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Sample records for b19 chlamydia pneumoniae

  1. No evidence of parvovirus B19, Chlamydia pneumoniae or human herpes virus infection in temporal artery biopsies in patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Tarp, B; Obel, N

    2002-01-01

    conditions. DNA was extracted from frozen biopsies and PCR was used to amplify genes from Chlamydia pneumoniae, parvovirus B19 and each of the eight human herpes viruses: herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus and human herpes viruses HHV-6, -7 and -8...

  2. Chlamydia Pneumoniae Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary ... Pneumoniae Infections Page Content Article Body When you hear the word chlamydia, you might think of the sexually transmitted disease (STD) by that ...

  3. A review of Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Fasting, H; Henneberg, E W

    1999-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium that causes acute upper and lower respiratory infections. Its distribution is worldwide. Seroepidemiological studies have shown an association between C. pneumoniae and atherosclerosis, and the risk of acute myocardial...

  4. Influenza B pneumonia with Staphylococcus aureus superinfection associated with parvovirus B19 and concomitant agranulocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, S; Adams, I; Arnold, U; Kalinski, T; Aumann, V; König, W; König, B

    2003-10-01

    An 11-year-old patient with anamnestic fever for 3 days and signs of upper respiratory tract infection underwent fulminant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia with concomitant agranulocytosis. From autopsia influenza B virus and parvovirus B19 were detected by nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT). Specific IgG but no IgM points to preexisting parvovirus B19 infection. Whether in this case agranulocytosis can be interpreted as early manifestation of reactivated parvovirus B19 infection is under discussion. Therefore, parvovirus B19 could have provoked a foudroyant course of influenza B pneumonia which was superinfected with S. aureus.

  5. Infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii by Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, A; Heinemann, M; Simnacher, U; Marre, R

    1997-04-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is an intracellular respiratory pathogen, which, similar to Legionella, might have developed mechanisms to escape the intracellular bactericidal activity of both human host cells and amoeba. We therefore investigated the intracellular growth and survival of C. pneumoniae in Acanthamoeba castellanii by using cell culture, immunofluorescence microscopy, and electron microscopy. A castellanii was incubated with purified elementary bodies of C. pneumoniae TW 183 at a concentration of 10(6) inclusion-forming units (IFU)/ml to give a ratio of approximately 1 IFU of C. pneumoniae per amoeba. Quantitative determination of chlamydial growth within A. castellanii revealed viable and infective C. pneumoniae in the range of 10(4) to 10(5) IFU/ml between days 7 and 14 postinfection. Immunofluorescence analysis and transmission electron microscopy with subsequent immunogold staining confirmed evidence of infection of the amoebae by C. Pneumoniae and additionally revealed that C. pneumoniae entered the typical growth cycle. Our results show that amoebae allow the survival of C. pneumoniae, suggesting that amoebae may serve as an additional reservoir for Chlamydia or Chlamydia-related organisms.

  6. Molecular biology of the Chlamydia pneumoniae surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Østergaard, Lars; Birkelund, Svend

    1997-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniaeis a fastidious microorganism with a characteristic biphasic lifecycle causing a variety of human respiratory tract infections. There is limited knowledge about the molecular biology of C. pneumoniae, and only a few genes have been sequenced. The structure of the chlamydial...

  7. Chlamydia pneumoniae and Atherosclerosis: The End?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the Journal, Patrick et al (pages 298-300 report on the results of a pilot study testing the hypothesis that seropositivity to Chlamydia pneumoniae together with a specific bacteriophage protein is associated with first-episode myocardial infarction or unstable angina. The study evolved from an earlier report suggesting that C pneumoniae with phage seropositivity was strongly associated with the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm. The phage association suggested a potential explanation for some of the variability in previous studies exploring C pneumoniae as a cause for atherosclerosis (ie, only selected strains of C pneumoniae were pathogenic. Patrick et al found no significant association or trend, and the authors concluded that the negative findings in their pilot study did not support further studies to address this potential association.

  8. Chlamydia pneumoniae e doença aterosclerótica = Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehnem, Luciele

    2010-01-01

    Conclusões: a infecção por Chlamydia pneumoniae pode constituir achado de importância etiopatogênica na ateromatose. Entretanto, a relevância clínica dessa associação, como mostram os estudos epidemiológicos e ensaios clínicos aqui revisados, ainda é incerta

  9. [Chlamydia pneumoniae in patients with acquired pneumonia in the Santiago of Chile community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos, T; Saldías, F; Cartagena, C; Jover, E; Alvarez, M; Moreno, R

    1998-12-01

    The prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection varies according to the population and geographic area studied. To evaluate the incidence of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in Chilean subjects with community acquired pneumonia. Between 1995 and 1997, patients with community acquired pneumonia attending two emergency rooms in Santiago, were studied. The diagnosis of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection was based on the detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae specific IgG antibody in samples from both the acute and convalescent phase, using an indirect microimmunofluorescent technique. Evidence of present infection was defined as seroconversion, a significant increase in the titer of the second sample and an initial titer equal or greater than 1/512. During the study period, 160 patients consulted and seven (six male), aged 54 +/- 27 years old, complied with the diagnostic criteria of present Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. These patients had no special clinical or radiological features. Five of seven patients improved without any specific treatment. Eight percent of this sample of patients with community acquired pneumonia had Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. This agent should be included in the design of empiric treatment schemes, although our results cast doubt on the pathogenic role of Chlamydia pneumoniae in pneumonia.

  10. Pneumonia due to Chlamydia pecorum in a Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, J T; Gillett, A K; Palmieri, C; Feng, T; Higgins, D P

    2016-11-01

    Chlamydiosis is a common infectious disease of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), but Chlamydia spp. have not yet been demonstrated to cause pneumonia in these animals. A juvenile male koala died following an episode of respiratory disease. At necropsy examination, the lung tissue was consolidated. Microscopical lesions in the lung included pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia, proliferation of bronchiolar and alveolar epithelium and interstitial fibrosis. Hyperplastic bronchiolar epithelial cells contained aggregates of small basophilic punctate organisms, which were confirmed as chlamydiae by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Real-time polymerase chain reaction identified these as Chlamydia pecorum. This report provides the best evidence to date of chlamydial infection causing pneumonia in a koala, and the first evidence that C. pecorum is capable of infecting the bronchiolar epithelium of the koala. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chlamydia pneumoniae : studies on an emerging pathogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.A.J. Verkooyen (Roel)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe Chlamydiae are characterized as bacteria because of the composition of their cell wall and their growth by binary division. However, they are obligate intracellular bacterial parasites of eukaryotic cells that have a unique replication cycle similar to Rickettsia. Chlamydial

  12. Detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients

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    Dunya Fareed Salloom

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis is a complex debilitating disease because its pathogenesis is not clear. This study aims at detecting some pathogenesis factors that lead to induce the disease. Chlamydia pneumoniae is one of these pathogenesis factors which acts as a triggering factor for the disease. The study groups included forty Iraqi Ankylosing spondylitis patients and forty healthy persons as a control group. Immunological and molecular examinations were done to detect Chlamydia. pneumoniae in AS group. The immunological results were performed by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA to detect anti-IgG and anti-IgM antibodies of C. pneumoniae revealed that five of forty AS patients' samples (12.5% were positive for anti-IgG and IgM C. pneumoniae antibodies compared to controls which revealed seronegative. Molecular detection included 16srRNA and HSP-70 genes were to ensure the serological examination for detection of bacteria in the five blood samples which were positive; therefore, these results improved that C. pneumoniae played a role in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  13. Evaluation of Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae as etiologic agents of persistent cough in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, Robert M; Castilla, Elias A; Laus, Stella; Kozy, Anita; Atchison, Robert W; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Ward, Joel I; Greenberg, David P

    2002-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were evaluated as agents of persistent cough in adolescents and adults (n = 491). Tests of 473 respiratory specimens by culture or PCR or both identified four episodes (0.8%) of M. pneumoniae-associated illness and no episodes of C. pneumoniae illness, suggesting that these bacteria do not frequently cause persistent cough.

  14. Mycoplasma contamination of Chlamydia pneumoniae isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huniche, BS; Jensen, Lise Torp; Birkelund, Svend

    1998-01-01

    We examined 6 C. pneumonia isolates from The American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and 2 Finnish isolates for Mycoplasma contamination. Three of the ATCC isolates and both of the Finnish isolates were Mycoplasma-contaminated. The contaminants were characterized by means of growth in BEa and BEg...... media, immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Two of the 6 ATCC isolates [ATCC VR1355 (TWAR strain 2043) and ATCC VR1356 (TWAR strain 2023)] were infected with Mycoplasma hominis and 1 isolate [ATCC VR2282 (TWAR strain TW183)] was contaminated with both...... Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma orale, whereas 3 of the ATCC isolates [ATCC VR1310, ATCC VR1360 (TWAR strain CM-1) and ATCC 53592 (TWAR strain AR39)] were not contaminated. The Finnish C. pneumoniae isolates Kajaani 6 and Parola were found to be contaminated with M. hominis and M. orale, respectively...

  15. Immunoglobulin A antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae are associated with expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Vammen, Sten

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the possible association between the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae.......The aim of this study was to examine the possible association between the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae....

  16. The progression of lower limb atherosclerosis is associated with IgA antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Vammen, Sten; Lind, I

    1999-01-01

    to study the influence of serologically diagnosed chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae on the progression of lower limb atherosclerosis in a group of disposed men.......to study the influence of serologically diagnosed chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae on the progression of lower limb atherosclerosis in a group of disposed men....

  17. The Association Between Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Chlamydia pneumoniae has been linked with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases; however, data on stroke and cerebrovascular accidents are sparse. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the association between C. pneumoniae infection and ischemic stroke. Patients and Methods In a case-control study, 141 patients, admitted with ischemic stroke, were compared with gender and age-matched control subjects (n = 141. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit, the presence of C. pneumoniae IgG and IgA in the patients’ sera was determined. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 15 and were compared between the two groups using T-test and chi square test. Results The mean ages of the case and control groups were 68.97 ± 12.29 and 66.95 ± 6.68 years old, respectively. The difference between these two groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.102. The seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae-specific IgG were 78.7% in the patients with stroke and 52.5% in the control group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001. The seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae-specific IgA were 41.1% in the stroke and 15.6% in the control group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001. Conclusions The results supported the hypothesis that serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection may be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular accident.

  18. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections from Lima, Peru.

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    Juana Del Valle-Mendoza

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae are atypical pathogens responsible for pneumonia and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in low income countries. The study objective is to determine the prevalence of this pathogens in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections.A consecutive cross-sectional study was conducted in Lima, Peru from May 2009 to September 2010. A total of 675 children admitted with clinical diagnoses of acute respiratory infections were tested for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and clinical symptoms were registered by the attending physician.Mycoplasma pneumonia was detected in 25.19% (170/675 of nasopharyngeal samples and Chlamydia pneumonia in 10.52% (71/675. The most common symptoms in patients with these atypical pathogens were rhinorrhea, cough and fever. A higher prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae cases were registered in summer, between December 2009 and March 2010.Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumonia are a significant cause of morbidity in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections (ARI. Further studies should evaluate the use of reliable techniques such as PCR in Peru in order to avoid underdiagnoses of these atypical pathogens.

  19. Lead Discovery Strategies for Identification of Chlamydia pneumoniae Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanski, Leena; Vuorela, Pia

    2016-11-28

    Throughout its known history, the gram-negative bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae has remained a challenging target for antibacterial chemotherapy and drug discovery. Owing to its well-known propensity for persistence and recent reports on antimicrobial resistence within closely related species, new approaches for targeting this ubiquitous human pathogen are urgently needed. In this review, we describe the strategies that have been successfully applied for the identification of nonconventional antichlamydial agents, including target-based and ligand-based virtual screening, ethnopharmacological approach and pharmacophore-based design of antimicrobial peptide-mimicking compounds. Among the antichlamydial agents identified via these strategies, most translational work has been carried out with plant phenolics. Thus, currently available data on their properties as antichlamydial agents are described, highlighting their potential mechanisms of action. In this context, the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the intracellular growth and survival of C . pneumoniae is discussed. Owing to the complex and often complementary pathways applied by C. pneumoniae in the different stages of its life cycle, multitargeted therapy approaches are expected to provide better tools for antichlamydial therapy than agents with a single molecular target.

  20. Lead Discovery Strategies for Identification of Chlamydia pneumoniae Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Hanski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Throughout its known history, the gram-negative bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae has remained a challenging target for antibacterial chemotherapy and drug discovery. Owing to its well-known propensity for persistence and recent reports on antimicrobial resistence within closely related species, new approaches for targeting this ubiquitous human pathogen are urgently needed. In this review, we describe the strategies that have been successfully applied for the identification of nonconventional antichlamydial agents, including target-based and ligand-based virtual screening, ethnopharmacological approach and pharmacophore-based design of antimicrobial peptide-mimicking compounds. Among the antichlamydial agents identified via these strategies, most translational work has been carried out with plant phenolics. Thus, currently available data on their properties as antichlamydial agents are described, highlighting their potential mechanisms of action. In this context, the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the intracellular growth and survival of C. pneumoniae is discussed. Owing to the complex and often complementary pathways applied by C. pneumoniae in the different stages of its life cycle, multitargeted therapy approaches are expected to provide better tools for antichlamydial therapy than agents with a single molecular target.

  1. Methods for Real-Time PCR-Based Diagnosis of Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia abortus Infections in an Opened Molecular Diagnostic Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opota, Onya; Brouillet, René; Greub, Gilbert; Jaton, Katia

    2017-01-01

    The advances in molecular biology of the last decades have dramatically improved the field of diagnostic bacteriology. In particular, PCR-based technologies have impacted the diagnosis of infections caused by obligate intracellular bacteria such as pathogens from the Chlamydiacae family. Here, we describe a real-time PCR-based method using the Taqman technology for the diagnosis of Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia abortus infection. The method presented here can be applied to various clinical samples and can be adapted on opened molecular diagnostic platforms.

  2. Inclusion Fluorescent-Antibody Test as a Screening Assay for Detection of Antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Tapia, Olga; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Sevrioukov, Evgueni; Hamor, Kathi; de la Maza, Luis M.; Peterson, Ellena M.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the ability of the inclusion immunofluorescence assay (inclusion IFA) to act as a screening test to detect samples with antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae; microimmunofluorescence (MIF) was used as the “gold standard.” In addition, the inclusion IFA was compared using HEp-2 cells infected with either C. pneumoniae CM-1 or Chlamydia trachomatis serovar E. A total of 331 serum samples representing a range of MIF titers were evaluated. The sensitivities of the ...

  3. Performance of three microimmunofluorescence assays for detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae immunoglobulin M, G, and A antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Mette; Berthelsen, Lene; Lind, Inga

    2002-01-01

    Labsystems (LAB) and MRL Diagnostics (MRL) by investigation of sera from three groups of patients: group I, 83 sera from 28 patients with atypical pneumonia; group II, 37 sera from 16 patients with acute C. pneumoniae or Chlamydia psittaci respiratory tract infection confirmed by PCR or culture; group III......The microimmunofluorescence (MIF) test is considered the "gold standard" for laboratory diagnosis of acute and chronic Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. The performance of a MIF test based on C. pneumoniae antigen from Washington Research Foundation (WRF) was compared with those of assays from...

  4. Chlamydia pneumoniae acute liver infection affects hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangoni, Antonella; Fiorino, Erika; Gilardi, Federica; Aldini, Rita; Scotti, Elena; Nardini, Paola; Foschi, Claudio; Donati, Manuela; Montagnani, Marco; Cevenini, Monica; Franco, Placido; Roda, Aldo; Crestani, Maurizio; Cevenini, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae has been linked to atherosclerosis, strictly associated with hyperlipidemia. The liver plays a central role in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Since in animal models C. pneumoniae can be found at hepatic level, this study aims to elucidate whether C. pneumoniae infection accelerates atherosclerosis by affecting lipid metabolism. Thirty Balb/c mice were challenged intra-peritoneally with C. pneumoniae elementary bodies and thirty with Chlamydia trachomatis, serovar D. Thirty mice were injected with sucrose-phosphate-glutamate buffer, as negative controls. Seven days after infection, liver samples were examined both for presence of chlamydia and expression of genes involved in inflammation and lipid metabolism. C. pneumoniae was isolated from 26 liver homogenates, whereas C. trachomatis was never re-cultivated (P triglycerides levels compared both with negative controls (P metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation of Chlamydia abortus from a laboratory worker diagnosed with atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Nieves; Caro, M Rosa; Gallego, M Carmen; Murcia-Belmonte, Antonio; Álvarez, Daniel; Del Río, Laura; Cuello, Francisco; Buendía, Antonio J; Salinas, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the aetiological agent of atypical pneumonia in human can sometimes be a tedious process, especially in cases where Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella species and Chlamydia pneumoniae are ruled out. In such cases, a correct anamnesis of the patient is basic to clarify which pathogens might have produced the infection. For this reason, health professionals including veterinarians and laboratory personnel working with zoonotic pathogens should keep their doctors informed. A human case of atypical pneumonia linked to Chlamydia abortus is reported. A 47-year-old male, a veterinarian researcher into chlamydiae, developed respiratory symptoms, breathing problems and high fever. Serological analyses ruled out the involvement of several respiratory pathogens, such as M. pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Rickettsia conorii and C. pneumoniae, and Chlamydia abortus was identified as the possible aetiological agent of the infection. The isolation of C. abortus from the patient's sputum and subsequent molecular analysis confirmed the presence of this microorganism. As far as we know, although C. abortus has not been previously described as capable of causing pneumonia in humans, this is the first reported case of atypical pneumonia in which C. abortus is thought to have played an aetiological role.

  6. Proteolytic cleavage of the Chlamydia pneumoniae major outer membrane protein in the absence of Pmp10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Stefan; Timmerman, E; Gevaert, K

    2007-01-01

    The genome of the obligate intracellular bacteria Chlamydia pneumoniae contains 21 genes encoding polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmp). While no function has yet been attributed to the Pmps, they may be involved in an antigenic variation of the Chlamydia surface. It has previously been demonstrated...... that Pmp10 is differentially expressed in the C. pneumoniae CWL029 isolate. To evaluate whether the absence of Pmp10 in the outer membrane causes further changes to the C. pneumoniae protein profile, we subcloned the CWL029 isolate and selected a clone with minimal Pmp10 expression. Subsequently, we...

  7. Chlamydia pneumoniae hides inside apoptotic neutrophils to silently infect and propagate in macrophages.

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    Jan Rupp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracellular pathogens have developed elaborate strategies for silent infection of preferred host cells. Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common pathogen in acute infections of the respiratory tract (e.g. pneumonia and associated with chronic lung sequelae in adults and children. Within the lung, alveolar macrophages and polymorph nuclear neutrophils (PMN are the first line of defense against bacteria, but also preferred host phagocytes of chlamydiae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We could show that C. pneumoniae easily infect and hide inside neutrophil granulocytes until these cells become apoptotic and are subsequently taken up by macrophages. C. pneumoniae infection of macrophages via apoptotic PMN results in enhanced replicative activity of chlamydiae when compared to direct infection of macrophages, which results in persistence of the pathogen. Inhibition of the apoptotic recognition of C. pneumoniae infected PMN using PS- masking Annexin A5 significantly lowered the transmission of chlamydial infection to macrophages. Transfer of apoptotic C. pneumoniae infected PMN to macrophages resulted in an increased TGF-ss production, whereas direct infection of macrophages with chlamydiae was characterized by an enhanced TNF-alpha response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data suggest that C. pneumoniae uses neutrophil granulocytes to be silently taken up by long-lived macrophages, which allows for efficient propagation and immune protection within the human host.

  8. Isolation of Chlamydia abortus from a laboratory worker diagnosed with atypical pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Nieves; Caro, M. Rosa; Gallego, M. Carmen; Murcia-Belmonte, Antonio; ?lvarez, Daniel; del R?o, Laura; Cuello, Francisco; Buend?a, Antonio J.; Salinas, Jes?s

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying the aetiological agent of atypical pneumonia in human can sometimes be a tedious process, especially in cases where Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella species and Chlamydia pneumoniae are ruled out. In such cases, a correct anamnesis of the patient is basic to clarify which pathogens might have produced the infection. For this reason, health professionals including veterinarians and laboratory personnel working with zoonotic pathogens should keep their doctors informed. ...

  9. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and acute encephalitis and poliomyelitis-like flaccid paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kanae; Kano, Gen; Shibata, Mayumi; Sakamoto, Izumi; Matsui, Hirofumi; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2011-05-01

    A 3-year-old male presented with Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The patient developed an episode of HLH with severe skin eruption following C. pneumoniae pneumonia. Symptoms responded to steroid/cyclosporine A therapy, but the patient slowly lost consciousness and developed systemic flaccid paralysis. He was diagnosed with encephalitis/myelitis by brain and spinal MRI. Neurological symptoms and signs gradually resolved. We thought that the immune response to C. pneumoniae infection triggered the development of HLH, associated with unusual neurological complications. This report describes a novel case of C. pneumoniae-associated HLH and with poliomyelitis like flaccid paralysis. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Genomic factors related to tissue tropism in Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

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    Weinmaier, Thomas; Hoser, Jonathan; Eck, Sebastian; Kaufhold, Inga; Shima, Kensuke; Strom, Tim M; Rattei, Thomas; Rupp, Jan

    2015-04-07

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) are obligate intracellular bacteria that cause acute infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract and have been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases. Although of significant clinical relevance, complete genome sequences of only four clinical Cpn strains have been obtained. All of them were isolated from the respiratory tract and shared more than 99% sequence identity. Here we investigate genetic differences on the whole-genome level that are related to Cpn tissue tropism and pathogenicity. We have sequenced the genomes of 18 clinical isolates from different anatomical sites (e.g. lung, blood, coronary arteries) of diseased patients, and one animal isolate. In total 1,363 SNP loci and 184 InDels have been identified in the genomes of all clinical Cpn isolates. These are distributed throughout the whole chlamydial genome and enriched in highly variable regions. The genomes show clear evidence of recombination in at least one potential region but no phage insertions. The tyrP gene was always encoded as single copy in all vascular isolates. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed distinct evolutionary lineages containing primarily non-respiratory Cpn isolates. In one of these, clinical isolates from coronary arteries and blood monocytes were closely grouped together. They could be distinguished from all other isolates by characteristic nsSNPs in genes involved in RB to EB transition, inclusion membrane formation, bacterial stress response and metabolism. This study substantially expands the genomic data of Cpn and elucidates its evolutionary history. The translation of the observed Cpn genetic differences into biological functions and the prediction of novel pathogen-oriented diagnostic strategies have to be further explored.

  11. Immunoglobulin A antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae are associated with expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J.S; Juul, Svend; Vammen, S

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the possible association between the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae. METHODS: Patients from a hospital-based mass screening programme for AAA with annual follow-up (mean 2.7 years...

  12. Relationship between Chlamydia pneumonia and helicobacter pylori with atherosclerosis

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    ali Pooria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pooria A1, Maasoomi M2, Rafiee E3, Rezaee M4, Sabzi F5, Hossain Zadegan H6, Salehi M7, Mozaffari P8 1. Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 2. Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, 3. Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pathology 4. Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences 5. Assistant Professor, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences 6. Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 7. Bsc in Nursing, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences 8. Instructor, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and midwifery, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of deaths in the developed countries and causes one million mortalities per year in the USA. Smoking, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidemia, stress, and low activity are known to be the causes of atherosclerosis. The objective of this study is to confirm the relationship between chlamydia pneumonia (Cpn, as well as helicobacter pylori (Hp and atherosclerosis. Materials and methods: In this analytical case-control study two groups of patients were studied. The first group including 30 patients over 30 years old with coronary artery disease were operated using coronary artery bypass graft. The control group included 30 persons assessed with angiography and having normal coronary arteries. The data were collected and analyzed using statistical methods. Results: The two groups were similar in terms of IgA and IgG anti-Cpn, and IgG anti- Hp but they were statistically different concerning IgA anti-Hp which had more positive cases in the case group in comparison with the

  13. Immunoblotting analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae recombinant MOMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vammen, Sten; Vorum, Henrik; Ostergaard, L

    2002-01-01

    and electron microscopy. However, the correlation between demonstrating C. pneumoniae DNA or antigen in tissue from plaque material or aneurysms and the antibody titres in serum is controversial. The specificity of immunohistochemical procedures is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the possibility......antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae have been associated with atherosclerosis and with expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). C. pneumoniae has been demonstrated in coronary arteries, AAA and the carotid arteries by use of polymerase chain reactions (PCR), immunohistochemical procedures...

  14. Detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae in a collection of captive snakes and response to treatment with marbofloxacin.

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    Rüegg, S R; Regenscheit, N; Origgi, F C; Kaiser, C; Borel, N

    2015-09-01

    In a collection of 58 snakes comprising predominantly Eurasian vipers in Switzerland, five snakes died unexpectedly during hibernation from 2009 to 2012. In one snake, organisms resembling chlamydiae were detected by immunohistochemistry in multiple histiocytic granulomas. Real-time quantitative PCR and microarray analysis were used to determine the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in tissue samples and cloacal/choanal swabs from snakes in the collection; 8/53 (15.1%) of the remaining snakes were positive. Although one infected snake had suppurative periglossitis, infection with C. pneumoniae did not appear to be associated with specific clinical signs in snakes. Of seven snakes treated with 5 mg/kg marbofloxacin IM once daily, five became PCR negative for C. pneumoniae following treatment, whereas one animal remained positive and one snake was lost to follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Outbreak of Pneumonia in the Setting of Fatal Pneumococcal Meningitis among US Army Trainees: Potential Role of Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection

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    Mitchell Stephanie L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to the civilian population, military trainees are often at increased risk for respiratory infections. We investigated an outbreak of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia that was recognized after 2 fatal cases of serotype 7F pneumococcal meningitis were reported in a 303-person military trainee company (Alpha Company. Methods We reviewed surveillance data on pneumonia and febrile respiratory illness at the training facility; conducted chart reviews for cases of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia; and administered surveys and collected nasopharyngeal swabs from trainees in the outbreak battalion (Alpha and Hotel Companies, associated training staff, and trainees newly joining the battalion. Results Among Alpha and Hotel Company trainees, the average weekly attack rates of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia were 1.4% and 1.2% (most other companies at FLW: 0-0.4%. The pneumococcal carriage rate among all Alpha Company trainees was 15% with a predominance of serotypes 7F and 3. Chlamydia pneumoniae was identified from 31% of specimens collected from Alpha Company trainees with respiratory symptoms. Conclusion Although the etiology of the outbreak remains unclear, the identification of both S. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae among trainees suggests that both pathogens may have contributed either independently or as cofactors to the observed increased incidence of pneumonia in the outbreak battalion and should be considered as possible etiologies in outbreaks of pneumonia in the military population.

  16. Chlamydia pneumoniae and symptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaque: a prospective study Chlamydia pneumoniae e placa aterosclerótica sintomática de carótida: um estudo prospectivo

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    Rubens J. Gagliardi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the possible link between symptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaque and Chlamydia pneumoniae. BACKGROUND: Recently, several studies have demonstrated that there may be a possible link between Chlamydia pneumonia and carotid atherosclerosis, however the real role of Chlamydia pneumoniae is not completely understood. METHOD: This is a prospective study with a total of 52 patients analyzed. All patients had been submitted to endarterectomy, and had suffered thrombotic ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack up to 60 days prior to the surgery. Every patient presented carotid stenosis over 70%. The plaque was removed during the surgery and the laboratory exams were immediately done. Evaluation of Chlamydia pneumoniae DNA was done using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. RESULTS: The PCR analyses of all 52 patients were negative for Chlamydia pneumoniae. CONCLUSION: These initial results do not show a relationship between Chlamydia pneumoniae and symptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaque.OBJETIVO: Investigar a possível relação entre placa sintomática de carótidas e Chlamydia pneumoniae. INTRODUÇÃO: Vários estudos têm demonstrado uma possível relação entre Chlamydia pneumonia e aterosclerose carotídea, entretanto o papel definitivo da bactéria não é totalmente conhecido. Há muita especulação: poderia iniciar o processo aterosclerótico, agravá-lo ou desestabilizá-lo. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo com um total de 52 pacientes, endarterectomizados e previamente acometidos de acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico ou crise isquêmica transitória, em até 60 dias antes da cirurgia. Todos os pacientes apresentavam estenose carotídea superior a 70%. Os testes laboratoriais foram realizados imediatamente após a endarterectomia. A Chlamydia pneumoniae foi pesquisada através de exame de DNA com reação de polimerização em cadeia (PCR. RESULTADOS: O PCR dos 52 pacientes foram negativos para Chlamydia

  17. Molecular biology of Chlamydia pneumoniae surface proteins and their role in immunopathogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Boesen, Thomas; Hjernø, Karin

    1999-01-01

    present on the surface of the bacteria, we analyzed what components are present on the C pneumoniae surface. We identified a family of proteins, the GGAI or Omp4-15 proteins, of which at least 3 are present on the surface of C pneumoniae. We immunized rabbits with recombinant GGAI proteins and used......BACKGROUND: The association of Chlamydia pneumoniae with the development of atherosclerosis is based on serology and on detection of C pneumoniae-specific DNA by polymerase chain reaction in the atheromas. METHODS AND RESULTS: Because the humoral immune response frequently recognizes epitopes...... these antibodies in immunofluorescence microscopy of experimentally infected mice. In lung sections, a massive infiltration with polymorph nuclear neutrophil cells was observed. In the bronchial epithelial cells, C pneumoniae inclusions were seen. Evidence was found of differential expression of the GGAI proteins...

  18. Serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Xueyu Chen

    Full Text Available We investigated the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration (AMD.A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology abstracts were searched to identify studies investigating the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration. The quality of original studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Heterogeneity was explored with meta-regression. The odds ratios (ORs and standardized mean differences (SMD of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection between AMD patients and controls were pooled.In total, 9 studies met the inclusion criteria using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale scores ranging from 4 to 9. There was heterogeneity among studies due to a difference in the study designs and measurement of exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. The overall OR of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with AMD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.57, P = 0.56. The overall SMD of antibody titer between AMD and control was 0.43 (95% confidence interval: -0.12 to 0.99, P = 0.13.Evidence from the current published literature suggested no statistically significant association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and AMD.

  19. Serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueyu; Jhanji, Vishal; Chen, Chupeng; Chen, Haoyu

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology abstracts were searched to identify studies investigating the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration. The quality of original studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Heterogeneity was explored with meta-regression. The odds ratios (ORs) and standardized mean differences (SMD) of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection between AMD patients and controls were pooled. In total, 9 studies met the inclusion criteria using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale scores ranging from 4 to 9. There was heterogeneity among studies due to a difference in the study designs and measurement of exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. The overall OR of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with AMD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.57, P = 0.56). The overall SMD of antibody titer between AMD and control was 0.43 (95% confidence interval: -0.12 to 0.99, P = 0.13). Evidence from the current published literature suggested no statistically significant association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and AMD.

  20. Role of Chlamydia pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of hypertrophy and adenoid tissue inflammation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicka, Anna; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Podsiadły, Edyta; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Rogulska, Joanna; Demkow, Urszula

    2016-10-31

    A tropism to epithelial cells and lymphocytes, an inhibition of apoptosis in host cells, an ability to occurrence in persistent form resistant to antibiotic treatment are the features of Chlamydia pneumoniae, which can have connection with chronic inflammation of an adenoid tissue and adenoid hypertrophy. This study aimed to (1) detect the C. pneumoniae in an adenoid in children undergoing adenoidectomy, (2) estimate a connection between C. pneumoniae occurrence and the size of adenoid, (3) demonstration in which of adenoid cells C. pneumoniae occurs most often. The examined group consisted of 200 children aged from 2 to 16 years (mean age 6,4) undergoing adenoidectomy. In all children during qualification for adenoidectomy a fiberoscopic examination of the nasopharynx was performed. A part of removed adenoid tissue was analysed by real-time PCR for C. pneumoniae. Adenoids from children with positive PCR examination and from 10 children with negative PCR examination were examined using immunohistochemistry (IHC). C. pneumoniae in the adenoid was present in 5,5% children. Positive results were obtained most frequently (24,14%, 7/29) in the eldest group (10-16 years). A statistical analysis demonstrated the correlation between C. pneumoniae occurrence in an adenoid tissue and the size of adenoid. In immunohistochemistry C. pneumoniae was found the most frequently in lymphocytes and in epithelial cells. A presence of C. pneumoniae in lymphocytes and epithelial cells of the adenoid first of all in older children with adenoid hypertrophy confirms the participation of this bacteria in adenoid pathology.

  1. Acute Glomerulonephritis in a Child with Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection: A Case Report

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    Giovanna Vitaliti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infectious diseases seem to be an important and independent risk factor for renal failure, but the underlying mechanism of renal involvement during some kinds of infectious diseases is still unclear, even if the literature data report immunomediated and/or autoimmune mechanisms to explain the pathogenic relationship between the two diseases. In paediatric patients, Chlamydia pneumoniae is a rare cause of renal complications and it may manifest in several ways, mainly involving the respiratory system, even if also renal and glomerulalr complications, have been described. Case Diagnosis/Treatment. Herein we report a case of a 3-year-old child who developed an acute glomerulonephritis that was chronologically, clinically, and biologically related to a previous Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. On our knowledge, in the literature it is the youngest patient with renal involvement during course of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection ever reported. Conclusions. The present case supports the hypothesis of a rather close causal relationship between this infective agent and renal and glomerular symptoms occurred in this child, during an acute episode of respiratory disease.

  2. Molecular cartography in acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infections--a non-targeted metabolomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Constanze; Dietz, Inga; Tziotis, Dimitrios; Moritz, Franco; Rupp, Jan; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    Infections with Chlamydia pneumoniae cause several respiratory diseases, such as community-acquired pneumonia, bronchitis or sinusitis. Here, we present an integrated non-targeted metabolomics analysis applying ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry and ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to determine metabolite alterations in C. pneumoniae-infected HEp-2 cells. Most important permutations are elaborated using uni- and multivariate statistical analysis, logD retention time regression and mass defect-based network analysis. Classes of metabolites showing high variations upon infection are lipids, carbohydrates and amino acids. Moreover, we observed several non-annotated compounds as predominantly abundant after infection, which are promising biomarker candidates for drug-target and diagnostic research.

  3. Community epidemiology of Chlamydia and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in LRTI in France over 29 months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillat, Jacques; Flahault, Antoine; Barbeyrac, Bertille de; Orfila, Jeanne; Portier, Henri; Ducroix, Jean-Pierre; Bebear, Christiane; Mayaud, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Background: The role of Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) in lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) is still little known in community settings. Methods: In all, 3207 adult cases of LRTI (871 with pneumonia, and 2336 with acute bronchitis) were prospectively included in the ETIIC 1 ETIIC : ETude de l'Incidence des Infections respiratoires basses d'origine Communautaire dues a Chlamydia pneumoniae et Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Incidence of CP and MP in LRTI in community settings)program by 303 general practitioners and 24 hospital physicians in France between September 1997 and February 2000. The polymerase chain reaction and immunoassays were used to detect CP or MP in 3198 pharyngeal specimens obtained by gargling. Results: Of these 3198 patients, 232 (7.3%), were PCR-positive for CP and/or MP. Immunoassays were far less sensitive than PCRs (Se = 2 and 13% for MP and CP). Among the 2336 patients with acute bronchitis, PCR was positive for CP in 95 (4.1%), and for MP, in 54 (2.3%). Among the 671 patients with radiologically confirmed pneumonia, PCR was positive for CP in 23 (3.4%), and for MP in 49 (7.3%). CP and MP displayed significant geographic heterogeneity. Independent clinical determinants of positive PCR for CP and/or MP were age below 45 years, previous antimicrobial therapy (especially betalactams). Clinical signs were not of practical use in distinguishing accurately between etiologic diagnoses. Conclusions: CP or MP diagnosed by PCR were found in more than 7% of patients with LRTI in community settings with a significant geographical heterogeneity and significant temporal trends in the incidence

  4. Chlamydia pneumoniae in elderly patients with stroke (C-PEPS): a case-control study on the seroprevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in elderly patients with acute cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeh, Joseph; Gupta, Sandeep; Goodbourn, Colin; Panayiotou, Barnabas; McElligott, Geraldine

    2003-01-01

    Multiple studies have suggested an association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and atherosclerotic vascular disease. We investigated whether serological markers of C. pneumoniae infection were associated with acute stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA), exclusively in elderly patients. One-hundred white patients aged over 65 years admitted with acute stroke or TIA, and 87 control patients admitted with acute non-cardiopulmonary, non-infective disorders were recruited prospectively. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit, the presence of C. pneumoniae immunoglobulins IgA, IgG, IgM in patients' sera was determined. The seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae-specific IgA, IgG, IgM were 63, 71, and 14% in the stroke/TIA group (median age = 80), and 62, 65, and 17% in the control group (median age = 80), respectively. Using a logistic regression statistical model, adjusting for age and sex, history of hypertension, smoking, diabetes, ischaemic heart disease (IHD), ischaemic electrocardiogram (ECG), the odds ratios (ORs) of having a stroke/TIA in relation to C. pneumoniae-specific IgA, IgG, IgM were 1.04, 1.24, 0.79 (p = NS). Further analysis identified 43 acute stroke/TIA cases and 44 controls without history of IHD or ischaemic ECG or both. After adjusting for history of hypertension, smoking, diabetes, age and sex, the ORs in this subgroup were 1.40 for IgA [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-3.65; p = 0.49], 2.41 for IgG (95% CI 0.90-6.46; p = 0.08) and 1.55 for IgM (95% CI 0.45-5.40; p = 0.49). Although a high seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae in elderly patients was confirmed, no significant association between serological markers of C. pneumoniae infection and acute cerebrovascular events was found. There was, however, a weak trend towards increased ORs for acute cerebrovascular disease in a subgroup of C. pneumoniae seropositive elderly patients without any history of IHD or ischaemic ECG. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Inhibition of apoptosis in neuronal cells infected with Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelt, Denah M; Roupas, Maria R; Way, Deana S; Bell, Marcus G; Albert, Elizabeth V; Hammond, Christine J; Balin, Brian J

    2008-01-24

    Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae is an intracellular bacterium that has been identified within cells in areas of neuropathology found in Alzheimer disease (AD), including endothelia, glia, and neurons. Depending on the cell type of the host, infection by C. pneumoniae has been shown to influence apoptotic pathways in both pro- and anti-apoptotic fashions. We have hypothesized that persistent chlamydial infection of neurons may be an important mediator of the characteristic neuropathology observed in AD brains. Chronic and/or persistent infection of neuronal cells with C. pneumoniae in the AD brain may affect apoptosis in cells containing chlamydial inclusions. SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells were infected with the respiratory strain of C. pneumoniae, AR39 at an MOI of 1. Following infection, the cells were either untreated or treated with staurosporine and then examined for apoptosis by labeling for nuclear fragmentation, caspase activity, and membrane inversion as indicated by annexin V staining. C. pneumoniae infection was maintained through 10 days post-infection. At 3 and 10 days post-infection, the infected cell cultures appeared to inhibit or were resistant to the apoptotic process when induced by staurosporine. This inhibition was demonstrated quantitatively by nuclear profile counts and caspase 3/7 activity measurements. These data suggest that C. pneumoniae can sustain a chronic infection in neuronal cells by interfering with apoptosis, which may contribute to chronic inflammation in the AD brain.

  6. Inhibition of apoptosis in neuronal cells infected with Chlamydophila (Chlamydia pneumoniae

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    Albert Elizabeth V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydophila (Chlamydia pneumoniae is an intracellular bacterium that has been identified within cells in areas of neuropathology found in Alzheimer disease (AD, including endothelia, glia, and neurons. Depending on the cell type of the host, infection by C. pneumoniae has been shown to influence apoptotic pathways in both pro- and anti-apoptotic fashions. We have hypothesized that persistent chlamydial infection of neurons may be an important mediator of the characteristic neuropathology observed in AD brains. Chronic and/or persistent infection of neuronal cells with C. pneumoniae in the AD brain may affect apoptosis in cells containing chlamydial inclusions. Results SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells were infected with the respiratory strain of C. pneumoniae, AR39 at an MOI of 1. Following infection, the cells were either untreated or treated with staurosporine and then examined for apoptosis by labeling for nuclear fragmentation, caspase activity, and membrane inversion as indicated by annexin V staining. C. pneumoniae infection was maintained through 10 days post-infection. At 3 and 10 days post-infection, the infected cell cultures appeared to inhibit or were resistant to the apoptotic process when induced by staurosporine. This inhibition was demonstrated quantitatively by nuclear profile counts and caspase 3/7 activity measurements. Conclusion These data suggest that C. pneumoniae can sustain a chronic infection in neuronal cells by interfering with apoptosis, which may contribute to chronic inflammation in the AD brain.

  7. Chlamydia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Jordan; Weber, Mary M; Nawrotek, Agata; Dooley, Cheryl A; Calderon, Mike; St Croix, Claudette M; Hackstadt, Ted; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Paumet, Fabienne

    2017-05-02

    The intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis develops in a parasitic compartment called the inclusion. Posttranslationally modified microtubules encase the inclusion, controlling the positioning of Golgi complex fragments around the inclusion. The molecular mechanisms by which Chlamydia coopts the host cytoskeleton and the Golgi complex to sustain its infectious compartment are unknown. Here, using a genetically modified Chlamydia strain, we discovered that both posttranslationally modified microtubules and Golgi complex positioning around the inclusion are controlled by the chlamydial inclusion protein CT813/CTL0184/InaC and host ARF GTPases. CT813 recruits ARF1 and ARF4 to the inclusion membrane, where they induce posttranslationally modified microtubules. Similarly, both ARF isoforms are required for the repositioning of Golgi complex fragments around the inclusion. We demonstrate that CT813 directly recruits ARF GTPases on the inclusion membrane and plays a pivotal role in their activation. Together, these results reveal that Chlamydia uses CT813 to hijack ARF GTPases to couple posttranslationally modified microtubules and Golgi complex repositioning at the inclusion. IMPORTANCE Chlamydia trachomatis is an important cause of morbidity and a significant economic burden in the world. However, how Chlamydia develops its intracellular compartment, the so-called inclusion, is poorly understood. Using genetically engineered Chlamydia mutants, we discovered that the effector protein CT813 recruits and activates host ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) and ARF4 to regulate microtubules. In this context, CT813 acts as a molecular platform that induces the posttranslational modification of microtubules around the inclusion. These cages are then used to reposition the Golgi complex during infection and promote the development of the inclusion. This study provides the first evidence that ARF1 and ARF4 play critical roles in controlling posttranslationally modified

  8. Chlamydia pneumoniae and typical bacteria occurrence in adenoid in children qualified for adenoidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicka, Anna; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Podsiadły, Edyta; Rogulska, Joanna; Demkow, Urszula

    2014-05-01

    The ability to occur in a persistent form and to inhibit apoptosis in host cells are the features of Chlamydia pneumoniae which may be associated with adenoid hypertrophy. This study aimed to (1) demonstrate the presence of C. pneumoniae DNA in the adenoid in children qualified for adenoidectomy, (2) evaluate the correlation between the presence of C. pneumoniae in the adenoid and the child's age, the size of adenoid, the incidence of recurrent respiratory tract infections, (3) demonstrate the co-occurrence of C. pneumoniae and typical bacteria in the adenoid tissue. A group of 200 children aged from 2 to 16 years (mean age 6.4) undergoing adenoidectomy from February 2010 to May 2011 were enrolled to the study. Adenoid tissue removed during planned adenoidectomy was analyzed for the presence of C. pneumoniae by real-time PCR and for the presence of typical bacteria by bacteriological culture. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS PASW Statistics 18 software. C. pneumoniae was detected in the adenoid in 5.5% of the 200 children. Positive results were obtained most frequently (24.1%, 7/29) in the eldest group (10-16 years). In PCR positive children the degree of choanal narrowing by an adenoid tended to be larger than in PCR negative children. The occurrence of C. pneumoniae in the adenoid was not associated with a presence of a specific typical bacterium. The presence of C. pneumoniae in an adenoid was most frequently detected in the children of 10-16 years qualified for adenoidectomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Infeção por Chlamydia pneumoniae e Hepatite Aguda

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    Ana R. Ramos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Chlamydia pneumoniae é uma espécie associada sobretudo a infeções da via aérea respiratória, e pouco descrita e muito raramente associada a Hepatite Aguda.1 Apresenta-se um caso de uma mulher de 86 que recorreu ao Serviço de Urgência por quadro de epigastralgias, associadas a náuseas e vómitos pós prandiais. Ao exame objetivo: subfebril e o abdómen globoso, com timpanismo difuso e doloroso à palpação profunda do epigastro e hipocôndrio direito. Do estudo complementar realizado apresentava parâmetros inflamatórios aumentados, uma citocolestase hepática, sem insuficiência hepática, com ecografia abdominal apenas com ectasia da via biliar principal; e excluiu-se causa tóxica, isquémica e imunológica, marcadores víricos negativos; serologias negativas, excepto a serologia da Chlamydia pneumoniae, IgM e IgG positivos. Quadro compatível com uma hepatite colestática aguda sem evidência de infeção respiratória prévia ou concomitante. Os autores apresentam este caso clínico dada a raridade desta correlação, mesmo após exclusão de todas as outras causas.

  10. Koala Biovar of Chlamydia pneumoniae Infects Human and Koala Monocytes and Induces Increased Uptake of Lipids In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Coles, Katie A.; Timms, Peter; Smith, David W.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the ability of the koala biovar of Chlamydia pneumoniae to infect both Hep-2 cells and human monocytes and the effect of infection on the formation of foam cells. The koala biovar produced large inclusions in both human and koala monocytes and in Hep-2 cells. Koala C. pneumoniae induced foam cell formation with and without added low-density lipoprotein, in contrast to TW183, which produced increased foam cell formation only in the presence of low-density lipoprotein.

  11. Smoking, season, and detection of chlamydia pneumoniae DNA in clinically stable COPD patients

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    Goldsmith Charles H

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and role of Chlamydia pneumoniae in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD remain unclear. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 100 outpatients with smoking-related, clinically stable COPD, and induced sputum was obtained in 62 patients. Results Patients had mean age (standard deviation of 65.8 (10.7 years, mean forced expiratory volume in one second of 1.34 (0.61 L, and 61 (61.0% were male. C. pneumoniae nucleic acids were detected by nested polymerase chain reaction in 27 (27.0%. Current smoking (odds ratio {OR} = 2.6, 95% confidence interval {CI}: 1.1, 6.6, P = 0.04, season (November to April (OR = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.4, 9.2, P = 0.007, and chronic sputum production (OR = 6.4, 95% CI: 1.8, 23.2, P = 0.005 were associated with detection of C. pneumoniae DNA. Conclusions Prospective studies are needed to examine the role of C. pneumoniae nucleic acid detection in COPD disease symptoms and progression.

  12. Evolution to a Chronic Disease Niche Correlates with Increased Sensitivity to Tryptophan Availability for the Obligate Intracellular Bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Wilhelmina M.; Barker, Christopher J.; Chacko, Anu

    2014-01-01

    The chlamydiae are obligate intracellular parasites that have evolved specific interactions with their various hosts and host cell types to ensure their successful survival and consequential pathogenesis. The species Chlamydia pneumoniae is ubiquitous, with serological studies showing that most humans are infected at some stage in their lifetime. While most human infections are asymptomatic, C. pneumoniae can cause more-severe respiratory disease and pneumonia and has been linked to chronic diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, and even Alzheimer's disease. The widely dispersed animal-adapted C. pneumoniae strains cause an equally wide range of diseases in their hosts. It is emerging that the ability of C. pneumoniae to survive inside its target cells, including evasion of the host's immune attack mechanisms, is linked to the acquisition of key metabolites. Tryptophan and arginine are key checkpoint compounds in this host-parasite battle. Interestingly, the animal strains of C. pneumoniae have a slightly larger genome, enabling them to cope better with metabolite restrictions. It therefore appears that as the evolutionarily more ancient animal strains have evolved to infect humans, they have selectively become more “susceptible” to the levels of key metabolites, such as tryptophan. While this might initially appear to be a weakness, it allows these human C. pneumoniae strains to exquisitely sense host immune attack and respond by rapidly reverting to a persistent phase. During persistence, they reduce their metabolic levels, halting progression of their developmental cycle, waiting until the hostile external conditions have passed before they reemerge. PMID:24682324

  13. Interactions between flagellar and type III secretion proteins in Chlamydia pneumoniae

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    Mahony James B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flagellar secretion systems are utilized by a wide variety of bacteria to construct the flagellum, a conserved apparatus that allows for migration towards non-hostile, nutrient rich environments. Chlamydia pneumoniae is an obligate, intracellular pathogen whose genome contains at least three orthologs of flagellar proteins, namely FliI, FlhA and FliF, but the role of these proteins remains unknown. Results Full length FliI, and fragments of FlhA, FliF, and FliI, were cloned and expressed as either GST or His tagged proteins in E. coli. The GST-tagged full length FliI protein was shown to possess ATPase activity, hydrolyzing ATP at a rate of 0.15 ± .02 μmol min-1 mg-1 in a time- and dose-dependant manner. Using bacterial-2-hybrid and GST pull-down assays, the N-terminal domain of FliI was shown to interact with the cytoplasmic domain of FlhA, but not with FliF, and the cytoplasmic domain of FlhA was shown to interact with the C-terminus of FliF. The absence of other flagellar orthologs led us to explore cross-reaction of flagellar proteins with type III secretion proteins, and we found that FliI interacted with CdsL and CopN, while FlhA interacted with CdsL and Cpn0322 (YscU ortholog CdsU. Conclusions The specific interaction of the four orthologous flagellar proteins in C. pneumoniae suggests that they interact in vivo and, taken together with their conservation across members of the chlamydiae sps., and their interaction with T3S components, suggests a role in bacterial replication and/or intracellular survival.

  14. Biochemical and structural insights into microtubule perturbation by CopN from Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrotek, Agata; Guimarães, Beatriz G; Velours, Christophe; Subtil, Agathe; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2014-09-05

    Although the actin network is commonly hijacked by pathogens, there are few reports of parasites targeting microtubules. The proposed member of the LcrE protein family from some Chlamydia species (e.g. pCopN from C. pneumoniae) binds tubulin and inhibits microtubule assembly in vitro. From the pCopN structure and its similarity with that of MxiC from Shigella, we definitively confirm CopN as the Chlamydia homolog of the LcrE family of bacterial proteins involved in the regulation of type III secretion. We have also investigated the molecular basis for the pCopN effect on microtubules. We show that pCopN delays microtubule nucleation and acts as a pure tubulin-sequestering protein at steady state. It targets the β subunit interface involved in the tubulin longitudinal self-association in a way that inhibits nucleotide exchange. pCopN contains three repetitions of a helical motif flanked by disordered N- and C-terminal extensions. We have identified the pCopN minimal tubulin-binding region within the second and third repeats. Together with the intriguing observation that C. trachomatis CopN does not bind tubulin, our data support the notion that, in addition to the shared function of type III secretion regulation, these proteins have evolved different functions in the host cytosol. Our results provide a mechanistic framework for understanding the C. pneumoniae CopN-specific inhibition of microtubule assembly. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis heat shock proteins in women with tubal factor infertility are associated with prior infection by C. trachomatis but not by C. pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, K; Osser, S; Birkelund, Svend

    1999-01-01

    The antibody response to heat shock proteins 60 and 10 were studied in 163 patients with tubal factor infertility and in 163 age-matched pregnant women. The associations of these antibodies with specific antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis and to Chlamydia pneumoniae as well as with antibodies...... proteins and to C. trachomatis but no independent influence of antibodies to C. pneumoniae. No interaction between C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae suggesting a synergistic effect was found although the heat shock proteins from these two organisms are immunologically similar. Antibodies to the chlamydial...... lipopolysaccharide also seemed to be related to C. trachomatis and not to C. pneumoniae in these women....

  16. The Type III Secretion System-Related CPn0809 from Chlamydia pneumoniae.

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    Astrid C Engel

    Full Text Available Chlamydia pneumoniae is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterium that possesses a type III secretion system (T3SS, which enables the pathogen to deliver, in a single step, effector proteins for modulation of host-cell functions into the human host cell cytosol to establish a unique intracellular niche for replication. The translocon proteins located at the top of the T3SS needle filament are essential for its function, as they form pores in the host-cell membrane. Interestingly, unlike other Gram-negative bacteria, C. pneumoniae has two putative translocon operons, named LcrH_1 and LcrH_2. However, little is known about chlamydial translocon proteins. In this study, we analyzed CPn0809, one of the putative hydrophobic translocators encoded by the LcrH_1 operon, and identified an 'SseC-like family' domain characteristic of T3S translocators. Using bright-field and confocal microscopy, we found that CPn0809 is associated with EBs during early and very late phases of a C. pneumoniae infection. Furthermore, CPn0809 forms oligomers, and interacts with the T3SS chaperone LcrH_1, via its N-terminal segment. Moreover, expression of full-length CPn0809 in the heterologous host Escherichia coli causes a grave cytotoxic effect that leads to cell death. Taken together, our data indicate that CPn0809 likely represents one of the translocon proteins of the C. pneumoniae T3SS, and possibly plays a role in the translocation of effector proteins in the early stages of infection.

  17. Chlamydia pneumoniae e Mycoplasma pneumoniae nos nódulos de calcificação da estenose da valva aórtica Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in calcified nodes of stenosed aortic valves

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    Marilia Harumi Higuchi-dos-Santos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar se chlamydia pneumoniae (CP ou mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP estão presentes na estenose da valva aórtica (EA. MÉTODOS: Imuno-histoquímica foi utilizada para identificar os antígenos de CP (Ag-CP, a hibridização in situ para identificar o DNA de MP, e microscopia eletrônica para avaliação dos dois agentes, nos grupos: normal - 11 valvas normais de autópsia; aterosclerose - 10 valvas de pacientes com aterosclerose sistêmica de autópsia e sem EA; e EA - 14 espécimes cirúrgicos provenientes de pacientes com EA analisados em 3 sub-regiões: EA-preservada - regiões mais preservadas na periferia da valva; EA-fibrose - tecido fibrótico peri-calcificação; e EA-calcificação - nódulos calcificados. RESULTADOS: As medianas da fração de área positiva para Ag-CP foram 0,09; 0,30; 0,18; 1,33; e 3,3 nos grupos acima descritos, respectivamente. A densidade de CP foi significativamente maior nos grupos aterosclerose e EA-calcificação em relação ao normal (pOBJECTIVE: We investigated whether Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP are present in aortic valve stenosis (AS. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry was utilized to identify CP antigens, in situ hybridization to identify MP DNA, and electron microscopy was used to evaluate the following three groups: Normal - 11 normal autopsy valves; Atherosclerosis - 10 autopsy valves from patients with systemic atherosclerosis and no AS; and AS - 14 surgical specimens of AS analyzed in 3 sub-regions: AS-Preserved - peripheral, preserved regions; AS-Fibrosis - peri-calcified fibrotic tissue; and AS-Calcification - calcified nodules. RESULTS: The positive area fraction of CP antigen median values were 0.09, 0.30, 0.18, 1.33, and 3.3 in groups Normal, Atherosclerosis, AS-Preserved, AS-Fibrosis, and AS-Calcification, respectively. CP density was significantly greater in Atherosclerosis and AS-Calcification than in Normal (P<0.05. Within the AS group, the amount of CP

  18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in calcified nodules of aortic stenotic valves Mycoplasma pneumoniae e Chlamydia pneumoniae nos focos de calcificação de valva aórtica estenótica

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    Maria de Lourdes HIGUCHI

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic Valve Stenosis (AVS has been explained as an atherosclerotic process of the valve as they often exhibit inflammatory changes with infiltration of macrophages, T lymphocytes and lipid infiltration. The present study investigated whether the bacteria Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP, detected previously in atherosclerotic plaques, are also present in AVS. Ten valves surgically removed from patients with AVS were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and electron microscopy. The mean and standard deviation of the percentage areas occupied by CP antigens and MP - DNA were respectively 6.21 +/- 5.41 and 2.27 +/- 2.06 in calcified foci; 2.8 +/- 3.33 and 1.78+/- 3.63 in surrounding fibrotic areas, and 0.21 +/- 0.17 and 0.12 +/- 0.13 in less injured parts of the valve. There was higher amount of CP and MP in the calcified foci and in the surrounded fibrosis than in more preserved valvular regions. In conclusion, the fact that there were greater amounts of CP and MP in calcification foci of AVS favors the hypothesis that AS is not an inevitable degenerative process due to aging, but rather that it may be a response to the presence of these bacteria, similarly to the morphology detected in atherosclerosis damage.Estenose da Valva Aórtica (EVA tem sido considerada como um processo aterosclerótico das valvas pois elas freqüentemente exibem alterações inflamatórias com acúmulo de macrófagos e linfócitos T, bem como infiltração de lípides. O presente estudo investigou se as bactérias Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP e Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP, detectadas previamente em placas ateroscleróticas, estavam presentes na EVA. Dez valvas removidas cirúrgicamente de pacientes com EVA foram analisadas pela imunohistoquímica, hibridização in situ e microscopia eletrônica. A média e desvio padrão das porcentagens de área ocupadas por antígenos de CP e de DNA do MP foram respectivamente de 6,21 +/- 5,41 e 2

  19. Persistent Chlamydia Pneumoniae serology is related to decline in lung function in women but not in men. Effect of persistent Chlamydia pneumoniae infection on lung function

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    Gislason Thorarinn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia pneumoniae (C pn infection causes an acute inflammation in the respiratory system that may become persistent, but little is known about the long-term respiratory effects of C pn infections. Aim: To estimate the long term respiratory effects of C pn with change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC as a main outcome variable. Methods The study comprised of 1109 subjects (500 men and 609 women, mean age 28 ± 6 years that participated in the Reykjavik Heart Study of the Young. Spirometry and blood samples for measurements of IgG antibodies for C pn were done at inclusion and at the end of the follow-up period (mean follow-up time 27 ± 4 years. Results Having IgG against C pn at both examinations was significantly associated to a larger decrease in FEV1 (6 mL/year and FVC (7 mL/year in women but not in men. In women the association between C pn and larger FEV1 decline was only found in women that smoked at baseline where having C pn IgG was associated with 10 mL/year decline compared to smokers without C pn IgG. These results were still significant after adjustment for age, smoking and change in body weight. Conclusion Our results indicate that persistent C pn serology is related to increased decline in lung function in women but not in men. This effect was, however, primarily found in smoking women. This study is a further indication that the pathophysiological process leading to lung impairment may differ between men and women.

  20. Parvovirus B19 Test

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    ... Professionals Subscribe Search Parvovirus B19 Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a Glance What is being ... www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/parvovirus-infection/basics/definition/con-20023045. Accessed on 6/25/17. (© 1995– ...

  1. Asociación entre enfermedad cardiovascular y anticuerpos contra Chlamydia pneumoniae

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    García-Elorriaga Guadalupe de los A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Precisar si existe asociación entre enfermedad cardiovascular (ECV y anticuerpos contra Chlamydia en población mexicana. Material y métodos. Estudio transversal, realizado en la Unidad de Investigación en Inmunología e Infectología -Hospital de Infectología del Centro Médico Nacional La Raza (CMNR- y en el Servicio de Cirugía Cardiovascular y Asistencia Circulatoria, del Hospital General del CMNR, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, de agosto de 1998 a abril de 2000. Se determinaron anticuerpos IgG e IgM contra C. psittaci, C. trachomatis y C. pneumoniae mediante microinmunofluorescencia, en suero de 70 pacientes con ECV hospitalizados en el CMNR, mayores de 30 años, de uno u otro sexo, y se compararon con 140 sanos, pareados por edad y sexo. Se utilizaron muestras aleatorias simples, con un tamaño poblacional de 110, una prevalencia de 50% y un nivel de confianza de 99%. Para establecer la diferencia entre las proporciones de los títulos se utilizó ji cuadrada y se calculó la razón de momios. Resultados. El 94.3% (66/70 de los pacientes presentó IgG en contra de C. pneumoniae vs 37% (52/140 de los individuos sanos (p<0.001. Conclusiones. Existe una fuerte asociación entre anticuerpos IgG hacia C. pneumoniae y ECV.

  2. Effect of Azithromycin plus Rifampin versus That of Azithromycin Alone on the Eradication of Chlamydia pneumoniae from Lung Tissue in Experimental Pneumonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Katerina; Malinverni, Raffaele

    1999-01-01

    Azithromycin, doxycycline, and rifampin, alone or in combination, were tested in vitro against Chlamydia pneumoniae AR-39. The combination of azithromycin plus rifampin showed the strongest activity and produced higher rates of eradication of C. pneumoniae from lung tissues than azithromycin alone in experimental mouse pneumonitis.

  3. Effect of a Mycoplasma hominis-like Mycoplasma on the infection of HEp-2 cells by the TW-183 strain of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, E A; Wadowsky, R M

    2000-02-01

    We isolated a Mycoplasma hominis-like mycoplasma from a stock culture of Chlamydia pneumoniae TW-183 obtained from the American Type Culture Collection and eradicated the contaminant by treating the stock suspension with a nonionic detergent, Igepal CA-630. The M. hominis-like mycoplasma neither inhibits nor enhances the infectivity of C. pneumoniae for HEp-2 cells.

  4. Effect of a Mycoplasma hominis-Like Mycoplasma on the Infection of HEp-2 Cells by the TW-183 Strain of Chlamydia pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Castilla, Elias A.; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    We isolated a Mycoplasma hominis-like mycoplasma from a stock culture of Chlamydia pneumoniae TW-183 obtained from the American Type Culture Collection and eradicated the contaminant by treating the stock suspension with a nonionic detergent, Igepal CA-630. The M. hominis-like mycoplasma neither inhibits nor enhances the infectivity of C. pneumoniae for HEp-2 cells.

  5. Quantificação morfométrica de Chlamydia pneumoniae e Mycoplasma pneumoniae em aneurismas de aorta abdominal humana Morphometrical quantification of Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in human atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms

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    Lucas José Tachotti Pires

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A inflamação aterosclerótica, com possível papel de agentes infecciosos, pode contribuir na patogênese dos aneurismas da aorta abdominal (AAA. O achado de Chamydia pneumoniae (CP nessas lesões, em estudos prévios, sem quantificação, variou de 0-100%. O objetivo é quantificar a presença de CP e de Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP nos AAA. MÉTODO: A espessura, o número de células positivas para CP detectadas por imunoperoxidase e a porcentagem de área ocupada por MP detectada por hibridização "in situ", nas três camadas da aorta, foram medidos com sistema de análise de imagens, em 10 aortas abdominais aneurismáticas. Usouse três grupos-controle: 1 amostras das mesmas aortas, fora do aneurisma, exceto se a dilatação tomasse toda a porção sub-renal da artéria (n=7; 2 aortas com aterosclerose grave, mas sem aneurismas (n=10; 3 aortas sem aterosclerose ou com grau leve da doença (n=10. Todos os espécimes foram obtidos em necropsias. Usou-se o teste de Wald para comparar os grupos; fixou-se o nível de significância em 5%. RESULTADOS: A íntima era mais fina e a média mais espessa nos casos normais que nos outros grupos (p0,05. Também se detectou MP em todos os grupos. Este agente predominou no grupo de pacientes com aterosclerose, mas sem aneurisma na íntima e na adventícia; entretanto, as diferenças entre os grupos não foram significativas (p>0,05. CONCLUSÕES: Nossos dados sugerem que os agentes enfocados não têm papel importante na patogênese dos AAA.OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerotic inflammation, with a possible role of infectious agents, could contribute to the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA. Finding of Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP in these lesions in previous, non-quantifying studies ranged from 0-100%. The objective is to quantify the presence of CP and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP in AAA. METHODS: Thickness, number of cells positive for CP by immunohistochemistry and percent area occupied by MP

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of human Chlamydia pneumoniae strains reveals a distinct Australian indigenous clade that predates European exploration of the continent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulis, Eileen; Bachmann, Nathan; Humphrys, Michael; Myers, Garry; Huston, Wilhelmina; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter

    2015-12-22

    The obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen, which has been found in a range of hosts including humans, marsupials and amphibians. Whole genome comparisons of human C. pneumoniae have previously highlighted a highly conserved nucleotide sequence, with minor but key polymorphisms and additional coding capacity when human and animal strains are compared. In this study, we sequenced three Australian human C. pneumoniae strains, two of which were isolated from patients in remote indigenous communities, and compared them to all available C. pneumoniae genomes. Our study demonstrated a phylogenetically distinct human C. pneumoniae clade containing the two indigenous Australian strains, with estimates that the most recent common ancestor of these strains predates the arrival of European settlers to Australia. We describe several polymorphisms characteristic to these strains, some of which are similar in sequence to animal C. pneumoniae strains, as well as evidence to suggest that several recombination events have shaped these distinct strains. Our study reveals a greater sequence diversity amongst both human and animal C. pneumoniae strains, and suggests that a wider range of strains may be circulating in the human population than current sampling indicates.

  7. [Evaluation of association between an acute attack of childhood bronchial asthma and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Xing-Lian; Xing, Fu-Qiang; Yang, Ju-Sheng; Tu, Hong

    2006-04-01

    To identify whether there is an association between an acute attack of childhood bronchial asthma and Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) infection. Serum specific antibodies IgM and IgG to CP were detected by ELISA in 120 asthmatic children with an acute attack and 82 healthy children. Anti-CP IgM was demonstrated in 22 cases (18.3%) and anti-CP IgG was demonstrated in 32 cases (26.7%) out of the 120 asthmatic patients. The incidence of CP infection in asthmatic children was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (3.7%) (P attack of asthma in 15 cases out of the 32 cases with CP infection, but 17 cases required glucocorticoid inhalation treatment together with anti-CP infection treatment (macrolide antibiotics, eg. azithromycin) for remission of asthma attack. There may be a link between an acute attack of childhood asthma and CP infection. It is thus necessary to detect the CP-specific antibodies in asthmatic children for proper treatment.

  8. Comparison of koala LPCoLN and human strains of Chlamydia pneumoniae highlights extended genetic diversity in the species

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    Carrasco Jose A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia pneumoniae is a widespread pathogen causing upper and lower respiratory tract infections in addition to a range of other diseases in humans and animals. Previous whole genome analyses have focused on four essentially clonal (> 99% identity C. pneumoniae human genomes (AR39, CWL029, J138 and TW183, providing relatively little insight into strain diversity and evolution of this species. Results We performed individual gene-by-gene comparisons of the recently sequenced C. pneumoniae koala genome and four C. pneumoniae human genomes to identify species-specific genes, and more importantly, to gain an insight into the genetic diversity and evolution of the species. We selected genes dispersed throughout the chromosome, representing genes that were specific to C. pneumoniae, genes with a demonstrated role in chlamydial biology and/or pathogenicity (n = 49, genes encoding nucleotide salvage or amino acid biosynthesis proteins (n = 6, and extrachromosomal elements (9 plasmid and 2 bacteriophage genes. Conclusions We have identified strain-specific differences and targets for detection of C. pneumoniae isolates from both human and animal origin. Such characterisation is necessary for an improved understanding of disease transmission and intervention.

  9. Is there any relationship between asthma and asthma attack in children and atypical bacterial infections; Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annagür, Ali; Kendirli, S G; Yilmaz, M; Altintas, D U; Inal, A

    2007-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease characterized by variable airway obstruction and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. There are many factors affecting the development and severity of childhood asthma such as genetic predisposition, atopy, environmental factors, obesity, diet, socioeconomic status, and infectious triggers. In the present study we aimed to investigate the frequency of Mycdoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Helicobacter pylori infections in asthmatic children. We investigated also whether there is a relationship between these agents and asthma attacks. Seventy-nine asthmatic children (46 males, aged 5-15 years) were included in study. The study group was divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of 37 children with asthma attacks and group 2 consisted of 42 children with stable asthma. As a control group we studied 36 healthy children. Pulmonary function tests, skin prick tests for common allergens were performed; serum total IgE, phadiatop, specific IgM and IgG antibody levels (ELISA) for M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae and H. pylori were measured in all patients. Mycoplasma IgM and Chlamidia IgM were positive in 8.1% (3 patients) and 18.9% (7 patients) of group 1 patients, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference for Mycoplasma IgM (p = 0.031) and Chlamidia IgM (p = 0.03) between group1 and other two groups. We have not found significant difference for M. pneumoniae IgG, C. pneumoniae IgG and H. pylori IgM and IgG among groups. M. Pneumoniae and C. Pneumoniae may play a role in development of asthma exacerbations in childhood. We could not find a relationship between H. Pylori and asthma.

  10. Valor pronóstico de los anticuerpos anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae en la cardiopatía isquémica

    OpenAIRE

    González Castañeda, C.; Pérez Castrillón, José Luis; Casero Lambas, A.; Mazón Ramos, M.Á.; Cañibano González, M. Á.; López Bello, M.; Herreros Fernández, V.

    2004-01-01

    Producción Científica Se ha relacionado la enfermedad arterial coronaria con infección por Chlamydia pneumoniae, pero existen pocos estudios que valoren la presencia de anticuerpos frente a este microorganismo y el pronóstico de los pacientes con cardiopatía isquémica. El objetivo de nuestro estudio fue valorar el impacto de la positividad de anticuerpos anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae en la morbimortalidad asociada a la cardiopatía isquémica.

  11. A combination of secondhand cigarette smoke and Chlamydia pneumoniae accelerates atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Bu, De-xiu; Hayfron, Kweku; Pinkerton, Kent E; Bevins, Charles L; Lichtman, Andrew; Wiedeman, Jean

    2012-05-01

    Secondhand smoke (SS) induces chronic infection of endothelial cells by Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) in vitro. We investigated the in vivo effect on atherosclerosis following exposure to SS and infection with Cpn both independently and in combination in ApoE-/- mice. Plaques were largest in the combined SS+Cpn-exposed mice with 12-57% greater cross-sectional area compared with all other groups (P<0.03). Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) from aortic roots revealed a synergistic upregulation of both OX40L (CD134L) and MyD88 in SS+Cpn mice (P<0.05). This upregulation occurred despite decreased numbers of macrophage, dendritic cell, CD4 T cell and smooth-muscle-cell infiltrates as determined by quantitative IHC and qRT-PCR. To elucidate whether enhanced apoptosis correlated with reduced plaque cellularity, area of Tdt-mediated dUTP nick labeling positive (TUNEL+) cells and expression of key bridging molecules necessary for efferocytosis (Mertk, Tgm2, FasL and C1qa) were examined. In SS+Cpn mice, there was an increase of the area of TUNEL+ cells in plaque cores (P<0.001) and a downregulation of efferocytosis gene expression (P<0.05). Systemic expression of cytokines in sera (Luminex) showed no differences between groups, suggesting that focal disease mechanisms within the plaque predominated. The combination of SS exposure and Cpn infection enhanced atherosclerosis more than either variable did independently by activating inflammatory cells and by promoting growth and maturation of lesions via defective phagocytic clearance and accumulation of apoptotic cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Secretion of Cpn0796 from Chlamydia pneumoniae into the host cell cytoplasm by an autotransporter mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandahl, Brian B S; Stensballe, Allan; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    in infected cells, whereas only the 65 kDa full-length Cpn0796 could be detected in purified Chlamydia. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that Cpn0796 was localized in the Chlamydia membrane in young inclusions. However, at 36 h post infection and later Cpn0796 was detected in the cytoplasm...

  13. The association of metabolic syndrome and Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus type 1: The Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study

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    Pazoki Raha

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome together with insulin resistance and their consequences are basic factors in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Chronic infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, cytomegalovirus (CMV, and Chlamydia pneumoniae are associated with the development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The infectious aspects of metabolic syndrome have not been investigated. Methods In a cross-sectional, population-based study, we used National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP-Adult Treatment Panel (ATP-III criteria in 1791 subjects, aged 25 years and over, selected by cluster random sampling in three Iranian ports in the northern Persian Gulf. Sera were analyzed for IgG antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae, HSV-1, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and CMV using ELISA. Results In multiple logistic regression analysis, of the infectious agents, CMV [OR = 1.81 (1.05–3.10; p = 0.03], H. pylori [OR = 1.50 (1.12–2.00; p = 0.007] and Chlamydia pneumoniae [OR = 1.69 (1.27–2.25; p Conclusion The metabolic syndrome, which occurs very frequently in the general population, has a significant association with prior infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus type 1. Hypothesis about participation of infection in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome should be investigated.

  14. Specific serum immunoglobulin g to chlamydia pneumoniae in healthy children and adults (south-east of iran)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemati, M.; Ali, S.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumonia) is an obligate intracellular bacterium and recognized as a risk factor for several diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis and arthritis. The aim of this study was to determine the sero-prevalence of C. pneumonia in healthy subjects in different age groups. Methods: The serum levels of anti C. pneumonia IgG were measured by using of ELISA. Results: Totally, 630 subjects (164 children and 466 adults) were included into study. The sero-prevalence and the mean titer of anti C. pneumonia antibody were 11.3% and 14.48 ± 2.18 RU/mL; at age = 10 years, 15% and 17.47 ± 2.40 RU/mL at age 11-20 years, 21% and 25.15 ± 4.56 RU/mL at age 21-30 years group, 40% and 53.77 ± 6.40 RU/mL at age 31-40 years, 94% and 146.41 ± 8.95 RU/mL at age 41-50 years, 98% and 153.59+-10.38 RU/mL at age 51-60 years, 96% and 138.80 ± 12.78 RU/mL at age 61-70 years, respectively. The differences of the sero-prevalence and the mean titer of anti C. pneumonia antibody between age groups were significant (p<0.0001). The sero-prevalence and the mean titer of anti C. pneumonia antibody were 11.6% and 14.33 ± 1.49 RU/mL in children and 65.5% and 97.40 ± 4.46 RU/mL in adults. The sero-prevalence and the mean titer of anti C. pneumonia antibody were significantly higher in adults in comparison with those in children (p<0.0001). Conclusion: These findings showed that the sero-prevalence and titer of anti C. pneumonia IgG were increased with advanced ages and were higher in adults as compared to children. (author)

  15. Aerobic bacteria, Chlamydia trachomatis, Pneumocystis carinii and Cytomegalovirus as agents of severe peneumonia in small infants Bactérias aeróbias, Chlamydia trachomatis, Pneumocystis carinii e Cytomegalovirus: agentes causadores de pneumonia grave em pequenos lactentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Ejzenberg

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied 58 infants hospitalized for pneumonia in a semi-intensive care unit. Age ranged from 1 complete to 6 incomplete months. The infants were sent from another hospital in 20 cases and from home in a further 38. Pulmonary involvement, which was alveolar in 46 cases and interstitial in 12, was bilateral in 31 children. The investigation was carried out prospectively on the etiological agents associated with respiratory infection to look for evidence of aerobic bacteria (blood cultures, Chlamydia trachomatis and Cytomegalovirus (serology, and Pneumocystis carinii (direct microscopy of tracheal aspirated material. The following infectious agents were diagnosed in 21 children (36.2%: Aerobic bacteria (8, Chlamydia trachomatis (5, Pneumocystis carinii (3, Cytomegalovirus (3, Cytomegalovirus and Chlamydia trachomatis (1, Aerobic bacteria and Cytomegalovirus (1. Seven cases of infection by Chlamydia trachomatis and/or Cytomegalovirus were diagnosed out of the 12 cases with pulmonary interstitial involvement.Os autores estudaram prospectivamente 58 lactentes internados por pneumonia em unidade semi-intensiva. A idade foi limitada entre 1 mês completo e 6 meses incompletos. A procedência das crianças foi de outro hospital em 20 casos e domiciliar em 38. O acometimento pulmonar era alveolar em 46 casos, intersticial em 12 e bilateral em 31 crianças. Foram pesquisados agentes etiológicos associados à infecção respiratória dos lactentes jovens: Bactérias aeróbias (Hemoculturas, Chlamydia trachomatis e Cytomegalovirus (sorologia, e Pneumocystis carinii (microscopia direta do aspirado traqueal. Foram diagnosticadas infecções em 21 crianças (36,2%: Bactérias aeróbias (8, Chlamydia trachomatis (5, Cytomegalovirus (3, Pneumocystis carinii (3, Cytomegalovirus e Chlamydia trachomatis (1, Bactéria aeróbia e Cytomegalovirus (1. Foram diagnosticadas 7 infecções por Chlamydia trachomatis e/ou Cytomegalovirus entre as 12 crianças com

  16. Construction of a highly flexible and comprehensive gene collection representing the ORFeome of the human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae

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    Maier Christina J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn is the leading intracellular human pathogen responsible for respiratory infections such as pneumonia and bronchitis. Basic and applied research in pathogen biology, especially the elaboration of new mechanism-based anti-pathogen strategies, target discovery and drug development, rely heavily on the availability of the entire set of pathogen open reading frames, the ORFeome. The ORFeome of Cpn will enable genome- and proteome-wide systematic analysis of Cpn, which will improve our understanding of the molecular networks and mechanisms underlying and governing its pathogenesis. Results Here we report the construction of a comprehensive gene collection covering 98.5% of the 1052 predicted and verified ORFs of Cpn (Chlamydia pneumoniae strain CWL029 in Gateway® ‘entry’ vectors. Based on genomic DNA isolated from the vascular chlamydial strain CV-6, we constructed an ORFeome library that contains 869 unique Gateway® entry clones (83% coverage and an additional 168 PCR-verified ‘pooled’ entry clones, reaching an overall coverage of ~98.5% of the predicted CWL029 ORFs. The high quality of the ORFeome library was verified by PCR-gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing, and its functionality was demonstrated by expressing panels of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli and by genome-wide protein interaction analysis for a test set of three Cpn virulence factors in a yeast 2-hybrid system. The ORFeome is available in different configurations of resource stocks, PCR-products, purified plasmid DNA, and living cultures of E. coli harboring the desired entry clone or pooled entry clones. All resources are available in 96-well microtiterplates. Conclusion This first ORFeome library for Cpn provides an essential new tool for this important pathogen. The high coverage of entry clones will enable a systems biology approach for Cpn or host–pathogen analysis. The high yield of

  17. Serum antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae outer membrane protein cross-react with the heavy chain of immunoglobulin in the wall of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Støvring, Jette; Østergaard, Lars

    2004-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cp) has been demonstrated in arteries and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, the validity of the methods used is questioned, and antibiotic treatment trials have thus far shown disappointing results. Nevertheless, antibodies against the Cp outer membrane proteins (O...... (OMPs) have been associated with progression of atherosclerosis and AAAs. The aim of this study was to detect Cp OMPs in the wall of AAA patients by use of purified serum antibodies directed against Cp OMP and to assess potential cross-reacting proteins in AAA walls.......Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cp) has been demonstrated in arteries and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, the validity of the methods used is questioned, and antibiotic treatment trials have thus far shown disappointing results. Nevertheless, antibodies against the Cp outer membrane proteins...

  18. [Chlamydiae. 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Piano, M; Nicosia, R; Pustorino, R; Santino, I; Sessa, R

    1989-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom the Chlamydiae are among the most common and ancient pathogens, but only in the 1966 they were classified by Page in the same genus because of different nosological pictures that they cause, while more recently were identified as bacteria. Chlamydiae have been divided into two species: C. trachomatis and C. psittaci. In 1986 Grayston et al. proved the etiological role of a "new chlamydial strain", named TWAR (Taiwan-Acute Respiratory), in human pneumonia and bronchitis; TWAR is distinguishable from other Chlamydiae and possibly represents a new entity. The Chlamydiae are non-motile, metabolically poor bacteria, completely lacking of any enzimatic system for energy production (ATP) and for this reason are obligate intracellular parasites; they poses group-specific, species-specific and type-specific antigens. Four series of surface proteins were identified as responsible for their pathogenic properties, while many Authors consider a particular lipopolysaccharidical acid, group antigen, as a real LPS. These bacteria poses an unique developmental cycle with production of two type of particles different for metabolic and infecting characters: elementary body and reticulate body. The Chlamydiae have a broad spectrum of host. They cause persistent or chronic infections and their survival is insured by the elementary body. The Chlamydiae stimulate the humoral and the cellular-mediate immunity system and are capable of survival in the monocytes and macrophages.

  19. Acquisition of Rab11 and Rab11-Fip2-A novel strategy for Chlamydia pneumoniae early survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölleken, Katja; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2017-08-01

    The initial steps in chlamydial infection involve adhesion and internalization into host cells and, most importantly, modification of the nascent inclusion to establish the intracellular niche. Here, we show that Chlamydia pneumoniae enters host cells via EGFR-dependent endocytosis into an early endosome with a phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) membrane identity. Immediately after entry, the early chlamydial inclusion acquires early endosomal Rab GTPases including Rab4, Rab5, Rab7, as well as the two recycling-specific Rabs Rab11 and Rab14. While Rab5, Rab11 and Rab14 are retained in the vesicular membrane, Rab4 and Rab7 soon disappear. Loss of Rab7 enables the C. pneumoniae inclusion to escape delivery to, and degradation in lysosomes. Loss of Rab4 and retention of Rab11/ Rab14 designates the inclusion as a slowly recycling endosome-that is protected from degradation. Furthermore, we show that the Rab11/ Rab14 adaptor protein Rab11-Fip2 (Fip2) is recruited to the nascent inclusion upon internalization and retained in the membrane throughout infection. siRNA knockdown of Fip2 demonstrated that the protein is essential for internalization and infection, and expression of various deletion variants revealed that Fip2 regulates the intracellular positioning of the inclusion. Additionally, we show that binding to Rab11 and Fip2 recruits the unconventional actin motor protein myosin Vb to the early inclusion and that together they regulate the relocation of the nascent inclusion from the cell periphery to the perinuclear region, its final destination. Here, we characterize for the first time inclusion identity and inclusion-associated proteins to delineate how C. pneumoniae establishes the intracellular niche essential for its survival.

  20. Acquisition of Rab11 and Rab11-Fip2-A novel strategy for Chlamydia pneumoniae early survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Mölleken

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The initial steps in chlamydial infection involve adhesion and internalization into host cells and, most importantly, modification of the nascent inclusion to establish the intracellular niche. Here, we show that Chlamydia pneumoniae enters host cells via EGFR-dependent endocytosis into an early endosome with a phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P membrane identity. Immediately after entry, the early chlamydial inclusion acquires early endosomal Rab GTPases including Rab4, Rab5, Rab7, as well as the two recycling-specific Rabs Rab11 and Rab14. While Rab5, Rab11 and Rab14 are retained in the vesicular membrane, Rab4 and Rab7 soon disappear. Loss of Rab7 enables the C. pneumoniae inclusion to escape delivery to, and degradation in lysosomes. Loss of Rab4 and retention of Rab11/ Rab14 designates the inclusion as a slowly recycling endosome-that is protected from degradation. Furthermore, we show that the Rab11/ Rab14 adaptor protein Rab11-Fip2 (Fip2 is recruited to the nascent inclusion upon internalization and retained in the membrane throughout infection. siRNA knockdown of Fip2 demonstrated that the protein is essential for internalization and infection, and expression of various deletion variants revealed that Fip2 regulates the intracellular positioning of the inclusion. Additionally, we show that binding to Rab11 and Fip2 recruits the unconventional actin motor protein myosin Vb to the early inclusion and that together they regulate the relocation of the nascent inclusion from the cell periphery to the perinuclear region, its final destination. Here, we characterize for the first time inclusion identity and inclusion-associated proteins to delineate how C. pneumoniae establishes the intracellular niche essential for its survival.

  1. Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cheek Rash Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses References Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... disease is the most common illness caused by parvovirus B19 infection. Learn More Parvovirus B19 infection can ...

  2. Chlamydia pneumoniae activates IKK/I kappa B-mediated signaling, which is inhibited by 4-HNE and following primary exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donath, Bernadette; Fischer, Claudia; Page, Sharon; Prebeck, Sigrid; Jilg, Nikolaus; Weber, Marion; da Costa, Clarissa; Neumeier, Dieter; Miethke, Thomas; Brand, Korbinian

    2002-11-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae may be involved in atherosclerosis by inducing inflammation as well as LDL oxidation. The transcription factor NF-kappa B is found in an active state in atherosclerotic lesions. This study examined the effect of C. pneumoniae exposure on the NF-kappa B system in human monocytic lineage cells. Short exposure to C. pneumoniae as well as chlamydial heat shock protein 60 activated NF-kappa B, accompanied by increased cytokine production. Incubation with C. pneumoniae-induced depletion of I kappa B-alpha and later I kappa B-epsilon which was preceded by I kappa B kinase complex activation. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an aldehyde LDL oxidation product, was shown to inhibit C. pneumoniae induced NF-kappa B activation by preventing I kappa B phosphorylation/proteolysis. During long-term incubation with C. pneumoniae I kappa B-alpha returned to baseline, whereas the levels of I kappa B-epsilon and p65 were upregulated. Interestingly, long-term preincubation with C. pneumoniae selectively prevented restimulation by this microorganism, which appears to be at least partly facilitated by inhibition of I kappa B proteolysis. C. pneumoniae-induced NF-kappa B activation as well as the inhibition of that effect under certain conditions may contribute to chronic inflammation with potential relevance to vascular disease.

  3. Parvovirus B19 Associated Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihari, Chhagan; Rastogi, Archana; Saxena, Priyanka; Rangegowda, Devraj; Chowdhury, Ashok; Gupta, Nalini; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection can present with myriads of clinical diseases and syndromes; liver manifestations and hepatitis are examples of them. Parvovirus B19 hepatitis associated aplastic anemia and its coinfection with other hepatotropic viruses are relatively underrecognized, and there is sufficient evidence in the literature suggesting that B19 infections can cause a spectrum of liver diseases from elevation of transaminases to acute hepatitis to fulminant liver failure and even chronic hepatitis. It can also cause fatal macrophage activation syndrome and fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis. Parvovirus B19 is an erythrovirus that can only be replicate in pronormoblasts and hepatocytes, and other cells which have globosides and glycosphingolipids in their membrane can also be affected by direct virus injury due to nonstructural protein 1 persistence and indirectly by immune mediated injury. The virus infection is suspected in bone marrow aspiration in cases with sudden drop of hemoglobin and onset of transient aplastic anemia in immunosuppressed or immunocompetent patients and is confirmed either by IgM and IgG positive serology, PCR analysis, and in situ hybridization in biopsy specimens or by application of both. There is no specific treatment for parvovirus B19 related liver diseases, but triple therapy regimen may be effective consisting of immunoglobulin, dehydrohydrocortisone, and cyclosporine. PMID:24232179

  4. GroEL1, a heat shock protein 60 of Chlamydia pneumoniae, impairs neovascularization by decreasing endothelial progenitor cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wen Lin

    Full Text Available The number and function of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs are sensitive to hyperglycemia, hypertension, and smoking in humans, which are also associated with the development of atherosclerosis. GroEL1 from Chlamydia pneumoniae has been found in atherosclerotic lesions and is related to atherosclerotic pathogenesis. However, the actual effects of GroEL1 on EPC function are unclear. In this study, we investigate the EPC function in GroEL1-administered hind limb-ischemic C57BL/B6 and C57BL/10ScNJ (a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 mutation mice and human EPCs. In mice, laser Doppler imaging, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the degree of neo-vasculogenesis, circulating level of EPCs, and expression of CD34, vWF, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS in vessels. Blood flow in the ischemic limb was significantly impaired in C57BL/B6 but not C57BL/10ScNJ mice treated with GroEL1. Circulating EPCs were also decreased after GroEL1 administration in C57BL/B6 mice. Additionally, GroEL1 inhibited the expression of CD34 and eNOS in C57BL/B6 ischemic muscle. In vitro, GroEL1 impaired the capacity of differentiation, mobilization, tube formation, and migration of EPCs. GroEL1 increased senescence, which was mediated by caspases, p38 MAPK, and ERK1/2 signaling in EPCs. Furthermore, GroEL1 decreased integrin and E-selectin expression and induced inflammatory responses in EPCs. In conclusion, these findings suggest that TLR4 and impaired NO-related mechanisms could contribute to the reduced number and functional activity of EPCs in the presence of GroEL1 from C. pneumoniae.

  5. Identification of Sphingomyelinase on the Surface of Chlamydia pneumoniae: Possible Role in the Entry into Its Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuula A. Peñate Medina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently suggested a novel mechanism, autoendocytosis, for the entry of certain microbes into their hosts, with a key role played by the sphingomyelinase-catalyzed topical conversion of sphingomyelin to ceramide, the differences in the biophysical properties of these two lipids providing the driving force. The only requirement for such microbes to utilize this mechanism is that they should have a catalytically active SMase on their outer surface while the target cells should expose sphingomyelin in the external leaflet of their plasma membrane. In pursuit of possible microbial candidates, which could utilize this putative mechanism, we conducted a sequence similarity search for SMase. Because of the intriguing cellular and biochemical characteristics of the poorly understood entry of Chlamydia into its host cells these microbes were of particular interest. SMase activity was measured in vitro from isolated C. pneumoniae elementary bodies (EB and in the lysate from E. coli cells transfected with a plasmid expressing CPn0300 protein having sequence similarity to SMase. Finally, pretreatment of host cells with exogenous SMase resulting in loss plasma membrane sphingomyelin attenuated attachment of EB.

  6. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection induced allergic airway sensitization is controlled by regulatory T-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R Crother

    Full Text Available Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate, but not a high dose (severe CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2-/-, and TLR4-/- mice were infected intranasally (i.n. with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2-/- mice, but not in TLR4-/- mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2-/- mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4-/- mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs.

  7. A potential role of Chlamydia pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajonuma, Louis Chukwuemeka

    2010-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are among the most common human infections that not only impact oral health but also are associated with adverse systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, stroke, diabetes, and respiratory diseases. Periodontal diseases is a chronic severe inflammatory process of the gingiva leading to the destruction of tooth-supporting structures, alveolar bone, and subsequently tooth loss due to bacteria infection. While it has been reported that several oral biofilm-forming bacteria might be involved, the role of C. pneumoniae infection in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease remains unknown. The present hypothesis proposes that C. pneumoniae is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. This will lead to a better understanding of the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease, better treatment strategy and savings on total health care costs.

  8. Serological study of Bordetella Pertussis, Mycoplasma Pneumonia and Chlamydia Pneumonia in Iranian hajj pilgrims with prolonged cough illnesses: A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Masoud; HosseiniB, Mahdi

    2017-11-01

    Hajj pilgrimage is the biggest and longest mass gathering in the Muslim world. Annually, about 50% of more than 2.5 million pilgrims participating in this ritual get involved in severe devastating coughs. Most coughs continue, so the pilgrims turn back home and transmit them to family members and other people. Despite the high prevalence of coughs for many years, what causes them remains unknown. Considering the pertussis-like clinical picture of the so-called "hajj coughs", the researchers conducted a study to measure antibodies against three known common atypical bacteria, namely Bordetella Pertussis, Chlamydia Pneumonia and Mycoplasma Pneumonia. The study was done on three out of eleven groups of pilgrims from Yazd province, central Iran. The sample was selected randomly and consisted of 202 pilgrims who completed an informed consent. Their blood samples were taken, and the plasma was separated and then stored at -70 °C. After turning back from the journey, the pilgrims had their second blood samples taken. As many as 52 pilgrims failed to come for the second sampling, and two samples were broken during transportation. The final analysis was performed on the remaining 148 pairs of samples. Antibodies were already elevated in many pilgrims before the journey probably due to their old age (causing more exposure to pathogens) or unplanned pertussis vaccination. After their return, antibody elevation was only mild, again probably due to the old age of the participants (i.e. due to their weaker immune systems). Some antibodies even fell down without any known reason. In this study, previous hajj journey was assumed as a prophylactic factor, due to acquisition of immunity. Coughs with a prolonged pertussis-like picture were also presumed to be more related than other types of coughs to atypical pathogens. Statistical tests showed that the history of previous journeys had no prophylactic effect. Also, no correlation was found between the clinical pictures of coughs

  9. C-reactive protein and anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies as risk factors of cardiovascular death in incident patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, Ramón; Frías, Yolanda; de Ventura, Maria Jesús; Rodríguez, Ernesto; Hurtado, María Elena; Alcántara, Guadalupe; Vázquez, Roberto; Ortiz, Ruth; Salcedo, Mario; Rios, Maria Elena; Kaji, Julio; Amato, Dante

    2003-01-01

    Recently it has been pointed out that inflammation and infections caused by germs such as Chlamydia pneumoniae are independent cardiovascular risk factors for the general population, but information about these relationships in dialysis patients is scarce. This work was done to analyze the association of C-reactive protein (CRP) and IgG anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies (anti-Chlp-IgG) as independent cardiovascular risk factors in incident patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Single-cohort, prospective observational study. Three CAPD centers from the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and one from the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado, Mexico. A cohort of 75 adult incident patients on CAPD, without clinical signs of congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, or peripheral arterial insufficiency. No restrictions for age, gender, or cause of renal failure were applied. Mortality. Demographic variables, body composition by electrical bioimpedance, serum glucose, urea, creatinine, lipids, homocysteine, nutritional markers (albumin, prealbumin, and transferrin), CRP, and anti-Chlp-IgG were measured and registered at the time of the first admission. When a patient died, the cause of death was determined by review of the clinical chart. Mean follow-up time was 10.25 patient-months. There were 14 cardiovascular deaths. CRP was positive (> 10 mg/L) in 64% of the patients, and anti-Chlp-IgG in 64%; 29% of the patients were positive for both markers. The relative risk for cardiovascular mortality was 6.23 for patients positive for either CRP or anti-Chlp-IgG, and increased to 9.52 when both markers were positive. Multivariate analysis revealed that CRP and anti-Chlp-IgG were stronger cardiovascular death predictors than age, diabetes, and nutritional status. These data suggest that inflammation and the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae infections are important predictors of cardiovascular death in

  10. Characterization of serine hydroxymethyltransferase GlyA as a potential source of D-alanine in Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedetti, Stefania; Bühl, Henrike; Gaballah, Ahmed; Klöckner, Anna; Otten, Christian; Schneider, Tanja; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Henrichfreise, Beate

    2014-01-01

    For intracellular Chlamydiaceae, there is no need to withstand osmotic challenges, and a functional cell wall has not been detected in these pathogens so far. Nevertheless, penicillin inhibits cell division in Chlamydiaceae resulting in enlarged aberrant bodies, a phenomenon known as chlamydial anomaly. D-alanine is a unique and essential component in the biosynthesis of bacterial cell walls. In free-living bacteria like Escherichia coli, penicillin-binding proteins such as monofunctional transpeptidases PBP2 and PBP3, the putative targets of penicillin in Chlamydiaceae, cross-link adjacent peptidoglycan strands via meso-diaminopimelic acid and D-Ala-D-Ala moieties of pentapeptide side chains. In the absence of genes coding for alanine racemase Alr and DadX homologs, the source of D-Ala and thus the presence of substrates for PBP2 and PBP3 activity in Chlamydiaceae has puzzled researchers for years. Interestingly, Chlamydiaceae genomes encode GlyA, a serine hydroxymethyltransferase that has been shown to exhibit slow racemization of D- and L-alanine as a side reaction in E. coli. We show that GlyA from Chlamydia pneumoniae can serve as a source of D-Ala. GlyA partially reversed the D-Ala auxotrophic phenotype of an E. coli racemase double mutant. Moreover, purified chlamydial GlyA had racemase activity on L-Ala in vitro and was inhibited by D-cycloserine, identifying GlyA, besides D-Ala ligase MurC/Ddl, as an additional target of this competitive inhibitor in Chlamydiaceae. Proof of D-Ala biosynthesis in Chlamydiaceae helps to clarify the structure of cell wall precursor lipid II and the role of chlamydial penicillin-binding proteins in the development of non-dividing aberrant chlamydial bodies and persistence in the presence of penicillin.

  11. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Mediate the Regulation of Inflammatory Type T Cell Response for Optimal Immunity against Respiratory Chlamydia Pneumoniae Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyee, Antony George; Yang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) infection is a leading cause for a variety of respiratory diseases and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. The regulatory mechanisms in host defense against Cpn infection are less understood. In this study, we investigated the role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in immune regulation in Cpn respiratory tract infection. We found that in vivo depletion of pDCs increased the severity of infection and lung pathology. Mice depleted of pDC had greater body weight loss, higher lung bacterial burden and excessive tissue inflammation compared to the control mice. Analysis of specific T cell cytokine production pattern in the lung following Cpn infection revealed that pDC depleted mice produced significantly higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, but lower IL-10 compared to the controls. In particular, pDC depleted mice showed pathogenic T cell responses characterized by inflammatory type-1 (CD8 and CD4) and inflammatory Th2 cell responses. Moreover, pDC depletion dramatically reduced CD4 regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the lungs and draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, pDC-T cell co-culture experiments showed that pDCs isolated from Cpn infected mice were potent in inducing IL-10 producing CD4 Tregs. Together, these findings provide in vivo evidence for a critical role of pDCs in homeostatic regulation of immunity during Cpn infection. Our findings highlight the importance of a ‘balanced’ immune response for host protective immunity and preventing detrimental immunopathology during microbial infections. PMID:24386207

  12. Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know you have it. Walking pneumonia (also called atypical pneumonia because it's different from the typical bacterial pneumonia) ... ray and blood tests. People with bacterial or atypical pneumonia will probably be given antibiotics to take at ...

  13. Evaluation of five DNA extraction methods for purification of DNA from atherosclerotic tissue and estimation of prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in tissue from a Danish population undergoing vascular repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Tina; Østergaard, Lars; Birkelund, Svend

    2003-01-01

    To date PCR detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae DNA in atherosclerotic lesions from Danish patients has been unsuccessful. To establish whether non-detection was caused by a suboptimal DNA extraction method, we tested five different DNA extraction methods for purification of DNA from atherosclerotic...

  14. No prognostic significance of chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae in acute coronary syndromes: insights from the Global Utilization of Strategies to Open Occluded Arteries IV Acute Coronary Syndromes trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhout, Cynthia M; Gnarpe, Judy; Chang, Wei-Ching

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although relationships between chronic Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) infection and the risk of coronary events in stable coronary artery disease patients have been reported, a similar link in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients has not been consistently observed. METHODS: In a nested ...

  15. In situ detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae, C. trachomatis, and cytokines among cardiovascular diseased patients from the Amazon region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitas LS

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Larissa S Freitas,1 Núbia Caroline C Almeida,1 Maria Alice Freitas Queiroz,1 Marcelo M Zaninotto,2 Hellen T Fuzii,3 Alfredo Ribeiro-Silva,4 Antonio CR Vallinoto,1 Marluísa OG Ishak,1 Juarez AS Quaresma,3 Ricardo Ishak1 1Virus Laboratory, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Para, 2Hospital of Clinic Gaspar Viana, 3Laboratory of Immunopathology, Nucleus of Tropical Medicine, Federal University of Para, Belém, 4Departament of Pathology, Medical School of Ribeirão Preto, University of Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Chronic coronary artery disease has been associated, as a consequence of the local inflammatory reaction with previous or persistent infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae, which led to the investigation of the association of cardiovascular disease and previous infection with C. trachomatis and the role of cytokine profile (in situ markers in the vascular system tissues. Methods: Sixty-nine biopsies were collected for immunohistochemical analysis for the presence of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IFN-γ, TGF-β, and IL-10, in 16 fragments from atheromatous plaques, 32 aorta fragments, and 21 valve fragments, using a tissue microarray technique for paraffin embedded tissues. Results: Most patients undergoing revascularization surgery were men >50 years, while those undergoing valve replacement were mostly women <50 years. TNF-α was the most prevalent marker, detected in 91.7% (55/60 of the samples. The mean percent area stained was greater in patients infected with C. pneumoniae (3.81% vs 1.92%; p=0.0115 and specifically in the aorta (4.83% vs 2.25%; p=0.0025; C. trachomatis infection was higher in valves, and C. pneumoniae in plaques, both without statistical significance. There was no significant difference in the cytokine staining profile between patients previously infected with both species and uninfected patients. Conclusion: Although there was no difference in the cytokine profile between patients previously

  16. Oral azithromycin in extended dosage schedule for chronic, subclinical Chlamydia pneumoniae infection causing coronary artery disease: a probable cure in sight? Results of a controlled preliminary trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jaideep DograPoly Clinic, Central Government Health Scheme, Jaipur, Rajasthan, IndiaPurpose: Two mega trials have raised the question as to whether the hypothesis that infection plays a role in atherosclerosis is still relevant. This controlled preliminary trial investigated an extended dose of azithromycin in the treatment of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection causing coronary artery disease (CAD.Patients and methods: Forty patients with documentary evidence of CAD were screened for immunoglobulin G titers against C. pneumoniae and grouped into either the study group (patients with positive titer, n = 32 or control group (patients with negative titer, n = 8. Cases who met inclusion criteria could not have had coronary artery bypass graft surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention in the preceding 6 months. Informed consent was obtained from every patient. Baseline blood samples were analyzed for red blood cell indices, serum creatinine, and liver function tests, and repeated every 2 months. A primary event was defined as the first occurrence of death by any cause, recurrent myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization procedure, or hospitalization for angina. Patients in the study group received 500 mg of oral azithromycin once daily for 5 days, which was then repeated after a gap of 10 days (total of 24 courses in the 1-year trial period. The control group did not have azithromycin added to their standard CAD treatment.Results: In the study group, 30 patients completed the trial. Two patients had to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention in the initial first quarter of the 1-year trial period. In the control group, one patient died during the trial, one had to undergo coronary artery bypass graft surgery, and one had percutaneous coronary intervention.Conclusion: The patients tolerated the therapy well and there was a positive correlation between azithromycin and secondary prevention of CAD.Keywords: azithromycin, Chlamydia pneumoniae

  17. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cholestatic hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Perrini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There are few reports in the literature of hepatitis as a manifestation of Parvovirus B19 infection. We describe a case of Parvovirus B19 associated acute cholestatic hepatitis diagnosed based on a positive serologic test (IgM and molecular detection of parvovirus B19 DNA in peripheral blood. Parvovirus B19 infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patient presenting with acute hepatitis of unknown etiology.

  18. 7 CFR 15b.19 - New construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false New construction. 15b.19 Section 15b.19 Agriculture... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Accessibility § 15b.19 New construction. (a) Design and construction. Each facility or part of a facility constructed by, on behalf of, or for the use of a recipient...

  19. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection acts as an endothelial stressor with the potential to initiate the earliest heat shock protein 60-dependent inflammatory stage of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutmayer, Simone; Csordas, Adam; Kern, Jan; Maass, Viola; Almanzar, Giovanni; Offterdinger, Martin; Öllinger, Robert; Maass, Matthias; Wick, Georg

    2013-05-01

    We identified increased expression and redistribution of the intracellular protein 60-kDa human heat shock protein (hHSP60) (HSPD1) to the cell surface in human endothelial cells subjected to classical atherosclerosis risk factors and subsequent immunologic cross-reactivity against this highly conserved molecule, as key events occurring early in the process of atherosclerosis. The present study aimed at investigating the role of infectious pathogens as stress factors for vascular endothelial cells and, as such, contributors to early atherosclerotic lesion formation. Using primary donor-matched arterial and venous human endothelial cells, we show that infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae leads to marked upregulation and surface expression of hHSP60 and adhesion molecules. Moreover, we provide evidence for an increased susceptibility of arterial endothelial cells for redistribution of hHSP60 to the cellular membrane in response to C. pneumoniae infection as compared to autologous venous endothelial cells. We also show that oxidative stress has a central role to play in endothelial cell activation in response to chlamydial infection. These data provide evidence for a role of C. pneumoniae as a potent primary endothelial stressor for arterial endothelial cells leading to enrichment of hHSP60 on the cellular membrane and, as such, a potential initiator of atherosclerosis.

  20. Caspase-1 dependent IL-1β secretion is critical for host defense in a mouse model of Chlamydia pneumoniae lung infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Shimada

    Full Text Available Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP is an important human pathogen that causes atypical pneumonia and is associated with various chronic inflammatory disorders. Caspase-1 is a key component of the 'inflammasome', and is required to cleave pro-IL-1β to bioactive IL-1β. Here we demonstrate for the first time a critical requirement for IL-1β in response to CP infection. Caspase-1⁻/⁻ mice exhibit delayed cytokine production, defective clearance of pulmonary bacteria and higher mortality in response to CP infection. Alveolar macrophages harbored increased bacterial numbers due to reduced iNOS levels in Caspase-1⁻/⁻ mice. Pharmacological blockade of the IL-1 receptor in CP infected wild-type mice phenocopies Caspase-1-deficient mice, and administration of recombinant IL-1β rescues CP infected Caspase-1⁻/⁻ mice from mortality, indicating that IL-1β secretion is crucial for host immune defense against CP lung infection. In vitro investigation reveals that CP-induced IL-1β secretion by macrophages requires TLR2/MyD88 and NLRP3/ASC/Caspase-1 signaling. Entry into the cell by CP and new protein synthesis by CP are required for inflammasome activation. Neither ROS nor cathepsin was required for CP infection induced inflammasome activation. Interestingly, Caspase-1 activation during CP infection occurs with mitochondrial dysfunction indicating a possible mechanism involving the mitochondria for CP-induced inflammasome activation.

  1. Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you have viral pneumonia, your doctor may prescribe an antiviral medicine to ...

  2. Parvovirus B19 infection in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Eveline P.; de Haan, Timo R.; Kroes, Aloys C. M.; Beersma, Matthias F. C.; Oepkes, Dick; Walther, Frans J.

    2006-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 is a small single-stranded DNA virus and a potent inhibitor of erythropoiesis, due to its cytotoxicity to erythroid progenitor cells. Infection with parvovirus B19 during pregnancy can cause several serious complications in the fetus, such as fetal anemia, neurological anomalies,

  3. The prospective association of Chlamydia pneumoniae and four other pathogens with development of coronary artery calcium: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laek, Babray; Szklo, Moyses; McClelland, Robyn L; Ding, Jingzhong; Tsai, Michael Y; Bluemke, David A; Tracy, Russell; Matsushita, Kunihiro

    2013-10-01

    Previous basic and cross-sectional studies obtained conflicting results regarding the association of pathogens with coronary artery calcium (CAC). The aim of this study is to prospectively evaluate this association in a population-based cohort. We examined 5744 individuals aged 45-84 years at baseline (2000-02) who underwent repeated CAC assessment on average 2.4 years later (a half at visit 2 [2002-04] and the other half at visit 3 [2004-05]). CAC incidence was defined as newly detectable CAC at follow-up (475 cases of 2942 participants). CAC progression was defined as annualized change in CAC Agatston score ≥10 units/year if baseline CAC score >0 to <100 or ≥10%/year if baseline score ≥ 100 (1537 cases of 2802 participants). Seropositivity was assessed in the entire cohort for Chlamydia pneumoniae and in a random sample (n = 873) for Helicobacter pylori, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and hepatitis A virus. Seropositivity to C. pneumoniae was not significantly associated with CAC incidence (odds ratio [OR] 1.11 [95% CI, 0.88-1.39], P = 0.371) or progression (1.14 [0.96-1.36], P = 0.135) even in unadjusted models. When CAC incidence and progression were combined, we observed significant association with C. pneumoniae seropositivity before adjustment (OR 1.17 [1.03-1.33], P = 0.016) but not in a model adjusting for traditional risk factors (1.04 [0.90-1.19], P = 0.611). The results were consistent across subgroups according to age, sex, and race/ethnicity. None of five pathogens or their accrual was associated with CAC incidence and progression in the subsample. Our prospective study does not support the pathophysiological involvement of these pathogens in CAC development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection in systemic sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewska, K.; Corcioli, F.; Carlsen, Karen Marie

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our previous reports suggested a possible association between parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection and systemic sclerosis (SSc), based on higher prevalence of B19V DNA in SSc patients in respect to controls. METHODS: In the present study, to further evaluate the differences in the pattern...

  5. [Parvovirus B19 infection and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savey, L; Poissonnier, M H; Leblanc, M; Colau, J C

    1995-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 was identified in 1975. It causes infections megalerythemia in adults associated with skin eruptions and joint pain (about 50% of the adult population is immunized). The risk of contamination in case of an epidemia is high in school teachers and school personnel. In 1984, the parvovirus B19 was implicated as the cause of fetal anasarca. The risk of transplacental contamination is estimated at 33% in case of maternal infection. Pregnant women with parvovirus B19 infection and confirmed serology should have an echography every 15 days. Fetal anasarca can be complicated by in utero fetal death related to erythroid stem-cell anaemia. The diagnosis of fetal infection is based on PCR techniques on fetal blood. Symptomatic antenatal treatment with in utero transfusion was proposed as early as 1988. This method does not however appear to be necessary in all cases as the outcome in several reports of untreated fetuses was delivery of a normal child. There is the possibility of myocardial damage caused by parvovirus B19 which would make in utero transfusion difficult and limit its beneficial effect. Finally associated thrombopenia is often severe and increased fetal risk.

  6. pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the first report in 1967, the incidence of Penicillin Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pneu- mococcus) has risen steadily worldwide, and now complicates diagnostic and treatment strategies for infections due to this organism. More worrisome is the fact that in areas where Penicillin Resistant. Streptococcus ...

  7. Polymicrogyria and Congenital Parvovirus B19 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant S. Schulert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fetal parvovirus B19 infection causes anemia, hydrops, and pregnancy loss but is generally not considered teratogenic. Nevertheless, disturbances of neuronal migration have been described with congenital parvovirus infection. We evaluated a term infant with congenital parvovirus disease and polymicrogyria. We compared this case with four other reports of central nervous system disease after birth to parvovirus-infected mothers. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation, this infant was found to have congenital parvovirus disease with severe anemia and nonimmune hydrops as well as extensive polymicrogyria. Although rare, this report and literature review suggest that parvovirus B19 has the potential to disrupt normal neurodevelopment. We suggest that infants with severe congenital parvovirus infection have close developmental surveillance and if symptomatic undergo neuroimaging to assess for disorders of neuromigration.

  8. Parvovírus B19

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Parvovírus são pequenos vírus, cuja designação deriva do latim parvus. Possui duas subfamílias: Parvovirinae e Densovirinae. A subfamília Parvivirinae possui três géneros: Parvovirus, Eritrovirus e Dependovirus. Apenas o género Eritrovirus possui um vírus potencialmente patogénico para o ser humano, o parvovirus B19.

  9. Characterization of a secreted Chlamydia protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, A.C.; Vandahl, B.B.; Larsen, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that are important human pathogens. The Chlamydia genomes contain orthologues to secretion apparatus proteins from other intracellular bacteria, but only a few secreted proteins have been identified. Most likely, effector proteins are secreted in order...... to promote infection. Effector proteins cannot be identified by motif or similarity searches. As a new strategy for identification of secreted proteins we have compared 2D-PAGE profiles of [35S]-labelled Chlamydia proteins from whole lysates of infected cells to 2D-PAGE profiles of proteins from purified...... Chlamydia. Several secretion candidates from Chlamydia trachomatis D and Chlamydia pneumoniae were detected by this method. Two protein spots were identified among the candidates. These represent fragments of the 'chlamydial protease- or proteasome-like activity factor' (CPAF) and were clearly present in 2D...

  10. Detección de Chlamydia pneumoniae en tejido aórtico humano: amplificación del gen kdtA e hibridación in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Guzmán

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La ateroesclerosis es la principal causa de enfermedad coronaria y cerebrovascular, las cuales, a su vez, son las causas más comunes de mortalidad y morbilidad en el mundo occidental. Publicaciones recientes sugieren que ciertos microorganismos infecciosos podrían jugar un papel importante en la génesis y progresión de la aterosclerosis. De acuerdo con reportes seroepidemiológicos y de detección directa, Chlamydia pneumoniae podría ser el candidato más plausible. No obstante, no se ha determinado su papel específico en el proceso aterogénico, por lo cual en los últimos años ha surgido la necesidad de explorar diversas técnicas de detección de C. pneumoniae en arterias. Objetivo. El propósito de este estudio fue investigar la presencia de C. pneumoniae en muestras de tejido aórtico de catorce pacientes sometidos a cirugía de reemplazo aórtico, utilizando la amplificación del gen kdtA por PCR acoplada a un ensayo de hibridación in vitro. Materiales y métodos. De cada uno de catorce segmentos de aorta se obtuvo una muestra al azar para la extracción de ADN y la detección de C. pneumoniae por PCR-hibridación in vitro. Resultados. Doce (85,7% de catorce muestras de tejido de aorta resultaron positivas para C. pneumoniae. Conclusión. Los resultados encontrados en este estudio sugieren que la presencia de C. pneumoniae es frecuente en el tipo de muestras analizado. En estudios posteriores resultaría importante examinar si esta proporción se mantiene en una muestra poblacional mayor.

  11. Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis Patient Education FAQs Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis Patient Education Pamphlets - ...

  12. Different presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, and Toxoplasma gondii in schizophrenia: meta-analysis and analytical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Fernández J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available José Gutiérrez-Fernández,1 Juan de Dios Luna del Castillo,2 Sara Mañanes-González,1 José Antonio Carrillo-Ávila,1 Blanca Gutiérrez,3 Jorge A Cervilla,3 Antonio Sorlózano-Puerto1 1Department of Microbiology, 2Department of Statistics and Operation Research, 3Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Neurosciences and CIBERSAM, School of Medicine and Biohealth Research Institute (Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria IBS-Granada, University of Granada, Granada, Spain Abstract: In the present study we have performed both a meta-analysis and an analytical study exploring the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in a sample of 143 schizophrenic patients and 143 control subjects. The meta-analysis was performed on papers published up to April 2014. The presence of serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. The detection of microbial DNA in total peripheral blood was performed by nested polymerase chain reaction. The meta-analysis showed that: 1 C. pneumoniae DNA in blood and brain are more common in schizophrenic patients; 2 there is association with parasitism by T. gondii, despite the existence of publication bias; and 3 herpes viruses were not more common in schizophrenic patients. In our sample only anti-Toxoplasma immunoglobulin G was more prevalent and may be a risk factor related to schizophrenia, with potential value for prevention. Keywords: meta-analysis, analytical study, Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, Toxoplasma gondii, schizophrenia

  13. Parvovirus B19: What Is the Relevance in Transfusion Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, David; Hennig, Holger

    2018-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) has been discovered in 1975. The association with a disease was unclear in the first time after the discovery of B19V, but meanwhile, the usually droplet transmitted B19V is known as the infectious agent of the “fifth disease,” a rather harmless children’s illness. But B19V infects erythrocyte progenitor cells and thus, acute B19V infection in patients with a high erythrocyte turnover may lead to a life-threatening aplastic crisis, and acutely infected pregnant women can transmit B19V to their unborn child, resulting in a hydrops fetalis and fetal death. However, in many adults, B19V infection goes unnoticed and thus many blood donors donate blood despite the infection. The B19V infection does not impair the blood cell counts in healthy blood donors, but after the acute infection with extremely high DNA concentrations exceeding 1010 IU B19V DNA/ml plasma is resolved, B19V DNA persists in the plasma of blood donors at low levels for several years. That way, many consecutive donations that contain B19V DNA can be taken from a single donor, but the majority of blood products from donors with detectable B19V DNA seem not to be infectious for the recipients from several reasons: first, many recipients had undergone a B19V infection in the past and have formed protective antibodies. Second, B19V DNA concentration in the blood product is often too low to infect the recipient. Third, after the acute infection, the presence of B19V DNA in the donor is accompanied by presumably neutralizing antibodies which are protective also for the recipient of his blood products. Thus, transfusion-transmitted (TT-) B19V infections are very rarely reported. Moreover, in most blood donors, B19V DNA concentration is below 1,000 IU/ml plasma, and no TT-B19V infections have been found by such low-viremic donations. Cutoff for an assay for B19V DNA blood donor screening should, therefore, be approximately 1,000 IU/ml plasma, if a general screening of blood

  14. Parvovirus B19 viremia in children with systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Parvovirus B19 infection may present with fever, rash, nonerosive arthritis, hepatitis, anemia, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia and positive ANA, B19 infection may be misdiagnosed as new onset systemic lupus erythematosus. At the same time, B19 infection and systemic lupus erythematosus may occur ...

  15. The molecular biology and diagnostics of Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend

    1992-01-01

    The rapid development of biotechnological methods provides the potential of dissecting the molecular structure of microorganisms. In this review the molecular biology of chlamydia is described. The genus Chlamydia contains three species C. trachomatis, C. psittaci, and C. pneumonia which all...... are important human pathogens. Chlamydia is obligate intracellular bacteria with a unique biphasic life cycle. The extracellularly chlamydial elementary bodies (EB) are small, metabolic inactive, infectious particles with a tight outer cell membrane. After internalization into host cells the chlamydial...

  16. Seroprevalence of erythrovirus B19 in Saudi pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johargy, Ayman K

    2016-01-01

    Erythrovirus B19 infection is associated with clinical symptoms that range from mild to severe. The common clinical presentation of B19 virus (B19V) infection is erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, aplastic crisis, and fetal infection. Infection in seronegative pregnant women can lead to fetal hydrops. To determine the seroprevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to erythrovirus B19 in Saudi pregnant women in the cities of Makkah and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia. A total of 364 blood (serum) samples were tested for erythrovirus B19-specific-IgG antibody in Saudi pregnant women in the cities of Makkah and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia. Erythrovirus B19-specific-IgG antibodies were detected in 182/364 (50%) of Saudi pregnant women of different age groups. This study indicated that B19V is clearly circulating in the community in a way that is similar to what is found in most nontemperate countries.

  17. Prevalence of chlamydia in patients attending gynecological clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the cultured samples 230 were positive for Chlamydia trachomatis and 99 positive to Chlamydia pneumoniae. Statistical analysis using the student\\'s t test at 95% confidence interval shows that there was no significant difference between the number of females and males that presented themselves for screening.

  18. Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila in elderly patients with stroke (C-PEPS, M-PEPS, L-PEPS): a case-control study on the infectious burden of atypical respiratory pathogens in elderly patients with acute cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeh, Joseph; Goodbourn, Colin

    2005-02-01

    Multiple studies have suggested an association between Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether the risk of cerebrovascular disease is associated with Legionella pneumophila infection and the aggregate number/infectious burden of these atypical respiratory pathogens. One hundred patients aged >65 years admitted with acute stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) and 87 control patients admitted concurrently with acute noncardiopulmonary, noninfective conditions were recruited prospectively. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits, we previously reported the seroprevalences of C pneumoniae and M pneumoniae in these patients. We have now determined the seroprevalences of L pneumophila IgG and IgM in this cohort of patients using ELISA. The seroprevalences of L pneumophila IgG and IgM were 29% (n=91) and 12% (n=81) in the stroke/TIA group and 22% (n=86) and 10% (n=72) in the controls, respectively. Using logistic regression to adjust for age, sex, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and ischemic ECG, the odds ratios for stroke/TIA in relation to L pneumophila IgG and IgM were 1.52 (95% CI, 0.70 to 3.28; P=0.29) and 1.49 (95% CI, 0.45 to 4.90; P=0.51), respectively. The odds ratios in relation to IgG seropositivity for 1, 2, or 3 atypical respiratory pathogens after adjustment were 3.89 (95% CI, 1.13 to 13.33), 2.00 (95% CI, 0.64 to 6.21), and 6.67 (95% CI, 1.22 to 37.04), respectively (P=0.06). L pneumophila seropositivity is not significantly associated with stroke/TIA. However, the risk of stroke/TIA appears to be associated with the aggregate number of chronic infectious burden of atypical respiratory pathogens such as C pneumoniae, M pneumoniae, and L pneumophila.

  19. Nefritis tubulo intersticial asociada a parvovirus b19 Tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with parvovirus b19 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Ramírez

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Paciente de 9 años, previamente sana, que ingresa en anasarca con síndrome nefrótico clínico y humoral, asociado a hipertensión arterial y microhematuria, con función renal normal y se comporta como corticorresistente. Se realiza 1° biopsia renal que informa glomerulonefritis proliferativa mesangial difusa con esclerosis focal y segmentaria. En tratamiento con ciclofosfamida y corticoides, presenta síndrome febril prolongado con anemia secundaria a crisis aplásica de la serie roja, asociada con una infección aguda por parvovirus B19, e insuficiencia renal aguda secundaria a nefritis tubulointersticial severa. La PCR para parvovirus B19 DNA fue positiva en tejido renal y médula ósea. La paciente evoluciona a insuficiencia renal crónica terminal. No se puede descartar que desde su inicio, el síndrome nefrótico estuviera asociado al daño glomerular por la infección viral, que comenzó como síndrome nefrótico con componentes nefríticos y que evoluciona inesperadamente a una nefritis tubulointersticial. Este sería el primer caso en el que se documenta como causa de insuficiencia renal crónica terminal, un daño tubulointersticial secundario a parvovirus B19.A previously healthy 9 year old girl developed nephrotic syndrome with hypertension, microhematuria and normal renal function. The patient evolved as steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome whose initial renal biopsy was consistent with diffuse proliferative mesangial glomerulonephritis with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. At the time of cyclophosphamide and prednisone treatment, she developed a prolonged febrile syndrome. She also had severe anemia following an aplastic crisis induced by human parvovirus B19 infection and acute renal failure secondary to a severe tubulointersticial disease. Bone marrow and renal tissue, tested by polimerase chain reaction were positive for parvovirus, while the patient’s blood was negative. The renal involvement did not improve requiring

  20. Atypical Papular Purpuric Eruption Induced by Parvovirus B19 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeyma Kayalı

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Parvovirus B19 infection’s most common dermatological manifestation is erythema infectiosum as also known the fifth disease. Rare clinical presentations of parvovirus B 19 like papulopurpuric gloves and socks syndrome and acropetechial syndrome has also been described re­cently. This study presents report of a case with atypical feature and distribution of rash due to parvovirus B19 in­fection. We want to emphasize that pediatricians should consider parvovirus B19 infection of any patient who has leukopenia presenting with petechial/purpuric eruption of an unclear origin.

  1. Neurologiske symptomer og akut hepatitis associeret til parvovirus B19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giørtz-Carlsen, Birgitte; Rittig, Søren; Thelle, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of symptoms correlated to parvovirus B19 infections has expanded greatly during the past years. We report a case of anaemia, encephalitis-like symptoms and acute hepatitis in a 15-months-old Danish girl associated with parvovirus B19, verified by positive serum IgM og IgG antibodies...

  2. Chronic hepatitis caused by persistent parvovirus B19 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogensen Trine H

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human infection with parvovirus B19 may lead to a diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations, including benign erythema infectiosum in children, transient aplastic crisis in patients with haemolytic anaemia, and congenital hydrops foetalis. These different diseases represent direct consequences of the ability of parvovirus B19 to target the erythroid cell lineage. However, accumulating evidence suggests that this virus can also infect other cell types resulting in diverse clinical manifestations, of which the pathogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. This has prompted important questions regarding the tropism of the virus and its possible involvement in a broad range of infectious and autoimmune medical conditions. Case Presentation Here, we present an unusual case of persistent parvovirus B19 infection as a cause of chronic hepatitis. This patient had persistent parvovirus B19 viraemia over a period of more than four years and displayed signs of chronic hepatitis evidenced by fluctuating elevated levels of ALAT and a liver biopsy demonstrating chronic hepatitis. Other known causes of hepatitis and liver damage were excluded. In addition, the patient was evaluated for immunodeficiency, since she had lymphopenia both prior to and following clearance of parvovirus B19 infection. Conclusions In this case report, we describe the current knowledge on the natural history and pathogenesis of parvovirus B19 infection, and discuss the existing evidence of parvovirus B19 as a cause of acute and chronic hepatitis. We suggest that parvovirus B19 was the direct cause of this patient's chronic hepatitis, and that she had an idiopathic lymphopenia, which may have predisposed her to persistent infection, rather than bone marrow depression secondary to infection. In addition, we propose that her liver involvement may have represented a viral reservoir. Finally, we suggest that clinicians should be aware of parvovirus B19 as an unusual

  3. Parvovirus B19 induced lupus-like syndrome with nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Elodie; Rihova, Zuzana; Cmejla, Radek; Decleire, Pierre-Yves; Langen, Corinne

    2016-12-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old man who developed an acute illness with fever, arthralgia and nephritic syndrome. Antinuclear antibodies were slightly positive and complement levels were low. Renal biopsy showed exudative diffuse proliferative endocapillary glomerulonephritis with diffuse immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA, IgM) and complement deposition (C3d, C4d, C1q) on immunofluorescence. The patient was first treated with corticosteroids and mycophenolate mofetil for suspected lupus with WHO class IV glomerulonephritis. The diagnosis was questioned and a diagnosis of parvovirus B19-associated nephritis was made based on elevation of serum IgM antibodies for parvovirus B19 and detection of parvovirus B19 DNA on renal biopsy. The immunosuppressive treatment was stopped and progressive spontaneous regression of clinical and laboratory abnormalities was observed. We conclude that human parvovirus B19 infection should be considered as a cause of lupus-like symptomatology and acute glomerulonephritis.

  4. Generalized edema associated with parvovirus B19 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter J. Vlaar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Generalized edema is a rare presentation of human parvovirus B19 infection. The etiology of this edema is unclear, particularly because signs of heart or renal failure are often not present. We report the case of a young adult presenting with generalized edema with serological and PCR evidence of parvovirus B19 infection, and discuss the potential mechanisms of edema based on the previous literature.

  5. Seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukkose, Mehves; Kozanoglu, Erkan; Basaran, Sibel; Bayramoglu, Ozlem; Yarkin, Fugen

    2009-03-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS). Seventy-five patients with FS (44.3 +/- 8.3) and 75 healthy controls (44.2 +/- 8.1) were evaluated. Serum anti-B19 IgM and IgG antibodies were measured by ELISA technique. Patients were questioned about duration of symptoms, characteristic features of FS, and symptoms related with viral infection preceding the onset of FS. No significant difference was found regarding the prevalence of anti-B19 IgM antibodies between the groups (p = 0.494). Seropositivity of anti-B19 IgG of the patients was significantly higher than control group (81.3% vs. 64% respectively, p = 0.027). No statistically significant differences were found regarding to the clinical features between fibromyalgia patients with IgG antibody compared to those without IgG antibody. Parvovirus B19 IgG seropositivity was found to be significantly higher in patients with FS. Parvovirus B19 infection might have a role in the etiopathogenesis of FS or might act as a triggering factor.

  6. Slovenian recommendations for parvovirus B19 infection in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Osvald Avguštin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Parvovirus B19 (B19V causes a mild disease called erythema infectiosum, also known as the fifh disease that affects mostly children and young adults. The virus can be transferred to the fetus during pregnancy in 31 to 51 % of the cases and can cause severe anaemia, non-immune hydrops fetalis or fetal death due to inhibition of erythropoiesis. It also affects the heart muscle, central nervous system, bones, and most likely can cause a subsequent arrest in children’s neurological development. It is estimated that 25–45 % of pregnant women are seronegative with a high risk of infection during pregnancy. A B19V infection in pregnant women is determined by detecting specific IgM and IgG antibodies, and in case of doubt, by using PCR method to detect viral DNA. Fetal infection with B19V is confirmed by detecting viral DNA in the amniotic fluid. In the case of either a suspected or confirmed fetal infection we monitor the fetus by ultrasound screening in a tertiary centre. We treat the fetus with an intrauterine transfusion at the first signs of anaemia or hydrops. To prevent fresh infections with B19V during pregnancy we should raise awareness amongst women and healthcare workers about the risks it poses for the fetus. The recommendations for management of women who are exposed to, are at risk of developing, or have developed B19V infection in pregnancy are published in this article.

  7. Multi locus sequence typing of Chlamydia reveals an association between Chlamydia psittaci genotypes and host species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannekoek, Yvonne; Dickx, Veerle; Beeckman, Delphine S A; Jolley, Keith A; Keijzers, Wendy C; Vretou, Evangelia; Maiden, Martin C J; Vanrompay, Daisy; van der Ende, Arie

    2010-12-02

    Chlamydia comprises a group of obligate intracellular bacterial parasites responsible for a variety of diseases in humans and animals, including several zoonoses. Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases such as trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity. Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Chlamydia psittaci, causing zoonotic pneumonia in humans, is usually hosted by birds, while Chlamydia abortus, causing abortion and fetal death in mammals, including humans, is mainly hosted by goats and sheep. We used multi-locus sequence typing to asses the population structure of Chlamydia. In total, 132 Chlamydia isolates were analyzed, including 60 C. trachomatis, 18 C. pneumoniae, 16 C. abortus, 34 C. psittaci and one of each of C. pecorum, C. caviae, C. muridarum and C. felis. Cluster analyses utilizing the Neighbour-Joining algorithm with the maximum composite likelihood model of concatenated sequences of 7 housekeeping fragments showed that C. psittaci 84/2334 isolated from a parrot grouped together with the C. abortus isolates from goats and sheep. Cluster analyses of the individual alleles showed that in all instances C. psittaci 84/2334 formed one group with C. abortus. Moving 84/2334 from the C. psittaci group to the C. abortus group resulted in a significant increase in the number of fixed differences and elimination of the number of shared mutations between C. psittaci and C. abortus. C. psittaci M56 from a muskrat branched separately from the main group of C. psittaci isolates. C. psittaci genotypes appeared to be associated with host species. The phylogenetic tree of C. psittaci did not follow that of its host bird species, suggesting host species jumps. In conclusion, we report for the first time an association between C. psittaci genotypes with host species.

  8. Multi locus sequence typing of Chlamydia reveals an association between Chlamydia psittaci genotypes and host species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Pannekoek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia comprises a group of obligate intracellular bacterial parasites responsible for a variety of diseases in humans and animals, including several zoonoses. Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases such as trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity. Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Chlamydia psittaci, causing zoonotic pneumonia in humans, is usually hosted by birds, while Chlamydia abortus, causing abortion and fetal death in mammals, including humans, is mainly hosted by goats and sheep. We used multi-locus sequence typing to asses the population structure of Chlamydia. In total, 132 Chlamydia isolates were analyzed, including 60 C. trachomatis, 18 C. pneumoniae, 16 C. abortus, 34 C. psittaci and one of each of C. pecorum, C. caviae, C. muridarum and C. felis. Cluster analyses utilizing the Neighbour-Joining algorithm with the maximum composite likelihood model of concatenated sequences of 7 housekeeping fragments showed that C. psittaci 84/2334 isolated from a parrot grouped together with the C. abortus isolates from goats and sheep. Cluster analyses of the individual alleles showed that in all instances C. psittaci 84/2334 formed one group with C. abortus. Moving 84/2334 from the C. psittaci group to the C. abortus group resulted in a significant increase in the number of fixed differences and elimination of the number of shared mutations between C. psittaci and C. abortus. C. psittaci M56 from a muskrat branched separately from the main group of C. psittaci isolates. C. psittaci genotypes appeared to be associated with host species. The phylogenetic tree of C. psittaci did not follow that of its host bird species, suggesting host species jumps. In conclusion, we report for the first time an association between C. psittaci genotypes with host species.

  9. Chlamydia Screening Decision Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, Janet

    2000-01-01

    .... A record review of 28 active duty women who received pelvic exams at a military health clinic for chlamydia screening and chlamydia prevalence was performed to enrich the interpretation of the data...

  10. Primary and secondary infection with human parvovirus B19 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary and secondary infection with human parvovirus B19 in pregnant women in South Africa. ... in the prevalence of IgG antibodies between population groups were observed, but active infections, as demonstrated by IgM antibodies, were significantly more prevalent in black than in white, coloured or Asian mothers.

  11. Primary and secondary infection with human parvovirus B19 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract A study of human parvovirus B19 infection in. I 967 pregnant women ofall races in Johannesburg revealed an overall prevalence of 24,9% for IgG antibodies and 3,3% for IgM antibodies. Ofthe 64. IgM-positive sera indicating active infection, 62 were resistant to urea denaturation. No differ- ences in the prevalence ...

  12. Parvovirus B19 viraemia in Dutch blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaaijer, H. L.; Koppelman, M. H. G. M.; Farrington, C. P.

    2004-01-01

    Blood, donated by asymptomatic donors, may contain and transmit parvovirus B19. To investigate the dynamics of parvovirus viraemia in asymptomatic blood donors, we studied the amounts of parvovirus DNA in pools of donor plasma, the prevalence of parvovirus antibodies among blood donors in relation

  13. Parvovirus B19-akut hepatitis hos immunkompetent patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lykke

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a case of acute hepatitis in an adult person without subsequent complications caused by parvovirus B19 (PVB19). The diagnosis was made by detection of PVB19 IgM and IgG antibody in the blood using ELISA. There was not made any affirmative polymerase chain reaction for DNA...

  14. Parvovirus B19 Infection in Children With Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Heather J; Luna, Jorge M; Wintermark, Max; Hills, Nancy K; Tokarz, Rafal; Li, Ying; Glaser, Carol; DeVeber, Gabrielle A; Lipkin, W Ian; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-10-01

    Case-control studies suggest that acute infection transiently increases the risk of childhood arterial ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that an unbiased pathogen discovery approach utilizing MassTag-polymerase chain reaction would identify pathogens in the blood of childhood arterial ischemic stroke cases. The multicenter international VIPS study (Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke) enrolled arterial ischemic stroke cases, and stroke-free controls, aged 29 days through 18 years. Parental interview included questions on recent infections. In this pilot study, we used MassTag-polymerase chain reaction to test the plasma of the first 161 cases and 34 controls enrolled for a panel of 28 common bacterial and viral pathogens. Pathogen DNA was detected in no controls and 14 cases (8.7%): parvovirus B19 (n=10), herpesvirus 6 (n=2), adenovirus (n=1), and rhinovirus 6C (n=1). Parvovirus B19 infection was confirmed by serologies in all 10; infection was subclinical in 8. Four cases with parvovirus B19 had underlying congenital heart disease, whereas another 5 had a distinct arteriopathy involving a long-segment stenosis of the distal internal carotid and proximal middle cerebral arteries. Using MassTag-polymerase chain reaction, we detected parvovirus B19-a virus known to infect erythrocytes and endothelial cells-in some cases of childhood arterial ischemic stroke. This approach can generate new, testable hypotheses about childhood stroke pathogenesis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Emerging role of Chlamydia and Chlamydia-like organisms in adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, David; Regan, Lesley; Greub, Gilbert

    2008-02-01

    This review considers the roles of Chlamydia spp. and newly identified Chlamydia-like organisms in miscarriage, stillbirths and preterm labour in both animals and humans. The cause of miscarriage, stillbirth and preterm labour often remains unexplained. Intracellular bacteria that grow either poorly or not at all on media used routinely to detect human pathogens could be the aetiological agents of these obstetrical conditions. There is growing evidence that Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydophila abortus, Chlamydophila psittaci and Chlamydophila pneumoniae infections may result in adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans and/or animals. Waddlia, a Chlamydia-like organism first isolated from an aborted bovine, has emerged as an agent of abortion in cattle. Recently, Waddlia was also implicated in human foetal death. Moreover, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae is also abortigenic in ruminants. Whether additional novel Chlamydia-like organisms, such as Protochlamydia amoebophila, Neochlamydia hartmanellae, Criblamydia sequanensis, Rhabdochlamydia crassificans and Simkania negevensis, are involved in foetal loss or premature delivery remains to be determined. This review provides an update on the consequences of chlamydial infection during pregnancy and summarizes current evidence suggesting that some Chlamydia-related organisms are probably emerging obstetrical pathogens.

  16. Prevalence of chlamydia infection using chlamydia antigen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background and Objectives: Tubal disease is often associated with persistent chlamydia trachomatis infection. The objective detection of this infection depends on tissue culture which is time consuming and expensive. Serologic techniques for chlamydia detection have been documented. While this may be rapid, ...

  17. Human parvovirus PARV4 DNA in tissues from adult individuals: a comparison with human parvovirus B19 (B19V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotellini Matteo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PARV4 is a new member of the Parvoviridae family not closely related to any of the known human parvoviruses. Viremia seems to be a hallmark of PARV4 infection and viral DNA persistence has been demonstrated in a few tissues. Till now, PARV4 has not been associated with any disease and its prevalence in human population has not been clearly established. This study was aimed to assess the tissue distribution and the ability to persist of PARV4 in comparison to parvovirus B19 (B19V. Results PARV4 and B19V DNA detection was carried out in various tissues of individuals without suspect of acute viral infection, by a real time PCR and a nested PCR, targeting the ORF2 and the ORF1 respectively. Low amount of PARV4 DNA was found frequently (>40% in heart and liver of adults individuals, less frequently in lungs and kidneys (23,5 and 18% respectively and was rare in bone marrow, skin and synovium samples (5,5%, 4% and 5%, respectively. By comparison, B19V DNA sequences were present in the same tissues with a higher frequency (significantly higher in myocardium, skin and bone marrow except than in liver where the frequency was the same of PARV4 DNA and in plasma samples where B19V frequency was significantly lower than that of PARV4 Conclusions The particular tropism of PARV4 for liver and heart, here emerged, suggests to focus further studies on these tissues as possible target for viral replication and on the possible role of PARV4 infection in liver and heart diseases. Neither bone marrow nor kidney seem to be a common target of viral replication.

  18. Isolated velopalatine paralysis associated with parvovirus B19 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares-Fernandes João P.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of isolated velopalatine paralysis in an 8-year-old boy is presented. The symptoms were sudden-onset of nasal speech, regurgitation of liquids into the nose and dysphagia. Brain MRI and cerebrospinal fluid examination were normal. Infectious serologies disclosed an antibody arrangement towards parvovirus B19 that was typical of recent infection. In the absence of other positive data, the possibility of a correlation between the tenth nerve palsy and parvovirus infection is discussed.

  19. Chlamydiae as etiologic agents in chronic undifferentiated spondylarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John D; Gérard, Hervé C; Espinoza, Luis R; Ricca, Louis R; Valeriano, Joanne; Snelgrove, Jessica; Oszust, Cynthia; Vasey, Frank B; Hudson, Alan P

    2009-05-01

    The majority of patients with Chlamydia-induced reactive arthritis do not present with the classic triad of arthritis, conjunctivitis/iritis, and urethritis. Moreover, acute chlamydial infections are often asymptomatic. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of synovial Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae infections in patients with chronic undifferentiated spondylarthritis (uSpA). Study patients met the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group criteria for SpA, without evidence of ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, or preceding dysentery. Symptoms were present for >or=6 months. Each patient underwent a synovial biopsy; tissue and concomitantly obtained peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for C trachomatis and C pneumoniae DNA. Other data collected on the day of the biopsy included standard demographic information and medical history, including any known history of C trachomatis or C pneumoniae. Physical examination (including joint count, evaluation for dactylitis and/or enthesitis, and skin examination) and HLA-B27 typing were performed. Synovial tissue (ST) samples from 167 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were used as controls. Twenty-six patients met the entry criteria and underwent synovial biopsy (25 knee, 1 wrist). Sixteen of them (62%) were positive for C trachomatis and/or C pneumoniae DNA (10 for C trachomatis, 4 for C pneumoniae, and 2 for both). PCR analysis of ST revealed the presence of Chlamydia significantly more frequently in patients with uSpA than in OA controls (P<0.0001). No specific clinical characteristics differentiated Chlamydia-positive from Chlamydia-negative patients. PBMCs from 4 of the 26 uSpA patients (15%) were positive for Chlamydia, and Chlamydia was found in ST from 2 of these 4 patients. No significant correlation between PCR positivity and HLA-B27 positivity was found. The frequency of Chlamydia-positive ST samples

  20. Role of Atypical Bacteria in Hospitalized Patients With Nursing Home-Acquired Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer-Junco, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) has been identified as one of the leading causes of mortality and hospitalization for long-term care residents. However, current and previous pneumonia guidelines differ on the appropriate management of NHAP in hospitalized patients, specifically in regard to the role of atypical bacteria such as Chlamydiae pneumonia, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella.

  1. Aberrant cellular immune responses in humans infected persistently with parvovirus B19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Norbeck, Oscar; Hirbod, Taha

    2006-01-01

    A subset of parvovirus B19 (B19) infected patients retains the infection for years, as defined by detection of B19 DNA in bone marrow. Thus far, analysis of B19-specific humoral immune responses and viral genome variations has not revealed a mechanism for the absent viral clearance. In this study...

  2. Atypical pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Bacteria that cause atypical pneumonia include: Mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae . It often affects people younger than age 40. Pneumonia due ...

  3. Parvovirus B19 1A complete genome from a fatal case in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Costa Conteville

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Parvovirus B19 (B19V infects individuals worldwide and is associated with an ample range of pathologies and clinical manifestations. B19V is classified into three distinct genotypes, all identified in Brazil. Here, we report a complete sequence of a B19V genotype 1A that was obtained by high-throughput metagenomic sequencing. This genome provides information that will contribute to the studies on B19V epidemiology and evolution.

  4. Incidence and progression of Parvovirus B19 infection and molecular changes in circulating B19V strains in children with haematological malignancy: A follow up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amita; Jain, Parul; Kumar, Archana; Prakash, Shantanu; Khan, Danish Nasar; Kant, Ravi

    2018-01-01

    The present study was planned to estimate the incidence of human Parvovirus B19 infection and understand its progression in children suffering with hematological malignancy. The circulating B19V genotypes and viral mutations occurring in strains of B19V over one-year period were also studied. Children with malignancies were enrolled consecutively and were followed up for one-year period. Serum sample was collected at the time of enrolment and each follow up visit and was tested for anti B19V IgG and IgM as well as for B19V DNA. At least one B19V DNA positive sample from each patient was processed for sequencing. For patients positive for B19V DNA >1 time and at least 6 months apart, last positive sample from the same patient was also sequenced to study the nucleotide change over time. We have found very high incidence of B19V infection (100%) in the study population. All the patients tested positive for at least one B19V infection parameter (either antibodies or DNA) at least once, over one year of follow up. Cumulative percent positivity of anti B19V IgG, anti B19V IgM and B19V DNA was 85.3%, 45.2% and 72.1% respectively. Genotype 3b was reported, with occasional nucleotide change over one year period. DNA clearance was delayed in spite of appearance of IgG antibodies. Appearance of IgM class of antibodies was either delayed or absent. To conclude, children with haematological malignancies have high incidence of B19V infection with late and short lived serological response and persistence of DNA for long duration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chlamydia - CDC Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... behaviors and biological factors common among young people. Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men are also at risk since chlamydia ... should get a test for chlamydia every year. Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men; as well as pregnant women should ...

  6. The radiological appearance of bacterial pneumonias and their differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.H.; Fabel, H.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1985-01-01

    Under the influence of antibiotic therapy, bacterial pneumonias have undergone a remarkable change in the last few decades. Individual forms of pneumonia can be distinguished morphologically by their localization, the way in which they spread, their limitations, and their course. Clinically, opportunistic bacterial infections predominate. Increasingly, secondary pneumonias are observed in poststenotic areas, areas of infarction, in hypostatic areas, after aspiration, and in previously damaged lobes. Radiologic criteria for differentiating from atypical pneumonias (viruses, mycoplasmas and chlamydia) are discussed. (orig.) [de

  7. Activity of synthetic peptides against Chlamydia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Manuela; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Biondi, Roberta; Papa, Valentina; Borel, Nicole; Vecchio Nepita, Edoardo; Magnino, Simone; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Levi, Aurora; Franco, Octavio L

    2017-11-01

    The in vitro activity of six synthetic peptides against 36 strains of Chlamydia from different origins was investigated. Clavanin MO (CMO) proved to be the most active peptide, reducing the inclusion number of all Chlamydia strains from eight different species tested by ≥50% at 10 µg mL -1 . Mastoparan L showed an equal activity against C. trachomatis, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, and C. muridarum, but did not exert any inhibitory effect against C. psittaci, C. pecorum, C. abortus, and C. avium even at 80 µg mL -1 . These data suggest that CMO could be a promising compound in the prevention and treatment of chlamydial infections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Parvovirus B19-induced vascular damage in the heart is associated with elevated circulating endothelial microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelier, Katrin; Biehl, Susanne; Schwarz, Viktoria; Kindermann, Ingrid; Kandolf, Reinhard; Sauter, Martina; Ukena, Christian; Yilmaz, Ali; Sliwa, Karen; Bock, Claus-Thomas; Klingel, Karin; Böhm, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of viral myocarditis is difficult by clinical criteria but facilitated by detection of inflammation and viral genomes in endomyocardial biopsies. Parvovirus B19 (B19V) targets endothelial cells where viral nucleic acid is exclusively detected in the heart. Microparticles (MPs) are released after cell damage or activation of specific cells. We aimed to investigate whether circulating endothelial MPs (EMPs) in human and experimental models of myocarditis are associated with B19V myocarditis. MPs were investigated in patients with myocarditis (n = 54), divided into two groups: B19V+ (n = 23) and B19V- (n = 31) and compared with healthy controls (HCTR, n = 25). MPs were also investigated in B19V transgenic mice (B19V-NS1+) and mice infected with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). MPs were analyzed with fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS). In human samples, EMP subpopulation patterns were significantly different in B19V+ compared to B19V- and HCTR (pmonocyte-derived MPs (MMPs) showed less specific patterns. Significantly different levels of EMPs were observed in transgenic B19V-NS1+ mice compared with CVB3-infected mice (p<0.001). EMP subpopulations are different in B19V+ myocarditis in humans and transgenic B19V mice reflecting vascular damage. EMP profiles might permit differentiation between endothelial-cell-mediated diseases like myocardial B19V infection and other causes of myocarditis.

  9. Understanding Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Pneumonia Learn About Pneumonia Pneumonia is a common lung infection caused by ... vaccinated and practicing good health habits What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection in one or both ...

  10. Atypical aetiology in patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia is associated with age, gender and season; a data-analysis on four Dutch cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeven, Vivian M; Spoorenberg, Simone M C; Boersma, Wim G; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Voorn, G P Paul; Bos, Willem Jan W; van Steenbergen, Jim E; Meijvis, Sabine CA|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341012637

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) can be categorised into viral, typical and atypical (Legionella species, Coxiella burnetii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydia species). Extensive microbiological testing to identify the causative microorganism is not standardly

  11. Investigation of Relationship Between Parvovirus B19 Infection and Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Yıldırım

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, relapsing skin disease, characterized by the formation of typical scaly papules or plaques. The three factors well-recognized as triggering the onset, causing new lesions or inducing a flare in the disease are: stress, skin injury and infection. Various microorganisms are associated with provocation and/or exacerbation of psoriasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between parvovirus B19 (PVB19 and psoriasis/psoriasis area severity index (PASI. Material and Method: Sixty patients with psoriasis (36 men, 24 women and 40 healthy volunteers (22 men, 18 women were included in our study. PVB19 DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: PVB19 DNA was detected in 27 of 60 subjects in the patient group (45% and in 9 of 40 controls (22.5% (p0.05. The relationship between the viral load and the subtypes of psoriasis was not statistically significant (p>0.05.Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it was concluded that a relationship may be present between psoriasis and PVB 19 infection.

  12. Chlamydia infections in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other types of STIs. Most common STIs are: Gonorrhea HIV/AIDS Syphilis Hepatitis Herpes Even if you ... you from passing the STIs back and forth. Gonorrhea often occurs with chlamydia. Therefore, treatment for gonorrhea ...

  13. High frequency of parvovirus B19 DNA in bone marrow samples from rheumatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Anders; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    analysed and of the immune status of the patient. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the clinical significance of B19 DNA positivity in bone marrow samples from rheumatic patients. STUDY DESIGN: Parvovirus B19 DNA was analysed in paired bone marrow and serum samples by nested PCR technique. Serum was also analysed...... negative group. A high frequency of parvovirus B19 DNA was thus detected in bone marrow samples in rheumatic patients. The clinical data does not support a direct association between B19 PCR positivity and rheumatic disease manifestation. Therefore, the clinical significance of B19 DNA positivity in bone...... marrow samples from rheumatic patients must be interpreted with caution....

  14. Chlamydia and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-02

    This women's health podcast focuses on chlamydia, its severe health consequences for women if left untreated, and the importance of annual chlamydia screening.  Created: 4/2/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 4/2/2009.

  15. Aspiration pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic pneumonia; Aspiration of vomitus; Necrotizing pneumonia; Aspiration pneumonitis ... The type of bacteria that caused the pneumonia depends on: Your ... facility, for example) Whether you were recently hospitalized ...

  16. Evidence for Chlamydia in wild mammals of the Serengeti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospischil, Andreas; Kaiser, Carmen; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans; Hilbe, Monika; Vaughan, Lloyd; Borel, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    Only limited information is available on the presence of Chlamydiaceae in wildlife, a deficit that is particularly acute concerning mammalian wildlife in Africa. In a retrospective analysis of organ material from an earlier study on wild mammals from the Seregenti National Park, 521 samples from 54 animals of 14 mammalian species were investigated. The presence of Chlamydiaceae was analyzed using molecular methods and immunohistochemistry. Chlamydial DNA was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues from large ruminants (African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, n=4) and a large predator (spotted hyena, Crocuta crocuta, n=1). Microarray results revealed Chlamydia abortus in all cases, confirmed by sequencing of selected samples, and a mixed infection with Chlamydia abortus and Chlamydia pneumoniae in an African buffalo. This is the first report of Chlamydiaceae in African wildlife of the Serengeti area.

  17. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - mycoplasma; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Mycoplasma pneumonia usually affects people younger than 40. People who live or work in crowded areas such as schools ...

  18. Human parvovirus B19 infection in HIV-positive patients Infecção por parvovirus humano B19 em pacientes HIV-positivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio S. Aguiar

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Parvovirus B19 infects predominantly erythroid cells, leading to transient inhibition of erythropoiesis. Immunocompromised patients may be unable to produce neutralizing antibodies and may develop severe chronic anemia. Epidemiological studies done on Niterói population showed that B19 infection occurs periodically in late spring and summer. We report a study from 55 HIV infected patients attending an infectious diseases outpatient clinic in this city during a 5-month period in which B19 circulation was well documented. All patients were under anti-retroviral therapy. No anti-B19 IgM was found, but a high prevalence of IgG anti-B19 (91% was observed. In six patients, B19 DNA was found by dot-blot hybridization techniques, but this was not confirmed by PCR. None of these 6 patients manifested anemia and only one had CD4 cell count below 200 x 10(7/L. We conclude that persistent infection causing anemia is an infrequent finding in our HIV positive patients under drug therapy.O parvovírus B19 infecta predominantemente células eritróides, causando inibição transitória da eritropoiese. Pacientes imunocomprometidos podem ser incapazes de produzir anticorpos neutralizantes, evoluindo com grave anemia crônica. Estudos epidemiológicos da população de Niterói mostraram que a infecção ocorre periodicamente no final da primavera e no verão. Descrevem-se 55 pacientes infectados pelo HIV atendidos num ambulatório de doenças infecciosas nesta cidade num período de cinco meses, no qual a circulação do parvovírus B19 foi documentada. Todos os pacientes estavam sob terapia anti-retroviral. Não se encontrou IgM anti-B19, mas notou-se uma prevalência alta de IgG anti-B19 (91%. Em seis pacientes verificou-se a presença de DNA do B19 por hibridização em dot-blot, o que não se confirmou por PCR. Nenhum destes seis pacientes tinha anemia, e apenas um tinha células CD4 abaixo de 200 x 10(7/L. Conclui-se que infecção persistente causando

  19. Frequency and significance of parvovirus B19 infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naciute, Milda; Mieliauskaite, Diana; Rugiene, Rita; Nikitenkiene, Rita; Jancoriene, Ligita; Mauricas, Mykolas; Nora-Krukle, Zaiga; Murovska, Modra

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to clarify the possible involvement of parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis by investigating the presence of B19V infection markers (genomic sequences and virus-specific antibodies) in association with the level of cytokines and RA clinical activity and aggressiveness. A total of 118 RA patients and 49 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. Nested PCR was used to detect B19V sequences in whole blood and cell-free plasma DNA, ELISA to detect virus-specific antibodies and cytokine levels in plasma and recomLine dot blot assay for antibodies to separate B19V antigens. The detection frequency of B19V DNA was higher in patients with RA (25.4 %) in comparison with healthy persons (18.4 %). B19V DNA in cell-free plasma (B19+p) was detected significantly often in RA patients in comparison with healthy controls (13.6 vs 2 %; P=0.0002). RA B19+p patients had higher disease activity and aggressiveness, decreased haemoglobin and increased erythrocyte sedimentation rates. IL-6 plasma levels were significantly higher in RA patients than in controls. Within the RA patients’ group the IL-6 level was significantly increased in B19+p patients with disease activity scores of DAS28>5.2, high C-reactive protein and low haemoglobin. Contrary to the healthy controls, the majority of RA B19+p patients did not have antibodies to VP-1S (VP1u) and VP-N (N-terminal half of structural proteins VP1 and VP2), which correspond to the epitopes of neutralizing antibodies. These results indicate that B19V infection at least in some patients is involved in RA pathogenesis. PMID:27902343

  20. Human parvovirus B19: a mechanistic overview of infection and DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Qiu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a human pathogen that belongs to genus Erythroparvovirus of the Parvoviridae family, which is composed of a group of small DNA viruses with a linear single-stranded DNA genome. B19V mainly infects human erythroid progenitor cells and causes mild to severe hematological disorders in patients. However, recent clinical studies indicate that B19V also infects nonerythroid lineage cells, such as myocardial endothelial cells, and may be associated with other disease outcomes. Several cell culture systems, including permissive and semipermissive erythroid lineage cells, nonpermissive human embryonic kidney 293 cells and recently reported myocardial endothelial cells, have been used to study the mechanisms underlying B19V infection and B19V DNA replication. This review aims to summarize recent advances in B19V studies with a focus on the mechanisms of B19V tropism specific to different cell types and the cellular pathways involved in B19V DNA replication including cellular signaling transduction and cell cycle arrest. PMID:26097496

  1. Human Parvovirus B19 Utilizes Cellular DNA Replication Machinery for Viral DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Wang, Zekun; Xiong, Min; Chen, Aaron Yun; Xu, Peng; Ganaie, Safder S; Badawi, Yomna; Kleiboeker, Steve; Nishimune, Hiroshi; Ye, Shui Qing; Qiu, Jianming

    2018-03-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection of human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) induces a DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest at late S phase, which facilitates viral DNA replication. However, it is not clear exactly which cellular factors are employed by this single-stranded DNA virus. Here, we used microarrays to systematically analyze the dynamic transcriptome of EPCs infected with B19V. We found that DNA metabolism, DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA damage response, cell cycle, and cell cycle arrest pathways were significantly regulated after B19V infection. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that most cellular DNA replication proteins were recruited to the centers of viral DNA replication, but not the DNA repair DNA polymerases. Our results suggest that DNA replication polymerase δ and polymerase α are responsible for B19V DNA replication by knocking down its expression in EPCs. We further showed that although RPA32 is essential for B19V DNA replication and the phosphorylated forms of RPA32 colocalized with the replicating viral genomes, RPA32 phosphorylation was not necessary for B19V DNA replication. Thus, this report provides evidence that B19V uses the cellular DNA replication machinery for viral DNA replication. IMPORTANCE Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection can cause transient aplastic crisis, persistent viremia, and pure red cell aplasia. In fetuses, B19V infection can result in nonimmune hydrops fetalis and fetal death. These clinical manifestations of B19V infection are a direct outcome of the death of human erythroid progenitors that host B19V replication. B19V infection induces a DNA damage response that is important for cell cycle arrest at late S phase. Here, we analyzed dynamic changes in cellular gene expression and found that DNA metabolic processes are tightly regulated during B19V infection. Although genes involved in cellular DNA replication were downregulated overall, the cellular DNA replication machinery was tightly

  2. Parvovirus B19 seroconversion in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Martins Lopes de Azevedo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Erythrovirus B19 (B19V infection may cause red cell aplasia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has improved the immune function of these patients by modifying the course of B19V infection. The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of B19 seroconversion in a cohort of HIV-infected patients and evaluate the occurrence of B19V-related anaemia during the seroconversion period. Adult HIV-infected patients were studied at a public hospital in Niterói, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. IgG and IgM antibodies against B19V were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and B19 viraemia was assayed by polymerase chain reaction. Medical records were reviewed for any clinical evaluation of anaemia. Seroconversion was detected in 31.8% of the 88 individuals who began the study as anti-B19V IgG-negative. No clinical manifestations of B19V infection were detected during the period of seroconversion. Patients who seroconverted were 5.40 times more likely to have anaemia than those who did not [odds ratio 5.40 (95% confidence interval: 1.33-22.93]. Anaemia was detected in eight patients. All patients recovered from anaemia by either beginning or continuing HAART, without requiring blood transfusions. In the HAART era, B19V infection may only be associated with a course of disease characterised by less severe chronic anaemia. This milder course of B19V-associated disease is likely due to the increased immune function of HAART-treated patients.

  3. Population-based study on the seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijckevorsel, G. G. C.; Sonder, G. J. B.; Schim van der Loeff, M. F.; van den Hoek, J. A. R.

    2009-01-01

    A study was undertaken to estimate the seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 infection in the general adult population of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. To our knowledge this is the first study testing parvovirus B19 in a random sample of the Dutch adult population. The study was a cross-sectional survey,

  4. Long-term outcome after fetal transfusion for hydrops associated with parvovirus B19 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagel, Hélène T. C.; de Haan, Timo R.; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.; Oepkes, Dick; Walther, Frans J.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate neurodevelopmental status of children treated with intrauterine red blood cell and platelet transfusion for fetal hydrops caused by parvovirus B19. Maternal and neonatal records of all intrauterine transfusions for congenital parvovirus B19 infection in our center between 1997 and 2005

  5. Parvovirus B19 integration into human CD36+ erythroid progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovitz, Tyler; Wong, Susan; Young, Neal S; Oliveira, Thiago; Falck-Pedersen, Erik

    2017-11-01

    The pathogenic autonomous human parvovirus B19 (B19V) productively infects erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs). Functional similarities between B19V nonstructural protein (NS1), a DNA binding endonuclease, and the Rep proteins of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) led us to hypothesize that NS1 may facilitate targeted nicking of the human genome and B19 vDNA integration. We adapted an integration capture sequencing protocol (IC-Seq) to screen B19V infected human CD36+ EPCs for viral integrants, and discovered 40,000 unique B19V integration events distributed throughout the human genome. Computational analysis of integration patterns revealed strong correlations with gene intronic regions, H3K9me3 sites, and the identification of 41 base pair consensus sequence with an octanucleotide core motif. The octanucleotide core has homology to a single region of B19V, adjacent to the P6 promoter TATA box. We present the first direct evidence that B19V infection of erythroid progenitor cells disrupts the human genome and facilitates viral DNA integration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Norbeck, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. METHODS AND FINDINGS......: The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA-peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia......, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function...

  7. Pneumonia Nosokomial

    OpenAIRE

    Keliat, E.N; Abidin, Alwinsyah; Lubis, Nursyamsiah

    2017-01-01

    Pada masa yang lalu pneumonia diklasifikasikan sebagai pneumonia tipikal yang disebabkan oleh Str. Pneumonia daan atipikal yang disebabkan kuman atipik seperti halnya M. pneumonia. Kemudian ternyata manifestasi dari patogen lain seperti H. influenza, S. aureus dan bakteri Gram negatif memberikan sindrom klinik yang identik dengan pneumonia oleh Str E.N Keliat

  8. Chloroquine and its derivatives exacerbate B19V-associated anemia by promoting viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Bönsch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An unexpectedly high seroprevalence and pathogenic potential of human parvovirus B19 (B19V have been observed in certain malaria-endemic countries in parallel with local use of chloroquine (CQ as first-line treatment for malaria. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of CQ and other common antimalarial drugs on B19V infection in vitro and the possible epidemiological consequences for children from Papua New Guinea (PNG. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Viral RNA, DNA and proteins were analyzed in different cell types following infection with B19V in the presence of a range of antimalarial drugs. Relationships between B19V infection status, prior 4-aminoquinoline use and anemia were assessed in 200 PNG children <10 years of age participating in a case-control study of severe infections. In CQ-treated cells, the synthesis of viral RNA, DNA and proteins was significantly higher and occurred earlier than in control cells. CQ facilitates B19V infection by minimizing intracellular degradation of incoming particles. Only amodiaquine amongst other antimalarial drugs had a similar effect. B19V IgM seropositivity was more frequent in 111 children with severe anemia (hemoglobin <50 g/L than in 89 healthy controls (15.3% vs 3.4%; P = 0.008. In children who were either B19V IgM or PCR positive, 4-aminoquinoline use was associated with a significantly lower admission hemoglobin concentration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data strongly suggest that 4-aminoquinoline drugs and their metabolites exacerbate B19V-associated anemia by promoting B19V replication. Consideration should be given for choosing a non-4-aminoquinoline drug to partner artemisinin compounds in combination antimalarial therapy.

  9. Neurological aspects of human parvovirus B19 infection: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barah, Faraj; Whiteside, Sigrid; Batista, Sonia; Morris, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 has been linked with various clinical syndromes including neurological manifestations. However, its role in the latter remains not completely understood. Although the last 10 years witnessed a surge of case reports on B19-associated neurological aspects, the literature data remains scattered and heterogeneous, and epidemiological information on the incidence of B19-associated neurological aspects cannot be accurately extrapolated. The aim of this review is to identify the characteristics of cases of B19-associated neurological manifestations. A computerized systematic review of existing literature concerning cases of B19-related neurological aspects revealed 89 articles describing 129 patients; 79 (61.2%) were associated with CNS manifestations, 41 (31.8%) were associated with peripheral nervous system manifestations, and 9 (7.0%) were linked with myalgic encephalomyelitis. The majority of the cases (50/129) had encephalitis. Clinical characteristic features of these cases were analyzed, and possible pathological mechanisms were also described. In conclusion, B19 should be included in differential diagnosis of encephalitic syndromes of unknown etiology in all age groups. Diagnosis should rely on investigation of anti-B19 IgM antibodies and detection of B19 DNA in serum or CSF. Treatment of severe cases might benefit from a combined regime of intravenous immunoglobulins and steroids. To confirm these outcomes, goal-targeted studies are recommended to exactly identify epidemiological scenarios and explore potential pathogenic mechanisms of these complications. Performing retrospective and prospective and multicenter studies concerning B19 and neurological aspects in general, and B19 and encephalitic syndromes in particular, are required. © 2014 The Authors. Reviews in Medical Virology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24459081

  10. Serological and virological analysis of maternal and fetal blood samples in prenatal human parvovirus b19 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiffenbach, Johannes; Bald, Rainer; Gloning, Karl-Philipp; Minderer, Sabine; Gärtner, Barbara C; Weidner, Andrea; Hanke, Monika; Enders, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Intrauterine parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection can be asymptomatic or may cause severe fetal complications. Information on serological and virological findings of infection in the fetus is scarce. We determined B19V-DNA and anti-B19V antibodies in maternal and fetal blood samples obtained from 41 pregnancies that were complicated by prenatal B19V infection. Most fetuses presented with moderate to severe anemia or hydrops. At the time of fetal blood sampling, all mothers were B19V-DNA positive and B19V-IgG positive. B19V-IgM was detected in 95% of maternal blood samples. B19V-DNA, B19V-IgM, and B19V-IgG were detected in 100%, 28%, and 24% of fetal blood samples, respectively. The probability of a positive B19V-IgG or B19V-IgM finding in fetal blood increased with gestational age. B19V-IgG levels in maternal blood did not correlate with the likelihood of a positive B19V-IgG test in the fetus. The presence of B19V-IgG in fetal blood was accompanied by lower B19V-DNA levels and less severe clinical findings. The lack of B19V-IgG in fetuses with B19V-derived anemia or hydrops is most likely due to a limited materno-fetal transfer of IgG and a poor fetal antibody response. Fetal B19V infection is poorly controlled in the absence of specific antibodies.

  11. Chlamydia pneumoniae en válvulas aórticas de pacientes sometidos a reemplazo valvular. Clínica Cardiovascular Santa María. Noviembre 1999 - Agosto 2000, Medellín

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Guete

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Diferentes estudios han demostrado una relación entre la presencia
    de C. pneumoniae y eenfermedades cardíacas como enfermedad
    coronaria, infarto agudo de miocardio y ateromatosis. En la actualidad hay muy pocas publicaciones que muestren la relación de este microorganismo con el daño valvular aórtico.

  12. Multicenter surveillance of adult atypical pneumonia in Japan: its clinical features, and efficacy and safety of clarithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hajime

    2011-02-01

    A prospective multicenter study involving 156 Japanese medical institutions was conducted to clarify the clinical features of adult atypical pneumonia and the efficacy and safety of clarithromycin. Atypical pneumonia was suspected in 730 patients according to the Japanese Respiratory Society's Guidelines for the Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults, and clarithromycin was administered. On the basis of bacteriological and serological tests, 465 patients were diagnosed with atypical pneumonia. Mycoplasma pneumonia was common among younger patients and chlamydia pneumonia among older patients. Underlying respiratory disease was uncommon among mycoplasma patients but prevalent among chlamydia patients. According to the severity classification given in the abovementioned guidelines, most mycoplasma patients had mild infection, whereas a high percentage of chlamydia patients had moderate infections. Body temperature was higher and coughing more severe in the mycoplasma patients than in the chlamydia patients. On the other hand, intergroup differences were not observed regarding extent of lung shadowing on plain radiographs, peripheral white blood cell count, or C-reactive protein (CRP). The effectiveness of clarithromycin was 96.8% in mycoplasma patients (153/158), 92.9% in chlamydia patients (78/84), and 96.0% in the group comprising all atypical pneumonia patients, including those with superinfection (288/300). The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 3.4% (24/698). Macrolide resistance in Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been reported in Japan, but the results of this surveillance study showed that clarithromycin is effective in treating adult atypical pneumonia.

  13. The seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 among kidney transplant recipients: A single-center study

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    Zakieh Rostamzadeh Khameneh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parvovirus B19 is a DNA virus that is responsible for causing several diseases in humans. Parvovirus B19-induced persistent anemia is one of its manifestations that is relatively common in transplant recipients. This study was aimed to investigate the seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 among kidney transplant recipients. Ninety-one transplant recipients were selected randomly and were investigated for several variables including age, gender, educational status, history of hemodialysis (HD, history of blood transfusion and immunosuppressive therapy. Two milliliters of blood samples were collected via venipuncture and evaluated for anti-Parvovirus B19 IgG antibody using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All recipients were anemic, with 72.5% of them suffering from severe anemia (Hb ≤ 11 in men and ≤ 10 in women. Sixty-three patients (69.2% were seropositive for Parvovirus B19. There was no significant difference in age, sex, educational status, history of blood transfusion, history of HD and immunosuppressive therapy between seropositive and seronegative groups. The seroprevalence of Parvovirus B19 was relatively high in kidney transplant recipients in Urmia, Iran. Our study failed to find a correlation between the severity of anemia and the seropositivity of Parvovirus B19.

  14. Cytokine responses in acute and persistent human parvovirus B19 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, A; Lundqvist, A; Lindblom, A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the proinflammatory and T helper (Th)1/Th2 cytokine responses during acute parvovirus B19 (B19) infection and determine whether an imbalance of the Th1/Th2 cytokine pattern is related to persistent B19 infection. Cytokines were quantified by multiplex beads...... immunoassay in serum from B19-infected patients and controls. The cytokine responses were correlated with B19 serology, quantitative B19 DNA levels and clinical symptoms. In addition to a proinflammatory response, elevated levels of the Th1 type of cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12 and IL-15 were evident...... at time of the initial peak of B19 viral load in a few patients during acute infection. This pattern was seen in the absence of an interferon (IFN)-gamma response. During follow-up (20-130 weeks post-acute infection) some of these patients had a sustained Th1 cytokine response. The Th1 cytokine response...

  15. Molecular diversity of human parvovirus B19 during two outbreaks of erythema infectiosum in Brazil

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    Rita de Cássia Nasser Cubel Garcia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to provide information on the genetic diversity of human parvovirus B19 (B19V circulating in the municipality of Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Southeast Brazil during 1996–2006, a period with two distinct outbreaks of B19V infection: 1999–2000 and 2004–2005. A total of 27 sera from patients with erythema infectiosum and five sera from HIV-infected patients that tested positive for B19V DNA during the study period were analyzed. To genotype B19V strains, a semi-nested PCR for partial amplification of the capsid gene was performed and sequence analysis revealed that 31 sequences belonged to subgenotype 1a (G1a of the main genotype 1 and one sequence was characterized as subgenotype 3b (G3b. The phylogenetic tree supported the division of the G1a into two well-defined clades with 1.3% of divergence. The low diversity of the G1a strains may be explained by the fact that all patients had acute B19V infection and 30/32 sera were collected during two distinct outbreaks. The G3b strain was from an HIV-infected patient who seroconverted to anti-B19 IgG antibodies in September/2005. This is the first report of G3b in the state of Rio de Janeiro.

  16. Severe anemia and hydrops in a neonate with parvovirus B19 infection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Sajjadian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anemia at the time of birth may cause some problem like asphyxia, heart failure shock or even death in a neonate. Different etiologies can be considered for this problem. Parvovirus B19, as a viral organism, can cause hydrops fetalis and neonatal anemia and consequent complications. We present here a case of newborn infant with severe anemia who had human parvovirus B19 infection.Case Presentation: A male newborn with gestational age of 36 week was born from a mother with poor prenatal care and history of contact with domestic animal. The neonate was very pale with Apgar score 2 at 1 min and received resuscitation, mechanical ventilation and repeated blood transfusion The hemoglobin level was significantly low. Analysis was made based on the clinical presentations. According to the case history, physical and laboratory findings, neonatal severe anemia induced by parvovirus B19 infection was suggested and Laboratory work up documented his infection with parovirus B19.Conclusion: Parvovirus B19 (B19 virus is the smallest single strand linear DNA virus in animal viruses, which is the only strain of parvovirus that is pathogenic in humans. Human parvovirus B19 may cross the placenta and result in fetal infection, morbidity and death. Parvovirus is an uncommon cause of neonatal anemia and hydrops fetalis so this etiology must be considered in differential diagnosis of anemia at birth.

  17. Chlamydia trachomatis as a cause of neonatal conjunctivitis in Dutch infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.I.J.G. Rours (Ingrid); M.R. Hammerschlag; A. Ott (Alewijn); J.T.H.N. de Faber; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); R. de Groot (Ronald); R.P.A.J. Verkooyen (Roel)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted pathogen in adults, which at delivery may be transmitted from mother to child and cause conjunctivitis and pneumonia. In the Netherlands, prenatal chlamydial screening and treatment of pregnant women is not routine

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis as a cause of neonatal conjunctivitis in Dutch infants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rours, I.G.; Hammerschlag, M.R.; Ott, A.; Faber, T.J. de; Verbrugh, H.A.; Groot, R. de; Verkooyen, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted pathogen in adults, which at delivery may be transmitted from mother to child and cause conjunctivitis and pneumonia. In The Netherlands, prenatal chlamydial screening and treatment of pregnant women is not routine practice.

  19. In vitro activity of a partially purified and characterized bark extract of Castanea sativa Mill. (ENC®) against Chlamydia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Valentina; Ginocchietti, Laura; Budriesi, Roberta; Micucci, Matteo; Costa, Roberta; Biondi, Roberta; Cevenini, Roberto; Chiarini, Alberto; Aldini, Rita; Donati, Manuela; Pollini, Gian Matteo; Cenacchi, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    Castanea sativa Mill (ENC®), containing tannins against 33 Chlamydia strains, was compared to SMAP-29 with inhibitory effect against C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae. The ENC® activity against Chlamydia spp. was evaluated determining the lowest concentration to achieve more than half reduction of intact chlamydial inclusions versus controls. ENC® reduced all Chlamydia strains tested at 1 µg/mL, while SMAP-29 induced reductions of C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae infectivity at 10 µg/mL. A great reduction of C. trachomatis, C. pneumoniae, and C. abortus infectivity was achieved with a 10 µg/mL ENC® concentration, whereas their infectivity was almost inhibited at 100 µg/mL ENC® concentration.

  20. The Chlamydia psittaci genome: a comparative analysis of intracellular pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Anja; Schöfl, Gerhard; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular pathogens causing a wide range of diseases in animals and humans, and facing unique evolutionary constraints not encountered by free-living prokaryotes. To investigate genomic aspects of infection, virulence and host preference we have sequenced Chlamydia psittaci, the pathogenic agent of ornithosis. A comparison of the genome of the avian Chlamydia psittaci isolate 6BC with the genomes of other chlamydial species, C. trachomatis, C. muridarum, C. pneumoniae, C. abortus, C. felis and C. caviae, revealed a high level of sequence conservation and synteny across taxa, with the major exception of the human pathogen C. trachomatis. Important differences manifest in the polymorphic membrane protein family specific for the Chlamydiae and in the highly variable chlamydial plasticity zone. We identified a number of psittaci-specific polymorphic membrane proteins of the G family that may be related to differences in host-range and/or virulence as compared to closely related Chlamydiaceae. We calculated non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratios for pairs of orthologous genes to identify putative targets of adaptive evolution and predicted type III secreted effector proteins. This study is the first detailed analysis of the Chlamydia psittaci genome sequence. It provides insights in the genome architecture of C. psittaci and proposes a number of novel candidate genes mostly of yet unknown function that may be important for pathogen-host interactions.

  1. The Chlamydia psittaci genome: a comparative analysis of intracellular pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Voigt

    Full Text Available Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular pathogens causing a wide range of diseases in animals and humans, and facing unique evolutionary constraints not encountered by free-living prokaryotes. To investigate genomic aspects of infection, virulence and host preference we have sequenced Chlamydia psittaci, the pathogenic agent of ornithosis.A comparison of the genome of the avian Chlamydia psittaci isolate 6BC with the genomes of other chlamydial species, C. trachomatis, C. muridarum, C. pneumoniae, C. abortus, C. felis and C. caviae, revealed a high level of sequence conservation and synteny across taxa, with the major exception of the human pathogen C. trachomatis. Important differences manifest in the polymorphic membrane protein family specific for the Chlamydiae and in the highly variable chlamydial plasticity zone. We identified a number of psittaci-specific polymorphic membrane proteins of the G family that may be related to differences in host-range and/or virulence as compared to closely related Chlamydiaceae. We calculated non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratios for pairs of orthologous genes to identify putative targets of adaptive evolution and predicted type III secreted effector proteins.This study is the first detailed analysis of the Chlamydia psittaci genome sequence. It provides insights in the genome architecture of C. psittaci and proposes a number of novel candidate genes mostly of yet unknown function that may be important for pathogen-host interactions.

  2. THE ROLE OF PARVOVIRUS B19 IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF INFLAMMATORY CARDIOMYOPATHY

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    A. Yu. Shchedrina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of inflammatory cardiomyopathy is discussed. The etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory cardiomyopathy are considered with focus on the role of parvovirus B19.

  3. Preservative Monitoring of a Greek Woman with Hydrops Fetalis due to Parvovirus B19 Infection

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    Zacharias Fasoulakis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primate erythroparvovirus 1 (parvovirus B19 is a member of the Erythrovirus genus of the Parvoviridae family and it is one of the few members of the family known to be pathogenic in human. B19 infection is common and widespread with the virus being associated with numerous rheumatologic and haematologic manifestations. More specifically, maternal infection with parvovirus B19 during pregnancy can cause severe anemia which may lead to nonimmune hydrops or fetal demise, as a result of fetal erythroid progenitor cells infection with shortened half-life of erythrocytes. We present a rare case reported in the Greek population, of subclinical transient reticulocytopenia due to B19 parvovirus infection, in an asymptomatic pregnant woman, without medical history of hemoglobinopathy, and with the presence of hydrops fetalis during the third trimester of her pregnancy.

  4. Parvovirus B19-triggered acute hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia in a child with Evans syndrome

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    ELPIS MANTADAKIS

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human parvovirus B19 (HPV-B19 is the etiologic agent of erythema infectiosum, of transient aplastic crises in individuals with underlying chronic hemolytic disorders, and of chronic pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised individuals. Case report. We describe a 14-year-old girl with long-standing Evans syndrome, who presented with severe anemia, reticulocytopenia and thromocytopenia. A bone marrow aspirate revealed severe erythroid hypoplasia along with presence of giant pronormoblasts, while serological studies and real-time PCR of whole blood were positive for acute parvovirus B19 infection. The patient was initially managed with corticosteroids, but both cytopenias resolved only after administration of intravenous gamma globulin 0.8g/kg. Conclusion: Acute parvovirus B19 infection should be suspected in patients with immunologic diseases, who present with reticulocytopenic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. In this setting, intravenous gamma globulin is effective for both cytopenias.

  5. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of parvovirus B19 infections in Ireland, January 1996-June 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nicolay, N

    2009-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection may be mistakenly reported as measles or rubella if laboratory testing is not performed. As Europe is seeking to eliminate measles, an accurate diagnosis of fever\\/rash illnesses is needed. The main purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiological pattern of parvovirus B19, a common cause of rash, in Ireland between January 1996 and June 2008, using times series analysis of laboratory diagnostic data from the National Virus Reference Laboratory. Most diagnostic tests for presumptive parvovirus B19 infection were done in children under the age of five years and in women of child-bearing age (between 20-39 years-old). As a consequence, most of the acute diagnoses of B19 infection were made in these populations. The most commonly reported reasons for testing were: clinical presentation with rash, acute arthritis, influenza-like symptoms or pregnancy. The time series analysis identified seasonal trends in parvovirus B19 infection, with annual cycles peaking in late winter\\/spring and a six-year cycle for parvovirus B19 outbreaks in Ireland.

  6. [Reactivation of parvovirus B19 infection in an HIV-infected woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpu, R; Ichou, H; Mahé, I; Mortier, E

    2014-06-01

    Infection by human parvovirus B19 (erythrovirus B19) is common and usually asymptomatic during childhood conferring lasting protection against a new infection. Parvovirus B19 infection may cause erythema infectiosum (5th disease) and aplastic crisis. Secondary symptomatic parvovirus B19 infection in the same patient is rare and its physiopathology is not always clear. A 48-year-old HIV-infected female patient presented within 5 years two acute episodes of parvovirus B19 infection although her CD4 cells count was above 500/mm(3). Absence of specific antibodies production after the first episode and persisting parvovirus viremia suggested viral reactivation rather than re-infection. During the second episode, specific antibodies were produced. Similarly to most DNA viruses, parvovirus B19 reactivation is possible in HIV-infected patients while effectively treated by antiretroviral therapy. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Parvovirus B19 infection in Tunisian patients with sickle-cell anemia and acute erythroblastopenia

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    Zili Mohamed

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human parvovirus B19 is the etiologic agent of erythema infectiosum in children. It is also associated with other clinical manifestations in different target groups. Patients with chronic hemolytic anemia are at high risk of developing acute erythroblastopenia following infection by the virus. They usually become highly viremic and pose an increased risk of virus transmission. Close monitoring of such high risk groups is required for epidemiologic surveillance and disease prevention activities. Here we report a molecular epidemiological study on B19 virus infection in Tunisian patients with chronic hemolytic anemia. Methods This study was conducted on 92 young chronic hemolytic anemia patients who attended the same ward at the National Bone Marrow Transplantation Center of Tunis and 46 controls from a different hospital. Screening for IgM and IgG anti-B19 antibodies was performed using commercially available enzyme immunoassays and B19 DNA was detected by nested PCR in the overlapping VP1/VP2 region. DNA was sequenced using dideoxy-terminator cycle sequencing technology. Results Anti-parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies were detected in 26 of 46 sickle-cell anemia patients, 18 of 46 β-thalassemia and 7 of 46 controls. Anti-parvovirus B19 IgM antibodies were detected only in 4 of the sickle-cell anemia patients: two siblings and two unrelated who presented with acute erythroblastopenia at the time of blood collection for this study and had no history of past transfusion. B19 DNA was detected only in sera of these four patients and the corresponding 288 bp nested DNA amplicons were sequenced. The sequences obtained were all identical and phylogenetic analysis showed that they belonged to a new B19 virus strain of Genotype1. Conclusion A new parvovirus B19 strain of genotype1 was detected in four Tunisian patients with sickle-cell anemia. Virus transmission appeared to be nosocomial and resulted in acute erythroblastopenia in the four

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis serotype A infections in the Amazon region of Brazil: prevalence, entry and dissemination

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    Marluísa de Oliveira Guimarães Ishak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chlamydia infection is associated with debilitating human diseases including trachoma, pneumonia, coronary heart disease and urogenital diseases. Serotypes of C. trachomatis show a fair correlation with the group of diseases they cause, and their distribution follows a well-described geographic pattern. Serotype A, a trachoma-associated strain, is known for its limited dissemination in the Middle East and Northern Africa. However, knowledge on the spread of bacteria from the genus Chlamydia as well as the distribution of serotypes in Brazil is quite limited. METHODS: Blood samples of 1,710 individuals from ten human population groups in the Amazon region of Brazil were examined for antibodies to Chlamydia using indirect immunofluorescence and microimmunofluorescence assays. RESULTS: The prevalence of antibodies to Chlamydia ranged from 23.9% (Wayana-Apalai to 90.7% (Awa-Guaja with a mean prevalence of 50.2%. Seroreactivity was detected to C. pneumoniae and to all serotypes of C. trachomatis tested; furthermore, we report clear evidence of the as-yet-undescribed occurrence of serotype A of C. trachomatis. CONCLUSIONS: Specific seroreactivity not only accounts for the large extent of dissemination of C. trachomatis in the Amazon region of Brazil but also shows an expanded area of occurrence of serotype A outside the epidemiological settings previously described. Furthermore, these data suggest possible routes of Chlamydia introduction into the Amazon region from the massive human migration that occurred during the 1,700s.

  9. Original Research: Parvovirus B19 infection in children with sickle cell disease in the hydroxyurea era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Lavoie, Paul; Tang, Li; Sun, Yilun; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection causes transient aplastic crisis in sickle cell disease (SCD) due to a temporary interruption in the red blood cell production. Toxicity from hydroxyurea includes anemia and reticulocytopenia, both of which also occur during a transient aplastic crisis event. Hydroxyurea inhibits proliferation of hematopoietic cells and may be immunosuppressive. We postulated that hydroxyurea could exacerbate parvovirus B19-induced aplastic crisis and inhibit the development of specific immune responses in children with SCD. We conducted a retrospective review of parvovirus B19 infection in 330 children with SCD. Altogether there were 120 known cases of aplastic crisis attributed to parvovirus B19 infection, and 12% of children were on hydroxyurea treatment during the episode. We evaluated hematological and immune responses. Children with HbSS or HbSβ0-thalassemia treated with hydroxyurea, when compared with untreated children, required fewer transfusions and had higher Hb concentration nadir during transient aplastic crisis. Duration of hospital stays was no different between hydroxyurea-treated and untreated groups. Children tested within a week following aplastic crisis were positive for parvovirus-specific IgG. Immune responses lasted for the duration of the observation period, up to 13 years after transient aplastic crisis, and there were no repeat aplastic crisis episodes. The frequencies of parvovirus-specific antibodies in all children with SCD increased with age, as expected due to the increased likelihood of a parvovirus exposure, and were comparable to frequencies reported for healthy children. Approximately one-third of children had a positive parvovirus B19-specific IgG test without a documented history of transient aplastic crisis, and 64% of them were treated with hydroxyurea. Hydroxyurea may reduce requirements for blood transfusions and may attenuate symptoms during transient aplastic crisis episodes caused by parvovirus B19 infections

  10. Recombinant human parvovirus B19 vectors: erythroid cell-specific delivery and expression of transduced genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnazhagan, S; Weigel, K A; Raikwar, S P; Mukherjee, P; Yoder, M C; Srivastava, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel packaging strategy combining the salient features of two human parvoviruses, namely the pathogenic parvovirus B19 and the nonpathogenic adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV), was developed to achieve erythroid cell-specific delivery as well as expression of the transduced gene. The development of such a chimeric vector system was accomplished by packaging heterologous DNA sequences cloned within the inverted terminal repeats of AAV and subsequently packaging the DNA inside the capsid structure of B19 virus. Recombinant B19 virus particles were assembled, as evidenced by electron microscopy as well as DNA slot blot analyses. The hybrid vector failed to transduce nonerythroid human cells, such as 293 cells, as expected. However, MB-02 cells, a human megakaryocytic leukemia cell line which can be infected by B19 virus following erythroid differentiation with erythropoietin (N. C. Munshi, S. Z. Zhou, M. J. Woody, D. A. Morgan, and A. Srivastava, J. Virol. 67:562-566, 1993) but lacks the putative receptor for AAV (S. Ponnazhagan, X.-S. Wang, M. J. Woody, F. Luo, L. Y. Kang, M. L. Nallari, N. C. Munshi, S. Z. Zhou, and A. Srivastava, J. Gen. Virol. 77:1111-1122, 1996), were readily transduced by this vector. The hybrid vector was also found to specifically target the erythroid population in primary human bone marrow cells as well as more immature hematopoietic progenitor cells following erythroid differentiation, as evidenced by selective expression of the transduced gene in these target cells. Preincubation with anticapsid antibodies against B19 virus, but not anticapsid antibodies against AAV, inhibited transduction of primary human erythroid cells. The efficiency of transduction of primary human erythroid cells by the recombinant B19 virus vector was significantly higher than that by the recombinant AAV vector. Further development of the AAV-B19 virus hybrid vector system should prove beneficial in gene therapy protocols aimed at the correction of inherited and

  11. Original Research: Parvovirus B19 infection in children with sickle cell disease in the hydroxyurea era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Jane S; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Lavoie, Paul; Tang, Li; Sun, Yilun; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-04-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection causes transient aplastic crisis in sickle cell disease (SCD) due to a temporary interruption in the red blood cell production. Toxicity from hydroxyurea includes anemia and reticulocytopenia, both of which also occur during a transient aplastic crisis event. Hydroxyurea inhibits proliferation of hematopoietic cells and may be immunosuppressive. We postulated that hydroxyurea could exacerbate parvovirus B19-induced aplastic crisis and inhibit the development of specific immune responses in children with SCD. We conducted a retrospective review of parvovirus B19 infection in 330 children with SCD. Altogether there were 120 known cases of aplastic crisis attributed to parvovirus B19 infection, and 12% of children were on hydroxyurea treatment during the episode. We evaluated hematological and immune responses. Children with HbSS or HbSβ(0)-thalassemia treated with hydroxyurea, when compared with untreated children, required fewer transfusions and had higher Hb concentration nadir during transient aplastic crisis. Duration of hospital stays was no different between hydroxyurea-treated and untreated groups. Children tested within a week following aplastic crisis were positive for parvovirus-specific IgG. Immune responses lasted for the duration of the observation period, up to 13 years after transient aplastic crisis, and there were no repeat aplastic crisis episodes. The frequencies of parvovirus-specific antibodies in all children with SCD increased with age, as expected due to the increased likelihood of a parvovirus exposure, and were comparable to frequencies reported for healthy children. Approximately one-third of children had a positive parvovirus B19-specific IgG test without a documented history of transient aplastic crisis, and 64% of them were treated with hydroxyurea. Hydroxyurea may reduce requirements for blood transfusions and may attenuate symptoms during transient aplastic crisis episodes caused by parvovirus B19 infections

  12. Prevalence of parvovirus B19 specific antibody in pregnant women with spontaneous abortion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Rahbar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 is a very common viral infection especially in school-aged children. The infection during pregnancy can affect the fetus due to lack of mother's immunity. Although, there is still no evidence of fetal teratogenic effects with parvovirus B19, but non-immune fetal hydrops and abortion may be caused by vertical transmission of the virus during pregnancy. This study was aimed to assess the prevalence of parvovirus B19-specific antibody (IgM in pregnant women who had a spontaneous abortion. This cross-sectional study was carried out in all pregnant women who referred due to a spontaneous abortion. All demographic information such as age, occupation, and gestational age, last history of abortion, gravity, and presence of children below the age of six was recorded and a blood sample was provided for all the women. Then, the blood samples were tested to assay parvovirus B19-specific antibody (IgM by EuroImmune ELISA kit. Among 94 pregnant women with the mean age of 28.4 years who had a spontaneous abortion, parvovirus B19 specific antibody (IgM was detected in 17 participants (18.1%. Meanwhile, 14 women (14.9% were suspected for presence of the antibody in their blood sample. There was no significant difference between the presence of antibody and age of pregnant women, occupation, gestational age, number of previous abortion, presence of children below the age of six and number of pregnancy. These findings revealed that a high percentage of pregnant women are probably non-immune against parvovirus B19, and also there might be a number of spontaneous abortions in which parvovirus infection caused fetal death.  However, more studies are needed to prove the absolute role of parvovirus B19 in these abortions.

  13. Prevalence of parvovirus B19 specific antibody in pregnant women with spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, Nahid; Vali Zadeh, Saeid; Ghorbani, Raheb; Kheradmand, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a very common viral infection especially in school-aged children. The infection during pregnancy can affect the fetus due to lack of mother's immunity. Although, there is still no evidence of fetal teratogenic effects with parvovirus B19, but non-immune fetal hydrops and abortion may be caused by vertical transmission of the virus during pregnancy. This study was aimed to assess the prevalence of parvovirus B19-specific antibody (IgM) in pregnant women who had a spontaneous abortion. This cross-sectional study was carried out in all pregnant women who referred due to a spontaneous abortion. All demographic information such as age, occupation, and gestational age, last history of abortion, gravity, and presence of children below the age of six was recorded and a blood sample was provided for all the women. Then, the blood samples were tested to assay parvovirus B19-specific antibody (IgM) by EuroImmune ELISA kit. Among 94 pregnant women with the mean age of 28.4 years who had a spontaneous abortion, parvovirus B19 specific antibody (IgM) was detected in 17 participants (18.1%). Meanwhile, 14 women (14.9%) were suspected for presence of the antibody in their blood sample. There was no significant difference between the presence of antibody and age of pregnant women, occupation, gestational age, number of previous abortion, presence of children below the age of six and number of pregnancy. These findings revealed that a high percentage of pregnant women are probably non-immune against parvovirus B19, and also there might be a number of spontaneous abortions in which parvovirus infection caused fetal death.  However, more studies are needed to prove the absolute role of parvovirus B19 in these abortions.

  14. Human parvovirus B19 in Iranian pregnant women: a serologic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khameneh, Zakieh Rostamzadeh; Hanifian, Haleh; Barzegari, Razieh; Sepehrvand, Nariman

    2014-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection is associated with clinical symptoms that vary in the spectrum from trivial to severe. The important clinical manifestations are erythema infectiosum or the fifth disease, transient aplastic anemia in patients with hemoglobinopathies, acute polyarthralgia syndrome in adults, hydrops fetalis, spontaneous abortion and stillbirth. Acute infection in nonimmune pregnant women can lead to fetal hydrops. In view of the many complications that can result from acute parvovirus B19 infections during pregnancy, documenting the seroprevalence of anti-parvovirus B19 IgG and its association with the history of abortion in an Iranian population of pregnant women would be of value. Serum samples from 86 pregnant women were collected between May and September 2011 in West Azerbaijan province of Iran. Every pregnant woman completed a questionnaire which included age, history of tattooing, blood transfusion, and abortion. Anti-B19 specific IgG was detected by using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Anti-B19-specific IgG antibody was detected in (65/86, 75.6%) of pregnant women. The mean age was 25.56 ± 5.30 years and three women had a documented history of blood transfusion (2 of them tested seropositive for B19). 16/18 (88.8%) of women with a history of abortion were IgG positive. The frequency of abortion sessions in the seropositive group (25 sessions of abortion: 11 women experienced once, 2 twice, 2 thrice and one 4 times) was 4.03 times greater than abortion in seronegative group (2 abortions/21 seronegative women). Our study reaffirms previous reports regarding the higher frequency of abortion among anti-B19 IgG seropositive pregnant women and a possible role of this viral infection in the pathogenesis of abortion.

  15. Adenovirus E1B 19-kilodalton protein modulates innate immunity through apoptotic mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Jay R; Grigera, Fernando; Ucker, David S; Cook, James L

    2014-03-01

    Cells that undergo apoptosis in response to chemical or physical stimuli repress inflammatory reactions, but cells that undergo nonapoptotic death in response to such stimuli lack this activity. Whether cells dying from viral infection exhibit a cell death-type modulatory effect on inflammatory reactions is unknown. We compared the effects on macrophage inflammatory responses of cells dying an apoptotic or a nonapoptotic death as a result of adenoviral infection. The results were exactly opposite to the predictions from the conventional paradigm. Cells dying by apoptosis induced by infection with an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 19-kilodalton (E1B 19K) gene deletion mutant did not repress macrophage NF-κB activation or cytokine responses to proinflammatory stimuli, whereas cells dying a nonapoptotic death from infection with E1B 19K-competent, wild-type Ad5 repressed these macrophage inflammatory responses as well as cells undergoing classical apoptosis in response to chemical injury. The immunorepressive, E1B 19K-related cell death activity depended upon direct contact of the virally infected corpses with responder macrophages. Replacement of the viral E1B 19K gene with the mammalian Bcl-2 gene in cis restored the nonapoptotic, immunorepressive cell death activity of virally infected cells. These results define a novel function of the antiapoptotic, adenoviral E1B 19K protein that may limit local host innate immune inflammation during accumulation of virally infected cells at sites of infection and suggest that E1B 19K-deleted, replicating adenoviral vectors might induce greater inflammatory responses to virally infected cells than E1B 19K-positive vectors, because of the net effect of their loss-of-function mutation. We observed that cells dying a nonapoptotic cell death induced by adenovirus infection repressed macrophage proinflammatory responses while cells dying by apoptosis induced by infection with an E1B 19K deletion mutant virus did not repress macrophage

  16. Molecular Study of Parvovirus B19 Infection in Children with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharwat Abou El-Khier, Noha; Darwish, Ahmad; El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa

    2018-02-26

    Background: Parvovirus B19 is a common viral infection in children. Nearby evidences are present about its association with acute leukemia, especially acute lymphoblast leukemia. Nevertheless, scanty reports have discussed any role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Purpose: To evaluate the frequency of virological markers of B19 infection including its DNA along with specific immunoglobulins G (IgG) and M (IgM) among children with newly diagnosed AML. Besides, describing the clinical importance of Parvovirus B19 infection in those patients. Patients and methods: A case-control retrospective study was conducted on 48 children recently diagnosed with AML before and during chemotherapy induction and 60 healthy control. Specific serum IgM and IgG levels were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Parvovirus DNA was detected in 20 patients with AML. IgM was found in sera of four patients and one case had positive DNA and IgG (5%). Patients with recent parvovirus B19 infection had a significantly reduced hemoglobin levels, RBCs counts, platelet counts, neutrophil counts and absolute lymphocytosis (p=0.01, p=0.0001, p=0.01, p=0.02, p=0.0003, respectively). There were no clinical findings with statistically significant association to recent infection. Half of the patients with AML had positive PCR and/or IgM for parvovirus B19. Among children with AML under chemotherapy, there were reduced hemoglobin levels (P=0.03), reduced platelet counts (P=0.0001) and absolute neutropenia (mean±SD, 1.200 ±1.00) in those with parvovirus B19 infection. More than half of patients with parvovirus B19 (72.2%) had positive PCR and/or IgM and 36.4% of them had positive IgG. Conclusion: This study highlights that parvovirus B19 is common in children with AML either at diagnosis or under chemotherapy. There are no clinical manifestations that can be used as markers for its presence, but hematological laboratory

  17. Petechial-Purpuric Rash, Leukopenia and Thrombocytopenia Associated Parvovirus B19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugce Tural Kara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Parvovirus B19 can cause different skin rashes like maculopapular, erythematous, petechial, or purpuric lesions. In addition, parvovirus B19 can cause some important hematologic disorders like aplastic anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. We report a child who was admitted to the hospital with petechial-purpuric rashes. On laboratory analysis, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were found and serologic testing of parvovirus B19 IgM was determined to be positive. After the third day of hospitalization, the petechial-purpuric rashes began to decline and laboratory results were in the normal range. We think that the disease was parvovirus B19 infection. The patient was treated with only antipyretic drugs. On follow up, the clinical and laboratory findings had completely returned to normal. In conclusion, parvovirus B19 can cause clinical signs such as petechiae and purpura. Also, hematologic disorders may be a complication. Because of this, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with rash, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia.

  18. Serological diagnosis of Chlamydia infections: proposal of a cost-effective approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino Ciarrocchi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by genus Chlamydia are challenging for phisicians, as a results of a complicated pathogenesis and a variable clinical picture. Furthermore, potential sequelae following Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci infections are of clinical relevant interest. Serodiagnosis is a clue tool when the direct antigen research or the bacteria fragments detection is impaired. Some serological tests such as the ELISA or the indirect micro-immunofluorescence methods are routinely performed. To improve the diagnostic efficiency of these tests, a selective coating of specie-specific reactive antigens on microwells or on microscopic slides is proposed.A highly selective coating is essential to generate a specific immune response for each Chlamydia species and high levels of distinct IgA, IgG, IgM antibody classes.The goal of serology is the diagnostic value of results, therefore the correct choice of the best screening and confirmation test is of extreme relevance due to the clinical impact of results for the therapeutical approach and management of acute and chronic infections. In conclusion, a quantitative specific anti-Chlamydia IgG and IgA antibody detection is a useful method to improve the follow up of complicated chronic clinical sequelae.

  19. Atypical pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubairi, Ali Bin Sarwar; Zafar, Afia; Salahuddin, Nawal; Haque, Ahmed Suleman; Waheed, Shahan; Khan, Javaid Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    To determine the frequency of community-acquired respiratory pathogens with special focus on atypical organisms in patients presenting to a tertiary care facility with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The descriptive study on adult patients was conducted from February 2007 to March 2008 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised 124 consenting patients of age 16 and above who presentd with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia. The diagnostic modalities used were based on significant changes in antibody titer or persisting high antibody titers in the case of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chalmydia pneumoniae infections, or bacterial antigen in urine, in the case of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 infection. Pyogenic bacteria were identified on the results of respiratory secretions or blood cultures. Continuous data and categorical variables were worked out using SPSS version 15. Among the 124 patients enrolled, an etiologic agent was identified in 44 (35.4%) patients. The most common organism was Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 21, 17%), followed by Chlamydia pneumoniae (n = 15, 12%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 9, 7%), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 2, 1.6%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 2, 1.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 1, 0.8%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism isolated from blood cultures. No cases of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were identified. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chalmydia pneumoniae are significant etiologic agents for community-acquired pneumonia occurring in Karachi. Local treatment guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia should include therapy directed specifically at these agents.

  20. Analysis of the humoral immune response to Chlamydia outer membrane protein 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, P; Christiansen, Gunna; Persson, K

    1998-01-01

    The humoral immune response to Chlamydia outer membrane protein 2 (Omp2) was studied. Omp2 is a highly genus-conserved structural protein of all Chlamydia species, containing a variable N-terminal fragment. To analyze where the immunogenic parts were localized, seven highly purified truncated...... patient sera, Omp2 was found to be a major immunogen of both C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis infections (P immune responses were not confined to any particular region of the Omp2 protein, and no species-specific anti-Omp2 immunoglobulins were detected....

  1. Genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Agnese Latino

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis (C.t. infection is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted disease in Europe and in developed countries. The main biological features and pathogenic mechanisms of C.t. infection are summarized in this review. It usually occurs without symptoms and often goes undiagnosed. If untreated, it can cause severe consequences for women, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID, ectopic pregnancy and tubal infertility. Several studies have found that Chlamydia is more common among young women <25 years old, with multiple sexual partners within six months and non protected intercourses. Because re-infection rates are high, complications may be reduced if partners are treated and women re-tested. This paper emphasizes the importance of counselling and prevention programs and underlines that selective screening of high-risk population remains an essential component of C.t. control. In the last years, the detection of C.t. infection has been improved in sensitivity and specificity.We describe the main diagnostic techniques, from culture, enzyme immunoassay (EIA, direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA to the new DNA-based test systems. Actually, NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests are regarded as the gold standard diagnostic techniques for chlamydial infections.

  2. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  3. Pneumonia (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia trachomatis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bom, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infections are the most prevalent bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STT) worldwide. A better understand of the transmission of C. trachomatis may contribute to improved screening and prevention programs in the future and ultimately alleviate this burden. Through the

  5. Clinico-pathological study of atypical pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Goda, Tarek

    2009-04-30

    Atypical respiratory pathogens such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella species, and Chlamydia pneumoniae are isolated with increasing frequency from community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This study highlights the importance of organisms responsible for CAP. One hundred consecutive patients with clinically and radiographically diagnosed CAP were evaluated from October 2005 to October 2006. Sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, and blood samples were collected for microbiological culture. Determination was performed for specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) for Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Coxiella burnettii, adenovirus, and influenza virus. The most common isolated bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae (22%) followed by Haemophilus influenzae (18%). Mycoplasma pneumoniae was isolated from 5% and Legionella pneumophila was isolated from 5% of patients. The most common positive serological reaction was for Chlamydia pneumoniae (30%) and Adenovirus (30%). In the study of accuracy of determination of specific IgM for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila compared to culture, the sensitivity was 60% and 80% respectively, specificity was 93.7 %, and 98.9 % respectively, and accuracy was 92 % and 97 % respectively. This study highlights the prominence of mixed bacterial/viral infections in lower respiratory tract infection diagnosis. Our data showed that at least 30% of our patients had concurrent infections. This observation raises two important questions: 1) whether sequential or concurrent viral and bacterial infections have a synergistic impact on the evolution of disease in children; and 2) should diagnostic batteries for any patient with CAP include methods for detecting both the typical and atypical bacterial or viral pathogens.

  6. Parvovirus B19 Infection in the First Trimester of Pregnancy and Risk of Fetal Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jonathan; Jensen, Anne K V; Bager, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Because parvovirus B19 infection during pregnancy has been associated with increased risk of fetal loss in small or selected study populations, the authors evaluated the risk in a population-based study. A nested case-control study was conducted by using a population-based screening for syphilis...

  7. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(19)-1 - Services of certain nonresident aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Services of certain nonresident aliens. 31.3121... 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(b)(19)-1 Services of certain nonresident aliens. (a) (1) Services performed after 1961 by a nonresident alien individual who is temporarily present in the United States as a...

  8. Hereditary Spherocytosis Unmasked by Human Parvovirus B19 Induced Aplastic Crisis in a Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samin Alavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus (HPV B19 induced aplastic crisis in a family leading to the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a very rare condition being barely reported in the literature. We herein report a 4-year-old girl, her brother, and their mother who all presented with progressive pallor and jaundice after a febrile illness. The HPV B19 was diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and positive serology for specific anti-HPV B19 IgM. They were further diagnosed with having HS. The clinical importance of this report is that in the case of an abrupt onset of unexplained severe anemia and jaundice, one should consider underlying hemolytic anemias mostly hereditary spherocytosis complicated by HPV B19 aplastic crisis. Herein, we report the occurrence of this condition, simultaneously in three members of a family. The distinguished feature of this report is that all affected family members developed some degrees of transient pancytopenia, not only anemia, all simultaneously in the course of their disease.

  9. Influenza A and Parvovirus B19 Seropositivity Rates in Gabonese Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabor, Julian J.; Schwarz, Norbert G.; Esen, Meral; Kremsner, Peter G.; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological data from Central Africa on influenza A and parvovirus B19 infections are limited. We analyzed 162 blood samples of infants 3, 9, 15, and 30 months of age for IgG antibodies against both pathogens. Antibody responses were 0, 3.7%, 12.3%, and 20.4% against influenza A;

  10. Estimation of serum concentration of parvovirus B19 DNA by PCR in patients with chronic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornsleth, A.; Carlsen, K. M.; Christensen, Laurids Siig

    1994-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 DNA was detected in serum samples from 10 out of 42 patients with chronic anaemia, the majority of whom suffered from aplastic anaemia, haemolytic anaemia, pure red cell anaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Nested PCR methods with sensitivities of 0.005-0.05 fg DNA were developed...

  11. Erythrovirus B19 infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: screening by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Setúbal

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Erythrovirus B19 infects erythrocytic progenitors, transiently interrupting erythropoiesis. In AIDS patients it causes chronic anemia amenable to treatment. We looked for evidences of B19 infection in stored bone marrow material from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Histological sections were made from stored paraffin blocks from 33 autopsies (39 blocks and 35 biopsies (45 blocks, 30 patients performed from 1988 to 2002. They were examined after hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining, immunohistochemical (IHC, and in situ hybridization. HE revealed intra-nuclear inclusion bodies ("lantern cells" suggesting B19 infection in 19 sections corresponding to 19 of 63 patients examined with this test. Seven of 78 sections subjected to immunohistochemistry were positive, corresponding to 7 of 58 patients examined with this test. Fourteen sections corresponding to 13 of the 20 HE and/or IHC positive patients were subjected to in situ hybridization, with six positives results. Among the 13 patients subjected to the three techniques, only one gave unequivocal positive results in all and was considered a true positive. The frequency of B19 infection (1/63 patients in the material examined can be deemed low.

  12. Slow clearance of human parvovirus B19 viremia following acute infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, Anna; Isa, Adiba; Norbeck, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 is a common, clinically significant pathogen. Reassessment of the viral kinetics after acute infection showed that the virus is not rapidly cleared from healthy hosts, despite early resolution of symptoms. These findings challenge our current conception of the virus' pathogenesis...

  13. Disturbance of cerebral neuronal migration following congenital parvovirus B19 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pistorius, Lourens Rasmus; Smal, Jaime; de Haan, Timo Robert; Page-Christiaens, Godelieve C. M. L.; Verboon-Maciolek, Malgorzata; Oepkes, Dick; de Vries, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the clinical course of an infant who presented with severe fetal anemia and fetal hydrops following congenital parvovirus B19 infection before 16 gestational weeks. The fetus was treated by cordocentesis and intrauterine transfusion at 18 weeks. The infant demonstrated mild unilateral

  14. Fetal stroke and congenital parvovirus B19 infection complicated by activated protein C resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Timo R.; van Wezel-Meijler, Gerda; Beersma, Matthias F. C.; Von Lindern, Jeanette S.; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Walther, Frans J.

    2006-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection in gestation has been associated with severe fetal complications such as anaemia, hydrops and fetal demise. Fetal infection in the first trimester poses the greatest risk for these complications, but infection during the third trimester is more common than previously

  15. Adult Reye-like syndrome associated with serologic evidence of acute parvovirus B19 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Gonçalves da Costa

    Full Text Available Reye's syndrome is an infrequently diagnosed medical condition affecting mainly children. The etiology, epidemiology and natural history of Reye's syndrome have been cloudily written in footnotes of medical books and exotic papers since the initial description in early 1950s. We report here a case of adult Reye's syndrome associated with serologic evidence of parvovirus B19 infection.

  16. Anemia crônica no pós-transplante renal: parvovirose B19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Calderia Loss Vincens

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A anemia é frequente em pacientes após o transplante renal (TxR e sua prevalência varia conforme o tempo pós-transplante e os critérios diagnósticos empregados. A infecção pelo Parvovírus B19 (PV B19 é causa subdiagnosticada de anemia nesta população. Para ilustrar a epidemiologia e espectro clínico, apresentamos caso de PV B19 que evoluiu com aplasia pura de série vermelha (APSV, ressaltando as dificuldades do diagnóstico e tratamento. O emprego da detecção do DNA viral pela reação em cadeia da polimerase e do diagnóstico das alterações da morfologia da medula óssea são particularmente úteis para o diagnóstico no paciente transplantado imunossuprimido que falha na produção da resposta humoral contra o PV B19.

  17. Estimation of serum concentration of parvovirus B19 DNA by PCR in patients with chronic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornsleth, A.; Carlsen, K. M.; Christensen, Laurids Siig

    1994-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 DNA was detected in serum samples from 10 out of 42 patients with chronic anaemia, the majority of whom suffered from aplastic anaemia, haemolytic anaemia, pure red cell anaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Nested PCR methods with sensitivities of 0.005-0.05 fg DNA were developed. ...

  18. sero-prevalence of human parvovirus b19 among patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    with age with the highest prevalence (51%) recorded among patients ≥51 years old while the lowest prevalence was among those < 1 ... individuals (5). Parvovirus B19 virus may cause transient anaemia amongst healthy adults, aplastic crises in infected persons with an underlying blood ..... Malaysia, 2002; 57 (1):97-103.

  19. Rocking pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers, Ger T; Rodriguez Gomez, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Ever since Chuck Berry coined the term "rocking pneumonia" in his 1956 song "Roll over Beethoven", pneumonia has been mentioned frequently in modern blues and rock songs. We analyzed the lyrics of these songs to examine how various elements of pneumonia have been represented in popular music, specifically the cause of pneumonia, the risk groups, comorbidity (such as the boogie woogie flu), the clinical symptoms, and treatment and outcome. Up to this day, songwriters suggest that pneumonia is caused mainly by the cold and rain and that treatment is hardly possible, aside from a shot of rhythm and blues.

  20. Chlamydia trachomatis Genital Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. O’Connell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Etiology, transmission and protection: Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI globally. However, C. trachomatis also causes trachoma in endemic areas, mostly Africa and the Middle East, and is a leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. Epidemiology, incidence and prevalence: The World Health Organization estimates 131 million new cases of C. trachomatis genital infection occur annually. Globally, infection is most prevalent in young women and men (14-25 years, likely driven by asymptomatic infection, inadequate partner treatment and delayed development of protective immunity. Pathology/Symptomatology: C. trachomatis infects susceptible squamocolumnar or transitional epithelial cells, leading to cervicitis in women and urethritis in men. Symptoms are often mild or absent but ascending infection in some women may lead to Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID, resulting in reproductive sequelae such as ectopic pregnancy, infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Complications of infection in men include epididymitis and reactive arthritis. Molecular mechanisms of infection: Chlamydiae manipulate an array of host processes to support their obligate intracellular developmental cycle. This leads to activation of signaling pathways resulting in disproportionate influx of innate cells and the release of tissue damaging proteins and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Treatment and curability: Uncomplicated urogenital infection is treated with azithromycin (1 g, single dose or doxycycline (100 mg twice daily x 7 days. However, antimicrobial treatment does not ameliorate established disease. Drug resistance is rare but treatment failures have been described. Development of an effective vaccine that protects against upper tract disease or that limits transmission remains an important goal.

  1. The Number, Organization, and Size of Polymorphic Membrane Protein Coding Sequences as well as the Most Conserved Pmp Protein Differ within and across Chlamydia Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lent, Sarah; Creasy, Heather Huot; Myers, Garry S A; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    Variation is a central trait of the polymorphic membrane protein (Pmp) family. The number of pmp coding sequences differs between Chlamydia species, but it is unknown whether the number of pmp coding sequences is constant within a Chlamydia species. The level of conservation of the Pmp proteins has previously only been determined for Chlamydia trachomatis. As different Pmp proteins might be indispensible for the pathogenesis of different Chlamydia species, this study investigated the conservation of Pmp proteins both within and across C. trachomatis,C. pneumoniae,C. abortus, and C. psittaci. The pmp coding sequences were annotated in 16 C. trachomatis, 6 C. pneumoniae, 2 C. abortus, and 16 C. psittaci genomes. The number and organization of polymorphic membrane coding sequences differed within and across the analyzed Chlamydia species. The length of coding sequences of pmpA,pmpB, and pmpH was conserved among all analyzed genomes, while the length of pmpE/F and pmpG, and remarkably also of the subtype pmpD, differed among the analyzed genomes. PmpD, PmpA, PmpH, and PmpA were the most conserved Pmp in C. trachomatis,C. pneumoniae,C. abortus, and C. psittaci, respectively. PmpB was the most conserved Pmp across the 4 analyzed Chlamydia species. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Processing of Chlamydia abortus polymorphic membrane protein 18D during the chlamydial developmental cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelhouse, Nick M; Sait, Michelle; Aitchison, Kevin; Livingstone, Morag; Wright, Frank; McLean, Kevin; Inglis, Neil F; Smith, David G E; Longbottom, David

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia possess a unique family of autotransporter proteins known as the Polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps). While the total number of pmp genes varies between Chlamydia species, all encode a single pmpD gene. In both Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) and C. pneumoniae, the PmpD protein is proteolytically cleaved on the cell surface. The current study was carried out to determine the cleavage patterns of the PmpD protein in the animal pathogen C. abortus (termed Pmp18D). Using antibodies directed against different regions of Pmp18D, proteomic techniques revealed that the mature protein was cleaved on the cell surface, resulting in a100 kDa N-terminal product and a 60 kDa carboxy-terminal protein. The N-terminal protein was further processed into 84, 76 and 73 kDa products. Clustering analysis resolved PmpD proteins into three distinct clades with C. abortus Pmp18D, being most similar to those originating from C. psittaci, C. felis and C. caviae. This study indicates that C. abortus Pmp18D is proteolytically processed at the cell surface similar to the proteins of C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae. However, patterns of cleavage are species-specific, with low sequence conservation of PmpD across the genus. The absence of conserved domains indicates that the function of the PmpD molecule in chlamydia remains to be elucidated.

  3. Processing of Chlamydia abortus polymorphic membrane protein 18D during the chlamydial developmental cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick M Wheelhouse

    Full Text Available Chlamydia possess a unique family of autotransporter proteins known as the Polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps. While the total number of pmp genes varies between Chlamydia species, all encode a single pmpD gene. In both Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae, the PmpD protein is proteolytically cleaved on the cell surface. The current study was carried out to determine the cleavage patterns of the PmpD protein in the animal pathogen C. abortus (termed Pmp18D.Using antibodies directed against different regions of Pmp18D, proteomic techniques revealed that the mature protein was cleaved on the cell surface, resulting in a100 kDa N-terminal product and a 60 kDa carboxy-terminal protein. The N-terminal protein was further processed into 84, 76 and 73 kDa products. Clustering analysis resolved PmpD proteins into three distinct clades with C. abortus Pmp18D, being most similar to those originating from C. psittaci, C. felis and C. caviae.This study indicates that C. abortus Pmp18D is proteolytically processed at the cell surface similar to the proteins of C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae. However, patterns of cleavage are species-specific, with low sequence conservation of PmpD across the genus. The absence of conserved domains indicates that the function of the PmpD molecule in chlamydia remains to be elucidated.

  4. Measles, mumps, rubella, and human parvovirus B19 infections and neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, James F

    2014-01-01

    While the systemic disorders associated with measles, mumps, and rubella viruses and human parvovirus B19 tend to be mild, each virus can produce potentially life-threatening neurologic disease in human hosts, especially when these viruses infect young children. Two of the viruses, rubella and parvovirus B19, can be vertically transmitted to fetuses during maternal infection and cause congenital infection. Neurologic complications are common after intrauterine infection with the rubella virus, a condition known as the congenital rubella syndrome. Two, measles and rubella viruses, can induce "slow viral" infections, serious, disorders that can occur several years after the initial exposure to the virus and typically have fatal outcomes. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Safety studies of the oral rabies vaccine SAD B19 in striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, A; Pommerening, E; Neubert, L; Kachel, S; Neubert, A

    2002-04-01

    Safety of the modified live rabies virus vaccine, SAD B19, was studied in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis). Seven skunks received 10(7.9) foci formatting units by direct oral administration. In four cages, a vaccinated animal was placed with a control animal, the other three vaccinated skunks were housed individually. Saliva and nasal swabs were collected 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 72 hr post-vaccination. From all vaccinated and control animals (n = 11) blood samples were collected 0, 28, 56, 84, and 296 days post-vaccination. Three of seven vaccinated skunks seroconverted. None of the control animals had detectable levels of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies. Also no vaccine virus was isolated from the nasal and saliva swabs collected from any animal. Thus, SAD B19 was innocuous for skunks in our study after direct oral administration at field concentration.

  6. Genetic stability (in vivo) of the attenuated oral rabies virus vaccine SAD B19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckert, Aline; Geue, Lutz; Vos, Ad; Neubert, Andreas; Freuling, Conrad; Müller, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of oral rabies vaccine baits containing replication-competent live viruses poses certain environmental safety risks; among others, the possibility of reversion to or an increase in virulence. Hence, the genetic stability of the complete genome of the most widely used oral rabies vaccine virus, SAD B19, was examined after four and 10 serial i.c. passages in foxes and mice, respectively. It was shown that the consensus strain of SAD B19 was extremely stable in vivo. After 10 consecutive passages in mice not a single mutation was observed. In foxes, seven single nucleotide exchanges were found between the first and fourth passage, of which only one resulted in an amino acid exchange at position 9240 of the L-gene. This mutation was not observed during the first three passages and, furthermore, it was shown that this mutation was not linked to enhanced virulence.

  7. Th17-related cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with dilated cardiomyopathies: a possible linkage to parvovirus B19 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Yuan Chen

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM are a major cause of mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Immune responses induced by human parvovirus B19 (B19 are considered an important pathogenic mechanism in myocarditis or DCM. However, little is known about Th17-related cytokines in SLE patients with DCM about the linkage with B19 infection. IgM and IgG against B19 viral protein, and serum levels of Th17-related cytokines were determined using ELISA in eight SLE patients with DCM and six patients with valvular heart disease (VHD. Humoral responses of anti-B19-VP1u and anti-B19-NS1 antibody were assessed using Western blot and B19 DNA was detected by nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Levels of interleukin (IL-17, IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α were significantly higher in SLE patients with DCM (mean ± SEM, 390.99±125.48 pg/ml, 370.24±114.09 pg/ml, 36.01±16.90 pg/ml, and 183.84±82.94 pg/ml, respectively compared to healthy controls (51.32±3.04 pg/ml, p<0.001; 36.88±6.64 pg/ml, p<0.001; 5.39±0.62 pg/ml, p<0.005; and 82.13±2.42 pg/ml, p<0.005, respectively. Levels of IL-17 and IL-6 were higher in SLE patients with DCM versus those with VHD (both p<0.01. Five (62.5% of DCM patients had detectable anti-B19-NS1 IgG and four (50.0% of them had anti-B19-VP1u IgG, whereas only one (16.7% of VHD patients had detectable anti-B19-NS1 IgG and anti-B19-VP1u IgG. Serum levels of IL-17, IL-6 and IL-1β were markedly higher in SLE patients with anti-B19-VP1u IgG and anti-B19-NS1 IgG compared to those without anti-B19-VP1u IgG or anti-B19-NS1 IgG, respectively. These suggest a potential association of B19 with DCM and Th17-related cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of DCM in SLE patients.

  8. Leukopenia due to parvovirus B19 in a Crohn's disease patient using azathioprine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asseldonk, Dirk P; Kanis, Bernardina M; de Boer, Nanne K H; van Bodegraven, Ad A

    2009-01-01

    Thiopurines such as azathioprine (AZA) and 6-mercaptopurine are frequently used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. Patients with low or absent thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) activity, resulting in high 6-thioguanine nucleotide levels, have an increased risk of developing leukopenia. Alternatively, certain viral infections could induce leukopenia. We present the case of an adult Crohn's disease patient with a parvovirus B19 infection and leukopenia during long-term AZA therapy. The uncomplicated long-term use of adequately-dosed AZA and stable non-toxic metabolite levels could not acknowledge TPMT deficiency as a primary cause of the leukopenia. parvovirus B19 was assumed to induce the leukopenia by restraining myeloid proliferation. In addition, AZA probably potentiated susceptibility to this viral infection and may have inhibited adequate immunological defense. Leukopenia during thiopurine therapy not explained by TPMT deficiency could be induced by parvovirus B19 infection and compels temporal but not permanent cessation of thiopurine therapy. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Prevalence of a positive TORCH and parvovirus B19 screening in pregnancies complicated by polyhydramnios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, L; Seravalli, V; Sisti, G; Battaglini, C; Nepi, F; Pelagalli, R; Di Tommaso, M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of women with polyhydramnios who eventually screened positive to infectious disease by serum screening testing for TORCH and parvovirus B19. This is a retrospective observational study on singleton pregnancies with a diagnosis of polyhydramnios and who had serum screening for TORCH and parvovirus B19. Patients were followed with serial ultrasounds between 2006 and 2013. Maternal characteristics, medical and obstetric history were reviewed. Ultrasound parameters, including amniotic fluid index and fetal anomalies, and the results of serologic tests were reviewed. Two hundred ninety patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 56 (19%) presented one of the following pathological conditions associated with polyhydramnios: diabetes (13% of total cases), obstructive gastrointestinal lesions (5%), Rhesus isoimmunization (0.3%), chromosomal abnormalities or genetic syndromes (1%). Among the remaining 234 patients, only three had a positive test result for infectious disease (1%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0-4%): two women were positive for parvovirus B19 and one for toxoplasmosis infection. In none of them the fetus was affected, as confirmed by serum testing after birth and by 3 years follow-up. Infectious disease screening does not seem beneficial in pregnancies with isolated polyhydramnios. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Construction of protein-functionalized virus-like particles of parvovirus B19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Soto-Román, Ricardo Arturo; Gutiérrez-Landa, Isabel Alejandra; Valadez-García, Josefina; Segovia-Trinidad, Carla Lizbeth

    2017-12-10

    Decoration of virus-like particles (VLPs) expands the repertory of functions these particles can display. In the last years, VLPs have successfully been used as scaffolds to present different molecules, frequently through the specific reaction of chemical groups on the surface of the particles, or by protein engineering when the presentation of peptides or proteins is the primary goal. VLPs of parvovirus B19 (B19V), have been previously produced in vitro and its stability and ability to assemble into hybrid particles composed of wild-type and chimeric proteins evidenced their potential as research tools. Herein, we report the presentation of functional proteins on the surface of B19V VLPs, through the fusion of the gene coding for the heterologous protein within the gene coding for the structural protein VP2. Two model proteins were used for the construction of chimeras, a lipase from Bacillus pumilus (BplA) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Both chimeras were folded and successfully assembled in vitro into VLPs. While the BplA chimera exhibited esterase activity, the chimera of EGFP showed no fluorescence. We replaced the EGFP by its fast-folding derivative "super folder GFP" (sfGFP) flanked by larger linkers to increase its movement freedom, which resulted in fluorescent protein able to assemble fluorescent VLPs. These results expand the toolbox for VLP decoration as well as for the construction of new nanobiomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Anaemia and fever in Kidney transplant. The role of human parvovirus B19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodis López, Yanet; Santana Estupiñán, Raquel; Marrero Robayna, Silvia; Gallego Samper, Roberto; Henríquez Palop, Fernando; Rivero Vera, José Carlos; Camacho Galán, Rafael; Pena López, María José; Sablón González, Nery; González Cabrera, Fayna; Oliva Dámaso, Elena; Vega Díaz, Nicanor; Rodríguez Pérez, José Carlos

    Infections remain an issue of particular relevance in renal transplant patients, particularly viral infections. Human parvovirus B19 infection causes severe refractory anaemia, pancytopenia and thrombotic microangiopathy. Its presence is recognized by analysing blood polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by the discovery of typical giant proerythroblasts in the bone marrow. We report the case of a 65 year-old man with a history of deceased donor renal transplant in September 2014. At 38 days after the transplant, the patient presented progressive anaemia that was resistant to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. At 64 days after transplant, hyperthermia occurred with progressive deterioration of the patient's general condition. The viral serology and the first blood PCR for human parvovirus B19 were both negative. At 4 months and 19 days after, a bone marrow biopsy was conducted, showing giant erythroblasts with nuclear viral inclusions that were compatible with parvovirus; a PCR in the tissue confirmed the diagnosis. A second blood PCR was positive for parvovirus. After treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and the temporary discontinuation of mycophenolate mofetil, a complete remission of the disease occurred, although the blood PCR for parvovirus B19 remained positive, so monitoring is necessary for future likely recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Rifalazil and other benzoxazinorifamycins in the treatment of chlamydia-based persistent infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, David M; van Duzer, John; Sternlicht, Andrew; Gilman, Steven C

    2007-10-01

    Rifalazil is a benzoxazinorifamycin which inhibits bacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The benzoxazine ring endows benzoxazinorifamycins with unique physical and chemical characteristics which favor the use of rifalazil and derivatives in treating diseases caused by the obligate intracellular pathogens of the genus chlamydia. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of benzoxazinorifamycins against chlamydia are in the pg/mL range. These compounds have potential as monotherapeutic agents to treat chlamydia-associated disease because they retain activity against chlamydia strains resistant to currently approved rifamycins such as rifampin. A pivotal clinical trial with rifalazil has been initiated for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. The rationale for this innovative use of rifalazil, including the association of C. pneumoniae in atherosclerotic plaque formation, as well as rifalazil's potency and efficacy against chlamydia in both preclinical and clinical studies, is discussed. Other benzoxazino derivatives may have utility as stand-alone topical antibacterials or combination antibacterials to treat serious Gram-positive infections. None of the benzoxazinorifamycins examined to date induce the cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme. This is in contrast to currently approved rifamycins which are strong inducers of P450 enzymes, resulting in drug-drug interactions that limit the clinical utility of this drug class.

  13. Chlamydia sequelae cost estimates used in current economic evaluations: does one-size-fit-all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Koh Jun; Soldan, Kate; Jit, Mark; Dunbar, J Kevin; Woodhall, Sarah C

    2017-02-01

    Current evidence suggests that chlamydia screening programmes can be cost-effective, conditional on assumptions within mathematical models. We explored differences in cost estimates used in published economic evaluations of chlamydia screening from seven countries (four papers each from UK and the Netherlands, two each from Sweden and Australia, and one each from Ireland, Canada and Denmark). From these studies, we extracted management cost estimates for seven major chlamydia sequelae. In order to compare the influence of different sequelae considered in each paper and their corresponding management costs on the total cost per case of untreated chlamydia, we applied reported unit sequelae management costs considered in each paper to a set of untreated infection to sequela progression probabilities. All costs were adjusted to 2013/2014 Great British Pound (GBP) values. Sequelae management costs ranged from £171 to £3635 (pelvic inflammatory disease); £953 to £3615 (ectopic pregnancy); £546 to £6752 (tubal factor infertility); £159 to £3341 (chronic pelvic pain); £22 to £1008 (epididymitis); £11 to £1459 (neonatal conjunctivitis) and £433 to £3992 (neonatal pneumonia). Total cost of sequelae per case of untreated chlamydia ranged from £37 to £412. There was substantial variation in cost per case of chlamydia sequelae used in published chlamydia screening economic evaluations, which likely arose from different assumptions about disease management pathways and the country perspectives taken. In light of this, when interpreting these studies, the reader should be satisfied that the cost estimates used sufficiently reflect the perspective taken and current disease management for their respective context. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. How Is Pneumonia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following types of bacteria, it is called atypical pneumonia. Legionella pneumophila. This type of pneumonia sometimes is ... ventilator machine to help them breathe get pneumonia. Atypical pneumonia . Atypical pneumonia is a type of CAP. It ...

  15. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following types of bacteria, it is called atypical pneumonia. Legionella pneumophila. This type of pneumonia sometimes is ... ventilator machine to help them breathe get pneumonia. Atypical pneumonia . Atypical pneumonia is a type of CAP. It ...

  16. What Is Walking Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pneumonia: What does it mean? What is walking pneumonia? How is it different from regular pneumonia? Answers from Eric J. Olson, M.D. Walking pneumonia is an informal term for pneumonia that isn' ...

  17. Acute pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown, that in the detailed study of various types of acute pneumonia s the roentgenologic method plays a great role. The most characteristic roentge nological signs of primary (bacterial, viral, rickettsial, parasitogenic and fun gous) and secondary pneumonias (in the case of lessions in lesser circulation, changes in bronchi, aspirational and other diseases of organism) are presented

  18. Atypical Pneumonia - Screening in a Tertiary Care Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorairaj, Aruna; Kopula, Sridharan Sathyamoorthy; Kumar, Kennedy

    2015-11-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading infectious causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Atypical respiratory pathogens account for 30 - 40% of these infections. The three most important atypical pathogens are Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila. To screen for atypical pathogens as cause for community acquired pneumonia. A cross-sectional study was done with 107 patients who had clinical suspicion of atypical pneumonia. The presence of atypical pathogens Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila were screened from the patient's sample. Respiratory samples in the form of sputum, Broncheoalveolar lavage and Non- Broncheoalveolar lavage were used for cultivation of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila. Urine specimen was used for the detection of Legionella antigen. Serum samples were used for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae IgM and Chlamydophila pneumoniae IgM antibodies. Among the 107 samples screened, 13(12.1%) were positive for antibodies against atypical pathogens. Out of which 7(6.5%) had IgM antibodies against Mycoplasma pneumoniae and the rest 6(5.6%) had Chlamydophila pneumoniae IgM antibodies. All the samples were culture negative for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila. Urinary antigen detection for Legionella pneumophila was also negative in patients. Atypical pathogens should also be considered routinely as a cause of lower respiratory tract infections, especially Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in our country. Serological diagnosis by ELISA can be adopted for determining the infections by atypical pathogens as cultivation is difficult and also requires special media and prolonged incubation. This may not be feasible for many laboratories. Early diagnosis and treatment will reduce the complications.

  19. Incidence of parvovirus B 19 infection. among an unselected population of pregnant women in the Netherlands : A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gessel, Peter H.; Gaytant, Michael A.; Vossen, Ann C. T. M.; Galama, Joep M. D.; Ursem, Nicolette T. C.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Wildschut, Hajo I. J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate seroprevalence of anti-parvovirus B19 IgG immunoglobulins and the rate of seroconversion in seronegative pregnant women. Design: Prospective assessment of anti-parvovirus B19 IgG immunoglobulins in an unselected population of pregnant women booked for antenatal care from 1998

  20. Incidence of parvovirus B19 infection among an unselected population of pregnant women in the Netherlands: A prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gessel, P.H. van; Gaytant, M.A.; Vossen, A.C.; Galama, J.M.D.; Ursem, N.T.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Wildschut, H.I.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate seroprevalence of anti-parvovirus B19 IgG immunoglobulins and the rate of seroconversion in seronegative pregnant women. DESIGN: Prospective assessment of anti-parvovirus B19 IgG immunoglobulins in an unselected population of pregnant women booked for antenatal care from 1998

  1. Human parvovirus B19 DNA is not detected in Guthrie cards from children who have developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Priftakis, Peter; Broliden, Kristina

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been much speculation about the cause of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). It has been suggested, on the basis of findings in epidemiological studies, that ALL may be initiated by an in utero infection of the fetus. The human parvovirus B19 (B19) is etiologically...

  2. Fastidious intracellular bacteria as causal agents of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoth, Frédéric; Greub, Gilbert

    2010-07-01

    Intracellular bacteria are common causes of community-acquired pneumonia that grow poorly or not at all on standard culture media and do not respond to beta-lactam antibiotic therapy. Apart from well-established agents of pneumonia such as Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci and Coxiella burnetii, some new emerging pathogens have recently been recognized, mainly Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Simkania negevensis, two Chlamydia-related bacteria. Most of them are causes of benign and self-limited infections. However, they may cause severe pneumonia in some cases (i.e., Legionnaires' disease) and they may cause outbreaks representing a public health problem deserving prompt recognition and appropriate therapy. Although extrapulmonary manifestations are often present, no clinical features allow them to be distinguished from classical bacterial agents of pneumonia such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus, specific molecular diagnostic tools are very helpful for early recognition of the offending bacteria, whereas serology often only allows retrospective or late diagnosis. Macrolides remain the best empirical treatment of intracellular respiratory pathogens, although some observational studies suggest that quinolones may be superior for the treatment of legionellosis.

  3. The presence of enterovirus, adenovirus, and parvovirus B19 in myocardial tissue samples from autopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Hansen, Jakob; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2014-01-01

    of adenovirus, enterovirus, and parvovirus B19 (PVB) in myocardial autopsy samples from myocarditis related deaths and in non-inflamed control hearts in an effort to clarify their significance as the causes of myocarditis in a forensic material. METHODS: We collected all autopsy cases diagnosed with myocarditis...... of myocarditis. The detection of PVB in myocardial autopsy samples most likely represents a persistent infection with no or limited association with myocardial inflammation. The forensic investigation of myocardial inflammation demands a thorough examination, including special attention to non-viral causes...

  4. Severe anemia due to parvovirus B19 in a silver haired boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency disorder in which the affected children present with characteristic silvery-white hairs. The hair microscopy of these children is characteristic and is helpful in differentiating GS from Chediak-Higashi syndrome which also presents with immunodeficiency and silver hairs. We report a 17-month-old boy with GS type 2 who presented with severe anemia. Bone marrow examination of the child suggested parvovirus B19 as the cause of severe anemia, which was later confirmed by DNA polymerase chain reaction.

  5. Chlamydia Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/chlamydiatest.html Chlamydia Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Chlamydia Test? Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually ...

  6. Multi Locus Sequence Typing of Chlamydia Reveals an Association between Chlamydia psittaci Genotypes and Host Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pannekoek, Y.; Dickx, V.; Beeckman, D.S.A.; Jolley, K.A.; Keijzers, W.C.; Vretou, E.; Maiden, M.C.J.; Vanrompay, D.; van den Ende, A.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydia comprises a group of obligate intracellular bacterial parasites responsible for a variety of diseases in humans and animals, including several zoonoses. Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases such as trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity.

  7. Novel B19-like parvovirus in the brain of a harbor seal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier Bodewes

    Full Text Available Using random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel parvovirus was detected in the brain of a young harbor seal (Phoca vitulina with chronic non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis that was rehabilitated at the Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC in the Netherlands. In addition, two novel viruses belonging to the family Anelloviridae were detected in the lungs of this animal. Phylogenetic analysis of the coding sequence of the novel parvovirus, tentatively called Seal parvovirus, indicated that this virus belonged to the genus Erythrovirus, to which human parvovirus B19 also belongs. Although no other seals with similar signs were rehabilitated in SRRC in recent years, a prevalence study of tissues of seals from the same area collected in the period 2008-2012 indicated that the Seal parvovirus has circulated in the harbor seal population at least since 2008. The presence of the Seal parvovirus in the brain was confirmed by real-time PCR and in vitro replication. Using in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus was present in the Virchow-Robin space and in cerebral parenchyma adjacent to the meninges. These findings showed that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus can be involved in central nervous system infection and inflammation, as has also been suspected but not proven for human parvovirus B19 infection.

  8. Novel B19-like parvovirus in the brain of a harbor seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewes, Rogier; Rubio García, Ana; Wiersma, Lidewij C M; Getu, Sarah; Beukers, Martijn; Schapendonk, Claudia M E; van Run, Peter R W A; van de Bildt, Marco W G; Poen, Marjolein J; Osinga, Nynke; Sánchez Contreras, Guillermo J; Kuiken, Thijs; Smits, Saskia L; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2013-01-01

    Using random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel parvovirus was detected in the brain of a young harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) with chronic non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis that was rehabilitated at the Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC) in the Netherlands. In addition, two novel viruses belonging to the family Anelloviridae were detected in the lungs of this animal. Phylogenetic analysis of the coding sequence of the novel parvovirus, tentatively called Seal parvovirus, indicated that this virus belonged to the genus Erythrovirus, to which human parvovirus B19 also belongs. Although no other seals with similar signs were rehabilitated in SRRC in recent years, a prevalence study of tissues of seals from the same area collected in the period 2008-2012 indicated that the Seal parvovirus has circulated in the harbor seal population at least since 2008. The presence of the Seal parvovirus in the brain was confirmed by real-time PCR and in vitro replication. Using in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus was present in the Virchow-Robin space and in cerebral parenchyma adjacent to the meninges. These findings showed that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus can be involved in central nervous system infection and inflammation, as has also been suspected but not proven for human parvovirus B19 infection.

  9. Parvovirus B19: recent insights and implications for pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Gallinella

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Parvovirus B19 is a human pathogenic virus, a ssDNA member of the family Parvoviridae, characterized by a selective tropism for erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs in the bone marrow and an ample pathogenetic potential. The selective tropism for EPCs can be explained both in terms of receptor-mediated tropism and of an intracellular permissive environment conditioned by the cell differentiation and proliferation stage. Infection of EPCs is productive, induces apoptosis and leads to a temporary arrest of erythropoiesis, which can usually be manifest in cases of underlying erythropoietic disorders or immune system deficiencies. Endothelial cells constitute an additional diffuse target, whose infection is mediated by ADE phenomenon, but is normally nonproductive and mainly leading to inflammatory processes. The relevance of parvovirus as a cardiotropic virus is recently emerging, while its capability of intrauterine transmission and consequences on the fetus is known and should not be overlooked. To the purpose of diagnosis, a combination of molecular and immunological methods offers the best discrimination of active infectious processes, and an application of these methods especially in cases of atypical presentations should be encouraged. Ongoing research is directed towards the development of a vaccine and the discovery of antiviral drugs that may be useful in the prevention and treatment of parvovirus B19 infections.

  10. Estimating the risk of parvovirus B19 infection in blood donors and pregnant women in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabae, Koji; Satoh, Hiroshi; Nishiura, Hiroshi; Tanaka-Taya, Keiko; Okabe, Nobuhiko; Oishi, Kazunori; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Seroepidemiological study of parvovirus B19 has not taken place for some 20 years in Japan. To estimate the risk of parvovirus B19 infection in Japan among blood donors and pregnant women in this century, a seroepidemiological survey and statistical modeling of the force of infection were conducted. The time- and age-specific seroprevalence data were suggestive of strong age-dependency in the risk of infection. Employing a piecewise constant model, the highest forces of infection of 0.05 and 0.12 per year were observed among those aged 0-4 and 5-9 years, respectively, while estimates among older individuals were less than 0.01 per year. Analyzing the antigen detection data among blood donors, the age-specific proportion positive was highest among those aged 30-39 years, agreeing with the presence of dip in seroprevalence in this age-group. Among pregnant women, up to 107 fetal deaths and 21 hydrops fetalis were estimated to have occurred annually across Japan. Seroepidemiological profiles of PVB19 infection in Japan was characterized with particular emphasis on the risk of infection in blood donors and the burden of infection among pregnant women. When a vaccine becomes available in the future, a similar seroepidemiological study is expected to play a key role in planning the appropriate immunization policy.

  11. Phosphorylated STAT5 directly facilitates parvovirus B19 DNA replication in human erythroid progenitors through interaction with the MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaie, Safder S; Zou, Wei; Xu, Peng; Deng, Xuefeng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Qiu, Jianming

    2017-05-01

    Productive infection of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) exhibits high tropism for burst forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) and colony forming unit erythroid (CFU-E) progenitor cells in human bone marrow and fetal liver. This exclusive restriction of the virus replication to human erythroid progenitor cells is partly due to the intracellular factors that are essential for viral DNA replication, including erythropoietin signaling. Efficient B19V replication also requires hypoxic conditions, which upregulate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathway, and phosphorylated STAT5 is essential for virus replication. In this study, our results revealed direct involvement of STAT5 in B19V DNA replication. Consensus STAT5-binding elements were identified adjacent to the NS1-binding element within the minimal origins of viral DNA replication in the B19V genome. Phosphorylated STAT5 specifically interacted with viral DNA replication origins both in vivo and in vitro, and was actively recruited within the viral DNA replication centers. Notably, STAT5 interacted with minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, suggesting that STAT5 directly facilitates viral DNA replication by recruiting the helicase complex of the cellular DNA replication machinery to viral DNA replication centers. The FDA-approved drug pimozide dephosphorylates STAT5, and it inhibited B19V replication in ex vivo expanded human erythroid progenitors. Our results demonstrated that pimozide could be a promising antiviral drug for treatment of B19V-related diseases.

  12. Screening on urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busse, Reinhard

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Around 92 million urogenital infections are caused yearly by Chlamydia trachomatis worldwide [1]. The overall incidence of sexually transmitted diseases is increasing, as shown by the increases in the number of reported cases of syphilis and gonorrhea [2]. Chlamydia trachomatis infections are associated with various serious diseases in women, men and newborns, which could be, at least partially, avoided by means of early diagnosis and therapy. The Federal Joint Committee - responsible for decision-making concerning the benefit package of the German Social Health Insurance - has publicly announced the starting of deliberations on the issue of screening for Chlamydia trachomatis. Research Questions: The leading question to be answered is whether screening for Chlamydia trachomatis should be included in the German benefit basket. The aim of this report is to provide a summary of the available evidence concerning the issue of screening for Chlamydia trachomatis. Methods: The summary of published scientific evidence, including HTA reports, systematic reviews, guidelines and primary research is represented. The synthesis follows the structure given by the criteria of Wilson and Jungner [3] for the introduction of screening in a population: relevance of the condition, availability of an adequate test, effectiveness of screening, acceptance of the programme, and economical issues. A literature search was conducted for each aspect of the synthesis and the evidence has been summarised in evidence tables. Results: We identified five HTA reports from three European agencies [4], [5], [6], [7] and one from the USA [8]. In addition, we identified four guidelines from Northamerica [9], [10], [11], [12] and one from Europe [13]. A total of 56 primary research publications were included: relevance of the disease (n=26, availability of test (n=1, effectiveness of screening (n=11, acceptance of the programme (n=11, economical issues (n=7. Discussion

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis infections in neonates and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darville, Toni

    2005-10-01

    In 1911, Lindner and colleagues identified intracytoplasmic inclusions in infants with a nongonococcal form of ophthalmia neonatorum called inclusion conjunctivitis of the newborn (ICN). Mothers of affected infants were found to have inclusions in their cervical epithelial cells, fathers of such infants had inclusions in their urethral cells, and the epidemiology of sexually transmitted chlamydial infections was revealed. Fifty years later, chlamydial isolation procedures were developed, and studies again demonstrated Chlamydia trachomatis as an etiology of ICN and the female birth canal as the reservoir. In the late 1970s, a report by Beem and Saxon described respiratory tract colonization and a distinct pneumonia syndrome in infected infants. Genital chlamydial infection is recognized as the world's most common sexually transmitted disease, with estimates of greater than 4 million new infections occurring annually in the United States. Although most C. trachomatis infections in men and women are asymptomatic, infection can lead to severe reproductive complications in women. The high prevalence in women of child-bearing age results in exposure of an estimated 100,000 neonates in the United States annually. Many of these infants develop conjunctivitis, pneumonia, or both in the first few months of life. Clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and approaches to prevention of conjunctivitis and pneumonia in the newborn and young infant are reviewed here. Appropriate testing for chlamydial infection in a pediatric victim of sexual assault and the implications of identifying C. trachomatis in suspected cases of childhood sexual abuse also are reviewed.

  14. Chlamydia control in Europe: literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Low, N; S, Redmond; Alexander, K

    Executive summary The literature reviews in this report bring together published evidence about the prevalence and reproductive tract complications of chlamydia infection, and about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of chlamydia screening interventions. Population prevalence of chlamydia...... prevalence. Estimates of chlamydia positivity in surveys with low response rates should not be interpreted as estimates of population prevalence. Only two population-based surveys in EU/EEA Member States in this review had a response rate of >70%. The highest response rates were seen when specimens...

  15. What Is Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Pneumonia Pneumonia Also known as Pneumonia is a bacterial, viral, ... t last as long Fewer serious complications Pneumococcal pneumonia vaccines Two vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal ...

  16. Serological and Molecular Biological Studies of Parvovirus B19, Coxsackie B Viruses, and Adenoviruses as Potential Cardiotropic Viruses in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova Stefka Kr.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inflammatory diseases of the heart (myocarditis, pericarditis are commonly caused by viruses. Among the human cardiotropic viruses, parvovirus B19, Coxsackie B viruses, and adenoviruses play a leading role.

  17. Aseptic arthritis due to parvovirus B19 infection immediately after kidney and pancreas transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoaneta A. Markova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 (PVB19 has been frequently identified as a cause of anemia in immunocompromised transplanted patients. Rarely the infection correlates with deterioration of the graft function. Immunomodulatory therapy in PVB19 cases, still not standardised in dose and duration, has been proven to achieve good clinical results. The clinical presentation depends mainly on the immunological status of the patient. Here we report an atypical presentation of an acute PVB19 infection in the immediate postoperative phase after transplantation and aim to raise the recognition of PVB19 as a significant human pathogen in the early post-transplantation period. Additionally, we provide a literature review of clinical presentation and management of recently published cases.

  18. [Ballantyne syndrome caused by materno-fetal Parvovirus B19 infection: about two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvignes, F; Bourdel, N; Laurichesse-Delmas, H; Savary, D; Gallot, D

    2011-05-01

    Ballantyne's syndrome also known as Mirror syndrome is the association of fetal hydrops and maternal hydric retention. The maternal condition is often misdiagnosed as preeclampsia. We report two cases of Ballantyne syndrome associated with materno-fetal Parvovirus B19 infection. In the first case, the syndrome occurred at 26GW in a context of premature rupture of membranes. Parents and medical staff opted for termination of pregnancy because of the poor fetal prognosis. Maternal symptoms regressed after delivery. In the second case, the patient presented a Ballantyne's syndrome at 25GW. Intrauterine transfusions reversed symptomatology. Fetal hydrops of any etiology can be associated with this syndrome. Specific treatment of the fetus can avoid maternal complication allowing continuation of the pregnancy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of age on the clinical differentiation of atypical pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Akaike, Hiroto; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Hayashi, Toshikiyo; Kurihara, Takeyuki; Okimoto, Niro

    2012-10-01

    The Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) scoring system is a useful tool for the early and simple presumptive diagnosis of atypical pneumonia (Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonia). However, it has been suggested that it is difficult to diagnose atypical pneumonia in the elderly using this system. In the present study, we evaluated the accuracy and usefulness of the JRS scoring system for diagnosing atypical pneumonia in different age groups. Cases of M. pneumoniae (n = 262), C. pneumoniae (n = 98) and common bacterial pneumonia (n = 364) were analysed. For both atypical pneumonias, the frequency of comorbid illnesses and being in a higher risk category were significantly greater in elderly (age ≥60 years) than in non-elderly patients (age atypical pneumonia were 39% and 88%, respectively, in the elderly group, and 86% and 88%, respectively, in the non-elderly group. When the patients were stratified into 10-year age groups, the diagnostic sensitivity was highest in the 18- to 29-year age group and decreased from the youngest to the oldest age group. These results indicate that it is difficult to distinguish between atypical pneumonia and bacterial pneumonia in the elderly using the JRS scoring system. When treating patients aged ≥60 years, physicians should use fluoroquinolones or β-lactam antibiotics + macrolides as empirical first-choice drugs so as to always provide antibiotic protection against potential atypical pathogens. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. Seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 antibodies and evidence of viremia among Nigerian patients with sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwalokun, Bamidele Abiodun; Iwalokun, Senapon Olusola; Hodonu, Semande Olufunmilayo

    2013-01-01

    Clinical, biochemical and molecular evidence for the sickle cell anemia (SCA) crisis in Nigerian patients arising from parvovirus b19 infection remains inadequate. This study determined the prevalence and correlates of anti-parvovirus b19 antibodies in a population of SCA patients and non-SCA healthy controls in Lagos, Nigeria. In this prospective cross-sectional study, we enrolled 73 confirmed SCA patients from 5 district hospitals in Lagos and 81 sex and age-matched non-SCA healthy controls. Serum sample from each study participant was screened for anti-parvovirus b19 by ELISA and PCR techniques. Standard biomedical assays were also done. Anti-parvovirus b19 IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in 22 (14.3%) and 97 (62.9%) of the 154 sera screened, 13 (17.8%) and 45 (61.6%) in SCA patients; 9 (11.1%) and 52 (64.2%) in non-SCA controls. The overall seronegativity rate was 19.5%. Parvovirus B19 DNA was found in 2 (11.1%) of the 18 IgM seropositive SCA serum samples screened. On the whole, parvovirus b19 infection was more commonly asymptomatic in non-SCA controls but caused significant elevation in liver enzymes in infected SCA patients (P parvovirus b19 infection increased 65 times during unsteady state among the SCA patients. Although no deaths of infected patients were recorded during the study, age below 12 years, hospitalization and overcrowded environment were risk factors for infection. We conclude that parvovirus b19 is common in SCA patients, incurring greater susceptibility to infections. PMID:23885266

  1. Adverse reproductive outcome induced by Parvovirus B19 and TORCH infections in women with high-risk pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Janak; Misra, Richa; Paisal, Abhiruchi; Pradeep, Yashodhra

    2011-12-13

    The frequency of fetopathogenic viruses and Toxoplasma gondii infections in the TORCH group (Toxoplasma gondii, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus) together with Parvovirus B19 (B19) in pregnant women with bad obstetric history (BOH) and/or concurrent pregnancy complications was investigated. Sixty women (20-35 years) with BOH and/or antecedent pregnancy complications were studied. Twenty-nine healthy pregnant women matched for age, parity and gestational age served as controls. Sera were analyzed for IgM antibodies for B19 and TORCH agents by ELISA. Cord blood and 33 placental tissues from six malformed newborns were tested for B19 DNA by PCR. Out of 60 high-risk pregnant women, 47 (78%) had BOH while 23 (38.3%) had underlying complications including polyhydramnios (n=10), oligohydramnios (n=6) and intrauterine growth restriction (n=7). Adverse outcomes occurred in 36 (60%) high-risk cases.  All 16 cases with polyhydramnios/oligohydramnios resulted in preterm stillbirths while the remaining 20 cases resulted in seven abortions, six newborns with congenital malformations, four full-term stillbirths and three cases of non-immune hydrops fetalis (NIHF). IgM positivity to T. gondii, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus and B19 virus was 8.3%, 15%, 30%, 3.3% and 13.6% respectively. B19 infection caused NIHF in three cases and cardiac anomaly in one. All placental tissues and cord blood were negative for B19 DNA. None of the controls had IgM antibodies to any pathogen. Women with BOH and/or pregnancy complications had a high frequency of TORCH and parvovirus B19 infections causing fetal wastage, IUGR, NIHF and congenital malformations.

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis in hydrocele fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, G; Mohanty, S; Pani, S P; Panda, S K

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis in hydrocele fluid. METHODS: 90 male patients with hydrocele of tunica vaginalis from an endemic area for bancroftian filariasis were investigated for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis in their hydrocele fluids. C trachomatis antigen detection tests-a direct immunofluorescence assay and an enzyme immunoassay along with polymerase chain reaction assay for amplification of a 517 bp fragment of C trachomatis endogenous plasmid-were used in this study. The patients were also tested for the presence of microfilaria in their hydrocele fluids and night blood. Histopathological examination was carried out to detect adult filarial worm in tunica vaginalis testes. RESULTS: Eight (8.88%) patients had chlamydia antigen in the hydrocele fluids; C trachomatis plasmid sequences could be amplified from five of these. Seven (7.77%) patients had microfilaria in the hydrocele fluids, three of them having adult worm in tunica vaginalis. CONCLUSION: C trachomatis infection might be associated with hydrocele in some of these patients. PMID:9582470

  3. Effects of atypical pneumonia agents on progression of atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriz, Erkan; Cirak, Meltem Yalinay; Engin, Evren Doruk; Zor, Mustafa Hakan; Erer, Dilek; Imren, Yildirim; Turet, Sevgi; Halit, Velit

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of various atypical pneumonia agents (Chlamydia pneumoniae, cytomegalovirus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae), which are considered to have a role in the ethiopathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in aortic biopsies without macroscopically visible plaque and in internal thoracic artery biopsies. Thirty-three patients (group 1), who had undergone coronary bypass operation and 10 non-atherosclerotic patients (group 2), were included in the study. Seventy-six tissue biopsies were taken. Biopsies from the patients in group 1 a were obtained from the atheroma plaque-free aortic tissue and 33 biopsies (group Ib) were obtained from their internal thoracic arteries. Following DNA extraction, nested PCR was used to detect Chlamydia pneumoniae DNA, and real time PCR was used to detect cytomegalovirus and Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA. Blood parameters (lipid profile, CRP, fibrinogen) of the patients and operation characteristics were recorded. Chlamydia pneumoniae DNA was detected in 5 of 33 biopsy samples from coronary bypass patients, whereas none of the control patients (group 1b and group 2) were positive for this agent (P = 0.001). Neither CMV nor Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected in IMA and aortic biopsies of both bypass and control patients. Elevated total cholesterol levels (P = 0.02) and positive CRP (P = 0.001) was found in C. pneumoniae positive patients. Prevalence of acute coronary syndrome was significantly higher in C. pneumoniae detected patients compared (P = 0.00 1). Detection of C. pneumoniae DNA in the atheroma free aortic biopsies might indicate that this micro-organism intervened in the progression of atheroma plaque. There was a strong relationship between the detection of this micro-organism in the aortic wall and acute coronary syndrome. The absence of DNA of the corresponding micro-organisms in the IMA wall may show its resistance to infective agents and in turn to atherosclerosis, which is a result of the

  4. Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Kumaraguruparan; Balasubramanian, Sowmya; Manickam, Krishnan; Pandranki, Lavanya; Taylor, Alexander B; Hart, P John; Baseman, Joel B; Kannan, T R

    2018-01-23

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an atypical bacterium that causes respiratory illnesses in humans, including pharyngitis, tracheobronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). It has also been directly linked to reactive airway disease, asthma, and extrapulmonary pathologies. During its colonization, M. pneumoniae expresses a unique ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating cytotoxin designated c ommunity- a cquired r espiratory d istress s yndrome (CARDS) toxin. CARDS toxin persists and localizes in the airway in CAP patients, asthmatics, and trauma patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia. Although CARDS toxin binds to specific cellular receptors, is internalized, and induces hyperinflammation, histopathology, mucus hyperplasia, and other airway injury, the intracellular trafficking of CARDS toxin remains unclear. Here, we show that CARDS toxin translocates through early and late endosomes and the Golgi complex and concentrates at the perinuclear region to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Using ER-targeted SNAP-tag, we confirmed the association of CARDS toxin with the ER and determined that CARDS toxin follows the retrograde pathway. In addition, we identified a novel CARDS toxin amino acid fingerprint, KELED, that is required for toxin transport to the ER and subsequent toxin-mediated cytotoxicity. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasma pneumoniae , a leading cause of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among children and adults in the United States, synthesizes a 591-amino-acid ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating protein, designated c ommunity- a cquired r espiratory d istress s yndrome (CARDS) toxin. CARDS toxin alone is sufficient to induce and mimic major inflammatory and histopathological phenotypes associated with M. pneumoniae infection in rodents and primates. In order to elicit its ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating activities, CARDS toxin must bind to host cell receptors, be internalized via clathrin-mediated pathways, and subsequently be transported to specific

  5. Chlamydia trachomatis in non-specific urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terho, P

    1978-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from 58.5% of 159 patients with non-specific urethritis (NSU) using irradiated McCoy cell cultures. Patients with persistent Chlamydia-positive NSU remained Chlamydia-positive each time they were examined before treatment and patients with Chlamydia-negative NSU remained Chlamydia-negative during the course of the illness. Neither the duration of symptoms of urethritis nor a history of previous urethritis affected the chlamydial isolation rate significantly. Of 40 patients with severe discharge 30 (75%) harboured C. trachomatis. One-third of the Chlamydia-positive patients had a severe urethral discharge, while this was present in only 15% of Chlamydia-negative patients. Complications--such as conjunctivitis, arthritis, and epididymitis--were more severe in men with Chlamdia-positive NSU than in those with Chlamydia-negative NSU. Of 64 men matched for sexual promiscuity but without urethritis, none harboured C. trachomatis in his urethra. This differs significantly (P less than 0.001) when compared with patients with NSU. C. trachomatis was isolated from the urogenital tract in 24 (42%) out of 57 female sexual contacts of patients with NSU. The presence of C. trachomatis in the women correlated significantly (P less than 0.001) with the isolation of the agent from their male contacts. These findings give further evidence for the aetiological role of C. trachomatis in non-specific urethritis and its sexual transmission. PMID:678958

  6. prevalence of genital chlamydia and gonococcal infec

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonor- rhoeae, at-risk women, Kumasi metropolis. INTRODUCTION. Chlamydia trachomatis is a small obligate intracellular bacterium transmitted by sexual intercourse. It is a cause of endocervicitis and also pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women.1,2,3 Chlamydial infection ...

  7. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection among Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection was investigated among 100 women attending infertility clinics and compared with another subset of 100 pregnant women who served as control. Chlamydia trachomatis antigen detection cassette supplied by Biomil Diagnostics was used to detect the presence of ...

  8. Genital chlamydia trachomatis infection among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection is a common bacterial sexually transmitted infection worldwide. There is little information about this infection in Nigeria. This study determined the prevalence of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection among female undergraduates of University of Port Harcourt and ...

  9. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infections in symptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-11

    Jul 11, 2011 ... application of direct immunofluorescence in the diagnostics of. Chlamydia trachomatis in the East Bohemian Region of Czech. Republic during 1997-2003. Ceska Gynekol. 70:128-33. Gerris H (2005). Molecular diagnostic methods for the Detection of. Neisseria gonorrheae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Rev ...

  10. Detection of Chlamydia in postmortal formalin-fixed tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, A G; Banner, Jytte; Birkelund, Svend

    1989-01-01

    A procedure to detect Chlamydia in postmortal formalin-fixed tissue is described. Monoclonal antibodies against a genus specific chlamydia epitope were used in immunofluorescence to detect chlamydia inclusions in formalin-fixed tissue sections. Lung sections from chlamydia-infected mice were exam...

  11. [Evaluation of the virus-elimination efficacy of nanofiltration (Viresolve NFP) for the parvovirus B19 and hepatitis A virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Deok Ja; Lee, Yoo La; Kang, Jae Won; Kwon, So Yong; Cho, Nam Sun; Kim, In Seop

    2010-02-01

    The safety of plasma derivatives has been reinforced since 1980s by variable pathogen inactivation or elimination techniques. Nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) for the source plasma has also been implemented worldwide. Recently nanofiltration has been used in some country for ensuring safety of plasma derivatives to eliminate non-enveloped viruses such as parvovirus B19 (B19V) and hepatitis A virus (HAV). We evaluated the efficacy of nanofiltration for the elimination of B19V and HAV. To verify the efficacy of nanofiltration, we adopted a 20 nm Viresolve NFP (Millipore, USA) in the scaling down (1:1,370) model of the antithrombin III production. As virus stock solutions, we used B19V reactive plasma and porcine parvovirus (PPV) and HAV obtained from cell culture. And 50% tissue culture infectious dose was consumed as infectious dose. The methods used to evaluate the virus-elimination efficacy were reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for B19V and the cytopathic effect calculation after filtration for PPV and HAV. B19V was not detected by RT-PCR in the filtered antithrombin III solutions with initial viral load of 6.42 x 10(5) IU/mL and 1.42 x 10(5) IU/mL before filtration. The virus-elimination efficacy of nanofiltration for PPV and HAV were > or = (3.32) and > or = (3.31), respectively. Nanofiltration would be an effective method for the elimination of B19V and HAV. It may be used as a substitute for NAT screening of these viruses in source plasma to ensure safety of plasma derivatives in Korea.

  12. Identification of Phylogenetic Position in the Chlamydiaceae Family for Chlamydia Strains Released from Monkeys and Humans with Chlamydial Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Karaulov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of the comparative analysis concerning relatedness and evolutional difference of the 16S–23S nucleotide sequences of the middle ribosomal cluster and 23S rRNA I domain, and based on identification of phylogenetic position for Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Chlamydia trichomatis strains released from monkeys, relatedness of the above stated isolates with similar strains released from humans and with strains having nucleotide sequences presented in the GenBank electronic database has been detected for the first time ever. Position of these isolates in the Chlamydiaceae family phylogenetic tree has been identified. The evolutional position of the investigated original Chlamydia and Chlamydophila strains close to analogous strains from the Gen-Bank electronic database has been demonstrated. Differences in the 16S–23S nucleotide sequence of the middle ribosomal cluster and 23S rRNA I domain of plasmid and nonplasmid Chlamydia trachomatis strains released from humans and monkeys relative to different genotype groups (group B-B, Ba, D, Da, E, L1, L2, L2a; intermediate group-F, G, Ga have been revealed for the first time ever. Abnormality in incA chromosomal gene expression resulting in Chlamydia life development cycle disorder, and decrease of Chlamydia virulence can be related to probable changes in the nucleotide sequence of the gene under consideration

  13. Risk of reproductive complications following chlamydia testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Bethan; Turner, Katy M E; Frølund, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncertainty in the risk of reproductive complications (pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and tubal factor infertility) following chlamydia infection and repeat infection hampers the design of evidence-based chlamydia control programmes. We estimate the association between...... diagnosed chlamydia and episodes of hospital health care (inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department) for a reproductive complication. METHODS: We constructed and analysed a retrospective population-based cohort of women aged 15-44 years from administrative records in Denmark (1995-2012). We used...... a subset of the national Danish Chlamydia Study. The master dataset contains all residents of Denmark (including Greenland) who had a positive chlamydia test recorded by a public health microbiology laboratory from Jan 1, 1992, to Nov 2, 2011. Individuals were randomly matched (by age and sex) to four...

  14. Identification and characterization of a novel Chlamydia trachomatis reticulate body protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Allan C; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Roepstorff, Peter

    2002-01-01

    was identified by tandem mass spectrometry. No homology of this protein was observed to proteins from other organisms. The protein was conserved in C. trachomatis but not found in Chlamydia pneumoniae. Using proteomics, we show that the expression of the protein is initiated at the middle of the developmental...... cycle. The protein is rapidly degraded and is only present in reticulate or intermediate bodies, suggesting a possible function in the intracellular stage of C. trachomatis development. We have termed the protein '7-kDa reticulate body protein'.......The genome of the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis comprises 894 genes predicted by computer-based analysis. As part of a large-scale proteome analysis of C. trachomatis, a small abundant protein encoded by a previously unrecognized novel 204-bp open reading frame...

  15. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Sook Youn

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP, the smallest self-replicating biological system, is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections, leading to a wide range of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary manifestations. MP pneumonia has been reported in 10 to 40% of cases of community-acquired pneumonia and shows an even higher proportion during epidemics. MP infection is endemic in larger communities of the world with cyclic epidemics every 3 to 7 years. In Korea, 3 to 4-year cycles have been observed from the mid-1980s to present. Although a variety of serologic assays and polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques are available for the diagnosis of MP infections, early diagnosis of MP pneumonia is limited by the lack of immunoglobulin (Ig M antibodies and variable PCR results in the early stages of the infection. Thus, short-term paired IgM serologic tests may be mandatory for an early and definitive diagnosis. MP infection is usually a mild and self-limiting disease without specific treatment, and if needed, macrolides are generally used as a first-choice drug for children. Recently, macrolide-resistant MP strains have been reported worldwide. However, there are few reports of apparent treatment failure, such as progression of pneumonia to acute respiratory distress syndrome despite macrolide treatment. The immunopathogenesis of MP pneumonia is believed to be a hyperimmune reaction of the host to the insults from MP infection, including cytokine overproduction and immune cell activation (T cells. In this context, immunomodulatory treatment (corticosteroids or/and intravenous Ig, in addition to antibiotic treatment, might be considered for patients with severe infection.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical significance of antimicrobial resistance in. Streptococcus pneumoniae. Michael R Jacobs. Despite increasing resistance in the pneumococcus over the past 30 years, there are few cases of treatment failure of non-meningeal infections with high-dosage parenteral penicillin G, which still remains highly effective for.

  17. Prevent Pneumonia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-06

    CDC’s Matthew Westercamp explains what pneumonia is, its symptoms, and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/6/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Respiratory Diseases Branch (RDB).   Date Released: 8/6/2015.

  18. [Postpartum parvovirus B19-associated acute pure red cell aplasia and hemophagocytic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, H; Shirono, K; Shimizu, K; Shimomura, T

    1995-07-01

    A 30-year-old postpartum woman was admitted to our hospital because of progressive anemia, malaise, night sweating, headache and low grade fever which began 9 days after delivery (day 0). She had normocytic hypochromic anemia accompanied with marked decrease in reticulocytes. In addition, a temporary decrease in platelets and white blood cells especially neutrophils were observed. Bone marrow smears showed an apparent decrease in erythroid cells and the presence of giant proerythroblasts (1.2%) as well as hemophagocytes (1.2%). IgM and IgG antibody against human parvovirus B19 (HPV) was detected on day 22 of the disease although negative results were obtained on day 3. The presence of the virus in the blood on admission was confirmed by dot-blot analysis. Thus, this case was diagnosed as acute pure red cell aplasia and hemophagocytic syndrome caused by HPV infection. This patient had been given iron for iron deficiency anemia before delivery and the iron deficiency was still present after the episode of the present disease although the iron metabolism data was perturbed during the disease. These findings suggest that HPV could cause acute pure red cell aplasia not only in patients with hemolytic anemia but also in patients with iron deficiency anemia or after acute bleeding. Furthermore it is suggested that pancytopenia often observed on HPV infection could be at least partly caused by hemophagocytic syndrome.

  19. [Atypical pathogens in adult patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi-hong; Deng, Rui; Fu, Rong-rong; Li, De-zhi; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yu-sheng; Hu, Cheng-ping; Li, Jia-shu; Wang, Rui-qin; Wei, Li-ping; Zhong, Xiao-ning; Tian, Gui-zhen; Mu, Lan; Wan, Huan-ying; Yu, Qin; He, Pei; Ma, Jian-jun; Gao, Zhan-cheng

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the current status of atypical pathogen associated infections in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults, and their clinical attributes. Clinical data, sputum specimens from acute phase, and paired sera from acute- and convalescent-phases of CAP in 153 adult patients were collected from May 2005 to May 2008 in multiple medical centers. Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) IgG antibody, and Legionella pneumophila (LP) mixed IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies were determined by indirect immuno-fluorescent assay. Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mpn) mixed IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies were determined by passive agglutination assay. All the sputum specimens were routinely cultured for bacterial isolation. Fifty-two (34%) out of the 153 cases were diagnosed as atypical CAP per the paired serum-antibody assay. Forty-seven of the 52 atypical CAP cases were infected by one atypical pathogen, 38 with Cpn, 4 with Mpn, and 5 with LP, while 5 out of the 52 atypical CAP cases were infected by 2 pathogens, Cpn and Mpnin 2, Cpn and LP in 3 cases. Eleven cases (21.2%) out of the 52 patients with atypical pneumonia were complicated with bacterial infection. Except peripheral white blood count was significant increased in the group of typical (bacterial only) pneumonia (WBC > 10 × 10⁹)/L, P = 0.03), all the other clinical parameters did not show statistically significant difference between the typical and the atypical pneumonia groups. Our data suggest that Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are common pathogens of adult CAP. Chlamydia pneumoniae might be the most frequent atypical pathogen associated with atypical CAP.

  20. Increased seroprevalence of IgG-class antibodies against cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, and varicella-zoster virus in women working in child day care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijckevorsel, Gini G. C.; Bovee, Lian P. M. J.; Damen, Marjolein; Sonder, Gerard J. B.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; van den Hoek, Anneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Primary maternal infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), parvovirus B19 (B19V), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) may result in adverse pregnancy outcomes like congenital infection or foetal loss. Women working in child day care have an increased exposure to CMV, B19V, and VZV. By comparing

  1. Acanthamoeba containing endosymbiotic chlamydia isolated from hospital environments and its potential role in inflammatory exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Tatsuya; Matsuo, Junji; Okubo, Torahiko; Nakamura, Shinji; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Oka, Kentaro; Takahashi, Motomichi; Akizawa, Kouji; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Chikara; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-15

    Environmental chlamydiae belonging to the Parachlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacteria that infect Acanthamoeba, a free-living amoeba, and are a risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia. However, whether amoebae harboring environmental chlamydiae actually survive in hospital environments is unknown. We therefore isolated living amoebae with symbiotic chlamydiae from hospital environments. One hundred smear samples were collected from Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Japan; 50 in winter (February to March, 2012) and 50 in summer (August, 2012), and used for the study. Acanthamoebae were isolated from the smear samples, and endosymbiotic chlamydial traits were assessed by infectivity, cytokine induction, and draft genomic analysis. From these, 23 amoebae were enriched on agar plates spread with heat-killed Escherichia coli. Amoeba prevalence was greater in the summer-collected samples (15/30, 50%) than those of the winter season (8/30, 26.7%), possibly indicating a seasonal variation (p = 0.096). Morphological assessment of cysts revealed 21 amoebae (21/23, 91%) to be Acanthamoeba, and cultures in PYG medium were established for 11 of these amoebae. Three amoebae contained environmental chlamydiae; however, only one amoeba (Acanthamoeba T4) with an environmental chlamydia (Protochlamydia W-9) was shown the infectious ability to Acanthamoeba C3 (reference amoebae). While Protochlamydia W-9 could infect C3 amoeba, it failed to replicate in immortal human epithelial, although exposure of HEp-2 cells to living bacteria induced the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-8. Comparative genome analysis with KEGG revealed similar genomic features compared with other Protochlamydia genomes (UWE25 and R18), except for a lack of genes encoding the type IV secretion system. Interestingly, resistance genes associated with several antibiotics and toxic compounds were identified. These findings are the first demonstration of the distribution in a hospital of a living

  2. Serological and Molecular Biological Studies of Parvovirus B19, Coxsackie B Viruses, and Adenoviruses as Potential Cardiotropic Viruses in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Stefka Kr; Angelova, Svetla G; Stoyanova, Asya P; Georgieva, Irina L; Nikolaeva-Glomb, Lubomira K; Mihneva, Zafira G; Korsun, Neli St

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the heart (myocarditis, pericarditis) are commonly caused by viruses. Among the human cardiotropic viruses, parvovirus B19, Coxsackie B viruses, and adenoviruses play a leading role. The aim of the present study was to determine the presumptive causative role of parvovirus B19, Coxsackie B viruses, and adenoviruses in the development of myocarditis, pericarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy by demonstrating the presence of specific antiviral antibodies or viral DNA in patients' serum samples. We tested serum samples collected between 2010 and 2014 from 235 patients with myocarditis (n=108), pericarditis (n=79), myopericarditis (n=19), dilated cardiomyopathy (n=7), and fever of unknown origin accompanied by cardiac complaints (n=22). The mean age of patients with the standard deviation was 33 ± 18 years. Serological and molecular methods (ELISA for specific IgM/IgG antibodies to parvovirus B19 and IgM antibodies to Coxsackie B viruses and adenoviruses, and PCR for detection of parvovirus B19 in serum samples, respectively) were used in the study. Of all tested 235 serum samples, in 60 (25.5%) positive results for at least one of the three tested viruses were detected. Forty out of these 235 serum samples (17%) were Coxsackie B virus IgM positive. They were found in 17% (18/108) of the patients with myocarditis, in 15% (12/79) of those with pericarditis, in 16% (3/19) of those with myopericarditis and in 32% (7/22) in those with fever of unknown origin. The 63 Coxsackie B virus IgM negative patient's serum samples were tested by ELISA for presence of adenovirus IgM antibodies. Such were found in 4 patients with pericarditis and in 2 patients with fever of unknown origin. Every IgM negative sample (n=189) for Coxsackie B and adenovirus was further tested by ELISA for parvovirus B19 IgM/IgG antibodies. B19-IgM antibodies were detected in 14 patients (7.4%). The percentages for B19-IgM antibodies was 8% (7/90), 5% (3/63) and 31% (4/13) in the

  3. On the lattice parameters of the B19' martensite in binary Ti-Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkin, S.D.; Khmelevskaya, I.Yu.; Korotitskij, A.V.; Trubitsyna, I.B.; Brailovskij, V.; Tyurenn, S.

    2003-01-01

    The concentration, temperature and deformation dependences of the B19' martensite lattice parameters (MLP) in the Ti-(47.0-50.7) at. % Ni binary alloys are studied through the X-ray diffractometry. The MLP concentration dependences exist in the behind-the-equiatomic area of the nickel concentrations. It is shown that the MLP temperature dependences are approximately similar for all the studied alloys. The martensite formation from the austenite containing the developed dislocation structure in the Ti-50.0 at. % Ni alloy and from the aged austenite in the Ti-50.7 at. % Ni alloy leads to the MLP change. The MLP change is not linked with the transition from the B2 → B19' transformation scheme to the B2 → R → B19'. The martensite deformation reorientation or its plastic deformation with compression up to 25% does not lead to the MLP change [ru

  4. Possible involvement of miRNAs in tropism of Parvovirus B19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarlou, Azadeh; AkhavanRahnama, Mahshid; Atashi, Amir; Soleimani, Masoud; Arefian, Ehsan; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Human Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) is one of the most important pathogens that targets erythroid lineage. Many factors were mentioned for restriction to erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs). Previous studies showed that in non-permissive cells VP1 and VP2 (structural proteins) mRNAs were detected but could not translate to proteins. A bioinformatics study showed that this inhibition might be due to specific microRNAs (miRNAs) present in non-permissive cells but not in permissive EPCs. To confirm the hypothesis, we evaluated the effect of miRNAs on VP expression. CD34(+) HSCs were separated from cord blood. Then, CD34(+) cells were treated with differentiation medium to obtain CD36(+) EPCs. To evaluate the effect of miRNAs on VP expression in MCF7 and HEK-293 cell lines (non-permissive cells) and CD36(+) EPCs, dual luciferase assay was performed in presence of shRNAs against Dicer and Drosha to disrupt miRNA biogenesis. QRT-PCR was performed to check down-regulation of Dicer and Drosha after transfection. All measurements were done in triplicate. Data means were compared using one-way ANOVAs. MicroRNA prediction was done by the online microRNA prediction tools. No significant difference was shown in luciferase activity of CD36(+) EPCs after co-transfection with shRNAs, while it was significant in non-permissive cells. Our study revealed that miRNAs may be involved in inhibition of VP expression in non-permissive cells, although further studies are required to demonstrate which miRNAs exactly are involved in regulation of PVB19 replication.

  5. Baculovirus expression of erythrovirus V9 capsids and screening by ELISA: serologic cross-reactivity with erythrovirus B19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Erik D; Qvortrup, Klaus; Christensen, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    to categorize V9 as an acute B19-like infection. Sequencing, combined with PCR studies, have since demonstrated the need for specific and differentiated techniques when examining samples for possible B19 or V9 viremia. The antigenic properties of the V9 capsid proteins have not been characterized previously....... To address this question, V9 VP1 and VP2 open reading frames were cloned and expressed in insect cells using a baculovirus vector. Large quantities of purified recombinant V9 capsid protein were produced and electron micrographs revealed self-assembly of V9 VP1/VP2 and VP2 capsids into empty icosahedral...

  6. Marcadores inflamatórios e anticorpos anti-chlamydia em pacientes com síndrome metabólica

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Rosecler Riethmuller; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Repetto, Giuseppe; Piccoli, Jacqueline da Costa Escobar; Wiehe, Mario; Bonato, Cassiane; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Duarte, Thiago

    2010-01-01

    FUNDAMENTO: A síndrome metabólica está associada ao aumento de risco de eventos cardiovasculares. Marcadores inflamatórios e anticorpos anti-Chlamydia têm sido relacionados ao desenvolvimento e à progressão da aterosclerose e dos eventos cardiovasculares. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os marcadores inflamatórios interleucina-6 (IL-6) e fator de necrose tumoral-alfa (TNF-α) e os anticorpos anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae em pacientes com síndrome metabólica (SM), com e sem eventos cardiovasculares. MÉTODOS: Est...

  7. Marcadores inflamatórios e anticorpos anti-chlamydia em pacientes com síndrome metabólica

    OpenAIRE

    Franco,Rosecler Riethmuller; Bodanese,Luiz Carlos; Repetto,Giuseppe; Piccoli,Jacqueline da Costa Escobar; Wiehe,Mario; Bonato,Cassiane; Duarte,Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Duarte,Thiago

    2011-01-01

    FUNDAMENTO: A síndrome metabólica está associada ao aumento de risco de eventos cardiovasculares. Marcadores inflamatórios e anticorpos anti-Chlamydia têm sido relacionados ao desenvolvimento e à progressão da aterosclerose e dos eventos cardiovasculares. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os marcadores inflamatórios interleucina-6 (IL-6) e fator de necrose tumoral-alfa (TNF-α) e os anticorpos anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae em pacientes com síndrome metabólica (SM), com e sem eventos cardiovasculares. MÉTODOS...

  8. Genital Chlamydia trachomatis: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Malhotra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of curable bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI worldwide. It manifests primarily as urethritis in males and endocervicitis in females. Untreated chlamydial infection in man can cause epididymitis and proctitis. Though most women with Chlamydia infection are asymptomatic or have minimal symptoms, some develop salpingitis, endometritis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID, ectopic pregnancy and tubal factor infertility. It is associated with an increased risk for the transmission or acquisition of HIV and is also attributed to be a risk factor for the development of cervical carcinoma. Early diagnosis and treatment of infected individuals is required to prevent the spread of the disease and severe sequelae. Traditionally, tissue culture was considered the gold standard for the diagnosis. However, with the availability of newer diagnostic techniques particularly molecular methods which are not only highly sensitive and specific but are cost-effective also, the diagnosis has became fast and easy. The purpose of this review is to study the various aspects of genital C. trachomatis infection. Also the advances related to the clinical picture, various diagnostic modalities, prevention, treatment, drug resistance and control measures will be dealt with.

  9. Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardi, Vincenzo; Domenichini, Paolo; Reali, Silvia; Chiappara, Gian Marco; Devoto, Gianluigi; Valbusa, Ugo

    2017-12-01

    In the last decade the detection of the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics treatment, developed by different kind of bacteria, is becoming a huge problem. We hereby present a different approach to the current problem of detection of bacteria resistance to antibiotics. Our aims were to use the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate bacteria morphological changes in response to antibiotics treatment and explore the possibility of reducing the time required to obtain information on their resistance. In particular, we studied Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria provided by the Lavagna Hospital ASL4 Liguria (Italy), where there are cases linked with antibiotics resistance of the Klebsiella pneumoniae . By comparing AFM images of bacteria strains treated with different antibiotics is possible to identify unambiguously the Klebsiella pneumoniae strains resistant to antibiotics. In fact, the analysis of the AFM images of the antibiotic-sensitive bacteria shows clearly the presence of morphological alterations in the cell wall. While in the case of the antibiotic-resistant bacteria morphological alterations are not present. This approach is based on an easy and potentially rapid AFM analysis.

  10. Effects of B2/B19′ phase boundary on thermally induced phase transition in NiTi: An atomistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Sheng-Jian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Shang, Jia-Xiang, E-mail: shangjx@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Xu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Fu-He [Department of Physics, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • A new order parameter is created to characterize the local atom structure. • Heterogeneous nucleation of B2 phase occurs at high temperatures in B2/B19′ phase boundary system. • B2/B19′ phase boundary provides the sites for heterogeneous B2 nucleation at high temperatures. • Homogeneous nucleation of B19′ phase occurs at low temperatures in B2/B19′ phase boundary system. • B2 and B19′ phases coexist at medium temperatures. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the thermally induced phase transition in NiTi B19′ single crystal at high temperatures (400, 500, 600 and 700 K), B2 single crystal at low temperatures (50, 100, 150 and 200 K) and the system containing a B2/B19′ phase boundary at high, medium (300, 320 and 340 K) and low temperatures. Homogeneous nucleation and growth of the B2 and the B19′ phases are observed in B19′ and B2 single crystal systems, respectively. In B2/B19′ system, heterogeneous nucleation and growth of the B2 phase are observed at high temperatures, which results in forming a B2/B2 grain boundary and a new B2/B19′ phase boundary; the B2 phase transforms homogeneously to B19′ phase at low temperatures; the B2 and B19′ phases coexist without heterogeneous nucleation of any phase at medium temperatures. Compared with the single crystal, the B2/B19′ phase boundary provides the sites for heterogeneous B2 nucleation at high temperatures and has little effect on the phase transition at low temperatures.

  11. Detection of parvovirus B19 IgM in patients with sickle cell disease in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianah Idowu Ayolabi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine anti-B19V IgM seroprevalence among sickle cell disease (SCD patients and patients with other blood genotypes. Methods: In this study, a commercially available ELISA kit (Parvovirus B19 RIDASCREEN Biopharma, Germany was used to analyze 93 serum samples, comprising 68 SCD patients and 25 control samples from individuals with other blood genotypes aged between 1 and 35 years. Results: Anti-B19V IgM was detected in 10 (~15% samples of the SCD patients, in which amongst the SC, 1 (25% positive was recorded, CC had 2 (~67% positive cases and SS had 7 (~11% positives. Among the study control group, a 16% seropositivity was observed, in which among those with genotype AA, 1 (20% was positive, for those with AS, 1 (~7% positive was recorded, for AC, 3 (50% were positive. The age range of 11–20 years showed a positivity of 3 (~4%, those of 21–30 years showed 12 (~24% positivity and both 1–10 years and > 30 years had no positive case recorded. Conclusions: This study showed that B19V is a significant blood borne pathogen in our environment and concerted effort is needed to advance strategies to curb this infection and diminish the common severe complications usually associated with this virus infection among SCD patients.

  12. Characterization of plasmids harbouring qnrS1, qnrB2 and qnrB19 genes in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Fernandez, A.; Fortini, D.; Veldman, K.T.; Mevius, D.J.; Carattoli, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize plasmids carrying qnrS1, qnrB2 and qnrB19 genes identified in Salmonella strains from The Netherlands. The identification of plasmids may help to follow the dissemination of these resistance genes in different countries and environments.

  13. 76 FR 18024 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-2B19 (Regional Jet Series 100 & 440...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... states: At present, the Wing Anti-Ice System (WAIS) sufficient heat switches/sensors on CL-600-2B19... check of the wing anti-ice standby overheat switches and overheat/sufficient heat sensors and associated..., ``Functional check of the wing anti-ice overheat sensors (duplicate Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMR...

  14. 75 FR 25788 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-2B19 (Regional Jet Series 100 & 440...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... present, the Wing Anti-Ice System (WAIS) sufficient heat switches/sensors on CL-600-2B19 aircraft are... consequence of unannunciated asymmetric ice build-up on the wing. * * * Such a condition, in combination with... unsafe condition for the specified products. The MCAI states: At present, the Wing Anti-Ice System (WAIS...

  15. NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  16. Prevalence of Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection among Female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    . Nigeria. The aim of this research is to determine the prevalence of and predictive risk factors for Chlamydia trachomatis infection among female undergraduate students of the University of Port Harcourt. Methods: Four hundred undergraduate ...

  17. NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  18. NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia to Coccidioidomycosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  20. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following types of bacteria, it is called atypical pneumonia. Legionella pneumophila. This type of pneumonia sometimes is ... ventilator machine to help them breathe get pneumonia. Atypical pneumonia . Atypical pneumonia is a type of CAP. It ...

  1. Down-Regulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Human Parvovirus B19 Capsid Protein VP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Almilaji

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Human parvovirus B19 (B19V may cause inflammatory cardiomyopathy (iCMP which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. The B19V capsid protein VP1 contains a lysophosphatidylcholine producing phospholipase A2 (PLA sequence. Lysophosphatidylcholine has in turn been shown to inhibit Na+/K+ ATPase. The present study explored whether VP1 modifies Na+/K+ ATPase activity. Methods: Xenopus oocytes were injected with cRNA encoding VP1 isolated from a patient suffering from fatal B19V-iCMP or cRNA encoding PLA2-negative VP1 mutant (H153A and K+ induced pump current (Ipump as well as ouabain-inhibited current (Iouabain both reflecting Na+/K+-ATPase activity were determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. Results: Injection of cRNA encoding VP1, but not of VP1(H153A or water, was followed by a significant decrease of both, Ipump and Iouabain in Xenopus oocytes. The effect was not modified by inhibition of transcription with actinomycin (10 µM for 36 hours but was abrogated in the presence of PLA2 specific blocker 4-bromophenacylbromide (50 µM and was mimicked by lysophosphatidylcholine (0.5 - 1 µg/ml. According to whole cell patch clamp, lysophosphatidylcholine (1 µg /ml similarly decreased Ipump in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC. Conclusion: The B19V capsid protein VP1 is a powerful inhibitor of host cell Na+/K+ ATPase, an effect at least partially due to phospholipase A2 (PLA2 dependent formation of lysophosphatidylcholine.

  2. Chlamydia psittaci exposure in pet birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, W; Huang, S Y; Zhang, X X; Zhou, D H; Xu, M J; Zhao, Q; Qian, A D; Zhu, X Q

    2014-04-01

    Chlamydia psittaci is a zoonotic pathogen with a wide range of avian hosts and may be transmitted to humans and cause severe disease. To assess the risk of psittacosis posed by pet birds, the seroprevalence of Chlamydia psittaci antibodies in 360 Eurasian siskins (Carduelis spinus), 289 oriental skylarks (Alauda arvensis) and 36 black-tailed grosbeaks (Coccothraustes migratorius) in Gansu province, north-western China was detected by an indirect haemagglutination assay. Twenty-seven out of 289 (9.34 %) Alauda arvensis, 45 out of 360 (12.50 %) Carduelis spinus and 2 out of 36 (5.56 %) Coccothraustes migratorius were positive for Chlamydia psittaci infection at a cut-off dilution of 1 : 16. The prevalence of Chlamydia psittaci was higher in Carduelis spinus (12.5 %) than in Alauda arvensis (9.34 %) and Coccothraustes migratorius (5.56 %); however, the differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Statistical analysis indicated that Chlamydia psittaci seroprevalence in adult pet birds (12.4 %, 67/540) was significantly higher than that in juvenile pet birds (4.83 %, 7/145) (P<0.01). There was no statistical difference in Chlamydia psittaci seroprevalence between male (12.4 %) and female (8.27 %) birds. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating the seroprevalence of Chlamydia psittaci exposure in pet birds in China. Our results indicate that close contact with pet birds poses the risk of zoonotic transmission of Chlamydia psittaci.

  3. Analysis of Polymorphic Membrane Protein Expression in Cultured Cells Identifies PmpA and PmpH of Chlamydia psittaci as Candidate Factors in Pathogenesis and Immunity to Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lent, Sarah; De Vos, Winnok H; Huot Creasy, Heather; Marques, Patricia X; Ravel, Jacques; Vanrompay, Daisy; Bavoil, Patrik; Hsia, Ru-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The polymorphic membrane protein (Pmp) paralogous families of Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Chlamydia abortus are putative targets for Chlamydia vaccine development. To determine whether this is also the case for Pmp family members of C. psittaci, we analyzed transcription levels, protein production and localization of several Pmps of C. psittaci. Pmp expression profiles were characterized using quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR), immunofluorescence (IF) and immuno-electron microscopy (IEM) under normal and stress conditions. We found that PmpA was highly produced in all inclusions as early as 12 hpi in all biological replicates. In addition, PmpA and PmpH appeared to be unusually accessible to antibody as determined by both immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy. Our results suggest an important role for these Pmps in the pathogenesis of C. psittaci, and make them promising candidates in vaccine development.

  4. A significantly lower potency observed for the 3rd WHO International Standard for Parvovirus B19V DNA with the cobas TaqScreen DPX test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, G; Cristiano, K; Fabi, S; Simeoni, M; Marino, F; Gaggioli, A

    2016-08-01

    In the context of the Official Medicines Control Laboratories plasma pool testing for Parvovirus B19 DNA, we use the cobas TaqScreen DPX test. When we re-evaluated this method using the 3rd B19 DNA WHO IS at the final concentration of 4 log IU/mL, we observed a titre lower than expected, i.e. 3.79 log IU/mL. Therefore, we further investigated the accuracy of the DPX test. The following B19V DNA materials were tested by using both the DPX test and an in-house real-time PCR: The 1st, 2nd and 3rd WHO ISs for B19V DNA The Non WHO B19V DNA Reference Material for NAT The Biological Reference Preparation B19 virus DNA for NAT testing, batch 1 . The DPX test showed a good accuracy for all B19V DNA materials with the exception of the 3rd WHO IS for B19V DNA. In fact, an underestimation of about 38% was observed for all dilutions of this standard with respect to the nominal titre. With the B19V in-house real-time PCR, all four materials proved to be well calibrated against the 1(st) WHO IS for B19V DNA, used as external standard curve. In this study, we demonstrated that the DPX test underestimates the B19V DNA content of the 3rd WHO IS for B19V DNA and that this is not due to an incorrect potency assigned to the standard but, most probably, to a mismatch between the primers/probe and the sequence of the target region in the 3rd WHO IS for B19V DNA. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  5. Prevalence of Chlamydia psittaci and Other Chlamydia Species in Wild Birds in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiec, Marta; Piasecki, Tomasz; Wieliczko, Alina

    2015-11-01

    Avian chlamydiosis is a zoonotic disease occurring in humans, poultry, and exotic birds. It has been suggested that some wild bird species play an important role as reservoirs for Chlamydia, especially Chlamydia psittaci. Whereas C. psittaci is the predominant chlamydial agent in birds, in the present study we have determined the prevalence of different species of Chlamydia among selected wild bird species in Poland using a rapid and sensitive real-time PCR method. In total, 369 free-living birds from 35 bird species and 15 orders were examined. Samples from 27 birds (7.3%) were positive for chlamydial DNA in the PCR; 22 positive samples (81.5%) belonged to C. psittaci, three to Chlamydia trachomatis (11.1%), and two (7.4%) classified only to the genus Chlamydia. Most of C. psittaci-positive samples belonged to five orders: Anseriformes, Columbiformes, Gruiformes, Phasianiformes, and Passeriformes. All C. trachomatis samples were obtained from Eurasian coots (Gruiformes). Two Chlamydia-positive samples not classified to any Chlamydia species were obtained from a common wood pigeon (Columbiformes) and a common buzzard (Accipitriformes). Detection of C. psittaci and C. trachomatis in free-living bird populations force to think on significance of birds as reservoir of varied Chlamydia species and their epidemiological importance.

  6. Marcadores inflamatórios e anticorpos anti-chlamydia em pacientes com síndrome metabólica Marcadores inflamatorios y anticuerpos anti-chlamydia en pacientes con síndrome metabólico Inflammatory markers and antichlamydial antibodies in patients with metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rosecler Riethmuller Franco; Luiz Carlos Bodanese; Giuseppe Repetto; Jacqueline da Costa Escobar Piccoli; Mario Wiehe; Cassiane Bonato; Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura Duarte; Thiago Duarte

    2011-01-01

    FUNDAMENTO: A síndrome metabólica está associada ao aumento de risco de eventos cardiovasculares. Marcadores inflamatórios e anticorpos anti-Chlamydia têm sido relacionados ao desenvolvimento e à progressão da aterosclerose e dos eventos cardiovasculares. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os marcadores inflamatórios interleucina-6 (IL-6) e fator de necrose tumoral-alfa (TNF-α) e os anticorpos anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae em pacientes com síndrome metabólica (SM), com e sem eventos cardiovasculares. MÉTODOS...

  7. Multi locus sequence typing of Chlamydiales: clonal groupings within the obligate intracellular bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langerak Ankie A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The obligate intracellular growing bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases like trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity. Several serovars and genotypes have been identified, but these could not be linked to clinical disease or outcome. The related Chlamydophila pneumoniae, of which no subtypes are recognized, causes respiratory infections worldwide. We developed a multi locus sequence typing (MLST scheme to understand the population genetic structure and diversity of these species and to evaluate the association between genotype and disease. Results A collection of 26 strains of C. trachomatis of different serovars and clinical presentation and 18 strains of C. pneumoniae were included in the study. For comparison, sequences of C. abortus, C. psittaci, C. caviae, C. felis, C. pecorum (Chlamydophila, C. muridarum (Chlamydia and of Candidatus protochlamydia and Simkania negevensis were also included. Sequences of fragments (400 – 500 base pairs from seven housekeeping genes (enoA, fumC, gatA, gidA, hemN, hlfX, oppA were analysed. Analysis of allelic profiles by eBurst revealed three non-overlapping clonal complexes among the C. trachomatis strains, while the C. pneumoniae strains formed a single group. An UPGMA tree produced from the allelic profiles resulted in three groups of sequence types. The LGV strains grouped in a single cluster, while the urogenital strains were distributed over two separated groups, one consisted solely of strains with frequent occurring serovars (E, D and F. The distribution of the different serovars over the three groups was not consistent, suggesting exchange of serovar encoding ompA sequences. In one instance, exchange of fumC sequences between strains of different groups was observed. Cluster analyses of concatenated sequences of the Chlamydophila and Chlamydia species together with those of Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila and Simkania

  8. Multi locus sequence typing of Chlamydiales: clonal groupings within the obligate intracellular bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannekoek, Yvonne; Morelli, Giovanna; Kusecek, Barica; Morré, Servaas A; Ossewaarde, Jacobus M; Langerak, Ankie A; van der Ende, Arie

    2008-02-28

    The obligate intracellular growing bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases like trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity. Several serovars and genotypes have been identified, but these could not be linked to clinical disease or outcome. The related Chlamydophila pneumoniae, of which no subtypes are recognized, causes respiratory infections worldwide. We developed a multi locus sequence typing (MLST) scheme to understand the population genetic structure and diversity of these species and to evaluate the association between genotype and disease. A collection of 26 strains of C. trachomatis of different serovars and clinical presentation and 18 strains of C. pneumoniae were included in the study. For comparison, sequences of C. abortus, C. psittaci, C. caviae, C. felis, C. pecorum (Chlamydophila), C. muridarum (Chlamydia) and of Candidatus protochlamydia and Simkania negevensis were also included. Sequences of fragments (400 - 500 base pairs) from seven housekeeping genes (enoA, fumC, gatA, gidA, hemN, hlfX, oppA) were analysed. Analysis of allelic profiles by eBurst revealed three non-overlapping clonal complexes among the C. trachomatis strains, while the C. pneumoniae strains formed a single group. An UPGMA tree produced from the allelic profiles resulted in three groups of sequence types. The LGV strains grouped in a single cluster, while the urogenital strains were distributed over two separated groups, one consisted solely of strains with frequent occurring serovars (E, D and F). The distribution of the different serovars over the three groups was not consistent, suggesting exchange of serovar encoding ompA sequences. In one instance, exchange of fumC sequences between strains of different groups was observed. Cluster analyses of concatenated sequences of the Chlamydophila and Chlamydia species together with those of Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila and Simkania negevensis resulted in a tree identical to that

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenfelz, Caroline; Hakansson, Anders P

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to review the literature regarding the mechanisms of transition from asymptomatic colonization to induction of otitis media and how the insight into the pathogenesis of otitis media has the potential to help design future otitis media-directed vaccines. Respiratory viruses have long been shown to predispose individuals to bacterial respiratory infections, such as otitis media. Recent information suggests that Streptococcus pneumoniae , which colonize the nasopharynx asymptomatically, can sense potentially "threatening" changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by virus infection by upregulating specific sets of genes involved in biofilm release, dissemination from the nasopharynx to other sites, and protection against the host immune system. Furthermore, an understanding of the transcriptional and proteomic changes occurring in bacteria during transition to infection has led to identification of novel vaccine targets that are disease-specific and will not affect asymptomatic colonization. This approach will avoid major changes in the delicate balance of microorganisms in the respiratory tract microbiome due to elimination of S. pneumoniae . Our recent findings are reviewed in the context of the current literature on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of otitis media. We also discuss how other otopathogens, such as Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis , as well as the normal respiratory microbiome, can modulate the ability of pneumococci to cause infection. Furthermore, the unsatisfactory protection offered by the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is highlighted and we review potential future strategies emerging to confer a more specific protection against otitis media.

  10. Chlamydia trachomatis infection in infertile and pregnant women in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Beltrami Gomez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chlamydia trachomatis (CT is the most prevalent sexually transmitted bacterial infection, affecting mainly young, sexually active women. Untreated infection may lead to reproductive complications due to tubal damage. Infections during pregnancy may cause preterm labor, low birth weight, perinatal death, and neonatal conjunctivitis and pneumonia. There are few data on CT infection in Brazil. The aim of this study was to determine CT prevalence in infertile and pregnant women. Methods: A cross-sectional study included 77 infertile and 60 asymptomatic pregnant women. First-void urine was tested for CT using PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction. Blood samples were collected for CT IgG antibodies testing using indirect immunofluorescence. A questionnaire about medical, gynecological, and sexual history was completed by all participants. Results: We found statistically similar prevalence of PCR and IgG antibodies between the groups. There was a 61% prevalence of CT IgG antibodies in infertile women and 56.7% in pregnant women. PCR was positive in only one (1.3% infertile woman and in none pregnant women. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of CT IgG antibody in Brazilian pregnant and infertile women, but we found a low prevalence of positive PCR in the urine samples. CT antibodies were associated with sexual behavior and smoking. Keywords: Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia infections, prevalence, nucleic acid amplification techniques; infertility, female; fluorescent antibody technique

  11. Chlamydia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause serious health problems in women, including: Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), an infection of a woman's reproductive organs. ... HIV and AIDS Human papillomavirus (HPV) Pap test Pelvic inflammatory disease Pregnancy Sexually transmitted infections (STI) Sexually transmitted infections, ...

  12. The Seropositivity Rate of Atypical Agents in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    Omer Deniz

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the IgM antibody positivities of atypical pneumonia agents in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, and to compare the results with controls. The serum samples which were collected from 87 adult patients and 21 healthy controls have been investigated by a commercial ELISA (Pneumobact ELISA IgM, Vircell, Spain in which four different atypical pneumonia agents were fixed onto a slide. In the patients group, IgM positivity rates for the agents were as follows, respectively; 2.3% for Legionella pneumophila, 56.3% Chlamydia pneumoniae, 33.3% for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 9.2% for Coxiella burnetii. The rates of IgM positivities in the control group varied 7% for all of the agents except M. Pneumoniae and C. Pneumoniae and 2 of these controls were positive for L. Pneumophila IgM, one was positive for C. Burnetii IgM. According to the statistical evaluation, there were significant differences for IgM seropositivities to Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia Pneumoniae,between the patient and the control groups (p0.05. We showed that the seropositivity rate of atypical agents in patients with CAP was significantly higher when compared to healthy control group. This result suggests us, atypical agents might be responsible in CAP patients in a great amount. Furthermore, our study also suggests that clinical and radiological findings are not useful for discriminating atypical from typical pneumonia. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 279-284

  13. The Seropositivity Rate of Atypical Agents in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhan Karakoc Gunes

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the IgM antibody positivities of atypical pneumonia agents in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, and to compare the results with controls. The serum samples which were collected from 87 adult patients and 21 healthy controls have been investigated by a commercial ELISA (Pneumobact ELISA IgM, Vircell, Spain in which four different atypical pneumonia agents were fixed onto a slide. In the patients group, IgM positivity rates for the agents were as follows, respectively; 2.3% for Legionella pneumophila, 56.3% Chlamydia pneumoniae, 33.3% for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 9.2% for Coxiella burnetii. The rates of IgM positivities in the control group varied 7% for all of the agents except M. Pneumoniae and C. Pneumoniae and 2 of these controls were positive for L. Pneumophila IgM, one was positive for C. Burnetii IgM. According to the statistical evaluation, there were significant differences for IgM seropositivities to Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia Pneumoniae,between the patient and the control groups (p0.05. We showed that the seropositivity rate of atypical agents in patients with CAP was significantly higher when compared to healthy control group. This result suggests us, atypical agents might be responsible in CAP patients in a great amount. Furthermore, our study also suggests that clinical and radiological findings are not useful for discriminating atypical from typical pneumonia. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 279-284

  14. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Pneumonia KidsHealth / For Parents / Pneumonia What's in this article? ... the Doctor? Print en español Neumonía What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs . The ...

  15. Human parvovirus B19 infection causes cell cycle arrest of human erythroid progenitors at late S phase that favors viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Kleiboeker, Steve; Deng, Xuefeng; Qiu, Jianming

    2013-12-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection has a unique tropism to human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) in human bone marrow and the fetal liver. It has been reported that both B19V infection and expression of the large nonstructural protein NS1 arrested EPCs at a cell cycle status with a 4 N DNA content, which was previously claimed to be "G2/M arrest." However, a B19V mutant infectious DNA (M20(mTAD2)) replicated well in B19V-semipermissive UT7/Epo-S1 cells but did not induce G2/M arrest (S. Lou, Y. Luo, F. Cheng, Q. Huang, W. Shen, S. Kleiboeker, J. F. Tisdale, Z. Liu, and J. Qiu, J. Virol. 86:10748-10758, 2012). To further characterize cell cycle arrest during B19V infection of EPCs, we analyzed the cell cycle change using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse-labeling and DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, which precisely establishes the cell cycle pattern based on both cellular DNA replication and nuclear DNA content. We found that although both B19V NS1 transduction and infection immediately arrested cells at a status of 4 N DNA content, B19V-infected 4 N cells still incorporated BrdU, indicating active DNA synthesis. Notably, the BrdU incorporation was caused neither by viral DNA replication nor by cellular DNA repair that could be initiated by B19V infection-induced cellular DNA damage. Moreover, several S phase regulators were abundantly expressed and colocalized within the B19V replication centers. More importantly, replication of the B19V wild-type infectious DNA, as well as the M20(mTAD2) mutant, arrested cells at S phase. Taken together, our results confirmed that B19V infection triggers late S phase arrest, which presumably provides cellular S phase factors for viral DNA replication.

  16. Parvovirus B19 in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient with Acute Liver Failure: An Underdiagnosed Cause of Acute Non-A-E Viral Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kee Ho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There are occasional pediatric reports of parvovirus B19-associated transient acute hepatitis and hepatic failure. A case of a 34-year-old immunocompetent woman who developed severe and prolonged but self-limited acute hepatitis and myelosuppression following acute parvovirus B19 infection is reported. Parvovirus B19 may be the causative agent in some adult cases of acute non-A-E viral hepatitis and acute liver failure.

  17. Combination antibiotics as a treatment for chronic Chlamydia-induced reactive arthritis: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J D; Espinoza, L R; Inman, R D; Sneed, K B; Ricca, L R; Vasey, F B; Valeriano, J; Stanich, J A; Oszust, C; Gerard, H C; Hudson, A P

    2010-05-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae are known triggers of reactive arthritis (ReA) and exist in a persistent metabolically active infection state in the synovium, suggesting that they may be susceptible to antimicrobial agents. The goal of this study was to investigate whether a 6-month course of combination antibiotics is an effective treatment for patients with chronic Chlamydia-induced ReA. This study was a 9-month, prospective, double-blind, triple-placebo trial assessing a 6-month course of combination antibiotics as a treatment for Chlamydia-induced ReA. Eligible patients had to be positive for C trachomatis or C pneumoniae by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Groups received 1) doxycycline and rifampin plus placebo instead of azithromycin; 2) azithromycin and rifampin plus placebo instead of doxycycline; or 3) placebos instead of azithromycin, doxycycline, and rifampin. The primary end point was the number of patients who improved by 20% or more in at least 4 of 6 variables without worsening in any 1 variable in both combination antibiotic groups combined and in the placebo group at month 6 compared with baseline. The primary end point was achieved in 17 of 27 patients (63%) receiving combination antibiotics and in 3 of 15 patients (20%) receiving placebo. Secondary efficacy end points showed similar results. Six of 27 patients (22%) randomized to combination antibiotics believed that their disease went into complete remission during the trial, whereas no patient in the placebo arm achieved remission. Significantly more patients in the active treatment group became negative for C trachomatis or C pneumoniae by PCR at month 6. Adverse events were mild, with no significant differences between the groups. These data suggest that a 6-month course of combination antibiotics is an effective treatment for chronic Chlamydia-induced ReA.

  18. Papular-purpuric "gloves and socks" syndrome due to parvovirus B19: report of a case with unusual features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PASSONI Luiz Fernando C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of papular-purpuric "gloves and socks" syndrome (PPGSS in an adult male with acute parvovirus B19 infection. The patient displayed the classical features of fever, oral lesions, and purpura on hands and feet, but the purpuric lesions on the feet evolved to superficial skin necrosis, a feature not previously described in this syndrome. We believe this is the first reported case of PPGSS occurring in Brazil.

  19. Combination Antibiotics as a Treatment for Chronic Chlamydia-Induced Reactive Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, JD; Espinoza, LR; Inman, RD; Sneed, KB; Ricca, LR; Vasey, FB; Valeriano, J; Stanich, JA; Oszust, C; Gerard, HC; Hudson, AP

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) and Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae (Cpn) are known triggers of reactive arthritis (ReA). These chlamydial species exist in a persistent metabolically active infection state in the synovium suggesting that persistent chlamydiae may be susceptible to antimicrobial agents. The goal of this study was to investigate whether a six-month course of combination antibiotics is an effective therapy for patients with chronic Chlamydia-induced ReA. Methods This study was a 9-month, double-blind, triple-dummy prospective trial assessing a 6-month course of combination antibiotics as a treatment for Chlamydia-induced ReA. Eligible patients were age 18 to 70 years, fulfilled the European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) Criteria, and had disease duration equal to or longer than 6 months. Subjects had to be polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive for Ct or Cpn in order to be randomized to therapy; randomization was performed in a 1:1:1 fashion. Treatment was for 6 months; the 3 groups included doxycycline 100mg twice daily and rifampin 300mg daily, azithromycin 500mg daily × 5 days then twice weekly and rifampin 300mg daily, or matching placebos. The primary efficacy endpoint was to assess the number of responders in the combination antibiotic group vs. placebo at month 6 compared to baseline. Responders were defined as those subjects who improved 20% or more in at least 4 of 6 variables without worsening in any one variable. Results 80 subjects were screened and 42 were randomized to treatment (27 to combination antibiotics and 15 to placebo). Subjects in each group had similar demographics and baseline characteristics. At month 6, 17/27 subjects (63%) randomized to combination antibiotics were responders compared to 3/15 (20%) on placebo (P-value = 0.01). Secondary efficacy endpoints showed similar results with significant improvement in the modified swollen joint count, tender joint count, physician global assessment (P

  20. Multicenter evaluation of a commercial multiplex polymerase chain reaction test for screening plasma donations for parvovirus B19 DNA and hepatitis A virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelman, Marco H G M; Cuijpers, H Theo M; Wessberg, Susanna; Valkeajärvi, Anne; Pichl, Lutz; Schottstedt, Volkmar; Saldanha, John

    2012-07-01

    Three European laboratories evaluated the TaqScreen DPX test (DPX test), a multiplex nucleic acid test assay for the simultaneous detection and quantitation of parvovirus B19 (B19V) DNA and the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) RNA. The 95% limit of detection of the test for B19V and HAV was determined using the respective WHO International Standards. The reproducibility of the test was evaluated by testing replicate samples of B19V at log 4.0 and 40 IU/mL and HAV at 5 IU/mL. The accuracy of the DPX test for B19V was evaluated by replicate testing of B19V samples containing log 3.0, log 4.0, and log 5.0 IU/mL. Panels of B19V Genotypes 1, 2, and 3 and HAV genotypes were evaluated. Cross-contamination was evaluated. For comparison of the DPX test and the established tests, the sites tested plasma samples in pools of either 96 or 480 donations. The mean 95% lower limits of detection of the three laboratories for B19V and HAV were 20.30 and 1.85 IU/mL. The test showed good reproducibility with the major part of the variance of the test being attributed to intermediate assay variation. The test showed great accuracy for B19V, especially at log 4.0 IU/mL. Spiking of test pools of 480 donations and manufacturing pools with log 4.0 IU/mL B19 DNA and 4 IU/mL HAV RNA showed that the DPX assay was robust. The test was able to detect the three genotypes of B19V and HAV genotypes. No cross-contamination was seen. Test results of routine samples correlated well with those of the established tests. The DPX test is a robust and sensitive test for the detection of B19V and HAV in plasma samples. The quantitative B19V results obtained with the test are accurate, and the test is able to detect all the known genotypes of B19V and HAV and fulfills all the European Pharmacopoeia and Food and Drug Administration requirements for a B19V and HAV test for screening of plasma donations and samples from plasma pools for manufacture. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  1. Detection of Chlamydia in postmortal formalin-fixed tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, A G; Banner, Jytte; Birkelund, Svend

    1989-01-01

    A procedure to detect Chlamydia in postmortal formalin-fixed tissue is described. Monoclonal antibodies against a genus specific chlamydia epitope were used in immunofluorescence to detect chlamydia inclusions in formalin-fixed tissue sections. Lung sections from chlamydia-infected mice were....... Background and non-specific fluorescence were reduced by treating the tissue sections with trypsin, rabbit serum and Evans blue counterstain. Besides giving an exact diagnosis at autopsy, the method provides the possibility of determining the occurrence of chlamydia infections in various tissues, based...

  2. Chlamydia Peritonitis and Ascites Mimicking Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anar Gojayev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID rarely results in diffuse ascites. Severe adhesive disease secondary to PID may lead to the formation of inclusion cysts and even pelvic peritoneal nodularity due to postinflammatory scarring and cause an elevation of serum CA-125 levels. The constellation of these findings may mimic an ovarian neoplasm. Case. We report a case of a 22-year-old female who presented with multiple pelvic cysts and diffuse ascites due to Chlamydia trachomatis infection. The initial gynecologic exam did not reveal obvious evidence of PID; however, a positive Chlamydia trachomatis test, pathologic findings, and the exclusion of other etiologies facilitated the diagnosis. Conclusion. Chlamydia trachomatis and other infectious agents should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a young sexually active female with abdominal pain, ascites, and pelvic cystic masses. Thorough workup in such a population may reduce the number of more invasive procedures as well as unnecessary repeat surgical procedures.

  3. Tracking of peptide-specific CD4+ T-cell responses after an acute resolving viral infection: a study of parvovirus B19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprowicz, Victoria; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of peptide-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses to acute viral infections of humans is poorly understood. We analyzed the response to parvovirus B19 (B19), a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen with a compact and conserved genome. The magnitude and breadth of the CD4(+) T...

  4. Study of chronic hemolytic anaemia patients in Rio de Janeiro: prevalence of anti-human parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies and the development aplastic crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Anna, Anadayr L M; Garcia, Rita de Cássia N Cubel; Marzoche, Mônica; da Rocha, Heloisa Helena A Gallo; Paula, Maria Tereza M; Lobo, Clarisse C; Nascimento, Jussara P

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of anti-human parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies was determined in sera from 165 chronic hemolytic anemia patients, receiving medical care at Instituto Estadual de Hematologia (IEHE), Rio de Janeiro, during the year of 1994. This sample represents around 10% of the chronic hemolytic anemia patients attending at IEHE. Most of these patients (140) have sickle cell disease. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were detected in 32.1% of patients. No statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) was seen between IgG antibody prevalence in male (27.8%) and female (35.5%) patients. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were more frequent in older (37.6%) than younger (28.2%) than 20 years old patients, although this difference had no statistical significance (p > 0.05). Anti-B19 IgG antibody prevalence showed that 67.9% of patients enrolled in the study were susceptible to B19 acute infection. With the aim to detect acute B19 infection, patients follow up continued until February 1996. During this period four patients presented transient aplastic crisis due to human parvovirus B19 as confirmed by the detection of specific IgM antibodies. All four patients were younger than 20 years old, and 3 were younger than 10 years old. Three of them were sickle cell disease patients. Three of the four acute B19 infection occurred during 1994 springtime.

  5. Study of chronic hemolytic anaemia patients in Rio de Janeiro: prevalence of anti-human parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies and the developement aplastic crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANT'ANNA Anadayr L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of anti-human parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies was determined in sera from 165 chronic hemolytic anemia patients, receiving medical care at Instituto Estadual de Hematologia (IEHE, Rio de Janeiro, during the year of 1994. This sample represents around 10% of the chronic hemolytic anemia patients attending at IEHE. Most of these patients (140 have sickle cell disease. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were detected in 32.1% of patients. No statistically significant difference (p > 0.05 was seen between IgG antibody prevalence in male (27.8% and female (35.5% patients. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were more frequent in older (37.6% than younger (28.2% than 20 years old patients, although this difference had no statistical significance (p > 0.05. Anti-B19 IgG antibody prevalence showed that 67.9% of patients enrolled in the study were susceptible to B19 acute infection. With the aim to detect acute B19 infection, patients follow up continued until February 1996. During this period four patients presented transient aplastic crisis due to human parvovirus B19 as confirmed by the detection of specific IgM antibodies. All four patients were younger than 20 years old, and 3 were younger than 10 years old. Three of them were sickle cell disease patients. Three of the four acute B19 infection occurred during 1994 springtime.

  6. Clinical characteristics of genital chlamydia infection in pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Taek; Lee, Suk Woo; Kim, Min Jeong; Kang, Young Mo; Moon, Hye Min; Rhim, Chae Chun

    2017-01-13

    Chlamydia infection in acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is associated with serious complications including ectopic pregnancy, tubal infertility, Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome and tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA). This study compared clinical and laboratory data between PID with and without chlamydia infection. The medical records of 497 women who were admitted with PID between 2002 and 2011 were reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups (PID with and without chlamydia infection), which were compared in terms of the patients' characteristics, clinical presentation, and laboratory findings, including inflammatory markers. The chlamydia and non-chlamydia groups comprised 175 and 322 women, respectively. The patients in the chlamydia group were younger and had a higher rate of TOA, a longer mean hospital stay, and had undergone more surgeries than the patients in the non- chlamydia group. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and CA-125 level were higher in the chlamydia group than in the non-chlamydia group, but there was no significant difference in the white blood cell count between the two groups. The CA-125 level was the strongest predictor of chlamydia infection, followed by the ESR and CRP level. The area under the receiving operating curve for CA-125, ESR, and CRP was 0.804, 0.755, and 0.663, respectively. Chlamydia infection in acute PID is associated with increased level of inflammatory markers, such as CA-125, ESR and CRP, incidence of TOA, operation risk, and longer hospitalization.

  7. Novel overlapping coding sequences in Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Klaus Thorleif; Petersen, Lise; Falk, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the aetiological agent of trachoma and sexually transmitted infections. The C. trachomatis genome sequence revealed an organism adapted to the intracellular habitat with a high coding ratio and a small genome consisting of 1.042-kilobase (kb) with 895 annotated protein...... of the novel genes in C. trachomatis Serovar A and Chlamydia muridarum. Several of the genes have typical gene-like and protein-like features. Furthermore, we confirm transcriptional activity from 10 of the putative genes. The combined evidence suggests that at least seven of the 15 are protein coding genes...

  8. Immunoelectron microscopy of lipopolysaccharide in Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Lundemose, AG; Christiansen, Gunna

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) specific for Chlamydia trachomatis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP) were used for immunoelectron microscopy analysis. MAb specific for MOMP showed strong reaction with the chlamydial surface, whereas MAb specific for LPS showed strong...... association of gold particles with the periphery of the chlamydial body. After fixation of the chlamydia cells, the reactivity was, however, similar to the anti-MOMP reactivity. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that MAb specific for LPS could remove LPS from the chlamydial membrane....

  9. Pneumocystis Pneumonia

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    Jang-Jih Lu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP in humans is caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii, which has recently been reclassified as a fungus because its cell wall composition and nucleotide sequences are more similar to those of fungi. PcP occurs only in immunocompromised individuals such as those with AIDS. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, PcP remains the leading opportunistic infection in AIDS patients. Based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer region of rRNA genes, more than 60 different types of P. jirovecii have been identified. Although type differences do not appear to correlate with the clinical characteristics of PcP, nucleotide sequence variations of the organism have been useful in epidemiologic studies. As a result, some recurrent infections are found to be due to re-infection with new types, and outbreaks due to the same types of P. jirovecii have been identified. Initial diagnosis of PcP is usually based on symptoms and chest radiography. A characteristic histopathologic feature is the presence of acellular eosinophilic exudates and organisms in the alveoli. Ultimate diagnosis of PcP is achieved by demonstration of the organism in induced sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by tinctorial staining or polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Among the many different PCR methods, the nested PCR that targets the large subunit mitochondrial rRNA gene is the most sensitive and specific. Combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole is the first choice of drugs for both treatment and prophylaxis of PcP. Other drugs that can be used include a combination of primaquine and clindamycin, pentamidine, atovaquone, and a combination of dapsone and trimethoprim. Pneumocystis organisms have the ability to inactivate the phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages and to induce them to undergo apoptosis. This apoptosis is due to activation of caspase 9 by polyamines that are present in high levels in the lung

  10. Pneumonia - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 简体中文) Expand Section Pneumonia - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Pneumonia in Children - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) ...

  11. Neonatal herpes simplex pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Lissauer, T J; Shaw, P J; Underhill, G

    1984-01-01

    A neonate with herpes simplex pneumonia is described. Herpes simplex infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pneumonia in newborn infants, even in the absence of clinically apparent herpes in the mother.

  12. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000093.htm Pneumonia - weakened immune system To use the sharing features on this page, ... fighting off infection because of problems with the immune system. This type of disease is called "pneumonia in ...

  13. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000017.htm Pneumonia in adults - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In ...

  14. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000671.htm Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is a fungal infection of the lungs. The ...

  15. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000011.htm Pneumonia in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. In ...

  16. FastStats: Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Pneumonia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with pneumonia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 423,000 ...

  17. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  18. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  19. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar, Jose E-mail: vilar_jlu@gva.es; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings.

  20. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar, Jose; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings

  1. Chemical cross-linking of Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Lundemose, AG; Christiansen, Gunna

    1988-01-01

    Purified elementary bodies (EBs) of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 were analyzed by chemical cross-linking with disuccinimidyl selenodipropionate. The effect of the cross-linking was analyzed by immunoblotting sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated components which...

  2. Prevalence of chlamydia in patients attending gynecological

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOMCS2

    can also cause post gonococcal urethritis. Chlamydia trachomatis can cause pelvic inflammatory diseases resulting in infertility and ectopic pregnancy9. Hence the screening of women with infertility cases, though they were asymptomatic. It has been found from studies reported in Italy, Sweden and USA that about 60% of.

  3. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Abdelrahman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments.

  4. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infections in symptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-11

    Jul 11, 2011 ... Chlamydia trachomatis is a ubiquitous human pathogen that is responsible for the most prevalent bacterial sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Studies show that polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is more sensitive than cellular culture for detection of C. trachomatis infections. The aim of this study is to.

  5. prevalence of genital chlamydia and gonococcal infec

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acquiring sexually transmitted infections in the Kumasi metropolis, Ghana. Design: Structured interviews and clinical examination of participants and obtaining vaginal swabs to test for gonorrhoea and chlamydia infections. ... subjects detects the outer membrane protein of C. tra- chomatis14. The endocervical swab was ...

  6. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infections in symptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a ubiquitous human pathogen that is responsible for the most prevalent bacterial sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Studies show that polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is more sensitive than cellular culture for detection of C. trachomatis infections. The aim of this study is to compare different ...

  7. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the world with severe complications. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and possible risk factors of C. trachomatis in Kano. There is dearth of information on this subject in this locality. Method: Urine samples ...

  8. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the world with severe complications. ... Conclusion: C. trachomatis infection if unchecked will continue to pose a threat to reproductive life with its established ... lead to chronic pelvic pain, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility3.

  9. Anemia y fiebre en el postrasplante renal: su relación con el parvovirus humano B19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanet Parodis López

    2017-03-01

    Presentamos el caso clínico de un varón de 65 años con trasplante renal de donante cadáver en septiembre de 2014. A los 38 días del trasplante comienza con anemia progresiva y resistente a los agentes estimulantes de la eritropoyesis. A los 64 días se produce hipertermia, con deterioro progresivo de su estado general. La serología vírica resultó negativa, al igual que la PCR inicial en sangre del parvovirus humano B19. A los 4 meses y 19 días se realiza una biopsia de médula ósea en la que se observan eritroblastos gigantes con inclusiones víricas nucleares compatibles con parvovirus, por lo que se realiza una PCR en dicho tejido que confirma el diagnóstico. Una segunda PCR en sangre resultó positiva. Tras el tratamiento con inmunoglobulinas intravenosas (IGIV y la suspensión temporal del micofenolato de mofetilo, se produce una remisión completa de la enfermedad, aunque persistía positiva la PCR para el parvovirus B19 en sangre, lo que hace necesario vigilar probables recidivas.

  10. Detection of a Novel qnrB19-Carrying Plasmid Variant Mediating Decreased Fluoroquinolone Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Serovar Hadar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegen, Ulrike; Klein, Günter; de Jong, Anno; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2017-04-01

    Thirty Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Hadar isolates of avian origin collected between 2007 and 2010 from chicken carcasses in five geographically spread abattoirs in Germany were investigated for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants. Four isolates were identified by PCR analysis and hybridization experiments to carry qnrB genes. The isolates were indistinguishable by their XbaI macrorestriction patterns and did not exhibit a mutation in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. The qnrB genes were found to be located on small plasmids of ∼2.6 kb, which mediated decreased susceptibility only to quinolones. The plasmids were assigned to the same type, pHAD28, and transformation studies into an Escherichia coli recipient strain confirmed their transferability. Sequence analysis of the complete plasmid pHAD28 revealed the presence of a qnrB19 gene. The gene was found on a novel variant of qnrB19-harboring plasmids with high similarity to plasmids pPAB19-3 from E. coli and pPAB19-4 from Salmonella sp. M9397. A presumptive recombination side was detected, suggesting that interplasmid recombination events might have played a role in the development of this plasmid variant.

  11. streptococcus pneumoniae , klebsiella pneumoniae proteus vulgaris

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. This investigation was conducted to determine the in-vitro effect of aqueous, ethanol and methanol crude extracts of Euphorbia hirta at concentrations ranging from 10mg/ml – 100mg/ml against three pathogenic bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris) using cup plate ...

  12. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) experimentally infected with B19V and hepatitis A virus: no evidence of the co-infection as a cause of acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Luciane Almeida Amado; Marchevsky, Renato Sergio; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Garcia, Rita de Cassia Nasser Cubel; Almeida, Adilson José de; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; Castro, Tatiana Xavier de; Nascimento, Jussara Pereira do; Brown, Kevin E; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to analyse the course and the outcome of the liver disease in the co-infected animals in order to evaluate a possible synergic effect of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) co-infection. Nine adult cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with serum obtained from a fatal case of B19V infection and/or a faecal suspension of acute HAV. The presence of specific antibodies to HAV and B19V, liver enzyme levels, viraemia, haematological changes, and necroinflammatory liver lesions were used for monitoring the infections. Seroconversion was confirmed in all infected groups. A similar pattern of B19V infection to human disease was observed, which was characterised by high and persistent viraemia in association with reticulocytopenia and mild to moderate anaemia during the period of investigation (59 days). Additionally, the intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed in pro-erythroblast cell from an infected cynomolgus and B19V Ag in hepatocytes. The erythroid hypoplasia and decrease in lymphocyte counts were more evident in the co-infected group. The present results demonstrated, for the first time, the susceptibility of cynomolgus to B19V infection, but it did not show a worsening of liver histopathology in the co-infected group.

  13. Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Melissa D; Winkler, Marisa L; Taracila, Magdalena A; Page, Malcolm G; Desarbre, Eric; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Shields, Ryan K; Nguyen, Minh-Hong; Clancy, Cornelius; Spellberg, Brad; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M; Bonomo, Robert A

    2017-10-31

    The emergence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs), β-lactamases that inactivate "last-line" antibiotics such as imipenem, represents a major challenge to contemporary antibiotic therapies. The combination of ceftazidime (CAZ) and avibactam (AVI), a potent β-lactamase inhibitor, represents an attempt to overcome this formidable threat and to restore the efficacy of the antibiotic against Gram-negative bacteria bearing KPCs. CAZ-AVI-resistant clinical strains expressing KPC variants with substitutions in the Ω-loop are emerging. We engineered 19 KPC-2 variants bearing targeted mutations at amino acid residue Ambler position 179 in Escherichia coli and identified a unique antibiotic resistance phenotype. We focus particularly on the CAZ-AVI resistance of the clinically relevant Asp179Asn variant. Although this variant demonstrated less hydrolytic activity, we demonstrated that there was a prolonged period during which an acyl-enzyme intermediate was present. Using mass spectrometry and transient kinetic analysis, we demonstrated that Asp179Asn "traps" β-lactams, preferentially binding β-lactams longer than AVI owing to a decreased rate of deacylation. Molecular dynamics simulations predict that (i) the Asp179Asn variant confers more flexibility to the Ω-loop and expands the active site significantly; (ii) the catalytic nucleophile, S70, is shifted more than 1.5 Å and rotated more than 90°, altering the hydrogen bond networks; and (iii) E166 is displaced by 2 Å when complexed with ceftazidime. These analyses explain the increased hydrolytic profile of KPC-2 and suggest that the Asp179Asn substitution results in an alternative complex mechanism leading to CAZ-AVI resistance. The future design of novel β-lactams and β-lactamase inhibitors must consider the mechanistic basis of resistance of this and other threatening carbapenemases. IMPORTANCE Antibiotic resistance is emerging at unprecedented rates and threatens to reach crisis levels. One key

  14. [DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF COMBINED USE OF COMBINED METHOD OF ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY AND POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION TO DETECT OF INTRAUTERINE FETAL INFECTION BY PARVOVIRUS B19].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, N P; Lakatosh, V P; Lakatosh, P V; Malanchuk, O B; Poladich, I V

    2015-01-01

    The combined method of diagnosis parvovirus infection during pregnancy by maternal serum enzyme immunoassay and deoxyribonucleic acid isolation parvovirus B19 polymerase chain reaction in amnniotic fluid and fetal cord blood newborns, can diagnose vertical transmission and anticipate a negative effect on the fetus parvovirus. Lack of maternal IgM antibodies in serum due to parvovirus seroconversion during pregnancy does not exclude the persistence of the virus in the fetus. To analyze the diagnostic value of the method for determining the LHP parvovirus B19 DNA in the amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood of newborns to determine vertical transmission of parvovirus infection when infected mothers B19 during pregnancy.

  15. Clinical and imaging features of neonatal chlamydial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yongli; Peng Yun; Sun Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical and imaging features of chlamydial pneumonia in newborns. Methods: Medical records,chest X-Ray and CT findings of 17 neonates with chlamydia pneumonia were reviewed. The age was ranged from 9.0 to 28.0 days with mean of (16.8 ± 5.8) days. There were 11 males and 6 females. Sixteen were full term infants and one was born post term. All babies were examined with chest X-ray film, and 13 patients also underwent chest CT scan. Serologic test using immunofluorescence method for Chlamydia IgG and IgM antibodies were performed in all patients. Results: All newborns presented with cough but without fever. Positive results of the serologic tests were demonstrated. Chest films showed bilateral hyperventilation in 10 patients, diffuse reticular nodules in 10 patients including nodules mimicking military tuberculosis in 7 patients, and accompanying consolidation in 9 patients. CT features included interstitial reticular nodules in 13 patients with size, density, and distribution varied. Subpleural nodules (11 patients) and fusion of nodules (10 patients) predominated. Bilateral hyperinflation was found in 10 patients, which combined with infiltration in 12 patients, thickening of bronchovascular bundles in 10 patients, and ground glass sign in 5 patients. No pleural effusion and lymphadenopathy was detected in any patient. Conclusions: Bilateral hyperinflation and diffuse interstitial reticular nodules were the most common imaging features of neonatal chlamydial pneumonia. The main clinical characteristic of neonatal chlamydial pneumonia is respiratory symptoms without fever, which is helpful to its diagnosis. (authors)

  16. Respiratory Review of 2012: Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Young-Soon

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality, despite advances in diagnosis and antibacterial treatment. Pneumonia is often misdiagnosed and mistreated up until recently. Recent classification of pneumonia consists of community-acquired pneumonia, health care-associated pneumonia, hospital-acquired pneumonia, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. The etiology, risk factors, and treatment are different among them. This article briefly introduces new concepts and ideas in biomar...

  17. [Detection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus and human parvovirus 4 infections in blood samples among 95 patients with liver disease in Nanjing by nested PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Rui; Zhou, Wei-Min; Liu, Xi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Lou, Yong-Liang; Tan, Wen-Jie

    2013-04-01

    To analyze the infection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus (HBoV) and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in blood samples among patients with liver disease in Nanjing by molecular detection. Nested PCR assays were designed and validated to detect B19, HBoV and PARV4, respectively. The assays were used to screen three parvoviruses in blood samples from 95 patients with different liver disease in Nanjing. The parvovirus infection was analyzed statistically. The detection limits were 10 copies of genomic DNA equivalents per reaction for each assays and the good specificity were observed. The frequency of B19 and HBoV were 2/95 (2.1%) and 9/95 (9.5%) in blood samples respectively. No PARV4 was detected. HBoV was detected in 3/5 patients with drug-induced hepatitis. Both B19 and HBoV infection were detected in blood from patients with liver disease.

  18. Synthesis of protein in host-free reticulate bodies of Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia trachomatis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, T.P.; Miceli, M.; Silverman, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Synthesis of protein by the obligate intracellular parasitic bacteria Chlamydia psittaci (6BC) and Chlamydia trachomatis (serovar L2) isolated from host cells (host-free chlamydiae) was demonstrated for the first time. Incorporation of [ 35 S]methionine and [ 35 S]cysteine into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable material by reticulate bodies of chlamydiae persisted for 2 h and was dependent upon a exogenous source of ATP, an ATP-regenerating system, and potassium or sodium ions. Magnesium ions and amino acids stimulated synthesis; chloramphenicol, rifampin, oligomycin, and carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (a proton ionophore) inhibited incorporation. Ribonucleoside triphosphates (other than ATP) had little stimulatory effect. The optimum pH for host-free synthesis was between 7.0 and 7.5. The molecular weights of proteins synthesized by host-free reticulate bodies closely resembled the molecular weights of proteins synthesized by reticulate bodies in an intracellular environment, and included outer membrane proteins. Elementary bodies of chlamydiae were unable to synthesize protein even when incubated in the presence of 10 mM dithiothreitol, a reducing agent which converted the highly disulfide bond cross-linked major outer membrane protein to monomeric form

  19. Increased seroprevalence of IgG-class antibodies against cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, and varicella-zoster virus in women working in child day care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rijckevorsel Gini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary maternal infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV, parvovirus B19 (B19V, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV may result in adverse pregnancy outcomes like congenital infection or foetal loss. Women working in child day care have an increased exposure to CMV, B19V, and VZV. By comparing the seroprevalence of IgG-class antibodies against CMV, VZV and B19V in female day care workers (DCW with the seroprevalence in women not working in day care this study aimed to assess the association between occupation and infection. Methods A cross-sectional design was used. Out of a random sample of 266 day care centres, demographic data, data on work history, and blood samples were collected from 285 women from 38 centres. In addition, blood samples and basic demographics from women who participated in a cross-sectional survey of the Amsterdam population (2004 were used. All blood samples were tested for IgG-class antibodies against CMV, B19V, and VZV. Results Twenty-seven percent of the DCW were still susceptible to B19V or CMV. Working in day care was independently associated with B19V infection in all DCW (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.2; 95 % CI 1.1–1.3, and with CMV infection in DCW of European origin only (PR 1.7; 95 % CI 1.3–2.3. Almost all women born outside Europe tested seropositive for CMV (96 %. All DCW tested seropositive for VZV, compared to only 94 % of the women not working in day care. Conclusion This study confirms the clear association between employment in child day care centres and infection with CMV and B19V. Intervention policies, like screening of new employees and awareness campaigns emphasizing hygienic measures among DCW, should be implemented urgently to improve the maternal health of these women and the health of their offspring.

  20. The formation and modification of chromatin-like structure of human parvovirus B19 regulate viral genome replication and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanzhou; Hao, Sujuan; Zhang, Junmei; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Hanzhong; Guan, Wuxiang

    2017-03-15

    B19 virus (B19V) is a single stranded virus in the genus of Erythroparvovirus in the family of Parvoviridae. One of the limiting steps of B19V infection is the replication of viral genome which affected the alternative processing of its RNA. Minute virus of mice (MVM) and adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been reported to form chromatin-like structure within hours after infection of cells. However, the role of chromatin-like structure is unclear. In the present study, we found that B19V formed chromatin-like structure after 12h when B19V infectious clone was co-transfected with pHelper plasmid to HEK293T cells. Interestingly, the inhibitor of DNA methyl-transferase (5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine, DAC) inhibited not only the formation of chromatin-like structure, but also the replication of the viral genomic DNA. More importantly, the splicing of the second intron at splice acceptor sites (A2-1, and A2-2) were reduced and polyadenylation at (pA)p increased when transfected HEK293T cells were treated with DAC. Our results showed that the formation and modification of chromatin-like structure are a new layer to regulate B19V gene expression and RNA processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Parvovirus B19 infection presenting with severe erythroid aplastic crisis during pregnancy in a woman with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and alpha-thalassemia trait: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Ching; Chen, Chin-Shan; Wang, Wei-Yao; Ma, Jui-Shan; Shu, Hwei-Fan; Fan, Frank S

    2015-03-12

    Parvovirus B19 virus commonly causes subclinical infection, but it can prove fatal to the fetus during pregnancy and cause severe anemia in an adult with hemolytic diseases. We present the case of a woman with autoimmune hemolytic anemia who was diagnosed with parvovirus B19-induced transient aplastic crisis during her second trimester of pregnancy and faced the high risk of both fetal and maternal complications related to this specific viral infection. To the best of our knowledge, the experience of successful intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for B19 virus infection during pregnancy, as in our case, is limited. A 28-year-old and 20-week pregnant Chinese woman with genetically confirmed alpha-thalassemia trait was diagnosed with cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia and suffered from transient aplastic crisis caused by B19 virus infection. She received intravenous immunoglobulin treatment to reduce the risk of hydrops fetalis. Her peripheral blood reticulocyte percentage recovered, but anemia persisted, so she underwent several courses of high dose intravenous dexamethasone for controlling her underlying hemolytic problem. Finally, her hemoglobin levels remained stable with no need of erythrocyte transfusion, and a healthy baby boy was naturally delivered. Parvovirus B19 virus infection should be considered when a sudden exacerbation of anemia occurs in a patient with hemolytic disease, and the possible fetal complications caused by maternal B19 virus infection during pregnancy should not be ignored. Close monitoring and adequate management can keep both mother and fetus safe.

  2. A novel synthetic peptide microarray assay detects Chlamydia species-specific antibodies in animal and human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Konrad; Rahman, Kh Shamsur; Schnee, Christiane; Müller, Elke; Peisker, Madlen; Schumacher, Thomas; Schubert, Evelyn; Ruettger, Anke; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard; Ehricht, Ralf

    2018-03-16

    Serological analysis of Chlamydia (C.) spp. infections is still mainly based on micro-immunofluorescence and ELISA. To overcome the limitations of conventional serology, we have designed a novel microarray carrying 52 synthetic peptides representing B-cell epitopes from immunodominant proteins of all 11 chlamydial species. The new assay has been validated using monospecific mouse hyperimmune sera. Subsequently, serum samples from cattle, sheep and humans with a known history of chlamydial infection were examined. For instance, the specific humoral response of sheep to treatment with a C. abortus vaccine has been visualized against a background of C. pecorum carriership. In samples from humans, dual infection with C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae could be demonstrated. The experiments revealed that the peptide microarray assay was capable of simultaneously identifying specific antibodies to each Chlamydia spp. The actual assay represents an open platform test that can be complemented through future advances in Chlamydia proteome research. The concept of the highly parallel multi-antigen microarray proven in this study has the potential to enhance our understanding of antibody responses by defining not only a single quantitative response, but also the pattern of this response. The added value of using peptide antigens will consist in unprecedented serodiagnostic specificity.

  3. Future of human Chlamydia vaccine: potential of self-adjuvanting biodegradable nanoparticles as safe vaccine delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rajnish; Verma, Richa; Dixit, Saurabh; Igietseme, Joseph U; Black, Carolyn M; Duncan, Skyla; Singh, Shree R; Dennis, Vida A

    2018-03-01

    There is a persisting global burden and considerable public health challenge by the plethora of ocular, genital and respiratory diseases caused by members of the Gram-negative bacteria of the genus Chlamydia. The major diseases are conjunctivitis and blinding trachoma, non-gonococcal urethritis, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, tubal factor infertility, and interstitial pneumonia. The failures in screening and other prevention programs led to the current medical opinion that an efficacious prophylactic vaccine is the best approach to protect humans from chlamydial infections. Unfortunately, there is no human Chlamydia vaccine despite successful veterinary vaccines. A major challenge has been the effective delivery of vaccine antigens to induce safe and effective immune effectors to confer long-term protective immunity. The dawn of the era of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles and the adjuvanted derivatives may accelerate the realization of the dream of human vaccine in the foreseeable future. Areas covered: This review focuses on the current status of human chlamydial vaccine research, specifically the potential of biodegradable polymeric nanovaccines to provide efficacious Chlamydia vaccines in the near future. Expert commentary: The safety of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles-based experimental vaccines with or without adjuvants and the array of available chlamydial vaccine candidates would suggest that clinical trials in humans may be imminent. Also, the promising results from vaccine testing in animal models could lead to human vaccines against trachoma and reproductive diseases simultaneously.

  4. Free-living and captive turtles and tortoises as carriers of new Chlamydia spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Mitura

    Full Text Available A variety of Chlamydia species belonging to the Chlamydiaceae family have been reported in reptilian hosts but scarce data about their occurrence in turtles and tortoises are available. In this study, research was conducted to acquire information on invasive alien species (IAS of turtles and indigenous turtles and tortoises, living both free and in captivity, as possible reservoirs of Chlamydiaceae. Analysis of specimens (pharyngeal and cloacal swabs and tissues from 204 turtles and tortoises revealed an overall Chlamydiaceae prevalence of 18.3% and 28.6% among free-living and captive animals respectively, with variable levels of shedding. Further testing conducted with a species-specific real-time PCR and microarray test was unsuccessful. Subsequently sequencing was applied to genotype the Chlamydiaceae-positive samples. Almost the full lengths of the 16S rRNA and ompA genes as well as the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (IGS and 23S rRNA domain I were obtained for 14, 20 and 8 specimens respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons revealed two distinct branches. Group 1 (10 specimens, specific to freshwater turtles and reported here for the first time, was most closely related to Chlamydia (C. pneumoniae strains and the newly described Candidatus C. sanzinia. Group 2 (four specimens, detected in Testudo spp. samples, showed highest homology to C. pecorum strains but formed a separate sub-branch. Finally, molecular analysis conducted on positive samples together with their geographical distribution in places distant from each other strongly suggest that Group 1 specimens correspond to a new species in the Chlamydiaceae family. In-depth studies of Chlamydia spp. from turtles and tortoises are needed to further characterise these atypical strains and address arising questions about their pathogenicity and zoonotic potential.

  5. Chlamydia psittaci in birds of prey, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Maria; Christerson, Linus; Waldenström, Jonas; Lindberg, Peter; Helander, Björn; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Herrmann, Björn; Olsen, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia psittaci is an intracellular bacterium primarily causing respiratory diseases in birds but may also be transmitted to other animals, including humans. The prevalence of the pathogen in wild birds in Sweden is largely unknown. DNA was extracted from cloacae swabs and screened for C. psittaci by using a 23S rRNA gene PCR assay. Partial 16S rRNA and ompA gene fragments were sequence determined and phylogenies were analysed by the neighbour-joining method. The C. psittaci prevalence was 1.3% in 319 Peregrine Falcons and White-tailed Sea Eagles, vulnerable top-predators in Sweden. 16S rRNA and ompA gene analysis showed that novel Chlamydia species, as well as novel C. psittaci strains, are to be found among wild birds.

  6. Chlamydia psittaci in birds of prey, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Blomqvist

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chlamydia psittaci is an intracellular bacterium primarily causing respiratory diseases in birds but may also be transmitted to other animals, including humans. The prevalence of the pathogen in wild birds in Sweden is largely unknown. Methods: DNA was extracted from cloacae swabs and screened for C. psittaci by using a 23S rRNA gene PCR assay. Partial 16S rRNA and ompA gene fragments were sequence determined and phylogenies were analysed by the neighbour-joining method. Results and conclusion: The C. psittaci prevalence was 1.3% in 319 Peregrine Falcons and White-tailed Sea Eagles, vulnerable top-predators in Sweden. 16S rRNA and ompA gene analysis showed that novel Chlamydia species, as well as novel C. psittaci strains, are to be found among wild birds.

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis Mip-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, AG; Rousch, DA; Birkelund, Svend

    1992-01-01

    A 27 kDa Chlamydia trachomatis Mip-like protein with homology of a 175-amino-acid C-terminal fragment to the surface-exposed Legionella pneumophila mip-gene product has previously been described. In this paper the entire chlamydia Mip-like sequence of C. trachomatis serovar L2 (lymphogranuloma...... venereum (LGV) biovar) is presented. The sequence shows high similarity to the legionella Mip protein and its C-terminal region, like that of the legionella Mip, has high amino acid similarity to eukaryotic and prokaryotic FK506-binding proteins. The chlamydial mip-like gene was detected by polymerase...... chain reaction (PCR) in other C. trachomatis serovars and by sequencing of the mip-like genes of serovars B and E (trachoma biovar) was shown to be highly conserved within the two major biovars of C. trachomatis. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant Mip-like protein failed...

  8. Chlamydia and Male Lower Urinary Tract Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Suk; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Of the chlamydia species that can cause infections in humans, C. trachomatis is responsible for lower urinary tract diseases in men and women. C. trachomatis infections are prevalent worldwide, but current research is focused on females, with the burden of disease and infertility sequelae considered to be a predominantly female problem. However, a role for this pathogen in the development of male urethritis, epididymitis, and orchitis is widely accepted. Also, it can cause complications such ...

  9. NS1 specific CD8+ T-cells with effector function and TRBV11 dominance in a patient with parvovirus B19 associated inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Streitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parvovirus B19 (B19V is the most commonly detected virus in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs from patients with inflammatory cardiomyopathy (DCMi. Despite the importance of T-cells in antiviral defense, little is known about the role of B19V specific T-cells in this entity. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An exceptionally high B19V viral load in EMBs (115,091 viral copies/mug nucleic acids, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and serum was measured in a DCMi patient at initial presentation, suggesting B19V viremia. The B19V viral load in EMBs had decreased substantially 6 and 12 months afterwards, and was not traceable in PBMCs and the serum at these times. Using pools of overlapping peptides spanning the whole B19V proteome, strong CD8(+ T-cell responses were elicited to the 10-amino-acid peptides SALKLAIYKA (19.7% of all CD8(+ cells and QSALKLAIYK (10% and additional weaker responses to GLCPHCINVG (0.71% and LLHTDFEQVM (0.06%. Real-time RT-PCR of IFNgamma secretion-assay-enriched T-cells responding to the peptides, SALKLAIYKA and GLCPHCINVG, revealed a disproportionately high T-cell receptor Vbeta (TRBV 11 expression in this population. Furthermore, dominant expression of type-1 (IFNgamma, IL2, IL27 and T-bet and of cytotoxic T-cell markers (Perforin and Granzyme B was found, whereas gene expression indicating type-2 (IL4, GATA3 and regulatory T-cells (FoxP3 was low. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that B19V Ag-specific CD8(+ T-cells with effector function are involved in B19V associated DCMi. In particular, a dominant role of TRBV11 and type-1/CTL effector cells in the T-cell mediated antiviral immune response is suggested. The persistence of B19V in the endomyocardium is a likely antigen source for the maintenance of CD8(+ T-cell responses to the identified epitopes.

  10. Congenital and neonatal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Michael D

    2007-09-01

    The greatest risk of death from pneumonia in childhood is in the neonatal period. It is estimated that pneumonia contributes to between 750000-1.2 million neonatal deaths annually, accounting for 10% of global child mortality. Congenital and neonatal pneumonias are often a difficult disease to identify and treat, with clinical manifestations often being non-specific. Many of the normal lung defences are compromised in the fetus and neonate, leading to an increased susceptibility to infection. The aetiology and epidemiology of congenital and neonatal pneumonias will depend on the clinical setting and population that the baby belongs to, the stage in the perinatal period, the gestational age of the baby and the definition of pneumonia. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention strategies are therefore also dependent on these factors, and will differ depending on the clinical setting. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning congenital and neonatal pneumonia worldwide and discusses future directions in the prevention of the disease.

  11. Pneumonia - Forgotten No More

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Chapman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CommentaryPneumonia - Forgotten No MoreChapman, P.L.Pneumonia is the leading cause of death in children worldwide and kills an estimated 1.2 million children under the age of five every year; more than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Relatively few resources have been committed to addressing the problem of childhood pneumonia, particularly in resource poor settings. Yet effective interventions are available but reach too few children.

  12. RNA Binding Protein RBM38 Regulates Expression of the 11-kDa Protein of Parvovirus B19 which Facilitates Viral DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaie, Safder S; Chen, Aaron Yun; Huang, Chun; Xu, Peng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Du, Aifang; Qiu, Jianming

    2018-02-07

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) expresses a single precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), which undergoes alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation to generate 12 viral mRNA transcripts that encode two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2) and three nonstructural proteins (NS1, 7.5-kDa, and 11-kDa). Splicing at the second 5' donor site (D2) of the B19V pre-mRNA is essential for the expression of VP2 and 11-kDa. We have previously identified that a cis -acting intronic splicing enhancer 2 (ISE2) that lies immediately after the D2 site facilitates recognition of the D2 donor for its efficient splicing. In this study, we report that ISE2 is critical for expression of the 11-kDa viral non-structural protein. We found that ISE2 harbors a consensus RNA-binding motif protein 38 (RBM38) binding sequence-5' -UGUGUG-3'. RBM38 is expressed during the middle stage of erythropoiesis. We first confirmed that the RBM38 binds specifically with the ISE2 element in vitro. Knockdown of RBM38 significantly decreases the level of the spliced mRNA at D2 that encodes 11-kDa protein and, thereafter, expression of the 11-kDa protein, but not the D2-spliced mRNA that encodes VP2. Importantly, we found that the 11-kDa protein enhances viral DNA replication and virion release. Accordingly, knockdown of RBM38 decreases virus replication via downregulating 11-kDa expression. Taken together, these results suggest that the 11-kDa protein facilitates B19V DNA replication, and that RBM38 is an essential host factor for B19V pre-mRNA splicing and for the expression of the 11-kDa protein. IMPORTANCE B19V is a human pathogen that can cause fifth disease, arthropathy, anemia in immune compromised patients and sickle cell disease patients, myocarditis, and hydrops fetalis in pregnant women. Human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) are most susceptible to B19V infection and fully support viral DNA replication. The exclusive tropism of B19V to erythroid lineage cells is not only dependent on the expression of viral

  13. The History of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the United States in the 1930s, although the pathogen was not known, atypical pneumonia was clinically distinguished from pneumococcal pneumonia by its resistance to sulfonamides. Reimann (1938) reported seven patients with an unusual form of tracheo bronchopneumonia and severe constitutional symptoms. He believed the clinical picture of this disease differed from that of the disease caused by influenza viruses or known bacteria and instead suspected "primary atypical pneumonia." For many years, the responsible infectious agent was tentatively classified as a filterable virus that could pass through a Seitz filter to remove bacteria and was reported to be a psittacosis-like or new virus. After that, Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) identified an agent that was the principal cause of primary atypical pneumonia using cotton rats, hamsters, and chick embryos. Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) did not perform an inoculation study in human volunteers. During the 1940s, there were three groups engaged in discovering the etiology of the primary atypical pneumonia. (1) Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases Diseases directed by John Dingle, (2) Dr. Monroe Eaton's group, the Virus Research Laboratory of the California State Public Health Department, (3) The Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research directed by Horsfall. During 1940s, the members of the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases concluded that the bacteria-free filtrates obtained from the patients, presumably containing a virus, could induce primary atypical pneumonia in human volunteers via Pinehurst trials. During 1950s, serological approaches for identification of the Eaton agent developed such as Fluorescent-Stainable Antibody, and at the beginning of the1960s, the Eaton agent successfully grew in media, and finally accepted as a cause of primary atypical pneumonia. Thus, technical difficulties with visualizing the agent and failure to recognize the full significance of the Pinehurst

  14. Parvovirus B19 NS1 protein induces cell cycle arrest at G2-phase by activating the ATR-CDC25C-CDK1 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 (B19V infection of primary human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs arrests infected cells at both late S-phase and G2-phase, which contain 4N DNA. B19V infection induces a DNA damage response (DDR that facilitates viral DNA replication but is dispensable for cell cycle arrest at G2-phase; however, a putative C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD2 within NS1 is responsible for G2-phase arrest. To fully understand the mechanism underlying B19V NS1-induced G2-phase arrest, we established two doxycycline-inducible B19V-permissive UT7/Epo-S1 cell lines that express NS1 or NS1mTAD2, and examined the function of the TAD2 domain during G2-phase arrest. The results confirm that the NS1 TAD2 domain plays a pivotal role in NS1-induced G2-phase arrest. Mechanistically, NS1 transactivated cellular gene expression through the TAD2 domain, which was itself responsible for ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related activation. Activated ATR phosphorylated CDC25C at serine 216, which in turn inactivated the cyclin B/CDK1 complex without affecting nuclear import of the complex. Importantly, we found that the ATR-CHK1-CDC25C-CDK1 pathway was activated during B19V infection of EPCs, and that ATR activation played an important role in B19V infection-induced G2-phase arrest.

  15. THE PREVALENCE OF CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS INFECTION IN SAINT-PETERSBURG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Kulyashova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Chlamydia trachomatis causes various diseases of reproductive organs. Only limited data on the incidence of urogenital chlamydia infection in the Russian Federation are available. The main goal of this study was to detect the prevalence of infection associated with Chlamydia trachomatis in citizens of St.Petersburg. Overall 3833 individuals including 2190 children and adolescents aged from 0 to 18 years old and 1643 adults aged 19–70 years old were tested in 2008–2010. This group included patients with acute and chronic pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility as well as patients without clinical symptoms of Chlamydia infection. The high level of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among newborns and dramatic increase of the infection among adolescents were determined. These results support urgent needs to develop adequate preventive measures to control Chlamydia trachomatis infection in the population. The effectiveness of different laboratory tests to detect Chlamydia trachomatis infection depends on the causative agent localization in the macroorganism, on acuity of infection process and on immune response. The combined using of different laboratory tests give the possibility to obtain objective results about Chlamydia etiology role in inflammatory disease of urogenital tract as well as about prevalence of infection in regions of the country.

  16. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section 866.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Chlamydia and provides...

  17. Production of labelled gammaglobulin for the detection of chlamydia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, G.; Dimitrova, Zl. (Akademiya na Selskostopanskite Nauki, Sofia (Bulgaria). Veterinaren Inst. za Infektsiozni i Parazitni Bolesti); Martinov, Sv.

    1981-01-01

    It was concluded that the main condition for the production of high titer labelled gammaglobulins was to obtain purified and concentrated Chlamydial antigens and use these with an adjuvant. To indicate Chlamydia in testing the conjugates it is essential to prepare standard test lamellas infected at high multiplicity of purified and concentrated Chlamydia.

  18. Prevalence of chlamydia trachomatis in patients attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study objective: To determine the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in patients presenting for termination of pregnancy. Chlamydia trachomatis is associated with severe morbidity and determining the prevalence would be a big step forward towards possible instituting a screening process or a universal ...

  19. Analysis of glycosidases activity in Chlamydia trachomatis L2 serotype

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlamydiae are prokaryotic, gram negative, intracellular parasites, causing a number of human diseases with serious sequelae. The exact mechanism of chlamydial attachment and entry into the host cell is still unclear. Chlamydia trachomatis, SA2F (L2) was tested for the activity of glycosidases. Glycosidases are involved ...

  20. Prevalence of genital Chlamydia and Gonococcal infections in at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the prevalence of genital chlamydia and gonococcal infections in women at risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections in the Kumasi metropolis, Ghana. Design: Structured interviews and clinical examination of participants and obtaining vaginal swabs to test for gonorrhoea and chlamydia infections.

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis IgG antibodies seroprevalence among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlamydia infection is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in humans caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. This study ... Hence, there is need to institute appropriate prevention and control measures against the transmission of the disease especially among those at risk of contracting the disease.

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis and placental inflammation in early preterm delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.I.J.G. Rours (Ingrid); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); A. Ott (Alewijn); H.F. Willemse; R. de Groot (Ronald); L.J.I. Zimmermann (Luc); R.F. Kornelisse (René); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); R.P.A.J. Verkooijen (Roel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractChlamydia trachomatis may infect the placenta and subsequently lead to preterm delivery. Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis and signs of placental inflammation in women who delivered at 32 weeks gestation or less. Setting: placental

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis and placental inflammation in early preterm delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rours, G.I.J.G.; Krijger, R.R. de; Ott, A.; Willemse, H.F.; Groot, R. de; Zimmermann, L.J.; Kornelisse, R.F.; Verbrugh, H.A.; Verkooijen, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis may infect the placenta and subsequently lead to preterm delivery. Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis and signs of placental inflammation in women who delivered at 32 weeks gestation or less. Setting: placental histology and

  4. In vivo activities of Baicalin against Chlamydia trachomatis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-03-15

    Mar 15, 2010 ... Our previous studies have shown that Baicalin could effectively inhibit Chlamydia trachomatis in vitro. In this study, Baicalin was tested for potential antichlamydial activity using a murine genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection model. It was demonstrated that Baicalin significantly reduced C. trachomatis.

  5. Seroevidence Of Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection In Infertile Male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Given the lack of information concerning the role of Chlamydia trachomatis in male infertility, it has become imperative to analyse the quality of semen of male with seroevidence of antibody to Chlamydia trachomatis infection. A total of 156 male patients attending the Human Reproduction Research Programme/Invitro ...

  6. Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment of Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Pneumonia Pneumonia Symptoms, Causes, and Risk Factors Anyone can get ... risk for pneumonia. What Are the Symptoms of Pneumonia? Pneumonia symptoms can vary from mild to severe, ...

  7. Pneumonia Can Be Prevented -- Vaccines Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Pneumonia Can Be Prevented—Vaccines Can Help Language: English ( ... with pneumonia. World Pneumonia Day is November 12th. Pneumonia Affects the Young and Old Pneumonia is an ...

  8. Detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens causing atypical pneumonia by multiplex Lightmix®RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karoline; Springer, Burkard; Imkamp, Frank; Opota, Onya; Greub, Gilbert; Keller, Peter M

    2018-04-01

    Pneumonia is a severe infectious disease. In addition to common viruses and bacterial pathogens (e.g. Streptococcus pneumoniae), fastidious respiratory pathogens like Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella spp. can cause severe atypical pneumonia. They do not respond to penicillin derivatives, which may cause failure of antibiotic empirical therapy. The same applies for infections with B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, the cause of pertussis disease, that may present atypically and need to be treated with macrolides. Moreover, these fastidious bacteria are difficult to identify by culture or serology, and therefore often remain undetected. Thus, rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens causing atypical pneumonia is crucial. We performed a retrospective method evaluation study to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the new, commercially available Lightmix ® multiplex RT-PCR assay that detects these fastidious bacterial pathogens causing atypical pneumonia. In this retrospective study, 368 clinical respiratory specimens, obtained from patients suffering from atypical pneumonia that have been tested negative for the presence of common agents of pneumonia by culture and viral PCR, were investigated. These clinical specimens have been previously characterized by singleplex RT-PCR assays in our diagnostic laboratory and were used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the respiratory multiplex Lightmix ® RT-PCR. The multiplex RT-PCR displayed a limit of detection between 5 and 10 DNA copies for different in-panel organisms and showed identical performance characteristics with respect to specificity and sensitivity as in-house singleplex RT-PCRs for pathogen detection. The Lightmix ® multiplex RT-PCR assay represents a low-cost, time-saving and accurate diagnostic tool with high throughput potential. The time-to-result using an automated DNA extraction device for respiratory specimens followed by multiplex RT-PCR detection was

  9. Diagnosis of in utero Parvovirus B19 infection and maternal immune response - the relevance of linear epitopes and advanced serologic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection in utero causing fetal anemia and non-immune hydrops fetalis (NIHF) is a potentially life-threatening event for the fetus. Postexpositional non-invasive diagnosis is based on maternal IgG/IgM response and detection of viral genome in maternal blood. Serologic testing directs prenatal follow-up. Fetal infection is confirmed by polymerase chain reaction or in situ hybridization in fetal blood and/or amniotic fluid cells. The performance of serologic tests is significant in order to direct pre- and perinatal care at rational use of resources. Timing of diagnostic procedures and knowledge of the time course of infection in pregnant, asymptomatic women are critical. IgM negative testing in the presence of prolonged viremia may complicate individual risk analysis in pregnancy. Recently, advanced IgG avidity assays and epitope-type specific assays (IgG ETS EIA) have been re-evaluated. Epidemiology, clinical relevance and management of B19V infection in pregnancy. A review of the current literature (November 1984 - May 2009) and evaluation of current information on performance and predictive value of molecular and VP1/VP2 antigen-based IgG tests directed at the diagnosis of materno-fetal B19V infection and detection of past immunity. New aspects of B19V-associated fetal disease other than anemia/NIHF are also covered. An overview of immunology and clinical relevance of B19V infection in pregnancy, of the potential value of advanced serologic testing and fields of future research. In the absence of a commercially available vaccine, serologic tests remain important tools in individual risk analysis of pregnant women exposed to B19V. Sequential application of IgG avidity and IgG ETS EIAs may improve risk stratification and timing of invasive testing in B19V-exposed pregnancies, in particular with IgM-negativity and/or persistent DNAemia. Prospective evaluation of these test systems correlated to fetal outcome in order to reduce fetal morbidity

  10. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection in Pregnancy: The Global Challenge of Preventing Adverse Pregnancy and Infant Outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Adachi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening and treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs in pregnancy represents an overlooked opportunity to improve the health outcomes of women and infants worldwide. Although Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common treatable bacterial STI, few countries have routine pregnancy screening and treatment programs. We reviewed the current literature surrounding Chlamydia trachomatis in pregnancy, particularly focusing on countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. We discuss possible chlamydial adverse pregnancy and infant health outcomes (miscarriage, stillbirth, ectopic pregnancy, preterm birth, neonatal conjunctivitis, neonatal pneumonia, and other potential effects including HIV perinatal transmission and review studies of chlamydial screening and treatment in pregnancy, while simultaneously highlighting research from resource-limited countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia.

  11. Pneumonia. Treatment and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Joshua T; Fine, Michael J; Limper, Andrew H; Murray, Patrick R; Chen, Bill B; Lin, Philana Ling

    2014-08-01

    Pneumonia remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality despite advances in treatment and therapy. The "Pneumonia: Treatment and Diagnosis" session of the Pittsburgh International Lung Conference examined topics related to improving care of patients with pneumonia. These topics included the process and quality of care for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), diagnosis and treatment of emerging fungal pathogens, an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of different diagnostic modalities, and an example of how basic science is exploring immunomodulatory strategies for pneumonia treatment. Systematic health care provider and institutional improvements can decrease mortality rates in CAP, particularly in patients with increasingly complex comorbidities. Aspects of current guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of fungal pneumonia were reviewed through a series of case presentations. Proper treatment of pneumonia hinges on correct pathogen identification but is complicated by the variety of diagnostic assays with variable specificity, sensitivity, and interpretation. In addressing this topic, Dr. Patrick Murray, Ph.D., discussed a range of diagnostic tests for a variety of pathogens and guidelines for their use. In addition to the current state of CAP treatment, Bill (Beibei) Chen, M.D., Ph.D., presented a new potential therapeutic agent called forsythin, an immunomodulatory compound derived from a plant used in traditional Chinese medicine. These topics, ranging from institution-sized policy to interactions at the molecular scale, paint a broad perspective of the efforts against pneumonia.

  12. Secondary acute pneumonias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Pathological changes, promoting the development of secondary pneumonias, are investigated. To this group belong: blood circulation disturbance in small circle, bronchial passability disturbance, aspiration of liquids, gases and vapors, infections and purulent processes, intoxications, injuries, operative interference. Roetgenologic symptomatics of each secondary acute pneumonia form is presented in detail

  13. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordonnier, Catherine; Cesaro, Simone; Maschmeyer, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii can cause life-threatening pneumonia following treatment for haematological malignancies or after HSCT. The mortality rate of P. jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in these patients is 30%-60%, especially after HSCT. The clinical presentation of PCP in haematology differs from that ...

  14. Osteopontin promotes host defense during Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, G. J. W.; Hoogerwerf, J. J.; de Vos, A. F.; Florquin, S.; van der Poll, T.

    2010-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein involved in inflammatory processes, some of which is mediated by CD44. The aim of this study was to determine the role of OPN during K. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia. Wild-type (WT) and

  15. Identification of the major structural and nonstructural proteins encoded by human parvovirus B19 and mapping of their genes by procaryotic expression of isolated genomic fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotmore, S.F.; McKie, V.C.; Anderson, L.J.; Astell, C.R.; Tattersall, P.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma from a child with homozygous sickle-cell disease, sampled during the early phase of an aplastic crisis, contained human parvovirus B19 virions. Plasma taken 10 days later (during the convalescent phase) contained both immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against two viral polypeptides with apparent molecular weights for 83,000 and 58,000 which were present exclusively in the particulate fraction of the plasma taken during the acute phase. These two protein species comigrated at 110S on neutral sucrose velocity gradients with the B19 viral DNA and thus appear to constitute the viral capsid polypeptides. The B19 genome was molecularly cloned into a bacterial plasmid vector. Two expression constructs containing B19 sequences from different halves of the viral genome were obtained, which directed the synthesis, in bacteria, of segments of virally encoded protein. These polypeptide fragments were then purified and used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies against a protein sequence specified between nucleotides 2897 and 3749 recognized both the 83- and 58-kilodalton capsid polypeptides in aplastic plasma taken during the acute phase and detected similar proteins in the similar proteins in the tissues of a stillborn fetus which had been infected transplacentally with B19. Antibodies against a protein sequence encoded in the other half of the B19 genome (nucleotides 1072 through 2044) did not react specifically with any protein in plasma taken during the acute phase but recognized three nonstructural polypeptides of 71, 63, and 52 kilodaltons present in the liver and, at lower levels, in some other tissues of the transplacentally infected fetus

  16. Identification of the major structural and nonstructural proteins encoded by human parvovirus B19 and mapping of their genes by procaryotic expression of isolated genomic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotmore, S.F.; McKie, V.C.; Anderson, L.J.; Astell, C.R.; Tattersall, P.

    1986-11-01

    Plasma from a child with homozygous sickle-cell disease, sampled during the early phase of an aplastic crisis, contained human parvovirus B19 virions. Plasma taken 10 days later (during the convalescent phase) contained both immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against two viral polypeptides with apparent molecular weights for 83,000 and 58,000 which were present exclusively in the particulate fraction of the plasma taken during the acute phase. These two protein species comigrated at 110S on neutral sucrose velocity gradients with the B19 viral DNA and thus appear to constitute the viral capsid polypeptides. The B19 genome was molecularly cloned into a bacterial plasmid vector. Two expression constructs containing B19 sequences from different halves of the viral genome were obtained, which directed the synthesis, in bacteria, of segments of virally encoded protein. These polypeptide fragments were then purified and used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies against a protein sequence specified between nucleotides 2897 and 3749 recognized both the 83- and 58-kilodalton capsid polypeptides in aplastic plasma taken during the acute phase and detected similar proteins in the similar proteins in the tissues of a stillborn fetus which had been infected transplacentally with B19. Antibodies against a protein sequence encoded in the other half of the B19 genome (nucleotides 1072 through 2044) did not react specifically with any protein in plasma taken during the acute phase but recognized three nonstructural polypeptides of 71, 63, and 52 kilodaltons present in the liver and, at lower levels, in some other tissues of the transplacentally infected fetus.

  17. PRDM1 expression via human parvovirus B19 infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Yao, Li; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Zhang, Wei-Chen; Zhang, Yue-Hua; Wang, Zhe; Yan, Qing-Guo; Guo, Ying; Fan, Lin-Ni; Liu, Yi-Xiong; Huang, Gao-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Ectopic lymphoid follicle infiltration is a key event in Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). Positive regulatory domain zinc finger protein 1 (PRDM1), which is induced by antigen stimulation, can regulate all lymphocyte lineages. Several groups independently demonstrated that human parvovirus B19 (PVB19) is closely associated with HT. Hence, we determined whether PRDM1 is expressed in HT thyroid tissue and whether there is any correlation between PRDM1 expression and PVB19 in the pathogenesis of HT. We detected PRDM1 expression in HT (n = 86), normal thyroid tissue (n = 30), and nontoxic nodular goiter (n = 20) samples using immunohistochemistry. We also detected PVB19 protein in HT samples in a double-blind manner and analyzed the correlation between the 2 proteins using immunofluorescence confocal detection and coimmunoprecipitation. Furthermore, we detected changes of the expression levels of PRDM1 and PVB19 in transfected primary thyroid follicular epithelial cells using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that PRDM1 protein is significantly highly expressed in the injured follicular epithelial cells in HT (83/86 cases) than in normal thyroid cells (0/30 cases) or in nontoxic nodular goiter cells (0/20 cases) (P < .001). In HT, the PRDM1 expression pattern was the same as that of PVB19, whereas PRDM1 and PVB19 were coexistent in the involved epithelial cells. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between PRDM1 and PVB19 (P < .001). In addition, primary thyroid epithelial cells also showed PRDM1 up-regulation after PVB19 NS1 transfection. Our findings suggest a previously unrecognized role of PRDM1 and PVB19 in the pathogenesis of HT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular and clinical evaluation of the acute human parvovirus B19 infection: comparison of two cases in children with sickle cell disease and discussion of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Nanev Slavov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 is a well-known cause of severe conditions in patients with sickle cell disease, but the molecular mechanisms of the infection are insufficiently understood. The different clinical outcome of the acute parvovirus B19 infection in two pediatric patients with sickle cell disease has been examined. One of them developed life-threatening condition requiring emergency transfusions, while the other had asymptomatic infection, diagnosed occasionally. Both cases had high viral load and identical subgenotype, indicating that the viral molecular characteristics play a minimal role in the infection outcome.

  19. Frequência de anticorpos antiparvovírus B19 em artrite reumatoide e lúpus eritematoso sistêmico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemar Pereira da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar a frequência de anticorpos antiparvovírus B19 (B19 em pacientes com artrite reumatoide (AR e lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES, e a possível correlação da soropositividade anti-B19 com a atividade das doenças e a qualidade de vida. Pacientes e métodos: Foram utilizadas amostras séricas de 57 pacientes com AR, 45 com LES e 65 controles sadios. Empregou-se protocolo com dados clínicos, os índices Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS 28, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI e Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ. Realizou-se a sorologia anti-B19 por ensaio imunoenzimático (ELISA. Resultados: A média de idade dos pacientes foi de 42,74 14,09 anos, e a dos controles foi de 38,38 13,42 anos.Tinham doença ativa 79 (77,5% pacientes, e doença inativa 23 (22,5%.Anti-B19 (IgG foi reagente em 49 (86,0% IC 95% (77,0 - 95,0% pacientes com AR, em 38 (84,4% IC 95% (73,9 - 95,0% com LES e em 40 (61,5% IC 95% (49,7 - 73,4% controles (p = 0,002. Anti-B19 (IgM foi reagente em 3 (5,3% IC 95% (0,0 - 11,1% pacientes com AR, em 7 (15,6% IC 95% (5,0 - 26,2% pacientes com LES e em 1 (1,5% IC 95% (0,0 - 4,5% controle (p = 0,011. Não houve correlação da reatividade anti-B19 com a atividade das doenças, os índices DAS 28, SLEDAI e HAQ. Conclusão: O presente estudo demonstrou que a população avaliada está exposta à infecção pelo B19, o que demanda atenção com suas manifestações, principalmente entre os pacientes que apresentam maior risco, como os imunossuprimidos.

  20. [Demonstration of Chlamydia from an equine abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, K; Sachse, K; Sting, R

    2000-02-01

    The isolation and identification of a chlamydial agent from an equine fetus is reported. The fetus was aborted by a mare with respiratory disease and fever in the 9th month of pregnancy. The serum of the mare was investigated by the compliment fixation test. Specific antibodies were detected for chlamydial antigen in a titer of > 1:40 and for equine herpes virus 1 antigen in a titer of 1:32. Pathological lesions were not found in the organs of the fetus. Chlamydiae were detected in the placenta by ELISA and subsequently isolated by cell culture. Using PCR technique the agent was identified as Chlamydophila psittaci.

  1. Role of Atypical Pathogens in the Etiology of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Forest W; Summersgill, James T; Ramirez, Julio A

    2016-12-01

    Atypical pneumonia has been described for over 100 years, but some of the pathogens attributed to it have been identified only in the past decades. The most common pathogens are Chlamydia pneumoniae , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , and Legionella pneumophila . The epidemiology and pathophysiology of these three pathogens have been studied since their discovery, and are reviewed herein to provide better insight when evaluating these patients, which hopefully translates into improved care. The incidence of atypical pathogens has been shown to be approximately 22% worldwide, but this probably varies with location. The history and physical exam of a patient with atypical pneumonia reveals how patients share many signs and symptoms with their counterpart patients who have typical pneumonias; therefore, the diagnosis primarily depends on laboratory identification, which is evolving and improving. What started out as simple, but difficult to yield cultures, has progressed to modern molecular-based testing assays. Treatment is missed if an empiric regimen includes only monotherapy with a β-lactam antimicrobial; so, many country guidelines, including the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia, recommend using a regimen containing either a macrolide or a fluorinated quinolone. Once an atypical pathogen has been identified, evidence trends toward favoring a quinolone, but more data are needed to confirm. The concept of using combination therapy in severe patients is also explored. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Marcadores inflamatórios e anticorpos anti-chlamydia em pacientes com síndrome metabólica

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    Rosecler Riethmuller Franco

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A síndrome metabólica está associada ao aumento de risco de eventos cardiovasculares. Marcadores inflamatórios e anticorpos anti-Chlamydia têm sido relacionados ao desenvolvimento e à progressão da aterosclerose e dos eventos cardiovasculares. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os marcadores inflamatórios interleucina-6 (IL-6 e fator de necrose tumoral-alfa (TNF-α e os anticorpos anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae em pacientes com síndrome metabólica (SM, com e sem eventos cardiovasculares. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal constituído por 147 indivíduos. Desses, 100 (68% com SM e sem eventos cardiovasculares; e 47 (32% com SM e com eventos cardiovasculares. Dos indivíduos que sofreram eventos cardiovasculares, 13 (6,11% apresentam infarto agudo do miocárdio (IAM, e dez (4,7%, acidente vascular cerebral (AVC. O diagnóstico da SM foi determinado pelos critérios do NCEP-ATPIII. RESULTADOS: A média de idade dos sujeitos com eventos cardiovasculares foi de 61,26 ± 8,5 e de 59,32 ± 9,9 nos indivíduos sem esses eventos (p=0,279, havendo predomínio do sexo feminino. O grupo com SM e sem evento apresentou maior peso, altura, IMC e circunferência abdominal. Para os indivíduos com eventos cardiovasculares (p=0,001, os marcadores inflamatórios IL-6 e TNF-α e a doença vascular periférica foram significativamente maiores. Obtiveram-se níveis elevados de anticorpos IgG para Chlamydia pneumoniae no grupo SM, sem eventos e de IgA no grupo com eventos quando comparados os dois grupos. Com relação ao IAM e ao AVC, os anticorpos anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae não demonstraram significância estatística, comparados ao grupo sem eventos cardiovasculares. Associação foi observada com o uso de estatinas, hipoglicemiantes orais, injetáveis e anti-inflamatórios não esteroidais no grupo com esses eventos. CONCLUSÃO: Marcadores inflamatórios encontram-se significativamente elevados em pacientes com SM, com IAM e AVC. Anticorpos anti-Chlamydia n

  3. Chlamydia in canine or feline coronary arteriosclerotic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabarevic Zeljko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are numerous reports linking Chlamydia infection to human coronary atherosclerosis. However, there is a lack of data regarding this correlation in dogs and cats, and there are no reports investigating coronary arteriosclerosis and Chlamydia in these species. The aim of the present study was to examine whether there is a correlation between canine and feline spontaneous atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis and the presence of Chlamydia. Archived histopathological samples of dogs (n = 16 and cats (n = 13 with findings of atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis in heart tissue were examined for the presence of Chlamydiaceae using real-time PCR, ArrayTube Microarray and immunohistochemistry. Additionally, arteriosclerotic lesions of all cases were histologically classified and graded. Results Both canine atherosclerotic cases, and all 14 canine arteriosclerotic cases were negative for Chlamydia. Only one of the 13 arteriosclerotic feline cases was positive for Chlamydia by real-time PCR, revealing C. abortus by ArrayTube Microarray. To our knowledge, this is the first description of C. abortus in a cat. Overall, the type and grade of canine and feline arteriosclerotic lesions revealed similarities, and were predominantly moderate and hyperplastic. Conclusions These findings suggest that there is no obvious correlation between canine and feline coronary arteriosclerosis and the presence of Chlamydia. In order to draw final conclusions about the correlation between Chlamydia and canine atherosclerosis, examination of more samples is required.

  4. Chlamydia in canine or feline coronary arteriosclerotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostaric-Zuckermann, Ivan C; Borel, Nicole; Kaiser, Carmen; Grabarevic, Zeljko; Pospischil, Andreas

    2011-09-09

    There are numerous reports linking Chlamydia infection to human coronary atherosclerosis. However, there is a lack of data regarding this correlation in dogs and cats, and there are no reports investigating coronary arteriosclerosis and Chlamydia in these species. The aim of the present study was to examine whether there is a correlation between canine and feline spontaneous atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis and the presence of Chlamydia. Archived histopathological samples of dogs (n = 16) and cats (n = 13) with findings of atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis in heart tissue were examined for the presence of Chlamydiaceae using real-time PCR, ArrayTube Microarray and immunohistochemistry. Additionally, arteriosclerotic lesions of all cases were histologically classified and graded. Both canine atherosclerotic cases, and all 14 canine arteriosclerotic cases were negative for Chlamydia. Only one of the 13 arteriosclerotic feline cases was positive for Chlamydia by real-time PCR, revealing C. abortus by ArrayTube Microarray. To our knowledge, this is the first description of C. abortus in a cat. Overall, the type and grade of canine and feline arteriosclerotic lesions revealed similarities, and were predominantly moderate and hyperplastic. These findings suggest that there is no obvious correlation between canine and feline coronary arteriosclerosis and the presence of Chlamydia. In order to draw final conclusions about the correlation between Chlamydia and canine atherosclerosis, examination of more samples is required.

  5. Pneumonia a Varicella zoster Varicella zoster pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Ferreira Santos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A varicela é uma doença infecto contagiosa comum na infância, ocorrendo pouco mais de 2% dos casos em adultos. Desde a década de 80 que a sua incidência nos adultos tem vindo a aumentar, dos quais apenas 7% são seronegativos¹. A pneumonia a Varicella zoster, se bem que rara, constitui a complicação mais grave e mais frequente no adulto. Os autores apresentam um caso clínico ilustrativo de pneumonia a Varicella zoster num adulto fumador e imunocompetente e fazem uma breve revisão teórica sobre o tema.Varicella (chickenpox is a common contagious infection of childhood, with fewer than 2% of the cases occurring in adults. Since the early 1980s the incidence of chickenpox in adults has been increasing and only 7% of them are seronegative for Varicella zoster antibodies. Pneumonia, although rare, is the most common and serious complication of chickenpox infection in adults. The authors present an illustrative case of varicella pneumonia in an immunocompetent adult with smoking habits and make a brief thematic review.

  6. Computed tomographic study on Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Koba, Hiroyuki; Mori, Takuji; Mori, Masaki; Tsunematsu, Kazunori; Natori, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Akira; Doi, Mikio.

    1985-01-01

    Serologically proven 21 patients with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia that showed infiltrative shadows on chest radiograms were studied by computed tomography (CT). Localization of the lesion and the fashion of its progression through the lung were analyzed. Following 3 loci were defined on the basis of the investigations of critical analysis of the chest radiograms, and of radiopathological analysis of the experimental animal model of mycoplasmal pneumonia with soft X-ray image. I: Peribronchial and periarterial interstitium. II: Bronchiole and its surroundings. III: Lung parenchyma, on hilar area as IIIh, on marginal area as IIIm. Even in the early phase of this disease, radiopathological findings on CT have been distributed in all loci mentioned above. The Shadow disappeared from locus III approximately 14th day from the onset. The shadow have remained, however, loci I, II for a long period. Those findings suggest that locus I and II are one of the major focus of Mycoplasma neumoniae pneumonia. Volume loss in the locus III was observed 78 % of the cases at 28th day from the onset. The shadow on locus IIIh was more prominent than locus IIIm. Reported analytical method with CT could be widely applied to disclose a radiopathological details in other infectious diseases of the lung. (author)

  7. Comparison of the population excess fraction of Chlamydia trachomatis infection on pelvic inflammatory disease at 12-months in the presence and absence of Chlamydia testing and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Bethan; Turner, Katy M.E.; Leung, Stella

    2017-01-01

    Background: The impact of Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia) control on the incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is theoretically limited by the proportion of PID caused by chlamydia. We estimate the population excess fraction (PEF) of treated chlamydia infection on PID at 12-months...... chlamydia on PID at 12-months. We undertook a systematic review to identify further studies that reported the risk of PID in women who were tested for chlamydia (infected and uninfected). We used the same method to calculate the PEF in eligible studies then compared all estimates of PEF. Results......: The systematic review identified a single study, a randomised controlled trial of chlamydia screening (POPI-RCT). In the presence of testing and treatment PID at 12-months was attributable to treated (baseline) chlamydia infections (Manitoba: 8.86%(95%CI 7.15-10.75); Denmark: 3.84%(3.26-4.45); screened...

  8. Spontaneous pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis RNA clearance. A cross-sectional study followed by a cohort study of untreated STI clinic patients in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, Martijn S.; van der Loeff, Maarten F. Schim; Morré, Servaas A.; van Dam, Alje P.; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; de Vries, Henry J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia) might contribute to ongoing chlamydia transmission, yet data on spontaneous clearance duration are rare. We examined the prevalence, spontaneous clearance, chlamydial DNA concentration and genotypes of pharyngeal chlamydia among clinic patients

  9. Role of Atypical Bacteria in Hospitalized Patients With Nursing Home-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Junco, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Background: Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) has been identified as one of the leading causes of mortality and hospitalization for long-term care residents. However, current and previous pneumonia guidelines differ on the appropriate management of NHAP in hospitalized patients, specifically in regard to the role of atypical bacteria such as Chlamydiae pneumonia, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella. Objectives: The purpose of this review is to evaluate clinical trials conducted in hospitalized patients with NHAP to determine the prevalence of atypical bacteria and thus the role for empiric antibiotic coverage of these pathogens in NHAP. Methods: Comprehensive MEDLINE (1966-April 2016) and Embase (1980-April 2016) searches were performed using the terms "atypical bacteria", "atypical pneumonia", "nursing-home acquired pneumonia", "pneumonia", "elderly", "nursing homes", and "long term care". Additional articles were retrieved from the review of references cited in the collected studies. Thirteen published clinical trials were identified. Results: In the majority of studies, atypical bacteria were infrequently identified in patients hospitalized with NHAP. However, when an active community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) cohort was available, the rate of atypical bacteria between NHAP and CAP study arms was similar. Only 3 studies in this review adhered to recommended strategies for investigating atypical bacteria; in 2 of these studies, C. pneumoniae was the most common pathogen identified in NHAP cohorts. Conclusion: Although atypical bacteria were uncommon in most NHAP studies in this review, suboptimal microbial investigations were commonly performed. To accurately describe the role of atypical bacteria in NHAP, more studies using validated diagnostic tests are needed.

  10. The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Darmochwal-Kolarz, Dorota; Borowiec-Blinowska, Agnieszka; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection, the risk factors, the impact of the infection on the course of pregnancy and the condition of neonates born from pregnancies complicated by Chlamydia trachomatis infection. 558 pregnant women aged 18-42 yrs, between the 4th and 40th week of pregnancy recruited from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medical Academy Lublin, and 10 men, partners of Chlamydia trachomatis infected patients were included in the study. All patients were examined using an immunoenzymatic method (MEIA). The ligase chain reaction (LCR) method was used only in cases of Chlamydia trachomatis detection with the use of MEIA method, in male partners of infected women and in patients with a cervical erosion and with a mucopurulent cervicitis. There were 64 women and 10 men who were examined using the LCR method. Positive results of MEIA test were found in 10 women (1.8% of studied population). Among men, the infection by Chlamydia trachomatis was present in 9 cases (90%). There were no infections with Chlamydia trachomatis in the group of neonates born from infected mothers. The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection was 1.8% in the studied group. The factors favourable for an infection are: young, unmarried patients, residents of towns or cities and changes in the cervix such as cervicitis or ectopy. In the cases of pathological pregnancy we should take into account Chlamydia trachomatis infections as a cause of abdominal pain or premature uterine contractions. The test towards Chlamydia trachomatis infection should be performed in pregnant patients to decrease the rate of pregnancy complications.

  11. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiere, H A; Niederman, M S

    1998-11-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups, especially the elderly, which is a patient population that continues to grow. Recently the spectrum and clinical picture of pneumonia has been changing as a reflection of this aging population; this requires a reassessment of and a new approach to the patient with pneumonia. Currently, pneumonia patients are classified as having either community-acquired or hospital-acquired infection rather than typical versus atypical. Patients who have CAP are categorized by age, presence of a coexisting medical illness, and the severity of the pneumonia. The rationale behind categorizing patients is to stratify them in terms of mortality risk to help determine the location of therapy (e.g., outpatient, inpatient, intensive care unit) and focus the choice of initial antimicrobial therapy. Once the decision to hospitalize a patient with pneumonia is made, the next step is to decide on an appropriate diagnostic evaluation and antibiotic therapy. Both decisions have evolved over the last several years since the publication of the American Thoracic Society's CAP guidelines. The current approach to the diagnostic work-up of pneumonia stresses a limited role of diagnostic tests and procedures. The antimicrobial regimen has now evolved into one that is empiric in nature and based on the age of the patient, the presence of coexisting medical disease, and the overall severity of the pneumonia. This process is a dynamic once because bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics can further complicate the course of pneumonia therapy, but the impact of resistance on outcome is less clear. Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to penicillin is a prime example of this growing problem, and adjustment to pneumonia therapy may be required. A difficult but not uncommon problem in pneumonia patients is slow recovery and delayed resolution of radiographic infiltrates. Factors that impact

  12. Viremic blood donor found by a rapid screening method in a season of high human parvovirus B19 activity in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Setúbal

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Erythrovirus B19 infection is usually benign but may have serious consequences in patients with hemolytic anemia (transient aplastic crisis, immunodeficiency (in whom persistent infection can lead to chronic bone marrow failure with anemia, or who are in the first or second trimester of gestation (spontaneous abortion, hydrops fetalis, and fetal death. Being non-enveloped, B19 resists most inactivation methods and can be transmitted by transfusion. B19 is difficult to cultivate and native virus is usually obtained from viremic blood. As specific antibodies may be absent, and there is no reliable immunological method for antigen detection, hybridization or polymerase chain reaction are needed for detecting viremia. A rapid method, gel hemagglutination (Diamed ID-Parvovirus B19 Antigen Test, can disclose highly viremic donations, whose elimination lessens the viral burden in pooled blood products and may even render them non-infectious. In order to obtain native antigen and to determine the frequency of viremic donors, we applied this test to blood donors in a period of high viral activity in our community. Positive or indeterminate results were re-tested by dot-blot hybridization. We tested 472 donors in 1998 and 831 ones in 1999. One viremic donor was found in 1999. We suggest that in periods of high community viral activity the gel hemagglutination test may be useful in avoiding highly viremic blood being added to plasma pools or directly transfused to patients under risk.

  13. A highly restricted T-cell receptor dominates the CD8+ T-cell response to parvovirus B19 infection in HLA-A*2402-positive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprowicz, V; Isa, Adiba; Jeffery, K

    2006-01-01

    Six of seven HLA-A*2402-positive individuals with acute parvovirus B19 infections made vigorous CD8-positive cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses to the viral epitope FYTPLADQF. All responders showed highly focused T-cell receptor (TCR) usage, using almost exclusively BV5.1. The BV5.1 TCR dominated...

  14. Glomeruloesclerose segmentar e focal (GESF colapsante associada ao parvovírus B19: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Rubens Ramos de Freitas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Descrever quadro clínico-laboratorial de glomeruloesclerose segmentar e focal (GESF subtipo colapsante em associação com infecção por parvovírus B19 (PVB19. Relato do caso: Paciente feminino, 37 anos, parda, iniciou quadro de faringoalgia e febre aferida com melhora parcial após penicilina. Com uma semana, observou redução de débito urinário e edema de membros inferiores. Tabagista, com histórico familiar e pessoal negativos para hipertensão, diabetes ou nefropatias. À admissão, apresentava-se com oliguria, hipertensão e edema, associados à anemia microcítica e hipocrômica hipoproliferativa, proteinúria nefrótica, hematúria microscópica e alteração da função renal. A investigação reumatológica e sorologias para hepatites e HIV foram negativas. Ultrassonografia de rins e vias urinárias sem alterações. PCR foi positivo para PVB19 em aspirado de medula óssea e sangue. A biópsia renal conclusiva de GESF subtipo colapsante. Ocorreu remissão espontânea com duas semanas do quadro. Em retorno ambulatorial, o PCR em sangue periférico foi negativo para PVB19, sugerindo associação de GESF colapsante a fase aguda ou reativação da infecção viral. Conclusão : Este relato registra a associação temporal entre GESF colapsante e viremia pelo PVB19, seja por infecção aguda ou reativação de infecção latente. A associação GESF colapsante e PVB19 é descrita na literatura, com demonstração da presença do vírus em tecido renal, porém, a real relação do vírus na patogênese dessa glomerulopatia permanece indefinida.

  15. The added value of chlamydia screening between 2008-2010 in reaching young people in addition to chlamydia testing in regular care; an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Liere, Geneviève; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole; van Bergen, Jan; Götz, Hannelore M.; Stals, Frans; Hoebe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Internet-based Chlamydia Screening Implementation (chlamydia screening programme) was introduced in the Netherlands in 2008-2010 to detect and treat asymptomatic infections and to limit ongoing transmission through annual testing and treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis in young people

  16. Acute interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuervo M, Francisco; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge; Ojeda, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    The paper refers to a 71 year-old patient, to who is diagnosed acute interstitial pneumonia; with square of 20 days of evolution of cough dry emetizant, fever, general uneasiness, migraine, progressive dyspnoea and lost of weight

  17. What Is Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fungus is found in the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys. Cryptococcus . This fungus is found throughout the ... of breathing in some areas of your chest. Diagnostic tests If your doctor thinks you have pneumonia, ...

  18. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of human parvovirus B19 infection in an urban area in Brazil (Niterói city area, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Artimos de Oliveira

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to analyse the clinical and epidemiological data from human parvovirus B19 cases in a six-year study of rash diseases conduct in an urban area in Brazil (Niterói city area, State of Rio de Janeiro. A total of 673 patients with acute rash diseases were seen at two primary health care units and at a general hospital. A clotted blood sample was collected from all subjects at the time of consultation. Forty-nine per cent (330 cases of the patients were negative for dengue, rubella and measles IgM or for low avidity IgG to HHV-6. Of these 330, 105 (31.8% were identified as IgM positive to parvovirus B19 by using an antibody capture EIA. During the study period, three distinct peaks of parvovirus infection were detected, suggesting that the disease appears to cycle in approximately 4-5 years. B19 infection was characterized by variable combinations of fever, flu-like symptoms, arthropathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Frequency of fever and arthropathy was substantially higher in adults, 75% [chi2 (1 D.F. = 11.39, p = 0.0007] and 62.5% [chi2 (1 D.F. = 29.89, p = 0.0000], respectively. "Slapped-cheek" appearance and reticular or lace-like rash were seen in only 30.1% of the children. No adult presented this typical rash. The lack of the typical rash pattern in a large proportion of parvovirus B19 and the similarity of clinical manifestations to other rash diseases, specially to rubella, highlight the difficulty of diagnosing B19 infection on clinical grounds alone.

  19. Pneumonia a Varicella zoster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Ferreira Santos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A varicela é uma doença infecto contagiosa comum na infância, ocorrendo pouco mais de 2% dos casos em adultos. Desde a década de 80 que a sua incidência nos adultos tem vindo a aumentar, dos quais apenas 7% são seronegativos1. A pneumonia a Varicella zoster, se bem que rara, constitui a complicação mais grave e mais frequente no adulto.Os autores apresentam um caso clínico ilustrativo de pneumonia a Varicella zoster num adulto fumador e imunocompetente e fazem uma breve revisão teórica sobre o tema. Abstract: Varicella (chickenpox is a common contagious infection of childhood, with fewer than 2% of the cases occurring in adults. Since the early 1980s the incidence of chickenpox in adults has been increasing and only 7% of them are seronegative for Varicella zoster antibodies. Pneumonia, although rare, is the most common and serious complication of chickenpox infection in adults.The authors present an illustrative case of varicella pneumonia in an immunocompetent adult with smoking habits and make a brief thematic review. Palavras-chave: Varicela, pneumonia, ARDS, Key-words: Chickenpox, pneumonia, ARDS

  20. NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia trachomatis infection to Coccidioidomycosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia trachomatis infection to Coccidioidomycosis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases...

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia trachomatis infection to Coccidioidomycosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Chlamydia trachomatis infection to Coccidioidomycosis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases...

  2. Cost-effectiveness of Chlamydia Vaccination Programs for Young Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-06-19

    Dr. Kwame Owusu-Edusei discusses the importance of chlamydia vaccine development.  Created: 6/19/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/22/2015.

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy in Chlamydia Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Syniachenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Relevance. Peripheral neuropathy (PNP in urogenital chlamydia reactive arthritis (CRA is described as single observations, and many clinical and pathogenetic aspects of this lesion of the nervous system remain unclear. Objective of the study: to evaluate the incidence and nature of the clinical course of PNP in CRA, the connection of the nerve and joint injuries, to explore the questions of pathogenetic constructions of this neuropathy, to identify risk factors. Material and methods. We observed 101 patients with CRA, mean age of them was 32 years, disease duration — 4 years, and the male to female ratio — 1 : 1. In 90 % of CRA cases, Chlamydia trochamatis was found in prostatic secretions, in scraps from the urethra, the cervix, the vaginal wall, in 83 % — positive serologic tests for chlamydia infection. Results. Signs of PNP in CRA were in 19 % of patients in the ratio of mononeuropathy to polyneuropathy as 1 : 1, with motor, sensory and mixed disorders in a ratio of 1 : 3 : 6, the presence of autonomic changes in every second patient and more frequent distal localization of the process in the hands, which is influenced by the severity of the articular syndrome, high levels of antichlamydia antibodies in the blood, and the axonal and demyelinating indicators of electroneuromyography — by the severity of urogenital lesions and the presence of Guillain-Barre syndrome. A high rate of arthritis progression is a prognosis-negative sign of PNP course in patients with CRA. The pathogenic constructions of PNP involve the inflammatory immune proteins, disturbances of vascular endothelial function and physicochemical surface rheological pro­perties of the serum. Conclusion. PNP takes place in every fifth patient with CRA, correlates with clinical and laboratory signs of joint disease, and in the future will be useful to identify actively this pathology of the nervous system for the subsequent timely rehabilitation, and CRA

  4. Inflammasome activation in ruminant cells infected with Chlamydia abortus

    OpenAIRE

    Doull, Laura Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia abortus is the most common known infectious cause of ovine abortion worldwide but is rarely linked with bovine abortion. The reasons for this differential pathogenesis are unknown but may involve differences in innate immune recognition and immune responsiveness. This is supported by the observation that chlamydial abortion in sheep is associated with an inflammatory cytokine/chemokine cascade that is not commonly observed in cattle. Studies with other Chlamydia speci...

  5. The role of Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae in the development of infection in children with recurrent and chronic lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Kushelevskaya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available And:O.N. Smirnova, S.A. Egorova Clinical manifestations of bleeding disorders in children of Stavropol Territory.A. Gromov, E.L. Semikina, L.S. Namazova Clinical and immunological value of the expression of membrane receptors in children with atopic asthma allergen during immunotherapyE.I. Ermolaeva The value of environmental and social factors in the development of peptic ulcer disease in adolescence

  6. Intratracheal infection as an efficient route for testing vaccines against Chlamydia abortus in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, D; Salinas, J; Buendía, A J; Ortega, N; del Río, L; Sánchez, J; Navarro, J A; Gallego, M C; Murcia-Belmonte, A; Cuello, F; Caro, M R

    2015-09-01

    Pregnant ewes have been widely used to test vaccines against Chlamydia abortus. However, this model entails many disadvantages such as high economic costs and long periods of pregnancy. The murine model is very useful for specific studies but cannot replace the natural host for the later stages of vaccine evaluation. Therefore, a non-pregnant model of the natural host might be useful for a vaccine trial to select the best vaccine candidates prior to use of the pregnant model. With this aim, two routes of infection were assessed in young non-pregnant sheep, namely, intranasal (IN) and intratracheal (IT). In addition, groups of non-vaccinated sheep and sheep immunised with an inactivated vaccine were established to investigate the suitability of the model for testing vaccines. After the experimental infection, isolation of the microorganism in several organs, with pathological and immunohistochemical analyses, antibody production assessment and investigation by PCR of the presence of chlamydia in the vagina or rectum were carried out. Experimental IT inoculation of C. abortus induced pneumonia in sheep during the first few days post-infection, confirming the suitability of the IT route for testing vaccines in the natural host. The course of infection and the resulting pathological signs were less severe in vaccinated sheep compared with non-vaccinated animals, demonstrating the success of vaccination. IN infection did not produce evident lesions or demonstrate the presence of chlamydial antigen in the lungs and cannot be considered an appropriate model for testing vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pneumonia Intersticial Descamativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. La Salete Valente

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Os autores descrevem um caso raro de Pneumonia Intersticial Descamativa, num rapaz de 12 anos, internado com o diagnóstico de pneumonía adquirida na comunidade. A sintomatologia inicial foi de febre alta, tosse produtiva de expectoração mucopurulenta e cansaço fácil. A telerradiografia do tórax mostrava consolidação do campo pulmonar inferior direito. A persistência do quadro clínico e radiológico apesar da terapêutica antibiótica prescrita, motivou a realização de uma biópsia transtorácica que mostrou alterações compatíveis com Pneumonia Intersticial Linfóide, embora não pudesse ser excluído um processo linfoproliferativo, dada a pequena área de tecido estudada; por este motivo, o doente foi submetido a toracotomia exploradora a qual terminaria com lobectomia inferior dìreita e esvaziamento ganglionar, dada a aparência macroscópica daquele lobo pulmonar e gânglios linfáticos. Isto permitiu o diagnóstico de Pneumonia Intersticial Descamativa. Houve uma evolução favorável, com regressão completa do quadro clínico.A etiopatogénese, diagnóstico e tratamento são revistos.REV PORT PNEUMOL 1999; V (3: 357-364 ABSTRACT: Authors describe a case of Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia in a twelve years old boy, with a clinical picture of ligh fever, productive cough and fatigue. The chest X-ray demonstrated the existence of opacity of the right lower lobe. The persistence of the symtoms and radiological alterations, in spite of appropriate antibiotics, motivated the realisation of a thoracotomy that conclued in a righ lower lobectomy and gangliooar deplection, due to the macroscopic apearence af the lung lobe and the lymphadenapaties. The diagnosis of Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia was made after histological examination of this lung lobe. The ethiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment are discussed.REV PORT PNEUMOL. 1999; V (3: 357-364 Palavras-chave: Pneumonia intersticial descamativa, pneumonia

  8. Molecular detection of atypical microorganisms in patients with ventilator associated pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahida Akter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among the critically ill patients of intensive care units (ICU. The present cross sectional study was conducted to isolate and identify bacterial causes of VAP among the patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU of Dhaka Medical College Hospital. The study was conducted between July, 2013 to June 2014. A total of 65 endotracheal aspirate (ETA and blood samples were collected from patients with clinically suspected ventilator associated peumonia(VAP. Samples were collected from patients on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. ETA and blood samples were cultured aerobically. Multiplex PCR was performed with ETA to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Among the atypical bacteria, M. pneumoniae were detected in 5 (7.69%, L. pneumophila in 4 (6.15% cases by multiplex PCR in ETA from VAP cases. No C. pneumoniae was detected. The study revealed that in VAP cases atypical bacteria should be considered as a possible bacterial agents. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2015; 9(1: 22-25

  9. Genotyping of human parvovirus B19 in clinical samples from Brazil and Paraguay using heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos César Lima de Mendonça

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing were utilised to genotype human parvovirus B19 samples from Brazil and Paraguay. Ninety-seven serum samples were collected from individuals presenting with abortion or erythema infectiosum, arthropathies, severe anaemia and transient aplastic crisis; two additional skin samples were collected by biopsy. After the procedure, all clinical samples were classified as genotype 1.

  10. De kans op 'pelvic inflammatory disease' bij urogenitale infectie met Chlamydia trachomatis; literatuuronderzoek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeke, A. J. P.; van Bergen, J. E. A. M.; Morré, S. A.; van Everdingen, J. J. E.

    2005-01-01

    To determine the rate of PID in women with genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Systematic literature review. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched over the years 1975-2003 using the keywords 'Chlamydia trachomatis', 'complication', 'pelvic (inflammatory disease)', 'PID', 'endometritis', 'adnexitis',

  11. De kans op 'pelvic inflammatory disease' bij urogenitale infectie met Chlamydia trachomatis; literatuuronderzoek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeke, A.J.P.; van Bergen, J.E.; Morre, S.A.; van Everdingen, J.J.E.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the rate of PID in women with genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection. DESIGN: Systematic literature review. METHOD: MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched over the years 1975-2003 using the keywords 'Chlamydia trachomatis', 'complication', 'pelvic (inflammatory disease)', 'PID',

  12. Parvovirus B19 presenting with persistent pancytopenia in a patient of T-ALL post induction chemotherapy diagnosed on bone marrow examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya S Gadage

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Manifestations of parvovirus B19 vary even in the normal host from asymptomatic or subclinical infection to a spectrum of illness with symptoms during viremic and immune complex mediated stage of disease. We report the morphological findings of parvovirus B19 infection (confirmed on serology in a patient of T-acute lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-ALL who underwent induction phase of chemotherapy (MCP 842 protocol. Persistent pancytopenia in the bone marrow aspirate with mild increase in blasts was thought to be due to failure to achieve marrow remission. However, giant pronormoblasts with prominent intranuclear inclusions confirmed on trephine biopsy led to the suspicion of parvovirus B19 infection which was later confirmed on serology. This case is presented to report the rarely seen classical morphological feature of parvovirus infection on bone marrow examination which was incidentally the first investigation to diagnose the viremic phase of the infection, indicating that a high index of suspicion needs to be kept in mind while examining bone marrows of susceptible patients.

  13. Corticosteroids for pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Anat; Skalsky, Keren; Avni, Tomer; Carrara, Elena; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2017-12-13

    Pneumonia is a common and potentially serious illness. Corticosteroids have been suggested for the treatment of different types of infection, however their role in the treatment of pneumonia remains unclear. This is an update of a review published in 2011. To assess the efficacy and safety of corticosteroids in the treatment of pneumonia. We searched the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS on 3 March 2017, together with relevant conference proceedings and references of identified trials. We also searched three trials registers for ongoing and unpublished trials. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed systemic corticosteroid therapy, given as adjunct to antibiotic treatment, versus placebo or no corticosteroids for adults and children with pneumonia. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We estimated risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and pooled data using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model when possible. We included 17 RCTs comprising a total of 2264 participants; 13 RCTs included 1954 adult participants, and four RCTs included 310 children. This update included 12 new studies, excluded one previously included study, and excluded five new trials. One trial awaits classification.All trials limited inclusion to inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), with or without healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). We assessed the risk of selection bias and attrition bias as low or unclear overall. We assessed performance bias risk as low for nine trials, unclear for one trial, and high for seven trials. We assessed reporting bias risk as low for three trials and high for the remaining 14 trials.Corticosteroids significantly reduced mortality in adults with severe pneumonia (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40 to 0

  14. [Cryptogenic organising pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazor, Romain

    2005-06-01

    Organising Pneumonia (formerly called Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organising Pneumonia) is a particular form of inflammatory and fibroproliferative lung disease. Its idiopathic form called Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia, was recently defined by an ATS/ERS consensus conference. The disease onset is subacute with cough, dyspnea, fever, asthenia, weight loss, crackles, and elevation of biological inflammatory markers. Bronchoalveolar lavage reveals a mixed alveolitis with elevated lymphocyte, neutrophil, and eosinophil counts. Chest imaging usually shows multifocal alveolar opacities predominating in the subpleural regions, often with a migratory pattern. Lung biopsy reveals budding connective tissue filling the distal airspaces. Diagnosis is established by combining clinical, radiological and histological criteria. Similarities with other disease processes can lead to delayed or erroneous diagnosis. Most patients respond well to corticosteroid therapy. Relapses are frequent but can generally be controlled with moderate doses of prednisone and do not worsen the prognosis. The therapeutic strategy aims at reducing the steroid doses while maintaining an optimal disease control.

  15. A compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Lynn Parrott

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, walking pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review.

  16. [Chlamydia trachomatis infection in mother and child; the importance of a complete history and efficient interdisciplinary communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naafs, Jolanda C; Kleinhout, Mirjam Y

    2016-01-01

    General practitioners and paediatricians are frequently confronted with coughing infants. The age of the infant, the history of both mother and child, as well as the current maternal condition may provide important diagnostic information. A 4-week-old male infant was referred to the paediatrician with a persistent cough. He was admitted to hospital with dyspnoea and need for supplemental oxygen. Meanwhile, his mother was admitted with unexplained abdominal pain and elevated laboratory inflammation markers. Her history revealed an ectopic pregnancy. The infant's condition, for which the initial differential diagnosis was viral bronchiolitis or whooping cough, deteriorated. His medical history revealed a purulent conjunctivitis. Chlamydia trachomatis PCR turned out to be positive in both mother and child. C. trachomatis pneumonia is a common, yet often overlooked cause of cough in infants. This clinical lesson emphasises the importance of a complete history and efficient communication between medical specialists.

  17. Detection of human parvovirus B19 in cases of hydrops fetalis in São Paulo, Brazil Detecção de parvovírus humano B19 em casos de hydropsia fetal em São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Adelaide Figueiredo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 infection is known to be one of the causes of hydrops fetalis. The maternal infection caused by the virus may be symptomatic or asymptomatic. In this study, 40 pregnant women with gestational age of approximately 25 weeks, prenatal diagnosis of non immune hydrops fetalis and suspected of human parvovirus B19 infection were studied between January 1999 and December 2005. Serology results and detection of DNA in the maternal serum, foetal serum and amniotic fluid confirmed that 20 pregnant women had been infected by human parvovirus B19. The ultrasound examination demonstrated foetal hydrops, anaemia, hepatosplenomegaly, ascites, cardiopathy and amniotic fluid disorders. Among the positive cases, there were three fatal losses, one by miscarriage and two by intrauterine foetal death.A infecção por parvovírus humano B19 é um dos responsáveis pela hidropsia fetal. A infecção materna causada pelo vírus pode ser sintomática ou assintomática. Neste estudo 40 mulheres com idade gestacional de aproximadamente 25 semanas, diagnóstico pré-natal de hidropsia fetal e suspeita de infecção por parvovírus humano B19 foram avaliadas durante o período de janeiro de 1999 a dezembro de 2005. Os resultados de sorologia e detecção de DNA no soro materno, fetal e fluido amniótico confirmaram 20 mulheres grávidas com infecção por parvovírus humano B19. A análise de ultra-som demonstrou hidropsia fetal, anemia, hepatosplenomegalia, ascite, cardiopatia e desordens amnióticas. Entre os casos positivos, ocorreram três perdas fetais: uma por aborto e duas por morte fetal intra-uterina.

  18. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Chlamydia abortus infection in free-ranging white yaks in China

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Si-Yuan; Huang, Si-Yang; Yin, Ming-Yang; Tan, Qi-Dong; Liu, Guang-Xue; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhou, Ji-Zhang; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background Chlamydia is gram-negative obligate bacteria which causes a wide variety of diseases in humans and animals. To date, there are a few reports about the seroprevalence of Chlamydia and the risk factors associated with Chlamydia infection in yaks in the world. In this study, 974 blood samples were collected from white yaks (Bos grunniens) in Tianzhu Tibetan Autonomous County, Gansu province, northwest China from June 2013 to April 2014. Results Antibodies against Chlamydia abortus wer...

  19. Internet testing for Chlamydia trachomatis in England, 2006 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodhall Sarah C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years there has been interest in websites as a means of increasing access to free chlamydia tests through the National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP in England. We aimed to describe and evaluate online access to chlamydia testing within the NCSP. Methods We analysed NCSP chlamydia testing data (2006–2010 for 15–24 year olds from the 71/95 programme areas in England where site codes were available to identify tests ordered through the internet. The characteristics of people using online testing services in 2010 were compared with those testing in general practice (GP or community sexual and reproductive health (SRH services. We evaluated 58 websites offering free chlamydia tests through the NCSP, and 32 offering kits on a commercial basis for signposting to clinical service and health promotion advice offered. Results Between 2006 and 2010, 5% of all tests in the included programme areas were accessed through the internet. The number of internet tests increased from 18 (1 sexual partner in the past year. Provision of sexual health information and appropriate signposting for those in need of clinical services varied between websites. Service provision within the NCSP was fragmented with multiple providers serving specific geographical catchment areas. Conclusion Internet testing reaches a population with a relatively high risk of chlamydia infection and appears acceptable to young men, a group that has been difficult to engage with chlamydia testing. In order to maximise the potential benefit of these services, websites should be consistent with national guidelines and adhere to minimum standards for signposting to clinical care and health promotion information. The current system with multiple providers servicing geographically specific catchment areas is contrary to the geographically unrestricted nature of the internet and potentially confusing for clients.

  20. Lycopene Inhibits Propagation of Chlamydia Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naylia A. Zigangirova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydiaceae is a family of obligate intracellular pathogenic bacteria with similar developmental cycles and cell biology responsible for a wide range of diseases in different hosts including genital and eye inflammatory diseases, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. In the present paper, we report that lycopene, one of the main dietary carotenoids, which is present in tomato and some other fruits, has a strong inhibitory effect on C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae infections in alveolar macrophages. This finding was documented by both immunofluorescence analysis and electron microscopy. It was noted that lycopene treatment inhibited intracellular phase of the chlamydial developmental cycle and resulted in a significant loss of infectious progeny. The antichlamydial effect of lycopene was also confirmed in a clinical setting. There was a significant reduction of IgG antibodies against C. pneumoniae in the serum of volunteers treated for a month with oral ingestion of 7 mg of lycopene. Additional studies are needed to further explore the antichlamydial activity of lycopene and its possible effect on C. pneumoniae in relation to antichlamydial activity of lycopene to mechanisms of atherosclerosis.

  1. Exploring Chlamydia Positivity among Females on College Campuses, 2008-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Melissa A.; Leichliter, Jami S.; Torrone, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Describe chlamydia positivity among young women tested at college health centers by student characteristics: age, race/ethnicity, and institution type. Participants: During 2008-2010, colleges participating in a national infertility prevention program provided chlamydia testing data from females aged 18-24. Methods: Chlamydia positivity…

  2. Characterization of native and recombinant 75-kilodalton immunogens from Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Lundemose, AG; Christiansen, Gunna

    1989-01-01

    A 75-kilodalton (kDa) immunogen from Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 was characterized. The 75-kDa protein was localized in the cytoplasm of chlamydiae and was shown to be a protein synthesized early in the developmental cycle of chlamydiae. A gene library was made by the recombinant DNA technique...

  3. Dysuria in the Emergency Department: Missed Diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan D. Wilbanks

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The clinical presentation of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection (chlamydia in women is often indistinguishable from a urinary tract infection. While merited in the setting of dysuria, emergency department (ED clinicians do not routinely test for chlamydia in women. The primary aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of chlamydia testing among women presenting to the ED with dysuria. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of women 19-25 years of age presenting with dysuria to an urban ED and who had been coded with urinary tract infection (UTI as their primary diagnosis (ICD-9 599.0 from October 2005 to March 2011. We excluded women who were pregnant, had underlying anatomical or neurological urinary system pathology, had continuation of symptoms from UTI or a sexually transmitted infection (STI diagnosed elsewhere, or were already on antibiotics for a UTI or STI. We identified the rates of sexual history screening, pelvic examination and chlamydia assay testing and evaluated predictors using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Of 280 women with dysuria and a UTI diagnosis, 17% were asked about their sexual history, with 94% reporting recent sexual activity. Pelvic examination was performed in 23%. We were unable to determine the overall chlamydia prevalence as only 20% of women in the cohort were tested. Among the 20% of women tested for chlamydia infection, 21% tested positive. Only 42% of chlamydia-positive women were prescribed treatment effective for chlamydia (azithromycin or doxycycline at their visit; the remaining were prescribed UTI treatment not effective against chlamydia. Predictors of sexual history screening included vaginal bleeding (OR 5.4, 95% CI=1.5 to 19.6 and discharge (OR 2.8, 95% CI=1.1 to 6.9. Predictors of a pelvic examination being performed included having a complaint of vaginal discharge (OR 11.8, 95% CI=4.2 to 32.9, a sexual history performed (OR 2.5, 95% CI=1.1 to 5

  4. Pneumonia in renal transplant patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowie, D. M.; Marrie, T. J.; Janigan, D. T.; MacKeen, A. D.; Belitsky, P.; MacDonald, A. S.; Lannon, S. G.; Cohen, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 28 episodes of pneumonia occurred in 26 renal transplant patients. The overall mortality rate was 46%. Of the 16 patients with nosocomial pneumonia 9 (56%) died, whereas of the 12 patients with community-acquired pneumonia 4 (33%) died. In all 9 cases of unknown cause the response to empiric treatment was prompt, whereas in 4 of the 10 cases of monomicrobial pneumonia and 8 of the 9 cases of polymicrobial pneumonia the patient died. Cytomegalovirus was the...

  5. [Chlamydia trachomatis and urogenital mycoplasms in nonconococcal urethritis in men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesić, Sonja; Vukićević, Jelica; Gvozdenović, Eleonora; Skiljević, Dusan; Janosević, Slobodanka; Medenica, Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Nongonococcal urethritis is the most common sexually transmitted infection in men, with vast majority of the etiological agents such as Chlamydia trachomatis, followed by urogenital mycoplasmas. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in nongonococcal urethritis in men, and to examine infections associated with these agents. Material and methods 299 sexually active, heterosexual men with nongonococcal urethritis were included into the study. Urethral samples were taken with a dacron swab placed into the urethra up to 2-3 cm. The Direct immunofluorescence technique was performed for identification of Chlamydia trachomatis. Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis were detected with Mycoplasma IST assay. Chlamydia trachomatis was detected in 22.75%, Uraeplasma urealyticum in 21.08% and Mycoplasma hominis in 8.02% cases. We found no significant differences in prevalence between Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticym (p > 0.05). Monoinfections were found in 51.85% with significantly higher rate (p urethritis with prevalence of 51.85% in monoinfections and 11.70% in associated infections. In 36.45% of cases the etiology of urethritis was not elucidated. These results suggest that more sensitive diagnostic tool should be applied when searching for the derailed etiology of nongonococcal urethritis.

  6. Community-acquired pneumonia in Chile: the clinical relevance in the detection of viruses and atypical bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchsinger, Vivian; Ruiz, Mauricio; Zunino, Enna; Martínez, María Angélica; Machado, Clarisse; Piedra, Pedro A; Fasce, Rodrigo; Ulloa, María Teresa; Fink, Maria Cristina; Lara, Pamela; Gebauer, Mónica; Chávez, Fernando; Avendaño, Luis F

    2013-11-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a relevant worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality, however the aetiology often remains uncertain and the therapy is empirical. We applied conventional and molecular diagnostics to identify viruses and atypical bacteria associated with CAP in Chile. We used sputum and blood cultures, IgG/IgM serology and molecular diagnostic techniques (PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR) for detection of classical and atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumoniae) and respiratory viruses (adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenzavirus, rhinovirus, coronavirus) in adults >18 years old presenting with CAP in Santiago from February 2005 to September 2007. Severity was qualified at admission by Fine's pneumonia severity index. Overall detection in 356 enrolled adults were 92 (26%) cases of a single bacterial pathogen, 80 (22%) cases of a single viral pathogen, 60 (17%) cases with mixed bacterial and viral infection and 124 (35%) cases with no identified pathogen. Streptococcus pneumoniae and RSV were the most common bacterial and viral pathogens identified. Infectious agent detection by PCR provided greater sensitivity than conventional techniques. To our surprise, no relationship was observed between clinical severity and sole or coinfections. The use of molecular diagnostics expanded the detection of viruses and atypical bacteria in adults with CAP, as unique or coinfections. Clinical severity and outcome were independent of the aetiological agents detected.

  7. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español ... Print Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , a microscopic fungus that ...

  8. Exogenous lipid pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasconi, A.; Gavelli, G.; Zompatori, M.; Galleri, C.; Zanasi, A.; Fabbri, M.; Bazzocchi, F.

    1988-01-01

    Exogenous lipid pneumonia (ELP) is caused by the aspiration of animal, vegetal or, more often, mineral oils. Even though it may also be acute, ELP is most frequently a chronic disease, affecting people with predisposing factors, such as neuromuscular disorders, structural abnormalities and so on; very often exogenous lipid pneumonia is found in tracheotomized patients. The pathology of lipid pneumonia is a chronic inflammatory process evolving in foreign-body-like reaction, and eventually in ''end-stage lung'' condition. Clinically, most patients are asymptomatic; few cases only present with cough, dyspnea and chest pain. Eight cases of ELP, studied over the past 3 years, are described in this paper. All the patients were examined by chest radiographs and standard tomograms; 3 patients underwent CT. X-ray features were mono/bilateral consolidation of the lower zones, with air bronchogram and variable reduction in volume. CT density was not specific for fat tissue. In all cases the diagnosis was confirmed at biopsy. In 5 patients, followed for at least one year, clinical-radiological features showed no change. Thus, complications of ELP (especially malignant evolution) could be excluded. The authors conclude that lipid pneumonia must be considered in differential diagnosis of patients with history of usage of oils and compatible X-ray findings. The usefulness of an accurate follow-up is stressed

  9. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J S; Jensen, T G; Kolmos, H J

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based cohort study among adult patients with first-time Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (SPB) from 2000 through 2008. Patients were identified in a population-based bacteremia database and followed up for mortality through the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS...

  10. Impact of low-level fluoroquinolone resistance genes qnrA1, qnrB19 and qnrS1 on ciprofloxacin treatment of isogenic Escherichia coli strains in a murine urinary tract infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lotte; Cattoir, Vincent; Jensen, Klaus S

    2012-01-01

    To study the impact of qnrA1, qnrB19 and qnrS1 on the ciprofloxacin treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI).......To study the impact of qnrA1, qnrB19 and qnrS1 on the ciprofloxacin treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI)....

  11. A prospective study of the psychosocial impact of a positive Chlamydia trachomatis laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sami L; Stoner, Bradley P; Zaidi, Akbar A; Buckel, Christina; Tran, Molly; Leichliter, Jami S; Berman, Stuart M; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2011-11-01

    Few data exist on potential harms of chlamydia screening. We assessed the psychosocial impact of receiving a positive Chlamydia trachomatis test result. We prospectively studied women ≥16 years of age undergoing chlamydia testing in 2 Midwestern family planning clinics. We surveyed women at baseline and about 1 month after receiving test results, using 9 validated psychosocial scales/subscales and chlamydia-specific questions. Changes in scale scores were calculated for each woman. Mean percent changes in scores for chlamydia-positive and -negative women were compared using a t test. We enrolled 1807 women (response rate, 84%). Of the 1688 women with test results, 149 (8.8%) tested positive. At follow-up, chlamydia-positive women (n = 71) had a 75% increase in anxiety about sexual aspects of their life on the Multidimensional Sexual Self-Concept Questionnaire (P < 0.001), significantly greater than the 26% increase among 280 randomly selected chlamydia-negative women (P = 0.02). There were no differences for the other 8 scales/subscales, including general measures of anxiety, depression, and self-esteem. Chlamydia-positive women were more likely than chlamydia-negative women to be "concerned about chlamydia" (80% vs. 40%, P < 0.001) and to report breaking up with a main partner (33% vs. 11%, P < 0.001) at follow-up. Women testing positive reported a range of chlamydia-specific concerns. Chlamydia-positive women had significant increases in anxiety about sex and concern about chlamydia, but did not have marked changes in more general measures of psychosocial well-being about 1 month after diagnosis. Chlamydia diagnoses were associated with some disruption of relationships with main partners. Chlamydia-specific concerns may guide counseling messages to minimize psychosocial impact.

  12. Tracing the primordial Chlamydiae: extinct parasites of plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subtil, Agathe; Collingro, Astrid; Horn, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria found as symbionts and pathogens in a wide range of eukaryotes, including protists, invertebrates, and vertebrates. It was recently proposed that an ancient chlamydial symbiont facilitated the establishment of primary plastids in a tripartite symbiosis with cyanobacteria and early eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding of the lifestyle and the evolutionary history of extant Chlamydiae. We reconstruct and describe key features of the ancient chlamydial symbiont. We propose that it was already adapted to an intracellular lifestyle before the emergence of Archaeplastida, and that several observations are compatible with an essential contribution of Chlamydiae to the evolution of algae and plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hemophagocytic Syndrome Associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Koike

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp sometimes causes immunological complications in children. We present a rare case of hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS caused by Mp in a previously healthy 7-year-old Japanese girl. A chest radiograph obtained to evaluate the source of her fever showed infiltration in the lower right lung with mild splenomegaly. We could diagnose the patient with HPS on the basis of the hemophagocytic-lymphohistiocytosis- (HLH 2004 criteria. She met the criteria for fever, splenomegaly, neutrophil count (265 mg/dL, and ferritin level (>500 ng/mL. Furthermore, a peripheral blood smear showed an increased number of monocytes/macrophages with erythrophagocytosis. Treatment with clarithromycin and prednisolone, which was initiated soon after the diagnosis, was successful. Mp infection might partly progress to HPS in certain conditions. Clinicians should be aware of HPS caused by Mp and start appropriate treatment as soon as possible if the disease is suspected.

  14. Marcadores inflamatórios e anticorpos anti-chlamydia em pacientes com síndrome metabólica Marcadores inflamatorios y anticuerpos anti-chlamydia en pacientes con síndrome metabólico Inflammatory markers and antichlamydial antibodies in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosecler Riethmuller Franco

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A síndrome metabólica está associada ao aumento de risco de eventos cardiovasculares. Marcadores inflamatórios e anticorpos anti-Chlamydia têm sido relacionados ao desenvolvimento e à progressão da aterosclerose e dos eventos cardiovasculares. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os marcadores inflamatórios interleucina-6 (IL-6 e fator de necrose tumoral-alfa (TNF-α e os anticorpos anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae em pacientes com síndrome metabólica (SM, com e sem eventos cardiovasculares. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal constituído por 147 indivíduos. Desses, 100 (68% com SM e sem eventos cardiovasculares; e 47 (32% com SM e com eventos cardiovasculares. Dos indivíduos que sofreram eventos cardiovasculares, 13 (6,11% apresentam infarto agudo do miocárdio (IAM, e dez (4,7%, acidente vascular cerebral (AVC. O diagnóstico da SM foi determinado pelos critérios do NCEP-ATPIII. RESULTADOS: A média de idade dos sujeitos com eventos cardiovasculares foi de 61,26 ± 8,5 e de 59,32 ± 9,9 nos indivíduos sem esses eventos (p=0,279, havendo predomínio do sexo feminino. O grupo com SM e sem evento apresentou maior peso, altura, IMC e circunferência abdominal. Para os indivíduos com eventos cardiovasculares (p=0,001, os marcadores inflamatórios IL-6 e TNF-α e a doença vascular periférica foram significativamente maiores. Obtiveram-se níveis elevados de anticorpos IgG para Chlamydia pneumoniae no grupo SM, sem eventos e de IgA no grupo com eventos quando comparados os dois grupos. Com relação ao IAM e ao AVC, os anticorpos anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae não demonstraram significância estatística, comparados ao grupo sem eventos cardiovasculares. Associação foi observada com o uso de estatinas, hipoglicemiantes orais, injetáveis e anti-inflamatórios não esteroidais no grupo com esses eventos. CONCLUSÃO: Marcadores inflamatórios encontram-se significativamente elevados em pacientes com SM, com IAM e AVC. Anticorpos anti-Chlamydia n

  15. Structure and density of Fe36Co36B19.2Si4.8Nb4 bulk glassy alloy

    OpenAIRE

    A. Januszka; R. Nowosielski

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The work presents density measurements of bulk metallic glasses in as-cast state. Additionally casting method and structure characterization was displayed.Design/methodology/approach: The studies were performed on Fe36Co36B19.2Si4.8Nb4 metallic glasses in form of rods with diameter 2 and 3 mm. Samples were fabricated using copper mould casting method. The master alloy characteristic temperatures (Tm – melting point and Tl – liquidus temperature) were determinate by differential therm...

  16. IgE, CD8(+)CD60+ T cells and IFN-alpha in human immunity to parvovirus B19 in selective IgA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Martin H; Norowitz, Kevin B; Chice, Seto; Shah, Vipin N; Nowakowski, Maja; Durkin, Helen G; Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A

    2005-10-01

    Although IgE is implicated in viral immunity, its role in parvovirus B19 immunity and its relationship to other immunological states has not been studied. Total serum immunoglobulin levels, IgG and IgE anti-parvovirus B19, blood lymphocyte numbers, and epsilon and cytokine specific mRNA were determined in pediatric patients with normal serum IgA levels (IgA+) and selective IgA deficiency (IgA-) on days 0 (initial diagnosis) and 14, and 3 years after recovery (nephelometry, Western blot test, flow cytometry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction). We found that both patients had serum IgM, IgG, IgE, and IgA levels within normal ranges on day 0 to 3 years, excluding IgG(1) and IgA in the IgA- patient, which were elevated and negative, respectively, and IgE in the IgA+ patient, which was elevated (>100 IU/ml). The serum IgA+ and IgA- patients made IgE (and IgG) anti-parvovirus B19 at all time points. Excluding CD8(+)CD60+ T cells, determinations of T, B, and NK lymphocyte subsets always were within normal ranges. In both patients, CD8(+)CD60+ T-cell numbers were within normal ranges on day 0, but dramatically increased on day 14 (more than fivefold). At 3 years, they had returned to normal in the IgA+ patient, but remained high in the IgA- patient. On day 0 to 3 years, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of both patients expressed epsilon- and interferon (IFN)-alpha-specific mRNA. On day 0, the IgA+ patient expressed interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10, but not IL-2, IFN-gamma, or IL-6 mRNA; the IgA- patient expressed IL-6 and IL-10 mRNA, but not IL-4, IL-2, or IFN-gamma mRNA. At 3 years, the IgA+ patient expressed mRNA for all cytokines, but the IgA- patient did not express mRNA for any of these cytokines. Our results suggest that IgE is important in parvovirus B19 immunity, and that IFN-alpha and CD8(+)CD60+ T cells may regulate IgE memory responses and isotype switching.

  17. A re-evaluation of the role of B cells in protective immunity to Chlamydia infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Xi; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of the most commonly reported bacterial sexual transmitted infection (STI) in North America and Europe. The control of Chlamydia infection is hindered by the asymptomatic nature of initial infection but the consequence of untreated infection seriously threatens the reproductive health of young women. Unfortunately, there is no licensed vaccine for Chlamydia vaccine, in part due to our incomplete understanding of the immune response to Chlamydia urogenital infection. It has been well established that T cell-mediated immunity plays a dominant role in protective immunity against Chlamydia and thus the importance of B cells is somewhat underappreciated. Here, we summarize recent progress on understanding the role of B cells during Chlamydia genital tract infections and discuss how B cells and humoral immunity make an effective contribution to host defense against important intracellular pathogens, including Chlamydia. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Concurrent sexual partners-A predictor of Chlamydia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marianne Johansson; Olesen, Frede; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2013-01-01

    Background:Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infection among young Danes and the spread is highly dependent on the population’s sexual behavior. Previous studies have found concurrent partnerships to be a possible predictor for C. trachomatis, but the signifi......Background:Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infection among young Danes and the spread is highly dependent on the population’s sexual behavior. Previous studies have found concurrent partnerships to be a possible predictor for C. trachomatis...

  19. Chlamydia trachomatis infection and risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtinen, Matti; Ault, Kevin A; Lyytikainen, Erika

    2011-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) is the primary cause of cervical cancer. As Chlamydia trachomatis is also linked to cervical cancer, its role as a potential co-factor in the development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or higher was examined.......High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) is the primary cause of cervical cancer. As Chlamydia trachomatis is also linked to cervical cancer, its role as a potential co-factor in the development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or higher was examined....

  20. Klebsiella pneumoniae Invasive Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Evangelista

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive syndrome (KPIS is a rare clinical condition characterized by primary liver abscess associated with metastatic infection. Most case reports are from Southeast Asia, with only one case described in Portugal. The Authors present the case of a 44-year-old man with a history of fever, dry cough and cervicalgia. A thoracic computed tomography (CT scan showed multiple pulmonary and hepatic nodules, suggestive of metastatic malignancy. Both blood cultures and bronchoalveolar lavage were positive for Klebsiella pneumoniae. Imaging studies were repeated during his hospital stay, showing a reduction in both number and volume of identified lesions, thus revealing their infectious nature. This case illustrates how much this entity can mimic other illnesses.

  1. Osteopontin promotes host defense during Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Windt, G J W; Hoogerwerf, J J; de Vos, A F; Florquin, S; van der Poll, T

    2010-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein involved in inflammatory processes, some of which is mediated by CD44. The aim of this study was to determine the role of OPN during K. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia. Wild-type (WT) and OPN knockout (KO) mice were intranasally infected with 10⁴ colony forming units of K. pneumoniae, or administered Klebsiella lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In addition, recombinant OPN (rOPN) was intranasally administered to WT and CD44 KO mice. During Klebsiella pneumonia, WT mice displayed elevated pulmonary and plasma OPN levels. OPN KO and WT mice showed similar pulmonary bacterial loads 6 h after infection; thereafter, Klebsiella loads were higher in lungs of OPN KO mice and the mortality rate in this group was higher than in WT mice. Early neutrophil recruitment into the bronchoalveolar space was impaired in the absence of OPN after intrapulmonary delivery of either Klebsiella bacteria or Klebsiella LPS. Moreover, rOPN induced neutrophil migration into the bronchoalveolar space, independent from CD44. In vitro, OPN did not affect K. pneumoniae growth or neutrophil function. In conclusion, OPN levels were rapidly increased in the bronchoalveolar space during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, where OPN serves a chemotactic function towards neutrophils, thereby facilitating an effective innate immune response.

  2. Evolution of acute infection with atypical bacteria in a prospective cohort of children with community-acquired pneumonia receiving amoxicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana M; Xavier-Souza, Gabriel; Vilas-Boas, Ana-Luisa; Fontoura, Maria-Socorro H; Barral, Aldina; Puolakkainen, Mirja; Ruuskanen, Olli

    2017-08-01

    Atypical bacteria are treatable causative agents of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, there is no conclusive evidence that a child with CAP should receive empirical treatment against such agents. We assessed the possibility of association between clinical failure and acute infection by these bacteria among children with CAP treated with amoxicillin. Patients aged 2-59 months with non-severe CAP received amoxicillin during prospective follow-up. Acute and convalescent blood samples were collected. Probable acute infection by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (specific IgM antibodies), by Chlamydia pneumoniae or Chlamydia trachomatis (specific IgM antibodies and/or IgG/IgA titre change) was investigated. Outcomes were assessed during follow-up at 2, 5 and 14-28 days. Treatment failure included development of danger signs, persistent fever, tachypnoea or death. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01200706. Of 787 children, 86 (10.9%; 95% CI = 8.9%-13.3%) had acute M. pneumoniae infection. C. pneumoniae acute infection was found in 79 of 733 (10.8%; 95% CI = 8.7%-13.2%) and C. trachomatis was found in 3 of 28 (10.7%; 95% CI = 2.8%-26.5%) amoxicillin was substituted in 3.5% versus 2.7% among patients with or without acute infection by one of these bacteria ( P  =   0.6). The overall substitution rate of amoxicillin was very low. It is not necessary to give an empirical non-β-lactam antibiotic as a first-line option to treat every child between 2 and 59 months old with non-severe CAP. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema associated with parvovirus B19 infection: two new cases and review of the comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Francesco; Ciccarese, Giulia; Agnoletti, Arianna F; Cogorno, Ludovica; Muda, Alessandro; Cozzani, Emanuele; Parodi, Aurora

    2015-10-01

    Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) is a rare syndrome consisting of acute symmetrical tenosynovitis of the hands and wrists associated with pain and marked pitting edema of the dorsum of the hands or the feet. Persistent rheumatoid factor seronegativity and elevated acute phase reactants are the rule, while radiographic findings are characterized by the absence of bony erosions. The syndrome has occasionally been associated with a wide range of diseases including solid and hematological malignancies, polymyalgia rheumatica, and other inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Two patients with skin eruption on hands and feet associated with arthromyalgias have been investigated to confirm diagnosis of RS3PE and to detect comorbidities. A revision of all the possible medical conditions correlated to RS3PE has been performed. We report two cases of RS3PE associated with Parvovirus B19 infection/reactivation. There are very few reports on the association between RS3PE and infectious agents, and in only one case the syndrome has been correlated to parvovirus infection. We want to underline the importance for patients with RS3PE to be seen by dermatologists who should become familiar with this syndrome and remark that Parvovirus B19 infection may be a potential cause of RS3PE. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  4. Hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Alyssa S.; Bajwa, Rajinder P.S.; Russo, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    A new hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged. First described in the Asian Pacific Rim, it now increasingly recognized in Western countries. Defining clinical features are the ability to cause serious, life-threatening community-acquired infection in younger healthy hosts, including liver abscess, pneumonia, meningitis and endophthalmitis and the ability to metastatically spread, an unusual feature for enteric Gram-negative bacilli in the non-immunocompromised. Despite infecting a healthier population, significant morbidity and mortality occurs. Although epidemiologic features are still being defined, colonization, particularly intestinal colonization, appears to be a critical step leading to infection. However the route of entry remains unclear. The majority of cases described to date are in Asians, raising the issue of a genetic predisposition vs. geospecific strain acquisition. The traits that enhance its virulence when compared with “classical” K. pneumoniae are the ability to more efficiently acquire iron and perhaps an increase in capsule production, which confers the hypermucoviscous phenotype. An objective diagnostic test suitable for routine use in the clinical microbiology laboratory is needed. If/when these strains become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials, we will be faced with a frightening clinical scenario. PMID:23302790

  5. Pneumonia in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tow Keang; Siow, Wen Ting

    2018-01-01

    Pneumonia in the tropics poses a heavy disease burden. The complex interplay of climate change, human migration influences and socio-economic factors lead to changing patterns of respiratory infections in tropical climate but also increasingly in temperate countries. Tropical and poorer countries, especially South East Asia, also bear the brunt of the global tuberculosis (TB) pandemic, accounting for almost one-third of the burden. But, as human migration patterns evolve, we expect to see more TB cases in higher income as well as temperate countries, and rise in infections like scrub typhus from ecotourism activities. Fuelled by the ease of air travel, novel zoonotic infections originating from the tropics have led to global respiratory pandemics. As such, clinicians worldwide should be aware of these new conditions as well as classical tropical bacterial pneumonias such as melioidosis. Rarer entities such as co-infections of leptospirosis and chikungunya or dengue will need careful consideration as well. In this review, we highlight aetiologies of pneumonia seen more commonly in the tropics compared with temperate regions, their disease burden, variable clinical presentations as well as impact on healthcare delivery. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  6. Molecular etiological profile of atypical bacterial pathogens, viruses and coinfections among infants and children with community acquired pneumonia admitted to a national hospital in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Cornejo-Tapia, Angela; Orellana-Peralta, Fiorella; Verne, Eduardo; Ugarte, Claudia; Aguilar-Luis, Miguel Angel; De Lama-Odría, María Del Carmen; Nazario-Fuertes, Ronald; Esquivel-Vizcarra, Mónica; Casabona-Ore, Verónica; Weilg, Pablo; Del Valle, Luis J

    2017-12-06

    The main objective of this study was to detect the presence of 14 respiratory viruses and atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae), via polymerase chain reaction in patients under 18 years old hospitalized due to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) from Lima, Peru. Atypical pathogens were detected in 40% (58/146); viral etiologies in 36% (52/146) and coinfections in 19% (27/146). The most common etiological agent was M. pneumoniae (n = 47), followed by C. pneumoniae (n = 11). The most frequent respiratory viruses detected were: respiratory syncytial virus A (n = 35), influenza virus C (n = 21) and parainfluenza virus (n = 10). Viral-bacterial and bacterium-bacterium coinfections were found in 27 cases. In our study population, atypical bacteria (40%) were detected as frequently as respiratory viruses (36%). The presence of M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae should not be underestimated as they can be commonly isolated in Peruvian children with CAP.

  7. Clinicoroentgenological control in chronic pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamilyaev, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive clinicoroentgenological study was used to examine 494 patients with chronic pneumonia. Morphological and functional changes observed in the pulmonary pare and functional changes observed in the pulmonary parenchyma and bronchial tree were studied. Types of pneumosclerosis, tigns of exacerbation of chronic pneumonia and abscess formation, morphological and functional disorders of bronchial penetrability in the pneumonic zone were described. Three forms of chronic pneumonia: bronchial, bronchiectatic and abscessing are signled out. The bronchial form is subdivided into chronic pneumonia with chronic bronchitis without deformity and wi.th deforming chronic bronchitis. In the bronchiectatic form pneumonia can be with cylindrical, saccular and cyst-like bronchiectasia. The general diagnosis of chronic pneumonia is established clinically depending on type and variants in 89-94% of cases, by X-ray and sonographic findings in all patients; types and variants of disease are most frequently defined after bronchography

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis Genotypes and the Swedish New Variant among Urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis Strains in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Niemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aims were to genotype Chlamydia trachomatis strains present in urogenital samples and to investigate the occurrence of the Swedish new variant of C. trachomatis in Finland. We genotyped 160 C. trachomatis positive samples with ompA real-time PCR and analyzed 495 samples for the new variant. The three most prevalent genotypes were E (40%, F (28%, and G (13%. Only two specimens containing bacteria with the variant plasmid were detected. It seems that in Finland the percentage of infections due to genotypes F and G has slightly increased during the last 20 years. Genotypes E and G appear to be more common, and genotypes J/Ja and I/Ia appear to be less common in Europe than in the USA. Although the genotype E was the most common genotype among C. trachomatis strains, the new variant was rarely found in Finland.

  9. Comparison of the population excess fraction of Chlamydia trachomatis infection on pelvic inflammatory disease at 12-months in the presence and absence of chlamydia testing and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Bethan; Turner, Katy M. E.; Leung, Stella

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia) control on the incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is theoretically limited by the proportion of PID caused by chlamydia. We estimate the population excess fraction (PEF) of treated chlamydia infection on PID at 12-months......: The systematic review identified a single study, a randomised controlled trial of chlamydia screening (POPI-RCT). In the presence of testing and treatment PID at 12-months was attributable to treated (baseline) chlamydia infections (Manitoba: 8.86%(95%CI 7.15-10.75); Denmark: 3.84%(3.26-4.45); screened...... in settings with widespread chlamydia control (testing and treatment) and compare this to the estimated PEF of untreated chlamydia. METHODS: We used two large retrospective population-based cohorts of women of reproductive age from settings with widespread chlamydia control to calculate the PEF of treated...

  10. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Habib; Jit, Mark; Heymann, David L.; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3–3.9 million) episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31–0.40 million) all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths) Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths), and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths). Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49–0.64 million) severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92–119 thousand) pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India’s pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our

  11. EXPERIMENTAL PNEUMONIA (FRIEDLANDER TYPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, W R; Walker, I C

    1915-12-01

    The foregoing experiments show that in cats a definite lobar pneumonia may be caused by Bacillus mucosus capsulatus. Judging both from the clinical course and from the pathological findings, this form of pulmonary infection differs from the usual pneumococcus types of pneumonia and closely resembles the so called Friedländer's bacillus or Bacillus pneumonioe in man. In all instances in which a lobar pneumonia was found after the injection of the bacillus, a similar organism was recovered from the lung, and in no case was this associated with other organisms. The course of the disease in cats is very short, the animals developing early symptoms of profound toxemia. In 87 per cent of the animals showing a lobar pneumonia positive blood cultures were obtained. The pathological findings, judging from the early stages of the disease, are subject to considerable variation. In some instances the process may suggest a pseudolobar or confluent lobular distribution. In these cases the lung has a mottled, marble-like appearance. In the majority of cases, however, the process gave a more homogeneous appearance, suggesting a diffuse and uniform distribution. Foci of hemorrhage were not uncommon in both. Such areas cause the mottled appearance sometimes found. In all instances the consolidated lung presents a greater infiltration of tissue than is usually seen in other types of experimental pneumonia. Although the exudate as seen on the cut surface may be abundant and especially viscid in character, this is not present in most cases. The cut surface of the consolidated lung does not present a granular appearance. The histological findings are also subject to considerable variation. In most instances the infundibular and alveolar spaces are completely filled with an exudate made up chiefly of polymorphonuclear cells. Associated with these are the capsulated bacilli, large vacuolated mononuclear phagocytic cells, and red blood cells, and occasionally small amounts of fibrin. The

  12. Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organizing Pneumonia (BOOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What can you tell me about cryptogenic organizing pneumonia? Answers from Teng Moua, M.D. Previously called bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a rare lung ...

  13. Antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis in patients presenting with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis in patients presenting with ectopic pregnancy at Groote Schuur hospital. ... South African Medical Journal ... While the role of C. trachomatis infection in women who develop ectopic pregnancies needs to be explored further, it seems wise to treat them all with empirical antibiotics at the ...

  14. 10 seroevidence of chlamydia trachomatis infection in infertile male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Eggert-Kruse W, Rohr G,. Demirakca T. et al. Chlamydial serology in 1303 asymptomatic subfertile couples. Hum. Reprod. 1997; 12:1464-1475. 4. Idahl A, Boman J, Kumlin U,. Olofsson JL. Demonstration of. Chlamydia trachomatis. IgG antibodies in the male partner of the infertile couple is correlated.

  15. Chlamydia control in Europe - a survey of Member States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Berit; van Bergen, J; Ward, H

    ), contributed to the design and interpretation of the survey, commented on the draft report and approved the final report. Shelagh Redmond (Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland) provided technical support. Nicola Low (University of Bern) led the Chlamydia Control...

  16. Characterization of Ancient Ferredoxins & Chlamydia Trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Hanne

    differences are that the R2 subunit in class I RNR function using a tyrosyl radical located close to a [Fe-Fe] site, while class Ic RNR function with a [Mn-Fe] site. In class Ic RNR a phenylalanine is found where the tyrosyl radical is formed in class I RNR. Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) RNR belongs to class Ic...

  17. Protegrins: structural requirements for inactivating elementary bodies of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, B; Lehrer, R I; Harwig, S S; Wagar, E A

    1996-01-01

    We tested 20 protegrins against Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 (L2/434/Bu). Five of the protegrins had native structures; the others included nonamidated, enantiomeric, and truncated variants and peptides with <2 disulfide bonds. Antichlamydial activity resided principally in residues 5 to 15 of native protegrin PG-1, and optimal activity required both intramolecular disulfide bonds. PMID:8890254

  18. prevalence and determinants of neisseria gonorhea and chlamydia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Background: Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an inflammatory process affecting typically the endometrium, fallopian tubes, ovaries, parametrium and pelvic peritoneum with its surrounding structures. More than 85% of spontaneous PID is caused by sexually transmitted infections like gonorrhea, chlamydia, mycoplasma ...

  19. Absence of Chlamydia-like organisms in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Van Gils

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive failure, especially abortion, causes significant economic loss in the pig industry. Waddlia chondrophila and Parachlamydia acanthamoebae are potential abortigenic agents for pigs. Therefore, we investigated the presence of these two Chlamydia-like organisms in abortion-related samples originating from Belgian pig farms. All investigated samples remained negative.

  20. Association of Chlamydia serology with HIV in Nigerian women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For an infection that is largely asymptomatic but has devastating effects on populations, only a preventive approach would have beneficial effects in controlling the disease and its effects on women's health in the country. Keywords: Chlamydia trachomatis, HIV, pregnant women, gynaecologic patients, co-infection ...

  1. The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among infertile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of sexually transmitted diseases that is not of viral origin and there is accumulating evidence of a significant role played by this pathogen in causing male factor infertility. This study thus aimed to determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis among infertile males and to ...

  2. Association of anti-Chlamydia antibodies with ectopic pregnancy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ectopic pregnancy remains a major public health problem especially in many developing countries where it is a significant contributor to pregnancy related morbidity and mortality. Objective: To determine the association between prior Chlamydia trachomatis infection and the risk of ectopic pregnancy. Methods: ...

  3. Primary endosymbiosis: have cyanobacteria and Chlamydiae ever been roommates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Deschamps

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotes acquired the ability to process photosynthesis by engulfing a cyanobacterium and transforming it into a genuine organelle called the plastid. This event, named primary endosymbiosis, occurred once more than a billion years ago, and allowed the emergence of the Archaeplastida, a monophyletic supergroup comprising the green algae and plants, the red algae and the glaucophytes. Of the other known cases of symbiosis between cyanobacteria and eukaryotes, none has achieved a comparable level of cell integration nor reached the same evolutionary and ecological success than primary endosymbiosis did. Reasons for this unique accomplishment are still unknown and difficult to comprehend. The exploration of plant genomes has revealed a considerable amount of genes closely related to homologs of Chlamydiae bacteria, and probably acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Several studies have proposed that these transferred genes, which are mostly involved in the functioning of the plastid, may have helped the settlement of primary endosymbiosis. Some of these studies propose that Chlamydiae and cyanobacterial symbionts coexisted in the eukaryotic host of the primary endosymbiosis, and that Chlamydiae provided solutions for the metabolic symbiosis between the cyanobacterium and the host, ensuring the success of primary endosymbiosis. In this review, I present a reevaluation of the contribution of Chlamydiae genes to the genome of Archaeplastida and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of this tripartite model for primary endosymbiosis.

  4. Molecular detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Herrmann, B; Jensen, K.T.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter highlights the use of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for the molecular diagnosis of gonorrhoea and chlamydia infection. In addition, good laboratory practice and issues that should be considered before and after implementation of NAATs for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae...

  5. Chlamydia Trachomatis IgG Antibodies Seroprevalence Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-31

    Dec 31, 2014 ... residence significantly affected Chlamydia trachomatis seroprevalence with a preponderance towards students living .... an important causal agent in pelvic inflammatory disease with sequelae including infertility, ectopic pregnancy and chronic Pain. Up to two thirds of cases of tubal-factor infertility and one ...

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae FimK Promotes Virulence in Murine Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David A; Hilliard, Julia K; Tiemann, Kristin M; Todd, Elizabeth M; Morley, S Celeste; Hunstad, David A

    2016-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a chief cause of nosocomial pneumonia, is a versatile and commonly multidrug-resistant human pathogen for which further insight into pathogenesis is needed. We show that the pilus regulatory gene fimK promotes the virulence of K. pneumoniae strain TOP52 in murine pneumonia. This contrasts with the attenuating effect of fimK on urinary tract virulence, illustrating that a single factor may exert opposing effects on pathogenesis in distinct host niches. Loss of fimK in TOP52 pneumonia was associated with diminished lung bacterial burden, limited innate responses within the lung, and improved host survival. FimK expression was shown to promote serum resistance, capsule production, and protection from phagocytosis by host immune cells. Finally, while the widely used K. pneumoniae model strain 43816 produces rapid dissemination and death in mice, TOP52 caused largely localized pneumonia with limited lethality, thereby providing an alternative tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis and control within the lung. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following types of bacteria, it is called atypical pneumonia. Legionella pneumophila. This type of pneumonia sometimes is ... ventilator machine to help them breathe get pneumonia. Atypical pneumonia . Atypical pneumonia is a type of CAP. It ...

  8. Sex and sport: chlamydia screening in rural sporting clubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Marcus Y

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common notifiable disease in Australia, mainly affecting those aged 15 to 29 years. Testing rates are low in Australia and considerably lower in rural areas, with access and confidentiality of sexual health services being problematic in rural and regional areas. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of establishing a pilot chlamydia testing outreach program among 16–25 year old males and females in rural Victoria (Australia undertaken at local sporting clubs and to determine the prevalence of chlamydia and acceptability of the program in this population. Methods We aimed to recruit young people from the Loddon Mallee region of Victoria, Australia between May and September 2007. After a night of sporting practice, participants provided a first pass urine sample, completed a brief questionnaire regarding risk taking behaviour and were then provided with condoms and health promotion materials about sexually transmitted infections (STIs. Those positive for chlamydia were managed by telephone consultation with a practitioner from Melbourne Sexual Health Centre. Results A total of 709 young people participated (77% male, 23% female, 77% being sexually active. All provided a urine sample and completed the questionnaire. Participation rate on recruitment nights was over 95%. Overall chlamydia prevalence in those sexually active was 5.1% (95%CI: 3.4–7.3, 7.4% in females (95%CI: 3.5–13.6 and 4.5% in males (95%CI: 2.7–6.9. Conclusion Sporting clubs represent a feasible, acceptable and innovative community based setting to screen, treat and educate young people in a rural and regional setting, especially for males.

  9. Pneumonia aguda fibrinosa e organizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Santos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O padrão histológico de Pneumonia Aguda Fibrinosa e Organizante (AFOP – Acute Fibrinous And Organizing Pneumonia, descrito por Beasley em 2002, caracteriza-se pela existência de fibrina intra-alveolar sob a forma de bolas de fibrina e pneumonia organizativa difusa. A apresentação clínica desta doença intersticial pulmonar pode ser aguda ou subaguda, diferindo no entanto dos outros padrões histológicos habitualmente associados a lesão pulmonar aguda – Lesão Alveolar Difusa (DAD, Pneumonia Organizativa (OP e Pneumonia Eosinofílica (EP.A propósito deste tema, os autores fazem uma revisão da literatura e descrevem o caso clínico de um doente de 44 anos, com aspectos imagiológicos e evolução pouco habituais. Abstract: The histologic pattern of Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia (AFOP, described by Beasley in 2002, is characterized by the existence of intra alveolar fibrin in the form of fibrin “balls” and diffuse organizing pneumonia. Presenting symptoms of this interstitial pulmonary disease can be acute or subacute. However, it differs from the well-recognized histologic patterns of acute pulmonary lesion – Diffuse Alveolar Damage (DAD, Organizing Pneumonia (OP and Eosinophilic Pneumonia (EP.The authors carry out a review of the literature concerning this topic and describe the clinical case of a 44-year-old patient with unusual imaging features and outcome. Palavras-chave: AFOP, bolas de fibrina, pneumonia organizativa, Key-word: AFOP, fibrin balls, organizing pneumonia

  10. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia

  11. Does population screening for Chlamydia trachomatis raise anxiety among those tested? Findings from a population based chlamydia screening study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Low Nicola

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of urine testing for Chlamydia trachomatis has raised the possibility of large-scale screening for this sexually transmitted infection, which is now the most common in the United Kingdom. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an invitation to be screened for chlamydia and of receiving a negative result on levels of anxiety, depression and self-esteem. Methods 19,773 men and women aged 16 to 39 years, selected at random from 27 general practices in two large city areas (Bristol and Birmingham were invited by post to send home-collected urine samples or vulvo-vaginal swabs for chlamydia testing. Questionnaires enquiring about anxiety, depression and self-esteem were sent to random samples of those offered screening: one month before the dispatch of invitations; when participants returned samples; and after receiving a negative result. Results Home screening was associated with an overall reduction in anxiety scores. An invitation to participate did not increase anxiety levels. Anxiety scores in men were lower after receiving the invitation than at baseline. Amongst women anxiety was reduced after receipt of negative test results. Neither depression nor self-esteem scores were affected by screening. Conclusion Postal screening for chlamydia does not appear to have a negative impact on overall psychological well-being and can lead to a decrease in anxiety levels among respondents. There is, however, a clear difference between men and women in when this reduction occurs.

  12. Does population screening for Chlamydia trachomatis raise anxiety among those tested? Findings from a population based chlamydia screening study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rona; Mills, Nicola; Sanford, Emma; Graham, Anna; Low, Nicola; Peters, Tim J

    2006-04-25

    The advent of urine testing for Chlamydia trachomatis has raised the possibility of large-scale screening for this sexually transmitted infection, which is now the most common in the United Kingdom. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an invitation to be screened for chlamydia and of receiving a negative result on levels of anxiety, depression and self-esteem. 19,773 men and women aged 16 to 39 years, selected at random from 27 general practices in two large city areas (Bristol and Birmingham) were invited by post to send home-collected urine samples or vulvo-vaginal swabs for chlamydia testing. Questionnaires enquiring about anxiety, depression and self-esteem were sent to random samples of those offered screening: one month before the dispatch of invitations; when participants returned samples; and after receiving a negative result. Home screening was associated with an overall reduction in anxiety scores. An invitation to participate did not increase anxiety levels. Anxiety scores in men were lower after receiving the invitation than at baseline. Amongst women anxiety was reduced after receipt of negative test results. Neither depression nor self-esteem scores were affected by screening. Postal screening for chlamydia does not appear to have a negative impact on overall psychological well-being and can lead to a decrease in anxiety levels among respondents. There is, however, a clear difference between men and women in when this reduction occurs.

  13. Fifth Disease (Parvovirus B19)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School 5-12yrs. Teen 12-18yrs. Young Adult 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations ...

  14. Healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgie, Sarah; Marrie, Thomas J

    2009-02-01

    Atypical pneumonia was first described in 1938, and over time, Mycoplasma, Legionella, and Chlamydophila were the agents commonly linked with community-associated atypical pneumonia. However, as technology has improved, so has our understanding of this clinical entity. It is now known that there are many agents linked with atypical pneumonia in the community, and many of these agents are also major causes of healthcare-associated pneumonia. This article discusses the history, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of infection; control of infection; clinical findings; diagnosis; and, where applicable, treatment of the agents of healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia. Bacterial agents include Legionella species, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila species, and Coxiella burnetii. Although there are over 100 viruses that can cause respiratory tract infections, only a fraction of those have been defined in the context of healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia: adenovirus and human bocavirus (HBoV); rhinovirus; human coronaviruses (HCoV), including HCoV 229E, HCoV OC43, HCoV NL63, HCoV HKU1; members of the paramyxoviridae (parainfluenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus); hantavirus; influenza; and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) Co-V. Our knowledge about healthcare-associated atypical pneumonia will continue to evolve as newer pathogens are identified and as newer diagnostic modalities such as multiplex polymerase chain reaction are introduced.

  15. Seroprevalence of human parvovirus B19 in a suburban population in São Paulo, Brazil Soroprevalência do parvovírus humano B19 em população de subúrbio no Estado de São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E M M Huatuco

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prevalence of IgG antibodies to human parvovirus B19. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in a suburban community in São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, between November 1990 and January 1991. Randomly selected (N=435 representative samples of sera were collected from healthy children older than 15 days old and adults up to 40 years old. IgG antibodies were detected using ELISA. RESULTS: High prevalence of IgG antibodies to B19 parvovirus was found in 87% of newborns. The prevalence of maternally derived IgG antibodies exponentially plunged up to the 19th month of age. Low prevalence of antibodies was found in the first 4 years of life, increasing up to 72% in those aged 31-40 years. It was estimated that the average age of first infection in this population is 21 ± 7 years old and the optimal age for vaccination with a hypothetical vaccine would be 1 year of age. CONCLUSIONS: Parvovirus B19 IgG antibody prevalence was high in newborns and those aged 31-40 years. The analysis by age groups showed a pattern similar to that found in previous studies, i.e., low prevalence of infection in children that increases with age.OBJETIVO: Analisar a prevalência de anticorpos IgG ao parvovírus humano B19. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal em uma comunidade de subúrbio de São Paulo, Brasil, de novembro 1990 a janeiro de 1991. Amostras aleatórias (N=435 e representativas de soro foram coletadas de crianças sadias a partir de 15 dias de idade e de adultos com até 40 anos. Os anticorpos IgG ao parvovírus humano B19 foram detectados pelo teste ELISA. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de anticorpos IgG ao parvovírus B19 foi de 87% dos recém-nascidos. A prevalência de anticorpos IgG de origem materna decaiu exponencialmente até o 19o mês de idade. Baixa prevalência de anticorpos foi observada nos primeiros quatro anos de vida, aumentando até 72% no grupo etário de 31-40 anos. A idade média de aquisição da primeira infecção nesta

  16. Seroepidemiologic survey for Chlamydia suis in wild boar (Sus scrofa) populations in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Antonietta; Donati, Manuela; Morandi, Federico; Renzi, Maria; Masia, Marco Antonio; Ostanello, Fabio; Salvatore, Daniela; Cevenini, Roberto; Baldelli, Raffaella

    2011-07-01

    We used serology to estimate the prevalence of exposure to chlamydiae in Italian populations of wild boars (Sus scrofa). Sera from 173 hunter-killed wild boars harvested during the 2006-2009 hunting seasons in three Italian regions were tested for antibodies to Chlamydia suis, Chlamydophila pecorum, Chlamydophila abortus, and Chlamydophila psittaci by the microimmunofluorescence test. Antibody titers to chlamydiae ≥ 1:32 were detected in 110 of the 173 samples tested (63.6%). Specific reactivity could be assessed only in 44 sera with antibody titers to C. suis that were two- to threefold higher than antibody titers against the other chlamydial species; the other 66 sera had similar reactivity against all the chlamydia species tested. Antibody to C. suis was detected in sera from wild boar populations with rare or no known contact with domestic pigs. These results suggest that the wild boar could be a chlamydia reservoir and may acquire chlamydiae independent of contacts with the domestic pig.

  17. Ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Michael Jan

    2005-05-01

    This review summarises some of the notable papers on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) from January 2003 to October 2004. Ventilator-associated pneumonia remains an important drain on hospital resources. All population groups are affected, but patients with VAP are more likely to be older, sicker, and male, with invasive medical devices in situ. Early VAP diagnosis is desirable to reduce VAP mortality and to retard emergence of multidrug-resistant microbes. This may be possible using preliminary culture results or intracellular organism in polymorphonuclear cells. In most intensive care units, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii are the commonest organisms isolated in VAP. However, causative organisms vary between and within hospitals. Consequently, individual intensive care units should develop empirical antibiotic policies to target the pathogenic bacteria prevalent in their patient populations. Preventative strategies aimed at reducing aerodigestive tract colonisation by pathogenic organisms, and also their subsequent aspiration, are becoming increasingly important. Educating medical staff about these simple measures is therefore pertinent. To reduce the occurrence of multidrug-resistant organisms, limiting the duration of antibiotic treatment to 8 days and antimicrobial rotation should be contemplated. Empirical therapy with antipseudomonal penicillins plus beta-lactamase inhibitors should be considered. If methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus VAP is a possibility, linezolid may be better than vancomycin. Prevention remains the key to reducing VAP prevalence.

  18. Pneumoniae in immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, Volkmar; Lehnert, Thomas; Thalhammer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Due to the large surface area, heat, high humidity and high oxygen supply in the lung makes an ideal environment for the propagation of germs. The purpose of the immune system is to establish and maintain the balance between saprophytes and immune defense so as to depress and ultimately kill germs as they infiltrate the body. This usually is achieved by the use of a highly complex immune system. It is a perfect combination of non-specific, cellular and humoral immune mechanisms with very specific immune cells and antibodies, which are specialized on particular pathogens. The specific defenses potentiate the effect of the nonspecific defense in a large extent so as to prevent re-infection and ultimately eliminate recognized pathogens. The causes of immune deficiency can be related to either the cellular or humoral level and affect both the specific and nonspecific defenses. There is a different excitation spectrum depending on the type of immune deficiency. Immune deficiency can prevalently cause complications in the course of infections, decelerate the healing and allow the occurrence of rare pathogens. In particular, the radiological characteristics of typical and atypical pneumonia in immunocompromised patients will be discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the appearance of bacterial infections, mycobacterioses, PCP, CMV, and laid fungual pneumonia. Even it is not possible to identify certain pathogens radiologically, it is often possible to narrow the spectrum of germs causing pulmonary infections significantly by comparing with other pulmonary complications such as lymphoma or kaposisarcomas. (orig.)

  19. Importancia clínica de las Chlamydias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Digna Llorente Molina

    Full Text Available Introducción: las infecciones por Chlamydia han alcanzado alta incidencia en el mundo. Constituyen importantes patógenos para los animales y el hombre. En la especie humana pueden ocasionar múltiples infecciones en diferentes órganos y sistemas de órganos. Objetivo: resumir los aspectos más novedosos relacionados con las Chlamydias en cuanto a sus características y formas de evitarla. Métodos: se realizó una revisión bibliográfica sobre la importancia clínica de las Chlamydias en la especie humana y su elevada incidencia. Se consultó la base de datos Medline disponible en INFOMED, de donde se extrajeron referencias bibliográficas entre los años 1995 y 2011, acerca de algunos aspectos etiológicos, clínicos, diagnósticos y terapéuticos de acuerdo a los últimos apuntes más relevantes en la literatura médica sobre Chlamydias y su relación con el hombre. Resultados: la Chlamydia Trachomatis en particular responsable del tracoma, primera causa de ceguera prevenible, provoca un impacto deletéreo en la salud reproductiva, produciendo entidades como abortos espontáneos, rotura prematura de membranas, restricción del crecimiento intrauterino, endometritis, conjuntivitis y neumonía del recién nacido. Es responsable además de Linfogranuloma Venéreo, Uretritis no Gonocóccica, Síndrome de Reiter, Enfermedad Inflamatoria Pélvica, Síndrome de Fitz Hugh Curtis, Embarazo Ectópico Crónico, Dolor Pélvico Crónico y más recientemente Carcinoma Cervical, entre otras. Conclusiones: partiendo de la base del impacto social y económico que tiene la infección por Chlamydias en el mundo y en nuestro país, pudimos resumir los aspectos más novedosos en cuanto a los tipos, infecciones que causan y sus características, diagnóstico, terapéutica y medidas generales para evitarlas o reducir su impacto negativo en la sociedad.

  20. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Chlamydia Infection in Domestic Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Ni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria distributed all over the world, known to cause various forms of diseases in animals and humans. In the present study, a serological survey was conducted to detect the seroprevalence and risk factors associated with rabbit chlamydiosis in northeast China, including Liaoning province, Jilin province, Heilongjiang province, and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. Antibodies to Chlamydia were determined by indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA. The overall seroprevalence was estimated at 17.88% in total of 800 blood samples. The Chlamydia seroprevalence varied in domestic rabbits from different factors, and genders of domestic rabbits were considered as major risk factors associated with Chlamydia infection. Our study revealed a widespread and high prevalence of Chlamydia infection in domestic rabbits in northeast China, with higher exposure risk in female domestic rabbits. These findings suggested the potential importance of domestic rabbits in the transmission of zoonotic Chlamydia infection, and thus Chlamydia should be taken into consideration in diagnosing rabbit diseases. To our knowledge, there is no report of Chlamydia infection in domestic rabbits in China and the results extend the host range for Chlamydia, which has important implications for public health and the local economy.