production in large quantities. Since then, test data have shown that some CASS materials are susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement at PWR operating temperatures and its effect on functionality is of concern. Recently, the US nuclear power industry has developed inspection and evaluation guidelines (MRP-227, Rev.0) for managing aging degradation in PWR reactor internals for both the current and extended license periods. The MRP-227, Rev.0 guidelines recommend additional inspections for certain internals components including CASS components in BW PWRs due to thermal aging embrittlement concerns. The thermal aging embrittlement susceptibility for CASS can be assessed by the casting method and ferrite content if sufficient information in the original fabrication records is available. AREVA NP has performed a fabrication records search to identify several CASS components in the BW PWR internals and reviewed the archived fabrication records. A database has been assembled as a result of this records search. Based on the fabrication records, the ferrite content is determined using Hull's equivalent factors. Grade CF8 castings (without molybdenum) have been found to not be susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement. However, thermal aging embrittlement is a potential concern for Grade CF3M castings (containing 2 to 3% molybdenum). As a result of this assessment, several CASS components in the BW PWRs are concluded to not be susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement. The findings provide the basis for the removal of these CASS components from the additional inspection requirements in MRP-227

  19. Nuclear criticality safety for drums at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B ampersand W) operates a nuclear fuel facility in Lynchburg, Virginia, processing uranium over the full range of possible enrichments (depleted to 97.65 wt% 235U). Nuclear fuel is produced for defense programs and for various research and test reactors worldwide. The facility has a uranium recovery operation that handles scrap produced at B ampersand W as well as scrap from other U.S. Department of Energy sites. B ampersand W also has a down-blending operation that is currently completing the down-blending of the fully enriched Project Sapphire Uranium to commercial-grade fuel (4 Wt% 235U). The facility generates approximately two hundred 55-gal drums of radioactive waste each month. Just a few years ago the number of waste drums on-site stood at ∼5000; however, through an aggressive waste reduction program, this number has been reduced to ∼2000. B ampersand W strives to avoid storing uranium scrap in 55-gal drums; however, there are approximately sixty-four 55-gal drums of scrap on-site. Scrap is that material from which the uranium is recovered because of financial, contractual, or regulatory considerations; waste is that material destined for disposal. Whether waste or scrap, nuclear criticality safety is of paramount concern in the handling, processing, and storing of uranium-bearing drums at B ampersand W. Any shipment complies with applicable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and U.S. Department of Transportation regulations

  20. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: BABCOCK AND WILCOX CYCLONE FURNACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is an evaluation of the performance of the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology and its applicability as a treatment technique for soils contaminated with heavy metals, radionuclides, and organics. oth the technical and economic aspects of...

  1. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BABCOCK AND WILCOX CYCLONE FURNACE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology is a treatment process for contaminated soils. he process was evaluated to determine its ability to destroy semivolatile organics and to isolate metals and simulated radionuclides into a non-leachable slag materi...

  2. Babcock and Wilcox comes up with a recipe for longevity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With many nuclear power plants ten to twelve years old, there is a growing awareness of the desirability of extending their useful life. Babcock and Wilcox recently released details of its life extension strategy. The five-step approach to plant life extension is outlined. (U.K.)

  3. Babcock and Wilcox Canada steam generators past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steam generators in all of the domestic CANDU Plants, and most of the foreign CANDU plants, were supplied by Babcock and Wilcox Canada, either on their own or in co-operation with local manufacturers. More than 200 steam generators have been supplied. In addition, Babcock and Wilcox Canada has taken the technology which evolved out of the CANDU steam generators and has adapted the technology to supply of replacement steam generators for PWR's. There is enough history and operating experience, plus laboratory experience, to point to the future directions which will be taken in steam generator design. This paper documents the steam generators which have been supplied, the experience in operation and maintenance, what has worked and not worked, and how the design, materials, and operating and maintenance philosophy have evolved. The paper also looks at future requirements in the market, and the continuing research and product development going on at Babcock and Wilcox to address the future steam generator requirements. (author)

  4. Babcock and Wilcox Canada steam generators past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.C. [Babcock and Wilcox Canada, Cambridge, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    The steam generators in all of the domestic CANDU Plants, and most of the foreign CANDU plants, were supplied by Babcock and Wilcox Canada, either on their own or in co-operation with local manufacturers. More than 200 steam generators have been supplied. In addition, Babcock and Wilcox Canada has taken the technology which evolved out of the CANDU steam generators and has adapted the technology to supply of replacement steam generators for PWR's. There is enough history and operating experience, plus laboratory experience, to point to the future directions which will be taken in steam generator design. This paper documents the steam generators which have been supplied, the experience in operation and maintenance, what has worked and not worked, and how the design, materials, and operating and maintenance philosophy have evolved. The paper also looks at future requirements in the market, and the continuing research and product development going on at Babcock and Wilcox to address the future steam generator requirements. (author)

  5. Quality assurance and inspection techniques in use at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When Babcock and Wilcox reentered the aluminum research reactor fuel element business, most of the equipment, processes and techniques were provided by our customers. Some of the equipment, both manufacturing and inspection, has been in use since the beginning of the program and dates back some 20 years. Babcock and Wilcox has applied the expertise and technology gained from our naval fuel program in several areas of research, fabrication and inspection to update this equipment. Areas of improvement are capacitance non-contact gaging, min-clad gage evaluation and the future of real time x-ray systems. With production and inspection costs rising, Babcock and Wilcox has also initiated alternative possibilities for inspecting components at lower costs and increased precision

  6. Compact Process Development at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of compaction trials have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel at packing fractions exceeding 46% by volume. Results from these trials are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operable using nuclear fuel materials. Final process testing is in progress to certify the process for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts in 2012.

  7. Babcock and Wilcox assessment of the Pratt and Whitney XNR2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Kurt O.; Scoles, Stephen W.; Jensen, R. R.; Rodes, J. R.; Ales, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    Babcock & Wilcox performed four subtasks related to the assessment of the Pratt & Whitney XNR2000 nuclear reactor as follows: (1) cermet fuel element fabricability assessment; (2) mechanical design review of the reactor system; (3) neutronic analysis review; and (4) safety assessment. The results of the mechanical and physics reviews have been integrated into the reactor design. The results of the fuel and safety assessments are presented.

  8. Standard technical specifications: Babcock and Wilcox Plants. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Babcock ampersand Wilcox Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  9. Babcock and Wilcox STACSL integration options in ACSL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pertinent features of the Babcock and Wilcox ordinary differential equation solver STACSL which has been implemented in the ACSL Advanced Continuous Simulation Language are described. STACSL solves systems which have either a dense or a sparse Jacobian matrix. Root-finding techniques are incorporated in STACSL to efficiently solve problems with derivative discontinuities or other special events which must be detected and processed. Extensive diagnostics are also included in STACSL to assist in developing and debugging complex models. Each of these features is described and illustrated

  10. LWRWIMS analysis of Babcock and Wilcox LWR fuel storage experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes very briefly an analysis of a series of critical experiments made by Babcock and Wilcox to study the relative importance on fuel storage reactivity of assembly spacing and various types of absorber. LWRWIMS in its standard design mode of calculation was used for the analysis. The results demonstrate that even the simplest options in LWRWIMS produce eigenvalues which are a very useful check of the Monte Carlo calculations normally made for criticality clearances. An appendix examines some of the eigenvalue trends in more detail. (author)

  11. Safety Evaluation Report related to Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group Plant Reassessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 1 to the ''Safety Evaluation Report (SER) Related to the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (BWOG's) Plant Reassessment Program'' has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This supplement contains the NRC staff's evaluation of the BWOG reassessment of the integrated control system/non-nuclear instrumentation system, the emergency feedwater initiation and control system, reactor trip initiating events, several additional open items identified in the SER, and BWOG comments on the SER

  12. Design, operating and maintenance experience of Babcock and Wilcox nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) has designed and manufactured nuclear steam generators since the beginnings of the nuclear era in the 1950's. This paper describes how the B and W recirculating steam generator design evolved, the operating and maintenance history of the design, and the evolution of design and manufacturing methods into replacement steam generators for non-B and W reactors. (author)

  13. Benchmarking of flowtran with Mark-22 mockup flow excursion test data from Babcock ampersand Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Version 16.2 of the FLOWTRAN code with a Savannah River Site (SRS) working criterion (St=0.00455) for the onset of significant void (OSV) was benchmarked against power and flow excursion data derived from tests at the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Alliance Research Center test facility. This document presents analyses which show that FLOWTRAN accurately predicts the mockup test assembly thermal-hydraulic behavior during the steady state and LOCA transient conditions, and that FLOWTRAN with a Savannah River Site (SRS) working limits criterion (St=0.00455) conservatively predicts the OFI power

  14. A probabilistic evaluation of the safety of Babcock and Wilcox nuclear reactor power plants with emphasis on historically observed operational events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes a study performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, Division of Engineering and System Technology (A/D for Systems), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This study was requested by the NRC to assist their staff in assessing the risk significance of features of the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) reactor plant design in the light of recent operational events. This study focuses on a critical review of submissions from the B and W Owners Group (BWOG) and as an independent assessment of the risk significance of ''Category C'' events at each operating B and W reactor. Category C events are those in which system conditions reach limits which require significant safety system and timely operator response to mitigate. A precursor study for each of the major B and W historical Category C events also was carried out. In addition, selected PRAs for B and W reactor plants and plants with other pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs were reviewed to appraise their handling of Category C events, thereby establishing a comparison between the risk profiles of B and W reactor plants and those of other PWR designs. The effectiveness of BWOG recommendations set forth in Appendix J of the BWOG SPIP (Safety and Performance Improvement Program) report (BAW-1919) also was evaluated. 49 refs., 21 figs., 52 tabs

  15. Babcock and Wilcox version of PDQ07: user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Babcock and Wilcox version of PDQ07 solves the neutron diffusion depletion problem in one, two, and three dimensions and in up to five lethargy groups. Adjoint and boundary value calculations may also be performed. Geometries available are rectangular, cylindrical, spherical, and hexagonal. Special capabilities of the code include thermal-hydraulic feedback with subcooled boiling effects, boron iteration, rod bank placement, automatic partial rod movement, and flux synthesis. Time-independent group diffusion equations are solved by Gaussian elimination in one dimension, single-line cyclic Chebyshev semi-iterative technique in two dimensions, and a modified block Gauss-Siedel in three dimensions. Diffusion coefficients, macroscopic data, and depletion use a modified HARMONY system. Thermal feedback effects use an iterative approach based on relative power density in the core. Flux synthesis uses two-dimensional trial functions to solve three-dimensional problems

  16. An assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 applicability to loss-of-feedwater transient analysis in a Babcock and Wilcox reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability and scaling capability of RELAP5/MOD2 when applied to a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) loss-of-feedwater transient is assessed using a code applicability methodology. A loss-of-feedwater test with a feed-and-bleed recovery was selected from the once-through integral system (OTIS) test data as a reference transient. Nondimensional comparisons are made between code assessment calculations and code applications calculations using computer code models scaled according to scaling criteria derived from the work of Ishii and others. The results indicate that RELAP5/MOD2 can scale the phenomena observed in the experiment and that the code is applicable for transients for which phenomena are within this envelope. The results also demonstrate the usefulness of the code applicability methodology for interpreting and verifying code calculations. 21 refs., 59 figs., 12 tabs

  17. Overview of Babcock and Wilcox involvement in the RERTR program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Division (NFD) of the Babcock and Wilcox (BandW) Company is fully committed to the goals/objectives of the RERTR program. In support of this program, the NFD has fabricated and shipped two full size ORR elements of U3Si2. In addition, developmental work has been done with U3SiAl. This paper provides an overview of this manufacturing experience, discusses the facility modifications both for LEU and increased capacity, and briefly reviews manufacturing changes for LEU fuels. Overall, the fabrication of the ORR silicide elements proceeded smoothly. To better improve the efficiency, additional information is being gathered on crushing schedules, blending times, and dies. (author)

  18. Results of a neutron flux perturbation experiment with Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group surveillance capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (B and WOG) Flux Perturbation Experiment in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Poolside Facility simulated the thermal shield, downcomer, pressure vessel, and cavity region of a B and W-designed 177-fuel assembly reactor by an arrangement of steel slabs and a void box. Two simulated surveillance capsules located in the downcomer were irradiated as part of the NRC-sponsored Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Pregram. The capsules contained extensive dosimetry provided B and W and the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). Dosimeters were also located outside of the capsules in the downcomer region. Flux distributions were calculated throughout the test configuration using the two-dimensional DOT 4.3 transport theory code. The calculated and measured data are compared in this paper

  19. Evaluation of operational safety at Babcock and Wilcox plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology was developed to assess the operational performance of nuclear power plants through an integration of thermal-hydraulic, human factors, and risk analysis techniques. This methodology was applied to evaluate the effectiveness of plant systems and operator actions in lessening the severity of selected transients for Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) plants. Comparisons were also performed to assess differences in operational performance capabilities and limitations between selected Combustion Engineering, Westinghouse, and B and W plants. For the selected B and W plant, the results show the probability that an operating crew would not respond within the times available (the non-response probability) is estimated to be relatively small for the three transients studied. Results also show a strong correlation between operator performance and the influence of eight performance shaping factors (PSFs). Comparison of results from the Oconee, Calvert Cliffs, and H. B. Robinson plants indicate that the likelihood operators would take the proper actions to return Oconee to a safe stable state is not judged to be significantly different than the likelihood operators at Calvert Cliffs or H. B. Robinson would recover their plants for the transients investigated. The validity of this conclusion depends on the assumption that the performance shaping factors at all three plants are essentially equivalent. Recommendations are made that influence performance shaping factors positively and thereby influence operator performance positively

  20. Babcock ampersand Wilcox experience with alloy A-286 reactor vessel internal bolting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple reactor vessel internal bolt failures were discovered during the 1981 and 1982 in service inspections performed at three PWR nuclear power plants. All the failures were limited to bolts that fastened the lower portion of the reactor vessel internal thermal shield to the lower grid assembly. Subsequent examinations during 1982, 1983 and 1984 revealed bolt failures at four additional plants. These failures included bolts that fastened the core barrel to the core support shield and lower grid assembly. Additional failures were also discovered in the bolts used to join the surveillance specimen holder tube to the thermal shield. All the affected fasteners were fabricated from Alloy A-286 (ASTM A453 Grade 660) material. Alloy A-286 is a high strength precipitation hardened austenitic stainless steel containing a nominal Cr and Ni content of 15% and 25%, respectively. As a result of these bolt failures, the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Co., under the direction of the B ampersand W Owners Group, performed extensive evaluations of Alloy A-286 reactor vessel internal fasteners. The principal conclusions obtained from this investigation are given below. 1. Internals bolting failures have been observed at nominal peak calculated stress levels of greater than or equal to 690 MPa (100 ksi). The number of failures generally increases with increasing stress. Variations in this correlation are postulated to be the result of scatter in the calculated peak stress data. 2. A variety of material conditions including the use of highly cold worked barstock in the fabrication of some of the bolts, degree of annealing and hot forging may have contributed to the bolt failures. 3. No specific upset environmental conditions were found that could be judged to be a leading cause of the bolt failures. 4 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Superconducting performance of CEBAF/Cornell prototype cavities fabricated by Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is participating in the development of an industrial production capability for CEBAF superconducting rf accelerator cavities. Five-cell elliptical cavities of the Cornell design (operating frequency 1500 MHz) have been fabricated at B and W and tested at the Cornell Laboratory of Nuclear Studies (LNS). Performance specifications (accelerating field of 5 MeV/m at a residual quality factor of 3 x 109) have been exceeded by comfortable margins in the first two prototypes. A comparison between the performance of cavities fabricated from niobium of different purities is presented

  2. Assessment of ISLOCA risk: Methodology and application to a Babcock and Wilcox nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents information essential to understanding the risk associated with inter-system loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs). The methodology developed and presented in this document provides a state-of-the-art method for identifying and evaluating plant-specific hardware designs, human performance issues, and accident consequence factors relevant to the prediction of the ISLOCA risk. This ISLOCA methodology was developed and then applied to a Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) nuclear power plant. The results from this application are described in detail. For this particular B ampersand W reference plant, the assessment indicated that the probability of a severe ISLOCA is approximately 2.2E-06/reactor-year

  3. TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION SUMMARY. BABCOCK AND WILCOX CYCLONE FURNACE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY (EPA/540/SR-92/017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Demonstration of the Babcock & Wilcox Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology was conducted in November 1991. This Demonstration occurred at the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Alliance Research Center (ARC) in Alliance, OH. The B&W cyc...

  4. Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford retrievable storage from Babcock and Wilcox, Leechburg, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report characterizes, as far as possible, the solid radioactive wastes generated by Babcock and Wilcox's Park Township Plutonium Facility near Leechburg, Pennsylvania that were sent to retrievable storage at the Hanford Site. Solid waste as defined in this document is any containerized or self-contained material that has been declared waste. The objective is a description of characteristics of solid wastes that are or will be managed by the Restoration and Upgrades Program; gaseous or liquid effluents are discussed only at a summary level This characterization is of particular interest in the planning of transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval operations, including the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility, because Babcock and Wilcox generated greater than 2.5 percent of the total volume of TRU waste currently stored at the Hanford Site

  5. Technology evaluation report: Babcock and Wilcox Cyclone Furnace Vitrification technology. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology is a treatment process for contaminated soils. The process was evaluated to determine its ability to destroy semivolatile organics and to isolate metals and simulated radionuclides into a non-leachable slag material. The feed material for the system was a prepared synthetic soil matrix (SSM) that was spiked with two organic compounds and six metals. This volume contains the appendices

  6. Safety evaluation report related to Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group Plant Reassessment Program: [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the accident of Three Mile Island, Unit 2, nuclear power plant owners made a number of improvements to their nuclear facilities. Despite these improvements, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff is concerned that the number and complexity of events at Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) nuclear plants have not decreased as expected. This concern was reinforced by the June 9, 1985 total-loss-of-feedwater event at Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station and the December 26, 1985 overcooling transient at Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station. By letter dated January 24, 1986, the Executive Director for Operations (EDO) informed the Chairman of the B and W Owners Group (BWOG) that a number of recent events at B and W-designed reactors have led the NRC staff to conclude that the basic requirements for B and W reactors need to be reexamined. In its February 13, 1986 response to the EDO's letter, the BWOG committed to lead an effort to define concerns relative to reducing the frequency of reactor trips and the complexity of post-trip response in B and W plants. The BWOG submitted a description of the B and W program entitled ''Safety and Performance Improvement Program'' (BAW-1919) on May 15, 1986. Five revisions to BAW-1919 have also been submitted. The NRC staff has reviewed BAW-1919 and its revisions and presents its evaluation in this report. 2 figs., 34 tabs

  7. Description of the Babcock and Wilcox owners group cavity dosimetry benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (B and WOG) Cavity Dosimetry Benchmark experiment is the first step in the B and WOG program to develop measurement-based methodology for use in monitoring vessel fluence in the post-Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program timeframe. Ex-vessel dosimetry has been chosen as the vehicle to provide fluence measurements for use in this measurement-based methodology. (Fluence is measured indirectly by first measuring a relatable quantity and then applying the known correspondence between the measured quantity and the fluence, (e.g., Cs137 activity of a fission foil or tracks on an SSTR). The results of the In-Out Experiment will be used in refining the analytical models and benchmarking the final methodology. The experiment will provide neutron and gamma fluence measurements, at points both inside and outside the reactor vessel, through the use of numerous fluence measuring devices. Four different categories of ex-vessel monitors have been specified. The in-vessel fluence will be measured using an unirradiated, standard B and W reactor vessel surveillance capsule that will be installed in a spare holder tube at the same azimuthal position as the main ex-vessel dosimetry stringer. This paper presents a detailed description of the experiment

  8. Technology evaluation report: Babcock and Wilcox Cyclone Furnace Vitrification technology. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project consists of an analysis of the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification process. The SITE Demonstration took place at the B and W Research and Development Division in Alliance, Ohio. The vitrification process was performed on a synthetic soil matrix (SSM) that was spiked with known concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds, metals, and simulated radionuclides. The Demonstration effort was directed at obtaining information on the performance and cost of the process for use at other sites. Documentation will consist of two reports. This Technology Evaluation Report (TER) is contained in two volumes and describes the field activities and laboratory results

  9. Comparison of licensing activities for operating plants designed by Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a comparison of a number of licensing activities for the operating Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) plants with emphasis on Rancho Seco. The factors selected were a comparison of staff resources expended in FY84, active licensing action reviews, implementation of NUREG-0737 modifications, exemptions to regulations, SALP reports, enforcement actions, and Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The eight licensed operating plants examined are as follows: Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 (ANO-1), Crystal River Unit 3, Davis Besse, Oconee Units 1, 2, and 3, Rancho Seco, and Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1)

  10. Evaluation of operational safety at Babcock and Wilcox Plants: Volume 1, Results overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology was developed to assess the operational performance of nuclear power plants through an integration of thermal-hydraulic and human factors analysis techniques together with inputs from information used in the assessment of risk. This methodology was applied to evaluate the extent to which plant systems and/or operator actions are effective in lessening the severity of selected transients for Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) plants. Comparisons were also performed to assess differences in operational performance capabilities and limitations between selected Combustion Engineering, Westinghouse, and B and W plants. Detailed results from the methodology application are presented in two volumes. This report Volume 1, presents an overview of the results with emphasis on the systems and operator performance. Volume 2 presents detailed results from thermal-hydraulic calculations. 22 refs., 9 figs., 16 tabs

  11. High density LEU [low enriched uranium] fuel development at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aggressive pursuit of developing a high-density LEU fuel process has been undertaken over the past six years at the Babcock and Wilcox Co. A major effort has been devoted to the U3Si2 fuel development. Today B and W feels confident that their current U3Si2 manufacturing process is comparable to existing U3O8 and UAlx fuel technologies. A continued effort will be maintained within the U3Si2 product line to provide the highest product quality and to increased process efficiencies. Investigations into other high density LEU fuel development such as U(x)Si(y) alloys will only be secondary considerations. (Author)

  12. Seismic risk analysis for the Babcock and Wilcox facility, Leechburg, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a detailed seismic risk analysis of the Babcock and Wilcox Plutonium Fuel Fabrication facility at Leechburg, Pennsylvania are presented. This report focuses on earthquakes; the other natural hazards, being addressed in separate reports, are severe weather (strong winds and tornados) and floods. The calculational method used is based on Cornell's work (1968); it has been previously applied to safety evaluations of major projects. The historical seismic record was established after a review of available literature, consultation with operators of local seismic arrays and examination of appropriate seismic data bases. Because of the aseismicity of the region around the site, an analysis different from the conventional closest approach in a tectonic province was adapted. Earthquakes as far from the site as 1,000 km were included, as were the possibility of earthquakes at the site. In addition, various uncertainties in the input were explicitly considered in the analysis. The results of the risk analysis, which include a Bayesian estimate of the uncertainties, are presented, expressed as return period accelerations. The best estimate curve indicates that the Babcock and Wilcox facility will experience 0.05 g every 220 years and 0.10 g every 1400 years. The bounding curves roughly represent the one standard deviation confidence limits about the best estimate, reflecting the uncertainty in certain of the input. Detailed examination of the results show that the accelerations are very insensitive to the details of the source region geometries or the historical earthquake statistics in each region and that each of the source regions contributes almost equally to the cumulative risk at the site. If required for structural analysis, acceleration response spectra for the site can be constructed by scaling the mean response spectrum for alluvium in WASH 1255 by these peak accelerations

  13. Nuclear criticality safety at Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company (B ampersand W) operates a nuclear fuel production plant in Virginia. It is a privately owned facility licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC maintains a resident inspector on-site. The plant produces highly enriched fuel for both certain defense programs and the various U.S. research and test reactors. The plant also produces nuclear fuel at an intermediate enrichment (20 wt%) for research and test reactors in the United States and overseas. B ampersand W operates a highly enriched uranium recovery operation for its scrap and as a service to various U.S. Department of Energy sites. B ampersand W's downblending operations are designed to produce low-enriched fuel (5 wt%); the company is currently under contract to clean up and downblend Sapphire material. Operations within the facility include ceramic (oxides, silicide, and carbides), foundry (metal), chemical (nitrates, ADUN, etc.), and mechanical assembly with extensive laboratory and quality assurance operations. Also located on-site is a hot cell facility for the examination of irradiated fuel. This report discusses B ampersand W's license renewal considerations

  14. Babcock and Wilcox Owners' Group program: Trip reduction and transient response improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985, the average trip frequency for the industry was 4.3 trips per plant per year while Babcock ampersand Wilcox (B ampersand W)-designed plants had 4.5 trips. In early 1986, the B ampersand W Owners' Group (B ampersand WOG) established goals to reduce trip frequency and improve posttrip transient response. Through the recommendations of the B ampersand WOG Trip Reduction and Transient Response Improvement Program (TR/TRIP) and other utility initiatives, the trip frequency for the B ampersand WOG plants has been on a progressive downward trend and has been consistently below the industry average since 1986. The successful results in trip reduction for the B ampersand WOG plants are shown. The B ampersand WOG has implemented several programs that have resulted in fewer trips per plant. This success can be attributed to the following: (1) a comprehensive program to evaluate each trip and transient for root-cause determination, define corrective actions, share information, and peer reviews; (2) a broad program to review systems and components that contribute to trips and transients, identify specific recommendations to correct deficiencies, utility commitment to implementation, conduct internal monitoring and indirectly exert peer pressure; (3) an awareness of the goals at all levels in the organization coupled with strong executive-level involvement; and (4) timely implementation of recommendations

  15. Aging assessment of the Combustion Engineering and Babcock and Wilcox control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of aging upon the Babcock ampersand Wilcox (B ampersand W) and Combustion Engineering (CE) control rod drive systems have been evaluated. For this study, the CRD system boundary included the control rod assemblies, guide tubes, control rod drive mechanism, control system components, rod position indication components, and cooling system. Detailed operation experience data for 1980 to 1990 was evaluated to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. The results of this evaluation, along with an assessment of component material and operating environment, lead to the conclusion that both the B ampersand W and CE CRD systems are susceptible to age degradation. Failures of the CRD system have resulted in significant plant effects including power reductions, plant shutdowns, scrams, and ESF actuations. Information on current plant system inspection and maintenance practices were obtained from two B ampersand W plants, and four CE plants through an industry survey. The results of this survey indicate that some plants have modified the system, replaced components, and established preventive maintenance programs, some of which effectively address the aging issue, while others do not. The potential application of some advanced monitoring inspection techniques are discussed

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the Babcock and Wilcox Nuclear Facilities and surrounding area, Lynchburg, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from July 18 through July 25, 1988, over a 41-square-kilometer (16-square-mile) area surrounding the Babcock and Wilcox nuclear facilities located near Lynchburg, Virginia. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) with line spacings of 91 meters (300 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 8 to 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h). A search of the data for man-made radiation sources revealed the presence of three areas of high count rates in the survey area. Spectra accumulated over the main plant showed the presence of cobalt-60 (60Co) and cesium-137 (137Cs). A second area near the main plant indicated the presence of uranium-235 (235U). Protactinium-234m (234mPa) and 60Co Were detected over a building to the east of the main plant. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries in support of the aerial data

  17. IE Information Notice No. 86-04: Transient due to loss of power to integrated control system at a pressurized water reactor designed by Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On December 26, 1985, Rancho Seco was operating on automatic control at a constant power level of 710 MWe (76% of licensed power). At 4:14 a.m., power to the integrated control system (ICS) was lost. The annunciator alarm for ''Loss of ICS or Fan Power'' sounded. As designed, ICS demand signals went to midscale. The main feedwater valves closed to 50%, and the atmospheric dump valves, turbine bypass valves, and one set of auxiliary feedwater valves opened to 50%. The main feedwater pump speed was reduced to minimum. Low discharge pressure at the main feedwater pump caused the motor-driven auxiliary feedwater pump to start automatically. The net decrease in feedwater flow caused the reactor to trip on high reactor coolant system (RCS) pressure. After the reactor trip, the above ICS valves remained at 50% (i.e., could not be operated from the control room) causing excessive cooling of the RCS which was exacerbated by autostarting of the dual-drive auxiliary feedwater pump. During the 26 minutes required to restore ICS power, operators acted to minimize the resulting transient. However, difficulties were experienced with manipulation of valves, operation of pumps, and control of various liquid levels, pressures, and temperatures. RCS pressure decreased to a minimum of 1,064 psig at 4:21 a.m. At 4:40 a.m., the lowest RCS temperature (386 F) during the cooling transient was reached. RCS pressure at that time was 1,413 psig. Eventually, a senior reactor operator discovered that switches which supplied power to the ICS dc power supplies were in the off position and set them to the on position

  18. BABCOCK & WILCOX CYCLONE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTAMINATED SOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Babcock & Wilcox 6 million Btu/hr pilot cyclone furnace was successfully used in a 2-yr Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Emerging Technology project to melt and vitrify an EPA Synthetic Soil Matrix (SSM) spiked with 7,000 ppm lead, 1,000 ppm cadmium, and 1,5...

  19. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: CYCLONE FURNACE SOIL VITRI- FICATION TECHNOLOGY - BABCOCK & WILCOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock and Wilcox's (B&W) cyclone furnace is an innovative thermal technology which may offer advantages in treating soils containing organics, heavy metals, and/or radionuclide contaminants. The furnace used in the SITE demonstration was a 4- to 6-million Btu/hr pilot system....

  20. SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT: BABCOCK & WILCOX CYCLONE VITRIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Babcock & Wilcox 6 million Btu/hr pilot cyclone furnace was successfully used in a 2-year SITE Emerging Technology project to melt and vitrify an EPA Synthetic Soil Matrix (SSM) spiked with 7,000 ppm lead, 1,000 ppm cadmium, and 1,500 ppm chromium. n advantage of vitrificatio...

  1. Standard technical specifications: Babcock and Wilcox plants. Volume 3, Revision 1: Bases (Sections 3.4--3.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Babcock and Wilcox Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  2. Generic evaluation of small break loss-of-coolant accident behavior in Babcock and Wilcox designed 177-FA operating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slow system depressurization resulting from small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) in the reactor coolant system have not, until recently, received detailed analytical study comparable to that devoted to large breaks. Following the TMI-2 accident, the staff had a series of meetings with Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) and the B and W licensees. The staff requested that B and W and the licensees: (1) systematically evaluate plant response for small break loss-of-coolant accidents; (2) address each of the concerns documented in the Michelson report; (3) validate the computer codes used against the TMI-2 accident; (4) extend the break spectrum analysis to very small breaks, giving special consideration to failure of pressurizer valves to close; (5) analyze degraded conditions where AFW is not available; (6) prepare design changes aimed at reducing the probability of loss-of-coolant accidents produced by the failure of a PORV to close; and (7) develop revised emergency procedures for small breaks. This report describes the review of the generic analyses performed by B and W based on the requests stated above

  3. Standard technical specifications - Babcock and Wilcox Plants: Bases (Sections 2.0-3.3). Volume 2, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NUREG contains the improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) plants. Revision 1 incorporates the cumulative changes to Revision 0, which was published in September 1992. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, specifically the B ampersand W Owners Group (BWOG), NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993 (58 FR 39132). Licensees are encouraged to upgrade their technical specifications consistent with those criteria and conforming, to the extent practical and consistent with the licensing basis for the facility, to Revision 1 to the improved STS. The Commission continues to place the highest priority on requests for complete conversions to the improved STS. Licensees adopting portions of the improved STS to existing technical specifications should adopt all related requirements, as applicable, to achieve a high degree of standardization and consistency

  4. Steam generator channel head dose rates at Babcock ampersand Wilcox reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of a program to collect historical OTSG dose rate data from the five (5) B ampersand W operating plants. Data is presented for Arkansas Nuclear One, Crystal River, Davis-Besse, Oconee, and Three Mile Island. Also included are dose reduction measures employed at each site

  5. Effects of natural phenomena on the Babcock and Wilcox Co. Plutonium Fabrication Plant at the Parks Township site, Leechburg, Pennsylvania. Docket No. 70-364

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed action is to issue a renewal to the full-term Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-414 (Docket No. 70-364) authorizing the Nuclear Material Division of the Babcock and Wilcox Company (BandW) to operate nuclear-fuel-fabrication facilities located in Leechburg, Pennsylvania. The plutonium fuel facility is presently being used to fabricate fuel for the fast test reactor under construction at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. Implicit in Sections 70.22 and 70.23 of 10CFR70 is a requirement that existing plutonium fabrication plants be examined with the objective of improving, to the extent practicable, their abilities to withstand adverse natural phenomena without loss of capability to protect the public. In accordance with these regulations, an analysis was initiated of the effects of natural phenomena on the BandW Plutonium Fabrication Plant. Following completion of the analysis, a condensation was prepared of the effects of natural phenomena on the facility

  6. Comparison of implementation of selected TMI action plan requirements on operating plants designed by Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the results of a study conducted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff to compare the degree to which eight Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) designed licensed nuclear power plants have complied with the requirements in NUREG-0737, Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements. The eight licensed operating plants examined are as follows: Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 (ANO-1), Crystal River Unit 3, Davis Besse, Oconee Units 1, 2, and 3, Rancho Seco, and Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1). The purpose of this audit was to establish the progress of the TMI-1 licensee, General Public Utilities (GPU) Nuclear Corporation, in completing the long-term requirements in NUREG-0737 relative to the other B and W licensees examined

  7. Modeling operator actions during a small break loss-of-coolant accident in a Babcock and Wilcox nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small break loss-of-accident (SBLOCA) in a typical Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) nuclear power plant was modeled using RELAP5/MOD3. This work was performed as part of the United States Regulatory Commission's (USNRC) Code, Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU) study. The break was initiated by severing one high pressure injection (HPI) line at the cold leg. Thus, the small break was further aggravated by reduced HPI flow. Comparisons between scoping runs with minimal operator action, and full operator action, clearly showed that the operator plays a key role in recovering the plant. Operator actions were modeled based on the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) and the Technical Bases Document for the EOPs. The sequence of operator actions modeled here is only one of several possibilities. Different sequences of operator actions are possible for a given accident because of the subjective decisions the operator must make when determining the status of the plant, hence, which branch of the EOP to follow. To assess the credibility of the modeled operator actions, these actions and results of the simulated accident scenario were presented to operator examiners who are familiar with B ampersand W nuclear power plants. They agreed that, in general, the modeled operator actions conform to the requirements set forth in the EOPs and are therefore plausible. This paper presents the method for modeling the operator actions and discusses the simulated accident scenario from the viewpoint of operator actions

  8. Babcock and Wilcox Safety Anaysis Report (B-SAR-205). Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the BW-205 standard reactor with a plant output of 1295 and 1200 MW(e) is described. The reactor is arranged in two closed coolant loops connected in parallel to the reactor vessel, and is controlled by a coordinated combination of chemical shim and mechanical control rods. The coolant serves as a neutron moderator, reflector, and solvent for the soluble boron used in chemical shim reactivity control. The fuel elements consist of slightly enriched UO2 pellets enclosed in zircaloy tubes

  9. Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a detailed description of the design, analyses, and testing programs for the BR-100 cask. The BR-100 is a Type B(U) cask designed for transport by rail or barge. This report presents the preliminary analyses and tests which have been performed for the BR-100 and outlines the confirmatory analyses and tests which will be performed

  10. Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-02-01

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a detailed description of the design, analyses, and testing programs for the BR-100 cask. The BR-100 is a Type B(U) cask designed for transport by rail or barge. This report presents the preliminary analyses and tests which have been performed for the BR-100 and outlines the confirmatory analyses and tests which will be performed.

  11. LOCA pipe break criteria for the design of Babcock and Wilcox nuclear steam systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document describes the criteria applied by B and W to determine design basis break locations, types of breaks, and break sizes in the primary piping system. Appendixes are provided in support of the basic assumptions made in the development of the criteria

  12. 75 FR 50009 - Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Inc.; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... Board Pursuant to delegation by the Commission dated December 29, 1972 (37 FR 28710), and the Commission...., on February 23, 2010. Pursuant to a Request for Hearing published in the Federal Register (74 FR 75... (72 FR 49139). Issued at Rockville, Maryland, this 6th day of August 2010. E. Roy Hawkens,...

  13. Scaled experiments for support of code modeling of main steam-line break phenomena in a B ampersand W [Babcock and Wilcox]-type once-through steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes and aspect of ongoing research to provide information on the performance of once-through steam generators (OTSGs) commonly used in the Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) nuclear steam supply system. This program is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and is being conducted in part at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The objectives of the program are to develop an experimental data base that can be used to assess existing models and to develop improved models for characterizing the behavior of an OTSG during various off-normal operating conditions and accident scenarios. The models are then implemented in the nuclear reactor safety codes RELAP5 and TRAC

  14. 75 FR 35846 - In the Matter of Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Inc., Lynchburg, VA; Order Imposing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28... COMMISSION In the Matter of Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Inc., Lynchburg, VA; Order Imposing Civil Monetary Penalty I Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Inc., (Licensee) is the holder...

  15. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs

  16. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Babcock and Wilcox revisions to CONTEMPT, computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CONTEMPT computer program predicts the pressure-temperature response of a single-volume reactor building to a loss-of-coolant accident. The analytical model used for the program is described. CONTEMPT assumes that the loss-of-coolant accident can be separated into two phases; the primary system blowdown and reactor building pressurization. The results of the blowdown analysis serve as the boundary conditions and are input to the CONTEMPT program. Thus, the containment model is only concerned with the pressure and temperature in the reactor building and the temperature distribution through the reactor building structures. The program also calculates building leakage and the effects of engineered safety features such as reactor building sprays, decay heat coolers, sump coolers, etc. 11 references. (U.S.)

  18. Replacement steam generators for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock and Wilcox Canada has developed an Advanced Series steam generator for PWR Systems. This design incorporates all of the features that have contributed to the successful CANDU steam generator performance. This paper presents an overview of the design features and how the overall design relates to the requirements of a PWR reactor system

  19. Low enriched aluminide and silicide fuel element technology at B and W (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock and Wilcox is fabricating full size fuel elements with low enriched uranium silicide and uranium aluminide. BandW also provides high enrichred U3O8 and UA Lsub(x) for United States Research Reactors, and Test Research and Training Reactors (TRTR). BandW and Argonne National Laboratry (ANL) are actively involved in the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program and have undertaken a joint effort in which BandW is fabricating two Oak Ridge Reactor (ORR ) elements with uranium silicide fuel. During plate development, fuel plates were fabricated with compacts containing U3SiAl and U3Si2 fuel. (author)

  20. Reactor internals design/analysis for normal, upset, and faulted conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical procedures used by Babcock and Wilcox to demonstrate the structural integrity of the 205-FA reactor internals are described. Analytical results are presented and compared to ASME Code allowable limits for Normal, Upset, and Faulted conditions. The particular faulted condition considered is a simultaneous loss-of-coolant accident and safe shutdown earthquake. The operating basis earthquake is addressed as an Upset condition

  1. Research reactor and fuel development/production facility decommissioning technology and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the technology and experience gained in a series of reactor and fuels development facility decommissioning programs carried out by Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) at its US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed sites in Lynchburg, Virginia. Areas of generic application to future projects are particularly emphasized. The projects included one test and one research reactor, four low-power critical experiment facilities, and two buildings that housed plutonium/uranium fuels development laboratories. These projects were comprehensive; they included developing the decommissioning and quality assurance plans, interfacing with the NRC, performing the actual decontamination/dismantling work, performing predecontamination and final radiological surveys, and volume reducing, packaging, certifying, classifying and shipping the radioactive waste for disposal

  2. Statistical study of conductivity probe output signals in a high-pressure and -temperature test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scaled test facility was designed to evaluate the thermal-hydraulics conditions in the reactor coolant system and steam generator of a model of a Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactor (PWR) during the natural circulation phases of a small-break loss-of-coolant accident. The test facility, referred to as the Once-Through Integral System (OTIS), was equipped with ∼ 250 instruments, including 36 conductivity probes to measure the thermal-hydraulics response of the system during the transient tests. The purpose of this study is to present statistical characteristics of the conductivity probe output signals. Autocorrelation and cross-correlation analyses of signals produced by spatially separated probes were computed using long and conditional sampling techniques. The cross-correlation signal analysis of conductivity probes revealed some information about the flow patterns in the hot leg and U-bend pipe of the PWR

  3. Multiloop integral system test (MIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multiloop integral system test (MIST) was part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox-designed plants. MIST was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral system facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST and two other supporting facilities were specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the once-through integral system (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and the other facilities will be used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The individual tests are described in detail in Volumes 2 through 8 and Volume 11, and are summarized in Volume 1. Inter-group comparisons are addressed in this document, Volume 9. These comparisons are grouped as follows: mapping versus SBLOCA transients, SBLOCA, pump effects, and the effects of noncondensible gases. Appendix A provides an index and description of the microfiched plots for each test, which are enclosed with the corresponding Volumes 2 through 8. 147 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Report of the Bulletins and Orders Task Force. Volume II. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appendices include: Office of Inspection and Enforcement bulletins; NRR status report on feedwater transients in BWR plants; orders on Babcock and Wilcox Company plants; letters lifting orders; letters issuing auxiliary feedwater system requirements; letter to licensees of all operating reactors, dated October 30, 1979 concerning short-term lessons learned requirements; and letters approving guidelines for preparation of small-break LOCA operating procedures

  5. Advanced test reactor. Testing capabilities and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner 'lobes' to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. In 2007 the US Department of Energy designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and plants for the NSUF. (author)

  6. Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST): MIST Facility Functional Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST) is part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox designed plants. MIST is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST was specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the Once Through Integral System (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and OTIS are used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The MIST Functional Specification documents as-built design features, dimensions, instrumentation, and test approach. It also presents the scaling basis for the facility and serves to define the scope of work for the facility design and construction. 13 refs., 112 figs., 38 tabs

  7. Reactor Simulator Integration and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfield, M. P.; Webster, K. L.; Pearson, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator (RxSim) test loop was designed and built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing were to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V because the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This Technical Memorandum summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained, which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature, indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  8. Development and testing of a diagnostic system for intelligen distributed control at EBR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic system is under development for demonstration of Intelligent Distributed Control at the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR--II). In the first phase of the project a diagnostic system is being developed for the EBR-II steam plant based on the DISYS expert systems approach. Current testing uses recorded plant data and data from simulated plant faults. The dynamical simulation of the EBR-II steam plant uses the Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) Modular Modeling System (MMS). At EBR-II the diagnostic system operates in the UNIX workstation and receives live plant data from the plant Data Acquisition System (DAS). Future work will seek implementation of the steam plant diagnostic in a distributed manner using UNIX based computers and Bailey microprocessor-based control system. 10 refs., 6 figs

  9. Nuclear plant-aging research on reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the rsults of a review of the Reactor Trip System (RTS) and the Engineered Safety Feature Actuating System (ESFAS) operating experiences reported in Licensee Event Reports (LER)s, the Nuclear Power Experience data base, Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, and plant maintenance records. Our purpose is to evaluate the potential significance of aging, including cycling, trips, and testing as contributors to degradation of the RTS and ESFAS. Tables are presented that show the percentage of events for RTS and ESFAS classified by cause, components, and subcomponents for each of the Nuclear Steam Supply System vendors. A representative Babcock and Wilcox plant was selected for detailed study. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research guidelines were followed in performing the detailed study that identified materials susceptible to aging, stressors, environmental factors, and failure modes for the RTS and ESFAS as generic instrumentation and control systems. Functional indicators of degradation are listed, testing requirements evaluated, and regulatory issues discussed

  10. Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo: the role of downward pumping and the equatorward propagation of activity

    OpenAIRE

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Cameron, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The key elements of the Babcock-Leighton dynamo are the generation of poloidal field through the decay of tilted bipolar active regions and the generation of toroidal field through the observed differential rotation. There are two classes of Babcock-Leighton models: flux transport dynamos where an equatorward flow at the bottom of the convection zone (CZ) causes the equatorial propagation of the butterfly wings, and dynamo waves where the radial shear and the $\\alpha$ effect act in conjunctio...

  11. Comment on a Wilcox Test Statistic for Comparing Means When Variances Are Unequal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Tung-Hsing; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The alternative proposed by Wilcox (1989) to the James second-order statistic for comparing population means when variances are heterogeneous can sometimes be invalid. The degree to which the procedure is invalid depends on differences in sample size, the expected values of the observations, and population variances. (SLD)

  12. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of hign-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing

  13. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, B.A.

    1995-03-15

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock & Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing.

  14. Reactor group constants and benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluated nuclear data files such as JENDL, ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2 are validated by analyzing critical mock-up experiments for various type reactors and assessing applicability for nuclear characteristics such as criticality, reaction rates, reactivities, etc. This is called Benchmark Testing. In the nuclear calculations, the diffusion and transport codes use the group constant library which is generated by processing the nuclear data files. In this paper, the calculation methods of the reactor group constants and benchmark test are described. Finally, a new group constants scheme is proposed. (author)

  15. Accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Powerplant. Part 1. Oversight hearings before a task force of the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs conducted an informal review of the accident beginning on March 28, 1979 at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant. Officials of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, plant operating personnel employed by General Public Utilities, and representatives of the reactor manufacturer, Babcock and Wilcox Company, related their activities during the accident and their analyses of the sequence of events

  16. Development of the steam generator by Babcock Atlantic and Stein Industries, for the super Phenix Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development program of steam generators studied by Babcock Atlantic and Stein Industries Companies, jointly with CEA and EDF, for the Super Phenix 1200 MWe Fast Breeder Power Plant is presented. The main characteristics of both sodium heated steam generators are emphasized and the experimental studies related to their key features are reported

  17. Reactor protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the reactor protection system (RPS-II) designed for use on Babcock and Wilcox 145-, later 177-, and 205-fuel assembly pressurized water reactors. In this system, relays in the trip logic have been replaced by solid state devices. A calculating module for the low DNBR, pump status, and offset trip functions has replaced the overpower trip (based on flow and imbalance), the power/RC pump trip, and the variable low-pressure trip. Included is a description of the changes from the present Oconee-type reactor protection system (RPS-I), a functional and hardware description of the calculating module, a description of the software programmed in the calculating module, and a discussion of the qualification program conducted to ensure that the degree of protection provided by RPS-II is not less than that provided by previously licensed systems supplied by B and W

  18. The simulation of thermohydraulic phenomena in a pressurized water reactor primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena essential to nuclear power reactor safety were investigated. Scaling and modeling laws for pressurized water reactors are reviewed and a new scaling approach focusing on the overall loop behavior is presented. Scaling criteria for one- and two-phase natural circulation are developed, as well as a simplified model describing the first phase of a small break loss of coolant accident. Reactor vessel vent valve effects are included in the analysis of steady one-phase natural circulation flow. Two new dimensionless numbers, which uniquely describe one-phase flow in natural circulation loops, were deduced and are discussed. A scaled model of the primary loop of a typical Babcock and Wilcox reactor was designed, built, and tested. The particular prototype modeled was the TMI unit 2 reactor. The electrically heated, stainless steel model operates at a maximum pressure of 300 psig and has a maximum heat input of 188 kW. The model is about 4 times smaller in height than the prototype reactor, with a nominal volume scale of 1:500. Experiments were conducted establishing subcooled natural circulation in the model loop. Both steady flow and power transients were investigated

  19. Fabrication, testing, and qualification of reactor graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work performed under the HBK project for development and testing of reactor graphites could have recourse to results and experience already gained in Great Britain, in the F.R.G., the USA, and the Netherlands. The specific problems to be tackled by the HBK project activities result from the particularly exacting requirements with regard to behaviour under irradiation that are to be met by the graphite reflector for the THTR follower plant. From a great number of candidate graphites, selected for testing and evaluation, the extensive irradiation experiments revealed a variety of graphites best suited to the various tasks in mind, as defined by the operational conditions. The tests examined radiation-induced changes of linear dimension, E-module, thermal expansion, and heat conductivity, as well as radiation-induced creep and corrosion in reactor graphites under specified normal and under accident conditions. The work performed also includes tests for defining design criteria for reactor graphite components. The goals have been achieved, but further work will be necessary, as new requirements are taking shape in the course of current THTR follower plant development. (orig.)

  20. Selection, training, qualification and licensing of Three Mile Island reactor operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various programs which were intended to staff Three Mile Island with competent, trained operators and supervisors are reviewed. The analysis includes a review of the regulations concerning operator training and licensing, and describes how the requirements were implemented by the NRC, Metropolitan Edison Company, and Babcock and Wilcox Company. Finally the programs conducted by these three organisations are evaluated. (U.K.)

  1. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  2. Preliminary study of uranium favorability of the Wilcox and Claiborne Groups (Eocene) in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbert, W.P.; Templain, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Rocks of the Wilcox and Claiborne Groups crop out in the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain and are represented by a series of sands and shales which reflect oscillation of the strandline. The Wilcox Group (lower Eocene), usually undifferentiated in Texas, consists of very fine sands and clays and abundant lignite. The Claiborne Group (middle Eocene) comprises, in ascending order, Carrizo Sand, Reklaw Formation (clay), Queen City Sand, Weches Formation (clay), Sparta Sand, Cook Mountain Formation (clay), and Yegua Formation (sand). Fluvial systems of the Wilcox and Claiborne Groups exist in east Texas and trend perpendicular to the present coastline. In central Texas, sand bodies are parallel to the present coastline and are strand-plain, barrier-bar systems. Since the time of deposition of the Queen City Sand, a significant fluvial sand buildup occurred in the area of the present Rio Grande embayment where the marine clays pinch out. Known occurrences of mineral matter in the Wilcox and Claiborne (up to the Yegua) are limited to lignite (particularly in the Wilcox), cannel coal in the upper Claiborne, and hydrocarbons throughout. No uranium mineralization is known, and no uranium is likely to be discovered in the Claiborne and Wilcox. Approximately 50 surface samples and many gamma-ray logs showed no significant anomalies. The sands are very good potential host rocks, but no uranium source was discovered. During deposition of the Wilcox and Claiborne Groups, there was no volcanism to serve as a source of uranium (as with the prolific occurrences in the younger rocks of south Texas); also, Precambrian crystalline rocks in the Llano uplift were not exposed.

  3. Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo: the role of downward pumping and the equatorward propagation of activity

    CERN Document Server

    Karak, Bidya Binay

    2016-01-01

    The key elements of the Babcock-Leighton dynamo are the generation of poloidal field through the decay of tilted bipolar active regions and the generation of toroidal field through the observed differential rotation. There are two classes of Babcock-Leighton models: flux transport dynamos where an equatorward flow at the bottom of the convection zone (CZ) is responsible for the equatorial propagation of the butterfly wings, and dynamo waves where the radial gradient of differential rotation and the $\\alpha$ effect act in conjunction to produce the equatorial propagation. Here we investigate the role of downward magnetic pumping near the surface using a kinematic Babcock-Leighton model. We find that the pumping causes the poloidal field to become predominately radial in the near-surface shear layer. This allows the negative radial shear in the near-surface layer to effectively act on the radial field to produce a toroidal field. Consequently, we observe a clear equatorward migration of the toroidal field at lo...

  4. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculations and data comparisons for MIST [Multi-Loop Integral System Test] small-break loss-of-coolant accidents with scaled 10 cm2 and 50 cm2 breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the Integral System Test (IST) program initiated in June 1983 for the purpose of providing integral system test data on specific issues/phenomena relevant to post-small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs), loss of feedwater and other transients in Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) plant designs. The Multi-Loop Integral System Test (MIST) facility is the largest single component in the IST program. MIST is a 2 x 4 (2 hot legs and steam generators, 4 cold legs and reactor-coolant pumps) representation of lowered-loop reactor systems of the B and W design. It is a full-height, full-pressure facility with 1/817 power and volume scaling. Two other experimental facilities are included in the IST program: test loops at the University of Maryland, College Park, and at Stanford Research Institute. The objective of the IST tests is to generate high-quality experimental data to be used for assessing thermal-hydraulic safety computer codes. Efforts are underway at Los Alamos to assess TRAC-PF1/MOD1 against data from each of the IST facilities. Calculations and data comparisons for TRAC-PF1/MOD1 assessment have been completed for two transients run in the MIST facility. These are the MIST nominal test. Test 3109AA, a scaled 10 cm2 SBLOCA and Test 320201, a scaled 50 cm2 SBLOCA. Only MIST assessment results are presented in this paper

  5. Annular Flow Distribution test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) Annular Flow Distribution testing for the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). The objective of the Annular Flow Distribution Test Program is to characterize the flow distribution between annular coolant channels for the Mark-22 fuel assembly with the bottom fitting insert (BFI) in place. Flow rate measurements for each annular channel were obtained by establishing ''hydraulic similarity'' between an instrumented fuel assembly with the BFI removed and a ''reference'' fuel assembly with the BFI installed. Empirical correlations of annular flow rates were generated for a range of boundary conditions

  6. Spent fuel working group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a memo dated 19 August 1993, Secretary O'Leary assigned the Office of Environment, Safety and Health the primary responsibility to identify, characterize, and assess the safety, health, and environmental vulnerabilities of the DOE's existing storage conditions and facilities for the storage of irradiated reactor fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. This volume is divided into three major sections. Section 1 contains the Working Group Assessment Team reports on the following facilities: Hanford Site, INEL, SRS, Oak Ridge Site, West Valley Site, LANL, BNL, Sandia, General Atomics (San Diego), Babcock ampersand Wilcox (Lynchburg Technology Center), and ANL. Section 2 contains the Vulnerability Development Forms from most of these sites. Section 3 contains the documents used by the Working Group in implementing this initiative

  7. TREAT [Transient Reactor Test Facility] reactor control rod scram system simulations and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air cylinders moving heavy components (100 to 300 lbs) at high speeds (above 300 in/sec) present a formidable end-cushion-shock problem. With no speed control, the moving components can reach over 600 in/sec if the air cylinder has a 5 ft stroke. This paper presents an overview of a successful upgrade modification to an existing reactor control rod drive design using a computer model to simulate the modified system performance for system design analysis. This design uses a high speed air cylinder to rapidly insert control rods (278 lb moved 5 ft in less than 300 msec) to scram an air-cooled test reactor. Included is information about the computer models developed to simulate high-speed air cylinder operation and a unique new speed control and end cushion design. A patent application is pending with the US Patent ampersand Trade Mark Office for this system (DOE case number S-68,622). The evolution of the design, from computer simulations thru operational testing in a test stand (simulating in-reactor operating conditions) to installation and use in the reactor, is also described. 6 figs

  8. Magnetic flux transport and the sun's dipole moment - New twists to the Babcock-Leighton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms that give rise to the sun's large-scale poloidal magnetic field are explored in the framework of the Babcock-Leighton (BL) model. It is shown that there are in general two quite distinct contributions to the generation of the 'alpha effect': the first is associated with the axial tilts of the bipolar magnetic regions as they erupt at the surface, while the second arises through the interaction between diffusion and flow as the magnetic flux is dispersed over the surface. The general relationship between flux transport and the BL dynamo is discussed.

  9. WILCOX COUNTY, ALABAMA--A STUDY OF SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, AND EDUCATIONAL BANKRUPTCY. REPORT OF AN INVESTIGATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BROADUS, JAMES; AND OTHERS

    THE REQUEST FOR THIS INVESTIGATION BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION COMMISSION ON PROFESSIONAL RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES RESULTED FROM THE FIRING OF NINE NEGRO TEACHERS IN WILCOX COUNTY. THE STUDY ITSELF IS MORE INCLUSIVE, INCORPORATING THE FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS OF SEPARATE STUDIES IN POVERTY, SCHOOL FINANCE,…

  10. New Sensors for Irradiation Testing at Materials and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhanced instrumentation, capable of providing real-time measurements of parameters during fuels and material irradiations, is required to support irradiation testing requested by US nuclear research programs. For example, several research programs funded by the US Department of Energy (US DOE) are emphasizing the use of first principle models to characterize the performance of fuels and materials. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time data are essential to demonstrate the performance of these new fuels and materials during irradiation testing. Furthermore, sensors that obtain such data in US MTRs, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), must be miniature, reliable, and able to withstand high fluxes and high temperatures. Depending on program requirements, sensors may need to obtain data in inert gas, pressurized water, or liquid metal environments. To address these needs, INL has developed and deployed several new sensors to support irradiation testing in US DOE programs. The paper identifies the sensors currently available to support higher flux US MTR irradiations. Recent results and products from sensor research and development are highlighted. In particular, progress in deploying enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting temperature, elongation, and thermal conductivity is emphasized. Finally, initial results from research to evaluate the viability of ultrasonic and fiber optic technologies for irradiation testing are summarized. (author)

  11. Wilcox Group Apparent Thickness, Gulf Coast (wlcxthkg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Apparent Wilcox Group thickness maps are contoured from location and top information derived from the Petroleum Information (PI) Wells database. The Wilcox...

  12. Defueling filter test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor (TMI-2) has sustained core damage creating a significant quantity of fine debris, which can become suspended during the planned defueling operations, and will have to be constantly removed to maintain water clarity and minimize radiation exposure. To accomplish these objectives, a Defueling Water Cleanup System (DWCS) has been designed. One of the primary components in the DWCS is a custom designed filter canister using an all stainless steel filter medium. The full scale filter canister is designed to remove suspended solids from 800 microns to 0.5 microns in size. Filter cartridges are fabricated into an element cluster to provide for a flowrate of greater than 100 gals/min. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) under contract to GPU Nuclear Corporation has evaluated two candidate DWCS filter concepts in a 1/100 scale proof-of-principle test program at BandW's Lynchburg Research Center. The filters were challenged with simulated solids suspensions of 1400 and 140 ppm in borated water (5000 ppm boron). Test data collected includes solids loading, effluent turbidity, and differential pressure trends versus time. From the proof-of-principle test results, a full-scale filter canister was generated

  13. Test reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Development Program created a need for engineering testing of fuels and materials. The Engineering Test Reactors were developed around the world in response to this demand. The design of the test reactors proved to be different from that of power reactors, carrying the fuel elements closer to the threshold of failure, requiring more responsive instrumentation, more rapid control element action, and inherent self-limiting behavior under accident conditions. The design of the experimental facilities to exploit these reactors evolved a new, specialized, branch of engineering, requiring a very high-lvel scientific and engineering team, established a meticulous concern with reliability, the provision for recovery from their own failures, and detailed attention to possible interactions with the test reactors. This paper presents this technology commencing with the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) through the Fast Flux Test Facility, some of the unique experimental facilities developed to exploit them, but discusses only cursorily the experiments performed, since sample preparation and sample analyses were, and to some extent still are, either classified or proprietary. The Nuclear Engineering literature is filled with this information

  14. Development, utilization, and future prospects of materials test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor radiation affects the chemical and physical properties of materials. These changes can be very drastic in certain cases. Special test reactors have therefore been built since the 1950's and specific skills were developed to expose materials specimens to the precise irradiation conditions required. Materials testing reactors are those research reactor facilities which are designed and operated predominantly for studies into radiation damage. About a dozen plants in European communities (EC) Member States and in the US can be identified in this category, with 5 to 100 MW fission power and neutron fluxes between 5 x 1013 and 1015 cm-2s-1. The paper elaborates common aspects of development, utilization, and future prospects of US and EC materials testing reactors, and indicates the most significant differences

  15. Research reactor and fuel development facility decommissioning experience and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the technology and experience gained in research reactor and fuels development facility decommissioning programs carried out by Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) at one of its NRC-licensed sites in Lynchburg, VA. The projects included two buildings that housed plutonium/uranium fuels development laboratories, four low-power critical experiment facilities, and two (megawatt-level) research reactors. This paper concentrates on the experiences with the plutonium/uranium fuels development laboratories and critical experiment facilities. These were comprehensive projects that included: developing the decommissioning and quality assurance plans; interfacing with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, performing the actual decontamination/dismantling work; performing decontamination and final radiological surveys; and volume reducing, packaging, certifying, classifying, and shipping the radioactive waste for disposal. This broad experience has involved handling radioactive contamination from the following sources: low- and high-enriched U-235 fuel; depleted uranium; mixed oxide fuel (Pu/UO); thorium fuel; U Al alloy fuel; and fission activation products (beta-gamma). Areas of application to future projects are highlighted in this paper

  16. Qualification of the B and W Mark B fuel assembly for high burnup. Third semi-annual progress report, July-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five Babcock and Wilcox-designed Mark B (15 x 15) pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies were irradiated to extended burnups in Duke Power Company's Oconee Unit 1 reactor. An assembly average burnup of 40,000 MWd/mtU, which is about 29% greater than previous discharge burnups at Oconee 1, was attained. The nondestructive examination of these five assemblies, which have been irradiated for four fuel cycles, was begun. Data obtained included fuel assembly and fuel dimensions, water channel spacings, fuel rod surface deposit samples, and holddown spring preload forces. Visual examination of the assemblies indicated that good fuel performance was maintained through four cycles of irradiation

  17. Status and future plan of Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooling tank typed reactor. JMTR has been used for fuel and material irradiation studies for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. Since the JMTR is connected with hot laboratory through the canal, re-irradiation tests can conduct easily by safety and quick transportation of irradiation samples. First criticality was achieved in March 1968, and operation was stopped from August, 2006 for the refurbishment. The reactor facilities are refurbished during four years from the beginning of FY 2007, and necessary examination and work are carrying out on schedule. The renewed and upgraded JMTR will start from FY 2011 and operate for a period of about 20 years (until around FY 2030). The usability improvement of the JMTR, such as higher reactor available factor, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussing as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  18. Improving the proliferation resistance of research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elimination, or substantial reduction, of the trade in highly enriched fuel elements for research and test reactors would significantly reduce the proliferation risk associated with the current potential for diversion of these materials. To this end, it is the long-term goal of U.S. policy to fuel all new and existing research and test reactors with uranium of less than 20% enrichment (but substantially greater than natural) excepting, perhaps, only a small number of high-power, high-performance, reactors. The U.S. development program for enrichment reduction in research and test reactor designs currently using 90-93% enriched uranium is based on the practical criterion that enrichment reduction should not cause significant flux performance (flux per unit power) or burnup performance degradation relative to the unmodified reactor design. A program is now beginning in the U.S. to develop the necessary fuel technology, but several years of work will be needed. Accordingly, as an immediate interim step, the U.S. is proposing to convert existing research and test reactors (and new designs) from the use of 90-93% enriched fuel to the use of 30-45% enriched fuel wherever this can be done without unacceptable reactor performance degradation

  19. Recent reactor testing and experience with gamma thermometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experience with gamma thermometers for light water reactors has primarily been in the Framatome reactors operated by Electricite de France. Other recent testing has taken place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Otto Hahn ship reactor. Earlier experience with gamma thermometers was in heavy water reactors at Savannah River and Halden. This paper presents recent data from the light water reactor (LWR) programs. The principles of design and operation of the Radcal gamma thermometer were presented in ''Gamma Thermometer Developments for Light Water Reactors'', Leyse and Smith1. Observations from LWRs confirm the earlier experience from heavy water reactors that the gamma thermometer units give signals which are proportional to the power of surrounding fuel rods and virtually independent of exposure, surrounding poison and other conditions which affect signals of neutron sensitive devices. After 200 sensor-years in EdF reactors, there has been no change in the sensitivity of the devices. Nonetheless, the Radcal units can be recalibrated in-reactor by the introduction of electrical heating via a heater cable imbedded in the device. Algorithms and signal processing software have been developed to interpret and display the gamma thermometer signals. The results of this processing are illustrated here

  20. Safety re-assessment of AECL test and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited currently has four operating engineering test/research reactors of various sizes and ages; a new isotope-production reactor Maple-X10, under construction at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and a heating demonstration reactor, SDR, undergoing high-power commissioning at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE). The company is also performing design studies of small reactors for hot water and electricity production. The older reactors are ZED-2, PTR, NRX, and NRU; these range in age from 42 years (NRX) to 29 years (ZED-2). Since 1984, limited-scope safety re-assessments have been underway on three of these reactors (ZED-2, NRX AND NRU). ZED-2 and PTR are operated by the Reactor Physics Branch; all other reactors are operated by the respective site Reactor Operations Branches. For the older reactors the original safety reports produced were entirely deterministic in nature and based on the design-basis accident concept. The limited scope safety re-assessments for these older reactors, carried out over the past 5 years, have comprised both quantitative probabilistic safety-assessment techniques, such as event tree and fault analysis, and/or qualitative techniques, such as failure mode and effect analysis. The technique used for an individual assessment was dependent upon the specific scope required. This paper discusses the types of analyses carried out, specific insights/recommendations resulting from the analysis, and the plan for future analysis. In addition, during the last four years safety assessments have been carried out on the new isotope-, heat-, and electricity-producing reactors, as part of the safety design review, commissioning and licensing activities

  1. FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (“AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C “green” microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led

  2. Technical and economic studies of small reactors for supply of electricity and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several years ago conventional opinion held that nuclear power plants must be very large to be competitive with fossil fuels. This situation has changed markedly in most countries within recent years, as oil and gas supplies have become more scarce and costly. Studies have been carried out for several nuclear steam supply systems in the small and intermediate size range. Detail studies are reported of the Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG), a 365 MW(th) pressurized water reactor being developed by Babcock and Wilcox, as applied to industrial energy needs. Both conventional and barge-mounted nuclear steam supply systems are considered. Conceptual studies have been started of pressurized and boiling water reactors in the range of 1000 MW(th), which are envisioned for utility operation for supply of electric power and steam. Design studies of a 500 MW(th) high temperature reactor are also reported. The small reactors are expected to have higher unit costs than the large commercial plants, but to have compensating advantages in higher plant availability, shorter construction schedule, and greater siting flexibility. Studies are also reported of power cycle parameters and cost allocations for extraction of steam from steam turbine plants. This steam could be used for industrial energy, district heating, or desalination

  3. Organic petrology and coalbed gas content, Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene), northern Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, P.C.; Warwick, P.D.; Breland, F.C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene) coal and carbonaceous shale samples collected from four coalbed methane test wells in northern Louisiana were characterized through an integrated analytical program. Organic petrographic analyses, gas desorption and adsorption isotherm measurements, and proximate-ultimate analyses were conducted to provide insight into conditions of peat deposition and the relationships between coal composition, rank, and coalbed gas storage characteristics. The results of petrographic analyses indicate that woody precursor materials were more abundant in stratigraphically higher coal zones in one of the CBM wells, consistent with progradation of a deltaic depositional system (Holly Springs delta complex) into the Gulf of Mexico during the Paleocene-Eocene. Comparison of petrographic analyses with gas desorption measurements suggests that there is not a direct relationship between coal type (sensu maceral composition) and coalbed gas storage. Moisture, as a function of coal rank (lignite-subbituminous A), exhibits an inverse relationship with measured gas content. This result may be due to higher moisture content competing for adsorption space with coalbed gas in shallower, lower rank samples. Shallower ( 600??m) coal samples containing less moisture range from under- to oversaturated with respect to their CH4 adsorption capacity.

  4. Irradiation testing of miniature fuel plates for the RERTR program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senn, R.L.; Martin, M.M.

    1981-07-01

    An irradiation test facility, which provides a test bed for irradiating a variety of miniature fuel plates (miniplates) for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, has been placed into operation. These tests screen various candidate fuel materials on their suitability for replacing the highly enriched uranium fuel materials currently used by the world's test and research reactors with a lower enrichment fuel material, without significantly degrading reactor operating characteristics and power levels. The use of low uranium enrichment of about 20% /sup 235/U in place of highly enriched fuel for these reactors would reduce the potential for /sup 235/U diversion. The irradiation test facility, designated as HFED, is operating in core position E-7 in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR), a 30-MW water-moderated reactor. The miniplates will achieve burnups of up to approx. 2.2 x 10/sup 27/ fissions/m/sup 3/ of fuel.

  5. Dual-core TRIGA research and materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomic Company is under contract from the Romanian Institute for Nuclear Technologies to design, fabricate, and install a research reactor in support of the Romanian National Program for Power Reactor Development. The goal was to select a design concept that provided reasonably high neutron fluxes for long term testing of various fuel-cladding-coolant combinations and also provide high performance pulsing for transient testing of fuel specimens. An effective solution was achieved by the selection of a 14 MW steady-state TRIGA reactor for high flux endurance testing, and an Annular Core Pulsing Reactor (ACPR) for high performance pulsing testing, with both reactors mounted in the same reactor tank and operated independently. The fuel bundles for the steady-state reactor consist of 25 uranium-zirconium hydride rods clad in stainless steel arranged in a square 5 x 5 array. The steady-state core is provided with downflow cooling at a rate of approximately 275 gpm/bundle. Bundle flow tests will be performed with both heated and unheated models. The core will be optimized for peak thermal neutron flux and reactivity lifetime within the constraint of a peak fuel meat temperature of 7500C. The operation of the steady-state reactor at a power level of 14 MW will yield peak unperturbed thermal neutron fluxes in the central experiment position of 2.9 x 1014 n/cm2-sec. The corresponding fast neutron flux (less than 1.125 keV) will be 2.6 x 1014 nv. (U.S.)

  6. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris{o} National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  7. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris oe National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  8. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results of intermediate vessel test monitoring and reactor hot functional testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses a program designed to develop the use of acoustic emission (AE) methods for continuous surveillance to detect and evaluate flaw growth in reactor pressure boundaries. Technology developed in the laboratory for identifying AE from crack growth and for using AE information to estimate flaw severity is now being evaluated on an intermediate vessel test and on a reactor facility. A vessel, designated ZB-1, has been tested under fatigue loadings with simulated reactor conditions at Mannheim, West Germany, in collaboration with the German Materialpruefungsanstalt (MPA), Stuttgart. Fatigue cracking from machined flaws and in a fabrication weld were both detected clearly by AE. AE data were measured on a US nuclear reactor (Watts Bar, Unit 1) during hot functional preservice testing. This demonstrated that coolant flow noise is a manageable problem and that AE can be detected under operational coolant flow and temperature conditions. (author)

  9. Research and Test Reactor Fuel Elements (RTRFE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BWX Technologies Inc. (BWXT) has experienced several production improvements over the past year. The homogeneity yields in 4.8 gU/cc U3Si2 plates have increased over last year's already high yields. Through teamwork and innovative manufacturing techniques, maintaining high quality surface finishes on plates and elements is becoming easier and less expensive. Currently, BWXT is designing a fabrication development plan to reach a fuel loading of 9 gU/cc within 2 - 4 years. This development will involve a step approach requested by ANL to produce plates using U-8Mo at a loading of 6 gU/cc first and qualify the fuel at those levels. In achieving the goal of a very high-density fuel loading of 9 gU/cc, BWXT is considering employing several new, state of the art, ultrasonic testing techniques for fuel core evaluation. (author)

  10. Present status and future perspective of research and test reactors in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Osamu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Kaieda, Keisuke

    1999-08-01

    Since 1957, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has constructed several research and test reactors to fulfil a major role in the study of nuclear energy and fundamental research. At present, four reactors, the Japan Research Reactor No. 3 and No. 4 (JRR-3M and JRR-4 respectively), the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), are in operation, and a new High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) has reached first criticality and is waiting for the power-up test. This paper introduce these reactors and describe their present operational status. The recent tendency of utilization and future perspectives are also reported. (author)

  11. Improving the proliferation resistance of research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elimination, or substantial reduction, of the trade in unirradiated highly-enriched fuel elements for research and test reactors would significantly reduce the proliferation risk associated with the current potential for diversion of these materials. To this end, it is the long-term goal of U.S. policy to fuel all new and existing research and test reactors with uranium of less-than-20% enrichment (but substantially greater than natural) excepting, perhaps, only a small number of high-power, high-performance, reactors. The U.S. development program for enrichment reduction in research and test reactor designs currently using 90-93% enriched uranium is based on the practical criterion that enrichment reduction should not cause significant flux performance (flux per unit power) or burnup performance degradation relative to the unmodified reactor design. To first order, this implies the requirement that the 235U loading in the reduced-enrichment fuel elements be the same as the 235U loading in the 90-93% enriched fuel elements. This can be accomplished by substitution of higher uranium density fuel technology for currently-used fuel technology in the fuel meat volume of the current fuel element design and/or by increasing the usable fuel meat volume. For research and test reactors of power greater than 5-10 megawatts, fuel technology does not currently exist that would permit enrichment reductions to below 20% utilizing this criterion. A program is now beginning in the U.S. to develop the necessary fuel technology. Currently-proven fuel technology is capable, however, of accommodating enrichment reductions to the 30-45% range (from 90-93%) for many reactors in the 5-50MW range. Accordingly the U.S. is proposing to convert existing reactors (and new designs) in the 5-50MW range from the use of highly-enriched fuel to the use of 30-45% enriched fuel, and reactors of less that about 5MW to less-than-20% enrichment, wherever this can be done without significant performance

  12. Reactor protection system with automatic self-testing and diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor protection system is disclosed having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Automatic detection and discrimination against failed sensors allows the reactor protection system to automatically enter a known state when sensor failures occur. Cross communication of sensor readings allows comparison of four theoretically ''identical'' values. This permits identification of sensor errors such as drift or malfunction. A diagnostic request for service is issued for errant sensor data. Automated self test and diagnostic monitoring, sensor input through output relay logic, virtually eliminate the need for manual surveillance testing. This provides an ability for each division to cross-check all divisions and to sense failures of the hardware logic. 16 figs

  13. Natural convection test in Phenix reactor and associated CATHARE calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Phenix sodium cooled fast reactor started operation in 1973 and was stopped in 2009. Before the reactor was definitively stopped, final tests were performed, including a natural convection test in the primary circuit. One objective of this natural convection test in Phenix reactor is the qualification of plant dynamic codes as CATHARE code for future safety studies. The paper firstly describes the Phenix reactor primary circuit. The initial test conditions and the detailed transient scenario are presented. Then, the CATHARE modelling of the Phenix primary circuit is described. The whole transient scenario is calculated, including the nominal state, the steam generators dry out, the scram, the onset of natural convection in the primary circuit and the natural convection phases. The CATHARE calculations are compared to the Phenix measurements. A particular attention is paid to the significant decrease of the core power before the scram. Then, the evolution of main components inlet and outlet temperatures is compared. The need of coupling a system code with a CFD code to model the 3D behaviour of large pools is pointed out. This work is in progress. (author)

  14. Design and testing of integrated circuits for reactor protection channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custom and semicustom application-specific integrated circuit design and testing methods are investigated for use in research and commercial nuclear reactor safety systems. The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working together through a cooperative research and development agreement to apply modern technology to a nuclear reactor protection system. Purpose of this project is to demonstrate to the nuclear industry an alternative approach for new or upgrade reactor protection and safety system signal processing and voting logic. Motivation for this project stems from (1) the difficulty of proving that software-based protection systems are adequately reliable, (2) the obsolescence of the original equipment, and (3) the improved performance of digital processing

  15. Safety analysis calculations for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment in Research and Test Reactor) Program at ANL is to provide technical means for conversion of research and test reactors from HEU (High-Enrichment Uranium) to LEU (Low-Enrichment Uranium) fuels. In exploring the feasibility of conversion, safety considerations are a prime concern; therefore, safety analyses must be performed for reactors undergoing the conversion. This requires thorough knowledge of the important safety parameters for different types of reactors for both HEU and LEU fuel. Appropriate computer codes are needed to predict transient reactor behavior under postulated accident conditions. In this discussion, safety issues for the two general types of reactors i.e., the plate-type (MTR-type) reactor and the rod-type (TRIGA-type) reactor, resulting from the changes associated with LEU vs. HEU fuels, are explored. The plate-type fuels are typically uranium aluminide (UAlx) compounds dispersed in aluminum and clad with aluminum. Moderation is provided by the water coolant. Self shut-down reactivity coefficients with EU fuel are entirely a result of coolant heating, whereas with LEU fuel there is an additional shut down contribution provided by the direct heating of the fuel due to the Doppler coefficient. In contrast, the rod-type (TRIGA) fuels are mixtures of zirconium hydride, uranium, and erbium. This fuel mixture is formed into rods ( ∼ 1 cm diameter) and clad with stainless steel or Incoloy. In the TRIGA fuel the self-shutdown reactivity is more complex, depending on heating of the fuel rather than the coolant. The two most important mechanisms in providing this feedback are: spectral hardening due to neutron interaction with the ZrH moderator as it is heated and Doppler broadening of resonances in erbium and U-238. Since these phenomena result directly from heating of the fuel, and do not depend on heat transfer to the moderator/coolant, the coefficients are prompt acting. Results of transient calculations

  16. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm3 was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed

  17. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

  18. Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo: the role of downward pumping and the equatorward propagation of activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Cameron, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the role of downward magnetic pumping near the surface using a kinematic Babcock-Leighton model. We find that the pumping causes the poloidal field to become predominately radial in the near-surface shear layer. This allows the negative radial shear in the near-surface layer to effectively act on the radial field to produce a toroidal field. Consequently, we observe a clear equatorward migration of the toroidal field at low latitudes even when there is no meridional flow in the deep CZ. We show a case where the period of a dynamo wave solution is approximately 11 years. Flux transport models are also shown with periods close to 11 years. Both the dynamo wave and flux transport dynamo are thus able to reproduce some of the observed features of solar cycle. The main difference between the two types of dynamo is the value of $\\alpha$ required to produce dynamo action. In both types of dynamo, the surface meridional flow helps to advect and build the polar field in high latitudes, while in flux transport dynamo the equatorward flow near the bottom of CZ advects toroidal field to cause the equatorward migration in butterfly wings and this advection makes the dynamo easier by transporting strong toroidal field to low latitudes where $\\alpha$ effect works. Another conclusion of our study is that the magnetic pumping suppresses the diffusion of fields through the photospheric surface which helps to achieve the 11-year dynamo cycle at a moderately larger value of magnetic diffusivity than has previously been used.

  19. Preliminary Design Concept for a Reactor-internal CRDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Tae Wan; Choi, Suhn; Kim, Keung Koo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    A rod ejection accident may cause severer result in SMRs because SMRs have relatively high control rod reactivity worth compared with commercial nuclear reactors. Because this accident would be perfectly excluded by adopting a reactor-internal CRDM (Control Rod Drive Mechanism), many SMRs accept this concept. The first concept was provided by JAERI with the MRX reactor which uses an electric motor with a ball screw driveline. Babcock and Wilcox introduced the concept in an mPower reactor that adopts an electric motor with a roller screw driveline and hydraulic system, and Westinghouse Electric Co. proposes an internal Control Rod Drive in its SMR with an electric motor with a latch mechanism. In addition, several other applications have been reported thus far. The reactor-internal CRDM concept is now widely adopted in many SMR designs, and this concept may also be applied in an evolutionary reactor development. So the preliminary study is conducted based on the SMART CRDM design. A preliminary design concept for a reactor-internal CRDM was proposed and evaluated through an electromagnetic analysis. It was found that there is an optimum design for the motor housing, and the results may contribute to the realization a reactor-internal CRDM for an evolutionary reactor development. More detailed analysis results will be reported later.

  20. On the Meaning of Formative Measurement and How It Differs from Reflective Measurement: Comment on Howell, Breivik, and Wilcox (2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagozzi, Richard P.

    2007-01-01

    D. Howell, E. Breivik, and J. B. Wilcox (2007) have presented an important and interesting analysis of formative measurement and have recommended that researchers abandon such an approach in favor of reflective measurement. The author agrees with their recommendations but disagrees with some of the bases for their conclusions. He suggests that…

  1. Fuels for research and test reactors, status review: July 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, D.

    1982-12-01

    A thorough review is provided on nuclear fuels for steady-state thermal research and test reactors. The review was conducted to provide a documented data base in support of recent advances in research and test reactor fuel development, manufacture, and demonstration in response to current US policy on availability of enriched uranium. The review covers current fabrication practice, fabrication development efforts, irradiation performance, and properties affecting fuel utilization, including thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, thermal expansion, corrosion, phase stability, mechanical properties, and fission-product release. The emphasis is on US activities, but major work in Europe and elsewhere is included. The standard fuel types discussed are the U-Al alloy, UZrH/sub x/, and UO/sub 2/ rod fuels. Among new fuels, those given major emphasis include H/sub 3/Si-Al dispersion and UO/sub 2/ caramel plate fuels.

  2. Fuels for research and test reactors, status review: July 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thorough review is provided on nuclear fuels for steady-state thermal research and test reactors. The review was conducted to provide a documented data base in support of recent advances in research and test reactor fuel development, manufacture, and demonstration in response to current US policy on availability of enriched uranium. The review covers current fabrication practice, fabrication development efforts, irradiation performance, and properties affecting fuel utilization, including thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, thermal expansion, corrosion, phase stability, mechanical properties, and fission-product release. The emphasis is on US activities, but major work in Europe and elsewhere is included. The standard fuel types discussed are the U-Al alloy, UZrH/sub x/, and UO2 rod fuels. Among new fuels, those given major emphasis include H3Si-Al dispersion and UO2 caramel plate fuels

  3. Mechanical behaviour of the reactor vessel support of a pressurized water reactor: tests and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PWR reactor vessel is supported by a steel ring laying on the reactor pit. This support has to ensure a good behaviour of the vessel in the event of accidental conditions (earthquake and pipe rupture). A new evolution of the evaluation methods of the applied forces has shown a significant increase in the design loads used until now. In order to take into account these new forces, we carried out a test on a representative mock-up of the vessel support (scale 1/6). This test was performed by CEA, EDF and FRAMATOME. Several static equivalent forces were applied on the experimental mock-up. Displacements and strains were simultaneously recorded. The results of the test have enabled to justify the design of the pit and the ring, to show up a wide safety margin until the collapse of the structures and to check our hypothesis about the transmission of the forces between the ring and the pit

  4. Apparent Depth to the Wilcox Group, Gulf Coast (wlcxdpthg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The depth to top of the Wilcox Group is contoured from location and top information derived from the Petroleum Information (PI) Wells database. The depth to Wilcox...

  5. Interpretational Confounding Is Due to Misspecification, Not to Type of Indicator: Comment on Howell, Breivik, and Wilcox (2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    R. D. Howell, E. Breivik, and J. B. Wilcox (2007) have argued that causal (formative) indicators are inherently subject to interpretational confounding. That is, they have argued that using causal (formative) indicators leads the empirical meaning of a latent variable to be other than that assigned to it by a researcher. Their critique of causal…

  6. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer Lyons; Wade R. Marcum; Mark D. DeHart; Sean R. Morrell

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  7. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  8. Reactor Simulator Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenny L.; Pearson, Boise J.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator test loop (RxSim) was design & built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing was to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V since the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This paper summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump (ALIP) tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  9. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; K. Rule; M. Viola; M. Williams; R. Strykowsky

    1999-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling.

  10. Simulator for materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A real-time simulator for both reactor and irradiation facilities of a materials testing reactor, “Simulator of Materials Testing Reactors”, was developed for understanding reactor behavior and operational training in order to utilize it for nuclear human resource development and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of anticipated operational transients and accident conditions caused by the reactor and irradiation facilities. The development of the simulator was sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. This report summarizes the simulation components, hardware specification and operation procedure of the simulator. (author)

  11. Reactor Testing and Qualification: Prioritized High-level Criticality Testing Needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were tasked with reviewing possible criticality testing needs to support development of the fission surface power system reactor design. Reactor physics testing can provide significant information to aid in development of technologies associated with small, fast spectrum reactors that could be applied for non-terrestrial power systems, leading to eventual system qualification. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to assess the data and analyses required to design and build a space fission power system with high confidence that the system will perform as designed (Marcille, 2004a, 2004b; Weaver, 2007; Parry et al., 2008). This report will provide a summary of previous critical tests and physics measurements that are potentially applicable to the current reactor design (both those that have been benchmarked and those not yet benchmarked), summarize recent studies of potential nuclear testing needs for space reactor development and their applicability to the current baseline fission surface power (FSP) system design, and provide an overview of a suite of tests (separate effects, sub-critical or critical) that could fill in the information database to improve the accuracy of physics modeling efforts as the FSP design is refined. Some recommendations for tasks that could be completed in the near term are also included. Specific recommendations on critical test configurations will be reserved until after the sensitivity analyses being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are completed (due August 2011).

  12. Reactor Testing and Qualification: Prioritized High-level Criticality Testing Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner; G. Harms; S. Bailey

    2011-09-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were tasked with reviewing possible criticality testing needs to support development of the fission surface power system reactor design. Reactor physics testing can provide significant information to aid in development of technologies associated with small, fast spectrum reactors that could be applied for non-terrestrial power systems, leading to eventual system qualification. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to assess the data and analyses required to design and build a space fission power system with high confidence that the system will perform as designed [Marcille, 2004a, 2004b; Weaver, 2007; Parry et al., 2008]. This report will provide a summary of previous critical tests and physics measurements that are potentially applicable to the current reactor design (both those that have been benchmarked and those not yet benchmarked), summarize recent studies of potential nuclear testing needs for space reactor development and their applicability to the current baseline fission surface power (FSP) system design, and provide an overview of a suite of tests (separate effects, sub-critical or critical) that could fill in the information database to improve the accuracy of physics modeling efforts as the FSP design is refined. Some recommendations for tasks that could be completed in the near term are also included. Specific recommendations on critical test configurations will be reserved until after the sensitivity analyses being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are completed (due August 2011).

  13. Operation, test, research and development of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). FY2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30MW of thermal power, constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is the first high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan. The HTTR was attained at the full power operation of 30MW in December 2001 and achieved the 950degC of outlet coolant temperature at the outside the reactor pressure vessel in June 2004. To establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs, we have obtained demonstration test data necessary for several R and Ds, and accumulated operation and maintenance experience of HTGRs throughout the HTTR's operation such as rated power operations, safety demonstration tests and long-term high temperature operations, and so on. In fiscal year 2013, we started to prepare the application document of reactor installation license for the HTTR to prove conformity with the new research reactor's safety regulatory requirements taken effect from December 2013. We had been making effort to restart the HTTR which was stopped since the 2011 when the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (2011.3.11) occurred. This report summarizes activities and results of HTTR operation, maintenance, and several R and Ds, which were carried out in the fiscal year 2013. (author)

  14. A Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model with multi-cellular meridional circulation in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Belucz, Bernadett; Forgacs-Dajka, Emese

    2015-01-01

    Babcock-Leighton type solar dynamo models with single-celled meridional circulation are successful in reproducing many solar cycle features. Recent observations and theoretical models of meridional circulation do not indicate a single-celled flow pattern. We examine the role of complex multi-cellular circulation patterns in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes. We show from simulations that presence of a weak, second, high-latitude reverse cell speeds up the cycle and slightly enhances the poleward branch in butterfly diagram, whereas the presence of a second cell in depth reverses the tilt of butterfly wing to an anti-solar type. A butterfly diagram constructed from middle of convection zone yields a solar-like pattern, but this may be difficult to realize in the Sun because of magnetic buoyancy effects. Each of the above cases behaves similarly in higher and lower magnetic diffusivity regimes. However, our dynamo with a meridional circulation containing four cells in...

  15. Uninstrumented assembly airflow testing in the Annular Flow Distribution facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    During the Emergency Cooling System phase of a postulated large-break loss of coolant accident (ECS-LOCA), air enters the primary loop and is pumped down the reactor assemblies. One of the experiments performed to support the analysis of this accident was the Annular Flow Distribution (AFD) experiment, conducted in a facility built for this purpose at Babcock and Wilcox Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. As part of this experiment, a large body of airflow data were acquired in a prototypical mockup of the Mark 22 reactor assembly. This assembly was known as the AFD (or the I-AFD here) reference assembly. The I-AFD assembly was fully prototypical, having been manufactured in SRS`s production fabrication facility. Similar Mark 22 mockup assemblies were tested in several test facilities in the SRS Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). Discrepancies were found. The present report documents further work done to address the discrepancy in airflow measurements between the AFD facility and HTL facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to disseminate the data from the U-AFD test, and to compare these test results to the I-AFD data and the U-AT data. A summary table of the test data and the B&W data transmittal letter are included as an attachment to this report. The full data transmittal volume from B&W (including time plots of the various instruments) is included as an appendix to this report. These data are further analyzed by comparing them to two other HTL tests, namely, SPRIHTE 1 and the Single Assembly Test Stand (SATS).

  16. Fracture toughness test methods and examples for fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the importance of the evaluation of fracture toughness in nuclear fusion reactor structural materials, and the fracture toughness evaluation methods that are used as the standards and their actual examples. It also discusses the problems involved in the standardized approach and the efforts for the technology improvement. To evaluate the material life under nuclear fusion reactor environment, fracture toughness measurement after neutron irradiation is indispensable. Due to a limitation in the irradiation area size of an irradiation reactor, and to avoid the temperature difference in a specimen, the size of the specimen is required to be minimized, which is different from the common standards. As for the size effect of the test specimen, toughness value tends to decrease when ligament length is 7 mm or below. The main problems and challenges are as follows. (1) As for the tendency that fracture toughness value decreases along with the miniaturization of the ligament length, it is necessary to elucidate the mechanism of size effects, and to develop the correction method for size effects. (2) As for the issues of the curve shape and application to irradiation time in the master curve method, it is necessary to review the data checking method and plastic constraint conditions for crack tip M = 30 that is stipulated in ASTM E1921, and to elucidate the material dependence of master curve shape. (A.O.)

  17. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    November 9--10, 1978, marked the first of what has become an annual event--the International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). The meeting brought together for the first time many people who became major program participants in later years. This first meeting emphasized fuel development, and it established the basis for all later meetings. Believing that the proceedings of this first meeting are important as a historical record of the beginning of the international RERTR effort. This report provides presentations and discussions of this original meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  18. Reports of the Technical Assessment Task Force on selection, training, qualification, and licensing of Three Mile Island reactor operating personnel; technical assessment of operating, abnormal, and emergency procedures; control room design and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the effort to identify and evaluate the possible causes of the Three Mile Island accident, an analysis of operator training, qualification, licensing, selection, and manning was conducted by the staff. The study included review of documents, interviews, and depositions at Three Mile Island, Babcock and Wilcox, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) during June, July, and August 1979. Analysis of the information obtained was conducted almost exclusively by the writer. This paper examines the roles of the actors involved in training and it reviews the various programs which were intended to staff Three Mile Island with sufficient numbers of competent, trained operators and supervisors. The analysis includes a review of the regulations concerning operator training and licensing; describes how the requirements were implemented by the NRC, Metropolitan Edison Company (Met Ed), and Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W), and then evaluates the programs conducted by these three organizations

  19. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results of intermediate vessel test monitoring and reactor hot functional testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the acoustic emission (AE)/flaw characterization program is to provide an experimental feasibility evaluation of using the AE method on a continuous basis (during operation and during hydrotest) to detect and analyze flaw growth in reactor pressure vessels and primary piping. This effort is based on earlier results showing that AE has potential for being a valuable addition to nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods with the added unique capability for continuous monitoring, high sensitivity and remote flaw location. Results are reported for the ZB-1 vessel test and the Watts Bar-1 hot functional test

  20. The RERTR [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor] program:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results and new developments which ocurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U3Si2-Al and U3Si-Al fuels was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U3Si2-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm3 was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40 % average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission 99Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of U.S. university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U3Si-Al with 19.75 % enrichment and U3Si2-Al with 45 % enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR program. (Author)

  1. High flux testing reactor Petten. Replacement of the reactor vessel and connected components. Overall report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project of replacing the HFR originated in 1974 when results of several research programmes confirmed severe neutron embrittlement of aluminium alloys suggesting a limited life of the existing facility. This report contains the detailed chronology of events concerning preparation and execution of the replacement. After a 14 months' outage the reactor resumed routine operation on 14th February, 1985. At the end of several years of planning and preparation the reconstruction proceded in the following steps: unloading of the old core, decay of short-lived radioactivity in December 1983, removal of the old tank and of its peripheral equipment in January-February 1984, segmentation and waste disposal of the removed components in March-April, decontamination of the pools, bottom penetration overhauling in May-June, installation of the new tank and other new components in July-September, testing and commissioning, including minor modifications in October-December, and, trials runs and start-up preparation in January-February 1985. The new HFR Petten features increased and improved experimental facilities. Among others the obsolete thermal columns was replaced by two high flux beam tubes. Moreover the new plant has been designed for future increases of reactor power and neutron fluxes. For the next three to four years the reactor has to cope with a large irradiation programme, claiming its capacity to nearly 100%

  2. Reactor Simulator Testing Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Test Objectives Summary: a) Verify operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation & control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. b) Examine cooling & heat regeneration performance of the cold trap purification. c) Test the ALIP pump at voltages beyond 120V to see if the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s can be obtained in the RxSim. Testing Highlights: a) Gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively for operations (NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain). b) Instrumentation & Control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings and ramped within prescribed constraints. It effectively interacted with reactor simulator control model and defaulted back to temperature control mode if the transient fluctuations didn't dampen. c) Cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the minimum temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. d) ALIP produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  3. Static and dynamic performance tests of nuclear powered ship Mutsu reactor (report on nuclear ship Mutsu power-up tests)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power-up tests of the Mutsu reactor were performed from March 29th 1990 to December 14th. The tests were divided into six phases: The tests Phase 0 and Phase 1 were done in the state that the ship was moored at the quay of Sekinehama port in March and April; The tests Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4, and Phase 5 were done on the Pacific Ocean from July to December. Present report describes the test results on the static and dynamic plant performance. On static plant performance tests, there are 13 test items including measurements of primary system heat balance at low and high power levels, a virgin run of feed water pump with SG steam, a change-over test of steam supply of auxiliary boiler to SG. On the dynamic plant performance, there are 11 test items including a test of reactor power auto-control system, a test of main feed water auto-control system, a test of small load variation, a load increasing test, a turbine trip test, tests of ahead and astern maneuvering, a test of single loop operation, and a reactor scram test. The reactor power for each item's test was increased step by step from zero power to the goal of rated power of 100 %, 36 MWt. In order to confirm proper reactor system performance, criteria were laid down for the static and dynamic tests: for example, (1) reactor scram shall not occur, (2) pressurizer relief valve and steam generator safety valve shall not work, and (3) after the transients reactor systems shall become the steady state without manual adjustment of the reactor control system. The test results satisfied these criteria and some of test data showed that reactor had much more margin in any performance for design. It is verified, therefore, that the Mutsu reactor systems have adequate performances as a marine reactor and that one is capable to respond smoothly and safely to the load of ship's demand. (author)

  4. Spent fuel working group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each Site Team, consisting of M ampersand O contractor and Operations Office personnel, performed data collection and identified ES ampersand H concerns relative to RINM storage by preparing responses to the detailed question set for each storage facility at the site. These responses formed the basis for the Site Team reports. These reports are contained in this volume and are from the following facilities: Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site, Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, West Valley Demonstration Project Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, General Atomics, San Diego, Babcock ampersand Wilcox, Lynchburg Technical Center, Argonne National Laboratory - East, Naval Reactors Facilities, Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory, EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies, Ohio, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Battelle Columbus Laboratory. This volume also contains information received from the sites that were not visited. These sites include the Naval Reactor Facility at the INEL, EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies, The Catholic University of America, Rocky Flats Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, Energy Technology Engineering Center, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Information received through the Chicago Operations Office for University Reactors, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Battelle Columbus Laboratory is also included. Materials contained in this volume consist of information, data and site documents. They are unedited

  5. The New US Public-Private Partnership to License and DeploySmall Modular Reactors, With Focus on The B and W mPower Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On December 16, 2011, The US Congress and the President approved new Fiscal Year 2012 funding for a Government - Industry cost shared program called 'Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Licensing Technical Support'. The new legislation appropriates $67 million in 2012 to provide licensing and first-of-a-kind engineering support for small modular reactor designs that can be deployed expeditiously. The legislation requires the Department of Energy to consider applications utilizing any small modular reactor technology. Competitive solicitations are likely to begin shortly and two or three SM R designs will be selected for U S Government support. Such support will likely accelerate deployment and operation of at least one such design by 2020. The Congressional language states that the Government portion of the program is expected to total $452 million over five years One of the candidates for this competition is the B and W mPower reactor being developed by Generation mPower, a company recently formed by the Babcock and Wilcox Company and Bechtel Power Corporation. This presentation will summarize the main features of this design, and explain why it meets the requirements for the Government program, and will be fully developed, licensed and deployed in the US within the next 8 years. Importantly, this design has many features that favor its introduction and use in smaller countries with critical needs for future electric generation capacity, with arid conditions that may require air cooled condensers, and with potential need for a desalination component of the new energy source. The relatively small capacity of the modules (e.g. 320 MWe for an initial two unit plant) will require much lower initial capital investment, as compared to the very large investment of $4 to $6 billion required for the newer 1100 to 1400 MWe plants now being constructed in China, France, Finland, Korea, the US, and the United Arab Emirates

  6. Program plan for decontamination and decommissioning the Materials Testing Reactor at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discussion is presented of a program plan developed for the dismantling of the Materials Testing Reactor located in the Testing Reactor Area (TRA) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are the scope of work, dismantling problems resulting from the nature of construction of the MTR, and a program plan for physically dismantling the reactor

  7. SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

  8. Electrical system regulations of the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IEA-R1 reactor of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP), is a research reactor open pool type, designed and built by the U.S. firm Babcock and Wilcox, having, as coolant and moderator, deionized light water and beryllium and graphite, as reflectors. Until about 1988, the reactor safety systems received power from only one source of energy. As an example, it may be cited the control desk that was powered only by the vital electrical system 220V, which, in case the electricity fails, is powered by the generator group: no-break 220V. In the years 1989 and 1990, a reform of the electrical system upgrading to increase the reactor power and, also, to meet the technical standards of the ABNT (Associacao Brasileira de Normas Tecnicas) was carried out. This work has the objective of showing the relationship between the electric power system and the IEA-R1 reactor security. Also, it demonstrates that, should some electrical power interruption occur, during the reactor operation, this occurrence would not start an accident event. (author)

  9. Testing of the thermoemission reactor-converters Topaz-I and Topaz-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, V.A.

    1972-12-31

    The construction of reactor-converters and their neutronphysics characteristics are outlined. The test equipment is described. Problems encountered in measuring the electric power output of the reactor-conventer are discussed. The basic results obtained are summarized. (JSR)

  10. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results of intermediate vessel test monitoring and reactor hot functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the acoustic emission (AE)/flaw characterization program presented is to develop use of the AE method on a continuous basis during operation and during hydrotest, to detect and analyze flow growth in reactor pressure vessels and primary piping. The program scope is described by three primary areas of effort: develop a method to identify crack growth AE signals; develop a relationship between measured AE and crack growth; demonstrate the total concept through off-reactor vessel tests; and, on-reactor monitoring. The laboratory speciments used to determine fundamental feasibility of program objectives were ASTM A533 B, Class 1 steel. The ZB-1 vessel test is described, and the results are presented. Reactor hot functional testing was done on the Watts Bar Unit 1. Evidence shows that AE from cracking in inaccessible parts of the reactor system such as the vessel beltline should be detectable

  11. Similarity Analysis for Reactor Flow Distribution Test and Its Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Soon Joon; Ha, Jung Hui [Heungdeok IT Valley, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Taehoo; Han, Ji Woong [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The newly derived dimensionless groups are slightly different from Hetsroni's. Reynolds number, relative wall roughness, and Euler don't appear, instead, friction factor appears newly. In order to conserve friction factor Reynolds number and relative wall roughness should be conserved. Since the effect of Reynolds number in high range is small, and since the scaled model is far smaller than prototype the conservation of friction factor is easily obtained by making the model wall just smooth. It is much easier to implement the test design than Hetsroni's because the Reynolds number and relative wall roughness do not appear explicitly. In case that there is no free surface within the interested domain of the reactor, the gravity is of second importance, and in this case the pressure drops should be compensated for in order to compare them between prototype and model. The gravity head compensated pressure drop is directly same to the measured value by a differential pressure transmitter. In order to conserve the gravity effect Froude number should be conserved. In pool type SFR (Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor) there exists liquid level difference, and if the level difference is desired to be conserved, the Froude number should be conserved. Euler number, which represents pressure terms in momentum equation, should be well conserved according to Hetsroni's approach. It is not a wrong statement, but it should be noted that Euler number is NOT an independent variable BUT a dependent variable according to Hong et al. It means that if all the geometrical similarity and the dimensionless numbers are conserved, Euler number is automatically conserved. So Euler number need not be considered in case that the perfect geometrical similarity is kept. However, even in case that the geometrical similarity is not conserved, it possible to conserved the velocity field similarity by just conserve Euler number. It gives tolerance to the engineer who designs the test

  12. Similarity Analysis for Reactor Flow Distribution Test and Its Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newly derived dimensionless groups are slightly different from Hetsroni's. Reynolds number, relative wall roughness, and Euler don't appear, instead, friction factor appears newly. In order to conserve friction factor Reynolds number and relative wall roughness should be conserved. Since the effect of Reynolds number in high range is small, and since the scaled model is far smaller than prototype the conservation of friction factor is easily obtained by making the model wall just smooth. It is much easier to implement the test design than Hetsroni's because the Reynolds number and relative wall roughness do not appear explicitly. In case that there is no free surface within the interested domain of the reactor, the gravity is of second importance, and in this case the pressure drops should be compensated for in order to compare them between prototype and model. The gravity head compensated pressure drop is directly same to the measured value by a differential pressure transmitter. In order to conserve the gravity effect Froude number should be conserved. In pool type SFR (Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor) there exists liquid level difference, and if the level difference is desired to be conserved, the Froude number should be conserved. Euler number, which represents pressure terms in momentum equation, should be well conserved according to Hetsroni's approach. It is not a wrong statement, but it should be noted that Euler number is NOT an independent variable BUT a dependent variable according to Hong et al. It means that if all the geometrical similarity and the dimensionless numbers are conserved, Euler number is automatically conserved. So Euler number need not be considered in case that the perfect geometrical similarity is kept. However, even in case that the geometrical similarity is not conserved, it possible to conserved the velocity field similarity by just conserve Euler number. It gives tolerance to the engineer who designs the test

  13. Development and verification test of integral reactor major components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual designs for SG, MCP, CEDM to be installed in the integral reactor SMART were developed. Three-dimensional CAD models for the major components were developed to visualize the design concepts. Once-through helical steam generator was conceptually designed for SMART. Canned motor pump was adopted in the conceptual design of MCP. Linear pulse motor type and ballscrew type CEDM, which have fine control capabilities were studied for adoption in SMART. In parallel with the structural design, the electro-magnetic design was performed for the sizing motors and electro-magnet. Prototypes for the CEDM and MCP sub-assemblies were developed and tested to verify the performance. The impeller design procedure and the computer program to analyze the dynamic characteristics of MCP rotor shaft were developed. The design concepts of SG, MCP, CEDM were also invetigated for the fabricability

  14. Development and verification test of integral reactor major components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. I.; Kim, Y. W.; Kim, J. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The conceptual designs for SG, MCP, CEDM to be installed in the integral reactor SMART were developed. Three-dimensional CAD models for the major components were developed to visualize the design concepts. Once-through helical steam generator was conceptually designed for SMART. Canned motor pump was adopted in the conceptual design of MCP. Linear pulse motor type and ballscrew type CEDM, which have fine control capabilities were studied for adoption in SMART. In parallel with the structural design, the electro-magnetic design was performed for the sizing motors and electro-magnet. Prototypes for the CEDM and MCP sub-assemblies were developed and tested to verify the performance. The impeller design procedure and the computer program to analyze the dynamic characteristics of MCP rotor shaft were developed. The design concepts of SG, MCP, CEDM were also invetigated for the fabricability.

  15. Development and testing of the EDF-2 reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This technical report reviews the work which has been necessary for defining the EDF-2 fuel element. After giving briefly the EDF-2 reactor characteristics and the preliminary choice of parameters which made it possible to draw up a draft plan for the fuel element, the authors consider the research proper: - Uranium studies: tests on the passage into the β phase of an internal crown of a tube, bending of the tube under the effect of a localized force, welding of the end-pellets and testing for leaks. The resistance of the tube to crushing and of the pellets to yielding under the external pressure have been studied in detail in another CEA report. - Can studies: conditions of production and leak proof testing of the can, resistance of the fins to creep due to the effect of the gas flow. - Studies of the extremities of the element: creep under compression and welding of the plugs to the can. - Cartridge studies: determination of the characteristics of the can fuel fixing grooves and of the canning conditions, verification of the resistance of the fuel element to thermal cycling, determination of the temperature drop at the can-fuel interface dealt with in more detail in another CEA report. - Studies of the whole assembly: this work which concerns the graphite jacket, the support and the cartridge vibrations has been carried out by the Mechanical and Thermal Study Service (Mechanics Section). In this field the Fuel Element Study Section has investigated the behaviour of the centering devices in a gas current. The outcome of this research is the defining of the plan of the element the production process and the production specifications. The validity of ail these out-of-pile tests will be confirmed by the in-pile tests already under way and by irradiation of the elements in the EDF-2 reactor itself. In conclusion the programme is given for improving the fuel element and for defining the fuel element for the second charge. (authors)

  16. CERCA LEU fuel assemblies testing in Maria Reactor - safety analysis summary and testing program scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented paper contains neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (for steady and unsteady states) calculation results prepared to support annex to Safety Analysis Report for MARIA reactor in order to obtain approval for program of testing low-enriched uranium (LEU) lead test fuel assemblies (LTFA) manufactured by CERCA. This includes presentation of the limits and operational constraints to be in effect during the fuel testing investigations. Also, the scope of testing program (which began in August 2009), including additional measurements and monitoring procedures, is described.

  17. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  18. Study for improvement of performance of the test and research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Fumio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    Current utilization needs for the test and research reactors become more advanced and diversified along with the advance of nuclear science and technology. Besides, the requested safety for the research and test reactors grows strictly every year as well as a case of the power reactors. Under this circumstance, every effort to improve reactor performance including its safety is necessary to be sustained for allowing more effective utilization of the test and research reactors as experimental apparatus for advanced researches. In this study, the following three themes i.e., JMTR high-performance fuel element, evaluation method of fast neutron irradiation dose in the JMTR, evaluation method of performance of siphon break valve as core covering system for water-cooled test and research reactors, were investigated respectively from the views of improvement of core performance as a neutron source, utilization performance as an experimental apparatus, and safety as a reactor plant. (author)

  19. Advances in sodium technology, testing and diagnostics of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains a selection of 29 papers from three international specialists' meetings: the CMEA conference ''Control and measuring instruments and diagnostic systems of fast reactors'' held in the GDR in April 1983; the IAEA conference on nuclear power experience held in Austria in September 1982; and the conference ''Problems of technology and corrosion in sodium coolant and protective gas'' held in the GDR in April 1977. Three papers on operating experience with Soviet fast reactors and their safety have a general character; they are followed up by three papers on sodium technology. Five papers deal with the diagnostics of fast sodium cooled reactors and nine papers are devoted to the diagnostics of steam generators. Eight papers relate to detectors for the diagnostics of fast reactors. Safety regulations for work with alkali metals are added. (A.K.)

  20. Establishing a safety and licensing basis for generation IV advanced reactors. License by test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The license by test approach to licensing is a novel method of licensing reactors. It provides an opportunity to deal with innovative non-water reactors in a direct way on a time scale that could permit early certification based on tests of a demonstration reactor. The uncertainties in the design and significant contributors to risk would be identified in the PRA during the design. Deterministic analysis computer codes could be tested on a real reactor. Scaling effects and associated uncertainties would be minimized. License by test is an approach that has sufficient merit to be developed and tested

  1. The IBR-2 test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major design criteria, specifications and potential fields of application of the IBR-2 pulsed test reactor (now under construction in Dubna, USSR) are described. The pulsed power bursts will be due to fast periodic reactivity changes by a rotating reflector. The frequency of approximately 100 μs pulsed may be 5, 12.5 or 50 Hz. The IBR-2 reactor will be mostly profitable for slow neutron experiments when investigating solids, nuclei or neutrons themselves using spectroscopic methods. Due to the high peak flux of thermal neutrons (1016-1017 n/cm2xs) the reactor will be superior (for the sort of experiments) to the currently operating SM-2 and HFR high flux steady-state test reactors for many times

  2. FASTER test reactor preconceptual design report summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The FASTER reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  3. FASTER test reactor preconceptual design report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FASTER reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  4. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 2000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 2000C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented

  5. Qualification in the reactor Siloe of low enriched fuels for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nearly two years now, in the scope of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program (CEA-ANL-CERCA Agreements), low enriched fuel has been irradiated in Siloe. In 1981 a complete 45% enriched fuel element (U Alx compound) was irradiated. A burn-up of 50% was obtained without any difficulty. Since June 1982 4 U3Si fuel plates are being irradiated. These plates, with a density of 5.5g of total uranium per cubic centimeter (two plates), and 6.0g per cubic centimeter (the other two plates) have already reached a mean burn-up of about 20% and their behaviour up till now is excellent. The fuel element and the plates have been manufactured by CERCA

  6. Locating leaking fuel rods in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several techniques have been developed to perform the rod-by-rod leakage discrimination tests on nuclear fuel elements that rod replacement requires, including visual, vibrational analysis, eddy current and ultrasonic techniques. The ultrasonic technique has proved to have the most potential. It is the only system that in the field has provided a reliable, unambiguous indication of which fuel pins have leaked and which are intact without moving any fuel rods in the assembly. The through-transmission system is shown to be reliable and has been successfully used in many countries. It depends however, on specialised personnel to operate it and interpret the data. A new system, Echo-330, has been developed by Babcock and Wilcox. This is fully automated, and uses a multiple probe system with computerized control and data evaluation. The probe design is illustrated and typical output data shown. The time needed to locate leaking fuel rods is considerably reduced. (U.K.)

  7. A review of experiments and results from the transient reactor test (TREAT) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TREAT Facility was designed and built in the late 1950s at Argonne National Laboratory to provide a transient reactor for safety experiments on samples of reactor fuels. It first operated in 1959. Throughout its history, experiments conducted in TREAT have been important in establishing the behavior of a wide variety of reactor fuel elements under conditions predicted to occur in reactor accidents ranging from mild off normal transients to hypothetical core disruptive accidents. For much of its history, TREAT was used primarily to test liquid-metal reactor fuel elements, initially for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), then for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP), the British Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), and finally, for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Both oxide and metal elements were tested in dry capsules and in flowing sodium loops. The data obtained were instrumental in establishing the behavior of the fuel under off-normal and accident conditions, a necessary part of the safety analysis of the various reactors. In addition, TREAT was used to test light-water reactor (LWR) elements in a steam environment to obtain fission-product release data under meltdown conditions. Studies are now under way on applications of TREAT to testing of the behavior of high-burnup LWR elements under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions using a high-pressure water loop

  8. Operating and test experience with Experimental Breeder Reactor number 2 (EBR-II), the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor number 2 (EBR-II) has operated for 30 years, the longest for any liquid metal cooled reactor (LMR) power plant in the world. Given the scope of what has been developed and demonstrated over those years, it is arguably the most successful test reactor operation ever. Tests have been carried out on virtually every fast reactor fuel type. The reactor itself has been extensively studied. The most dramatic safety tests, conducted on 3 April, 1986, showed that an LMR with metallic fuel could safely accommodate loss of flow or loss of heat-sink without scram. EBR-II operated as the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) prototype, demonstrating important innovations in safety, plant design, fuel design and actinide recycle. The ability to accommodate anticipated transients without scram passively resulted in significant simplification of the reactor plant, primarily through less reliance on emergency power and not having to require the secondary sodium or steam systems to be safety grade. These features have been quantified in a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) conducted for EBR-II, demonstrating considerable safety advantages over other reactor concepts. Fundamental to the superior safety and operating characteristics of this reactor is the metallic U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel. Performance of the fuel has been fully proven: achieved burnup levels exceed 20 at.% in the lead test assemblies. A complete set of fuel performance and safety limits has been developed and was carried forward in formal safety documents supporting conversion of the core to IFR fuel. The last major demonstration planned was to assess the performance of recycled actinides in the fuel and to confirm that passive safety characteristics are maintained with recycled actinide fuel in the core. (author)

  9. U.S. regulatory requirements for nuclear plant license renewal: The B and W Owners Group License Renewal Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the current U.S. Regulatory Requirements for License Renewal and describes the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (B and WOG) Generic License Renewal Program (GLRP). The B and W owners, recognizing the need to obtain the maximum life for their nuclear generating units, embarked on a program to renew the licenses of the seven reactors in accordance with the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and further defined by Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulation Part 54 (10 CFR 54). These reactors, owned by five separate utilities, are Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) ranging in net rated capacity from approximately 800 to 900 MW. The plants, predominately constructed in the 70s, have USNRC Operating Licenses that expire between 2013 to 2017. (author)

  10. Testing of HTR UO2 TRISO fuels in AVR and in material test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German High Temperature Reactor Fuel Development Program successfully developed, licensed and manufactured many thousands of spherical fuel elements that were used to power the experimental AVR reactor and the commercial THTR reactor. In the 1970s, this program extended the performance envelope of HTR fuels by developing and qualifying the TRISO-coated particle system. Irradiation testing in real-time AVR tests and accelerated MTR tests demonstrated the superior manufacturing process of this fuel and its irradiation performance. In the 1980s, another program direction change was made to a low enriched UO2 TRISO-coated particle system coupled with high-quality manufacturing specifications designed to meet new HTR plant design needs. These needs included requirements for inherent safety under normal operation and accident conditions. Again, the German fuel development program met and exceeded these challenges by manufacturing and qualifying the low-enriched UO2 TRISO-fuel system for HTR systems with steam generation, gas-turbine systems and very high temperature process heat applications. Fuel elements were manufactured in production scale facilities that contained near defect free UO2 TRISO coated particles, homogeneously distributed within a graphite matrix with very low levels of uranium contamination. Good irradiation performance for these elements was demonstrated under normal operating conditions to 12% FIMA and under accident conditions not exceeding 1600 °C

  11. INITIAL IRRADIATION OF THE FIRST ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION EXPERIMENT IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2007-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  12. RERTR-2004: International meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral and poster presentations of the Meeting covered the following topics: National and international programs related to Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR); development of new fuel types, testing, fabrication, modelling; studies of reactor cores conversion from highly enriched to low enriched fuel, including licensing; new and converted reactors; spent fuel management including storage and transportation; production of Molybdenum 99 under converted core conditions

  13. Operation and maintenance experience with control rod and their drive mechanisms of fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explains the functional and construction features of Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) and control rod used in Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) which is a 40 MWt loop type sodium cooled fast reactor. It discusses all safety related incidents and failures encountered during its service in reactor, the solutions evolved and modifications carried out to prevent recurrence. It also details the maintenance activities and periodical surveillance carried out. The results of a reliability analysis done are also discussed. (author)

  14. On the classification of structures, systems and components of nuclear research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classification of structures, systems and components of nuclear reactors is a relevant issue related to their design because it is directly associated with their safety functions. There is an important statement regarding quality standards and records that says Structures, systems, and components important to safety shall be designed, fabricated, erected, and tested to quality standards commensurate with the importance of the safety functions to be performed. The definition of the codes, standards and technical requirements applied to the nuclear reactor design, fabrication, inspection and tests may be seen as the main result from this statement. There are well established guides to classify structures, systems and components for nuclear power reactors such as the Pressurized Water Reactors but one can not say the same for nuclear research and test reactors. The nuclear reactors safety functions are those required to the safe reactor operation, the safe reactor shutdown and continued safe conditions, the response to anticipated transients, the response to potential accidents and the control of radioactive material. So, it is proposed in this paper an approach to develop the classification of structures, systems and components of these reactors based on their intended safety functions in order to define the applicable set of codes, standards and technical requirements. (author)

  15. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 12th meeting was attended by 113 participants coming from 21 countries and from EURATOM and IAEA.42 reports were presented orally within 10 sessions dealing with 5 main topics: 1) programs(5); 2) fuels(12); 3) reactor conversions(17); 5) high performance neutron sources(4); 5) others(4). (HP)

  16. Static and dynamic performance tests of nuclear powered ship Mutsu reactor (report on nuclear ship Mutsu power-up tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ochiai, Masa-aki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tanaka, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kimio; Yao, Toshiaki; Kamai, Satoshi; Kitamura, Toshikatsu

    1992-08-01

    The power-up tests of the Mutsu reactor were performed from March 29th 1990 to December 14th. The tests were divided into six phases: The tests Phase 0 and Phase 1 were done in the state that the ship was moored at the quay of Sekinehama port in March and April; The tests Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4, and Phase 5 were done on the Pacific Ocean from July to December. Present report describes the test results on the static and dynamic plant performance. On static plant performance tests, there are 13 test items including measurements of primary system heat balance at low and high power levels, a virgin run of feed water pump with SG steam, a change-over test of steam supply of auxiliary boiler to SG. On the dynamic plant performance, there are 11 test items including a test of reactor power auto-control system, a test of main feed water auto-control system, a test of small load variation, a load increasing test, a turbine trip test, tests of ahead and astern maneuvering, a test of single loop operation, and a reactor scram test. The reactor power for each item`s test was increased step by step from zero power to the goal of rated power of 100 %, 36 MWt. In order to confirm proper reactor system performance, criteria were laid down for the static and dynamic tests: for example, (1) reactor scram shall not occur, (2) pressurizer relief valve and steam generator safety valve shall not work, and (3) after the transients reactor systems shall become the steady state without manual adjustment of the reactor control system. The test results satisfied these criteria and some of test data showed that reactor had much more margin in any performance for design. It is verified, therefore, that the Mutsu reactor systems have adequate performances as a marine reactor and that one is capable to respond smoothly and safely to the load of ship`s demand. (author).

  17. Static and dynamic performance tests of nuclear powered ship Mutsu reactor (report on nuclear ship Mutsu power-up tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ochiai, Masa-aki (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment); Tanaka, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kimio; Yao, Toshiaki; Kamai, Satoshi; Kitamura, Toshikatsu.

    1992-08-01

    The power-up tests of the Mutsu reactor were performed from March 29th 1990 to December 14th. The tests were divided into six phases: The tests Phase 0 and Phase 1 were done in the state that the ship was moored at the quay of Sekinehama port in March and April; The tests Phase 2, Phase 3, Phase 4, and Phase 5 were done on the Pacific Ocean from July to December. Present report describes the test results on the static and dynamic plant performance. On static plant performance tests, there are 13 test items including measurements of primary system heat balance at low and high power levels, a virgin run of feed water pump with SG steam, a change-over test of steam supply of auxiliary boiler to SG. On the dynamic plant performance, there are 11 test items including a test of reactor power auto-control system, a test of main feed water auto-control system, a test of small load variation, a load increasing test, a turbine trip test, tests of ahead and astern maneuvering, a test of single loop operation, and a reactor scram test. The reactor power for each item's test was increased step by step from zero power to the goal of rated power of 100 %, 36 MWt. In order to confirm proper reactor system performance, criteria were laid down for the static and dynamic tests: for example, (1) reactor scram shall not occur, (2) pressurizer relief valve and steam generator safety valve shall not work, and (3) after the transients reactor systems shall become the steady state without manual adjustment of the reactor control system. The test results satisfied these criteria and some of test data showed that reactor had much more margin in any performance for design. It is verified, therefore, that the Mutsu reactor systems have adequate performances as a marine reactor and that one is capable to respond smoothly and safely to the load of ship's demand. (author).

  18. Refurbish research and test reactors corresponding to global age of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This special article featured arguments for refurbishment of research and test reactors corresponding to global age of nuclear energy, based on the report: 'Investigation of research facilities necessary for future joint usage' issued by the special committee of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) in September 2010. It consisted of six papers titled as 'Introduction-establishment of AESJ special committee for investigation', 'State of research and test reactors in Japan', 'State of overseas research and test reactors', 'Needs analysis for research and test reactors', 'Proposal of AESJ special committee' and 'Summary and future issues'. In order to develop human resources and promote research and development needed in global age of nuclear energy, research and test reactors would be refurbished as an Asian regional center of excellence. (T. Tanaka)

  19. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  20. Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) as a facility for reactor safety research and its modification for the future test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NSRR is a modified TRIGA-ACPR (annular core pulse reactor), and attained the initial criticality in May, 1975. It was built for studying reactor fuel behavior under a reactivity-initiated accident condition. The reactor is installed in a pool of 3.6 m width, 4.5 m length and 9 m depth, and water above the reactor core serves as a radiation shield. The reactor core contains 149 driver fuel rods, 6 regulating rods, 2 safety rods and 3 transient rods. An arbitrary reactivity up to 4.67 $ can be set up almost instantaneously in the reactor core. The pulse power generation is terminated by the large negative reactivity induced by prompt temperature feedback without inserting the control rods. This is brought about by an excellent property of the driver fuel which contains 12 wt.% U-ZrH enriched to 20 wt.% U-235. As a unique feature, the NSRR is equipped with a big experimental cavity through the center of the reactor core. It has the diameter of 220 mm, and is called loading tube. It is branched into a vertical loading tube and an offset loading tube. The characteristics of the pulse operation in the NSRR, the outline of fuel irradiation experiment, the future test plan and the modification of the NSRR are described. (Kako, I.)

  1. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection

  2. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection.

  3. MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) cores fuel management. Application of a low enrichment reactor for the equilibrium and transitory core calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes a methodology to define the equilibrium core and a MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) type reactor's fuel management upon multiple boundary conditions, such as: end cycle and permitted maximum reactivities, burn-up extraction and maximun number of movements by rechange. The methodology proposed allows to determine the best options through conceptual relations, prior to a detailed calculation with the core code, reducing the test number with these codes and minimizing in this way CPU cost. The way to better systematized search of transient cores from the first one to the equilibrium one is presented. (Author)

  4. Ground test facility for nuclear testing of space reactor subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two major reactor facilities at the INEL have been identified as easily adaptable for supporting the nuclear testing of the SP-100 reactor subsystem. They are the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) and the Loss of Fluid Test Reactor (LOFT). In addition, there are machine shops, analytical laboratories, hot cells, and the supporting services (fire protection, safety, security, medical, waste management, etc.) necessary to conducting a nuclear test program. This paper presents the conceptual approach for modifying these reactor facilities for the ground engineering test facility for the SP-100 nuclear subsystem. 4 figs

  5. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  6. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation

  7. Comparative Investigation of River Water Quality by OWQI, NSFWQI and Wilcox Indexes (Case study: the Talar River – IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darvishi Gholamreza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rivers are considered as one of the main resources of water supply for various applications such as agricultural, drinking and industrial purposes. Also, these resources are used as a place for discharge of sewages, industrial wastewater and agricultural drainage. Regarding the fact that each river has a certain capacity for acceptance of pollutants, nowadays qualitative and environmental investigations of these resources are proposed. In this study, qualitative investigation of the Talar river was done according to Oregon Water Quality Index (OWQI, National Sanitation Foundation Water Quality Index (NSFWQI and Wilcox indicators during 2011–2012 years at upstream, midstream and downstream of the river in two periods of wet and dry seasons. According to the results of OWQI, all of the values at 3 stations and both periods are placed at very bad quality category and the water is not acceptable for drinking purposes. According to NSFWQI, the best condition was related to the upstream station at wet season period (58, medium quality and the worst condition was related to the downstream in wet season period (46, very bad quality. Also the results of Wilcox showed that in both periods of wet season and dry season, the water quality is getting better from upstream station to the downstream station, and according to the index classification, the downstream water quality has shown good quality and it is suitable for agriculture.

  8. The Status and Development Potential of Plate-Type Fuels for Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, D.

    1979-03-01

    Recent U.S. Department of State action to restrict the shipment and use of highly enriched uranium for research and test reactors has renewed fuel development activity. The objective of these development activities is to increase the total uranium loading in the fuel meat so that enrichment reduction can be accomplished without significant performance penalties. This report characterizes the status and the potential for development of the currently utilized plate-type fuels for research and test reactors. The report also characterizes the newer high-density fuels which could be utilized in these reactors and indicates the impact of the utilization of both the new and current fuels on enrichment reduction.

  9. Application of non-destructive testing and in-service inspections to research reactors and preparation of ISI programme and manual for WWR-C research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report gives a review on the results of application of non-destructive testing and in-service inspections to WWR-C reactors in different countries. The major problems related to reactor safety and the procedure of inspection techniques are investigated to collect the experience gained from this type of reactors. Exchangeable experience in solving common problems in similar reactors play an important role in the effectiveness of their rehabilitation programmes. 9 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Proceedings of the 1984 international meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors. Base technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 40 papers were presented at this RERTR Meeting during the following sessions: Status of RERTR programs and licensing procedures; LEU fuel element development; fuel fabrication and testing; economics; mixed reactor cores; and applications, i.e. neutronics and thermal hydraulics design of upgraded reactors, with new LEU fuel, fuel cycle studies, feasibility and safety analyses

  11. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Appendix G: Commercial design and technology evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    A technology evaluation of five coal gasifier systems (Koppers-Totzek, Texaco, Babcock and Wilcox, Lurgi and BGC/Lurgi) and procedures and criteria for evaluating competitive commercial coal gasification designs is presented. The technology evaluation is based upon the plant designs and cost estimates developed by the BDM-Mittelhauser team.

  12. Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The design of the first experiment (designated AGR-1) was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the test train as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in September 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and is serving as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed and the status of the experiment is provided.

  13. Design and safety consideration in the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The budget for construction of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was recently committed by the Government in Japan. The HTTR is a test reactor with thermal output of 30 MW and reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 deg. C at high temperature test operation. The HTTR plant uses a pin-in-block design core and will be used as an experience leading to high temperature applications. Several major important safety considerations are adopted in the design of the HTTR. These are as follows: 1) A coated particle fuel must not be failed during a normal reactor operation and an anticipated operational occurrence; 2) Two independent and diverse reactor shut-down systems are provided in order to shut down the reactor safely and reliably in any condition; 3) Back-up reactor cooling systems which are safety ones are provided in order to remove residual heat of reactor in any condition; 4) Multiple barriers and countermeasures are provided to contain fission products such as a containment, pressure gradient between the primary and secondary cooling circuit and so on, though coated particle fuels contain fission products with high reliability; 5) The functions of materials used in the primary cooling circuit are separated to be pressure-resisting and heat-resisting in order to resolve material problems and maintain high reliability. The detailed design of the HTTR was completed with extensive accumulation of material data and component tests. (author)

  14. Neutronic calculation for cobalt irradiation devices and test loop of etrr2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCNP monte Carlo code were used to model ETRR-2 research reactor. The model were used to simulate the irradiation facilities of the reactor. The reactivity worth and neutron flux for cobalt irradiation device and test loop were calculated. The axial thermal flux were also calculated at the six irradiation water channels around the reactor core. The results of the present model were compared both with the experimental measurements for cobalt device and with the design calculations for test loop. Satisfactory agreement were found between the present MCNP results and measurements for both cobalt device and test loop

  15. Startup operational tests of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is mainly concerned with the experiences of the two main phases of startup operational tests of fast reactors: (1) The general tests and Sodium filling before core loading. (2) The core loading,approach to criticality and power build up operational tests, taking for example a large and middle demonstrating integrated-type fast reactor. (author)

  16. Homogeneous fast reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How to choose correct weighting spectrum has been studied to produce multigroup constants for fast reactor benchmark calculations. A correct weighting option makes us obtain satisfying results of Keff and central reaction rate ratios for nine fast reactor benchmark testings of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6. (4 tabs., 2 figs.)

  17. Homogeneous fast reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How to choose correct weighting spectrum has been studied to produce multigroup constants for fast reactor benchmark calculations. A correct weighting option makes us obtain satisfying results of Keff and central reaction rate ratios for nine fast reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  18. Sequential probability ratio tests for reactor signal validation and sensor surveillance applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the properties of sequential probability ratio tests (SPRT's) and the application of these tests to nuclear power reactor operation. Recently SPRT's have been applied to delayed-neutron (DN) signal data analysis using actual reactor data from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which is operated by Argonne National Laboratory. The implementation of this research as part of an expert system is described. Mathematical properties of the SPRT are investigated, and theoretical results are validated with tests that use DN-signal data taken from the EBR-II in Idaho. Variations of the basic SPRT and applications to general signal validation are also explored. 16 refs., 3 figs

  19. Research and developments on nondestructive testing in fabrications of fast breeder reactor structural components in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and developments (R and D) have been conducted on the nondestructive testing techniques necessary for the construction of fast breeder reactor (FBR). Radiographic tests have been made on tube-tube plate welds and small-diameter tube welds, etc. Ultrasonic tests have been conducted on austenitic stainless steel welds. In the penetrant tests and magnetic particle tests, the investigations have been performed on the effects of various test factors on the test results

  20. Full conversion of materials and nuclear fuel in TRIGA SSR 14 MW research and test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1952-2005 General Atomics built and commissioned worldwide 62 TRIGA research reactors. Almost all reactors built by General Atomics use Low Enriched Uranium (19,9%). One exception was the TRIGA reactor from ICN Pitesti. The transition from HEU to LEU utilization, called a core conversion, is supported by Department of Energy - USA and Member States in the project 'Reduced Enrichment in Research and Testing Reactors (RERTR)' and by Member States and IAEA through Technical Cooperation programmes. The activities that are related to core conversion are managed and reviewed as refueling operations. This type of activities was performed at least six times from reactor commissioning stage until now. The implied personnel in this type of activities is licensed by CNCAN, the Romanian Regulatory Body and periodically trained. (authors)

  1. Non-process instrumentation surveillance and test reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of operating experience, instrument failure modes, and degraded instrument performance has led to a reduction in Technical Specification surveillance and test requirements for nuclear power plant process instrumentation. These changes have resulted in lower plant operations and maintenance (O ampersand M) labor costs. This report explores the possibility of realizing similar savings by reducing requirements for non-process instrumentation. The project team reviewed generic Technical Specifications for the four major US nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) vendors (Westinghouse, General Electric, Combustion Engineering, and Babcock ampersand Wilcox) to identify nonprocess instrumentation for which surveillance/test requirements could be reduced. The team surveyed 10 utilities to identify specific non-process instrumentation at their plants for which requirements could be reduced. The team evaluated utility analytic approaches used to justify changes in surveillance/test requirements for process equipment to determine their applicability to non-process instrumentation. The report presents a prioritized list of non-process instrumentation systems suitable for surveillance/test requirements reduction. The top three systems in the list are vibration monitors, leak detection monitors, and chemistry monitors. In general, most non-process instrumentation governed by Technical Specification requirements are candidates for requirements reduction. If statistical requirements are somewhat relaxed, the analytic approaches previously used to reduce requirements for process instrumentation can be applied to non-process instrumentation. The report identifies as viable the technical approaches developed and successfully used by Southern California Edison, Arizona Public Service, and Boston Edison

  2. Testing the reactor charging machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main objective of the R - D technological engineering program devoted to the Fuel Handling System is domestic production of equipment and technology for testing the ends of the reactor charging machine (MID) destined to Cernavoda NPP, beginning with Unit 2. To achieve the objective based on an own design, a bench-scale testing stand of MIDs which can simulate the pressure, flow-rate, and temperature conditions proper to fuel channels in operating CANDU 600 reactors. The main components of this testing facility are: - fuel channels, cold also test sections, allowing the coupling of MID end upwardly and downwardly, corresponding to the direction of the water flow through the channel; - technological installation feeding with light water the testing sections of the facility in thermohydraulic conditions, similar to those in the reactor, allowing the cold and hot testings, respectively, of the MID end; - cold testing installation, water supply and oil control panel, feeding the hydraulic drives of the MID's end during the testings; - fixed bridge and mobile carrier for MID's end positioning against testing sections; - installation for functional testing of MID thrusters, before pre-admission and reception tests; - dedicated tools and devices; - raising and transport mechanical devices for handling and positioning the MID's end upon the carrier; - automation panel for controlling the stand equipment and MID's end; - process computer for conducting on-line tests. MID's end testing implies mainly the following operations: - regulation, calibration and functional testing of the MID thrusters carried out independently on a specialised stand; - regulation and calibration of MID's end sub-assemblages; - carrying out the cold and hot pre-admission tests consisting in automatic performing, without operator intervention, of 12 fuel changes, two of which being successive; - performing the cold and hot reception tests, consisting in automatic accomplishment of 4

  3. Development of research reactor simulator and its application to dynamic test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a real-time simulator for 'High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO), and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator into a dynamic test-bed (DTB) to test the functions and dynamic control performance of reactor regulating system (RRS) in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The software includes a mathematical model that implements plant dynamics in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface module. The developed research reactor simulators are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by actual RRS cabinet, and was interfaced using a hard-wired and network-based interface. RRS cabinet generates control signals for reactor power control based on the various feedback signals from DTB, and the DTB runs plant dynamics based on the RRS control signals. Thus the Hardware-In-the-Loop Simulation between RRS and the emulated plant (DTB) has been implemented and tested in this configuration. The test result shows that the developed DTB and actual RRS cabinet works together simultaneously resulting in quite good dynamic control performances. (author)

  4. Requirements, needs, and concepts for a new broad-application test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a variety of reasons, including (a) the increasing demands of the 1990s regulatory environment, (b) limited existing test capactiy and capability to satisfy projected future testing missions, and (c) an expected increasing need for nuclear information to support development of advanced reactors, there is a need for requirements and preliminary concepts for a new broad-application test reactor (BATR). These requirements must include consideration not only for a broad range of projected testing missions but also for current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements. The requirements will form the basis for development and assessment of preconceptual reactor designs and lead to the identification of key technologies to support the government's long-term strategic and programmatic planning. This paper outlines the need for a new BATR and suggests a few preliminary reactor concepts that can meet that need

  5. Proceedings of the international meeting on reduced enrichment for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Meeting was to exchange and discuss the most up-to-date information on the progress of various programs related to research and test reactor core conversion from high enriched uranium to lower enriched uranium. The papers presented during the Meeting were divided into 9 sessions and one round able discussion which concluded the Meeting. The Sessions were: Program, Fuel Development, Fuel Fabrication, Irradiation testing, Safety Analysis, Special Reactor Conversion, Reactor Design, Critical Experiments, and Reprocessing and Spent Fuel Storage. Thus, topics of this Meeting were of a very wide range that was expected to result in information exchange valuable for all the participants in the RERTR program

  6. Proceedings of the international meeting on development, fabrication and application of reduced enrichment fuels for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the papers presented in the following areas: (1) Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program Status; (2) Fuel Development; (3) Fuel Demonstrations; (4) General Topics; and (5) Specific Reactor Applications

  7. Testing and qualification of Control and Safety Rod and its drive mechanism of Fast Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) has two independent fast acting diverse shutdown systems. The absorber rod of the first system is called Control and Safety Rod (CSR). CSR and its Drive Mechanism (CSRDM) are used for reactor control and for safe shutdown of the reactor by scram action. In view of the safety role, the qualification of CSRDM is one of the important requirements. CSR and CSRDM were qualified in two stages by extensive testing. In the first stage, the critical subassemblies of the mechanism, such as scram release electromagnet, hydraulic dashpot and dynamic seals and CSR subassembly, were tested and qualified individually simulating the operating conditions of the reactor. Experiments were also carried out on sodium vapour deposition in the annular gaps between the stationary and mobile parts of the mechanism. In the second stage, full-scale CSRDM and CSR were subjected to all the integrated functional tests in air, hot argon and subsequently in sodium simulating the operating conditions of the reactor and finally subjected to endurance tests. Since the damage occurring in CSRDM and CSR is mainly due to fatigue cycles during scram actions, the number of test cycles was decided based on the guidelines given in ASME, Section III, Div. 1. The results show that the performance of CSRDM and CSR is satisfactory. Subsequent to the testing in sodium, the assemblies having contact with liquid sodium/sodium vapour were cleaned using CO2 process and the total cleaning process has been established, so that the mechanism can be reused in sodium. The various stages of qualification programmes have raised the confidence level on the performance of the system as a whole for the intended and reliable operation in the reactor.

  8. Interview with Professor Mark Wilcox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Mark Wilcox speaks to Georgia Patey, Commissioning Editor: Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist and Head of Microbiology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals (Leeds, UK), the Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds (Leeds, UK), and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile and the Head of the UK C. difficile Reference Laboratory for Public Health England (PHE). He was the Director of Infection Prevention (4 years), Infection Control Doctor (8 years) and Clinical Director of Pathology (6 years) at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals. He is Chair of PHE's Rapid Review Panel (reviews utility of infection prevention and control products for National Health Service), Deputy Chair of the UK Department of Health's Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection Committee and a member of PHE's HCAI/AR Programme Board. He is a member of UK/European/US working groups on C. difficile infection. He has provided clinical advice as part of the FDA/EMA submissions for the approval of multiple novel antimicrobial agents. He heads a healthcare-associated infection research team at University of Leeds, comprising approximately 30 doctors, scientists and nurses; projects include multiple aspects of C. difficile infection, diagnostics, antimicrobial resistance and the clinical development of new antimicrobial agents. He has authored more than 400 publications, and is the coeditor of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (5th/6th/7th Editions, 15 December 2007). PMID:27494150

  9. Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors. Proceedings of the XIV international meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apart from the progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program the national programs of Indonesia, Japan and China were presented. The major events, findings, and activities of 1991 are reviewed with a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program had achieved by the end of 1990 in collaboration with its many international partners. The RERTR program, has concentrated its efforts on technology transfer and implementation activities consistent with the guidance received from the Department of Energy at the end of 1990. A number of presentations were devoted to development of new fuel uranium silicide fuel elements, fuel irradiation testing and reactor core conversions from highly enriched (HEU) to slightly enriched uranium (LEU). Calculations and measurements of converted reactor core parameters were shown related to safety test and analysis. Fuel cycle issue were discussed as well. One should note that a significant number of papers were devoted to Indonesian GA SIWABESSY reactor core conversion and related topics

  10. Design and Laboratory Evaluation of Future Elongation and Diameter Measurements at the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; J. C. Crepeau; S. Solstad

    2015-07-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. In order to accurately predict these changes, real-time data must be obtained under prototypic irradiation conditions for model development and validation. To provide such data, researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) are developing several instrumented test rigs to obtain data real-time from specimens irradiated in well-controlled pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop and evaluate prototype test rigs that rely on Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) in laboratory settings. Although similar LVDT-based test rigs have been deployed in lower flux Materials Testing Reactors (MTRs), this effort is unique because it relies on robust LVDTs that can withstand higher temperatures and higher fluxes than often found in other MTR irradiations. Specifically, the test rigs are designed for detecting changes in length and diameter of specimens irradiated in ATR PWR loops. Once implemented, these test rigs will provide ATR users with unique capabilities that are sorely needed to obtain measurements such as elongation caused by thermal expansion and/or creep loading and diameter changes associated with fuel and cladding swelling, pellet-clad interaction, and crud buildup.

  11. Effect of diameter and geometry on two-phase flow regimes and carry-over in a model pwr hot leg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a series of tests investigating two-phase flow characterization and carry-over in a transparent model of a Babcock and Wilcox (BandW) pressurized water reactor (PWR) hot leg geometry. This work was performed, in part, to support the interpretation of results from the Once-Through Integral System (OTIS) and Multiloop Integral Test (MIST) facilities. Test conditions were selected to cover a wide range of gas and liquid superficial velocities expected to occur in a prototypical reactor geometry during a small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA). Tests at high gas superficial velocities were also performed for comparison with semi-analytical predictions. Tests were conducted in a test rig with 30.5-cm (12-inch) diameter pipe. Results include average void fraction, amount of water carry-over through the U-bend and a description of the two-phase flow phenomena. Results of these tests indicate that slug flow is not observed in large diameter pipes. Instead, as the air flow rate is increased, the flow regime progresses from bubbly to churn-type flow with the presence of large bubbles (approximately 15-cm diameter). The results also indicate that flow regimes and collapsed liquid level are more strongly dependent on air superficial velocity than the water superficial velocity and that the amount of water carry-over for a given air flow rate is a strong function of collapsed water level. Furthermore, the results show that similar thresholds for breakdown in natural circulation flow exist between small and large diameter pipes for gas and liquid superficial velocities expected in a SBLOCA

  12. Peter Wilcox: A new purple-skin, yellow flesh fresh market potato cultivar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Wilcox is a new, medium-maturing, purple-skin, yellow-flesh potato cultivar for fresh market. Peter Wilcox also produces light-colored chips, although it is being released primarily as a fresh market potato because of its skin and flesh colors. Tubers of Peter Wilcox are attractive, smooth, wi...

  13. Status of the RERTR [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor] program in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission started in 1978 the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors in the field of reactor engineering; engineering, development and manufacturing of fuel elements and research reactors operators. This program was initiated with the conviction that it would contribute to the international efforts to reduce risks of nuclear weapons proliferation owing to an uncontrolled use of highly enriched uranium. It was intended to convert RA-3 reactor to make possible its operation with low enriched fuel (LEU), instead of high enriched fuel (HEU) and to develop manufacturing techniques for said LEU. Afterwards, this program was adapted to assist other countries in reactors conversion, development of the corresponding fuel elements and supply of fuel elements to other countries. (Author)

  14. Advanced Test Reactor In-Canal Ultrasonic Scanner: Experiment Design and Initial Results on Irradiated Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Wachs; J. M. Wight; D. T. Clark; J. M. Williams; S. C. Taylor; D. J. Utterbeck; G. L. Hawkes; G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek; N. C. Craft

    2008-09-01

    An irradiation test device has been developed to support testing of prototypic scale plate type fuels in the Advanced Test Reactor. The experiment hardware and operating conditions were optimized to provide the irradiation conditions necessary to conduct performance and qualification tests on research reactor type fuels for the RERTR program. The device was designed to allow disassembly and reassembly in the ATR spent fuel canal so that interim inspections could be performed on the fuel plates. An ultrasonic scanner was developed to perform dimensional and transmission inspections during these interim investigations. Example results from the AFIP-2 experiment are presented.

  15. Research and Test Reactor Conversion to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel: Technical and Programmatic Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program - the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) - in 1978 to develop the technology necessary to reduce the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel in research reactors by converting them to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. In 2004, the reactor conversion program became the driving pilar of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), a program established by the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration. The overall GTRI objectives are the conversion, removal or protection of vunerable civilian radiological and nuclear material. As part of the GTRI, the Conversion Program has accelerated the schedules and plans for conversion of additional research reactors operating with HEU. This paper provides an update on the progress made since 2007 and describes current technical challenges that the program faces. (author)

  16. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the Advanced Test Reactor Remote Monitoring and Management Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohachek, Randolph Charles [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR; TRA-670), which is located in the ATR Complex at Idaho National Laboratory, was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, assessments are continuing. These assessments intend to identify areas to provide defense–in-depth and improve safety for ATR. One of the assessments performed by an independent group of nuclear industry experts recommended that a remote accident management capability be provided. The report stated that: “contemporary practice in commercial power reactors is to provide a remote shutdown station or stations to allow shutdown of the reactor and management of long-term cooling of the reactor (i.e., management of reactivity, inventory, and cooling) should the main control room be disabled (e.g., due to a fire in the control room or affecting the control room).” This project will install remote reactor monitoring and management capabilities for ATR. Remote capabilities will allow for post scram reactor management and monitoring in the event the main Reactor Control Room (RCR) must be evacuated.

  17. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the Advanced Test Reactor Remote Monitoring and Management Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR; TRA-670), which is located in the ATR Complex at Idaho National Laboratory, was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, assessments are continuing. These assessments intend to identify areas to provide defense–in-depth and improve safety for ATR. One of the assessments performed by an independent group of nuclear industry experts recommended that a remote accident management capability be provided. The report stated that: 'contemporary practice in commercial power reactors is to provide a remote shutdown station or stations to allow shutdown of the reactor and management of long-term cooling of the reactor (i.e., management of reactivity, inventory, and cooling) should the main control room be disabled (e.g., due to a fire in the control room or affecting the control room).' This project will install remote reactor monitoring and management capabilities for ATR. Remote capabilities will allow for post scram reactor management and monitoring in the event the main Reactor Control Room (RCR) must be evacuated.

  18. Manufacturing and material properties of forgings for the reactor pressure vessel of the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) which has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 2.25Cr-1Mo steel is used for the first time in the world for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The RPV is 13.2 m in height and 5.5 m in internal diameter. Operation temperature is about 400 C and the internal pressure is 4 MPa. A material confirmation test has been carried out to demonstrate good applicability of forged low Si 2.25Cr-1Mo steel to the RPV of the HTTR. Recently, Japan Steel Works has succeeded in manufacturing large size ring forgings and a large size forged cover dome integrated with nozzles for the stand pipe for the RPV. This paper describes the results of the material confirmation test as well as the manufacturing and material properties of the large forged cover dome integrated with nozzles for the stand pipe. (orig.)

  19. Reactor building integrity testing: A novel approach at Gentilly 2 - principles and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1987, Hydro-Quebec embarked on an ambitious development program to provide the Gentilly 2 nuclear power station with an effective, yet practical reactor building Integrity Test. The Gentilly 2 Integrity Test employs an innovative approach based on the reference volume concept. It is identified as the Temperature Compensation Method (TCM) System. This configuration has been demonstrated at both high and low test pressure and has achieved extraordinary precision in the leak rate measurement. The Gentilly 2 design allows the Integrity Test to be performed at a nominal 3 kPa(g) test pressure during an (11) hour period with the reactor at full power. The reactor building Pressure Test by comparison, is typically performed at high pressure 124 kPa(g)) in a 7 day window during an annual outage. The Integrity Test was developed with the goal of demonstrating containment availability. Specifically it was purported to detect a leak or hole in the 'bottled-up' reactor building greater in magnitude than an equivalent pipe of 25 mm diameter. However it is considered feasible that the high precision of the Gentilly 2 TCM System Integrity Test and a stable reactor building leak characteristic will constitute sufficient grounds for the reduction of the Pressure Test frequency. It is noted that only the TCM System has, to this date, allowed a relevant determination of the reactor building leak rate at a nominal test pressure of 3 kPa(g). Classical method tests at low pressure have lead to inconclusive results due to the high lack of precision

  20. Performance and testing of refractory alloy clad fuel elements for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two fast reactor irradiation tests, SP-1 and SP-2, provide a unique and self-consistent data set with which to evaluate the technical feasibility of potential fuel systems for the SP-100 space reactor. Fuel pins fabricated with leading cladding candidates (Nb-1Zr, PWC-11, and Mo-13Re) and fuel forms (UN and UO2) are operated at temperatures typical of those expected in the SP-100 design. The first US fast reactor irradiated, refractory alloy clad fuel pins, from the SP-1 test, reached 1 at .% burnup in EBR-II in March 1985. At that time selected pins were discharged for interim examination. These examinations confirmed the excellent performance of the Nb-1Zr clad uranium oxide and uranium nitride fuel elements, which are the baseline fuel systems for two SP-100 reactor concepts

  1. Factory acceptance of the compressor skids at Samifi-Babcock. All pictures show the second stage compressor skid.

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Perinic

    2001-01-01

    Most recent pictures taken during the factory acceptance of the compressor skids at Samifi-Babcock. All pictures show the second stage compressor skid. Picture two was taken during the leak tests and shows all the pockets around flanges and valves.

  2. Warm Water Oxidation Verification - Scoping and Stirred Reactor Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-15

    Scoping tests to evaluate the effects of agitation and pH adjustment on simulant sludge agglomeration and uranium metal oxidation at {approx}95 C were performed under Test Instructions(a,b) and as per sections 5.1 and 5.2 of this Test Plan prepared by AREVA. (c) The thermal testing occurred during the week of October 4-9, 2010. The results are reported here. For this testing, two uranium-containing simulant sludge types were evaluated: (1) a full uranium-containing K West (KW) container sludge simulant consisting of nine predominant sludge components; (2) a 50:50 uranium-mole basis mixture of uraninite [U(IV)] and metaschoepite [U(VI)]. This scoping study was conducted in support of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Phase 2 technology evaluation for the treatment and packaging of K-Basin sludge. The STP is managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy. Warm water ({approx}95 C) oxidation of sludge, followed by immobilization, has been proposed by AREVA and is one of the alternative flowsheets being considered to convert uranium metal to UO{sub 2} and eliminate H{sub 2} generation during final sludge disposition. Preliminary assessments of warm water oxidation have been conducted, and several issues have been identified that can best be evaluated through laboratory testing. The scoping evaluation documented here was specifically focused on the issue of the potential formation of high strength sludge agglomerates at the proposed 95 C process operating temperature. Prior hydrothermal tests conducted at 185 C produced significant physiochemical changes to genuine sludge, including the formation of monolithic concretions/agglomerates that exhibited shear strengths in excess of 100 kPa (Delegard et al. 2007).

  3. Batch Tests To Determine Activity Distribution and Kinetic Parameters for Acetate Utilization in Expanded-Bed Anaerobic Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Peter; Suidan, Makram T.

    1990-01-01

    Batch tests to measure maximum acetate utilization rates were used to determine the distribution of acetate utilizers in expanded-bed sand and expanded-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) reactors. The reactors were fed a mixture of acetate and 3-ethylphenol, and they contained the same predominant aceticlastic methanogen, Methanothrix sp. Batch tests were performed both on the entire reactor contents and with media removed from the reactors. Results indicated that activity was evenly distrib...

  4. Use of the modular modeling system in severe transient analysis of Penn State advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Nuclear Engineering of the Pennsylvania State University has designed and developed, with Department of Energy support, an inherently safe pressurized light water reactor concept. The Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor (PSU ALWR) incorporates various passive and active ultra-safe features, such as continuous online injection and letdown for pressure control, a raised-loop reactor primary system for enhanced natural circulation, a dedicated primary reservoir (the atmospheric tank) for enhanced thermal hydraulic control, and a secondary shutdown turbine. Because of the conceptual design basis of the project, the dynamic system modeling was to be performed using a code with a high degree of flexibility. For these reasons, the modeling was performed with the Modular Modeling System (MMS) developed by Babcock and Wilcox for EPRI. The demonstrative transient chosen for the PSU ALWR was a turbine trip and reactor scram, concurrent with total station blackout. This transient demonstrates the utility of the pressure control system, the shutdown turbine generator, and the enhanced natural circulation of the PSU ALWR. However, the low flow rates, low pressure drops, and large derivative states encountered in such a transient pose special problems for the modeler and for MMS. The use of Extended Range MMS, the development of the necessary system controls, and certain local modifications to the MMS itself are described below, along with the final results of the prescribed transient

  5. Handbook of materials testing reactors and ancillary hot laboratories in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Handbook is to make available to those interested in 'in-pile' irradiation experiments important data on Materials Testing Reactors in operation in the European Community. Only thermal reactors having a power output of more than 5 MW(th) are taken into consideration. In particular, detailed technical information is given on the experimental irradiation facilities of the reactors, their specialized irradiation devices (loops and instrumented capsules), and the associated hot cell facilities for post-irradiation examination of samples

  6. Experience of Deutsche Babcock AG with the maintenance and rehabilitation of existing power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horstmann, H.; Frank, R.

    1997-12-31

    With regard to the exponentially increasing power demand in a lot of countries the rehabilitation of existing power plants has become more and more important during the last years. From the economic viewpoint, it is necessary to develop a tailor made rehabilitation program for the individual power plant by defining the relevant measures. The main benefits of power plant rehabilitation are shown in relation to the necessary technical measures and with regard to their economic effect. 15 figs.

  7. Altitude of the water table in the alluvial and Wilcox aquifers in the vicinity of Richland and Tehuacana creeks and the Trinity River, Texas, December 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Sergio

    1980-01-01

    This map shows the altitude of the water table in the alluvial and Wilcox aquifers in the vicinity of Richland and Tehuacana Creeks and the Trinity River, Tex., in December 1979. The water-table contours were constructed on the basis of water-level control derived from an inventory of shallow wells in the area, topographic maps, and field locations of numerous small springs and seeps. (USGS)

  8. Design characteristics and startup tests of HANARO. The newly in-service Korean research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has successfully completed the commissioning tests, including the long-term operational performance test for the HANARO, a newly in-service multi-purpose research reactor in Korea. This paper presents the design characteristics of the HANARO and a brief description on the startup tests carried out at zero and low power during its commissioning. The reactor is now at the shutdown state for the periodic surveillance after cycle 1 operation and is waiting for the additional fuel loading to configure the cycle 2 core. The reactor is expected to undergo five more cycles of operation in this year. The important physics tests will be conducted at the beginning and at the end of each cycle. (author)

  9. An evaluation of lifetime of JMTR and a study of new materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressure vessel of the JMTR, which is made of austenite stainless steel, was designed so as to be in service for at least 20 years. Hence, the JMTR is expected to be in use until at least 1989, as the operation was started in 1969. But it was not clear how long the JMTR will be in use thereafter. Therefore, based on the ASME Section III, a review of the lifetime was made this time with the result that the pressure vessel can be in service for further 30 years hereafter. In evaluating the lifetime of the JMTR, the pressure vessel and its adaptors such as the grid plate are to be taken up and rather than these conponents are not to be taken up, as latters are exchangeable or repairable. A review of current requests for reactor irradiation was parallelly made, and a type of new reactor (JMTR-II is a tentative name) was preliminarily surveyed. Though being able to be in use for a fairly long time hereafter, as mentioned above, the JMTR has a possibility to be shutdown due to becomming stale like almost all research and test reactors. Therefore, it is not so early to survey the new reactor this time. New fields of reactor usage such as materials irradiation and tritium production for developing controlled thermonuclear reactor are to be considered in the design of the JMTR-II. Some requests from various fields for new reactor are incompatible, hence compromise is to be inevitable, because there might be no possibility to construct a couple of research and test reactors in Japan at a time. A light water moderated and cooled, pressurized type is selected as a recommendable candidate of the JMTR-II, after comparing some reactor types considered, and nuclear survey calculations were performed on it. (author)

  10. Design and present status of high-temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy commission (JAEC) decided to construct the high-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in 1987 for establishing and upgrading the basic technologies for advanced HTGRs and serving an irradiation test facility for research in high temperature technologies. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled test reactor with thermal output of 30MW and inlet and maximum outlet coolant temperature of 395 C and 950 C respectively. Construction started in March 1991 at Oarai site of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), with its first criticality at the end of 1997 to be followed after a series of functional tests of half a year. Fabrication of reactor pressure vessel, an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), gas circulators and other main cooling components has been finished in their factories and installed to the site in 1994. At present, the construction of HTTR reactor building and installation of containment vessel, main and auxiliary cooling systems, etc. are almost completed. This paper describes design of the HTTR reactor cooling system, control system and present status of the HTTR construction

  11. Design and fabrication of irradiation testing capsule for research reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Kim, Bong Goo; Park, Seung Jae; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Oh, Jong Myeong; Choi, Myeong Hwan; Lee, Byung Chul; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Dae Jong; Chun, Young Bum; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Recently, the demand of research reactors is increasing because there are many ageing research reactors in the world. Also, the production of radioisotope related with the medical purpose is very important. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is designing and licensing for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) and new type research reactor for export which will be constructed in Amman, Jordan and Busan, Korea, respectively. Thus, It is expected that more research reactors will be designed and constructed by KAERI. To design the research reactor, the irradiation performance and behavior of core structure material are necessary. However, the irradiation behavior of these materials is not yet investigated. Therefore, the irradiation performance must be verified by irradiation test. 11M 20K and 11M 21K irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated to conduct the irradiation test for some candidate core materials, Zircaloy 4, beryllium, and graphite, at HANARO. In this paper, the design and fabrication features of 11M 20K and 11M 21K were discussed.

  12. Design and fabrication of irradiation testing capsule for research reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the demand of research reactors is increasing because there are many ageing research reactors in the world. Also, the production of radioisotope related with the medical purpose is very important. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is designing and licensing for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) and new type research reactor for export which will be constructed in Amman, Jordan and Busan, Korea, respectively. Thus, It is expected that more research reactors will be designed and constructed by KAERI. To design the research reactor, the irradiation performance and behavior of core structure material are necessary. However, the irradiation behavior of these materials is not yet investigated. Therefore, the irradiation performance must be verified by irradiation test. 11M 20K and 11M 21K irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated to conduct the irradiation test for some candidate core materials, Zircaloy 4, beryllium, and graphite, at HANARO. In this paper, the design and fabrication features of 11M 20K and 11M 21K were discussed

  13. Abbreviated sampling and analysis plan for planning decontamination and decommissioning at Test Reactor Area (TRA) facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective is to sample and analyze for the presence of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents within certain areas of the Test Reactor Area (TRA), prior to D and D activities. The TRA is composed of three major reactor facilities and three smaller reactors built in support of programs studying the performance of reactor materials and components under high neutron flux conditions. The Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) and Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) facilities are currently pending D/D. Work consists of pre-D and D sampling of designated TRA (primarily ETR) process areas. This report addresses only a limited subset of the samples which will eventually be required to characterize MTR and ETR and plan their D and D. Sampling which is addressed in this document is intended to support planned D and D work which is funded at the present time. Biased samples, based on process knowledge and plant configuration, are to be performed. The multiple process areas which may be potentially sampled will be initially characterized by obtaining data for upstream source areas which, based on facility configuration, would affect downstream and as yet unsampled, process areas. Sampling and analysis will be conducted to determine the level of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents present in designated areas within buildings TRA-612, 642, 643, 644, 645, 647, 648, 663; and in the soils surrounding Facility TRA-611. These data will be used to plan the D and D and help determine disposition of material by D and D personnel. Both MTR and ETR facilities will eventually be decommissioned by total dismantlement so that the area can be restored to its original condition

  14. Abbreviated sampling and analysis plan for planning decontamination and decommissioning at Test Reactor Area (TRA) facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    The objective is to sample and analyze for the presence of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents within certain areas of the Test Reactor Area (TRA), prior to D and D activities. The TRA is composed of three major reactor facilities and three smaller reactors built in support of programs studying the performance of reactor materials and components under high neutron flux conditions. The Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) and Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) facilities are currently pending D/D. Work consists of pre-D and D sampling of designated TRA (primarily ETR) process areas. This report addresses only a limited subset of the samples which will eventually be required to characterize MTR and ETR and plan their D and D. Sampling which is addressed in this document is intended to support planned D and D work which is funded at the present time. Biased samples, based on process knowledge and plant configuration, are to be performed. The multiple process areas which may be potentially sampled will be initially characterized by obtaining data for upstream source areas which, based on facility configuration, would affect downstream and as yet unsampled, process areas. Sampling and analysis will be conducted to determine the level of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents present in designated areas within buildings TRA-612, 642, 643, 644, 645, 647, 648, 663; and in the soils surrounding Facility TRA-611. These data will be used to plan the D and D and help determine disposition of material by D and D personnel. Both MTR and ETR facilities will eventually be decommissioned by total dismantlement so that the area can be restored to its original condition.

  15. The reactor core configuration and important systems related to physics tests of Daya Bay NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief introduction to reactor core configuration and important systems related to physics tests of Daya Bay NPP is given. These systems involve the reactor core system (COR), the full length rod control system (RGL), the in-core instrumentation system (RIC), the out-of-core nuclear instrumentation system (RPN), and the LOCA surveillance system (LSS), the centralized data processing system (KIT) and the test data acquisition system (KDO). In addition, that the adjustment and evaluation of boron concentration related to other systems, for example the reactor coolant system (RCP), the chemical and volume control system (RCV), the reactor boron and water makeup system (REA), the nuclear sampling system (REN) and the reactor control system (RRC), etc. is also described. Analysis of these systems helps not only to familiarize their functions and acquires a deepen understanding for the principle procedure, points for attention and technical key of the core physics tests, but also to further analyze the test results. (3 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.)

  16. Use of research and test reactors for SPD development and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to using a research or test reactor for performance studies or calibration of self powered detectors, it is first necessary to fully characterize the reactor environment in the region to be utilized. This presentation details Characterization Experiments performed to quantify research/test reactor core/site parameters as they would apply for use with SPD applications. Methods will be described to: Determine the Westcott parameter, r (T n/T o) , for the region of interest; Characterize the neutron energy spectrum in terms of the cadmium absorption cut-off, i.e., consider neutrons of energy 5kT 0.13 eV to be epithermal neutrons; Determine T n, the effective neutron temperature, in the region of interest; Determine the gamma flux in the region of interest; and, Establish SPD calibration standard detectors.

  17. The role of the test and research reactors in supporting regulatory technical assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frappier, G. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    An increasingly important contribution of activities conducted in test and research reactors in the last two decades is in supporting the regulatory independent technical assessment. The provision of samples for measurement is an important infrastructure activity and the availability of facilities able to supply the demands of modern measurements remains a crucial issue. After providing a brief overview of the contribution of the ZED-2 and NRU reactors to safety research, and the international as well as Canadian approach to regulatory technical assessments, few examples of contribution of results from safety research programs conducted at ZED-2 and NRU facilities in supporting regulatory technical assessment in the areas of reactor physics and fuel for current CANDU reactors and new designs are discussed.

  18. The role of the test and research reactors in supporting regulatory technical assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increasingly important contribution of activities conducted in test and research reactors in the last two decades is in supporting the regulatory independent technical assessment. The provision of samples for measurement is an important infrastructure activity and the availability of facilities able to supply the demands of modern measurements remains a crucial issue. After providing a brief overview of the contribution of the ZED-2 and NRU reactors to safety research, and the international as well as Canadian approach to regulatory technical assessments, few examples of contribution of results from safety research programs conducted at ZED-2 and NRU facilities in supporting regulatory technical assessment in the areas of reactor physics and fuel for current CANDU reactors and new designs are discussed.

  19. Design of Seismic Test Rig for Control Rod Drive Mechanism of Jordan Research and Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor assembly is submerged in a reactor pool filled with water and its reactivity is controlled by locations of four control absorber rods(CARs) inside the reactor assembly. Each CAR is driven by a stepping motor installed at the top of the reactor pool and they are connected to each other by a tie rod and an electromagnet. The CARs scram the reactor by de-energizing the electromagnet in the event of a safe shutdown earthquake(SSE). Therefore, the safety function of the control rod drive mechanism(CRDM) which consists of a drive assembly, tie rod and CARs is to drop the CAR into the core within an appropriate time in case of the SSE. As well known, the operability for complex equipment such as the CRDM during an earthquake is very hard to be demonstrated by analysis and should be verified through tests. One of them simulates the reactor assembly and the guide tube of the CAR, and the other one does the pool wall where the drive assembly is installed. In this paper, design of the latter test rig and how the test is performed are presented. Initial design of the seismic test rig and excitation table had its first natural frequency at 16.3Hz and could not represent the environment where the CRDM was installed. Therefore, experimental modal analyses were performed and an FE model for the test rig and table was obtained and tuned based on the experimental results. Using the FE model, the design of the test rig and table was modified in order to have higher natural frequency than the cutoff frequency. The goal was achieved by changing its center of gravity and the stiffness of its sliding bearings

  20. Design of Seismic Test Rig for Control Rod Drive Mechanism of Jordan Research and Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jongoh; Kim, Gyeongho; Yoo, Yeonsik; Cho, Yeonggarp; Kim, Jong In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The reactor assembly is submerged in a reactor pool filled with water and its reactivity is controlled by locations of four control absorber rods(CARs) inside the reactor assembly. Each CAR is driven by a stepping motor installed at the top of the reactor pool and they are connected to each other by a tie rod and an electromagnet. The CARs scram the reactor by de-energizing the electromagnet in the event of a safe shutdown earthquake(SSE). Therefore, the safety function of the control rod drive mechanism(CRDM) which consists of a drive assembly, tie rod and CARs is to drop the CAR into the core within an appropriate time in case of the SSE. As well known, the operability for complex equipment such as the CRDM during an earthquake is very hard to be demonstrated by analysis and should be verified through tests. One of them simulates the reactor assembly and the guide tube of the CAR, and the other one does the pool wall where the drive assembly is installed. In this paper, design of the latter test rig and how the test is performed are presented. Initial design of the seismic test rig and excitation table had its first natural frequency at 16.3Hz and could not represent the environment where the CRDM was installed. Therefore, experimental modal analyses were performed and an FE model for the test rig and table was obtained and tuned based on the experimental results. Using the FE model, the design of the test rig and table was modified in order to have higher natural frequency than the cutoff frequency. The goal was achieved by changing its center of gravity and the stiffness of its sliding bearings.

  1. The Jules Horowitz Reactor - A new High Performance European Material Testing Reactor open to International Users Present Status and Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of sustainable nuclear energy requires R and D on fuel and material behaviour under irradiation with a high level of performance in order to meet the needs and challenges for the benefit of industry, research and public bodies. These stakes require a sustainable and secured access to an up-to-date high performance Material Testing Reactor. Following a broad survey within the European Research Area, the international community agreed that the need for Material Test Reactors in support of nuclear power plant safety and operation will continue in the context of sustainable nuclear energy. The Jules Horowitz Reactor project (JHR) copes with this context. JHR is designed as a user facility addressing the needs of the international community. This means: - flexibility with irradiation loops able to reproduce a large variation in operation conditions of different power reactor technologies, - high flux capacity to address Generations II, III, and IV needs. JHR is designed, built and operated as an international user facility because: - Given the maturity and globalization of the industry, domestic tools have no more the required level of economic and technical efficiency. Meanwhile, countries with nuclear energy need an access to high performance irradiation experimental capabilities to support technical skill and guarantee the competitiveness and safety of nuclear energy. - Many research items related to safety or public policy (waste management, etc.) require international cooperation to share costs and benefits of resulting consensus. JHR design is optimised for offering high performance material and fuel irradiation capability for the coming decades. This project is driven and funded by an international consortium gathering vendors, utilities and public stakeholders. This consortium has been set up in March 2007 when the construction began. The construction is in progress and the start of operation is scheduled for 2014. The JHR is a research

  2. Computer-aided testing and operational aids for PARR-1 nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, S.A. (Nuclear Engineering Div., Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (PK))

    1990-06-01

    The utilization of the plant computer of Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) for automatic periodic testing of nuclear instrumentation in the reactor is described. Computer algorithms have been developed for on-line acquisition and real-time processing of nuclear channel signals. The mean value, standard deviation, and probability distributions of nuclear channel signals are obtained in real time, and the computer generates a warning message if the signal error exceeds the maximum permissible error. In this way a faulty channel is automatically identified. Other real-time algorithms are also described that assist the operator in safe reactor operation by automatically computing approach-to-criticality during reactor start-up and the control rod worth determination.

  3. Computer-aided testing and operational aids for PARR-1 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of the plant computer of Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) for automatic periodic testing of nuclear instrumentation in the reactor is described. Computer algorithms have been developed for on-line acquisition and real-time processing of nuclear channel signals. The mean value, standard deviation, and probability distributions of nuclear channel signals are obtained in real time, and the computer generates a warning message if the signal error exceeds the maximum permissible error. In this way a faulty channel is automatically identified. Other real-time algorithms are also described that assist the operator in safe reactor operation by automatically computing approach-to-criticality during reactor start-up and the control rod worth determination

  4. An overview of the fuels and materials testing programme at the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuels and materials testing programme of the OECD Halden Reactor Project is aimed at investigations of fuel and cladding properties at high burnup, water chemistry effects and in-core materials ageing problems. For the execution of this programme, different types of irradiation rigs and experimental facilities providing typical power reactors conditions are available. Data are obtained from in-core sensors developed at the Halden Project; these are shortly described. An overview of the current test programme and the scope of the following years are briefly presented. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs

  5. Final safety and hazards analysis for the Battelle LOCA simulation tests in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final safety and hazards report for the proposed Battelle LOCA simulation tests in NRU. A brief description of equipment test design and operating procedure precedes a safety analysis and hazards review of the project. The hazards review addresses potential equipment failures as well as potential for a metal/water reaction and evaluates the consequences. The operation of the tests as proposed does not present an unacceptable risk to the NRU Reactor, CRNL personnel or members of the public. (author)

  6. The BR2 materials testing reactor. Past, ongoing and under-study upgradings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BR2 reactor (Mol, Belgium) is a high-flux materials testing reactor. The fuel is 93% 235U enriched uranium. The nominal power ranges from 60 to 100 MW. The main features of the design are the following: 1) maximum neutron flux, thermal: 1.2 x 1015 n/cm2 s; fast (E > 0.1 MeV) : 8.4 x 1014 n /cm2 s; 2) great flexibility of utilization: the core configuration and operation mode can be adapted to the experimental loading; 3) neutron spectrum tailoring; 4) availability of five 200 mm diameter channels besides the standard channels (84 mm diameter); 5) access to the top and bottom covers of the reactor authorizing the irradiation of loops. The reactor is used to study the behaviour of fuel elements and structural materials intended for future nuclear power stations of several types (fission and fusion). Irradiations are carried out in connection with performance tests up to very high burn-up or neutron fluence as well as for safety experiments, power cycling experiments, and generally speaking, tests under off-normal conditions. Irradiations for nuclear transmutation (production of high specific activity radio-isotopes and transplutonium elements), neutron-radiography, use of beam tubes for physics studies, and gamma irradiations are also carried out. The BR2 is used in support of Belgian programs, at the request of utilities, industry and universities and in the framework of international agreements. The paper reviews the past and ongoing upgrading and enhancement of reactor capabilities as well as those under study or consideration, namely with regard to: reactor equipment, fuel elements, irradiation facilities, reactor operation conditions and long-term strategy. (author)

  7. Development of Research Reactor Simulator and Its Application to Dynamic Test-bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Seung Wook; Bang, Dane; Bae, Sung Won [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We developed HANARO and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) real-time simulator for operating staff training. The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator as a dynamic test-bed to test the reactor regulating system in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator configuration is divided into hardware and software. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The simulator software is divided into three major parts: a mathematical modeling module, which executes the plant dynamic modeling program in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface (HMI) module. The developed research reactors are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by a hardware controller and the simulator and target controller were interfaced with a hard-wired and network-based interface.

  8. Development of Research Reactor Simulator and Its Application to Dynamic Test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed HANARO and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) real-time simulator for operating staff training. The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator as a dynamic test-bed to test the reactor regulating system in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator configuration is divided into hardware and software. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The simulator software is divided into three major parts: a mathematical modeling module, which executes the plant dynamic modeling program in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface (HMI) module. The developed research reactors are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by a hardware controller and the simulator and target controller were interfaced with a hard-wired and network-based interface

  9. 3D Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Hazra, Gopal; Karak, Bidya Binay; Teweldebirhan, Kinfe; Upton, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    We present results from the new STABLE (Surface flux Transport and Babcock Leighton) Dynamo Model. STABLE is a 3D Babcock-Leighton/Flux Transport dynamo model in which the source of poloidal field is the explicit emergence, distortion, and dispersal of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). In this talk I will discuss initial results with axisymmetric flow fields, focusing on the operation of the model, the general features of the cyclic solutions, and the challenge of achieving supercritical dynamo solutions using only the Babcock-Leighton source term. Then I will present dynamo simulations that include 3D convective flow fields based on the observed velocity power spectrum inferred from photospheric Dopplergrams. I'll use these simulations to assess how the explicit transport and amplification of fields by surface convection influences the operation of the dynamo. I will also discuss the role of surface magnetic fields in regulating the subsurface toroidal flux budget.

  10. Operation, test, research and development of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). FY1999-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    The HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) with the thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850/950 degC is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in Japan, which uses coated fuel particle, graphite for core components, and helium gas for primary coolant. The HTTR, which locates at the south-west area of 50,000 m{sup 2} in the Oarai Research Establishment, had been constructed since 1991 before accomplishing the first criticality on November 10, 1998. Rise to power tests of the HTTR started in September, 1999 and the rated thermal power of 30 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850 degC was attained in December 2001. JAERI received the certificate of pre-operation test, that is, the commissioning license for the HTTR in March 2002. This report summarizes operation, tests, maintenance, radiation control, and construction of components and facilities for the HTTR as well as R and Ds on HTGRs from FY1999 to 2001. (author)

  11. Safety Issues at the DOE Test and Research Reactors. A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report provides an assessment of safety issues at the Department of Energy (DOE) test and research reactors. Part A identifies six safety issues of the reactors. These issues include the safety design philosophy, the conduct of safety reviews, the performance of probabilistic risk assessments, the reliance on reactor operators, the fragmented…

  12. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  14. Cold Model Study and Commercial Test on Novel Vapor-Liquid Distributor of Hydroprocessing Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shaobing; Zhang Zhanzhu; Wu Defei; Guo Qingming

    2007-01-01

    A novel vapor-liquid distributor was developed on the basis of sufficient study on the existing distributors applied in hydroprocessing reactors.The cold model test data showed that the fluid distribution performance of the novel vapor-liquid distributor was evidently better than the traditional one.Commercial tests of the new distributor were carried out in the 300 kt/a gas oil hydrotreating reactor at SINOPEC Changling Branch Company,showing that the new vapor-liquid distributor could improve the fluid distribution,promote the hydrotreating efficiency and lead to better performance than the traditional one.

  15. Design and test of a continuous reactor for palm oil transesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Allen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous reactor for transesterification of refined palm oil with methanol was designed and tested. The reaction condition was focused at ambient pressure, temperature of 60ºC, molar ratio of alcohol to oil of 6:1, and NaOH of 1.0 %wt of oil. The designed reactor was in a form of a 6-stage mechanically stirred tank. Rushton turbines, with 4 standard baffles, and plates with a small opening were installed inside. The reactor has a simple form which could be conveniently constructed and operated. The reactor could produce methyl esters (ME with purities ranging from 97.5-99.2 %wt within residence times of 6-12 minutes in which its production performance was equivalent to a plug flow reactor and the power consumption of a stirrer in the range of 0.2-0.6 kW/m3 was required. The reaction modeling based on a homogeneous concentration field with reaction kinetics could accurately predict the produced purities of ME. The production yields by weight of final product and of ME to the fed oil were 94.7 and 92.3%, respectively. The developed continuous reactor has good potential for producing ME to be used as biodiesel.

  16. Evaluating and planning the radioactive waste options for dismantling the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, K.; Scott, J.; Larson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a kind tritium fusion research reactor, and is planned to be decommissioned within the next several years. This is the largest fusion reactor in the world and as a result of deuterium-tritum reactions is tritium contaminated and activated from 14 Mev neutrons. This presents many unusual challenges when dismantling, packaging and disposing its components and ancillary systems. Special containers are being designed to accommodate the vacuum vessel, neutral beams, and tritium delivery and processing systems. A team of experienced professionals performed a detailed field study to evaluate the requirements and appropriate methods for packaging the radioactive materials. This team focused on several current and innovative methods for waste minimization that provides the oppurtunmost cost effective manner to package and dispose of the waste. This study also produces a functional time-phased schedule which conjoins the waste volume, weight, costs and container requirements with the detailed project activity schedule for the entire project scope. This study and project will be the first demonstration of the decommissioning of a tritium fusion test reactor. The radioactive waste disposal aspects of this project are instrumental in demonstrating the viability of a fusion power reactor with regard to its environmental impact and ultimate success.

  17. Study of Channel Morphology and Infill Lithology in the Wilcox Group Central Louisiana Using Seismic Attribute Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng

    The fluvial and deltaic Wilcox Group is a major target for hydrocarbon and coal exploration in northern and central Louisiana. However, the characterization and delineation of fluvial systems is a difficult task due to the variability and complexity of fluvial systems and their internal heterogeneities. Seismic geomorphology is studied by recognizing paleogeographic features in seismic stratal slices, which are seismic images of paleo-depositional surfaces. Seismic attributes, which are extracted along seismic stratal slices, can reveal information that is not readily apparent in raw seismic data. The existence and distribution of fluvial channels are recognized by the channel geomorphology in seismic attributes displayed on stratal slices. The lithologies in the channels are indicated by those seismic attributes that are directly related to the physical properties of rocks. Selected attributes utilized herein include similarity, spectral decomposition, sweetness, relative acoustic impedance, root mean square (RMS) amplitude, and curvature. Co-rendering and Red/Green/Blue (RGB) display techniques are also included to better illuminate the channel geometry and lithology distribution. Hydrocarbons may exist in the channel sand-bodies, but are not explicitly identified herein. Future drilling plans for oil and gas exploration may benefit from the identification of the channels and the lithologies that fill them.

  18. Technical bases to consider for performance and demonstration testing of space fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance and demonstration testing are critical to the success of a space fission reactor program. However, the type and extent to which testing of space reactors should be performed has been a point of discussion within the industry for many years. With regard to full power ground nuclear tests, questions such as: (1) Do the benefits outweigh the risks; (2) Are there equivalent alternatives; (3) Can a test facility be constructed (or modified) in a reasonable amount of time; (4) Will the test article accurately represent the flight system; and (5) Are the costs too restrictive, have been debated for decades. There are obvious benefits of full power ground nuclear testing such as obtaining systems integrated reliability data on a full-scale, complete end-to-end system. But these benefits come at some programmatic risk. In addition, this type of testing does not address safety related issues. This paper will discuss and assess these and other technical considerations essential in deciding which type of performance and demonstration testing to conduct on space fission reactor systems.

  19. The U.S. Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and test reactors are widely deployed to study the irradiation behavior of materials of interest in nuclear engineering, to produce radioisotopes for medicine, industry, and agriculture, and as a basic research and teaching tool. In order to maximize neutron flux per unit power and/or to minimize capital costs and fuel cycle costs, most of these reactors were designed to utilize uranium with very high enrichment (in the 70% to 95% range). Research reactor fuels with such high uranium enrichment cause a potential risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. Over 140 research and test reactors of significant power (between 1 kW and 250 MW) are in operation with very highly enriched uranium in more than 35 countries, with total power in excess of 1700 MW. The overall annual fuel requirement of these reactors corresponds to approximately 1200 kg of 235-U. This highly strategic material is normally exported from the United States, converted to metal form, shipped to a fuel fabricator, and then shipped to the reactor site in finished fuel element form. At the reactor site the fuel is first stored, then irradiated, stored again, and eventually shipped back to the United States for reprocessing. The whole cycle takes approximately four years to complete, bringing the total required fuel inventory to approximately 5000 kg of 235U. The resulting international trade in highly-enriched uranium may involve several countries in the process of refueling a single reactor and creates a considerable concern that the highly-enriched uranium may be diverted for non peaceful purposes while in fabrication, transport, or storage, particularly when it is in the unirradiated form. The proliferation resistance of nuclear fuels used in research and test reactors can be considerably improved by reducing their uranium enrichment to a value less than 20%, but significantly greater than natural to avoid excessive plutonium production. The principal objective of the RERTR program is to provide

  20. The operating experience and incident analysis for High Flux Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the incidents analysis for High Flux Engineering test reactor (HFETR) and introduces operating experience. Some suggestion have been made to reduce the incidents of HFETR. It is necessary to adopt new improvements which enhance the safety and reliability of operation. (author)

  1. Corrosion tests of candidate fuel cladding and reactor internal structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion screening tests were conducted on candidate materials for nuclear fuel cladding and reactor internals of supercritical water reactor (SCWR) in static and flowing supercritical water (SCW) autoclave at the temperatures of 550, 600 and 650°C, pressure of about 25MPa, deaerated or saturated dissolved hydrogen (STP). Samples are nickel base alloy type Hastelloy C276, austenitic stainless steels type 304NG and AL-6XN, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel type P92, and oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956. This paper focuses on the formation and breakdown of corrosion oxide scales, and proposes the future trend for the development of SCWR fuel cladding materials. (author)

  2. Corrosion tests of candidate fuel cladding and reactor internal structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.; Zhu, F.; Bao, Y. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai (China); Tang, R. [Nuclear Power Inst. of China, National Key Lab. for Nuclear Fuel and Materials, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2010-07-01

    Corrosion screening tests were conducted on candidate materials for nuclear fuel cladding and reactor internals of supercritical water reactor (SCWR) in static and flowing supercritical water (SCW) autoclave at the temperatures of 550, 600 and 650°C, pressure of about 25MPa, deaerated or saturated dissolved hydrogen (STP). Samples are nickel base alloy type Hastelloy C276, austenitic stainless steels type 304NG and AL-6XN, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel type P92, and oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956. This paper focuses on the formation and breakdown of corrosion oxide scales, and proposes the future trend for the development of SCWR fuel cladding materials. (author)

  3. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  4. Analysis and Down Select of Flow Passages for Thermal Hydraulic Testing of a SNAP Derived Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroy, T. J.; Sadasivan, P.; Masterson, S.

    2007-01-01

    As past of the Vision for Space Exploration, man will return to the moon. To enable safe and productive time on the lunar surface will require adequate power resources. To provide the needed power and to give mission planners all landing site possibilities, including a permanently dark crater, a nuclear reactor provides the most options. Designed to be l00kWt providing approx. 25kWe this power plants would be very effective in delivering dependable, site non-specific power to crews or robotic missions on the lunar surface. An affordable reference reactor based upon the successful SNAP program of the 1960's and early 1970's has been designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory that will meet such a requirement. Considering current funding, environmental, and schedule limitations this lunar surface power reactor will be tested using non-nuclear simulators to simulate the heat from fission reactions. Currently a 25kWe surface power SNAP derivative reactor is in the early process of design and testing with collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Glenn Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Sandia National Laboratory to ensure that this new design is affordable and can be tested using non-nuclear methods as have proven so effective in the past. This paper will discuss the study and down selection of a flow passage concept for a approx. 25kWe lunar surface power reactor. Several different flow passages designs were evaluated using computational fluid dynamics to determine pressure drop and a structural assessment to consider thermal and stress of the passage walls. The reactor design basis conditions are discussed followed by passage problem setup and results for each concept. A recommendation for passage design is made with rationale for selection.

  5. A simulated test of physical starting and reactor physics on zero power facility of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core neutron economics has been verified through experiments conducted at a zero power reactor with baffles of various thickness. A simulated test of physical starting of Qinshan PWR has been introduced. The feasibility and safety of the programme are verified. The research provides a valuable foundation for developing physical starting programme

  6. Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately.

  7. Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately

  8. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  9. Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Raymond W.

    2012-07-30

    This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

  10. Problems and future plan on material development of beryllium in materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium has been utilized as a moderator and/or reflector in a number of material testing reactors. The attractive nuclear properties of beryllium are its low atomic number, low atomic weight, low parasitic capture cross section for thermal neutrons, readiness to part with one of its own neutrons, and good neutron elastic scattering characteristics. However, it is difficult to reprocess irradiated beryllium because of high induced radioactivity. Disposal has also been difficult because of toxicity issues and special nuclear material controls. In this paper, problems and future plans of beryllium technology are introduced for nuclear reactors. (author)

  11. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form

  12. Review of Savannah River Site K Reactor inservice inspection and testing restart program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inservice inspection (ISI) and inservice testing (IST) programs are used at commercial nuclear power plants to monitor the pressure boundary integrity and operability of components in important safety-related systems. The Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Defense Programs (DP) operates a Category A (> 20 MW thermal) production reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This report represents an evaluation of the ISI and IST practices proposed for restart of SRS K Reactor as compared, where applicable, to current ISI/IST activities of commercial nuclear power facilities

  13. Thermal simulations and tests in the development of a helmet transport spent fuel elements Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel from research reactors was designed by a group of researchers to improve the capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the reactors operated in the region. Two half-scale models for MTR fuel were constructed and tested so far and a third one for both MTR and TRIGA fuels will be constructed and tested next. Four test campaigns have been carried out, covering both normal and hypothetical accident conditions of transportation. The thermal test is part of the requirements for the qualification of transportation packages for nuclear reactors spent fuel elements. In this paper both the numerical modelling and experimental thermal tests performed are presented and discussed. The cask is briefly described as well as the finite element model developed and the main adopted hypotheses for the thermal phenomena. The results of both numerical runs and experimental tests are discussed as a tool to validate the thermal modelling. The impact limiters, attached to the cask for protection, were not modelled. (author)

  14. French safety authority projects in the field of research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an outline of some actions initiated by the French safety authority in the field of research and test reactors. An important action concerns the definition of the authorisation criteria for the implementation of experiments in these reactors. In particular, it is necessary to define clearly in which conditions an experiment may be authorised internally by the operating organisation or needs a formal approval by the safety authority. The practice related to the systematic safety reassessment of old facilities and the regulatory provisions associated with the decommissioning are presented after a discussion on the ageing issues. (author)

  15. Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years there has been an unstable supply of the critical diagnostic medical isotope 99Tc. Several concepts and designs have been proposed to produce 99Mo the parent nuclide of 99Tc, at a commercial scale sufficient to stabilize the world supply. This work lays out a testing and experiment plan for a proposed 2 MW open pool reactor fueled by Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) 99Mo targets. The experiments and tests necessary to support licensing of the reactor design are described and how these experiments and tests will help establish the safe operating envelop for a medical isotope production reactor is discussed. The experiments and tests will facilitate a focused and efficient licensing process in order to bring on line a needed production reactor dedicated to supplying medical isotopes. The Target Fuel Isotope Reactor (TFIR) design calls for an active core region that is approximately 40 cm in diameter and 40 cm in fuel height. It contains up to 150 cylindrical, 1-cm diameter, LEU oxide fuel pins clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy), in an annular hexagonal array on a ∼2.0 cm pitch surrounded, radially, by a graphite or a Be reflector. The reactor is similar to U.S. university reactors in power, hardware, and safety/control systems. Fuel/target pin fabrication is based on existing light water reactor fuel fabrication processes. However, as part of licensing process, experiments must be conducted to confirm analytical predictions of steady-state power and accident conditions. The experiment and test plan will be conducted in phases and will utilize existing facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories. The first phase is to validate the predicted reactor core neutronics at delayed critical, zero power and very low power. This will be accomplished by using the Sandia Critical Experiment (CX) platform. A full scale TFIR core will be built in the CX and delayed critical measurements will be taken. For low power experiments, fuel

  16. An investigation of integral facility scaling and data relation methods (Integral System Test Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integral Systems Test (IST) Program was initiated in 1982 by government and industry to provide information needed to help resolve issues raised by the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. Three different integral test facilities, each scaled to a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) design nuclear steam supply system, will ultimately contribute data to meet the objectives of the program. Each of the facilities was designed using different scaling methodologies, and each has different operating capabilities, such as maximum operating pressure and core power. The overall scaling of each facility is examined in this report, and local scaling is analyzed to demonstrate potential similarities and dissimilarities in facility response relative to expected plant responses. The scaling relationships are used to show how local thermal-hydraulic phenomena in each facility can be compared to each other or to expected plant behavior. The concept of an equilibrium plot is used to show how the global response of each facility can be related for a specific small break loss-of-coolant transient. Potential complications that may arise as a consequence of the facility scaling or facility limitations are enumerated. The potential use of dimensionless groupings for relating and specifying experiments is discussed. Finally, some specific experiments and conditions are proposed for the purpose of simplifying interfacility comparison of test results

  17. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  18. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Human Factors, Controls, and Statistics; Smith, James A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Fuel Performance and Design; Jewell, James Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Fuel Performance and Design

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  19. Proceedings of the 1990 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global effort to reduce, and possibly, eliminate the international traffic in highly-enriched uranium caused by its use in research reactors requires extensive cooperation and free exchange of information among all participants. To foster this free exchange of information, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the thirteenth of a series which began in 1978. The common effort brought together, past, a large number of specialists from many countries. On hundred twenty-three participants from 26 countries, including scientists, reactor operators, and personnel from commercial fuel suppliers, research centers, and government organizations, convened in Newport, Rhode Island to discuss their results, their activities, and their plans relative to converting research reactors to low-enriched fuels. As more and more reactors convert to the use of low-enriched uranium, the emphasis of our effort has begun to shift from research and development to tasks more directly related to implementation of the new fuels and technologies that have been developed, and to refinements of those fuels and technologies. It is appropriate, for this reason, that the emphasis of this meeting was placed on safety and on conversion experiences. This individual papers in this report have been cataloged separately

  20. Proceedings of the 1990 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The global effort to reduce, and possibly, eliminate the international traffic in highly-enriched uranium caused by its use in research reactors requires extensive cooperation and free exchange of information among all participants. To foster this free exchange of information, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the thirteenth of a series which began in 1978. The common effort brought together, past, a large number of specialists from many countries. On hundred twenty-three participants from 26 countries, including scientists, reactor operators, and personnel from commercial fuel suppliers, research centers, and government organizations, convened in Newport, Rhode Island to discuss their results, their activities, and their plans relative to converting research reactors to low-enriched fuels. As more and more reactors convert to the use of low-enriched uranium, the emphasis of our effort has begun to shift from research and development to tasks more directly related to implementation of the new fuels and technologies that have been developed, and to refinements of those fuels and technologies. It is appropriate, for this reason, that the emphasis of this meeting was placed on safety and on conversion experiences. This individual papers in this report have been cataloged separately.

  1. Test Facility for SMART Reactor Flow Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Reactor Flow Distribution Test Facilities for SMART, named SCOP (SMART Core Flow and Pressure Test Facility), were designed in order to simulate the distributions of (1) core flow and (2) reactor sectional flow resistance and flow rates. SCOP facility was designed based on the linear scaling law in order to preserve the flow characteristics of the prototype system, which are distributions of flow rate and pressure drop. The reduced scale was selected as a 1/5 of prototype length scale. The nominal flow condition was designed to be similar based on the velocity as that of the SMART reactor, which can minimize the flow distortion in the reduced scale of test facility by maintaining high Re number flow. Test facility includes fluid system, control/instrumentation system, data acquisition system, power system, which were designed to meet the requirement for each system. This report describes the details of the scaling and design features for the test facility

  2. RIA and LOCA simulating tests on experimental fuel elements in TRIGA MT reactor of INR Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the main objectives of Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), Pitesti R and D Program is to investigate thermal and mechanical behaviour of fuel elements, thresholds and mechanisms of cladding failure during RIA and LOCA tests. Dual core TRIGA Material Testing Reactor of INR Pitesti (TRIGA SS MTR and TRIGA ACPR) is utilized extensively for studies of fuel behaviour under normal and postulated accident condition. A total of 39 test fuel elements have been irradiated in the TRIGA Annular Core Pulse Reactor (TRIGA ACPR) of INR Pitesti under RIA conditions. The ACPR tests program is still in progress and new experiments are foreseen to be performed in the following period. The test fuel elements are instrumented with CrAl thermocouples for cladding surface temperature measurement and every test fuel element has a pressure sensor for the internal pressure measurement. An experimental database of fuel behaviour parameters including fission - gas release, sheath strain, power - burnup history, etc. has been obtained using in-pile measurements and PIE results of test fuel elements irradiated in the TRIGA Steady State Material Testing Reactor (TRIGA SS MTR) of INR Pitesti. More than 100 test fuel elements have been irradiated in TRIGA SS MTR in different power history conditions. LOCA simulating tests are planned to be performed in C2 LOCA tests capsule and in Loop A of TRIGA SS MTR of INR Pitesti. The LOCA tests in capsule C2 are instrumented to measure fuel, sheath and coolant temperature, internal element and coolant pressure during the entire irradiation period. In the second phase of the experiment the C2 capsule will be connected to the sweep gas system with the on-line gamma ray spectrometer included. RIA type tests are planned in C6 capsule of TRIGA ACPR on test fuel elements with pre-hydrided claddings in order to investigate the influence of the precipitated hydride on fuel element cladding failure at high burnups in RIA conditions. This paper

  3. International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project. IRPhE Handbook - 2015 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    performed at 50 reactor facilities. To be published as approved benchmarks the experiments must be evaluated against agreed technical criteria and reviewed by the IRPhE Technical Review Group. A total of 139 of the 143 evaluations are published as approved benchmarks. The remaining four evaluations are published as draft documents only. New to the handbook are benchmark specifications for selected measurements from the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Spectral Shift Reactor Lattice Experiment that was performed to study the nuclear properties of rod lattices moderated by D2O-H2O mixtures. The International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments was prepared by a working party comprised of experienced reactor physics personnel from Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, P.R. of China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States of America

  4. NUPEC's large scale hydrogen mixing test in a reactor containment vessel. (1) Hydrogen mixing and distribution test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUPEC has started Containment Integrity Project entitled 'Proving Test on the Reliability for Reactor Containment Vessel' since June, 1987. This is the project for the term of sixteen years sponsored by MITI (Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japanese Government). In this project, NUPEC has constructed an experimental facility for hydrogen mixing and distribution test, and the NUPEC tests conducted have suggested that hydrogen is well mixed in the model containment vessel and the prediction by a computer code is in excellent agreement with the data. (author)

  5. Design, Testing and Modeling of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System for AHTRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Quiping [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Sun, Xiaodong [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Chtistensen, Richard [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Blue, Thomas [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Yoder, Graydon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-08

    The principal objective of this research is to test and model the heat transfer performance and reliability of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) for AHTRs. In addition, component testing of fluidic diodes is to be performed to examine the performance and viability of several existing fluidic diode designs. An extensive database related to the thermal performance of the heat exchangers involved will be obtained, which will be used to benchmark a computer code for the DRACS design and to evaluate and improve, if needed, existing heat transfer models of interest. The database will also be valuable for assessing the viability of the DRACS concept and benchmarking any related computer codes in the future. The experience of making a liquid fluoride salt test facility available, with lessons learned, will greatly benefit the development of the Fluoride Salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) and eventually the AHTR programs.

  6. Design, Testing and Modeling of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System for AHTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of this research is to test and model the heat transfer performance and reliability of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) for AHTRs. In addition, component testing of fluidic diodes is to be performed to examine the performance and viability of several existing fluidic diode designs. An extensive database related to the thermal performance of the heat exchangers involved will be obtained, which will be used to benchmark a computer code for the DRACS design and to evaluate and improve, if needed, existing heat transfer models of interest. The database will also be valuable for assessing the viability of the DRACS concept and benchmarking any related computer codes in the future. The experience of making a liquid fluoride salt test facility available, with lessons learned, will greatly benefit the development of the Fluoride Salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) and eventually the AHTR programs.

  7. Startup testing of Romania dual-core test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late in 1979 both the Annular Core Pulsed Reactor (ACPR) and the 14-MW steady-state reactor (SSR) were loaded to critical. The fuel loading in both was then carried to completion and low-power testing was conducted. Early in 1980 both reactors successfully underwent high-power testing. The ACPR was operated for several hours at 500 kW and underwent pulse tests culminating in pulses with reactivity insertions of $4.60, peak power levels of about 20,000 MW, energy releases of 100 MW-sec, and peak measured fuel temperatures of 830 deg. C. The SSR was operated in several modes, both with natural convection and forced cooling with one or more pumps. The reactor successfully completed a 120-hr full-power test. Subsequent fuel element inspections confirmed that the fuel has performed without fuel damage or distortion. (author)

  8. A study on fast reactor core mechanics by an ex-reactor test and comparisons with calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents and discusses the results of core bowing experiments performed with an ex-reactor rig holding a half hexagon array of 22 sub-assemblies (S/As) simulating the Japanese DFBR conditions and the comparisons of the measured results with calculations by individually developed codes--ARKAS, RAINBOW, SANBOW. The main conclusions of this study are (1) interwrapper loads and S/A displacements within the array were measured at selected positions for a series of five tests simulating the DFBR core bowing modes, (2) the overall comparison between the non-friction calculation and measurement showed good agreement for loads, displacements and their directions, and (3) validation of the friction algorithm has also been carried out and further improvement of the agreement was obtained

  9. Feasibility of Ground Testing a Moon and Mars Surface Power Reactor in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground testing of a surface fission power system would be necessary to verify the design and validate reactor performance to support safe and sustained human exploration of the Moon and Mars. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has several facilities that could be adapted to support a ground test. This paper focuses on the feasibility of ground testing at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) facility and using other INL existing infrastructure to support such a test. This brief study concludes that the INL EBR-II facility and supporting infrastructure are a viable option for ground testing the surface power system. It provides features and attributes that offer advantages to locating and performing ground testing at this site, and it could support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration schedules for human exploration of the Moon. This study used the initial concept examined by the U.S. Department of Energy Inter-laboratory Design and Analysis Support Team for surface power, a low-temperature, liquid-metal, three-loop Brayton power system. With some facility modification, the EBR-II can safely house a test chamber and perform long-term testing of the space reactor power system. The INL infrastructure is available to receive and provide bonded storage for special nuclear materials. Facilities adjacent to EBR-II can provide the clean room environment needed to assemble and store the test article assembly, disassemble the power system at the conclusion of testing, and perform posttest examination. Capability for waste disposal is also available at the INL

  10. A premature demise for RERTR [Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors programme]?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common commitment from France, Belgium, Germany and the US to eliminate highly enriched uranium from their research reactors is needed to help guard against this material falling into the wrong hands. In the US, an essential part of this commitment would be rekindling the weakened Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors programme (RERTR). This is an American initiative to develop low-enrichment uranium fuel for research reactors that have previously required weapons-usable material. Underway since 1978 at Argonne National Laboratory, RERTR has achieved some impressive results: the development of higher density, low enriched fuels that are suitable for use at over 90% of the world's research reactors; a net reduction of US exports of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from the annual 700kg levels in the late 1970s to a 1990 level of just over 100kg; the encouragement of international scientific co-operation aimed at developing new fuels and facilitating the conversion of existing reactors to these fuels. However, in recent years, the US commitment to RERTR has been declining -budgets have fallen and advanced fuel development work has terminated. (author)

  11. Plutonium recycle test reactor characterization activities and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Report contains results of PRTR core and associated structures characterization performed in January and February of 1997. Radiation survey data are presented, along with recommendations for stabilization activities before transitioning to a decontamination and decommissioning function. Recommendations are also made about handling the waste generated by the stabilization activities, and actions suggested by the Decontamination and Decommissioning organization

  12. Reliability tests for reactor internals replacement technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural damage due to aging degradation of LWR reactor internals has been reported in several nuclear plants. NUPEC has started a project to test the reliability of the technology for replacing reactor internals, which was directed at preventive maintenance before damage and repair after damage for the aging degradation. The project has been funded by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) of Japan since 1995, and it follows the policy of a report that the MITI has formally issued in April 1996 summarizing the countermeasures to be considered for aging nuclear plants and equipment. This paper gives an outline of the whole test plans and the test results for the BWR reactor internals replacement methods; core shroud, ICM housing, and CRD Housing and stub tube. The test results have shown that the methods were reliable and the structural integrity was appropriate based on the evaluation. (author)

  13. Forced vibration tests and simulation analyses of a nuclear reactor building. Part 1: outline of the forced vibration tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes forced vibration tests carried out at the Hamaoka (BWR) Unit 4 reactor building in Japan in April and May of 1992. Fundamental dynamic characteristics of the R/B including its interaction with the adjacent T/B and the soil-structure interaction were obtained. Results for preceding R/Bs are compared, and probable causes for fluctuation of the resonance curve around the first peak are discussed. (author). 11 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts are presented for each of the papers included in the data base concerning RERTR programs and licensing; fuel development; plate-type fuel fabrication; fuel demonstration; economics; mixed cores; and applications

  15. Reactivity initiated accident (RIA) type tests and annular core pulse reactor (ACPR) operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the test conducted to investigate the failure threshold of the fuel when subject to RIA, accomplished in the TRIGA ACPR Nuclear Research Institute, Pitesti. The reactor facility, the capsule used in experiments and the experimental results are presented. The failure threshold was determined at 200 cal/g for an atmospheric gap pressure comparable with similar tests. The failure threshold decreases with increasing gap pressure. The tests proved useful for a better understanding of the fuel behavior in the transient conditions. As it is known RIA is not a common accident for the CANDU reactors, but the fuel failure mechanism can be similar to other type of accidents as LOCA and PCM. The program will be continued, with better instrumentation for the fuel sample and also independent instrumentation to measure pulse characteristics with better statistics. A new project for the experimental fuel elements must be considered to eliminate fuel-endcap interactions. (author)

  16. Procedures and techniques for the management of experimental fuels from research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost all countries that have undertaken fuel development programs for power, research or military reactors have experimental and exotic fuels, either stored at the original research reactors where they have been tested or at some away-from-reactor storage facility. These spent fuel liabilities cannot follow the standard treatment recognized for modern power reactor fuels. They include experimental and exotic fuels ranging from liquids to coated spheres and in configurations ranging from full test assemblies to post irradiation examination specimens set in resin. This document contains an overview of the extent of the problem of managing experimental and exotic fuels from research and test reactors and an expert evaluation of the overall situation in countries which participated in the meeting

  17. Obituary: Horace Welcome Babcock, 1912-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Arthur Harris

    2003-12-01

    Horace Welcome Babcock died in Santa Barbara, California on 29 August 2003, fifteen days short of his ninety-first birthday. An acclaimed authority on solar and stellar magnetism and the originator of ingenious advances in astronomical instrumentation in his earlier career, he served as Director of Mount Wilson and Palomar (later Hale) Observatories from 1964 until his retirement in 1978. The founding of the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Las Campanas Observatory in Chile was the culmination of his directorship. Horace was born in Pasadena California on 13 September 1912, the only child of Harold Delos Babcock and Mary G. Henderson. His father, an electrical engineer and physicist by training, had been hired by George Ellery Hale to work at the recently founded Mount Wilson Solar Observatory beginning in 1909. Thus Horace spent much of his boyhood on Mount Wilson in the company of astronomers. Horace developed an early interest in astronomy, worked as a volunteer solar observer at Mount Wilson and published his first paper in 1932, with his father. He was fascinated by fine mechanisms and by optical and electrical instruments. After graduating from Caltech with a degree in structural engineering in 1934, he earned his PhD in astronomy at Lick Observatory in 1938. His dissertation provided the first measurement of the rotational velocity curve and a derivation of the mass-to-luminosity ratio for M31; this work is still cited in reviews of the study of ``dark matter." Horace served as a research assistant at Lick Observatory (1938 39) and an Instructor at the University of Chicago's McDonald and Yerkes Observatories (1939--41) under Otto Struve. He undertook radar-related wartime electronics work at the MIT Radiation Laboratory (1941 42) and then worked on aircraft rocket launchers as part of the Caltech Rocket Project (1942 45). This project brought him into contact with Ira S. Bowen, head of the project's Photographic Division. Impressed with his knowledge of

  18. Operating the Advanced Test Reactor in today's economic and regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, is the US Department of Energy's largest and most versatile test reactor. Base programs at ATR are planned well into the 21st century. The ATR and support facilities along with an overview of current programs will be reviewed, but the main focus of the presentation will be on the impact that today's economic and regulatory concerns have had on the operation of this test reactor. Today's economic and regulatory concerns have demanded more work be completed at lower cost while increasing the margin of safety. By the beginning of the 1990 s, federal budgets for research generally and particularly for nuclear research had decreased dramatically. Many national needs continued to require testing in the ATR; but demanded lower cost, increased efficiency, improved performance, and an increased margin of safety. At the same time budgets were decreasing, there was an increase in regulatory compliance activity. The new standards imposed higher margins of safety. The new era of greater openness and higher safety standards complemented research demands to work safer, smarter and more efficiently. Several changes were made at the ATR to meet the demands of the sponsors and public. Such changes included some workforce reductions, securing additional program sponsors, upgrading some facilities, dismantling other facilities, and implementing new safety programs. (author)

  19. Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for Supercritical Water Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water cooled reactor concept which uses water pressurized above its thermodynamic critical pressure as the reactor coolant. This concept offers high thermal efficiencies and a simplified reactor system, and is hence expected to help to improve economic competitiveness. Various kinds of SCWR concepts have been developed, with varying combinations of reactor type (pressure vessel or pressure tube) and core spectrum (thermal, fast or mixed). There is great interest in both developing and developed countries in the research and development (R&D) and conceptual design of SCWRs. Considering the high interest shown in a number of Member States, the IAEA established in 2008 the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermo-hydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs. The aim was to foster international collaboration in the R&D of SCWRs in support of Member States’ efforts and under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department’s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR) and Heavy Water Reactors (TWG-HWR). The two key objectives of the CRP were to establish accurate databases on the thermohydraulics of supercritical pressure fluids and to test analysis methods for SCWR thermohydraulic behaviour to identify code development needs. In total, 16 institutes from nine Member States and two international organizations were involved in the CRP. The thermohydraulics phenomena investigated in the CRP included heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of supercritical pressure fluids, development of new heat transfer prediction methods, critical flow during depressurization from supercritical conditions, flow stability and natural circulation in supercritical pressure systems. Two code testing benchmark exercises were performed for steady state heat transfer and flow stability in a heated channel. The CRP was completed with the planned outputs in

  20. Model test on interaction of reactor building and soil. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical and experimental studies on the effects of dynamic interaction between structures and soil have been carried out in recent years. Most of the dynamic tests, however, have been conducted using comparatively small-scale models. In order to evaluate the effects of soil-structure interaction for rigid structure such as reactor building, a series of tests, including forced vibration test and earthquake observations, was carried out. Large-scale models constructed on an actual soil were used. These tests included forced vibration tests on individual foundations, on foundations with superstructures, on cross interaction through the soil between adjacent structures. Tests on the embedded effects of foundation, on artificial ground-shaking, on large amplitude excitation, and aging effects in soil properties were performed. This paper describes the results of forced vibration tests and analyses of cross interaction through the soil between adjacent structures

  1. Post-Construction Testing of the Elk River, Hallam and Piqua Power Reactor Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actual experience gained during the post-construction testing of three nuclear power plants, under the USAEC Power Reactor Demonstration Program, may permit some generalizations concerning this phase of plant construction and operation. The three plants, Elk River Reactor (ERR), Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (HNPF), and the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility (PNPF), represent three different reactor concepts: natural-circulation boiling water, sodiumgraphite, and organic cooled and moderated, respectively. The post-construction testing period included the time between the end of construction (erection of structures and installation of equipment) and the beginning of power operation (generation of significant net electrical power). The tests were intended to: (a) verify the performance characteristics of the as-installed equipment; (b) obtain initial criticality and reactivity coefficient measurements; and (c) determine reactor physics and plant performance characteristics at a sequence of increasing power levels. .The experience gained can be reported in six separate but interrelated categories: (1) schedule; (2) costs; (3) staffing requirements; (4) procedures; (5) equipment performance (including malfunctions); and (6) actual, as compared to predicted, system performance characteristics. The average project staffing, including craftsmen, operators, supervisors, technical support and trainees, was approximately 50 for ERR, 115 for HNPF, and 60 for PNPF. Detailed written Pre-operational Test Procedures were prepared for each major component and system. To the maximum possible extent, all tests were performed before fuel loading and operation of the integrated plant. Authorization procedures (duplicates of the licensing procedures for non-USAEC-owned plants) were in progress during almost all of the post-construction testing periods. The time required for post-construction testing of each of these plants significantly exceeded the original estimates. The tests disclosed

  2. BODYFIT-2PE-HEM: LWR core thermal-hydraulic code using boundary-fitted coordinates and two-phase homogeneous equilibrium model. Volume 3: validation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BODYFIT-2PE-HEM code was used to simulate several Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) types of experiments to validate its applicability and accuracy. Five simulations are reported in this volume. The first comparison was between the closed form analytical solution and the BODYFIT calculation of 3-D flows in an inifinite square array of circular tubes. Both the velocity profiles along symmetry lines and Nusselt numbers as a function of the entrance distance were given in the report. The second simulation was on the Columbia University 4 x 4 rod bundle experiment with a power skew of 2 to 1. The calculated mass flow rates and qualities for both hot and cold subchannels at the exit of the rod bundle were compared with the experimental isokinetic measurements. The third simulation was on the Babcock and Wilcox 4 x 6 rod bundle experiments with a power skew of 1.5 to 1. Again, the calculated mass flow rates and qualities for both hot and cold subchannels at the exit of the rod bundle were compared with the experimental isokinetic measurements. The fourth simulation was on the Westinghouse 4 x 5 rod bundle critical heat flux experiments and transient pressure drop tests. In this simulation, the critical heat fluxes calculated by the code with several CHF correlations were compared with the experimental measurements. Furthermore, the pressure drops, as a function of time, were compared with the experimental values for the flow rundown transients. The fifth simulation was on the GE 3 x 3 CHF experiments. Many operating conditions with different inlet temperatures, inlet velocities, and system pressures were used in the experiments. Code calculations were based on the Biasi correlation and the Columbia University correlation. Comparisons between calcuations and measurements show good agreements, demonstrating the validity and accuracy of the BODYFIT-2PE-HEM code. 14 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs

  3. Standard review plan for the review and evaluation of emergency plans for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a Standard Review Plan to assure that complete and uniform reviews are made of research and test reactor radiological emergency plans. The report is organized under ten planning standards which correspond to the guidance criteria in American National Standard ANSI/ANS 15.16 - 1982 as endorsed by Revision 1 to Regulatory Guide 2.6. The applicability of the items under each planning standard is indicated by subdivisions of the steady-state thermal power levels at which the reactors are licensed to operate. Standard emergency classes and example action levels for research and test reactors which should initiate these classes are given in an Appendix. The content of the emergency plan is as follows: the emergency plan addresses the necessary provisions for coping with radiological emergencies. Activation of the emergency plan is in response to the emergency action levels. In addition to addressing those severe emergencies that will fall within one of the standard emergency classes, the plan also discusses the necessary provisions to deal with radiological emergencies of lesser severity that can occur within the operations boundary. The emergency plan allows for emergency personnel to deviate from actions described in the plan for unusual or unanticipated conditions

  4. Safety research program of LWR fuels and materials using the Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power up-rates, burn-up extension and long term operation enable us to utilize Light Water Reactors efficiently. This will have the fuels and structural materials exposed to severe operational condition for a longer period, which can affect their integrity. Continuous researches for solving irradiation-related issues on the fuels for high-duty uses and the plant aging are essential in order to realize the up-graded uses of LWR safely. Japanese regulator has decided to install new irradiation test facilities in the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). For the fuels tests, transient tests facility is being constructed for the power transient tests of new design BWR fuels. For the materials tests, the irradiation test loops under well controlled environment simulating BWR water chemistry condition and a large irradiation capsule, which can accommodate 1 inch-thickness compact tension specimens in an inert gas environment, are being prepared for the researches on stress corrosion cracking and irradiation embrittlement, respectively. These fuels and materials irradiation tests will be started in 2011 after refurbishment of JMTR. (author)

  5. The forced vibration test and observation of earthquake response at PWR (3loop) reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At SN nuclear power plant, the dynamic properties of reactor building have been studied by forced vibration test and earthquake measurement in order to obtain practical data for the confirmation of the seismic safety of the power plant facilities and for more rational earthquake resistant design. The forced vibration test was carried out from January to February in 1983, when the reactor building and other surrounding buildings had been almost completed. It was aimed at the investigation of the translational and vertical vibration mode (beam and vertical mode) of outer shield building and inner concrete structure as well as the oval vibration mode (oval mode) of outer shield building. The earthquake response were observed three times in the next year 1984. They were April 17, August 7, and August 15. The observed results were simulated by analyses. (orig.)

  6. The forced vibration test and observation of earthquake response at PWR (3 loop) reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At SN nuclear power plant, the dynamic properties of reactor building have been studied by forced vibration test and earthquake measurement in order to obtain practical data for the confirmation of the seismic safety of the power plant facilities and for more rational earthquake resistant design. The forced vibration test was carried out from January to February in 1983, when the reactor building and other surrounding buildings had been almost completed. It is aimed at the investigation of the translational and vertical vibration mode (beam and vertical mode) of outer shield building and inner concrete structure as well as the oval vibration mode (oval mode) of outer shield building. The earthquake response were observed three times in the next year 1984. They were April 17, August 7, and August 15. The observed results were simulated by analyses

  7. The BR2-material testing reactor and its major contribution to the reactor material, fuel and safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BR2 was shutdown at the end of June 1995 for a programme of extensive refurbishment after more than 30 years utilization. The beryllium matrix was replaced and the aluminum vessel inspected and requalified for the envisaged 15 years life extension. Other aspects of the refurbishment programme were aimed at reliability and availability of the installations, safety of operation and compliance with modem safety standards. The reactor was restarted in April 1997. This paper deals with aspects of this refurbishment in general as well as the ongoing experimental projects in the areas of reactor material, fuel behaviour and safety research. (author)

  8. Neutronic tests and reactivity balance in the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Rose Mary Gomes do Prado; Souza, Luiz Claudio Andrade, E-mail: souzarm@cdtn.br, E-mail: lcas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the 2014 neutronic tests performed on CDTN's TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor. Such tests are performed annually, as prescribed by the Safety Analysis Report. The three control rods, Regulating, Shim and Safety, were calibrated and their worth determined to be 0.52 $, 3.08 $ and 2.78 $, respectively. The Shim rod takes 0.44 s to shutdown the reactor and the Safety rod 0.48 s. The maximum reactivity insertion rates are 48 pcm/s by the Shim rod and 46 pcm/s by the Safety rod. Total reactivity excess is 1.88 $. The temperature reactivity coefficient determined is -0.94 cent/deg C. A reactivity insertion of 0.71 $ is necessary in order to achieve the licensed maximum reactor power of 100 kW. Reactivity losses due to xenon poisoning, after operating for 8 h at maximum power, is 0.20 $, and the insertion of a void tube in the Central Thimble corresponds to 0.22 $. A significant amount of reactivity is required to overcome the temperature effect and allow the reactor to operate at full power for extended periods of time. Given all these reactivity losses, a new fuel element should soon be added to the core in order to increase the reactivity excess. Adding this new fuel element to the C ring and moving the element withdrawn from that position to the F ring, replacing a graphite dummy element, would increase 45.5 cents in the reactivity excess worth. Calculations and experimental results will be used to optimize a new core configuration for the reactor. (author)

  9. Summary of TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] diagnostics, including JET [Joint European Torus] and JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic instrumentation on TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and the specific properties of each diagnostic, i.e., number of channels, time resolution, wavelength range, etc., are summarized in tables, grouped according to the plasma parameter measured. For comparison, the equivalent diagnostic capabilities of JET (Joint European Torus) and the Japanese large tokamak, JT-60, as of late 1987 are also listed in the tables. Extensive references are given to publications on each instrument

  10. High flux materials testing reactor HFR Petten. Characteristics of facilities and standard irradiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information is presented. Besides the nuclear data for the experiment positions short descriptions are given of the most important standard facilities for material irradiation and radionuclide production. One paragraph deals with the experimental set-ups for solid state and nuclear structure investigations. The information in this report refers to a core type, which is operational since March 1977. The numerical data compiled have been up-dated to June 1978

  11. Status and development of instrumented fuel rod testing simulating the power reactor operating conditions in the research reactor MIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper includes the analysis of parameters for instrumented refabricated fuel rods having high burnup under power cycling as an example. The SSC RF RIAR carries out all activities, which are required for testing. The whole cycle of such activities, with the experiment with irradiated fuel rods of WWER fuel assembly has been carried out in the MIR reactor, is shown. The zero power reactor MIR (critical assembly) is used for experimental support and safety analysis. The main characteristics of the loop facilities, which are used for testing and the designs of several devices are presented. The location of fuel rods and sensors throughout the height and over the cross-section of the experimental device is shown. The changes of fuel rod (A) length and diameter as a function of average linear power throughout the fuel rod height and the relation between the length and diameter changes are given. The experiments with WWER-440 and WWER-1000 refabricated fuel rods having a burnup of 50 to 60 MWd/kgU approximately were carried out under repetitive power cycling conditions. The curves of linear power change in these experiments are represented schematically. Some results of the data processing, which are logged under the transient conditions during the first experiment with WWER instrumented refabricated fuel rods having a burnup of 50 MWd/kgU approximately are given. The change of the logged data on fuel temperature and neutron flux and changes in the length of fuel rods in the course of power change after different number of cycles are demonstrated. The experimental capabilities improvements like: 1) Development of the technique and experimental device for testing of WWER fuel rods under conditions simulating some design-basis accidents accompanied with pulse power change; 2) Improvement of dynamic techniques used for analysis of thermal and physical parameters of the WWER fuel rods, calculation of local power and heat-transfer factor with the help of correlation and

  12. Transients and safety testing of LMFBR fuel pins in the reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing of the behaviour of LMFBR fuel pins under operational transients has been performed in the reactor BR2 at S.C.K./C.E.N.-Mol (Belgium) since 1981 in the framework of the DEBENE programme ''SNR-Betriebstransienten-experimente''. A special purpose sodium loop, called ''VIC'', has therefore been developed to allow off-nominal and transient experiments on single fuel pins under realistic fast reactor operating conditions. Two basic types of tests can be run, either separately or simultaneously: fission power alteration, e.g. steady overpower runs, power cycling and fast transient overpower (TOP); mismatch of the sodium cooling, e.g. operation with reduced sodium flow and transient loss of flow (LOF). The loop allows the loading and testing of pre-irradiated fuel pins. In the field of safety oriented tests, the programme ''MOL 7 C'' investigates the LMFBR fuel element behaviour under locally blocked cooling conditions and the possible failure propagation. The work is jointly carried out by the Karlsruhe center KfK (FRG) and S.C.K./C.E.N.-Mol (Belgium). The related in-pile tests in the reactor BR2 have started in 1977 and are performed in a fully integrated sodium loop. The test section contains a 30-rod bundle with fresh or pre-irradiated fuel pins. A local porous blockage within the fuel bundle initiates severe local damage to the central rods. Important informations are obtained with respect to the problems of pin to pin propagation and the long term behaviour of a fuel subassembly with defect pins. The MOL 7 C loop system can also be used to run operational transients on a fuel bundle with representative fuel pins. The paper describes the irradiation devices VIC and MOL 7 C from their technological point of view and depicts their field of testing applications. Also the major experiments already performed and relevant irradiation data are reviewed

  13. 2007 international meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Abstracts and available papers presented at the meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Meeting papers discuss research and test reactor fuel performance, manufacturing and testing. Some of the main topics are: conversion from HEU to LEU in different reactors and corresponding problems and activities; flux performance and core lifetime analysis with HEU and LEU fuels; physics and safety characteristics; measurement of gamma field parameters in core with LEU fuel; nondestructive analysis of RERTR fuel; thermal hydraulic analysis; fuel interactions; transient analyses and thermal hydraulics for HEU and LEU cores; microstructure research reactor fuels; post irradiation analysis and performance; computer codes and other related problems

  14. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  15. Design and fabrication of sodium test facility for fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the promotion policy for energy research and development base construction plan (priority facility) of the Japanese government in FY2009 is 'to construct in Tsuruga City the research and development base for plant operation technology for the practical use of fast breeder reactor where researchers in and out of Japan gather, and to contribute to the development and revitalization of the region as the base with international characteristics.' In conformity to this purpose, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency built 'sodium engineering research facilities' in Tsuruga. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and installation of interior equipment that were carried out by Kawasaki Heavy Industries. 'Sodium engineering research facilities' are the test and research facilities to conduct research and development related to sodium, while reflecting the experiences of operation and maintenance of 'Monju,' which aims at the commercialization of fast reactor. The facilities specialize in the handling technology of sodium to meet the needs in and out of Japan, and were completed in June 2015. The facilities consist of six units including tank-loop test equipment, mini-loop test equipment, sodium purification and supply equipment, etc. For the tank-loop test equipment, a sodium transfer test of about 5.5 tons, and a subsequent comprehensive function test using sodium are scheduled. (A.O.)

  16. Experience, status and perspectives of material testing researches within frameworks of BN-350 reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization and analysis of post-operational status of hexahedral casing of BN-350 reactor spent fuel assemblies of screen and fuel type are presented. Results of earlier fulfilled a wide complex of material testing studies on structure change and physical-mechanical properties of stainless steels 12Cr18Ni10Ti and 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 and 12Cr13Mo2BFR are taken into attention. Constructional materials of active core are exploited in fast reactor at comparatively low temperatures (280-420 deg. C), and were irradiated up to damage doses within range 18-23 dpa with velocities of its acceleration comparable with values characteristic for energy reactors (∼10-8-10-7 dpa/s) and are placed in storage pool for from 2 to 25 years. Among obtained results experimental data on swelling, strengthening, embrittlement, corrosion, phase-structural transformations, induced neutron transformations are discussing the most completely. Requirements to planned experiments with application of steels irradiated in BN-350 reactor are formulated

  17. Hydraulic and hydrodynamic tests for design evaluation of research reactors fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the design steps of research reactors fuel elements some tests are usually necessary to verify its design, i.e.: its hydraulic characteristics, dynamical response and structural integrity. The hydraulic tests are developed in order to know the pressure drops characteristics of different parts or elements of the prototype and of the whole fuel element. Also, some tests are carried out to obtain the velocity distribution of the coolant water across different prototype's sections. The hydrodynamic tests scopes are the assessment of the dynamical characteristics of the fuel elements and their components and its dynamical response considering the forces generated by the coolant flowing water at different flow rate conditions. Endurance tests are also necessary to qualify the structural design of the FE prototypes and their corresponding clamp tools, verifying the whole system structural integrity and wear processes influences. To carry out these tests a special test facility is needed to obtain a proper representation of the hydraulic and geometric boundary conditions of the fuel element. In some cases changes on the fuel element prototype or dummy are necessary to assure that the data results are representative of the case under study. Different kind of sensors are mounted on the test section and also on the fuel element itself when necessary. Some examples of the instrumentation used are strain gauges, displacement transducers, absolute and differential pressure transducers, pitot tubes, etc. The obtained data are, for example, plates' vibration amplitudes and frequencies, whole bundle displacement characterization, pressure drops and flow velocity measurements. The Experimental Low Pressure Loop is a hydraulic loop located at CNEA's Constituyentes Atomic Center and is the test facility where different kind of tests are performed in order to support and evaluate the design of research reactor fuel elements. A brief description of the facility, and examples of

  18. Use and Storage of Test and Operations Data from the High Temperature Test Reactor Acquired by the US Government from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Gougar

    2010-02-01

    This document describes the use and storage of data from the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) acquired from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) by the U.S. Government for high temperature reactor research under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project.

  19. Use of the modular modeling system in the design of the Penn State advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Modular Modeling System (MMS), developed by Babcock and Wilcox under a contract from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is a computer code designed for the simulation of nuclear and fossil power plants. MMS uses preprogrammed modules to present specific power plant components and allows for the interconnection of these modules in a wide variety of configurations to model present and future plant configurations. MMS requires the use of a simulation language to translate and execute the plant model. The Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ASCL), a general purpose simulation language by Mitchell and Gauthier, was used in conjunction with MMS for the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) studies at the Pennsylvania State University (PSU). For the past year, the Nuclear Engineering Department at PSU, under a contract from the Department of Energy (DOE), has been involved in the conceptual design and evaluation of a reconfigured Ultra-Safe ALWR. The underlying design philosophy was that the large amounts of energy stored in a reactor at shutdown could be used in such a way as to ensure safe plant shutdown, even if all AC power to the plant is lost. A secondary shutdown turbine was employed to recover energy to power the initial cooldown of the plant until natural circulation can develop and dissipate the remaining decay heat in the core. Primary system pressure is no longer controlled using a conventional pressurizer. Instead a modified let-down injection system connected to an inside containment atmospheric tank controls pressure

  20. Use of the modular modeling system in the design of the Penn State Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study involves the design and subsequent transient analysis of the Penn State Advanced Light Water Reactor (PSU ALWR). The performance of the PSU ALWR is evaluated during small step changes in power and a turbine trip from full power without scram. The Modular Modeling System (MMS), developed by Babcock and Wilcox under a contract from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is a computer code designed for the simulation of nuclear and fossil power plants. MMS uses preprogrammed modules to represent specific power plant components such as pipes, pumps, steam generators, and a nuclear reactor. These components can then be connected in any manner the user desires providing certain simple interconnection rules are followed. In this study, MMS is used to develop computer models of both the PSU ALWR and a conventional PWR operating at the same power level. These models are then subjected to the transients mentioned above to evaluate the ability of the letdown-injection system to maintain primary system pressure. The transient response of the PSU ALWR and conventional PWR MMS models were compared to each other and whenever possible to actual plant transient data. 14 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.E. Lumia; C.A. Gentile

    2002-01-18

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

  2. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed

  3. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lumia, M E

    2002-01-01

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

  4. Operating experience of Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is a 40 MWt / 13.2 MWe sodium cooled, loop type mixed carbide fuelled reactor. Its main aim is to gain experience in the design, construction and operation of fast reactors and to serve as an irradiation facility for development of fuel and structural material for future fast reactors. The reactor achieved first criticality in October 1985 with small indigenously designed and fabricated Mark I core (70% PuC-30% UC). The reactor power was subsequently raised in steps to 17.4 MWt by addition of Mark II fuel subassemblies (55% PuC-45% UC) and with the Mark I fuel operating at the designed linear heat rating of 400 W/cm. The turbo-generator was synchronized with the grid in July 1997. The achieved peak burn-up is 137 000 MWd/t so far without any fuel-clad failure. Presently the reactor is being operated at a nominal power of 15.7 MWt for irradiation of a test fuel subassembly of the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor, which is coming up at Kalpakkam. It is also planned to irradiate test subassemblies made of metallic fuel for future fast reactor program. Being a small reactor, all feed back coefficients of reactivity including void coefficient are negative and hence the reactor is inherently safe. This was confirmed by carrying out physics tests. The capability to remove decay heat under various incidental conditions including natural convection was demonstrated by carrying out engineering tests. Thermo couples are provided for on-line monitoring of fuel SA outlet temperature by dedicated real time computer and processed to generate trip signals for the reactor in case of power excursion, increase in clad hot spot temperature and subassembly flow blockage. All pipelines and capacities in primary main circuit are provided with segmented outer envelope to minimize and contain radioactive sodium leak while ensuring forced cooling through reactor to remove decay heat in case of failure of primary boundary. In secondary circuit, provision is

  5. A visual inspection method for recurent tests of weld seams at the reactor-tank and double-tank walls of the reactor SNR-300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As is customary with other types of reactors, the primary circuit of the SNR-300 reactor has to be periodically inspected in order to assure its integrity. Part of the inspection is carried out by optical methods. High temperatures (up to 523 K) and radiation dose rates (up to 120 Gy/h), as well as geometrical constraints, which impair the accessability, require the respective instruments to be positioned by remotely controlled manipulators. Taking the external inspection of the reactor vessel as an example, the development of a visual inspection method is presented. Tests of the equipment are also described. (orig.)

  6. 'Experience with decommissioning of research and test reactors at Argonne National Laboratory'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large number of research reactors around the world have reached the end of their useful operational life. Many of these are kept in a controlled storage mode awaiting decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). At Argonne National Laboratory located near Chicago in the United States of America, significant experience has been gained in the D and D of research and test reactors. These experiences span the entire range of activities in D and D - from planning and characterization of the facilities to the eventual disposition of all waste. A multifaceted D nd D program has been in progress at the Argonne National Laboratory - East site for nearly a decade. The program consists of three elements: - D and D of nuclear facilities on the site that have reached the end of their useful life; - Development and demonstrations of technologies that help in safe and cost effective D and D; - Presentation of training courses in D and D practices. Nuclear reactor facilities have been constructed and operated at the ANL-E site since the earliest days of nuclear power. As a result, a number of these early reactors reached end-of-life long before reactors on other sites and were ready for D and D earlier. They presented an excellent set of test beds on which D and D practices and technologies could be demonstrated in environments that were similar to commercial reactors, but considerably less hazardous. As shown, four reactor facilities, plutonium contaminated glove boxes and hot cells, a cyclotron facility and assorted other nuclear related facilities have been decommissioned in this program. The overall cost of the program has been modest relative to the cost of comparable projects undertaken both in the U.S. and abroad. The safety record throughout the program was excellent. Complementing the actual operations, a set of D and D technologies are being developed. These include robotic methods of tool handling and operation, chemical and laser decontamination techniques, sensors

  7. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  8. Equipment and piping for nuclear power plants, test and research reactors, and nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard concerns the primary and secondary circuits as well as the safety and protection equipment in nuclear power plants with PWR or LWGR type reactors. Rules for design, manufacturing, erection, operation, and maintenance of the reactors, steam generators, vessels, pumps and housings, and pressure pipes are provided

  9. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  10. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data

  11. 'DPS-1 SKODA' diagnostic system for the reactor control rod drives functional and lifetime tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'DSP-J SKODA' diagnostic system of the reactor control rod drives (VVER-440, 213 type) is described in this paper. The hardware structure, methods and utility software of the diagnostic system is explained. The main goal of this system is defined: to ensure the functional availability and longer lifetime of modernized drives (15 to 20 years). Experiences from the measurements, evaluation and analysis with the 'DSP-1 SKODA' system in die testing room in SKODA - Bolevec are introduced. The results of functional and lifetime tests of prototype drive reductors are presented. (author)

  12. The OECD Halden reactor project fuels testing programme: methods, selected results and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuels testing programme conducted in the Halden reactor (heavy boiling water reactor (HBWR)) is aimed at providing data for a mechanistic understanding of phenomena, which may affect fuel performance and safety parameters. The investigations focus on implications of high burnup and address thermal property changes, fission gas release as influenced by power level and operation mode, fuel swelling, and pellet-clad interaction. Relevant burnup levels (>50 MWd kg-1 U) are provided through long-term irradiation in the HBWR and through utilisation of re-instrumented fuel segments from commercial light water reactors (LWR). Both urania and MOX fuels are being studied regarding thermal behaviour, conductivity degradation, and aspects of fission gas release. Experiments are also conducted to assess the cladding creep behaviour at different stress levels and to establish the overpressure below which the combination of fuel swelling and cladding creep does not cause increasing fuel temperatures. Clad elongation measurements provide information on the strain during a power increase, the relaxation behaviour and the extent of a possible ratcheting effect during consecutive start-ups. Investigations foreseen in the programme period 2000-2002 include the behaviour of MOX and Gd-bearing fuel and other variants developed in conjunction with burnup extension programmes. Some LWR-irradiated fuel segments will undergo a burnup increase in the HBWR to exposures not yet achieved in LWRs, while others will be re-instrumented and tested for shorter durations

  13. The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) program: A progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1986-11-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1985, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1986 are reviewed. The second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was expanded and its irradiation continued. Postirradiation examinations of several of these miniplates and of six previously irradiated U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al full-size elements were completed with excellent results. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ is well under way and due for completion before the end of 1987. DOE removed an important barrier to conversions by announcing that the new LEU fuels will be accepted for reprocessing. New DOE prices for enrichment and reprocessing services were calculated to have minimal effect on HEU reactors, and to reduce by about 8 to 10% the total fuel cycle costs of LEU reactors. New program activities include preliminary feasibility studies of LEU use in DOE reactors, evaluation of the feasibility to use LEU targets for the production of fission-product /sup 99/Mo, and responsibility for coordinating safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors, as required by NRC. Achievement of the final program goals is projected for 1990. This progress could not have been achieved without close international cooperation, whose continuation and intensification are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR Program.

  14. Seismic testing and functional verification of by-pass loop reactor coolant RTD's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the ability of reactor protection system equipment to perform under earthquake conditions and under process conditions, Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTD's) as provided by two suppliers were subjected to vibration tests. The RTD's were subjected to vibration tests to provide design information in regards to performance under conditions which far exceeded any application presently used for the RTD's and which far exceeded any earthquake design basis for high seismic plants. During the tests, the RTD's operation were monitored to prove proper performance of functions. The results show that there were no electrical malfunctions with the exception of the RTD tested to failure. In addition to the seismic and functional verification tests, resonant frequency searches were performed on four RTD's to determine the resonant frequencies of the RTD's

  15. Design, Fabrication and Testing of the Control Rods for the Experimental Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criteria and methods used for the design of the control rods for the Experimental Gas-Cooled Reactor are described. The final mechanical design was derived from extensive thermal and mechanical calculations and actual experience obtained by fabrication of a prototype rod. The nuclear design of the rod was based on detailed calculations, the accuracy of which was checked by comparison with a measurement of rod worth made with the Physical Constants Test Reactor; By means of a meticulous application of basic principles the calculation agreed with the measurement within the experimental uncertainty. The most important nuclear aspect of the design is the large amount of epithermal absorption, which approximately doubles the worth over that of a purely thermal absorber. The rod is of an articulated type and consists of hot-pressed B4C-bushings clad in stainless-steel. The unique design of the load-supporting members allows operation at cladding temperatures up to 1600°F. Comparisons are made with control-rod designs for other gas-cooled reactors, and justifications for the choice of design features and material selection are discussed. The fabrication procedures and the final test programme for verification of the adequacy of the design are described. (author)

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF U10MO MONOLITHIC MINIPLATES FOR RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakan Ozaltun & Herman Shen

    2011-11-01

    This article presents assessment of the mechanical behavior of U-10wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy based monolithic fuel plates subject to irradiation. Monolithic, plate-type fuel is a new fuel form being developed for research and test reactors to achieve higher uranium densities within the reactor core to allow the use of low-enriched uranium fuel in high-performance reactors. Identification of the stress/strain characteristics is important for understanding the in-reactor performance of these plate-type fuels. For this work, three distinct cases were considered: (1) fabrication induced residual stresses (2) thermal cycling of fabricated plates; and finally (3) transient mechanical behavior under actual operating conditions. Because the temperatures approach the melting temperature of the cladding during the fabrication and thermal cycling, high temperature material properties were incorporated to improve the accuracy. Once residual stress fields due to fabrication process were identified, solution was used as initial state for the subsequent simulations. For thermal cycling simulation, elasto-plastic material model with thermal creep was constructed and residual stresses caused by the fabrication process were included. For in-service simulation, coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction was considered. First, temperature field on the plates was calculated and this field was used to compute the thermal stresses. For time dependent mechanical behavior, thermal creep of cladding, volumetric swelling and fission induced creep of the fuel foil were considered. The analysis showed that the stresses evolve very rapidly in the reactor. While swelling of the foil increases the stress of the foil, irradiation induced creep causes stress relaxation.

  17. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor D-T modifications and operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, in support of the Department of Energy's proposal for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) D-T program. The objective of the proposed D-T program is to take the initial step in studying the effects of alpha particle heating and transport in a magnetic fusion device. These studies would enable the successful completion of the original TFTR program objectives, and would support the research and development needs of the Burning Plasma Experiment, BPX (formerly the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)) and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in the areas of alpha particle physics, tritium retention, alpha particle diagnostic development, and tritium handling

  18. Nondestructive testing of PWR type fuel rods by eddy currents and metrology in the OSIRIS reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Saclay Reactor Department has developed a nondestructive test bench, now installed above channel 1 of the OSIRIS reactor. As part of investigations into the dynamics of PWR fuel degradation, a number of fuel rods underwent metrological and eddy current inspection, after irradiation

  19. An in-reactor loss-of-coolant test with flow blockage and rewet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three CANDU-type fuel elements were subjected to a blowdown transient in the Blowdown Test Facility of the NRU reactor. These elements, operating at 41 to 43 kW/m, went into sustained dryout about 22 seconds after depressurization. Sheath temperatures escalated rapidly following dryout, and subsequent damage to the elements caused a flow blockage below the fuel assembly. The high-temperature transient was terminated by automatic reactor shutdown and the initiation of cold water rewet. The first rewet water vapourized, but rewet eventually cooled the fuel. Fission products were released and measured during and following the transient. Post-irradiation examination has shown severe fuel damage at the bottom of the assembly

  20. The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program: Progress and plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1987-01-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40% average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission /sup 99/Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U/sub 3/Si-Al with 19.75% enrichment and U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al with 45% enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR Program.

  1. SP-100 nuclear space power reactor system hardware and testing progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SP-100 Space Reactor System was established by agencies of the US government as the system of choice to meet the nation's long lifetime, high reliability space power needs in the 10's to 100's of kWe power range. SP-100 is compatible with all power conversion technologies that can utilize reactor coolant temperatures ≤ 1,350 K. The technologies incorporated in SP-100 are directly applicable to earth orbiting satellites, planetary probes or surface power for commercial, military or civil missions. The most significant hardware and testing accomplishments that were made during the past year are reported in this summary paper, including fuel, fabrication technologies, control mechanisms, liquid metal pumps, lithium thaw behavior and characterization, and thermoelectric power conversion

  2. Babcock Redux: An Ammendment of Babcock's Schematic of the Sun's Magnetic Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Ronald L; Sterling, Alphonse C

    2016-01-01

    We amend Babcock's original scenario for the global dynamo process that sustains the Sun's 22-year magnetic cycle. The amended scenario fits post-Babcock observed features of the magnetic activity cycle and convection zone, and is based on ideas of Spruit and Roberts (1983) about magnetic flux tubes in the convection zone. A sequence of four schematic cartoons lays out the proposed evolution of the global configuration of the magnetic field above, in, and at the bottom of the convection zone through sunspot Cycle 23 and into Cycle 24. Three key elements of the amended scenario are: (1) as the net following-polarity field from the sunspot-region omega-loop fields of an ongoing sunspot cycle is swept poleward to cancel and replace the opposite-polarity polar-cap field from the previous sunspot cycle, it remains connected to the ongoing sunspot cycle's toroidal source-field band at the bottom of the convection zone; (2) topological pumping by the convection zone's free convection keeps the horizontal extent of t...

  3. Monitoring and Control Research Using a University Reactor and SBWR Test-Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing hybrid simulation capability of the Penn State Breazeale nuclear reactor was expanded to conduct research for monitoring, operations and control. Hybrid simulation in this context refers to the use of the physical time response of the research reactor as an input signal to a real-time simulation of power-reactor thermal-hydraulics which in-turn provides a feedback signal to the reactor through positioning of an experimental changeable reactivity device. An ECRD is an aluminum tube containing an absorber material that is positioned in the central themble of the reactor kinetics were used to expand the hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability to include out-of-phase stability characteristics observed in operating BWRs

  4. Preliminary results of the BTF-105A test: an in-reactor instrument development and fuel behaviour test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BTF-105A test, performed in 1996 March, was the first of a pair of in-reactor tests planned to investigate fuel behaviour and fission-product release from CANDU-type fuel for the high-temperature conditions expected following large-break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) with coincident loss-of-emergency-core-cooling (LOECC). The BTF-105A test assembly consisted of an instrumented fuel stringer containing a single, unirradiated, fuel element; while the second test, denoted BTF-105B, will use a similarly instrumented assembly containing a single, previously irradiated, fuel element. As the first of these two tests, the primary objectives of BTF-105A were to test instrumentation and procedures planned for use in BTF-105B, and to obtain data on the relationship between fuel-centreline and sheath temperatures under transient conditions with steam cooling. This paper describes the conduct and preliminary results of the BTF-105A test, and also indicates improvements to be made for the upcoming BTF-105B test. (author)

  5. Design and Testing of D.C. Conduction Pump for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DC Conduction pump immersed in sodium forms a part of Failed Fuel Location Module (FFLM) of 500 MWe Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) currently under construction. FFLM housed in control plug of the reactor, is used to locate the failed fuel sub-assembly due to clad rupture in the fuel pin. The DC conduction pump sucks the sodium from the top of fuel sub-assemblies through the selector valve and pumps the sodium to hold up for detecting the presence of delayed neutrons. Presence of delayed neutron is the indication of failure in the sampled fuel sub-assembly. The DC Conduction Pump was chosen because of its low voltage operation (2 V) where argon/alumina ceramic can provide required electrical insulation even at operating temperature of 560 deg. C without much complication on the manufacturing front. Sampling of sodium from top of different sub-assemblies is achieved by operation of selector valve in-conjunction with the drive motor. FFLM requires the pump to be immersed in sodium pool at ∼ 560 deg. C located above the fuel sub-assemblies in the reactor. The Pump of 0.36 m3/h capacity and developing 1.45 Kg/ cm2 pressure was designed, manufactured and tested. The DC Conduction Pump has a stainless steel duct filled with liquid sodium, which is to be pumped. The stainless steel duct is kept in magnetic field obtained by means of electromagnet. The electromagnet is made of soft iron and the coil made of copper conductor surrounds the yoke portion of electromagnet. The external DC source of 2000 Amps, 2 Volt is used to send current through sodium placed in the stainless steel duct and the same current is sent through copper coil of electromagnet for producing required magneto motive force, which in turn produces required magnetic field. The interaction of current in sodium (placed in stainless steel duct) and magnetic field produced by the electromagnet in the duct region produces pumping force in the sodium. Electromagnet, copper coil, stainless steel duct, copper bus

  6. The past, present, and future of test and research reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor physics calculations have been performed on research reactors since the first one was built 50 yr ago under the University of Chicago stadium. Since then, reactor physics calculations have evolved from Fermi-age theory calculations performed with slide rules to three-dimensional, continuous-energy, coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo computations performed with supercomputers and workstations. Such enormous progress in reactor physics leads us to believe that the next 50 year will be just as exciting. This paper reviews this transition from the past to the future

  7. Closing down and dismantling of research - material testing - and teaching reactors. Stillegung und Beseitigung von Forschungs-, Materialpruef- und Unterrichtsreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrasch, P.; Seidler, M.; Stasch, W.

    1983-02-01

    This study is subdivided in six topics: - determination of mass and radioactivity of the parts to be dismantled, - identification of future tasks of research and development, - estimation of radiation exposure for workers charged with dismantling, - determination of cost for closing-down and dismantling of research reactors. In total, 22 research-, materials testing- and traning reactors are taken into consideration here. Only those component that belong directly to the reactor proper plus the auxiliary - and service plants are dismantled. The reactor buildings will only be dismantled if the are a direct reactor component serving for example as a biological shield. The waste quantity created by closing-down and dismantling of all research reactors comes up to about 25200 Mg out of that 720 Mg are radioactive wastes. Planning and carrying out of closing-down and dismantling of all research reactors need about 4870 man-months the total cost will be about 86,4 Mio DM. There are vast differences between the individual research reactors. On 10 Mg will have to be disposed in the case of the Siemens training-reactor 100 (SUR-100) of which a very small share consists of radioactive waste; in the case of the research reactor Neuherberg (FRN) there are about 3500 Mg, about 94 Mg out of it is radioactive waste. The work needed per reactor varies between 26 man-months (SUR-100) and about 740 man-months (FRN). Costs for dosing-down and dismantling range between 0,4 Mio DM (SUR-100) and about 13 Mio DM (FRN).

  8. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  9. Characterization and testing of materials for nuclear reactors. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear techniques in general and neutrons based methods in particular have played and will continue to play an important role in research in materials science and technology. Today the world is looking at nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as the main sources of energy supply for the future. Research reactors have played a key role in the development of nuclear technology. A materials development programme will thus play a major role in the design and development of new nuclear power plants, for the extension of the life of operating reactors as well as for fusion reactors. Against this background, the IAEA had organized a Technical Meeting on Development, Characterization and Testing of Materials - With Special Reference to the Energy Sector under the activity on specific applications of research reactors. The meeting was held in Vienna, May 29- June 2, 2006. There was also participation by experts in techniques, complementary to neutrons. The participants for the technical meeting were experts in the utilization of nuclear techniques namely the high flux and medium flux research reactors, fusion research and positron annihilation. They presented the design, development and utilization of the facilities at their respective centres for materials characterization with main focus on materials for nuclear energy, both fission and fusion. In core irradiation of materials, development of instrument for residual stress measurement in large and / or irradiated specimen, neutron radiography for inspection of irradiated fuel, work on oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels and SiC composites, relevant to future power systems were cited as application of nuclear techniques in fission reactors. The use of neutron scattering for helium bubbles in steel, application of positron annihilation to study helium bubbles in Cu, Ti-stabilized stainless steel and voidswelling studies etc. show that these techniques have an important role in the development of materials for energy

  10. Definition and analysis of heavy water reactor benchmarks for testing new multigroup libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of heavy water reactor benchmarks has been selected for testing new WIMS-D libraries. The libraries were constricted using data from ENDF/B-VI, Release 7, JENDL-3.2 and JEF-2.2 evaluated nuclear data files. The benchmarks cover a wide variety of reactor types and conditions, from fresh fuel to high burnup, and for natural and enriched uranium and Th-U fuels. The main parameters compared are the effective multiplication factor and other integral parameters, and isotopic composition of actinides on burnup cases. Besides, further investigations related with energy spectra used for preparation of WIMS-D libraries when applied on HWTR reactor calculations are included. Mostly of the benchmarks show a good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated values for all libraries. One exception is Th232 benchmark, were it is found that a library with JEND-3.2 Th232 data produces better results than ENDF/B-VI, R.7 and JEF-2.2 Th232 data. Results are slightly improved when HWTR spectra are used for weighting function to prepare the multi-group cross sections. This work is part of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Coordinated Research Project on 'Final Stage of WIMS-D Library Update Project'. (author)

  11. Neutronics and thermal hydraulics modelling of the Harwell Materials Testing Reactors DIDO and PLUTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed 2-D cylindrical diffusion theory neutronics model is presented for the Harwell reactors DIDO and PLUTO, based on the WIMS-E program. The model for these highly asymmetric reactors allows for the presence of the various control systems, experimental rigs and fuel burnup. Comparisons made with measurements of burnup and of radial and axial flux distributions validate the approach. (author)

  12. Design, implementation and cost-benefit analysis of a dynamic testing program in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic tests have been performed for many years in commercial pressurized and boiling water reactors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technological and economical feasibility of extending the current light water reactor testing procedures to both present and future liquid metal fast breeder reactors. A 38 node linearized, lumped parameter, EBR-II system model was developed. This model was analyzed to obtain the predicted system time and frequency response for reactivity perturbations, intermediate heat exchanger secondary inlet sodium temperature perturbation frequency response, and various system nodal frequency response sensitivities

  13. Comparison of diffusion and transport theory analysis with experimental results in fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic analysis has been performed by 3 dimensional diffusion and transport methods to calculate the measured control rod worths and subassembly wise power distribution in fast breeder test reactor. Geometry corrections (rectangular to hexagonal and diffusion to transport corrections are estimated for multiplication factors and control rod worths. Calculated control rod worths by diffusion and transport theory are nearly the same and 10% above measured values. Power distribution in the core periphery is over predicted (15%) by diffusion theory. But, this over prediction reduces to 8% by use of the SN method. (authors). 9 refs., 4 tabs., 3 fig

  14. Improved Computational Neutronics Methods And Validation Protocols For The Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is in the process of modernizing the various reactor physics modeling and simulation tools used to support operation and safety assurance of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009 was successfully completed during 2011. This demonstration supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR fuel cycle management process beginning in 2012. On the experimental side of the project, new hardware was fabricated, measurement protocols were finalized, and the first four of six planned physics code validation experiments based on neutron activation spectrometry were conducted at the ATRC facility. Data analysis for the first three experiments, focused on characterization of the neutron spectrum in one of the ATR flux traps, has been completed. The six experiments will ultimately form the basis for a flexible, easily-repeatable ATR physics code validation protocol that is consistent with applicable ASTM standards.

  15. Final Assembly and Initial Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. B. Grover

    2007-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing.1,2 The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the first experiment test train (designated AGR-1) as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment

  16. Final Assembly and Initial Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the first experiment test train (designated AGR-1) as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during

  17. DT and DHe3 tokamak test reactor concepts using advanced, high field superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If practical high temperature superconducting ceramic magnets can be developed, there could be a significant impact on reactor design. Potential advantages include a simpler, more robust magnet design, the possibility of demountable superconducting toroidal field coils and reduced shielding requirements. The high temperature superconductors can also have very high critical fields and could provide super high field operation. This could substantially increase eta tau/sub E/ values, reduce β requirements, and improve prospects for ohmic heating to ignition. The combination of moderately high β and super high field could make DHe3 operation possible in a JET size tokamak. In this paper we discuss possibilities for test reactor designs using high temperature high field superconductors. An illustrative design has a field at the plasma of 15 T. This reduces the required β to less than 2% for DT operation. The required plasma current is 5 MA. For a reactor size of R0 = 3.4m and a = 0.6m, the neutron wall loading is 3.3 MW/m2 at β = 1.5% for DT operation and an equal amount of fusion power is produced at β = 10% for DHe3 operation. One possible mode of operation is to use ohmic heating to ignition in a DT plasma followed by thermal runaway to DHe3 temperatures. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  18. Comparative analysis of pellet-cladding interaction from IFA-431 and IFA-432 Halden reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two test assemblies containing a total of 12 instrumented fuel rods were irradiated in the HBWR to obtain well-characterized data for fuel operating in the linear heat ranges of commercial nuclear power plants. These data are needed for verification of GAPCON-THERMAL and FRAP computer codes and will provide a series of benchmarks for indexing other thermal performance codes used for reactor safety analysis. Two essentially identical test assemblies, IFA-431 and IFA-432, each containing six instrumented fuel rods, were irradiated under similar conditions. Parameters in the test include pellet-cladding gap size and/or gap eccentricity, fill gas composition, fuel density and stability, linear heat rating, and burnup. The BWR-6 geometry except for length, a 95% theoretical density (TD) pellet, a 0.229 mm (9 mils) diameter gap, and helium fill gas were selected for the reference rod

  19. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  20. Progress of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program in 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1989-01-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1988, the major events, findings, and activities of 1989 are reviewed. The scope of the RERTR Program activities was curtailed, in 1989, by an unexpected legislative restriction which limited the ability of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency to adequately fund the program. Nevertheless, the thrust of the major planned program activities was maintained, and meaningful results were obtained in several areas of great significance for future work. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D and D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment

  2. The Jules Horowitz Reactor: A New European Material Test Reactor (MTR) Open to International Collaboration: Update Description and Focus on Modern Safety Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is a new Material Testing Reactor currently under construction at CEA Cadarache research centre in the south of France. It will represent a major Research Infrastructure for scientific studies dealing with material and fuel behaviour under irradiation (and is consequently identified for this purpose within various European road maps and forums; ESFRI, SNE-TP, etc.). The reactor will also be devoted to medical isotopes production. The reactor will perform R and D programs for the optimization of the present generation of NPP, support the development of the next generation of NPP (mainly LWR) and also offer irradiation capacities for future reactors. JHR is designed, built and will be operated as an international user-facility open to international collaboration. In order to comply with the evolution of safety requirements and to guarantee long term operations, the construction safety standards of JHR have been significantly improved compared to MTRs built in the 60s. The paper gives an up-to-date status of the construction and of the developments performed to build the future experimental capacity and is particularly focusing on the modern Safety approach used and its consequences on the design of the reactor. (author)

  3. Experimental tests and calculation methods for missile crashing effects on a reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the analysis of missile crashing on a reactor containment there are two main effects to be taken into account: the overall behaviour of the building; the local perforation. The overall behaviour of the building is easily calculated when the applied force as a function of time is known. Two calculation examples are presented. The local perforation is a much more difficult problem and experimental work is necessary. The report presents a series of perforation tests of concrete plates by cylindrical missiles with a flat nose. The aim of these tests is to extrapolate for the lower speeds the existing experimental correlations and to check the calculation methods. The calculations are made with the PASTEL code (Finite elements, implicit integration), with elastoplasticity of the reinforcing steel bars and the concrete. Various plastification and fracturation laws are tested. (Auth.)

  4. Calorific energy deposited by gamma radiations in a test reactor. Calorimetric measurements and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to determine the calorific energy deposited by gamma radiations in the experimental devices irradiated in the test reactors of the Grenoble Nuclear Study Centre. A theoretical study briefly recalls to mind the various sorts of nuclear reactions that occur in a reactor, from the special angle of their ability to deposit calorific energy in the materials. A special study with the help of a graphite calorimeter made it possible to show the possible effect of the various parameters intervening in this energy absorption: the nature of the materials, their geometry, the spectrum of the incident gamma rays and the fact that the variation of this spectrum is due to the position of the measuring point with respect to the reactor core or to the presence of structures around the measuring instrument. The results of the calculations made with the help of the Mercury IV and ANISN codes are compared with those of the determinations in order to ascertain that very are adapted to the forecasts of energy deposition in the various materials. The conclusion was reached that in order to calculate with accuracy the depositifs of gamma energy in the experimental devices, it is necessary either to introduce the build-up calculation for the low energy photons, in the Mercury IV calculation code or to associate the DOT code to the ANISN calculation code

  5. Integrity assessment of research reactor fuel cladding and material testing using eddy current inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology to perform the integrity assessment of research reactors nuclear fuels cladding, such as those installed in IPR-Rl (TRIGA) and IEA-R1 (MTR), using nondestructive electromagnetic inspection (eddy current) is presented. This methodology is constituted by: the development of calibration reference standards, specific for each type of fuel; the development of special test probes; the recommendations for the inspection equipment calibration; the construction of voltage based evaluation curves and the inspection procedures developed for the characterization of detected flaws. The test probes development, specially those designed for the inspection of MTR fuels cladding, which present access difficulties due to the narrow gap between fuel plates (2,89 mm for IEAR-R1), constituted a challenge that demanded the introduction of unusual materials and constructive techniques. The operational performance of the developed resources, as well as the special operative characteristics of the test probes, such as their immunity to adjacent fuel plates interference and electrical resistivity changes of the fuels meat are experimentally demonstrated. The practical applicability of the developed methodology is verified in non radioactive environment, using a dummy MTR fuel element model, similar to an IEA-R1 reactor fuel element, produced and installed in IPEN, Sao Paulo. The efficacy of the proposed methodology was verified by the achieved results. (author)

  6. Reactor analysis support package (RASP). Volume 7. PWR set-point methodology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides an overview of the basis and methodology requirements for determining Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) technical specifications related setpoints and focuses on development of the methodology for a reload core. Additionally, the report documents the implementation and typical methods of analysis used by PWR vendors during the 1970's to develop Protection System Trip Limits (or Limiting Safety System Settings) and Limiting Conditions for Operation. The descriptions of the typical setpoint methodologies are provided for Nuclear Steam Supply Systems as designed and supplied by Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, and Westinghouse. The description of the methods of analysis includes the discussion of the computer codes used in the setpoint methodology. Next, the report addresses the treatment of calculational and measurement uncertainties based on the extent to which such information was available for each of the three types of PWR. Finally, the major features of the setpoint methodologies are compared, and the principal effects of each particular methodology on plant operation are summarized for each of the three types of PWR

  7. Results and Analysis of the Infrastructure Request for Information (DE-SOL-0008318)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, Brenden John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) released a request for information (RFI) (DE-SOL-0008318) for “University, National Laboratory, Industry and International Input on Potential Office of Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Investments” on April 13, 2015. DOE-NE solicited information on five specific types of capabilities as well as any others suggested by the community. The RFI proposal period closed on June 19, 2015. From the 26 responses, 34 individual proposals were extracted. Eighteen were associated with a DOE national laboratory, including Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was referenced in a proposal as a proposed capability location, although the proposal did not originate with ORNL. Five US universities submitted proposals (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pennsylvania State University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, University of Houston and the University of Michigan). Three industrial/commercial institutions submitted proposals (AREVA NP, Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)). Eight major themes emerged from the submissions as areas needing additional capability or support for existing capabilities. Two submissions supported multiple areas. The major themes are: Advanced Manufacturing (AM), High Performance Computing (HPC), Ion Irradiation with X-Ray Diagnostics (IIX), Ion Irradiation with TEM Visualization (IIT), Radiochemistry Laboratories (RCL), Test Reactors, Neutron Sources and Critical Facilities (RX) , Sample Preparation and Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) and Thermal-Hydraulics Test Facilities (THF).

  8. Supported Pd-Au Membrane Reactor for Hydrogen Production: Membrane Preparation, Characterization and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulianelli, Adolfo; Alavi, Marjan; Bagnato, Giuseppe; Liguori, Simona; Wilcox, Jennifer; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Eslamlouyan, Reza; Anzelmo, Bryce; Basile, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    A supported Pd-Au (Au 7wt%) membrane was produced by electroless plating deposition. Permeation tests were performed with pure gas (H₂, H₂, N₂, CO₂, CH₄) for long time operation. After around 400 h under testing, the composite Pd-Au membrane achieved steady state condition, with an H₂/N₂ ideal selectivity of around 500 at 420 °C and 50 kPa as transmembrane pressure, remaining stable up to 1100 h under operation. Afterwards, the membrane was allocated in a membrane reactor module for methane steam reforming reaction tests. As a preliminary application, at 420 °C, 300 kPa of reaction pressure, space velocity of 4100 h(-1), 40% methane conversion and 35% hydrogen recovery were reached using a commercial Ni/Al₂O₃ catalyst. Unfortunately, a severe coke deposition affected irreversibly the composite membrane, determining the loss of the hydrogen permeation characteristics of the supported Pd-Au membrane. PMID:27171067

  9. Model test on interaction of reactor building and soil-Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical studies of soil-structure interaction have progressed in recent years. At the same time, experimental studies to verify the theoretical results have been carried out energetically. These experimental studies, however, have been mostly conducted by means of vibration tests or earthquake observations individually. In order to investigate experimentally the effects of soil-structure interaction, it is desirable to carry both the forced vibration tests and the earthquake observations of the same models. To this end, the earthquake observations were conducted to obtain the dynamic behaviors of soil-reactor building system during earthquakes and to compare them with the results of the forced vibration tests. The results are described in this paper

  10. In-reactor testing of ionic thermometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionic thermometers have been tested in a nuclear reactor with attention to the steepness of the ionic conductivity jump and the influence of a glass container on the accuracy of the temperature measurements. It was found that, at the neutron fluxes up to 1.5 x 1018 m-2 s-1 (thermal) and 3 x 1018 m-2 s-1 (fast) in a light water reactor, the change of conductivity jump slope is negligible or nil for an ionic thermometer filled by HgI2, i.e., at 256.0 +- 0.2 0C. The need to use boron-free glass was confirmed. The impact on the accuracy of the temperature point indication in a nuclear reactor core is discussed, as well as obvious inertness of the melting process mechanism to the intense irradiation field

  11. Proposal of world network on material testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishment of an international cooperation system of worldwide testing reactor network (world network) is proposed in order to achieve efficient facility utilization and provide high quality irradiation data by role sharing of irradiation tests with materials testing reactors in the world. As for the first step, mutual understanding among materials testing reactors is thought to be necessary. From this point, an international symposium on materials testing reactors (ISMTR) was held to construct the world network from 2008, and a common understanding of world network has begun to be shared. (author)

  12. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Options Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Preliminary scoping calculations are being performed for a 100 MWt gas-cooled test reactor. The initial design uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to identify some reactor design features to investigate further. Current status of the effort is described.

  13. Laser-Ultrasonic Testing and its Applications to Nuclear Reactor Internals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, M.; Miura, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2008-02-01

    A new nondestructive testing technique for surface-breaking microcracks in nuclear reactor components based on laser-ultrasonics is developed. Surface acoustic wave generated by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and detected by frequency-stabilized long pulse laser coupled with confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to detect and size the cracks. A frequency-domain signal processing is developed to realize accurate sizing capability. The laser-ultrasonic testing allows the detection of surface-breaking microcrack having a depth of less than 0.1 mm, and the measurement of their depth with an accuracy of 0.2 mm when the depth exceeds 0.5 mm including stress corrosion cracking. The laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with laser peening system, which is another laser-based maintenance technology to improve surface stress, for inner surface of small diameter tube is developed. The generation laser in the laser-ultrasonic testing system can be identical to the laser source of the laser peening. As an example operation of the system, the system firstly works as the laser-ultrasonic testing mode and tests the inner surface of the tube. If no cracks are detected, the system then changes its work mode to the laser peening and improves surface stress to prevent crack initiation. The first nuclear industrial application of the laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with the laser peening was completed in Japanese nuclear power plant in December 2004.

  14. Status of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1987, the major events, findings and activities of 1988 are reviewed. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a formal and generic approval of the use of U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel in research and test reactors, with densities up to 4.8 g U/cmT. New significant findings from postirradiation examinations, from ion-beam irradiations, and from analytical modeling, have raised serious doubts about the potential of LEU U3Si-Al dispersion fuel for applications requiring very high uranium densities and high burnups (>6 g U/cmT, >50% burnup). As a result of these findings, the fuel development efforts have been redirected towards three new initiatives: (1) a systematic application of ion-beam irradiations to screen new materials; (2) application of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) procedures to produce U3Si2-Al plates with high uranium densities and thin uniform cladding; and (3) application of HIP procedures to produce plates with U3Si wires imbedded in an aluminum matrix, achieving stability, high uranium density, and thin uniform cladding. The new fuel concepts hold the promise of extraordinary performance potential and require approximately five years to develop.

  15. Correction to Wilcox et al. (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Reports an error in "How being busy can increase motivation and reduce task completion time" by Keith Wilcox, Juliano Laran, Andrew T. Stephen and Peter P. Zubcsek (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2016[Mar], Vol 110[3], 371-384). In the article, the affiliation of the author Andrew T. Stephen was incorrectly listed in the byline and the author note. The author is affiliated with the University of Oxford. The author note paragraph "Andrew T. Stephen is now at the University of Oxford" should have been omitted. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-11945-002.) This research tests the hypothesis that being busy increases motivation and reduces the time it takes to complete tasks for which people miss a deadline. This effect occurs because busy people tend to perceive that they are using their time effectively, which mitigates the sense of failure people have when they miss a task deadline. Studies 1 and 2 show that when people are busy, they are more motivated to complete a task after missing a deadline than those who are not busy, and that the perception that one is using time effectively mediates this effect. Studies 3 and 4 show that this process makes busy people more likely to complete real tasks than people who are not busy. Study 5 uses data from over half a million tasks submitted by thousands of users of a task management software application to show that busy people take less time to complete a task after they miss a deadline for completing it. The findings delineate the conditions under which being busy can mitigate the negative effects of missing a deadline and reduce the time it takes to complete tasks. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27176772

  16. Testing and analyses of a high temperature duct for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 0.6 scale model of a steam cycle gas-cooled reactor high temperature duct was tested in a closed loop helium facility. The object of the test series was to determine: 1) the thermal effects of gas permeation within the thermal barrier, 2) the plastic deformation of the metallic components, and 3) the thermal performance of the fibrous insulation. A series of tests was performed with thermal cyclings from 1000C to 7600C at 50 atmospheres until the system thermal performance had stabilized hence enabling predictions for the reactor life. Additional tests were made to assess permeation by deliberately simulating sealing weld failures thereby allowing gas flow by-pass within the primary thermal barrier. After 100 cycles the entire primary structure was found to have performed without structural failure. Due to high pressures exerted by the insulation on the cover plates and a design oversight, the thin seal sheets were unable to expand in an anticipated manner. Local buckling resulted. The insulation retained an acceptable degree of resiliency. However, some fiber damage was observed within both the high and low temperature insulation blankets. A thermal analysis was conducted to correlate the hot duct heat transfer results with those obtained from the analytical techniques used for the HTGR design using a computer thermal model representative of the duct and test setup. The thermal performance of the insulation, the temperature gradient through the structural components, the heating load to the cooling system and the permeation flow effect on heat transfer were verified. Exellent correlation between the experimental data and the analytical techniques were obtained

  17. Post reactor researches of fuel pins, tested under alternating NEMF reactor functioning modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changing of rod ceramic fuel pins state under their exploitation conditions changing influence at alternating of three-mode nuclear energy-moving facility reactor functioning has been examined. There are presented the results of researches of fuel pins, tested in the reactor IRGIT and RA, firstly under moving mode, then - under energy mode of minor power of NEMF reactor. (author)

  18. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Appendix D: Cost and economic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The detailed cost estimate documentation for the designs prepared in this study are presented. The include: (1) Koppers-Totzek, (2) Texaco (3) Babcock and Wilcox, (4) BGC-Lurgi, and (5) Lurgi. The alternate product cost estimates include: (1) Koppers-Totzek and Texaco single product facilities (methane, methanol, gasoline, hydrogen), (2) Kopers-Totzek SNG and MBG, (3) Kopers-Totzek and Texaco SNG and MBG, and (4) Lurgi-methane and Lurgi-methane and methanol.

  19. Uranium dioxide caramel fuel. An alternative fuel cycle for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work performed in France on Caramel fuels for research reactors reflects the reality of a program based on non proliferation criteria, as they have already appeared several years ago. This work actually includes the following different aspects: - identification of the non proliferation criterion defining this action; - determination of the economical and technical goals to be reached; - realization of research and development studies finalized in a full scale demonstration; - transposition to an industrial and commercial level. The Caramel fuel goals have been defined by comparison with existing reactors: to keep the same performance level in the same safety and reliability conditions, without substantial increase in the fuel cycle cost. Taking into account the wide range of the reactors in operation, these goals will be reached, totally or partially, by assemblies with various geometries. The Caramel fuels utilize slightly enriched uranium, because of the high density of the uranium dioxide 10.25 g/cm.3 The reactivity control capacity of the core is consistent with the behaviour under irradiation so as to keep the operation cycle lengths with the same values as the present ones; the average burn-up being limited to about 30,000 MWd/t, the enrichment is maintained lower than 10%. A study of the Caramel behaviour under irradiation has been undertaken. It started with individual Caramel, and followed successfully with fuel assemblies, irradiated in the reactor Osiris within a significant environment: maximum specific power higher than 3000 W/cm3, and maximum burn up about 30 000 MWd/t. Safety experiments have led to creation of deliberate defects such as clad failure in order to test the irradiation behaviour to study its evolution. The results are positive, the kinetics being rather slow. The full change of a fuel cycle connected with nonproliferation goals appears to be a very wide program with political, technical and industrial implications. The development

  20. SMART Reactor Flow Distribution Test (SCOP-E-01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Reactor Flow Distribution Test Facilities for SMART, named SCOP (SMART Core Flow and Pressure Test Facility), were designed in order to simulate the distributions of (1) core flow and (2) reactor sectional flow resistance and flow rates. This report summaries and analyzes the SCOP-E-01 Test which simulated the reactor internal flow distribution under the steady state conditions with the same flow rate at each loop. The primary parameters, which are represented by static/differential pressure, flow rate and temperature were found to satisfy well the requirement of instrumentation and uncertainties. In order to evaluate overall quality of test results, various secondary parameters were selected and analyzed, which shows that the quality of data are good. From the various hydraulic data representing the hydraulics of the SMART reactor, the soundness and performance of the reactor design can be demonstrated. The test data will be utilized as boundary conditions for the thermal margin analysis of SMART reactor

  1. Design of Fire/Gas Penetration Seals and fire exposure tests for Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor experimental areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Fire/Gas Penetration Seal is required in every penetration through the walls and ceilings into the Test Cell housing the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), as well as other adjacent areas to protect the TFTR from fire damage. The penetrations are used for field coil lead stems, diagnostics systems, utilities, cables, trays, mechanical devices, electrical conduits, vacuum liner, air conditioning ducts, water pipes, and gas pipes. The function of the Fire/Gas Penetration Seals is to prevent the passage of fire and products of combustion through penetrations for a period of time up to three hours and remain structurally intact during fire exposure. The Penetration Seal must withstand, without rupture, a fire hose water stream directed at the hot surface. There are over 3000 penetrations ranging in size from several square inches to 100 square feet, and classified into 90 different types. The material used to construct the Fire/Gas Penetration Seals consist of a single and a two-component room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber compound. Miscellaneous materials such as alumina silica refractory fibers in board, blanket and fiber forms are also used in the construction and assembly of the Seals. This paper describes some of the penetration seals and the test procedures used to perform the three-hour fire exposure tests to demonstrate the adequacy of the seals

  2. Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Experiences and Considerations With Irradiation Test Performance in an International Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MH Lane

    2006-02-15

    This letter forwards a compilation of knowledge gained regarding international interactions and issues associated with Project Prometheus. The following topics are discussed herein: (1) Assessment of international fast reactor capability and availability; (2) Japanese fast reactor (JOYO) contracting strategy; (3) NRPCT/Program Office international contract follow; (4) Completion of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contract for manufacture of reactor test components; (5) US/Japanese Departmental interactions and required Treaties and Agreements; and (6) Non-technical details--interactions and considerations.

  3. Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Experiences and Considerations With Irradiation Test Performance in an International Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This letter forwards a compilation of knowledge gained regarding international interactions and issues associated with Project Prometheus. The following topics are discussed herein: (1) Assessment of international fast reactor capability and availability; (2) Japanese fast reactor (JOYO) contracting strategy; (3) NRPCT/Program Office international contract follow; (4) Completion of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contract for manufacture of reactor test components; (5) US/Japanese Departmental interactions and required Treaties and Agreements; and (6) Non-technical details--interactions and considerations

  4. Material and fabrication of the HTTR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is under construction at Oarai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and planned to be critical in October 1997. Fabrication of the HTTR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) at Kure Works, Babcock-Hitachi K.K. took about two years, and the RPV was transported to the Oarai site in August 1994. Pressure test of the primary and secondary cooling system including the RPV was performed successfully in March 1996. Because temperature of the HTTR RPV becomes about 400 deg. C at normal operation, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel is chosen for it. Fluence of the RPV is calculated to be less than 1 X 1017 n/cm2 (E>l MeV), and so irradiation embrittlement, is presumed to be negligible, but temper embrittlement is not. For the purpose of reducing embrittlement, content of some elements is limited on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for the HTTR RPV using embrittlement parameters: J-factor and X-bar. In this paper design and structure of the HTTR RPV is briefly reviewed first. Fabrication procedure of the RPV and its special feature is shown. Material data on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel manufactured for the RPV, especially the embrittlement parameters J-factor and X-bar, and nil-ductility transition temperatures TNDT by drop weight tests, are shown, and increase in the transition temperature is estimated based on data available in literature. Technology of the HTTR RPV is applicable to RPVs of future commercial High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). (author)

  5. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  6. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  7. Melt-dilute treatment of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site is the U.S. Department of Energy's preferred site for return and treatment of all aluminum-base, spent, research and test reactor fuel assemblies. There are over 20,000 spent fuel assemblies now stored in different countries around the world, and by 2035 many will be returned to SRS for treatment and interim storage, in preparation for disposal in a geologic repository. The early fuel assemblies for research and test reactors were made using aluminum clad plates that were fabricated from highly enriched (93%) uranium-aluminum alloy. Later, powder metallurgical fabrication methods were developed to produce plate fuels with higher uranium contents using either uranium aluminide, uranium oxide or uranium silicide powders mixed with aluminum. Silicide fuel elements generally are fabricated with low enriched uranium containing less than 20% 2'35U. Following irradiation, the spent fuel assemblies are discharged from the reactor, and most assemblies have been stored in underwater pools, some since the early 1950's. A number of disposition options including direct/co-disposal and melt-dilute treatment were evaluated recently. The melt-dilute technique was identified as the preferred method for treatment of aluminum-base spent fuel. The technique consists of melting the spent fuel assembly and adding depleted uranium to the melt for isotopic dilution to 2'35U. Aluminum is added, if necessary, to produce a predetermined alloy composition. Additionally, neutron poisons may be added to the melt where they form solid solution phases or compounds with uranium and/or aluminum. Lowering the enrichment reduces both criticality and proliferation concerns for storage. Consolidation by melting also reduces the number of storage canisters. Laboratory and small-scale process demonstration using irradiated fuel is underway. Tests of the off gas absorption system have been initiated using both surrogate and irradiated RERTR mini fuel plates. An experimental L

  8. Proceedings of the 1994 international meeting on reduced enrichment for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting brought together participants in the international effort to minimize and eventually eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civilian nuclear programs. Papers cover the following topics: National programs; fuel cycle; nuclear fuels; analyses; advanced reactors; and reactor conversions. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion to the Energy Science and Technology Database

  9. Hot cell works and related irradiation tests in fission reactor for development of new materials for nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present status of research works in Oarai Branch, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, utilizing Japan Materials Testing Reactor and related hot cells will be described.Topics are mainly related with nuclear materials studies, excluding fissile materials, which is mainly aiming for development of materials for advanced nuclear systems such as a nuclear fusion reactor. Conflict between traditional and routined procedures and new demands will be described and future perspective is discussed. (author)

  10. Nondestructive analysis at B and W's uranium conversion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Containers and processing lines bearing high and low enriched uranium are routinely analyzed by nondestructive assay. Measurement systems used at Babcock and Wilcox's nuclear fuels plant in Apollo, Pennsylvania include the segmented gamma scanner (SGS) and the stabilized assay meter (SAM-II). These systems have been calibrated and used for a variety of tasks including uranium holdup measurements prior to decommissioning, in situ filter analysis and assay of calcined waste. 2 refs

  11. Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmann, Frank [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Lombaerde, Robert [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Moriconi, Franco [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States); Nelson, Albert [Zenergy Power, Inc., Burlingame, CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Zenergy Power has successfully designed, built, tested, and installed in the US electrical grid a saturable reactor Fault Current Limiter. Beginning in 2007, first as SC Power Systems and from 2008 as Zenergy Power, Inc., ZP used DOE matching grant and ARRA funds to help refine the design of the saturated reactor fault current limiter. ZP ultimately perfected the design of the saturated reactor FCL to the point that ZP could reliably design a suitable FCL for most utility applications. Beginning with a very basic FCL design using 1G HTS for a coil housed in a LN2 cryostat for the DC bias magnet, the technology progressed to a commercial system that was offered for sale internationally. Substantial progress was made in two areas. First, the cryogenics cooling system progressed from a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen container housing the HTS coils to cryostats utilizing dry conduction cooling and reaching temperatures down to less than 20 degrees K. Large, round cryostats with warm bore diameters of 1.7 meters enabled the design of large tanks to hold the AC components. Second, the design of the AC part of the FCL was refined from a six legged spider design to a more compact and lighter design with better fault current limiting capability. Further refinement of the flux path and core shape led to an efficient saturated reactor design requiring less Ampere-turns to saturate the core. In conclusion, the development of the saturable reactor FCL led to a more efficient design not requiring HTS magnets and their associated peripheral equipment, which yielded a more economical product in line with the electric utility industry expectations. The original goal for the DOE funding of the ZP project Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters was to stimulate the HTS wire industry with, first 1G, then 2G, HTS wire applications. Over the approximately 5 years of ZP's product development program, the amount of HTS

  12. Unusual occurrences in fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is a 40 MWt/13.2 MWe sodium cooled mixed carbide fuelled reactor. Its main aim is to generate experience in the design, construction and operation of fast reactors including sodium systems and to serve as an irradiation facility for the development of fuel and structural materials for future fast reactors. It achieved first criticality in Oct 85 with Mark I core (70% PuC - 30% UC). Steam generator was put in service in Jan 93 and power was raised to 10.5 MWt in Dec 93. Turbine generator was synchronised to the grid in Jul 97. The indigenously developed mixed carbide fuel has achieved a burnup of 44,000 MW-d/t max at a linear heat rating of 320 W/cm max without any fuel clad failure. The commissioning and operation of sodium systems and components have been smooth and performance of major components, viz., sodium pumps, intermediate heat exchangers and once through sodium heated steam generators (SG) have been excellent. There have been three minor incidents of Na/NaK leaks during the past 14 years, which are described in the paper. There have been no incident of a tube leak in SG. However, three incidents of water leaks from water / steam headers have been detailed. The plant has encountered some unusual occurrences, which were critically analysed and remedial measures, in terms of system and procedural modifications, incorporated to prevent recurrence. This paper describes unusual occurrences of fuel handling incident of May 1987, main boiler feed pump seizure in Apr 1992, reactivity transients in Nov 1994 and Apr 1995, and malfunctioning of the core cover plate mechanism in Jul 1995. These incidents have resulted in long plant shutdowns. During the course of investigation, various theoretical and experimental studies were carried out for better understanding of the phenomena and several inspection techniques and tools were developed resulting in enriching the technology of sodium cooled reactors. FBTR has 36 neutronic and process

  13. Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

    2008-12-16

    The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an

  14. Calculation and comparisons with measurement of fast neutron fluxes in the material testing facilities of the NRU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRU reactor at Chalk River provides three irradiation facilities to study the effects of fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) on reactor materials for assessing material damage and deformation. The facilities comprise two types of fast neutron rods (Mark 4 and Mark 7), and a Material Test Bundle (MTB) irradiated in a loop site. This paper describes the neutronic simulation of these testing facilities using the WIMS-AECL and TRIAD codes, and comparisons with the fast neutron flux measurements using iron-wire activation techniques. It also provides comparisons of flux levels, neutron spectra, and size limitations of the experimental cavities between these test facilities. (author)

  15. Calculation and comparisons with measurement of fast neutron fluxes in the material testing facilities of the NRU research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, T.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The NRU reactor at Chalk River provides three irradiation facilities to study the effects of fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) on reactor materials for assessing material damage and deformation. The facilities comprise two types of fast neutron rods (Mark 4 and Mark 7), and a Material Test Bundle (MTB) irradiated in a loop site. This paper describes the neutronic simulation of these testing facilities using the WIMS-AECL and TRIAD codes, and comparisons with the fast neutron flux measurements using iron-wire activation techniques. It also provides comparisons of flux levels, neutron spectra, and size limitations of the experimental cavities between these test facilities. (author)

  16. Testing and Commissioning of a Multifunctional Tool for the Dismantling of the Activated Internals of the KNK Reactor Shaft - 13524

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor Facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype reactor to demonstrate the Fast Breeder Reactor Technology in Germany, was in operation from 1971 to 1991. The dismantling activities started in 1991. The project aim is the green field in 2020. Most of the reactor internals as well as the primary and secondary cooling loops are already dismantled. The total contaminated sodium inventory has already been disposed of. Only the high activated reactor vessel shielding structures are remaining. Due to the high dose rates these structures must be dismantled remotely. For the dismantling of the primary shielding of the reactor vessel, 12 stacked cast iron blocks with a total mass of 90 Mg and single masses up to 15.5 Mg, a remote-controlled multifunctional dismantling device (HWZ) was designed, manufactured and tested in a mock-up. After successful approval of the test sequences by the authorities, the HWZ was implemented into the reactor building containment for final assembling of the auxiliary equipment and subsequent hot commissioning in 2012. Dismantling of the primary shielding blocks is scheduled for early 2013. (authors)

  17. Testing and Commissioning of a Multifunctional Tool for the Dismantling of the Activated Internals of the KNK Reactor Shaft - 13524

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothschmitt, Stefan; Graf, Anja [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bauer, Stefan; Klute, Stefan; Koselowski, Eiko [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Am Taubenfeld 25/1, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Hendrich, Klaus [Ingenieurbuero Hendrich, Moerikeweg 14, 75015 Bretten (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor Facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype reactor to demonstrate the Fast Breeder Reactor Technology in Germany, was in operation from 1971 to 1991. The dismantling activities started in 1991. The project aim is the green field in 2020. Most of the reactor internals as well as the primary and secondary cooling loops are already dismantled. The total contaminated sodium inventory has already been disposed of. Only the high activated reactor vessel shielding structures are remaining. Due to the high dose rates these structures must be dismantled remotely. For the dismantling of the primary shielding of the reactor vessel, 12 stacked cast iron blocks with a total mass of 90 Mg and single masses up to 15.5 Mg, a remote-controlled multifunctional dismantling device (HWZ) was designed, manufactured and tested in a mock-up. After successful approval of the test sequences by the authorities, the HWZ was implemented into the reactor building containment for final assembling of the auxiliary equipment and subsequent hot commissioning in 2012. Dismantling of the primary shielding blocks is scheduled for early 2013. (authors)

  18. Conceptual design of the integral test loop (I): Reactor coolant system and secondary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Lee, Seong Je; Kwon, Tae Soon; Moon, Sang Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of the primary coolant system and the secondary system of the Integral Test Loop (ITL) which simulates overall thermal hydraulic phenomena of the primary system of a nuclear power plant during postulated accidents or transients. The design basis for the primary coolant system and secondary system is as follows ; Reference plant: Korean Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP), Height ratio : 1/1, Volume ratio : 1/200, Power scale : Max. 15% of the scaled nominal power, Temperature, Pressure : Real plant conditions. The primary coolant system includes a reactor vessel, which contains a core simulator, a steam generator, a reactor coolant pump simulator, a pressurizer and piping, which consists of two hot legs, four cold legs and four intermediate legs. The secondary system consists of s steam discharge system, a feedwater supply system and a steam condensing system. This conceptual design report describes general configuration of the reference plant, and major function and operation of each system of the plant. Also described is the design philosophy of each component and system of the ITL, and specified are the design criteria and technical specifications of each component and system of the ITL in the report. 17 refs., 43 figs., 51 tabs. (Author)

  19. Definition and Analysis of Heavy Water Reactor Benchmarks for Testing New Wims-D Libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of the IAEA-WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP). A group of heavy water reactor benchmarks have been selected for testing new WIMS-D libraries, including calculations with WIMSD5B program and the analysis of results.These benchmarks cover a wide variety of reactors and conditions, from fresh fuels to high burnup, and from natural to enriched uranium.Besides, each benchmark includes variations in lattice pitch and in coolants (normally heavy water and void).Multiplication factors with critical experimental bucklings and other parameters are calculated and compared with experimental reference values.The WIMS libraries used for the calculations were generated with basic data from JEF-2.2 Rev.3 (JEF) and ENDF/B-VI iNReleaseln 5 (E6) Results obtained with WIMS-86 (W86) library, included with WIMSD5B package, from Windfrith, UK with adjusted data, are included also, for showing the improvements obtained with the new -not adjusted- libraries.The calculations with WIMSD5B were made with two methods (input program options): PIJ (two-dimension collision probability method) and DSN (one-dimension Sn method, with homogenization of materials by ring).The general conclusions are: the library based on JEF data and the DSN meted give the best results, that in average are acceptable

  20. Standard Test Method for Application and Analysis of Helium Accumulation Fluence Monitors for Reactor Vessel Surveillance, E706 (IIIC)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the concept and use of helium accumulation for neutron fluence dosimetry for reactor vessel surveillance. Although this test method is directed toward applications in vessel surveillance, the concepts and techniques are equally applicable to the general field of neutron dosimetry. The various applications of this test method for reactor vessel surveillance are as follows: 1.1.1 Helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) capsules, 1.1.2 Unencapsulated, or cadmium or gadolinium covered, radiometric monitors (RM) and HAFM wires for helium analysis, 1.1.3 Charpy test block samples for helium accumulation, and 1.1.4 Reactor vessel (RV) wall samples for helium accumulation. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  1. Prediction and measurement of neutron energy spectrum in a material test research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkawi, S.R.; Ahmad, N. E-mail: epg.pieas@dgcc.org.pk

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this work is to calculate and measure the neutron energy spectrum in the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1), which is a typical Material Test Reactor (MTR) fueled with low enriched uranium. The method of multiple foil activation was used with the adjustment code MSITER, a modified version of the code STAY'SL, to obtain the experimentally measured spectrum. The calculated spectrum, which was used as pre-information in the adjustment procedure, was obtained through modeling the core and its surroundings in three-dimensions and the use of the transport code WIMS-D/4 and the diffusion code CITATION. A comparison between the calculated and measured spectra shows that the ratio of measured to calculated flux density in the thermal region (E{<=}0.5 eV) is 0.998. This ratio is 1.02 for resonance (1/E) region (0.5 eVand 0.932 for the fast region (E>0.5 MeV). This result is compared with other published results that report an agreement within 10 to 30% between the calculated and measured spectra.

  2. Accelerating the design and testing of LEU fuel assemblies for conversion of Russian-designed research reactors outside Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper identifies proposed geometries and loading specifications of LEU tube-type and pin-type test assemblies that would be suitable for accelerating the conversion of Russian-designed research reactors outside of Russia if these fuels are manufactured, qualified by irradiation testing, and made commercially available in Russia. (author)

  3. Status of the RERTR program: overview, progress and plans. [Reduced Enrighment Research and Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.

    1985-01-01

    The status of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a summary of the accomplishments which the RERTR Program had achieved by the end of 1984 with its many international partners, emphasis is placed on the progress achieved during 1985 and on current plans and schedules. A new miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was fabricated and is well into irradiation. The whole-core ORR demonstration is scheduled to begin in November 1985, with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/. Altogether, 921 full-size test and prototype elements have been ordered for fabrication with reduced enrichment and the new technologies. Qualification of U/sub 3/Si-Al fuel with approx.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ is still projected for 1989. This progress could not have been achieved without the close international cooperation which has existed since the beginning, and whose continuation and intensification will be essential to the achievement of the long-term RERTR goals.

  4. Fuel irradiation test plan at the Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of high performance fuels, which enables burnup extension and high duty uses of light water reactors (LWRs) by means of power up rates and flexible operating cycles, is one of key technical issues for extending the uses for longer periods. Introduction of new design fuel rods with new cladding alloys and wider utilization of mixed oxide fuels is expected in Japan. Fuel irradiation tests for development and safety demonstration are quite important, in order to realize theses progress. Operational management on water chemistry, minimizing the long term degradation of reactor components, could have unfavorable influence on the integrity of the fuel rods. Japanese government and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency have decided to re new the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and to install new test rigs, in order to play an active role solving the issues on the development and the safety of the fuel and the plant aging. Fuel integrity under abnormal transient conditions will be investigated using a special capsule type test rig, which has its own power control system under simulated LWR cooling conditions. Water loops for simulation of high duty operation, e.g. high power, high burnup and high rod internal pressure conditions, are proposed for the development and safety examination of the high performance fuels. Combination of the JMTR tests with simulated reactivity initiated accident tests in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor and loss of coolant accident tests in hot laboratories would provide a comprehensive data for safety evaluation and design progress of the high performance fuels at extended burnups, covering from the normal to the accident conditions, including abnormal transients

  5. Prediction and measurement of neutron energy spectrum in a material test research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to calculate and measure the neutron energy spectrum in the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1), which is a typical Material Test Reactor (MTR) fueled with low enriched uranium. The method of multiple foil activation was used with the adjustment code MSITER, a modified version of the code STAY'SL, to obtain the experimentally measured spectrum. The calculated spectrum, which was used as pre-information in the adjustment procedure, was obtained through modeling the core and its surroundings in three-dimensions and the use of the transport code WIMS-D/4 and the diffusion code CITATION. A comparison between the calculated and measured spectra shows that the ratio of measured to calculated flux density in the thermal region (E≤0.5 eV) is 0.998. This ratio is 1.02 for resonance (1/E) region (0.5 eV0.5 MeV). This result is compared with other published results that report an agreement within 10 to 30% between the calculated and measured spectra

  6. ACRR [Annular Core Research Reactor] fission product release tests: ST-1 and ST-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two experiments (ST-1 and ST-2) have been performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACER) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) to obtain time-resolved data on the release of fission products from irradiated fuels under light water reactor (LWR) severe accident conditions. Both experiments were conducted in a highly reducing environment at maximum fuel temperatures of greater than 2400 K. These experiments were designed specifically to investigate the effect of increased total pressure on fission product release; ST-1 was performed at approximately 0.16 MPa and ST-2 was run at 1.9 MPa, whereas other parameters were matched as closely as possible. Release rate data were measured for Cs, I, Ba, Sr, Eu, Te, and U. The release rates were higher than predicted by existing codes for Ba, Sr, Eu, and U. Te release was very low, but Te did not appear to be sequestered by the zircaloy cladding; it was evenly distributed in the fuel. In addition, in posttest analysis a unique fuel morphology (fuel swelling) was observed which may have enhanced fission product release, especially in the high pressure test (ST-2). These data are compared with analytical results from the CORSOR correlation and the VICTORIA computer model. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Evaluation method and prediction result of fuel behavior during the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Yoshimuta, Shigeharu; Sato, Masashi; Saito, Kenji; Tobita, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Small amounts of additional failure of HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) fuel will occur during operation. In the safety design requirements for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) fuel, the additional failure fraction in the coating layers of the coated fuel particles is limited less than 0.2% through the full service period. The failure fraction should be know during the HTTR operation. Short-lived fission gases are released from the through-coatings-failed particles and contamination uranium in the fuel compact matrix since the coating layers can retain short-lived fission gases. Then fission gas concentration in the primary coolant reflects the failure fraction in the core. Based on fuel fabrication data (exposed uranium fractions and the SiC failure fractions) and the HTTR operating condition, the though-coatings-failure fraction and release fraction of {sup 88}Kr are analytically predicted. The results are as follows. (1) The intact particles will not fail by kernel migration, Pd-SiC corrosion and internal pressure, however, some of the as-fabricated SiC-failed particles will be the through-coatings-failed particles by the pressure vessel failure. (2) The release fraction of {sup 88}Kr, that will be determined mainly by the release from the contamination uranium in the fuel compact matrix, will be less than 10{sup -6} considering the additional through-coatings-failure fraction. (author)

  8. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper presented in the following areas of interest: (1) fuel development; (2) post-irradiation examinations; (3) reprocessing; (4) thermite reaction; (5) fuel fabrication; (6) element tests; (7) core tests; (8) criticals; (9) shipping; and (10) reactors and methods

  9. Reactor design of the SP-100 nuclear assembly test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Assembly Test is currently being designed to demonstrate the performance characteristics of a 100-kWe version of the power source for the SP-100 Generic Flight System. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the operation of the prototypical ground test reactor under conditions of high-working temperatures and long life. The key features of the reactor include a small, compact core with component materials consisting of refractory metals and alloys. Because of the unique features of the SP-100 system, extensive use is made of Monte Carlo methods in the design and analysis of the reactor configuration. In addition, detailed testing of the reactor design has been carried out in the Zero Power Physics Reactor facility to provide calibration factors for the principal performance parameters. The key features of the test reactor design are described in this paper

  10. Tensile and impact testing of an HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] control rod follower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook a program to machine and test specimens from a control rod follower from the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Tensile and Charpy impact specimens were machined and tested from non-irradiated aluminum alloys in addition to irradiated 6061-T6 from the HFBR. The tensile test results on irradiated material showed a two-fold increase in tensile strength to a maximum of 100.6 ksi. The impact resistance of the irradiated material showed a six-fold decrease in values (3 in-lb average) compared to similar non-irradiated material. Fracture toughness (KI) specimens were tested on an unirradiated compositionally and dimensionally similar (to HFBR follower) 6061 T-6 material with Kmax values of 24.8 ± 1.0 Ksi√in (average) being obtained. The report concludes that the specimens produced during the program yielded reproducible and believable results and that proper quality assurance was provided throughout the program. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Improved plastic liner for Indian nuclear power reactor containment and irradiation test of coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plastic liner or the heavy duty paint coating system in a nuclear power reactor building of the Indian Pressurised Heavy Water type, forms part of the last one of the multiple radioactive barriers, namely the concrete containment envelope and therefore, deserves the attention of a class II safety system. The duties of this paint coating call for an elaborate testing and evaluation before the coating is approved for containment service. This paper deals with indigenous development of suitable paint coatings for such application and associated development of tests, quantification of test parameters, simulation of integrated aggressive environment (so as to be able to predict the change in properties at the end of service life), evaluation of a performance oriented specification with due weightage to the functional requirements and establishing acceptance criteria with product ranking system. While doing the development work a common irradiation test of candidate coating for this duty along with those devised and developed for high radiation areas like fuelling machine vault, has been conducted to observe the post-irradiation performance and radiation threshold of the same. The results of these have also been included in this paper. (author). 6 refs., 3 tables

  12. Turbine coastdown test to evaluate the availability of power supply when reactor trip and LOOP occur at YGN 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integrity of nuclear fuel is greatly dependent on whether the Reactor Coolant Pumps(RCP) can keep on running during the drop of control rods after a reactor trip signal is generated. It was assumed in the safety analysis for Younggwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 5 and 6 (YGN 5 and 6) that the RCPs are powered for 3 seconds since the Loss Of Off-site Power(LOOP) will not occur within 3 seconds after reactor and turbine trip simultaneously. A turbine coastdown test was performed at YGN 5 during the power ascension test period to justify the assumption. The purpose of the test was to measure how long the power is supplied to RCPs in virtue of the turbine inertia after a LOOP occurs simultaneously with reactor/turbine trips at 15% reactor power. Based on the data obtained from the test, a computational model was developed and verified. This model is used to simulate the turbine coastdown at various plant power levels including the full power with different magnitudes of houseload. The results of the test and simulation justified the assumption of the delayed interruption of power supply to RCPs

  13. The Improvement of Plant Efficiency by Testing and Revising of the Reactor Thermal Power Calculation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the uncertainty of flow measurement mostly affects the result of reactor thermal power calculation, reactor power in most of Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs) is controlled by excore Nuclear Instrumentation System(NIS) based on SPPC which has less uncertainty of flow measurement by using venture-meter. Real time monitoring system for reactor thermal power of Kori unit 3 and 4 has been established since 1992, and plant efficiency was improved by detecting errors and revising the program in 2012 following the engineering judgement that reactor thermal power varies according to steam generator blowdown flow change, unit conversion constant, and thermal expansion coefficient, etc. The reactor thermal power calculation program for Kori unit 3 and 4 was developed in 1992 and operated for 20 years without any correction or revision. Based on the engineering judgement that reactor thermal power varies according to change of steam generator blowdown flow, we conducted a research and found a couple of errors in steam generator blowdown specific volume, unit conversion constants for differential pressure of main feed water inlet flow, and thermal expansion coefficient of venture-meter which measures main feed water flow for steam generator. By correcting the errors in reactor thermal power program, generator power increased by 3.2 MWe for two units, Kori 3 and 4. Considering recent capacity factor of the plant, additional net electricity of 26,434 MWh was produced annually

  14. Standard review plan for the review and evaluation of emergency plans for research and test reactors. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a Standard Review Plan for the guidance of the NRC staff to assure that complete and uniform reviews are made of research and test reactor emergency plans. The report is organized under ten planning standards which correspond to the guidance criteria in Draft II of ANSI/ANS 15.16 as endorsed by Revision 1 to Regulatory Guide 2.6. The applicability of the items under each planning standard is indicated by subdivisions of the steady state thermal power levels at which the reactors are licensed to operate. Standard emergency classes and example action levels for research and test reactors which should initiate these classes are given in an Appendix

  15. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D and D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D and D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget

  16. Transmission computer microtomography for nondestructive testing of fuel and reactor control means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for the X-ray transmission computerized microtomography with the defect resolution level up to some μm is developed relative to solving the problem on controlling the quality of the nuclear reactor fuel elements and regularity means. The solution of the problem on the nondestructive control of such objects conditioned the conduct of studies on characteristics of certain range of detectors of the X-ray radiation, organization of scanning principles with application of the laser interferometry principles and construction of the system for the measurement data procession. The performed studies led to the SAPR realization fro the problem-oriented computerized tomographs and the apparatus realization of the experimental version of such a device. The studies on the specially-produced test-samples with calibrated defects demonstrated the correctness of the approach to designing such facilities for the items nondestructive control in the nuclear engineering

  17. Testing stand for cosmic gas-cooling fast reactor's sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For carrying out of technical decision and nuclear, radiation and technological safety of gas-cooling space nuclear power plants is elaborating gas-cooling fast reactor's testing stand. In the base of its draft is taken conception of the reactor with filling up type reactor core on the base of ball fuel elements and radial coolant flowing. On the testing stand would suggested carrying out testing for study neutron and physical parameters of gas-cooling reactor, its behaviour under accident simulation. In the reactor core will suggest use carbon nitrides fuel elements with tungsten cover, provides under nominal regime relatively low fission products yield to first contour of device. Construction of fuel element was carrying out on reactor and non reactor testing and its calculated on working resource about 3000 hours. Constructive materials of reactor core have lower melting temperature, that provides organized in good time remove fuel element to containers placed under reactor in case connected with hypothetical accident. In the construction of reactor for seen tree-contours system of heat transfer and its provides multistage system of barriers against fission products yield to environment. tabs.1

  18. TRIGA reactor dynamics: Frequency response tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the results of frequency response tests conducted on ITU TRIGA Reactor are presented. To conduct the experiments, a special 'micro control rod' and its submersible stepping-motor drive mechanism was designed and constructed. The experiments cover a frequency range of 0.002 - 2 Hz., and 0.02, 4, 200 kW nominal power levels. Zero-power and at-power reactivity to % power transfer functions are presented as gain, and phase shift vs. frequency diagrams. Low power response is in close agreement with the point reactor zero-power transfer function. Response at 200 kW is studied with the help of a Nyquist diagram, and found to be stable. An elaboration on the main features of the feedback mechanism is also given. Power to reactivity feedback was measured to be just about 1.5 cent / % power change. (authors)

  19. Long- and short-term trends in vessel conditioning of TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated trends in the conditioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel during the May 1984 to April 1985 run period. The initial conditioning of the vessel, consisting of glow discharge cleaning (GDC) and pulse discharge cleaning (PDC) in concert with a 1500C vessel bakeout, is necessary to assure plasma operation after atmospheric venting. A long-term conditioning process, ascribed to limiter conditioning, effectively improves operational conditions during the course of the run. Over several thousand high power plasma discharges, the improvement was documented by using standard parameter (fiducial) plasma discharges. Several techniques demonstrated short-term improvements in vessel conditioning during this time period, including: Cr gettering and programming the plasma position relative to the limiter contact area

  20. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

    2003-10-28

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

  1. The fabrication and performance of Canadian silicide dispersion fuel for test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel fabrication effort is now concentrated on the commissioning of large-scale process equipment, defining product specifications, developing a quality assurance plan, and setting up a mini-computer material accountancy system. In the irradiation testing program, full-size NRU assemblies containing 20% enriched silicide dispersion fuel have been Irradiated successfully to burnups in the range 65-80 atomic percent. Irradiations have also been conducted on mini-elements having 1.2 mm diameter holes In their mid-sections, some drilled before irradiation and others after irradiation to 22-83 atomic percent burnup. Uranium was lost to the coolant in direct proportion to the surface area of exposed core material. Pre-irradiation in the intact condition appeared to reduce in-reactor corrosion. Fuel cores developed for the NRU reactor are dimensionally very stable, swelling by only 6-8% at the very high burnup of 93 atomic percent. Two important factors contributing to this good performance are cylindrical clad restraint and coarse silicide particles. Thermal ramping tests were conducted on irradiated silicide aspersion fuels. Small segments of fuel cores released 85Kr starting at about 520 deg. C and peaking at about 680 deg C. After a holding period of 1 hour at 720 deg. C a secondary 85Kr peak occurred during cooling (at about 330 deg. C) probably due to thermal contraction cracking. Whole mini-elements irradiated to 93 atomic percent burnup were also ramped thermally, with encouraging results. After about 0.25 h at 530 deg. C the aluminum cladding developed very localized small blisters, some with penetrating pin-hole cracks preventing gross pillowing or ballooning. (author)

  2. Performance tests for integral reactor nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Dong-Seong; Yim, Jeong-Sik; Lee, Chong-Tak; Kim, Han-Soo; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Oh, Je-Yong

    2006-02-15

    An integral type reactor SMART plans to utilize metallic Zr-U fuel which is Zr-based alloy with 34{approx}38 wt% U. In order to verify the technologies for the design and manufacturing of the fuel and get a license, performance tests were carried out. Experimental Fuel Assembly (EFA) manufactured in KAERI is being successfully irradiated in the MIR reactor of RIAR from September 4 2004, and it has achieved burnup of 0.21 g/cc as of January 25 2006. Thermal properties of irradiated Zr-U fuel were measured. Up to the phase transformation temperature, thermal diffusivity increased linearly in proportion to temperature. However its dependence on the burnup was not significant. RIA tests with 4 unirradiated Zr-U fuel rods were performed in Kurchatov Institute to establish a safety criterion. In the case of the un-irradiated Zr-U fuel, the energy deposition during the control rod ejection accident should be less than 172 cal/g to prevent the failure accompanying fuel fragmentation and dispersal. Finally the irradiation tests of fuel rods have been performed at HANARO. The HITE-2 test was successfully completed up to a burnup of 0.31 g/cc. The HITE-3 test began in February 2004 and will be continued up to a target burnup of 0.6 g/cc.

  3. Performance tests for integral reactor nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral type reactor SMART plans to utilize metallic Zr-U fuel which is Zr-based alloy with 34∼38 wt% U. In order to verify the technologies for the design and manufacturing of the fuel and get a license, performance tests were carried out. Experimental Fuel Assembly (EFA) manufactured in KAERI is being successfully irradiated in the MIR reactor of RIAR from September 4 2004, and it has achieved burnup of 0.21 g/cc as of January 25 2006. Thermal properties of irradiated Zr-U fuel were measured. Up to the phase transformation temperature, thermal diffusivity increased linearly in proportion to temperature. However its dependence on the burnup was not significant. RIA tests with 4 unirradiated Zr-U fuel rods were performed in Kurchatov Institute to establish a safety criterion. In the case of the un-irradiated Zr-U fuel, the energy deposition during the control rod ejection accident should be less than 172 cal/g to prevent the failure accompanying fuel fragmentation and dispersal. Finally the irradiation tests of fuel rods have been performed at HANARO. The HITE-2 test was successfully completed up to a burnup of 0.31 g/cc. The HITE-3 test began in February 2004 and will be continued up to a target burnup of 0.6 g/cc

  4. Developing the MAPLE materials test reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAPLE-MTR is a new multipurpose research facility being planned by AECL Research as a possible replacement for the 35-year-old NRU reactor. In developing the MAPLE-MTR concept, AECL is starting from the recent design and licensing experience with the MAPLE-X10 reactor. By starting from technology developed to support the MAPLE-X10 design and adapting it to produce a concept that satisfies the requirements of fuel channel materials testing and fuel irradiation programs, AECL expects to minimize the need for major advances in nuclear technology (e.g., fuel, heat transfer). Formulation of the MAPLE-MTR concept is at an early stage. This report describes the irradiation requirements of the research areas, how these needs are translated into design criteria for the project and elements of the preliminary design concept

  5. Final report on in-reactor tensile tests on OFHC - Copper and CuCrZr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N; Edwards, D.J.; Tähtinen, S.;

    2004-01-01

    of uniaxial tensile tests on pure copper and a CuCrZr alloy in a fission reactor at 363 and 393K. In the following, we first describe the experiments and then present results illustrating the build up ofstress as a function of concurrently increasing strain and displacement dose level. Results on...... of the combination of strain and radiation hardening, the rate of hardening in the plastic regime is found tobe enhanced. The rate of hardening, the maximum level of hardening and the magnitude of the total elongation achieved during an in-reactor test are found to depend strongly on the pre...

  6. High-density reduced-enrichment fuels for Research and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels have been conducted by the US RERTR Program in order to provide the technical means to reduce the enrichment of fuels for research and test reactors. The traditional aluminum dispersion fuel technology has been extended to include the highest practical loadings of uranium-aluminide (UAl/sub x/, 2.3 MgU/m3), uranium-oxide (U3O8, 3.2 MgU/m3), and uranium-silicide (U3Si2, 5.5 MgU/m3; U3Si, 7.0 MgU/m3) fuels. A third uranium-silicide alloy, U3SiAl (U + 3.5 wt % Si + 1.5 wt % Al) has been found to perform poorly at high burnup. Testing of miniature fuel plates and full-sized fuel elements is at an advanced stage for the highest loadings of the aluminide and oxide fuels and intermediate loadings of the silicide fuels, and good results have been obtained for low-enriched uranium. The data obtained to date are discussed. 1 reference, 3 figures, 1 table

  7. CO2 Absorption in a Lab-Scale Fixed Solid Bed Reactor: Modelling and Experimental Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gabbrielli

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The CO2 absorption in a lab-scale fixed solid bed reactor filled with different solid sorbents has been studied under different operative conditions regarding temperature (20-200°C and input gas composition (N2, O2, CO2, H2O at 1bar pressure. The gas leaving the reactor has been analysed to measure the CO2 and O2 concentrations and, consequently, to evaluate the overall CO2 removal efficiency. In order to study the influence of solid sorbent type (i.e. CaO, coal bottom ash, limestone and blast furnace slag and of mass and heat transfer processes on CO2 removal efficiency, a one-dimensional time dependent mathematical model of the reactor, which may be considered a Plug Flow Reactor, has been developed. The quality of the model has been confirmed using the experimental results.

  8. Method of testing fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stresses occurring in the fuel assemblies are simulated by power excursions. For this purpose the fuel assembly is placed in the neutron field of a test reactor and for a short time can be exposed to the much higher neutron field of a pulsed reactor. One possibility of design provides for the test and the pulsed reactor lying one above the other, separated by a neutron absorber and penetrated by a common irradiation channel. The fuel assembly then is to be moved from the position in the test reactor to the position in the pulsed reactor. The other possibility is to make the irradiation duct pass along the gap between both reactors and, by means of a tube-shaped absorber, open one or the other irradiation field. (DG)

  9. Non-Destructive Testing of Reactor-Fuel, Target, and Control Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Savannah River Plant (a production facility of the United States Atomic Energy Commission), fuel, target, and control elements are non-destructively tested before and after irradiation in reactors. Design and performance of unique instruments - used for measuring physical soundness, nuclear properties, and dimensions - are described. A nickel thickness gauge, utilizing the Hall effect in a magnetic field, is used to measure the thickness of nickel layers on uncanned uranium cores. A similar instrument is used after cores have been diffusion bonded to aluminium cladding to determine that each core has a layer of residual nickel, and that the end cap is sufficiently thick. Ultrasonic instruments are used (1) to measure uranium grain size to determine whether the cores were properly heat-treated, and (2) to detect unbonded areas between cladding and core. The Nuclear Test Gauge (NTG), a small subcritical assembly of U235-A1 alloy slugs in an H2O-moderated lattice, is used to determine the fuel (U235) or absorber (Li6) content of reactor elements. These determinations, made from changes in neutron multiplication, have a 1-sigma precision of about ± 0.5% for fuel elements containing up to 250 g U235/ 30.5 cm (1 ft), and about ± 1% for target and control elements containing up to 4 g Li6/30.5 cm (1 ft). Compared to the more commonly used large.critical test pile, the NTG costs about 1/20 as much; measures fuel or absorber content in about one minute vs. ten minutes; and measures the axial distribution of fuel or absorber which the test pile cannot do. Irradiated fuel elements are measured under water with (1) differential transformers that can measure diameter and length to an accuracy of ± 0.05 cm (0.002 in), and (2) simple mechanical linkages with dial indicators above water that can measure inside diameter and warp. By keeping the elements submerged in water, personnel are shielded from radiation, and the elements do not undergo the dimensional changes that

  10. Potential of duplex fuel in prebreeder, breeder, and power reactor designs: tests and analyses (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual region fuel pellets, called duplex pellets, are comprised of an outer annular region of relatively high uranium fuel enrichment and a center pellet of fertile material with no enrichment. UO2 and ThO2 are the fissile and fertile materials of interest. Both prebreeders and breeders are discussed as are the performance advantages of duplex pellets over solid pellets in these two pressurized water reactor types. Advantages of duplex pellets for commercial reactor fuel rods are also discussed. Both irradiation test data and analytical results are used in comparisons. Manufacturing of duplex fuel is discussed

  11. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185 C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (∼50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185 C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention

  12. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  13. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  14. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called 'AGR-1,' graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on fuel

  15. CNSS plant concept, capital cost, and multi-unit station economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) and the Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) have performed several studies over the last eight years related to small integral pressurized water reactors. These reactors include the 365 MWt (100 MWe) Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG) and the 1200 MWt Consolidated Nuclear Steam System (CNSS). The studies, mostly performed under contract to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have led to a 1250 MWt (400 MWe) Consolidated Nuclear Steam System (CNSS) plant concept, with unique design and cost features. This report contains an update of earlier studies of the CNSS reactor and balance-of-plant concept design, capital costs, and multi-unit plant economics incorporating recent design developments, improvements, and post-TMI-2 upgrades. The economic evaluation compares the total system economic impact of a phased, three stage 400 MWe CNSS implementation program, i.e., a three-unit station, to the installation of a single 1200 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) into a typical USA utility system

  16. Supported Pd-Au Membrane Reactor for Hydrogen Production: Membrane Preparation, Characterization and Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Iulianelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A supported Pd-Au (Au 7wt% membrane was produced by electroless plating deposition. Permeation tests were performed with pure gas (H2, H2, N2, CO2, CH4 for long time operation. After around 400 h under testing, the composite Pd-Au membrane achieved steady state condition, with an H2/N2 ideal selectivity of around 500 at 420 °C and 50 kPa as transmembrane pressure, remaining stable up to 1100 h under operation. Afterwards, the membrane was allocated in a membrane reactor module for methane steam reforming reaction tests. As a preliminary application, at 420 °C, 300 kPa of reaction pressure, space velocity of 4100 h−1, 40% methane conversion and 35% hydrogen recovery were reached using a commercial Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Unfortunately, a severe coke deposition affected irreversibly the composite membrane, determining the loss of the hydrogen permeation characteristics of the supported Pd-Au membrane.

  17. Full conversion of the core of a research, nuclear fuel testing and material testing reactor of TRIGA SSR 14 MW type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All the TRIGA type reactors have power levels between 100 kW and 14 MW and use a nuclear fuel formed of a uranium - hydride zirconium alloy. The reactor cores made of this fuel are intrinsically secure against any accident of reactivity insertion. This type of fuel presents a low coefficient of fission product release and a remarkable stability to the temperature cycling up to high burnups. All the TRIGA type reactors except the 14 MW reactors, as the type of the TRIGA reactor of INR Pitesti is, make use of low enrichment uranium (19.9%), LEU. Due to the international policy of non-proliferation and nuclear safeguard requirements as well, the highly enriched uranium fuel fabrication ceased in 1978. Subsequently, only LEU type fuel continued to be used. The process of using LEU fuel instead of HEU fuel, coined as conversion, was supported by DOE of USA and the IAEA member states in the frame of the 'Reduced Enrichment in Research and Testing Reactors' (RERTR project) together with the technical cooperation projects (TC) between IAEA and the member states. INR Pitesti enjoyed the both forms of international support since 1984. The conversion process at the TRIGA reactor of INR Pitesti began in 1992 by feeding the reactor core with LEU fuel produced by General Atomics. The report of General Atomics from 1998, titled 'Final Results from TRIGA - LEU fuel Postirradiation Examination and Evaluation following Long-term Irradiation Testing in the OAK Ridge Reactor (ORR)' (UZR-22) presents the results of irradiation testing of the LEU f 13,22 fuel for a burnup of about 65% and an irradiation period of about 900 FPD (full power days). The report confirmed the reliability of the LEU fuel replaced in the conversion process. Similar results were obtained by irradiation of LEU fuel, produced by General Atomics, in the 14 MW TRIGA reactor of INR Pitesti and by post irradiation examination of some fuel element selected from the batch of fuel provided by the Argonne National

  18. Off reactor testings. Technological engineering applicative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the end of year 2000 over 400 nuclear electro-power units were operating world wide, summing up a 350,000 MW total capacity, with a total production of 2,300 TWh, representing 16% of the world's electricity production. Other 36 units, totalizing 28,000 MW, were in construction, while a manifest orientation towards nuclear power development was observed in principal Asian countries like China, India, Japan and Korea. In the same world's trend one find also Romania, the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 generating electrical energy into the national system beginning with 2 December 1996. Recently, the commercial contract was completed for finishing the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 and launching it into operation by the end of year 2004. An important role in developing the activity of research and technological engineering, as technical support for manufacturing the CANDU type nuclear fuel and supplying with equipment the Cernavoda units, was played by the Division 7 TAR of the INR Pitesti. Qualification testings were conducted for: - off-reactor CANDU type nuclear fuel; - FARE tools, pressure regulators, explosion proof panels; channel shutting, as well as functional testing for spare pushing facility as a first step in the frame of the qualification tests for the charging/discharging machine (MID) 4 and 5 endings. Testing facilities are described, as well as high pressure hot/cool loops, measuring chains, all of them fulfilling the requirements of quality assurance. The nuclear fuel off-reactor tests were carried out to determine: strength; endurance; impact, pressure fall and wear resistance. For Cernavoda NPP equipment testings were carried out for: the explosion proof panels, pressure regulators, behaviour to vibration and wear of the steam generation tubings, effects of vibration upon different electronic component, channel shutting (for Cernavoda Unit 2), MID operating at 300 and 500 cycles. A number of R and D programs were conducted in the frame of division 7 TAR of INR

  19. Ethology of Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox) (Diptera: Asilidae) in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    In southwest Wyoming, Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox), hunted primarily from the surface of the sandy substrate in a greasewood community. Prey, captured in flight, represented four insect orders with Diptera and Hymenoptera predominating. Courtship consisted of the male approaching the female from...

  20. Azalea's Worst Nightmare: The Strawberry Rootworm, Paria fargariae Wilcox

    Science.gov (United States)

    The strawberry rootworm (SRW), Paria fargariae Wilcox, is an emergent pest of azaleas in commercial production nurseries in the southeastern US. Larvae feed on roots but do minimal damage. Adults feed at night and make small holes in the foliage. Severe damage has been reported in many nurseries, es...

  1. Management and storage of spent nuclear fuel at research and test reactors. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated fuel from research and test reactors has been stored at various facilities for several decades. As these facilities age and approach or exceed their original design lifetimes, there is mounting concern about closure of the fuel cycle and about the integrity of ageing fuels from the materials point of view as well as some concern about the loss of self-protection of the fuels as their activity decays. It is clear that an international effort is necessary to give these problems sufficient exposure and to ensure that work continues on appropriate solutions. The future of nuclear research, with its many benefits to mankind, is in jeopardy in some countries, especially countries without nuclear power programmes, because effective solutions for extended interim storage and final disposition of spent research reactor fuels are not yet available. An advisory Group meeting was convened in Vienna to consider a Database on the Management and Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Research and Test Reactors. Sixteen experts from sixteen different countries participated in the Advisory Group meeting and presented country reports, which together represent an overview of the technologies used in spent fuel management and storage at research and test reactors world-wide. The sixteen country reports together with the database summary are presented in this publication. Refs, figs, tabs

  2. Babcock-pocket guide energy- and environmental engineering in the plant technology. Refractory construction, heat- and sound insulation, coatings. 4. ed.; Babcock-Taschenbuch Energie- und Umwelttechnik im Anlagenbau. Feuerfestbau, Waerme- und Schallschutz, Beschichtungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, W.E.

    2003-07-01

    Main topics of the pocket guide: constructions for refractories; thermal insulation for pipes, boilers and ceramic components; sound protection and measures on buildings; corrosion protection by coatings; ventilation in power plants; fire prevention in components and general fundamentals as data of technical, physical and chemical data of important materials. (GL)

  3. Research and test reactor fuel treatment at AREVA NC la Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The La Hague plant has a long successful history of treatment power reactor spent fuel. To accommodate a new contract, the process needed to be adapted to fuel from Research Test Reactors (RTR) taking into account the dimensional characteristics, the chemical composition and the high uranium enrichment of RTR fuel. Several treatment options resulted have been studied and proposed. The chosen approach for the detailed design consists of dissolving the RTR fuel in a dissolution pit in one line of dissolver facility (T1B). The process was designed for small RTR fuel elements composed of aluminium and uranium alloy. 'Taxi' baskets containing the RTR fuel elements are transferred from the fuel storage pools, to the feed cell in T1B. The fuel elements are loaded into canisters and transferred to a rack in the general maintenance cell. The RTR fuel canisters are picked up one by one and the fuel element is dropped into a transfer tube leading to the dissolution pit. The RTR dissolution process is fundamentally different from the continuous power reactor fuel dissolution process and is done in batches. The RTR fuel elements are completely dissolved in nitric acid. It appeared that the dissolution rate is higher than expected allowing more flexibility in operation. At the end of a batch, the solution is drained from the dissolver and diluted with UOX solutions from line T1A. The resulting UOX/RTR mixture complies with the specifications for downstream processing operations, including high level waste vitrification, where aluminium is incorporated into glass in accordance with specified limits. The innovative nature of the process, demanded by the special characteristics of the RTR fuel, required a major qualification program. The main objectives of the qualification program were to validate the dissolver pit concept, to verify basic RTR process data for the T1B production environment and to acquire data showing control of the process. The first active batch dissolution was

  4. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  5. Annual report of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center. FY 2007. April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), achieving the first criticality in March 1968, has been used to test the durability and integrity of reactor fuels and components, basic nuclear research, production of radioisotopes (RIs), and other purposes. The JMTR, however, was halted in August 2006 after its 165th cycle operation, and is currently undergoing partial renewal of the apparatus and installation of new irradiation equipment, aiming at restarting from 2011. In addition, to cope with strong requests from users to improve the usability of the JMTR, efforts are being made to increase reactor operating efficiency, shorten the turnaround time for obtaining results, and conduct other necessary tasks for the JMTR to recommence reoperation. The present report summarizes the activities carried out in 2007 for the refurbishment and restart of the JMTR. (author)

  6. Development of operation and maintenance technology for HTGRs by using HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Atsushi, E-mail: shimizu.atsushi35@jaea.go.jp [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kawamoto, Taiki [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Tochio, Daisuke [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Saito, Kenji; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Honma, Fumitaka; Furusawa, Takayuki; Saikusa, Akio [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Takada, Shoji [HTTR Reactor Engineering Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Shinozaki, Masayuki [HTTR Operation Section, Department of HTTR, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    To establish the technical basis of HTGR (High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor), the long term high temperature operation using HTTR was carried out in the high temperature test operation mode during 50-day since January till March, 2010. It is necessary to establish the technical basis of operation and maintenance by demonstrating the stability of plant during long-term operation and the reliability of components and facilities special to HTGRs, in order to attain the stable supply of the high temperature heat to the planned heat utilization system of HTTR. Test data obtained in the operation were evaluated for the technical issues which were extracted before the operation. As the results, it was confirmed that the temperatures and flow rate of primary and secondary coolant were well controlled within sufficiently small deviation against the disturbance by the atmospheric temperature variation in daily. Stability and reliability of the components and facility special to HTGRs was demonstrated through the long term high temperature operation by evaluating the heat transfer performance of high temperature components, the stability performance of pressure control to compensate helium gas leak, the reliability of the dynamic components such as helium gas circulators, the performance of heat-up protection of radiation shielding. Through the long term high temperature operation of HTTR, the technical basis for the operation and maintenance technology of HTGRs was established.

  7. Development of operation and maintenance technology for HTGRs by using HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish the technical basis of HTGR (High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor), the long term high temperature operation using HTTR was carried out in the high temperature test operation mode during 50-day since January till March, 2010. It is necessary to establish the technical basis of operation and maintenance by demonstrating the stability of plant during long-term operation and the reliability of components and facilities special to HTGRs, in order to attain the stable supply of the high temperature heat to the planned heat utilization system of HTTR. Test data obtained in the operation were evaluated for the technical issues which were extracted before the operation. As the results, it was confirmed that the temperatures and flow rate of primary and secondary coolant were well controlled within sufficiently small deviation against the disturbance by the atmospheric temperature variation in daily. Stability and reliability of the components and facility special to HTGRs was demonstrated through the long term high temperature operation by evaluating the heat transfer performance of high temperature components, the stability performance of pressure control to compensate helium gas leak, the reliability of the dynamic components such as helium gas circulators, the performance of heat-up protection of radiation shielding. Through the long term high temperature operation of HTTR, the technical basis for the operation and maintenance technology of HTGRs was established

  8. Mobile reactor concepts as applied to testing of compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact fusion reactor concepts have recently received increased emphasis because of advantages principally related to their low cost and short development time. Physics experiments are underway and test results are sufficiently encouraging to merit consideration of ignition-type experiments. Since experiments of this nature involve radioactivity, the requirement for test facilities which incorporate remote handling capabilities becomes apparent. One approach to a test facility concept which has particularly attractive features is based on the mobile test reactor concept employing facilities such as are found at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The mobile reactor test concept was developed in the 1950s and was used extensively in the testing of aircraft nuclear propulsion reactors at the INEL. In this instance, test reactors were assembled on a dolly and were transported to and from test facilities on a four-rail track system. Nuclear operations were conducted from heavily shielded underground control rooms and, for major maintenance operations, the reactors were unplugged and returned to a large, centrally located hot shop. A similar concept is envisioned for compact fusion reactor testing

  9. The mobile reactor concept as applied to testing of compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact fusion reactor concepts have recently received increased emphasis because of advantages principally related to their low cost and short development time. Physics experiments are underway and test results are sufficiently encouraging to merit consideration of ''ignition''-type experiments. Since experiments of this nature involve radioactivity, the requirement for test facilities which incorporate remote handling capabilities becomes apparent. One approach to a test facility concept which has particularly attractive features is based on the mobile test reactor concept employing facilities such as are found at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The mobile reactor test concept was developed in the 1950s and was used extensively in the testing of aircraft nuclear propulsion reactors at the INEL. In this instance, test reactors were assembled on a dolly and were transported to and from test facilities on a fourrail track system. Nuclear operations were conducted from heavily shielded underground control rooms and, for major maintenance operations, the reactors were ''unplugged'' and returned to a large, centrally located ''hot'' shop. A similar concept is envisioned for compact fusion reactor testing

  10. The test of the fuel assembly of the IVV-2M reactor at the IGR reactor under emergency modes with the flow rate blockage and power leap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results on studying into the IVV-2M fuel assembly operation in the IGR pulse reactor under conditions of coolant flow blockage and power pulse growth, simulating an accident with prompt rupture of pipeline in the primary coolant circuit for reactor operating at nominal power level and an accident connected with positive reactivity insertion at nominal reactor power with the account for reactor protection system signal delay are presented

  11. A single-stage high pressure steam injector for next generation reactors: test results and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam injectors can be used in advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for high pressure makeup water supply; this solution seems to be very attractive because of the ''passive'' features of steam injectors, that would take advantage of the available energy from primary steam without the introduction of any rotating machinery. The reference application considered in this work is a high pressure safety injection system for a BWR; a water flow rate of about 60 kg/s to be delivered against primary pressures covering a quite wide range up to 9 MPa is required. Nevertheless, steam driven water injectors with similar characteristics could be used to satisfy the high pressure core coolant makeup requirements of next generation PWRs. With regard to BWR application, an instrumented steam injector prototype with a flow rate scaling factor of about 1:6 has been built and tested. The tested steam injector operates at a constant inlet water pressure (about 0.2 MPa) and inlet water temperature ranging from 15 to 37oC, with steam pressure ranging from 2.5 to 8.7 MPa, always fulfilling the discharge pressure target (10% higher than steam pressure). To achieve these results an original double-overflow flow rate-control/startup system has been developed. (Author)

  12. UO2 and PuO2 utilization in high temperature engineering test reactor with helium coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Novitrian, Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Su'ud, Zaki

    2016-03-01

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is one of high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) types which has been developed by Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The HTTR is a graphite moderator, helium gas coolant, 30 MW thermal output and 950 °C outlet coolant temperature for high temperature test operation. Original HTTR uses UO2 fuel. In this study, we have evaluated the use of UO2 and PuO2 in form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in HTTR. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. The result shows that HTTR can obtain its criticality condition if the enrichment of 235U in loaded fuel is 18.0% or above.

  13. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results

  14. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

  15. Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST): Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multiloop integral system test (MIST) facility is part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of- coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock ampersand Wilcox (B ampersand W) designed plants. MIST is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the B ampersand W Owners group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and B ampersand W. The unique features of the B ampersand W design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral system facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST and two other supporting facilities were specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the once-through integral system (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and the other facilities will be used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such a RELAP5/MOD2 and TRAC-PF1, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The MIST program included funding for seven individual RELAP pre- and post-test predictions. The comparisons against data and final conclusions are the subject of this volume of the MIST Final Report. 15 refs., 227 figs., 17 tabs

  16. Manufacturing and licensing of a lead test assembly for the R2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Sweden there is a law stating that a reactor operator must have a final solution for the back-end of the fuel cycle. The R2 reactor, operated by Studsvik Nuclear outside Nykoeping in Sweden, has such a solution at hand until May 2006, through the US policy regarding Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, FRRSNF. For the period after that date the RERTR program has been working on a new fuel type the UMo fuel. However, this program is lagging behind and the full qualification program will not be finalised in time for the R2 needs. Based on this Studsvik Nuclear decided to go along on its own with an LTA program aiming for the full qualification of an UMo fuel design in 2005. In 2002, CERCA proposed to develop, manufacture and deliver to the R2 reactor, a new design of fuel element based on the alloy (UMo 7% alloy) as an alternative to the common Low Enriched Uranium silicide element. The development challenge was to keep the fuel element performances as high as possible without going beyond the actual inspection criteria. The specification agreed between STUDSVIK and CERCA showed the possibility to manufacture this high-density fuel element in CERCA's facility in Romans-sur-Isere (France). We propose to present how the fabrication was conducted and what were the main obtained results and how the licensing of and the introduction into the R2 reactor are planned. (author)

  17. Manufacturing and licensing of a lead test assembly for the R2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Sweden there is a law stating that a reactor operator must have a final solution for the back-end of the fuel cycle. The R2 reactor, operated by Studsvik Nuclear outside Nykoeping in Sweden, has such a solution at hand until May 2006, through the US policy regarding Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, FRRSNF. For the period after that date the RERTR program has been working on a new fuel type the UMo fuel. However, this program is lagging behind and the full qualification program will not be finalised in time for the R2 needs. Based on this Studsvik Nuclear decided to go along on its own with an LTA-program aiming for the full qualification of an UMo fuel design in 2005. In 2002, CERCA proposed to develop, manufacture and deliver to the R2 reactor, a new design of fuel element based on the alloy (UMo 7% alloy) as an alternative to the common Low Enriched Uranium silicide element. The development challenge was to keep the fuel element performances as high as possible without going beyond the actual inspection criteria. The specification agreed between STUDSVIK and CERCA showed the possibility to manufacture this high-density fuel element in CERCA's facility in Romans-sur-Isere (France). We propose to present how the fabrication was conducted and what were the main obtained results and how the licensing of and the introduction into the R2 reactor are planned. (author)

  18. Proceedings of the international symposium on materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Materials Testing Reactors hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The symposium was held on July 16 to 17, 2008, at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA. This symposium was also held for the 40th anniversary ceremony of Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) from achieving its first criticality. The objective of the symposium is to exchange the information on current status, future plan and so on among each testing reactors for the purpose of mutual understanding. There were 138 participants from Argentina, Belgium, France, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Korea, the Russian Federation, Sweden, the United State, Vietnam and Japan. The symposium was divided into four technical sessions and three topical sessions. Technical sessions addressed the general topics of 'status and future plan of materials testing reactors', 'material development for research and testing reactors', irradiation technology (including PIE technology)' and 'utilization with materials testing reactors', and 21 presentations were made. Also the topical sessions addressed 'establishment of strategic partnership', 'management on re-operation work at reactor trouble' and 'basic technology for neutron irradiation tests in MTRs', and panel discussion was made. The 21 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Retention of activation and fission radionuclides by mallards from the Test Reactor Area radioactive leaching pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty semi-wild mallard ducks were banded, fitted with dorsal and ventral thermoluminescent dosimeter packets, and released on the Test Reactor Area radioactive leaching ponds. Ducks were live captured after 75 days and 145 days on the pond, placed in metabolic cages and whole-body counted periodically for 52 days. Ducks from each group were sacrificed immediately after capture, dissected, and muscle, feather, gut, and liver samples submitted for analyses. The remaining ducks were also sacrificed and dissected after the 52 day counting period. Concentrations of the 17 gamma emitting radionuclides detected at capture and after 52 days of physical and biological decay were compared. Highest mean radionuclide concentrations were found in feathers followed by gut, liver, and muscle. Effective and biological halflives of Zn-65, Cr-51, Cs-134, Cs-137, and Se-75 were determined and compared with data from previous studies. Samples are currently being analyzed for Pu-238, Pu-239-240, Am-241, Cm-242, Cm-244 and Sr-90. Further data analyses will be completed after data collection has terminated

  20. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wiffen, F.W. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Fusion Energy

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  1. The installation of PEANO at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor: first test and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After extensive testing of PEANO with data from process simulators, the next step was to set-up an installation in a real process, where the signal validation is performed online. For this purpose the Halden Boiling Water Reactor was used. One implication is that recorded process data from past operation would be used for the training of the system. This type of data is corrupted with errors, faults, process noise or even previous sensor problems, which need to be removed before the data can be used. The pre-processing was therefore a very import step during this installation. A 15 minute average of 29 process signals, spread out over the primary, secondary and tertiary loops, was used. At the end of the design process a fuzzy-neural network resulted containing 5 clusters, that has been trained with over 20.000 patterns. To establish the TCP/IP connection to the process computer and receiving the process data in real-time, some extra software was developed. With this installation it has been shown that it is possible to have the PEANO Server and PEANO Client (monitoring unit) running on one machine (e.g. in the control room), while additional monitoring units are connected from a remote location (e.g. main office building). The first results show that the installation of PEANO is capable of performing its validation task properly, even during transients. Both start-up and shutdown situations can be handled without any problems. In situations where incoming patterns represent unknown process situations that have not been encountered during the training, the 'I don't know' answer was given. To test the ability to detect a sensor failure off-line tests have been run, where sensor faults and drifts were added (author) (ml)

  2. Evaluation of fracture toughness and tensile properties of reactor pressure vessel steel by small punch test and automated ball indentation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniature sample testing techniques like Small Punch Test (SPT) and Automated Ball Indentation (ABI) test are being developed to evaluate mechanical property and fracture toughness of reactor materials. Small size specimens provide the advantage of testing highly radioactive samples with a low manrem exposure. SPTand ABI tests were carried out on the prepared samples from Advance Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (ARPV) materials to evaluate the UTS, YS, fracture toughness values. The paper presents the comparative results of studies carried out, on A533B steel and Advanced Reactor Pressure Vessel (ARPV) steel. (author)

  3. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  4. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  5. Power supply for control and instrumentation in Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and operation of the four 'no-break' power supplies for control and instrumentation in the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR), Kalpakkam, are described. Interruptions in the power supplies are eliminated by redundancy and battery back-up source while voltage dips and transients are taken care by automatic regulation system. The four power supplies are : (1) 24 V D.C. exclusively for neutronic and safety circuits, (2) 48 V D.C. for control logic indication lamps and solenoid valves, (3) 220 V D.C. for switchgear control, control room emergency lighting and D.C. flushing oil pump for the turbine and (4) 220 V A.C. single-phase 50 H/Z for computers and electronics of control and instrumentation. Stationary lead-acid batteries (lead antimony type) in floating mode operation with rectifier/charger are used for emergency back-up. All these power supplies are fed by 415 V, 3-phase, 50 HZ emergency supply buses which are provided with diesel generator back-up. Static energy conversion system (in preference to mechanical rotation system) is used for A.C. to D.C. and also for A.C. to A.C. conversion. (M.G.B.)

  6. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion of research and test reactor cores from the use of high enrichment uranium to the use of low enrichment uranium depends on the cooperation of many research organizations, reactor operators, and government agencies. At a technical level, it involves almost all aspects of the fuel cycle, including fuel development, testing, shipping and reprocessing; experiment performance; economics; and safety and licensing aspects. The reactors involved and the conversion activities are distributed among approximately 25 countries, making this a subject which is best dealt with on an international basis. To foster direct communication in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the fifth of a series which began in 1978. The previous meetings were held at Argonne (International Meeting of Research Reactor Fuel Designers, Developers, and Fabricators, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 910, 1978), at Saclay (IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Research Reactor Core Conversions from HEU to LEU, Centre d'etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay, France, December 12-14, 1979), at Argonne (International Meeting on Development, Fabrication and Application of Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 12-14, 1980) and at Juelich (Seminar on Research Reactor Operation and Use, Juelich Nuclear Research Center, Juelich, F.R.G., September 48, 1981). Proceedings from the two most recent previous meetings were published as ANL/RERTR/TM-3 (CONF-801144) and IAEA-SR-77. The spirit of this meeting differs slightly from that of the previous meetings. The advances which have been made and the growing maturity of the effort have caused a gradual shift of emphasis away from those topics which dominated the floor during the first meetings, such as fuel and methods development, and towards topics which concern more

  7. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart

  8. Annual report of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center. FY 2008. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JMTR, one of the most high flux test reactors in the world, has been used for the irradiation experiments of fuels and materials related to LWRs, fundamental research and radioisotope productions. The JMTR was stopped at the beginning of August 2006 to conduct refurbishment works, and the reoperation will be planned from FY 2011. After reoperation, the JMTR will contribute to many fields, such as the lifetime extension of LWRs, expansion of industrial use, progress of science and technology. This report summarizes the activities on refurbishment works, development of new irradiation techniques, enhancement of reactor availability, etc. in FY 2008. (author)

  9. Annual report of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center. FY 2008. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JMTR, one of the most high flux test reactors in the world, has been used for the irradiation experiments of fuels and materials related to LWRs, fundamental research and radioisotope productions. The JMTR was stopped at the beginning of August 2006 to conduct refurbishment works, and the reoperation will be planned from FY 2011. After reoperation, the JMTR will contribute to many fields, such as the lifetime extension of LWRs, expansion of industrial use, progress of science and technology. This report summarizes the activities on refurbishment works, development of new irradiation techniques, enhancement of reactor availability, etc. (author)

  10. Design criteria, production and total integrity assessment of fuels of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the design criteria, production and total integrity of the HTTR fuels for the safety design of the reactor. The fuels were designed so that they should not lose their integrity even though taking account of various kinds of possible deteriorations during reactor service. Sufficiently low values of initial (as-produced) fuel failure fractions have been achieved, and experience of fuel production is enough for full core loading. Results of the present assessment have shown that total integrity of the fuels will be maintained successfully in terms of coating failure of the fuel particles, thermal and mechanical performance of the fuel compacts, graphite sleeves and fuel assemblies. (author)

  11. Development of ground water from the Carrizo sand and Wilcox group in Dimmit, Zavala, Maverick, Frio, Atacosa, Median, Bexar, Live Oak, McMullen, La Salle, and Webb Counties, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, E.A.

    1957-01-01

    The development of ground water for irrigation from the Carrizo sand south and southwest of San Antonio, Tex., has increased rapidly during the past few years. Declining pumping water levels in irrigation wells, caused by increased withdrawals, have caused considerable concern among the residents of the area. In response, the Nueces River Conservation and Reclamation District entered into a cooperative agreement with the Texas Board of Water Engineers and the United States Geological Survey to determine the extent of development and the rate of withdrawal that has cause the decline. All wells that discharged more than 150 gallons per minute for extended periods of time in 1955 from either the Carrizo sand or sands of the Wilcox group were studied and are shown on [late 1. Estimates were made of the total withdrawals by county and are given in table 2. Similar estimates of withdrawals in some of the counties for the irrigation years 1929-30, 1938-39, 1944-45, and 1947-48 are presented for comparison in table 3. Although the Carrizo sand is the principal source of ground water pumped in the area, estimate of withdrawals of water from the Wilcox were included in this inventory because (1) the formation appears to be hydraulically connected to the Carrizo sand, (2) the quality of water generally is good in the outcrop area of the Wilcox, and (3) appreciable withdrawals are being made from the Wilcox for irrigation in a few areas. The investigation covered an area of about 7,500 square miles and included all or parts of the following counties: Dimmit, Zavala, Maverick, Frio, Atascosa, Medina, Bexar, Live Oak, McMullen, La Salle, and Webb (fig. 1).

  12. Tower Shielding Reactor II design and operation report. Vol. 3. Assembling and testing of the control mechanism assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms that are operated to control the reactivity of the Tower Shielding Reactor II(TSR-II) are mounted on a Control Mechanism Housing (CMH) that is centered inside the reactor core. The information required to procure, fabricate, inspect, and assemble a CMH is contained in the ORNL engineering drawings listed in the appropriate sections. The components are fabricated and inspected from these drawings in accordance with a Quality Assurance Plan and a Manufacturing Plan. The material in this report describes the acceptance and performance tests of CMH subassemblies used ty the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) staff but it can also be used by personnel fabricating the components. This information which was developed and used before the advent of the formalized QA Program and Manufacturing Plans evolved during the fabrication and testing of the first five CMHs

  13. Simulation and testing of a vertical organometallic vapor phase epitaxy reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, R. A.; Barmawi, M.; Mindara, J. Y.

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to design a single wafer vertical organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) reactor which gives a uniform deposition around the symmetry axis. The vertical reactor under the consideration consist of a diffuser and a system of coaxial cylinders to laminarize the flow which may lead to a uniform deposition without rotating the susceptor. The simulation shows that for a susceptor with a radius of 2.5 cm, a uniformity can be achieved in a region of a radius of 2 cm within 1% for certain operating condition. The result is compared with the experimental measurement of TiO2 deposition from TTIP.

  14. The HTR-10 test reactor project and potential use of HTGR for non-electric application in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal is the dominant source of energy in China. This use of coal results in two significant problems for China; it is a major burden on the train, road and waterway transportation infrastructures and it is a significant source of environmental pollution. In order to ease the problems caused by the burning of coal and to help reduce the energy supply shortage in China, national policy has directed the development of nuclear power. This includes the erection of nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor types, specifically, the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The HTGR was chosen for its favorable safety features and its ability to provide high reactor outlet coolant temperatures for efficient power generation and high quality process heat for industrial applications. As the initial modular HTGR development activity within the Chinese High Technology Programme, a 10MW helium cooled test reactor is currently under construction on the site of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology northwest of Beijing. This plant features a pebble-bed helium cooled reactor with initial criticality anticipated in 1999. There will be two phases of high temperature heat utilization from the HTR-10. The first phase will utilize a reactor outlet temperature of 700 deg. C with a steam generator providing steam for a steam turbine cycle which works on an electrical/heat co-generation basis. The second phase is planned for a core outlet temperature of 900 deg. C to investigate a steam cycle/gas turbine combined cycle system with the gas turbine and the steam cycle being independently parallel in the secondary side of the plant. This paper provides a review of the technical design, licensing, safety and construction schedule for the HTR-10. It also addresses the potential uses of the HTGR for non-electric applications in China including process steam for the petrochemical industry, heavy oil recovery, coal conversion and

  15. MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND TEST REACTOR ALUMINUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL - A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-07-11

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program is responsible for the receipt and storage of aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel or used fuel until ultimate disposition. Aluminum research reactor used fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the U.S. and stored at DOE-EM storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper assesses the technologies and the options for safe transportation/receipt and interim storage of aluminum research reactor spent fuel and reviews the comprehensive strategy for its management. The U.S. Department of Energy uses the Appendix A, Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Criteria, to identify the physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of spent nuclear fuel to be returned to the United States under the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The fuel is further evaluated for acceptance through assessments of the fuel at the foreign sites that include corrosion damage and handleability. Transport involves use of commercial shipping casks with defined leakage rates that can provide containment of the fuel, some of which are breached. Options for safe storage include wet storage and dry storage. Both options must fully address potential degradation of the aluminum during the storage period. This paper focuses on the various options for safe transport and storage with respect to technology maturity and application.

  16. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  17. Two-phase control absorber development program: out-reactor tests and analysis to establish system operating characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-phase control absorber system uses a continuously flowing mixture of borated water and oxygen to regulate neutron flux in a reactor core. By varying the flow of water through the absorber element, the density and hence the neutron absorption of the mixture is controlled. The test facility was subjected to a comprehensive experimental program at different operating pressures to establish system operating characteristics so that a conceptual design for a power reactor could be developed. It was possible to establish the density operating range of the absorber, determine the desired water-valve flow characteristic required for constant gain in the flux regulating loop, validate the computer code which would be used for the static calculatons required for the conceptual design of an absorber system for a power reactor, and validate a dynamic, hybrid computer simulation of the two-phase control abosrber. (auth)

  18. Test and application of thermal neutron radiography facility at Xi'an pulsed reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Jun; Zhao Xiang Feng; Wang Dao Hua

    2002-01-01

    A thermal neutron radiography facility at Xi'an Pulsed Reactor is described as well as its characteristics and application. The experiment results show the inherent unsharpness of BAS ND is 0.15 mm. The efficient thermal neutron n/gamma ratio is lower in not only steady state configuration but also pulsing state configuration and it is improved using Pb filter

  19. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Final conceptual design report. [Overall cost and scheduling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-02-01

    The TFTR is the first U.S. magnetic confinement device planned to demonstrate the fusion of D-T at reactor power levels. This report addresses the physics objectives and the engineering goals of the TFTR project. Technical, cost, and schedule aspects of the project are included. (MOW)

  20. Non-Reactor testing stands for investigation of interaction of the fuel and constructive materials with the coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1991 in the United Expedition of Scientific and Industrial Corp. Luch the non-reactor experiments were beginning. The appearances accompanied by water cooling reactor heavy accident were studied. There are 'Ruchej', 'LAVA', 'SLAVA' experimental facilities working out for such purposes. The 'Ruchej' facility is intended for conducting of the investigation of behavior of water cooling reactor core constructive elements in the high temperature gas-steam media. There were 27 testing start-up of 'Ruchej' facility and 70 fuel elements shells samples and 2 models fuel elements. 'LAVA' facility is intended to study the processes of the interaction of the melting composition of WWER-1000 reactor core with water. The 'SLAVA' facility is destined for study of corium jet characteristics and the processes of interaction of corium with WWER-1000 reactor constructive materials. The corium generation is realized in the electric melting furnaces (EPP-1, EPP-2) and both of them could be using for the 'LAVA' facility and the 'SLAVA' facility. The expenses, temperature, pressure of the water in the facility's cooling highway, pressure of gas within device, temperature of the corium or its imitator, geometrical parameters of stream' temperature of construct device's elements, electric parameters (voltage, current) has being registered