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Sample records for b-type carbohydrate kinase

  1. The plastid-localized pfkB-type carbohydrate kinases FRUCTOKINASE-LIKE 1 and 2 are essential for growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilkerson Jonathan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription of plastid-encoded genes requires two different DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, a nuclear-encoded polymerase (NEP and plastid-encoded polymerase (PEP. Recent studies identified two related pfkB-type carbohydrate kinases, named FRUCTOKINASE-LIKE PROTEIN (FLN1 and FLN2, as components of the thylakoid bound PEP complex in both Arabidopsis thaliana and Sinapis alba (mustard. Additional work demonstrated that RNAi-mediated reduction in FLN expression specifically diminished transcription of PEP-dependent genes. Results Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis FLN knockout alleles to examine the contribution of each gene in plant growth, chloroplast development, and in mediating PEP-dependent transcription. We show that fln plants have severe phenotypes with fln1 resulting in an albino phenotype that is seedling lethal without a source of exogenous carbon. In contrast, fln2 plants display chlorosis prior to leaf expansion, but exhibit slow greening, remain autotrophic, can grow to maturity, and set viable seed. fln1 fln2 double mutant analysis reveals haplo-insufficiency, and fln1 fln2 plants have a similar, but more severe phenotype than either single mutant. Normal plastid development in both light and dark requires the FLNs, but surprisingly skotomorphogenesis is unaffected in fln seedlings. Seedlings genetically fln1-1 with dexamethasone-inducible FLN1-HA expression at germination are phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type. Induction of FLN-HA after 24 hours of germination cannot rescue the mutant phenotype, indicating that the effects of loss of FLN are not always reversible. Examination of chloroplast gene expression in fln1-1 and fln2-1 by qRT-PCR reveals that transcripts of PEP-dependent genes were specifically reduced compared to NEP-dependent genes in both single mutants. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that each FLN protein contributes to wild type growth, and acting additively are

  2. Prevalence of the B Type Raf Kinase V600E Mutation in Cytologically Indeterminate Thyroid Nodules: Correlation with Ultrasonographic and Pathologic Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chae Hyun; Choi, Yoon Jung; Choi, Seon Hyeong; Rho, Myong Ho Kook Shin Ho; Chung, Eun Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Seoung Wan; Kim, Dong Hoon; Sohn, Jin Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Ji Sup [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    To study the prevalence of B type Raf kinase (BRAF) mutations, and to evaluate the ultrasonographic and clinicopathological features associated with thyroid cytology of indeterminate nodules. We assessed the presence or absence of BRAF mutation in 44 specimens from patients with cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules according to two consecutive preoperative fine needle aspiration cytology procedures. In 9 specimens, the test for BRAF mutation was not possible due to scant cellularity. DNA was extracted from the atypical cells and then analyzed for the BRAF V600E mutation by pyrosequencing. The ultrasonographic and clinicopathological features of the patients were characterized according to their mutation status. The BRAF V600E mutation was present in 17 (48.6%) of 35 patients with indeterminate cytology results and in 17 (54.8%) of the 31 patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Twenty two of 35 cytologically indeterminate nodules had calcifications, and among them 14 cases were proven to be positive for BRAF V600E mutations. Extrathyroid extension was significantly more frequent in the presence of the BRAF V600E mutation (p = 0.027), while tumor size, lympho-vascular invasion, or lymph node metastasis were not associated with the mutation. Screening for BRAF V600E mutations in conjunction with cytology may increase the diagnostic accuracy for PTC with indeterminate cytology results.

  3. Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  4. The FGGY carbohydrate kinase family: insights into the evolution of functional specificities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Function diversification in large protein families is a major mechanism driving expansion of cellular networks, providing organisms with new metabolic capabilities and thus adding to their evolutionary success. However, our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms of functional diversity in such families is very limited, which, among many other reasons, is due to the lack of functionally well-characterized sets of proteins. Here, using the FGGY carbohydrate kinase family as an example, we built a confidently annotated reference set (CARS of proteins by propagating experimentally verified functional assignments to a limited number of homologous proteins that are supported by their genomic and functional contexts. Then, we analyzed, on both the phylogenetic and the molecular levels, the evolution of different functional specificities in this family. The results show that the different functions (substrate specificities encoded by FGGY kinases have emerged only once in the evolutionary history following an apparently simple divergent evolutionary model. At the same time, on the molecular level, one isofunctional group (L-ribulokinase, AraB evolved at least two independent solutions that employed distinct specificity-determining residues for the recognition of a same substrate (L-ribulose. Our analysis provides a detailed model of the evolution of the FGGY kinase family. It also shows that only combined molecular and phylogenetic approaches can help reconstruct a full picture of functional diversifications in such diverse families.

  5. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase β-Subunit Requires Internal Motion for Optimal Carbohydrate Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Michael; Mobbs, Jesse I.; Koay, Ann; Louey, Gavin; Mok, Yee-Foong; Hatters, Danny M.; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Neumann, Dietbert; Stapleton, David; Gooley, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase interacts with oligosaccharides and glycogen through the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) containing the β-subunit, for which there are two isoforms (β1 and β2). Muscle-specific β2-CBM, either as an isolated domain or in the intact enzyme, binds carbohydrates more tightly than the ubiquitous β1-CBM. Although residues that contact carbohydrate are strictly conserved, an additional threonine in a loop of β2-CBM is concurrent with an increase in flexibility in β2-CBM, which may account for the affinity differences between the two isoforms. In contrast to β1-CBM, unbound β2-CBM showed microsecond-to-millisecond motion at the base of a β-hairpin that contains residues that make critical contacts with carbohydrate. Upon binding to carbohydrate, similar microsecond-to-millisecond motion was observed in this β-hairpin and the loop that contains the threonine insertion. Deletion of the threonine from β2-CBM resulted in reduced carbohydrate affinity. Although motion was retained in the unbound state, a significant loss of motion was observed in the bound state of the β2-CBM mutant. Insertion of a threonine into the background of β1-CBM resulted in increased ligand affinity and flexibility in these loops when bound to carbohydrate. However, these mutations indicate that the additional threonine is not solely responsible for the differences in carbohydrate affinity and protein dynamics. Nevertheless, these results suggest that altered protein dynamics may contribute to differences in the ligand affinity of the two naturally occurring CBM isoforms. PMID:22339867

  6. Data regarding the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on different carbohydrates and recombinant production of elongation factor G and pyruvate kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Ufuk Celebioglu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the growth of the very well-known probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on different carbohydrates. Furthermore, recombinant production of putative moonlighting proteins elongation factor G and pyruvate kinase from this bacterium is described. For further and detailed interpretation of the data presented here, please see the research article “Mucin- and carbohydrate-stimulated adhesion and subproteome changes of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM” (Celebioglu et al., 2017 [1].

  7. Data regarding the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on different carbohydrates and recombinant production of elongation factor G and pyruvate kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Olesen, Sita Vaag; Prehn, Kennie

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes the growth of the very well-known probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on different carbohydrates. Furthermore, recombinant production of putative moonlighting proteins elongation factor G and pyruvate kinase from this bacterium is described. For further ...... and detailed interpretation of the data presented here, please see the research article “Mucin- and carbohydrate-stimulated adhesion and subproteome changes of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM” (Celebioglu et al., 2017) [1]....

  8. Chronological Lifespan in Yeast Is Dependent on the Accumulation of Storage Carbohydrates Mediated by Yak1, Mck1 and Rim15 Kinases

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    Tang, Yingzhi; Quan, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhe; Oliver, Stephen G.; Zhang, Nianshu

    2016-01-01

    Upon starvation for glucose or any other macronutrient, yeast cells exit from the mitotic cell cycle and acquire a set of characteristics that are specific to quiescent cells to ensure longevity. Little is known about the molecular determinants that orchestrate quiescence entry and lifespan extension. Using starvation-specific gene reporters, we screened a subset of the yeast deletion library representing the genes encoding ‘signaling’ proteins. Apart from the previously characterised Rim15, Mck1 and Yak1 kinases, the SNF1/AMPK complex, the cell wall integrity pathway and a number of cell cycle regulators were shown to be necessary for proper quiescence establishment and for extension of chronological lifespan (CLS), suggesting that entry into quiescence requires the integration of starvation signals transmitted via multiple signaling pathways. The CLS of these signaling mutants, and those of the single, double and triple mutants of RIM15, YAK1 and MCK1 correlates well with the amount of storage carbohydrates but poorly with transition-phase cell cycle status. Combined removal of the glycogen and trehalose biosynthetic genes, especially GSY2 and TPS1, nearly abolishes the accumulation of storage carbohydrates and severely reduces CLS. Concurrent overexpression of GSY2 and TSL1 or supplementation of trehalose to the growth medium ameliorates the severe CLS defects displayed by the signaling mutants (rim15Δyak1Δ or rim15Δmck1Δ). Furthermore, we reveal that the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species are cooperatively controlled by Yak1, Rim15 and Mck1, and the three kinases mediate the TOR1-regulated accumulation of storage carbohydrates and CLS extension. Our data support the hypothesis that metabolic reprogramming to accumulate energy stores and the activation of anti-oxidant defence systems are coordinated by Yak1, Rim15 and Mck1 kinases to ensure quiescence entry and lifespan extension in yeast. PMID:27923067

  9. Counting carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk and milk products, soy milk Beans, legumes, ...

  10. Understanding Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Understanding Carbohydrates How much and what type of carbohydrate foods ... glucose levels in your target range. Explore: Understanding Carbohydrates Glycemic Index and Diabetes Learn about the glycemic ...

  11. Molecular characterization of AMP-activated protein kinase α2 from herbivorous fish Megalobrama amblycephala and responsiveness to glucose loading and dietary carbohydrate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Liu, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Wang, Kai-Zhou; Xia, Si-Lei; Li, Xiang-Fei

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to characterize the full-length cDNA of AMPKα2 in Megalobrama amblycephala, and evaluate its potential role in glucose homeostasis and carbohydrate metabolism. The cDNA obtained covered 1942bp with an open reading frame of 1635bp encoding 545 amino acids. Multiple alignments and phylogenetic analysis revealed a high homology (91-100%) among most fish and higher vertebrates. This AMPKα2 mRNA predominantly expressed in muscle, liver and brain, while little in gill and intestine. Then, the AMPKα2 expressions were determined in the muscle, liver and brain of fish subjected to a glucose load (injected intraperitoneally with 0, 1.67 and 3.34g glucose per kg body weight) and after a 12-week feeding trial (fed two dietary carbohydrate levels: 30% and 43%), respectively. After the glucose load, plasma glycemia peaked at 1h in fish. Thereafter, it decreased significantly to the basal level at 8h. However, AMPKα2 expression in muscle, liver and brain all decreased significantly during the first 2h, then returned to the basal value at 24h. Unlikely, tissue AMPKα2 expression of fish receiving saline solution increased significantly during the whole sampling period. Additionally, high-carbohydrate diet enhanced its expression in liver and muscle, but not that in brain. These findings indicated that the AMPKα2 gene shared a high degree of conservation with that of the other vertebrates. Muscle, liver and brain AMPKα2 expressions were highly induced by glucose administration. Furthermore, high dietary carbohydrate modified its expressions in these tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Carbohydrate Analysis

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    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  13. Metabolic aspects of low carbohydrate diets and exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Sandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Following a low carbohydrate diet, there is a shift towards more fat and less carbohydrate oxidation to provide energy to skeletal muscle, both at rest and during exercise. This review summarizes recent work on human skeletal muscle carbohydrate and fat metabolic adaptations to a low carbohydrate diet, focusing mainly on pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, and how these changes relate to the capacity for carbohydrate oxidation during exercise.

  14. Carbohydrate Loading.

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    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  15. Carbohydrate microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sungjin; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Blixt, Klas Ola

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, carbohydrate microarrays have been core technologies for analyzing carbohydrate-mediated recognition events in a high-throughput fashion. A number of methods have been exploited for immobilizing glycans on the solid surface in a microarray format. This microarray-based technol......In the last decade, carbohydrate microarrays have been core technologies for analyzing carbohydrate-mediated recognition events in a high-throughput fashion. A number of methods have been exploited for immobilizing glycans on the solid surface in a microarray format. This microarray......-based technology has been widely employed for rapid analysis of the glycan binding properties of lectins and antibodies, the quantitative measurements of glycan-protein interactions, detection of cells and pathogens, identification of disease-related anti-glycan antibodies for diagnosis, and fast assessment...

  16. Carbohydrate malabsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Nordgaard-Andersen, I; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies in small series of healthy adults have suggested that parallel measurement of hydrogen and methane resulting from gut fermentation may improve the precision of quantitative estimates of carbohydrate malabsorption. Systematic, controlled studies of the role of simultaneous hydrogen...

  17. Food carbohydrate chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wrolstad, R. E

    2012-01-01

    .... Now in Food Carbohydrate Chemistry, author Wrolstad emphasizes the application of carbohydrate chemistry to understanding the chemistry, physical and functional properties of food carbohydrates...

  18. B-type natriuretic peptide secretion following scuba diving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passino, Claudio; Franzino, Enrico; Giannoni, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    To examine the neurohormonal effects of a scuba dive, focusing on the acute changes in the plasma concentrations of the different peptide fragments from the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) precursor.......To examine the neurohormonal effects of a scuba dive, focusing on the acute changes in the plasma concentrations of the different peptide fragments from the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) precursor....

  19. Preoperative B-type natriuretic peptide risk stratification: Do ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: It is unclear if there is value in measuring postoperative B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in patients risk-stratified using preoperative BNP. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting and subjects: Patients undergoing vascular surgery at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital, Durban. Data on intraoperative risk ...

  20. Preoperative B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preoperative B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery: a cumulative meta-analysis. ... Journal Home > Vol 21, No 4 (2015) > ... Future investigation should focus on the clinical implications of these data and the application of these findings with regard to further investigation, optimisation and ...

  1. Kepler observations of the variability in B-type stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balona, Luis A.; Pigulski, A.; De Cat, P.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the light curves of 48 B-type stars observed by Kepler is presented. Among these are 15 pulsating stars, all of which show low frequencies, characteristic of slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars. Seven of these stars also show a few weak, isolated high frequencies and they could...

  2. Specificity of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saenger, Amy K; Rodriguez-Fraga, Olaia; Ler, Ranka

    2017-01-01

    -proBNP), and proBNP peptides to probe the cross-reactivity of each assay. METHODS: Nine B-type natriuretic peptides were studied,including synthetic and recombinant BNP (Shionogi, Scios, Mayo), human and synthetic glycosylated and nonglycosylated NT-proBNP (HyTest, Roche Diagnostics), and human glycosylated......BACKGROUND: B-type natriuretic peptides (BNPs) are used clinically to diagnose and monitor heart failure and are present in the circulation as multiple proBNP-derived fragments. We investigated the specificity of BNP immunoassays with glycosylated and nonglycosylated BNP, N-terminal proBNP (NT......-Rad, Goetze] were evaluated. Specificity was assessed by calculating the recovery between baseline and peptide-spiked human plasma pools at target concentrations of 100 ng/L BNP, 300 ng/L proBNP, or 450 ng/L NT-proBNP. All assays were performed in duplicate. RESULTS: BNP and NT-proBNP assays demonstrated...

  3. X-rays from Magnetic B-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Corinne; Petit, Véronique; Caballero-Nieves, Saida Maria; Nazé, Yaël; Owocki, Stan; Wade, Gregg; Cohen, David; Townsend, Richard; David-Uraz, Alexandre; Shultz, Matt

    2018-01-01

    Recent surveys have found that ~10% of OB-type stars host strong (~1kG), mostly dipolar magnetic fields. The prominent idea describing the interaction between the stellar winds and the magnetic field is the magnetically confined wind shock model. In this model, the ionized wind material is forced to move along the closed magnetic field loops and collides at the magnetic equator creating a shock. As the shocked material cools radiatively it will emit X-rays. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in detecting and characterizing the wind material confined by the magnetic fields of these stars. Some of these magnetic B-type stars are found to have very short rotational periods. The effects of the rapid rotation on the X-ray production within the magnetosphere have yet to be explored in detail. The added centrifugal force is predicted to cause faster wind outflows along the field lines, which could lead to higher shock temperatures and harder X-rays. However, this is not observed in all rapidly rotating magnetic B-type stars. In order to address this question from a theoretical point of view, we use the X-ray Analytical Dynamical Magnetosphere model, developed for slow rotators and implement the physics of rapid rotation. Using X-ray spectroscopy from ESA’s XMM-Newton space telescope, we observed 5 rapidly rotating B-types stars to add to the previous list of observations. Comparing the observed X-ray luminosity and hardness ratio to that predicted by the XADM allows us to determine the role an added centrifugal acceleration plays in the magnetospheres of these stars.

  4. Investigating the Magnetospheres of Rapidly Rotating B-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, C. L.; Petit, V.; Nazé, Y.; Wade, G. A.; Townsend, R. H.; Owocki, S. P.; Cohen, D. H.; David-Uraz, A.; Shultz, M.

    2017-11-01

    Recent spectropolarimetric surveys of bright, hot stars have found that ~10% of OB-type stars contain strong (mostly dipolar) surface magnetic fields (~kG). The prominent paradigm describing the interaction between the stellar winds and the surface magnetic field is the magnetically confined wind shock (MCWS) model. In this model, the stellar wind plasma is forced to move along the closed field loops of the magnetic field, colliding at the magnetic equator, and creating a shock. As the shocked material cools radiatively it will emit X-rays. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in detecting and characterizing the hot wind material confined by the magnetic fields of these stars. Some B-type stars are found to have very short rotational periods. The effects of the rapid rotation on the X-ray production within the magnetosphere have yet to be explored in detail. The added centrifugal force due to rapid rotation is predicted to cause faster wind outflows along the field lines, leading to higher shock temperatures and harder X-rays. However, this is not observed in all rapidly rotating magnetic B-type stars. In order to address this from a theoretical point of view, we use the X-ray Analytical Dynamical Magnetosphere (XADM) model, originally developed for slow rotators, with an implementation of new rapid rotational physics. Using X-ray spectroscopy from ESA's XMM-Newton space telescope, we observed 5 rapidly rotating B-types stars to add to the previous list of observations. Comparing the observed X-ray luminosity and hardness ratio to that predicted by the XADM allows us to determine the role the added centrifugal force plays in the magnetospheric X-ray emission of these stars.

  5. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. ...

  6. Carbohydrates for fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Dietmar

    2006-01-01

    Biomass accumulated by the photosynthetic fixation of carbon dioxide is the only renewable carbon source, and hence, the only renewable raw material for the chemical industry. Carbohydrates are the main constituents of biomass and occur as cell wall and storage carbohydrates, transportation carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. Cellulose, hemicelluloses and starch in particular as well as pectin, inulin and saccharose to a smaller extent are the most abundant carbohydrates. Glucose is the most important monosaccharide and monomer of polysaccharides in natural carbohydrates. Thus, it is the most abundant organic compound on earth. Production of pulp from wood cellulose, applications of starch for paper making as well as uses of glucose and saccharose for fermentation are the most important chemical and technical uses of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates used as fermentation feedstock are essential for the chemical industry. Their importance is steadily growing due to the increasing implementation of biotechnological processes.

  7. Atrial secretion of B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2006-01-01

    In the normal heart, the endocrine capacity resides in the atria. Atrial myocytes express and secrete natriuretic hormones that regulate fluid homeostasis and blood pressure. But in ventricular disease, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) gene expression is also...... understanding of the endocrine atria during ventricular dysfunction is still scarce. Although ventricular disease and increased circulating concentrations are associated, it does not entail that the ventricle is the sole or even the main source in all types of heart disease. Clearly, the endocrine atria...... are also active in heart failure. Plasma measurement of cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors can perhaps help us to discriminate when, where and how....

  8. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  9. Multiple recycling of NdFeB-type sintered magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakotnik, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: miha.zakotnik@gmail.com; Harris, I.R.; Williams, A.J. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-05

    Some fully dense, sintered NdFeB-type magnets (employed in VCM disc drives) have been subjected to a recycling process using the hydrogen decrepitation (HD) process. After a brief milling treatment, the powder was aligned, pressed and re-sintered and this procedure was repeated four times with a progressive fall in the density and in the magnetic properties. The chemical analysis indicated that this was due to the progressive oxidation of the Nd-rich material and to some Nd loss by evaporation. The procedure was then repeated but with the addition (blending) of a fine powder of neodymium hydride after the first cycle. It was found that the addition of 1 at.% of neodymium at each stage was sufficient to maintain the density and the magnetic properties of the recycled magnets up to and including the 4th cycle. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and metallographic analysis indicated that the neodymium hydride additions compensated for the neodymium loss due to evaporation and to oxidation so that the proportion of Nd-rich material remained approximately constant. The additional amount of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the blended recycled magnets appeared to inhibit grain growth on the 3rd and 4th cycles when compared to that of the unblended magnets. The next challenge is to see if the process can be scaled-up to an industrial scale.

  10. Massive B-type pulsators in low-metallicity environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, C.; Arentoft, T.; Glowienka, L.; Coutures, C.; Nielsen, T. B.; Dogan, G.; Grundahl, F.; Kjeldsen, H.

    2009-07-01

    Massive B-type pulsators such as β Cep and slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars pulsate due to layers of increased opacity caused by partial ionization. The increased opacity blocks the energy flux to the surface of the stars which causes the layers to rise and the opacity to drop. This cyclical behavior makes the star act as a heat engine and the star will thus pulsate. For β Cep and SPB stars the increased opacity is believed to be caused by partial ionization of iron and these stars should therefore contain non-insignificant quantities of the metal. A good test of this theory is to search for β Cep and SPB stars in low-metallicity environments. If no stars are found the theory is supported, but, on the other hand, if a substantial number of β Cep and SPB stars are found in these environments then the theory is not supported and a %solutions solution is needed. With a growing number of identified β Cep and SPB stars in the low-metallicity Magellanic Clouds we seem to be left with the second case. We will in this context discuss recent findings of β Cep and SPB stars in the Magellanic Clouds and some possible solutions to the discrepancy between these observations and the theory. We also describe an ambitious project that we have initiated on the Small Magellanic Cloud open cluster NGC 371 which will help to evaluate these solutions.

  11. Parasite Carbohydrate Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaurigue, Jonnel A; Seeberger, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is an efficient means of combating infectious disease burden globally. However, routine vaccines for the world's major human parasitic diseases do not yet exist. Vaccines based on carbohydrate antigens are a viable option for parasite vaccine development, given the proven success of carbohydrate vaccines to combat bacterial infections. We will review the key components of carbohydrate vaccines that have remained largely consistent since their inception, and the success of bacterial carbohydrate vaccines. We will then explore the latest developments for both traditional and non-traditional carbohydrate vaccine approaches for three of the world's major protozoan parasitic diseases-malaria, toxoplasmosis, and leishmaniasis. The traditional prophylactic carbohydrate vaccine strategy is being explored for malaria. However, given that parasite disease biology is complex and often arises from host immune responses to parasite antigens, carbohydrate vaccines against deleterious immune responses in host-parasite interactions are also being explored. In particular, the highly abundant glycosylphosphatidylinositol molecules specific for Plasmodium, Toxoplasma , and Leishmania spp. are considered exploitable antigens for this non-traditional vaccine approach. Discussion will revolve around the application of these protozoan carbohydrate antigens for vaccines currently in preclinical development.

  12. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  13. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging

  14. CARBOHYDRATE-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS WHICH BIND TO CARBOHYDRATE BINDING RECEPTORS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1995-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases.......Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases....

  15. Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dietitian or diabetes educator can help you learn what foods to eat, how much to eat, and when ... enter a type of food and find out what nutrients the food contains, including carbohydrates. Try visiting these sites: www. ...

  16. Applied carbohydrate counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lovely; Khandelwal, Deepak; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-09-01

    Carbohydrate counting or "carb counting" is a meal planning technique for persons with diabetes for managing blood glucose levels by tracking the grams of carbohydrate consumed at meals. With better patient education and awareness, carb counting has become an important step in diabetes management. People with all types of diabetes can be benefited with this approach via improved glycaemic control and quality of life. In the first part of this review basic principles of carbohydrate counting, its application in clinical practice and exchange lists pertaining primarily to South Asian populations have been discussed. Advanced carb counting involving equations which help in better understanding of insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio and insulin dose adjustment are also included in this review.

  17. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  18. Learning about Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called starches. Starches include grain products, such as bread, crackers, pasta, and rice. As with simple sugars, some complex carbohydrate foods are better choices than others. Refined (say: ree-FIND) grains, such ...

  19. Carbohydrates, Sugar, and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Carbohydrates and Sugar KidsHealth / For Parents / Carbohydrates and Sugar ... carbohidratos, el azúcar y su hijo What Are Carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are the body's most important and readily ...

  20. N-terminal Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide: a measure of significant patent cuctus arteriosus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    OFarombi-Oghuvbu, IO

    2008-01-24

    Background: B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a marker for ventricular dysfunction secreted as a pre-prohormone, Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (ProBNP), and cleaved into BNP and a biologically inactive fragment, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Little is known about the clinical usefulness of NT-proBNP in preterm infants.\\r\

  1. Diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Heinz F; Hammer, Johann

    2012-09-01

    This article will focus on the role of the colon in the pathogenesis of diarrhea in carbohydrate malabsorption or physiologically incomplete absorption of carbohydrates, and on the most common manifestation of carbohydrate malabsorption, lactose malabsorption. In addition, incomplete fructose absorption, the role of carbohydrate malabsorption in other malabsorptive diseases, and congenital defects that lead to malabsorption will be covered. The article concludes with a section on diagnostic tools to evaluate carbohydrate malabsorption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Who is the carbohydrate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Enrique Cuevas Mestanza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry is a complex science that studies biomolecules and their interactions in metabolic pathways in living beings. Due to the large amount of contents against the short period to apply them, only expositive classes are not enough to arouse the interest of students and solve questions. In this perspective, is very important to develop new educational tools to improve the understanding of these contents. “Who is the carbohydrate?” It is a didactic game created to review the structural and functional relationship of carbohydrates. Based on the classic “Guess who?” The objective of the player or group is to first find out the opponent's carbohydrate name.

  3. Carbohydrate and exercise performance: the role of multiple transportable carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2010-07-01

    Carbohydrate feeding has been shown to be ergogenic, but recently substantial advances have been made in optimizing the guidelines for carbohydrate intake during prolonged exercise. It was found that limitations to carbohydrate oxidation were in the absorptive process most likely because of a saturation of carbohydrate transporters. By using a combination of carbohydrates that use different intestinal transporters for absorption it was shown that carbohydrate delivery and oxidation could be increased. Studies demonstrated increases in exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates of up to 65% of glucose: fructose compared with glucose only. Exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates reach values of 1.75 g/min whereas previously it was thought that 1 g/min was the absolute maximum. The increased carbohydrate oxidation with multiple transportable carbohydrates was accompanied by increased fluid delivery and improved oxidation efficiency, and thus the likelihood of gastrointestinal distress may be diminished. Studies also demonstrated reduced fatigue and improved exercise performance with multiple transportable carbohydrates compared with a single carbohydrate. Multiple transportable carbohydrates, ingested at high rates, can be beneficial during endurance sports in which the duration of exercise is 3 h or more.

  4. Catalytic Conversion of Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmundsen, Christian Mårup

    with the production of commodity chemicals from the most abundantly available renewable source of carbon, carbohydrates. The production of alkyl lactates by the Lewis acid catalyzed conversion of hexoses is an interesting alternative to current fermentation based processes. A range of stannosilicates were....... The synthesis of these by the cycloaddition of ethylene to furanic compounds, followed by dehydrative aromatization, was demonstrated in good yields, using a strong Brønsted acidic catalyst, WOx/ZrO2. As both ethylene and furanics can be derived from carbohydrates by known processes, this constitutes...

  5. Carbohydrate intake and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, R.M.; Seidell, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased rapidly worldwide and the importance of considering the role of diet in the prevention and treatment of obesity is widely acknowledged. This paper reviews data on the effects of dietary carbohydrates on body fatness. Does the composition of the diet as related

  6. Kinases and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicenas, Jonas; Zalyte, Egle; Bairoch, Amos; Gaudet, Pascale

    2018-03-01

    Protein kinases are a large family of enzymes catalyzing protein phosphorylation. The human genome contains 518 protein kinase genes, 478 of which belong to the classical protein kinase family and 40 are atypical protein kinases [...].

  7. Kinases and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas Cicenas; Egle Zalyte; Amos Bairoch; Pascale Gaudet

    2018-01-01

    Protein kinases are a large family of enzymes catalyzing protein phosphorylation. The human genome contains 518 protein kinase genes, 478 of which belong to the classical protein kinase family and 40 are atypical protein kinases [...

  8. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with growth hormone disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Faber, Jens; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Acromegaly is associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, hypertension and subsequent congestive heart failure. Impairment of cardiac function has also been associated with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). B-type natriuretic peptides (BNPs) have emerged as strong diagnostic and prognostic risk m...

  9. B-type natriuretic peptide as prognostic marker in tetralogy of Fallot surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Subramanian, Arun; Malik, Vishwas; Kiran, Usha; Velayoudham, Devagourou

    2015-02-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide has been extensively studied in patients with cardiovascular disease, but its impact on the perioperative outcome of patients with cyanotic congenital heart defects is still unclear. We assessed the perioperative changes in B-type natriuretic peptide levels and their correlation with preoperative factors and clinical outcomes in a large homogenous group of patients with tetralogy of Fallot undergoing definitive repair at a tertiary care center. A prospective study was undertaken in the cardiac operating room and intensive care unit at a single institution; 250 patients with tetralogy of Fallot undergoing intracardiac repair under cardiopulmonary bypass were studied. B-type natriuretic peptide levels were taken at 3 time points and correlated with clinical variables. Baseline B-type natriuretic peptide levels correlated with the degree of cyanosis in all 4 groups. B-type natriuretic peptide levels at 24 h after admission to the intensive care unit correlated with mortality in the adult subset of patients. B-type natriuretic peptide levels > 290 pg mL(-1) in the intensive care unit predicted an increased probability of adverse clinical outcomes. We demonstrated a rise in serum B-type natriuretic peptide levels in patients with tetralogy of Fallot undergoing definitive repair on cardiopulmonary bypass. B-type natriuretic peptide levels may be monitored to identify patients with cyanosis at increased risk of an augmented inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Crystallographic studies of carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefrey, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The monosaccharides which constitute the monomer units of many important industrial and biological macromolecules are well represented among the 2000 crystal structures of the carbohydrate class 45 of the Cambridge Structural Database. There are few examples of crystal structure analyses of the corresponding acids, but many of their calcium salts and calcium salt complexes. With the exception of the disaccharides and cyclodextrins, the oligosaccharides are not well represented, with less than ten trisaccharides, one tetrasaccharide and one hexasaccharide-iodide complex. Two important conformational factors are the Hassel-Ottar effect and the anomeric effect, both of which have been studied using crystallographic data. Hydrogen bonding is ubiquitous in carbohydrate crystals and generally involves all the hydroxyls as both donors and acceptors, and some of the ring and glycosidic oxygens as acceptors. These hydrogen bonds tend to form finite or infinite chains. In hydrates, these chains are linked through the water molecules to form networks. Cyclic hydrogen-bond systems are observed in the cyclodextrins. Long-chain alkylated carbohydrates provide a large class of thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals and some non-ionic surfactants which have been shown to be useful for membrane-protein solubilization and crystallization. (orig.)

  11. Dehydration breakdown of antigorite and the formation of B-type olivine CPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Wallis, Simon R.; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Seto, Yusuke; Miyake, Akira; Matsumoto, Megumi

    2014-02-01

    Peridotite formed by contact metamorphism and dehydration breakdown of an antigorite schist from the Happo area, central Japan shows a strong olivine crystallographic preferred orientation (Ol CPO). The lack of mesoscale deformation structures associated with the intrusion and the lack of microstructural evidence for plastic deformation of neoblastic grains suggest that olivine CPO in this area did not form as a result of solid-state deformation. Instead, the good correspondence between the original antigorite orientation and the orientation of the newly formed olivine implies the CPO formed by topotactic growth of the olivine after antigorite. Ol CPO is likely to develop by a similar process in subduction zone environments where foliated serpentinite is dragged down to depths where antigorite is no longer stable. The Happo Ol CPO has a strong a-axis concentration perpendicular to the lineation and within the foliation-commonly referred to as B-type Ol CPO. Seismic fast directions parallel to the ocean trench are observed in many convergent margins and are consistent with the presence of B-type Ol CPO in the mantle wedge of these regions. Experimental work has shown that B-type CPO can form by dislocation creep under hydrous conditions at relatively high stresses. There are, however, several discrepancies between the characteristics of natural and laboratory samples with B-type Ol CPO. (1) The formation conditions (stress and temperature) of some natural examples with B-type CPO fall outside those predicted by experiments. (2) In deformation experiments, slip in the crystallographic c-axis direction is important but has not been observed in natural examples of B-type CPO. (3) Experimental work suggests the presence of H2O and either high shear stress or relatively low temperatures are essential for the formation of B-type CPO. These conditions are most likely to be achieved close to subduction boundaries, but these regions are also associated with serpentinization

  12. Effects of Carbohydrate Consumption Case Study: carbohydrates in Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neacsu N.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates perform numerous roles in living organisms; they are an important source of energy. The body uses carbohydrates to make glucose which is the fuel that gives it energy and helps keep everything going. However, excess carbohydrate consumption has negative health effects. Bread is a basic product in our nutrition and it also is a product with a high content of carbohydrates. So, it is important to find out more information on bread and on the recommended bread type best for consumption.

  13. Heat capacity changes in carbohydrates and protein-carbohydrate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavelas, Eneas A; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2009-05-13

    Carbohydrates are crucial for living cells, playing myriads of functional roles that range from being structural or energy-storage devices to molecular labels that, through non-covalent interaction with proteins, impart exquisite selectivity in processes such as molecular trafficking and cellular recognition. The molecular bases that govern the recognition between carbohydrates and proteins have not been fully understood yet. In the present study, we have obtained a surface-area-based model for the formation heat capacity of protein-carbohydrate complexes, which includes separate terms for the contributions of the two molecular types. The carbohydrate model, which was calibrated using carbohydrate dissolution data, indicates that the heat capacity contribution of a given group surface depends on its position in the saccharide molecule, a picture that is consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies showing that the high abundance of hydroxy groups in carbohydrates yields particular solvation properties. This model was used to estimate the carbohydrate's contribution in the formation of a protein-carbohydrate complex, which in turn was used to obtain the heat capacity change associated with the protein's binding site. The model is able to account for protein-carbohydrate complexes that cannot be explained using a previous model that only considered the overall contribution of polar and apolar groups, while allowing a more detailed dissection of the elementary contributions that give rise to the formation heat capacity effects of these adducts.

  14. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy: The role of troponins and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaperta, Rea; De Siena, Claudia; Cardani, Rosanna; Lombardia, Fortunata; Cenko, Edina; Rampoldi, Benedetta; Fossati, Barbara; Brigonzi, Elisa; Rigolini, Roberta; Gaia, Paola; Meola, Giovanni; Costa, Elena; Bugiardini, Raffaele

    2017-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2) are dominant inherited muscular dystrophies with multiple systemic involvement, often producing cardiac injury. This study sought to determine the clinical significance of elevated high sensitivity cardiac troponin T and I (hs-cTnT and hs-cTnI), and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) in this population. Sixty DM patients (35 men and 25 women; mean age: 45.1 years, range: 12-73 years) underwent clinical cardiac investigations and measurements of serum hs-cTnT, hs-cTnI, creatine kinase (CK), and NT-proBNP. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) was assessed by echocardiography. Genetic analysis revealed that 46 of the 60 patients were DM1, and 14 DM2. Blood measurements showed persistent elevation of hs-cTnT and CK in 55/60 DM patients (91.73%). In contrast, hs-cTnI values were persistently normal throughout the study. Only 2 patients showed an EF 125 pg/mL was an independent predictor of ECG abnormalities. NT-pro-BNP levels may be considered to be used clinically to identify DM patients at increased risk of developing myocardial conduction abnormalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Close-In Substellar Companions and the Formation of sdB-Type Close Binary Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Zhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The sdB-type close binaries are believed to have experienced a common-envelope phase and may evolve into cataclysmic binaries (CVs. About 10% of all known sdB binaries are eclipsing binaries consisting of very hot subdwarf primaries and low-mass companions with short orbital periods. The eclipse profiles of these systems are very narrow and deep, which benefits the determination of high precise eclipsing times and makes the detection of small and close-in tertiary bodies possible. Since 2006 we have monitored some sdB-type eclipsing binaries to search for the close-in substellar companions by analyzing the light travel time effect. Here some progresses of the program are reviewed and the formation of sdB-type binary is discussed.

  16. Issues in Nutrition: Carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Margaret E; Noel, Mary Barth

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and dietary fibers. Resistant starches resemble fiber in their behavior in the intestinal tract, and may have positive effects on blood glucose levels and the gut microbiome. Fibers are classified as soluble and insoluble, but most fiber-containing foods contain a mixture of soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber has been shown to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Many artificial sweeteners and other sugar substitutes are available. Most natural sources of sweeteners also are energy sources. Many artificial sweeteners contain no kilocalories in the amounts typically used. Sugar alcohols may have a laxative effect when consumed in large amounts. Glycemic index and glycemic load are measurements that help quantify serum glucose response after ingestion of particular foods. These measurements may be affected by the combination of foods consumed in a given meal, and the glycemic index may vary among individuals eating the same meal. Eating foods with a low glycemic index may help prevent development of type 2 diabetes. There is no definitive evidence to recommend low-carbohydrate diets over low-fat diets for long-term weight loss; they are equally effective. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  17. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  18. Optical absorption of irradiated carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supe, A.A.; Tiliks, Yu.E.

    1994-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of γ-irradiated carbohydrates (glucose, lactose, sucrose, maltose, and starch) and their aqueous solutions were studied. The comparison of the data obtained with the determination of the concentrations of molecular and radical products of radiolysis allows the absorption bands with maxima at 250 and 310 nm to be assigned to the radicals trapped in the irradiated carbohydrates

  19. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  20. Discovery of a magnetic field in the early B-type star σ Lupi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrichs, H.F.; Kolenberg, K.; Plaggenborg, B.; Marsden, S.C.; Waite, I.A.; Landstreet, J.D.; Wade, G.A.; Grunhut, J.H.; Oksala, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Magnetic early B-type stars are rare. Indirect indicators are needed to identify them before investing in time-intensive spectropolarimetric observations. Aims. We use the strongest indirect indicator of a magnetic field in B stars, which is periodic variability of ultraviolet (UV) stellar

  1. Increased plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in infants of women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Karen G; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk; Goetze, Jens P

    2005-01-01

    Up to 40% of newborn infants of women with type 1 diabetes have echocardiographic signs of cardiomyopathy. Increased plasma concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its precursor (proBNP) are markers of cardiac failure and hypoxia in adults. In this study, we investigated whether pl...

  2. Impact of hemoglobin on plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Benn, Marianne; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    Age, sex, and renal function contribute to variations in plasma concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its molecular precursor (proBNP). Recent studies indicate that anemia may also affect proBNP concentrations in patients with heart failure or stroke. However, the impact...

  3. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  4. Clinical correlation between N-terminal pro-b-type natriuretic peptide and angiographic coronary atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demóstenes G.L. Ribeiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES:This study aimed to investigate the clinical correlation between angiographic coronary atherosclerosis and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide along with other known correlated factors.METHODS:In total, 153 patients with a diagnostic hypothesis of stable angina, unstable angina or acute myocardial infarction were classified as group A (patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries or group B (patients with angiographic coronary atherosclerosis. The two groups were analyzed with respect to the following factors: gender, age, body mass index, abdominal circumference, smoking, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, early family history of atherosclerosis, statin use, the presence of metabolic syndrome, clinical presentation and biochemical factors, including cholesterol, creatinine and fibrinogen plasma concentrations, monocyte counts and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide.RESULTS:Univariate analyses comparing the two groups revealed that group B patients more frequently had diabetes, used statins and had systolic dysfunction, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels ≥250 pg/mL, fibrinogen levels >500 mg/dL and ≥501 monocytes/mm3 compared with group A patients (p<0.05. Nevertheless, multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the independent predictors of angiographic coronary atherosclerosis were an N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level ≥250 pg/mL, diabetes mellitus and increased monocyte numbers and fibrinogen plasma concentration, regardless of the creatinine level or the presence of systolic dysfunction.CONCLUSIONS:An N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide plasma concentration of ≥250 pg/mL is an independent predictor of angiographic coronary atherosclerosis.

  5. Methodological challenges in carbohydrate analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beth Hall

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates can provide up to 80% of the dry matter in animal diets, yet their specific evaluation for research and diet formulation is only now becoming a focus in the animal sciences. Partitioning of dietary carbohydrates for nutritional purposes should reflect differences in digestion and fermentation characteristics and effects on animal performance. Key challenges to designating nutritionally important carbohydrate fractions include classifying the carbohydrates in terms of nutritional characteristics, and selecting analytical methods that describe the desired fraction. The relative lack of information on digestion characteristics of various carbohydrates and their interactions with other fractions in diets means that fractions will not soon be perfectly established. Developing a system of carbohydrate analysis that could be used across animal species could enhance the utility of analyses and amount of data we can obtain on dietary effects of carbohydrates. Based on quantities present in diets and apparent effects on animal performance, some nutritionally important classes of carbohydrates that may be valuable to measure include sugars, starch, fructans, insoluble fiber, and soluble fiber. Essential to selection of methods for these fractions is agreement on precisely what carbohydrates should be included in each. Each of these fractions has analyses that could potentially be used to measure them, but most of the available methods have weaknesses that must be evaluated to see if they are fatal and the assay is unusable, or if the assay still may be made workable. Factors we must consider as we seek to analyze carbohydrates to describe diets: Does the assay accurately measure the desired fraction? Is the assay for research, regulatory, or field use (affects considerations of acceptable costs and throughput? What are acceptable accuracy and variability of measures? Is the assay robust (enhances accuracy of values? For some carbohydrates, we

  6. Decarbonylation and dehydrogenation of carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Mark A.; Klaeren, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    Carbohydrates, especially aldose or ketose sugars, including those whose carbonyl group is masked by hemi-acetal or hemi-ketal formation, are decarbonylated by heating the feed carbohydrate together with a transition metal complex in a suitable solvent. Also, primary alcohols, including sugar alditols are simultaneously dehydrogenated and decarbonylated by heating a mixture of rhodium and ruthenium complexes and the alcohol and optionally a hydrogen acceptor in an acceptable solvent. Such defarbonylation and/or dehydrogenation of sugars provides a convenient procedure for the synthesis of certain carbohydrates and may provide a means for the conversion of biomass into useful products.

  7. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide as a marker of blunt cardiac contusion in trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Halil; Sarikaya, Sezgin; Neijmann, Sebnem Tekin; Uysal, Emin; Yucel, Neslihan; Ozucelik, Dogac Niyazi; Okuturlar, Yıldız; Solak, Suleyman; Sever, Nurten; Ayan, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac contusion is usually caused by blunt chest trauma and, although it is potentially a life-threatening condition, the diagnosis of a myocardial contusion is difficult because of non-specific symptoms and the lack of an ideal test to detect myocardial damage. Cardiac enzymes, such as creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase MB fraction (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTn-I), and cardiac troponin T (cTn-T) were used in previous studies to demonstrate the blunt cardiac contusion (BCC). Each of these diagnostic tests alone is not effective for diagnosis of BCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum heart-type fatty acid binding protein (h-FABP), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels as a marker of BCC in blunt chest trauma in rats. The eighteen Wistar albino rats were randomly allocated to two groups; group I (control) (n=8) and group II (blunt chest trauma) (n=10). Isolated BCC was induced by the method described by Raghavendran et al. (2005). All rats were observed in their cages and blood samples were collected after five hours of trauma for the analysis of serum h-FABP, NT-pro BNP, CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels. The mean serum NT-pro BNP was significantly different between group I and II (10.3±2.10 ng/L versus 15.4±3.68 ng/L, respectively; P=0.0001). NT-pro BNP level >13 ng/ml had a sensitivity of 87.5%, a specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 70%, and a negative predictive value of 87.5% for predicting blunt chest trauma (area under curve was 0.794 and P=0.037). There was no significant difference between two groups in serum h-FABP, CK, CK-MB and c Tn-I levels. A relation between NT-Pro BNP and BCC was shown in this study. Serum NT-proBNP levels significantly increased with BCC after 5 hours of the blunt chest trauma. The use of NT-proBNP as an adjunct to other diagnostic tests, such as troponins, electrocardiography (ECG), chest x-ray and echocardiogram may be beneficial for diagnosis of BCC

  8. Intermediate phases in the hydrogen disproportionated state of NdFeB-type powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, G.; Chapman, J. N.; Brown, D. N.; Harris, I. R.

    2001-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies have been carried out on partially disproportionated NdFeB-type alloys. A new intermediate magnetic (NIM) phase has been identified. Moreover, the lamella structure which subsequently develops from the tetragonal NIM phase comprises a tetragonal NdFe-containing (IL) phase and α-Fe. The experimental data show strong evidence of a well-defined crystallographic relation between both the NIM and lamella phases and between the IL phase and α-Fe. These observations give insight into how crystallographic texture, and hence anisotropy, can be developed in NdFeB-type powders processed by the hydrogenation, disproportionation, desorption, and recombination route. copyright 2001 American Institute of Physics

  9. PROJECTED ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES OF 136 EARLY B-TYPE STARS IN THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garmany, C. D.; Glaspey, J. W. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bragança, G. A.; Daflon, S.; Fernandes, M. Borges; Cunha, K. [Observatório Nacional-MCTI, Rua José Cristino, 77. CEP: 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oey, M. S. [University of Michigan, Department of Astronomy, 311 West Hall, 1085 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI: 48109-1107 (United States); Bensby, T., E-mail: garmany@noao.edu [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Box 43, SE-22100, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    We have determined projected rotational velocities, v sin i, from Magellan/MIKE echelle spectra for a sample of 136 early B-type stars having large Galactocentric distances. The target selection was done independently of their possible membership in clusters, associations or field stars. We subsequently examined the literature and assigned each star as Field, Association, or Cluster. Our v sin i results are consistent with a difference in aggregate v sin i with stellar density. We fit bimodal Maxwellian distributions to the Field, Association, and Cluster subsamples representing sharp-lined and broad-lined components. The first two distributions, in particular, for the Field and Association are consistent with strong bimodality in v sin i. Radial velocities are also presented, which are useful for further studies of binarity in B-type stars, and we also identify a sample of possible new double-lined spectroscopic binaries. In addition, we find 18 candidate Be stars showing emission at Hα.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Magnetic early B-type stars. I. (Shultz+, 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, M.; Wade, G. A.; Rivinius, Th.; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Bohlender, D.; Monin, D.; Sikora, J.; Mimes Collaboration; Binamics Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    Longitudinal magnetic field measurements of early B-type stars derived from 1) least-squares deconvolution profiles extracted from high-resolution spectropolarimetric data (ESPaDOnS, Narval, HARPSpol), using masks consisting of metallic lines, metallic + He lines, individual chemical elements, as well as single-line H measurements; and 2) from single-line low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations with dimaPol. (3 data files).

  11. Impact of hemoglobin on plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Benn, Marianne; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    Age, sex, and renal function contribute to variations in plasma concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its molecular precursor (proBNP). Recent studies indicate that anemia may also affect proBNP concentrations in patients with heart failure or stroke. However, the impact of hemog...... of hemoglobin status on proBNP concentrations has not been established in the general population....

  12. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine and Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Eroglu; Ali Osman Yildirim; Yusuf Emrah Eyi; Salim Kemal Tuncer; Umit Kaldirim; Gunalp Uzun; Erdinc Cakir

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is a leading cause of toxicity related mortality and morbidity. Recent studies focused on cardiovascular consequences of CO poisoning. The aim of this study was to investigate asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and pro B-type natriuretic peptide (pro-BNP) levels in CO poisoned patients during normobaric oxygen treatment. METHODS: The patients treated for CO poisoning at the Emergency Department from October 2005 to May 2006 were consecutively incl...

  13. Facultative thermogenesis induced by carbohydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Bülow, J; Christensen, N J

    1986-01-01

    In addition to the obligatory thermogenesis due to processing and storage, carbohydrate ingestion is accompanied by a facultative thermogenesis mediated by catecholamines via beta-adrenoceptors. The anatomical origin of facultative thermogenesis has hitherto not been determined. The possible...

  14. Transition metals in carbohydrate chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Robert

    1997-01-01

    This review describes the application of transition metal mediated reactions in carbohydrate synthesis. The different metal mediated transformations are divided into reaction types and illustrated by various examples on monosaccharide derivatives. Carbon-carbon bond forming reactions are further ...

  15. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plans and Diabetes Diabetes Center Weight and Diabetes Eating Out When Your Child Has Diabetes Carbohydrates and Sugar Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? Eating Out When You Have Diabetes Meal Plans: What Kids ...

  16. An Einstein Observatory SAO-based catalog of B-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, F.; Sciortino, S.; Micela, G.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    About 4000 X-ray images obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to measure the 0.16-4.0 keV emission from 1545 B-type SAO stars falling in the about 10 percent of the sky surveyed with the IPC. Seventy-four detected X-ray sources with B-type stars are identified, and it is estimated that no more than 15 can be misidentified. Upper limits to the X-ray emission of the remaining stars are presented. In addition to summarizing the X-ray measurements and giving other relevant optical data, the present extensive catalog discusses the reduction process and analyzes selection effects associated with both SAO catalog completeness and IPC target selection procedures. It is concluded that X-ray emission, at the level of Lx not less than 10 exp 30 ergs/s, is quite common in B stars of early spectral types (B0-B3), regardless of luminosity class, but that emission, at the same level, becomes less common, or nonexistent, in later B-type stars.

  17. Carbohydrate Microarrays in Plant Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Pedersen, H.L.; Vidal-Melgosa, S.

    2012-01-01

    Almost all plant cells are surrounded by glycan-rich cell walls, which form much of the plant body and collectively are the largest source of biomass on earth. Plants use polysaccharides for support, defense, signaling, cell adhesion, and as energy storage, and many plant glycans are also important...... for plant research and can be used to map glycan populations across large numbers of samples to screen antibodies, carbohydrate binding proteins, and carbohydrate binding modules and to investigate enzyme activities....

  18. Racemic carbohydrates - fact or fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senning, Alexander Erich Eugen

    2007-01-01

    Chemical Abstracts Service has developed unsound practices in the naming and handling of simple carbohydrates such as aldopentoses 1, aldohexoses 2, and ketohexoses 3. Typically, the common name glucose is sometimes, inappropriately, interpreted as meaning DL-glucose DL-2d. Thus, a considerable...... number of CA names and registry numbers have been created for non-existing racemic carbohydrates and linked to irrelevant references which, moreover, in many cases cannot be retrieved by the SciFinder Scholar program....

  19. Complexes of natural carbohydrates with metal cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, Yurii E; Garnovskii, Alexander D; Zhdanov, Yu A

    1998-01-01

    Data on the interaction of natural carbohydrates (mono-, oligo-, and poly-saccharides, amino sugars, and natural organic acids of carbohydrate origin) with metal cations are surveyed and described systematically. The structural diversity of carbohydrate metal complexes, caused by some specific features of carbohydrates as ligands, is demonstrated. The influence of complex formation on the chemical properties of carbohydrates is discussed. It is shown that the formation of metal complexes plays an important role in the configurational and conformational analysis of carbohydrates. The practical significance of the coordination interaction in the series of carbohydrate ligands is demonstrated. The bibliography includes 571 references.

  20. Radiolysis of carbohydrates and of carbohydrate-containing foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, J.F.; Adam, S.; Delincee, H.; Jakubick, V.

    1978-01-01

    Toxicological evaluation of irradiated foodstuffs requires knowledge of radiation-induced chemical changes. A review of the literature reveals much information on the radiation chemistry of pure substances, e.g., dilute solutions of individual carbohydrates. Much less is known about the interactions of food constituents during irradiation. In an effort to remedy this situation, radiation effects on various compounds have been studied in systems of increasing complexity. In one approach, gas chromatography was used to investigate the radiolysis of tehalose in pure solution and in the presence of amino acids or proteins. In another approach, radiation-induced aggregation of proteins and of [ 14 C]tryptophan with proteins was studied in the absence and presence of carbohydrates (trehalose, starch), emulsified sunfower oil, and a mixture of carbohydrates and emulsified sunflower oil

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectrocopic Binarity of O and B type stars (Chini+, 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, R.; Hoffmeister, V. H.; Nasseri, A.; Stahl, O.; Zinnecker, H.

    2013-05-01

    We have performed a comprehensive spectroscopic survey on a large representative sample of 249 O- and 581 B-type stars. Using the high-resolution spectrograph BESO at the Hexapod Telescope at the Universitatssternwarte Bochum near Cerro Armazones in Chile, we obtained 3632 multi-epoch optical spectra. The observing period started in 2009 January and is still going on. The spectra comprise a wavelength range from 3620 to 8530Å and provide a mean spectral resolution of R=50000. (1 data file).

  2. Carbohydrates Through Animation: Preliminary Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Methods of education are changing, so the educational tools must change too. The developmentof the systems of information and communication gave the opportunity to bring new technology tothe learning process. Modern education needs interactive programs that may be available to theacademic community, in order to ease the learning process and sharing of the knowledge. Then,an educational software on Carbohydrates is being developed using concept maps and FLASH-MXanimations program, and approached through six modules. The introduction of Carbohydrates wasmade by the module Carbohydrates on Nature, which shows the animations gures of a teacher andstudents, visiting a farm, identifying the carbohydrates found in vegetables, animals, and microor-ganisms, integrated by links containing short texts to help understanding the structure and functionof carbohydrates. This module was presented, as pilot experiment, to teachers and students, whichdemonstrated satisfaction, and high receptivity, by using animation and interactivitys program asstrategy to biochemistrys education. The present work is part of the project Biochemistry throughanimation, which is having continuity.

  3. Aminooxylated Carbohydrates: Synthesis and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Carlo; Daskhan, Gour Chand; Fiore, Michele; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Roy, René; Renaudet, Olivier

    2017-08-09

    Among other classes of biomolecules, carbohydrates and glycoconjugates are widely involved in numerous biological functions. In addition to addressing the related synthetic challenges, glycochemists have invested intense efforts in providing access to structures that can be used to study, activate, or inhibit these biological processes. Over the past few decades, aminooxylated carbohydrates have been found to be key building blocks for achieving these goals. This review provides the first in-depth overview covering several aspects related to the syntheses and applications of aminooxylated carbohydrates. After a brief introduction to oxime bonds and their relative stabilities compared to related C═N functions, synthetic aspects of oxime ligation and methodologies for introducing the aminooxy functionality onto both glycofuranosyls and glycopyranosyls are described. The subsequent section focuses on biological applications involving aminooxylated carbohydrates as components for the construcion of diverse architectures. Mimetics of natural structures represent useful tools for better understanding the features that drive carbohydrate-receptor interaction, their biological output and they also represent interesting structures with improved stability and tunable properties. In the next section, multivalent structures such as glycoclusters and glycodendrimers obtained through oxime ligation are described in terms of synthetic design and their biological applications such as immunomodulators. The second-to-last section discusses miscellaneous applications of oxime-based glycoconjugates, such as enantioselective catalysis and glycosylated oligonucleotides, and conclusions and perspectives are provided in the last section.

  4. Comparison of physicochemical properties of B-type nontraditional starches from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Zhao, Lingxiao; Man, Jianmin; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Weidong; Huai, Huyin; Wei, Cunxu

    2015-01-01

    Starches were isolated from rhizomes of Curcuma longa, Canna edulis and Canna indica and bulbs of Lilium lancifolium, and showed a B-type X-ray diffraction pattern. Their physicochemical properties were investigated and compared. These starches showed significantly different granule morphologies and sizes, but all had eccentric hila. The C. longa starch had the lowest content of amylopectin short branch-chain and branching degree and the highest content of amylopectin long branch-chain, and the L. lancifolium starch the highest content of amylopectin short branch-chain and branching degree and the lowest content of amylopectin long branch-chain among the four starches. The L. lancifolium starch had the lowest resistance to gelatinization, and showed the lowest pasting peak, hot and final viscosities, and the C. longa starch had the highest resistance to gelatinization, and showed the highest pasting hot, final and setback viscosities and the lowest pasting breakdown viscosity. The C. longa and L. lancifolium starches possessed very high and low resistance to hydrolysis and digestion, respectively. The above physicochemical properties would be useful for the applications of B-type starches in food and nonfood industries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Origin of B-type Runaway Stars: Non-LTE Abundances as a Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, Catherine M.; Dufton, Philip L.; Smoker, Jonathan V.; Keenan, Francis P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Lambert, David L. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Astronomy, RLM 16.316, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Schneider, Fabian R. N. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); De Wit, Willem-Jan [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2017-06-10

    There are two accepted mechanisms to explain the origin of runaway OB-type stars: the binary supernova (SN) scenario and the cluster ejection scenario. In the former, an SN explosion within a close binary ejects the secondary star, while in the latter close multibody interactions in a dense cluster cause one or more of the stars to be ejected from the region at high velocity. Both mechanisms have the potential to affect the surface composition of the runaway star. tlusty non-LTE model atmosphere calculations have been used to determine the atmospheric parameters and the C, N, Mg, and Si abundances for a sample of B-type runaways. These same analytical tools were used by Hunter et al. for their analysis of 50 B-type open-cluster Galactic stars (i.e., nonrunaways). Effective temperatures were deduced using the Si-ionization balance technique, surface gravities from Balmer line profiles, and microturbulent velocities derived using the Si spectrum. The runaways show no obvious abundance anomalies when compared with stars in the open clusters. The runaways do show a spread in composition that almost certainly reflects the Galactic abundance gradient and a range in the birthplaces of the runaways in the Galactic disk. Since the observed Galactic abundance gradients of C, N, Mg, and Si are of a similar magnitude, the abundance ratios (e.g., N/Mg) are as obtained essentially uniform across the sample.

  6. Rotation, Emission, & Evolution of the Magnetic Early B-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, M.; Wade, G. A.; Rivinius, Th.; Neiner, C.; Kochukhov, O.; Alecian, E.

    2018-01-01

    We report the results of the first population study of 51 magnetic early B-type stars, based upon a large database of high-resolution spectropolarimetry assembled by the MiMeS and BinaMIcS collaborations. Utilizing these data, rotational periods were determined for all but 5 of the sample stars. This enabled us to determine dipole oblique rotator model parameters, rotational parameters, and magnetospheric parameters. We find that the ratio of the Alfvén radius to the Kepler corotation radius is highly predictive of whether or not a star displays Hα emission from a Centrifugal Magnetosphere (CM), as expected from theoretical considerations. We also find that CM host stars are systematically younger than the general population, as expected given that CM emission requires rapid rotation and a strong magnetic field, and a strong magnetic field will lead to rapid magnetic braking. We conclude that emission-line magnetic early B-type stars are, almost without exception, strongly magnetized, rapidly rotating, and young.

  7. Carbohydrates of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    for the understanding of glycosylation in cancer. For anti-viral therapy in AIDS, inhibitors of glycosylation enzymes are very promising as their mode of action may preclude evolvement of resistent HIV substrains, which seems to be a common problem with the reverse transcriptase inhibitors presently used. Successful...... therapy with glycosylation enzyme inhibitors will, however, require the development of more specific and less toxic compounds. If carbohydrate antigens can elicit a neutralizing immune response in vivo, the possibility exists that carbohydrate neoantigens can be utilized in the construction of a vaccine...

  8. Carbohydrate inhibitors of cholera toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vajinder; Turnbull, W Bruce

    2018-01-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease caused by a protein toxin released by Vibrio cholera in the host's intestine. The toxin enters intestinal epithelial cells after binding to specific carbohydrates on the cell surface. Over recent years, considerable effort has been invested in developing inhibitors of toxin adhesion that mimic the carbohydrate ligand, with particular emphasis on exploiting the multivalency of the toxin to enhance activity. In this review we introduce the structural features of the toxin that have guided the design of diverse inhibitors and summarise recent developments in the field.

  9. Carbohydrate-Aromatic Interactions in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Kieran L; Bartlett, Gail J; Diehl, Roger C; Agirre, Jon; Gallagher, Timothy; Kiessling, Laura L; Woolfson, Derek N

    2015-12-09

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions play pivotal roles in health and disease. However, defining and manipulating these interactions has been hindered by an incomplete understanding of the underlying fundamental forces. To elucidate common and discriminating features in carbohydrate recognition, we have analyzed quantitatively X-ray crystal structures of proteins with noncovalently bound carbohydrates. Within the carbohydrate-binding pockets, aliphatic hydrophobic residues are disfavored, whereas aromatic side chains are enriched. The greatest preference is for tryptophan with an increased prevalence of 9-fold. Variations in the spatial orientation of amino acids around different monosaccharides indicate specific carbohydrate C-H bonds interact preferentially with aromatic residues. These preferences are consistent with the electronic properties of both the carbohydrate C-H bonds and the aromatic residues. Those carbohydrates that present patches of electropositive saccharide C-H bonds engage more often in CH-π interactions involving electron-rich aromatic partners. These electronic effects are also manifested when carbohydrate-aromatic interactions are monitored in solution: NMR analysis indicates that indole favorably binds to electron-poor C-H bonds of model carbohydrates, and a clear linear free energy relationships with substituted indoles supports the importance of complementary electronic effects in driving protein-carbohydrate interactions. Together, our data indicate that electrostatic and electronic complementarity between carbohydrates and aromatic residues play key roles in driving protein-carbohydrate complexation. Moreover, these weak noncovalent interactions influence which saccharide residues bind to proteins, and how they are positioned within carbohydrate-binding sites.

  10. Carbohydrates of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism by which viral infection induces the appearance of carbohydrate neoantigens is highly important. Results from such studies could be expected to be significant for a general understanding of the regulation of glycosylation, and perhaps especially important for the unde...

  11. What factors do relate with plasma B type natriuretic peptide levels? A study by nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Keita; Sarai, Masayoshi; Sato, Takahisa [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    2002-02-01

    To find clinical factors relating with plasma B type natriuretic peptide levels (BNP), early and delayed imagings at rest were done in 104 patients with heart diseases (66 males/38 females, mean age of 65.4 y) after the intravenous injection of 111 MBq of {sup 123}I-MIDI (metaiodobenzylguanidine). Myocardial SPECT synchronized with electrocardiography was also done after 600 MBq of {sup 123}I-MIDI injection. In the same day, BNP was measured. Images were taken with ADAC gamma camera VERTEX-plus of 2-detector type. Log BNP was found related with age, H/M(D) (heart/mediastinum count ratio, delayed) and BMI (body mass index) as well as EF (left ventricular ejection fraction) and since the correlation was more significant than BNP, log BNP was considered to be a more sensitive measure. (K.H.)

  12. B-type natriuretic peptide: issues for the intensivist and pulmonologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Jason; Jason, Phua; Lim, Tow Keang; Keang, Lim Tow; Lee, Kang Hoe; Hoe, Lee Kang

    2005-09-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-proBNP), although promising as biomarkers for heart failure, are affected by multiple confounders. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the utility of BNP and NT-proBNP as biomarkers, with a focus on their role in critical illness and pulmonary diseases. Published articles on BNP and NT-proBNP. Multiple disorders in the intensive care unit cause elevated BNP and NT-proBNP levels, including cardiac diseases, shock, pulmonary hypertension, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute pulmonary embolism, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal failure, and other conditions. Intensivists and pulmonologists should understand that BNP and NT-proBNP levels might be raised to different degrees not only in heart failure but also in critical illness and various pulmonary diseases; in these situations, BNP and NT-proBNP may also serve as markers of severity and prognosis.

  13. Preliminary Analysis of Radiation Shielding for B-type HIC Transport Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dohyung; Lee, Unjang; Ko, Jaehoon; Choi, Kyu-Sup [Korea Nuclear Engineering and Service Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    A radiation shielding analysis has been conducted using a computer program MCNP5 for a B-type HIC (High Integrated Container) Transport Package, which contains HIC with radioactive waste or Spent Resin, for transportation from nuclear power plant sites to disposal repository. Radiation source term is first carefully determined from the safety analysis reports related to HIC for appropriate calculation. And then MCNP (v.5) is performed to obtain the minimum thickness of HIC transport package, which meets the dose rate limit for HIC transport package prescribed in Korea Nuclear Law and IAEA Safety Standards for Radioactive Material Transport. In addition, some other analyses are done about the trend of dose rates depending on the thickness of shielding material and distance from the package.

  14. A review on B-type natriuretic peptide monitoring: assays and biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalouf, Rita; Bailey, Steven

    2016-09-01

    Since its discovery in 1988, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been recognized as a powerful cardiovascular biomarker for a number of disease states, specifically heart failure. Concurrent with such a discovery, much effort has been allocated to the precise monitoring of physiological BNP levels. Thus, it can be used to guide the therapy of heart failure and determine the patient's stage of disease. Thus, we discuss in this article BNP as a potent biomarker. Subsequently, we will review the progress of biosensing devices as they could be applied to monitor BNP levels as assays, benchtop biosensors and implantable biosensors. The analytical characteristics of commercially available BNP assays are presented. Still emerging as a field, we define four obstacles that present opportunity for the future development of implantable biosensor: foreign body response, sensor renewability, sensitivity and selectivity.

  15. Dissolved carbohydrate in the central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhople, V.M.; Bhosle, N.B.

    Seawater samples (161), collected from 8 depths (0 to 1000 m) at 21 stations were analysed for total dissolved carbohydrate. Dissolved carbohydrate concentrations varied from 0.072 to 1.15 mg.l-1. Carbohydrate concentrations did not decrease...

  16. Carbohydrate Microarray on Glass: a Tool for Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetala, K.K.R.; Giesbers, M.; Visser, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Beek, van T.A.

    2007-01-01

    A simple method to immobilize carbohydrates on a glass surface to obtain a carbohydrate microarray is described. The array was used to study carbohydrate-lectin interactions. The glass surface was modified with aldehyde terminated linker groups of various chain lengths. Coupling of carbohydrates

  17. Cell surface carbohydrates as prognostic markers in human carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Tumour development is usually associated with changes in cell surface carbohydrates. These are often divided into changes related to terminal carbohydrate structures, which include incomplete synthesis and modification of normally existing carbohydrates, and changes in the carbohydrate core struc...

  18. Serotonin, carbohydrates, and atypical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, S E

    1992-01-01

    At least three categories of atypical depression have been described. The hysteroid dysphoria is characterized by repeated episodes of depressed mood in response to feeling rejected, and a craving for sweets and chocolate. Two other issues are characterized by a cyclical occurrence of changes of mood and appetite, i.e., the late luteal phase dysphoric disorder (DSM-III-R, appendix), or "the premenstrual syndrome" (PMS), and the major depression with seasonal pattern (DSM-III-R), or seasonal affective disorder (SAD). The reactive mood changes are frequently accompanied by features as hypersomnia, lethargy and increased appetite, particularly with a preference for carbohydrates. Central serotonin pathways participate in the regulation of mood and behavioural impulsivity, and modulate eating patterns qualitatively and quantitatively. Depressives with PMS og SAD benefit, in general, from treatments with serotonin potentiating drugs, suggesting that brain serotonin plays a role in the pathophysiology. Ingestion of carbohydrates increases the plasma ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids in man and animal, and the serotonin synthesis in the rat brain. Based on these findings it has been suggested that the excessive carbohydrate intake by patients with PMS and SAD reflects a self-medication that temporarily relieves the vegetative symptoms via an increased central serotonergic activity.

  19. Significance of B-type natriuretic peptide in the diagnosis of diastolic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Lin Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the significance of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP in the diagnosis of diastolic heart failure (DHF. Methods: A total of 50 patients with DHF who were admitted in our hospital from September, 2014 September, 2015 were included in the study and served as DHF group. Moreover, 30 patients with non heart failure were served as the control group. Color Doppler ultrasonic diagnostic apparatus was used to measure LEVDD, LAD, and LVEF. The four-chamber-view pulse Doppler was used to detect E and Ea. The average value was taken and E/Ea was calculated. The full automatic electrochemiluminescence immunoassay was used to determine the plasma BNP level. Results: With the aggravation of cardiac function grading, LAD, LEVDD, E, and E/Ea were significantly increased, but LVEF and Ea were significantly reduced when compared with the control group. BNP level in DHF group was significantly higher than that in the control group. With the increasement of NYHA grading, BNP level was gradually increasing, and the comparison between the two groups was statistically significant. Conclusions: BNP level is increasing with the increasement of NYHA grading, which is of great significance in the early diagnosis of DHF, and the hazard estimation, and is characterized by simple operation and high accuracy; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  20. Magnetic viscosity and Barkhausen noise in NdFeB-type permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.J.; Street, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Barkhausen noise and magnetic viscosity in sintered and melt-quenched needles of anisotropic NdFeB-type magnets are examined. In the sintered magnet, the time integral of the Barkhausen signal during magnetic viscosity is shown to correlate with the change in the bulk magnetisation as measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. This is in contrast with similar measurements on soft magnetic materials by Tebble et al., where the magnetisation change, as estimated from the time integral of the Barkhausen noise, was significantly less than that measured by magnetometric techniques. The activation volume in each of the two materials is estimated from measurements of the coefficient of magnetic viscosity, S v , and in the case of the sintered magnet is shown to be up to 13 orders of magnitude smaller that the largest Barkhausen volumes associated with the demagnetisation process. The magnitude of the Barkhausen volumes are indicative of magnetisation processes involving instabilities in the magnetisation of clusters of grains. It was not possible to identify heterogeneities in the microstructural or magnetic topology in these materials which would account for the magnitudes of the observed Barkhausen jumps. (orig.)

  1. A preliminary electron backscattered diffraction study of sintered NdFeB-type magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, S J; Williams, A J; Davies, B E; Harris, I R

    2002-03-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, the use of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) to study orientation in sintered NdFeB type magnets. The magnetic properties of NdFeB magnets are greatly improved if a strong crystallographic texture is firstly achieved, namely, the direction of the c-axis is along the direction of magnetization. A systematic survey of sample preparation techniques showed that samples that were mechanically polished and then etched gave the most reliable EBSD data. Analyses were made using both fully automated EBSD scans and by EBSD measurements taken after manual movement of the beam. The EBSD results are presented as secondary electron SEM micrographs, orientation images and 001 pole figures. For the selection of grains investigated, the deviation of the c-axis was shown to be between 10 degrees and 30 degrees from the ideal [001]//magnetization direction. It is demonstrated that EBSD is a valuable tool for characterizing the microstructure and texture relationships and for assessing the performance of the processing routes of NdFeB magnets.

  2. Identification of B-type procyanidins in Fallopia spp. involved in biological denitrification inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Clément; Piola, Florence; Haichar, Feth el Zahar; Meiffren, Guillaume; Comte, Gilles; Missery, Boris; Balby, Manon; Poly, Franck

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) is considered as a main limiting factor in plant growth, and nitrogen losses through denitrification can be responsible for severe decreases in plant productivity. Recently, it was demonstrated that Fallopia spp. is responsible for biological denitrification inhibition (BDI) through the release of unknown secondary metabolites. Here, we investigate the secondary metabolites involved in the BDI of Fallopia spp. The antioxidant, protein precipitation capability of Fallopia spp. extracts was measured in relation to the aerobic respiration and denitrification of two bacteria (Gram positive and Gram negative). Proanthocyanidin concentrations were estimated. Proanthocyanidins in extracts were characterized by chromatographic analysis, purified and tested on the bacterial denitrification and aerobic respiration of two bacterial strains. The effect of commercial procyanidins on denitrification was tested on two different soil types. Denitrification and aerobic respiration inhibition were correlated with protein precipitation capacity and concentration of proanthocyanidins but not to antioxidant capacity. These proanthocyanidins were B-type procyanidins that inhibited denitrification more than the aerobic respiration of bacteria. In addition, procyanidins also inhibited soil microbial denitrification. We demonstrate that procyanidins are involved in the BDI of Fallopia spp. Our results pave the way to a better understanding of plant-microbe interactions and highlight future applications for a more sustainable agriculture. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Endothelial Expression of Scavenger Receptor Class B, Type I Protects against Development of Atherosclerosis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris L. Vaisman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI in endothelial cells (EC was examined in several novel transgenic mouse models expressing SR-BI in endothelium of mice with normal C57Bl6/N, apoE-KO, or Scarb1-KO backgrounds. Mice were also created expressing SR-BI exclusively in endothelium and liver. Endothelial expression of the Tie2-Scarb1 transgene had no significant effect on plasma lipoprotein levels in mice on a normal chow diet but on an atherogenic diet, significantly decreased plasma cholesterol levels, increased plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C levels, and protected mice against atherosclerosis. In 8-month-old apoE-KO mice fed a normal chow diet, the Tie2-Scarb1 transgene decreased aortic lesions by 24%. Mice expressing SR-BI only in EC and liver had a 1.5 ± 0.1-fold increase in plasma cholesterol compared to mice synthesizing SR-BI only in liver. This elevation was due mostly to increased HDL-C. In EC culture studies, SR-BI was found to be present in both basolateral and apical membranes but greater cellular uptake of cholesterol from HDL was found in the basolateral compartment. In summary, enhanced expression of SR-BI in EC resulted in a less atherogenic lipoprotein profile and decreased atherosclerosis, suggesting a possible role for endothelial SR-BI in the flux of cholesterol across EC.

  4. Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and their application to B-type variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, H.

    1981-01-01

    A Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, formed from the differential rotation in the narrow region between the core and envelope, is proposed as a promising mechanism responsible for the excitation of pulsations in B-type variables (53 Per variables and β Cep stars), in which the unstable inertia wave resulting from this instability resonates with an eigenmode of the non-radial oscillation of the whole star. The degeneracy of the two frequencies is found to be expected at any evolutionary stage of a star. The equations for a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability have been formulated for the stellar case, and in the cylindrical configuration limit, the necessary condition for instability and characteristics of the instability have been discussed. It is shown that prograde modes with large /m/ for a given l are excited in almost all cases; which seems to agree with observations. The back reaction of the excited modes on the differential rotation is discussed in these stars, and it is pointed out that the differential rotation can be significantly affected by this effect in a short time. (author)

  5. B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations to guide treatment of patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attridge, J T; Kaufman, D A; Lim, D S

    2009-05-01

    To determine whether b-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations can guide treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) to reduce the number of indomethacin doses without increasing morbidity. Prospective, randomised, controlled trial. Single-centre referral neonatal intensive care unit. Infants with echocardiographic diagnosis of PDA. Infants with congenital heart disease or renal insufficiency were excluded. BNP measurement and echocardiography were performed in all subjects before and after indomethacin treatment. The investigational group had BNP concentrations measured 12 and 24 h after the first dose (before the 2nd and 3rd doses of indomethacin). Indomethacin dosing was withheld in the BNP-guided group if the 12 or 24 h BNP concentrations were found to be gender or indomethacin prophylaxis. Median baseline and 48 h BNP concentrations did not differ between the groups (0 h: 500 vs 542 pg/ml; 48 h: 85 vs 126 pg/ml; control and BNP-guided groups, respectively). During primary indomethacin treatment, the BNP-guided group received fewer doses of indomethacin than controls (70 vs 88 doses, p<0.05). The rate of PDA ligation, intestinal perforation and chronic lung disease did not differ between groups. BNP-guided treatment reduced the number of primary indomethacin doses. There was no increase in PDA persistence or associated morbidity.

  6. Designability of Aromatic Interaction Networks at E. coli Bacterioferritin B-Type Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterioferritin from E. coli (BFR, a maxi-ferritin made of 24 subunits, has been utilized as a model to study the fundamentals of protein folding and self-assembly. Through structural and computational analyses, two amino acid residues at the B-site interface of BFR were chosen to investigate the role they play in the self-assembly of nano-cage formation, and the possibility of building aromatic interaction networks at B-type protein–protein interfaces. Three mutants were designed, expressed, purified, and characterized using transmission electron microscopy, size exclusion chromatography, native gel electrophoresis, and temperature-dependent circular dichroism spectroscopy. All of the mutants fold into α-helical structures and possess lowered thermostability. The double mutant D132W/N34W was 12 °C less stable than the wild type, and was also the only mutant for which cage-like nanostructures could not be detected in the dried, surface-immobilized conditions of transmission electron microscopy. Two mutants—N34W and D132W/N34W—only formed dimers in solution, while mutant D132W favored the 24-mer even more robustly than the wild type, suggesting that we were successful in designing proteins with enhanced assembly properties. This investigation into the structure of this important class of proteins could help to understand the self-assembly of proteins in general.

  7. Cats and Carbohydrates: The Carnivore Fantasy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Adronie; Hesta, Myriam

    2017-01-01

    The domestic cat’s wild ancestors are obligate carnivores that consume prey containing only minimal amounts of carbohydrates. Evolutionary events adapted the cat’s metabolism and physiology to this diet strictly composed of animal tissues and led to unique digestive and metabolic peculiarities of carbohydrate metabolism. The domestic cat still closely resembles its wild ancestor. Although the carnivore connection of domestic cats is well recognised, little is known about the precise nutrient profile to which the digestive physiology and metabolism of the cat have adapted throughout evolution. Moreover, studies show that domestic cats balance macronutrient intake by selecting low-carbohydrate foods. The fact that cats evolved consuming low-carbohydrate prey has led to speculations that high-carbohydrate diets could be detrimental for a cat’s health. More specifically, it has been suggested that excess carbohydrates could lead to feline obesity and diabetes mellitus. Additionally, the chances for remission of diabetes mellitus are higher in cats that consume a low-carbohydrate diet. This literature review will summarise current carbohydrate knowledge pertaining to digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, food selection and macronutrient balancing in healthy, obese and diabetic cats, as well as the role of carbohydrates in prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes mellitus. PMID:29140289

  8. Cats and Carbohydrates: The Carnivore Fantasy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adronie Verbrugghe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The domestic cat’s wild ancestors are obligate carnivores that consume prey containing only minimal amounts of carbohydrates. Evolutionary events adapted the cat’s metabolism and physiology to this diet strictly composed of animal tissues and led to unique digestive and metabolic peculiarities of carbohydrate metabolism. The domestic cat still closely resembles its wild ancestor. Although the carnivore connection of domestic cats is well recognised, little is known about the precise nutrient profile to which the digestive physiology and metabolism of the cat have adapted throughout evolution. Moreover, studies show that domestic cats balance macronutrient intake by selecting low-carbohydrate foods. The fact that cats evolved consuming low-carbohydrate prey has led to speculations that high-carbohydrate diets could be detrimental for a cat’s health. More specifically, it has been suggested that excess carbohydrates could lead to feline obesity and diabetes mellitus. Additionally, the chances for remission of diabetes mellitus are higher in cats that consume a low-carbohydrate diet. This literature review will summarise current carbohydrate knowledge pertaining to digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, food selection and macronutrient balancing in healthy, obese and diabetic cats, as well as the role of carbohydrates in prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  9. Cats and Carbohydrates: The Carnivore Fantasy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Adronie; Hesta, Myriam

    2017-11-15

    The domestic cat's wild ancestors are obligate carnivores that consume prey containing only minimal amounts of carbohydrates. Evolutionary events adapted the cat's metabolism and physiology to this diet strictly composed of animal tissues and led to unique digestive and metabolic peculiarities of carbohydrate metabolism. The domestic cat still closely resembles its wild ancestor. Although the carnivore connection of domestic cats is well recognised, little is known about the precise nutrient profile to which the digestive physiology and metabolism of the cat have adapted throughout evolution. Moreover, studies show that domestic cats balance macronutrient intake by selecting low-carbohydrate foods. The fact that cats evolved consuming low-carbohydrate prey has led to speculations that high-carbohydrate diets could be detrimental for a cat's health. More specifically, it has been suggested that excess carbohydrates could lead to feline obesity and diabetes mellitus. Additionally, the chances for remission of diabetes mellitus are higher in cats that consume a low-carbohydrate diet. This literature review will summarise current carbohydrate knowledge pertaining to digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, food selection and macronutrient balancing in healthy, obese and diabetic cats, as well as the role of carbohydrates in prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  10. A systematic study of chemogenomics of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiangyong; Luo, Fang; Chen, Lirong; Yuan, Gu; Xu, Xiaojie

    2014-03-04

    Chemogenomics focuses on the interactions between biologically active molecules and protein targets for drug discovery. Carbohydrates are the most abundant compounds in natural products. Compared with other drugs, the carbohydrate drugs show weaker side effects. Searching for multi-target carbohydrate drugs can be regarded as a solution to improve therapeutic efficacy and safety. In this work, we collected 60 344 carbohydrates from the Universal Natural Products Database (UNPD) and explored the chemical space of carbohydrates by principal component analysis. We found that there is a large quantity of potential lead compounds among carbohydrates. Then we explored the potential of carbohydrates in drug discovery by using a network-based multi-target computational approach. All carbohydrates were docked to 2389 target proteins. The most potential carbohydrates for drug discovery and their indications were predicted based on a docking score-weighted prediction model. We also explored the interactions between carbohydrates and target proteins to find the pathological networks, potential drug candidates and new indications.

  11. B-type natriuretic peptide: a novel early blood marker of acute myocardial infarction in patients with chest pain and no ST-segment elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassan, Roberto; Potsch, Alfredo; Maisel, Alan; Tura, Bernardo; Villacorta, Humberto; Nogueira, Mônica Viegas; Campos, Augusta; Gamarski, Roberto; Masetto, Antonio Cláudio; Moutinho, Marco Aurélio

    2005-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the diagnostic value of admission B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with acute chest pain and no ST-segment elevation. A prospective study with 631 consecutive patients was conducted in the emergency department. Non-ST elevation AMI was present in 72 patients and their median admission BNP level was significantly higher than in unstable angina and non-acute coronary syndrome patients. Sensitivity of admission BNP for AMI (cut-off value of 100 pg/mL) was significantly higher than creatine kinase-MB (CKMB) and troponin-I on admission (70.8 vs. 45.8 vs. 50.7%, respectively, P<0.0001) and specificity was 68.9%. Simultaneous use of these markers significantly improved sensitivity to 87.3% and the negative predictive value to 97.3%. In multiple logistic regression analysis, admission BNP was a significant independent predictor of AMI, even when CKMB and troponin-I were present in the model. BNP is a useful adjunct to standard cardiac markers in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and no ST-segment elevation, particularly if initial CKMB and/or troponin-I are non-diagnostic.

  12. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  13. Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whole grains and refined grains. Whole grains are foods like whole wheat bread, brown rice, whole cornmeal, and oatmeal. They offer ... brown-looking bread are not necessarily whole grain breads. Refined grains mean that the food company has removed some of the grain — ...

  14. Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... added sugar. These include: Candy Cookies, cakes, and pastries Regular (non-diet) carbonated beverages, such as soda ... quinoa Refined grains, such as those found in pastries, white bread, crackers, and white rice also contain ...

  15. Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide concentration for diagnosis of acute heart failure with renal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Atik Khan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background : Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP is the diagnostic tool for acute heart failure (AHF.This natriu­retic peptide level depends on renal function, through renal metabolism and excretion. Therefore we examined the effect ofrenal impairment on plasma BNP level during diagnosis of AHF.Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the effect of renal dysfunction on plasma BNP level and to determine appropriate cutoff value of plasma BNP to diagnose the patients of AHF with renal insufficiency.Methods: This cross sectional analytical study was conducted in the Depart­ment of Biochemistry Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU. The study was done among 90 AHF patients selected from cardiology emergency department during the period of July 2012 to June 2013. After enrollment plasma BNP concentration was measured and eGFR was estimated from serum creatinine by the four parameter Modifica­tion of Diet and Renal Disease (MORD equation and then grouped into two groups on the basis of empirical cut off value of eGFR 60 ml/min/1.73 m2Results: In this study a significant negative correlation was found between plasma BNP evel and eGFR (P<0.001 , with higher BNP levels observed as eGFR declined. The optimal BNP cutoff value for diagno­sis of AHF patients with renal insufficiency was 824 pg/ml. At this cutoff level AHF with renal insufficiency could be diagnosed with sensitivity and specificity of 84% and 71 %, respectively.Conclusions: By adjusting the cutoff value, plasma BNP can be used to diagnose AHF with renal insufficiency with an acceptable sensitivity and specificity.

  16. B-type natriuretic peptide as a marker for heart failure in patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Matthew A; Puttgen, H Adrian; Prabhakaran, Vivek; Reich, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D

    2007-09-01

    To determine whether serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (N-BNP), a biomarker of myocardial wall stress, is specific to acute heart failure (HF) in patients hospitalized with stroke. Case-control study. Tertiary hospital, Neurosciences Critical Care Unit and Stroke Unit. Consecutive patients with acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who were evaluated for HF. None. Cases and controls were classified, respectively, as patients with or without HF, defined according to modified Framingham criteria. Seventy-two patients were evaluated, 39 with ischemic stroke, 22 with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and 11 with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Thirty-four patients (47%) met criteria for HF, and 47 patients (65%) had systolic or diastolic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction on echocardiogram. Serum N-BNP was measured a median of 48 h following the onset of stroke and was increased (> 900 pg/ml) in 56 patients (78%), with higher levels in non-survivors (11898 +/- 12741 vs 4073 +/-5691; p = 0.001). In a multiple regression model, N-BNP elevation was not independently associated with HF (OR 5.4, 95% CI 0.8-36.0, p = 0.084). At a cut-off of 900 pg/ml, the sensitivity of N-BNP for HF was 94%, specificity 37%, positive predictive value (PPV) 57%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 88%. For systolic or diastolic LV dysfunction, the sensitivity of N-BNP was 89%, specificity 44%, PPV 75%, and NPV 69%. These results demonstrate that N-BNP elevation is not specific to HF or LV dysfunction in patients with acute ischemic stroke, SAH, and ICH.

  17. [B-type natriuretic peptide assessment in the diagnosis of rejection after pediatric heart transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylos, Cristina de; Azeka, Estela; Kajita, Luis; Benvenutti, Luis; Strunz, Célia Cassaro; Branco, Klébia Castello; Riso, Arlindo Almeida; Tanamati, Carla; Jatene, Marcelo; Barbero-Marcial, Miguel

    2009-03-01

    Rejection is one of the major causes of mortality following pediatric heart transplant. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been studied as a method for the diagnosis of acute rejection, especially in adult patients undergoing heart transplant. To correlate serum BNP levels with acute rejection as diagnosed by endomyocardial biopsy in patients of the pediatric heart transplant group. A total of 50 BNP samples were collected from 33 children in the postoperative period of heart transplant, and data on age, gender, skin color, blood group, immune panel, follow-up time after transplant, functional class, immunosuppressive regimen used and number of rejections were analyzed. Thirty three children with median age of 10.13 years were analyzed; of these, 54% were females and 78% were Caucasians. BNP levels were determined at a mean time from transplant of 4.25 years. Nine episodes of rejection were diagnosed in eight patients (27%) by means of endomyocardial biopsy; of these, three were grade 3A, five were grade 2, and one had humoral rejection. At the moment of biopsy, most patients were asymptomatic. The mean serum BNP level was 77.18 pg/ml, with 144.22 pg/ml in the group with rejection and 62.46 pg/ml in the group without rejection, with p = 0.02. Asymptomatic children can present acute rejection in the postoperative period of heart transplant. Serum BNP levels show a statistically significant difference in the group with rejection and thus can be an additional method in the diagnosis of cardiac rejection.

  18. Factors associated with serum B-type natriuretic peptide in infants with single ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Ryan J; Zak, Victor; Hsu, Daphne; Cnota, James; Colan, Steven D; Hehir, David; Kantor, Paul; Levine, Jami C; Margossian, Renee; Richmond, Marc; Szwast, Anita; Williams, Derek; Williams, Richard; Atz, Andrew M

    2014-06-01

    Data regarding the value of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) measurements in infants with a single-ventricle (SV) physiology are lacking. This analysis aimed to describe the BNP level changes in infants with an SV physiology before and after superior cavopulmonary connection (SCPC) surgery. Levels of BNP were measured by a core laboratory before SCPC (at 5.0 ± 1.6 months) and at the age of 14 months during a multicenter trial of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition therapy for infants with SV. Multivariable longitudinal analysis was used to model the associations between BNP levels and three sets of grouped variables (echocardiography, catheterization, growth). Multivariable analysis was performed to assess associations with patient characteristics at both visits. Associations between BNP levels and neurodevelopmental variables were investigated at the 14 month visit because neurodevelopmental assessment was performed only at this visit. The BNP level was significantly higher before SCPC (n = 173) than at the age of 14 months (n = 134). The respective median levels were 80.8 pg/ml (interquartile range [IQR], 35-187 pg/ml) and 34.5 pg/ml (IQR, 17-67 pg/ml) (p SCPC and in 21 subjects (16 %) at the age of 14 months. In the 117 patients who had BNP measurements at both visits, the median BNP level decreased 32 pg/ml (IQR, 1-79 pg/ml) (p SCPC surgery (p SCPC surgery (p = 0.04), and a lower Bayley psychomotor developmental index (p = 0.02). The levels of BNP decreases in infants with SV from the pre-SCPC visit to the age of 14 months. A higher BNP level is associated with increased ventricular dilation in systole, increased AV valve regurgitation, impaired growth, and poorer neurodevelopmental outcomes. Therefore, BNP level may be a useful seromarker for identifying infants with SV at risk for worse outcomes.

  19. The magnetic early B-type stars I: magnetometry and rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, M. E.; Wade, G. A.; Rivinius, Th; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Bohlender, D.; Monin, D.; Sikora, J.; MiMeS Collaboration; BinaMIcS Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    The rotational and magnetic properties of many magnetic hot stars are poorly characterized, therefore the Magnetism in Massive Stars and Binarity and Magnetic Interactions in various classes of Stars collaborations have collected extensive high-dispersion spectropolarimetric data sets of these targets. We present longitudinal magnetic field measurements for 52 early B-type stars (B5-B0), with which we attempt to determine their rotational periods Prot. Supplemented with high-resolution spectroscopy, low-resolution Dominion Astrophysical Observatory circular spectropolarimetry, and archival Hipparcos photometry, we determined Prot for 10 stars, leaving only five stars for which Prot could not be determined. Rotational ephemerides for 14 stars were refined via comparison of new to historical magnetic measurements. The distribution of Prot is very similar to that observed for the cooler Ap/Bp stars. We also measured v sin i and vmac for all stars. Comparison to non-magnetic stars shows that v sin i is much lower for magnetic stars, an expected consequence of magnetic braking. We also find evidence that vmac is lower for magnetic stars. Least-squares deconvolution profiles extracted using single-element masks revealed widespread, systematic discrepancies in between different elements: this effect is apparent only for chemically peculiar stars, suggesting it is a consequence of chemical spots. Sinusoidal fits to H line measurements (which should be minimally affected by chemical spots), yielded evidence of surface magnetic fields more complex than simple dipoles in six stars for which this has not previously been reported; however, in all six cases, the second- and third-order amplitudes are small relative to the first-order (dipolar) amplitudes.

  20. Facile synthesis of B-type carbonated nanoapatite with tailored microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti, E-mail: magdalena.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Romagnoli, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.romagnoli@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Hanuskova, Miriam, E-mail: Miriam.hanuskova@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Fabbri, Elena, E-mail: Elena.fabbri@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Gualtieri, Alessandro F., E-mail: Alessandro.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41121 Modena (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Nanolime and a phosphate-based chelating agent were used to synthesize B-type carbonated apatite. Developed Rietveld refinement strategies allowed one to determine process yield, product crystallinity as well as structural (unit cell) and microstructural (size, strain) parameters. The effect of synthesis temperature (20–60 °C) as well as Ca/P ratio (1.5–2.5) and solid content (10–30 wt%) of the starting batch on these properties were investigated. FTIR, TEM and gas adsorption data provided supporting evidence. The process yield was 42–60 wt% and found to be governed by the Ca/P ratio. The purified products had high specific surface area (107–186 m{sup 2}/g) and crystallinity (76–97%). The unit cell parameters, correlated to the degree of structural carbonate, were sensitive to the Ca/P ratio. Instead, temperature governed the microstructural parameters. Less strained and larger crystals were obtained at higher temperatures. Long-term aging up to 6 months at 20 °C compensated for higher crystal growth kinetics at higher temperature. - Graphical abstract: Controlled synthesis of carbonated apatite at moderate temperatures using nanolime and sodiumhexametaphosphate as starting reagent. - Highlights: • Chemical synthesis of nano-sized apatite with tailored microstructure was performed. • Colloidal Ca(OH){sub 2} and a phosphorus-based chelating agents were used as reagents. • The method is simple and reproducible which facilitate industrial process scale-up. • Rietveld refinement strategies for product characterization were developed. • Rietveld analyses provided yield, microstructural and structure information.

  1. Facile synthesis of B-type carbonated nanoapatite with tailored microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Romagnoli, Marcello; Hanuskova, Miriam; Fabbri, Elena; Gualtieri, Alessandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Nanolime and a phosphate-based chelating agent were used to synthesize B-type carbonated apatite. Developed Rietveld refinement strategies allowed one to determine process yield, product crystallinity as well as structural (unit cell) and microstructural (size, strain) parameters. The effect of synthesis temperature (20–60 °C) as well as Ca/P ratio (1.5–2.5) and solid content (10–30 wt%) of the starting batch on these properties were investigated. FTIR, TEM and gas adsorption data provided supporting evidence. The process yield was 42–60 wt% and found to be governed by the Ca/P ratio. The purified products had high specific surface area (107–186 m 2 /g) and crystallinity (76–97%). The unit cell parameters, correlated to the degree of structural carbonate, were sensitive to the Ca/P ratio. Instead, temperature governed the microstructural parameters. Less strained and larger crystals were obtained at higher temperatures. Long-term aging up to 6 months at 20 °C compensated for higher crystal growth kinetics at higher temperature. - Graphical abstract: Controlled synthesis of carbonated apatite at moderate temperatures using nanolime and sodiumhexametaphosphate as starting reagent. - Highlights: • Chemical synthesis of nano-sized apatite with tailored microstructure was performed. • Colloidal Ca(OH) 2 and a phosphorus-based chelating agents were used as reagents. • The method is simple and reproducible which facilitate industrial process scale-up. • Rietveld refinement strategies for product characterization were developed. • Rietveld analyses provided yield, microstructural and structure information

  2. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP serum levels in rats after forced repeated swimming stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almira Hadžovic-Džuvo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To estimate the effects of forced repeated swimming stress on BNP serum levels in rats. Methods Adult male Wistar rats weighting between 280-330 g were divided into two groups: control group (n =8 and stress group (n =8. Rats in the stress group were exposed to forced swimming stress daily, for 7 days. The rats were forced to swim in plastic tanks (90 cm wide, 120 cm deep containing tap water (temperature ca. 25°C. The depth of water was 40 cm. Duration of each swimming session progressively increased from 10 minutes on the irst day to 40 minutes on days 6 and 7. Rats were sacriiced and blood was drawn from abdominal aorta for BNP analysis immediately after the last swimming session. B-type natriuretic serum level was determined by ELISA method using RAT BNP-32 kit (Phoenix Pharmaceutical Inc.. Results There was no statistically signiicant difference between mean BNP serum level in the stress group after the swimming period (0.81±0.14 ng/ml as compared to the unstressed group of rats (0.8 ±0.08ng/ml. After the swimming period mean body weight slightly decreased in the stress group in comparison with values before stress period (296.3 g vs.272.8 g, but this difference was not statistically signiicant. The stress period had no inluence on food intake in the stress rat group. Conclusion The workload consisting of 40-minutes long swimming session is not suficient to provoke BNP release from myocardium in rats.

  3. B-type olivine fabric induced by low temperature dissolution creep during serpentinization and deformation in mantle wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenlong; Zhang, Junfeng; Barou, Fabrice

    2018-01-01

    The B-type olivine fabric (i.e., the [010] axes subnormal to foliation and the [001] axes subparallel to the lineation) has been regarded as an important olivine fabric for interpreting global trench-parallel S-wave polarization in fore-arc regions. However, strong serpentinization and cold temperature environment in the mantle wedge should inhibit development of the B-type olivine fabric that requires high temperature to activate solid-state plastic deformation. Here we report fabrics of olivine and antigorite generated at low temperatures (300-370 °C) during serpentinization in a fossil mantle wedge of the Val Malenco area, Central Alps. Olivine in the serpentine matrix develops a pronounced B-type fabric, while antigorite in the same matrix displays a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) with the (001) planes and the [010] axes subparallel to foliation and lineation, respectively. The following evidence leads to the conclusion that the B-type olivine fabric results from dissolution creep assisted by grain boundary sliding (GBS) and grain rotation, rather than solid-state plastic deformation: (1) serpentinization took place at low temperatures and a fluid-enriched environment, ideal for dissolution-precipitation creep; (2) the voids and zigzag boundaries along the interface between antigorite and olivine suggest a fluid dissolution reaction; (3) the primary coarse olivine develops a nearly random fabric, indicating the B-type fabrics in the fine-grained olivine may not be inherited fabrics. These results document for the first time the B-type olivine CPO formed by dissolution creep at low temperatures during serpentinization and provide a mechanism to reconcile petrofabric observations with geophysical observations of trench parallel fast S-wave seismic anisotropy in fore-arc mantle wedge regions.

  4. [Carbohydrates synthesized by the spirulines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillet, M

    1975-01-01

    Carbohydrates roughly constitute 15 p. 100 of the dry matter of Sirulina. They are extracted after complete delipidation, by successive exhaustions: first with ethanol of decreasing title, then with cold water slightly acidified by chlorhydric acid in order to drain out the calcium of the phytate; then by neutral boiling water; at last by alkaline or acidic warm solutions. After neutralization, suitable defecation and concentration, carbohydrates are either purified by a slow cristalization or hydrolyzed and analysed by usual techniques of chromatography on paper or on column of borated resins. Glucose, levulose, sucrose, glycerol and several polyols are so detected. They are in small amounts and of little nutritional interest. There is no trehalose. The carbohydrate storage products are mainly a glucosan and a rhamnosan, both containing glucosamine. There is about 2 p. 100 of the glucosan and 10 p. 100 of the rhamnosan, the composition of which are, in molar ratio: (see text). More or less phosphated cyclitols constitute, together with a small amount of glycogen, the rest of the metabolisable part. The cell-walls which could not be perfectly purified were degraded either by HC1 or by enzymes (pronase, neuraminidase). So have been found glucosamine and muramic acid, associated with peptides rich in glycine, serine, alanine, glutamic acid. These results joined to the presence, formerly signaled, of a rhamnosan, reveal a relationship between Spirulina and some Gram(+) bacteria. It is a fact that the celle-walls of Spirulina actually, though weakly, take the Gram coloration. To conclude, Spirulina presents some alimental interest.

  5. Carbohydrate clearance receptors in transfusion medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Louise Tølbøll; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2012-01-01

    are especially important to enhance size and reduce glomerular filtration loss. Carbohydrates are, however, also ligands for a large number of carbohydrate-binding lectins exposed to the circulatory system that serve as scavenger receptors for the innate immune system, or have more specific roles in targeting......Complex carbohydrates play important functions for circulation of proteins and cells. They provide protective shields and refraction from non-specific interactions with negative charges from sialic acids to enhance circulatory half-life. For recombinant protein therapeutics carbohydrates...

  6. The effects of carbohydrate variation in isocaloric diets on glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, PH; Arias, AMP; Ackermans, MT; Endert, E; Pijl, H; Kuipers, F; Meijer, AJ; Sauerwein, HP; Romijn, JA

    To evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate content on postabsorptive glucose metabolism, we quantified gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis after 11 days of high carbohydrate (85% carbohydrate), control (44% carbohydrate), and very low carbohydrate (2% carbohydrate) diets in six healthy men. Diets

  7. The effects of carbohydrate variation in isocaloric diets on glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, P. H.; Pereira Arias, A. M.; Ackermans, M. T.; Endert, E.; Pijl, H.; Kuipers, F.; Meijer, A. J.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate content on postabsorptive glucose metabolism, we quantified gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis after 11 days of high carbohydrate (85% carbohydrate), control (44% carbohydrate), and very low carbohydrate (2% carbohydrate) diets in six healthy men. Diets

  8. N-Terminal Pro–B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Variability in Stable Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayen, Andrew; Horvath, Andrea R.; Dimeski, Goce; Coburn, Amanda; Johnson, David W.; Hawley, Carmel M.; Campbell, Scott B.; Craig, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Monitoring N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may be useful for assessing cardiovascular risk in dialysis patients. However, its biologic variation is unknown, hindering the accurate interpretation of serial concentrations. The aims of this prospective cohort study were to estimate the within- and between-person coefficients of variation of NT-proBNP in stable dialysis patients, and derive the critical difference between measurements needed to exclude biologic and analytic variation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Fifty-five prevalent hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients attending two hospitals were assessed weekly for 5 weeks and then monthly for 4 months between October 2010 and April 2012. Assessments were conducted at the same time in the dialysis cycle and entailed NT-proBNP testing, clinical review, electrocardiography, and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Patients were excluded if they became unstable. Results This study analyzed 136 weekly and 113 monthly NT-proBNP measurements from 40 and 41 stable patients, respectively. Results showed that 22% had ischemic heart disease; 9% and 87% had left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction, respectively. Respective between- and within-person coefficients of variation were 153% and 27% for weekly measurements, and 148% and 35% for monthly measurements. Within-person variation was unaffected by dialysis modality, hydration status, inflammation, or cardiac comorbidity. NT-proBNP concentrations measured at weekly intervals needed to increase by at least 46% or decrease by 84% to exclude change due to biologic and analytic variation alone with 90% certainty, whereas monthly measurements needed to increase by at least 119% or decrease by 54%. Conclusions The between-person variation of NT-proBNP was large and markedly greater than within-person variation, indicating that NT-proBNP testing might better be applied in the dialysis population using a

  9. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide variability in stable dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Magid A; Hayen, Andrew; Horvath, Andrea R; Dimeski, Goce; Coburn, Amanda; Johnson, David W; Hawley, Carmel M; Campbell, Scott B; Craig, Jonathan C

    2015-04-07

    Monitoring N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may be useful for assessing cardiovascular risk in dialysis patients. However, its biologic variation is unknown, hindering the accurate interpretation of serial concentrations. The aims of this prospective cohort study were to estimate the within- and between-person coefficients of variation of NT-proBNP in stable dialysis patients, and derive the critical difference between measurements needed to exclude biologic and analytic variation. Fifty-five prevalent hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients attending two hospitals were assessed weekly for 5 weeks and then monthly for 4 months between October 2010 and April 2012. Assessments were conducted at the same time in the dialysis cycle and entailed NT-proBNP testing, clinical review, electrocardiography, and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Patients were excluded if they became unstable. This study analyzed 136 weekly and 113 monthly NT-proBNP measurements from 40 and 41 stable patients, respectively. Results showed that 22% had ischemic heart disease; 9% and 87% had left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction, respectively. Respective between- and within-person coefficients of variation were 153% and 27% for weekly measurements, and 148% and 35% for monthly measurements. Within-person variation was unaffected by dialysis modality, hydration status, inflammation, or cardiac comorbidity. NT-proBNP concentrations measured at weekly intervals needed to increase by at least 46% or decrease by 84% to exclude change due to biologic and analytic variation alone with 90% certainty, whereas monthly measurements needed to increase by at least 119% or decrease by 54%. The between-person variation of NT-proBNP was large and markedly greater than within-person variation, indicating that NT-proBNP testing might better be applied in the dialysis population using a relative-change strategy. Serial NT-proBNP concentrations need to double or halve to confidently

  10. B-type natriuretic peptide-guided treatment for heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Julie; Heneghan, Carl J; Perera, Rafael; Clements, Alison M; Glasziou, Paul P; Kearley, Karen E; Pidduck, Nicola; Roberts, Nia W; Tyndel, Sally; Wright, F Lucy; Bankhead, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a condition in which the heart does not pump enough blood to meet all the needs of the body. Symptoms of heart failure include breathlessness, fatigue and fluid retention. Outcomes for patients with heart failure are highly variable; however on average, these patients have a poor prognosis. Prognosis can be improved with early diagnosis and appropriate use of medical treatment, use of devices and transplantation. Patients with heart failure are high users of healthcare resources, not only due to drug and device treatments, but due to high costs of hospitalisation care. B-type natriuretic peptide levels are already used as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure, but could offer to clinicians a possible tool to guide drug treatment. This could optimise drug management in heart failure patients whilst allaying concerns over potential side effects due to drug intolerance. Objectives To assess whether treatment guided by serial BNP or NT-proBNP (collectively referred to as NP) monitoring improves outcomes compared with treatment guided by clinical assessment alone. Search methods Searches were conducted up to 15 March 2016 in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database in the Cochrane Library. Searches were also conducted in the Science Citation Index Expanded, the Conference Proceedings Citation Index on Web of Science (Thomson Reuters), World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry and ClinicalTrials.gov. We applied no date or language restrictions. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials of NP-guided treatment of heart failure versus treatment guided by clinical assessment alone with no restriction on follow-up. Adults treated for heart failure, in both in-hospital and out-of-hospital settings, and trials reporting a

  11. Dietary A- and B-type procyanidins : characterization and biofunctional potential of an abundant and diverse group of phenolics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appeldoorn, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Procyanidins (PCs) are phenolic compounds that belong to the class of flavonoids and are oligomers of monomeric (epi)catechin units. These monomeric units can be linked to each other by a single C4-C8 or C4-C6 linkage, which is referred to as B-type. Besides these single linkages an additional ether

  12. Efficient isolation of major procyanidin A-type dimers from peanut skins and B-type dimers from grape seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appeldoorn, M.M.; Sanders, M.B.; Vincken, J.P.; Cheynier, V.; Guerneve, Le C.; Gruppen, H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to fully explore the biofunctional potential of proanthocyanidins (PA), isolated and well-characterised PA dimers are of great importance. Current methods to obtain pure A- and B-type dimers are laborious, because they comprise multiple chromatographic steps, often yielding only one or two

  13. Cardiac effects of 3 months treatment of acromegaly evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and B-type natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Faber, Jens; Kjær, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    of acromegaly is initiated. This was a three months prospective study investigating short-term cardiac effects of treatment in acromegalic patients. Cardiac function was evaluated by the gold standard method cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and circulating levels of B-type natriuretic peptides (BNP...

  14. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Prognosis in Heart Failure Patients With Preserved and Reduced Ejection Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Linssen, Gerard C. M.; Jaarsma, Tiny; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Hoes, Arno W.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Paulus, Walter J.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Hillege, Hans L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine the prognostic value of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), in comparison to data in HF patients with reduced left ventricular (LV) EF ( Background Management of patients with HFPEF is

  15. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, and expression of a B-type (cricket-type) allatostatin preprohormone from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, M; Lenz, C; Winther, A M

    2001-01-01

    and nonamidated C terminus. We have previously reported the structure of an A-type allatostatin preprohormone from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Here we describe the molecular cloning of a B-type prepro-allatostatin from Drosophila (DAP-B). DAP-B is 211 amino acid residues long and contains one copy each...

  16. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone in relation to plasma B-type natriuretic peptide : the Hoorn Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ballegooijen, Adriana J; Visser, Marjolein; Snijder, Marieke B; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Nijpels, Giel; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Diamant, Michaela; Brouwer, Ingeborg A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A disturbed vitamin D-parathyroid hormone (PTH)-calcium axis may play a role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Therefore, we investigated whether lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and higher PTH are cross sectionally and after 8 years of follow-up associated with higher B-type

  17. Differential spatial expression of A- and B-type CDKs, and distribution of auxins and cytokinins in the open transverse root apical meristem of Cucurbita maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappetta, Adriana; Bruno, Leonardo; Salimonti, Amelia; Muto, Antonella; Jones, Jessica; Rogers, Hilary J; Francis, Dennis; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice

    2011-05-01

    Aside from those on Arabidopsis, very few studies have focused on spatial expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in root apical meristems (RAMs), and, indeed, none has been undertaken for open meristems. The extent of interfacing between cell cycle genes and plant growth regulators is also an increasingly important issue in plant cell cycle studies. Here spatial expression/localization of an A-type and B-type CDK, auxin and cytokinins are reported in relation to the hitherto unexplored anatomy of RAMs of Cucurbita maxima. Median longitudinal sections were cut from 1-cm-long primary root tips of C. maxima. Full-length A-type CDKs and a B-type CDK were cloned from C. maxima using degenerate primers, probes of which were localized on sections of RAMs using in situ hybridization. Isopentenyladenine (iPA), trans-zeatin (t-Z) and indole-3yl-acetic acid (IAA) were identified on sections by immunolocalization. The C. cucurbita RAM conformed to an open transverse (OT) meristem typified by an absence of a clear boundary between the eumeristem and root cap columella, but with a distinctive longitudinally thickened epidermis. Cucma;CDKA;1 expression was detected strongly in the longitudinally thickened epidermis, a tissue with mitotic competence that contributes cells radially to the root cap of OT meristems. Cucma;CDKB2 was expressed mainly in proliferative regions of the RAM and in lateral root primordia. iPA and t-Z were mainly distributed in differentiated cells whilst IAA was distributed more uniformly in all tissues of the RAM. Cucma;CDKA;1 was expressed most strongly in cells that have proliferative competence whereas Cucma;CDKB2 was confined mainly to mitotic cells. iPA and t-Z marked differentiated cells in the RAM, consistent with the known effect of cytokinins in promoting differentiation in root systems. iPA/t-Z were distributed in a converse pattern to Cucma;CDKB2 expression whereas IAA was detected in most cells in the RAM regardless of their proliferative

  18. Pyruvate kinase blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003357.htm Pyruvate kinase blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... energy when oxygen levels are low. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. In the laboratory, white blood ...

  19. One strike against low-carbohydrate diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is intense controversy over whether low-carbohydrate or low-fat diets are more efficacious for weight management. Using precise methodology, Hall et al. (2015) demonstrated that a low-carbohydrate diet promoted greater fat oxidation than an isocaloric low-fat diet but, in contrast to popular s...

  20. Carbohydrate epitopes on Haemonchus contortus antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schallig, H. D.; van Leeuwen, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Extracts of infective larvae and adults of the trichostrongylid Haemonchus contortus were studied for the presence of carbohydrate moieties. Several different lectin-binding sites were demonstrated in both stages using a panel of nine lectins. The carbohydrate specificity of the lectins used

  1. Total dissolved carbohydrate in Mahi river estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Rokade, M.A.; Zingde, M.D.

    Total dissolved carbohydrate varied from 4.37-15 mg l-1 and 3.71-15.95 mg l-1 in the surface and bottom samples respectively. Highest concentration of carbohydrate was observed at station 1 which decreased downward upto Station 6 which showed...

  2. Determining a carbohydrate profile for Hansenula polymorpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of the levels of carbohydrates in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha required the development of new analytical procedures. Existing fractionation and analytical methods were adapted to deal with the problems involved with the lysis of whole cells. Using these new procedures, the complete carbohydrate profiles of H. polymorpha and selected mutant strains were determined and shown to correlate favourably with previously published results.

  3. Wood adhesives containing proteins and carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years there has been resurgent interest in using biopolymers as sustainable and environmentally friendly ingredients in wood adhesive formulations. Among them, proteins and carbohydrates are the most commonly used. In this chapter, an overview is given of protein-based and carbohydrate-...

  4. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5 ′ -monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results

  5. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Joong-Won, E-mail: jshin@govst.edu [Division of Science, Governors State University, University Park, Illinois 60484-0975 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States); Bernstein, Elliot R., E-mail: erb@lamar.colostate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5'-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  7. Characterization of carbohydrate fractions and fermentation quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of adding fast-sile (FS), previous fermented juice (PFJ), sucrose (S) or fast-sile + sucrose (FS + S) on the fermentation characteristics and carbohydrates fractions of alfalfa silages by the Cornell net carbohydrates and proteins systems (CNCPS). Silages quality were well ...

  8. A functional carbohydrate chip platform for analysis of carbohydrate-protein interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Chang Sup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2010-01-01

    A carbohydrate chip based on glass or other transparent surfaces has been suggested as a potential tool for high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we proposed a facile, efficient, and cost-effective method whereby diverse carbohydrate types are modified in a single step and directly immobilized onto a glass surface, with retention of functional orientation. We modified various types of carbohydrates by reductive amination, in which reducing sugar groups were coupled with 4-(2-aminoethyl)aniline, which has di-amine groups at both ends. The modified carbohydrates were covalently attached to an amino-reactive NHS-activated glass surface by formation of stable amide bonds. This proposed method was applied for efficient construction of a carbohydrate microarray to analyze carbohydrate-protein interactions. The carbohydrate chip prepared using our method can be successfully used in diverse biomimetic studies of carbohydrates, including carbohydrate-biomolecule interactions, and carbohydrate sensor chip or microarray development for diagnosis and screening.

  9. Low-carbohydrate diets: an update on current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Davis, Nichola J

    2009-10-01

    The diabetes and obesity epidemics have stimulated research to assess the benefits and potential risks of low-carbohydrate diets. Carbohydrate comprises less than 45% of calories in carbohydrate-restricted diets, but very low carbohydrate ketogenic diets may restrict carbohydrate to 20 g initially with variability in the carbohydrate level subsequently. Some research suggests that low-carbohydrate diets may achieve better early weight loss than comparison diets higher in carbohydrate. Studies of up to 1 year suggest that weight loss on low-carbohydrate diet is comparable with fat-restricted diets with higher carbohydrate content. Limited research has been conducted to evaluate low-carbohydrate diets in managing type 2 diabetes. Although science continues to advance in this field, current research suggests that low-carbohydrate diets can be a viable option for achieving weight loss and may have beneficial effects on glycemic control, triglyceride levels, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in some patients.

  10. Phenol-Sulfuric Acid Method for Total Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The phenol-sulfuric acid method is a simple and rapid colorimetric method to determine total carbohydrates in a sample. The method detects virtually all classes of carbohydrates, including mono-, di-, oligo-, and polysaccharides. Although the method detects almost all carbohydrates, the absorptivity of the different carbohydrates varies. Thus, unless a sample is known to contain only one carbohydrate, the results must be expressed arbitrarily in terms of one carbohydrate.

  11. Comment on ;Dehydration breakdown of antigorite and the formation of B-type olivine CPO; by Nagaya et al. (2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaka, Toshio

    2014-12-01

    Recently, Nagaya et al. (2014) have reported the B-type crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of olivine in thermally metamorphosed serpentinites from the Happo ultramafic complex, central Japan, and interpreted the CPO as a result of topotactic growth of olivine after antigorite. Their conclusions require the reconsideration of the genesis of B-type olivine CPO, which is generally believed to be formed by plastic deformation of hydrous peridotites, and could have an impact on structural models of supra-subduction zones. I appreciate the detailed observations by Nagaya et al. (2014) but have to point out that they committed significant misinterpretation of facts and failed to show robust evidence and rationale for their argument.

  12. Characterizing carbohydrate-protein interactions by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Carole A.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and soluble carbohydrates and/or surface displayed glycans are central to countless recognition, attachment and signaling events in biology. The physical chemical features associated with these binding events vary considerably, depending on the biological system of interest. For example, carbohydrate-protein interactions can be stoichiometric or multivalent, the protein receptors can be monomeric or oligomeric, and the specificity of recognition can be highly stringent or rather promiscuous. Equilibrium dissociation constants for carbohydrate binding are known to vary from micromolar to millimolar, with weak interactions being far more prevalent; and individual carbohydrate binding sites can be truly symmetrical or merely homologous, and hence, the affinities of individual sites within a single protein can vary, as can the order of binding. Several factors, including the weak affinities with which glycans bind their protein receptors, the dynamic nature of the glycans themselves, and the non-equivalent interactions among oligomeric carbohydrate receptors, have made NMR an especially powerful tool for studying and defining carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we describe those NMR approaches that have proven to be the most robust in characterizing these systems, and explain what type of information can (or cannot) be obtained from each. Our goal is to provide to the reader the information necessary for selecting the correct experiment or sets of experiments to characterize their carbohydrate-protein interaction of interest. PMID:23784792

  13. Correlation between low-temperature creep and intergranular diffusion of Kh16N15M3B type steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solonin, M.I.; Kondrat'ev, V.P.; Krasina, T.A.; Voejkov, V.P.; Tarasyuk, V.B.; Fedorov, G.B.; Ryabenko, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for Kh16N15M3B type steel containing different amounts of carbon, molybdenum and niobium that was tested the diffusion mobility of iron-59 species. It is shown that at 400-500 deg C the diffusion of iron-59 is only intergranular. The correlation established between creep and diffusion. It is shwn that the activation energies for creep and intergranular diffusion correlate. 5 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. Analysis of A-Type and B-Type Highly Polymeric Proanthocyanidins and Their Biological Activities as Nutraceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Yokota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins have a series of heteroflavan-3-ols, (+-catechin/(−-epicatechin units, which are linked through a single B-type linkage and a doubly linked A-type linkage. Recently, we have performed the structural characterization of seed shells of the Japanese horse chestnut and fruits of blueberry and cranberry. The molecular sizes of them were higher in the order of blueberry > cranberry > seed shells of the Japanese horse chestnut between the respective fractions. For the analysis of terminal and extension units in those proanthocyanidins, the isolated fractions were subjected to the thiolytic cleavage of the B-type linkages using 1-dodecanethiol, and the resulting degradation products were identified by ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry. These analyses provided fast and good resolution of the degradation products and revealed higher proportions of A-type linkages compared with B-type linkages in both isolated fractions in the order of the seed shells > cranberry > blueberry. Moreover, the isolated fractions with higher molecular sizes and those more abundant in the proportions of A-type linkages were found to be more effective in the inhibition of pancreatic lipase activity. The results suggest that A-type highly polymeric proanthocyanidins are promising for the attenuation of lipid digestion as dietary supplements.

  15. Reply to comment by Nozaka (2014) on ;Dehydration breakdown of antigorite and the formation of B-type olivine CPO;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Wallis, Simon R.; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Seto, Yusuke; Miyake, Akira; Matsumoto, Megumi

    2014-12-01

    We would like to thank Dr. Nozaka for his interest in our work and also for supplying some of the crystal orientation data that we used in our study. He presents a detailed discussion of differences in interpretation between our two studies. The main difference is whether the strong B-type olivine CPO developed as a result of topotactic static growth after breakdown of antigorite (Nagaya et al., 2014) or if it developed due to homoepitaxial growth on a limited number of olivine grains that already showed a general B-type CPO (Nozaka, 2014). In both of our studies static growth of olivine due to the breakdown of antigorite is key in the strengthening or formation of B-type olivine CPO. This conclusion has potentially far reaching implications for the interpretation of mantle seismic anisotropy in subduction zones and is the most important take home message. However, the details of interpretation are also important. In our reply, we focus on what we consider to be the 5 main points of disagreement. We refer to Fig. 1 to explain different microstructural domains.

  16. Utilization of carbohydrates by radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F.

    2002-01-01

    Upgrading and utilization of carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated for recycling these bio-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction, etc. were induced. On the other hand, some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose and carboxymethylstarch, could be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produce the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use

  17. Extravascular lung water, B-type natriuretic peptide, and blood volume contraction enable diagnosis of weaning-induced pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dres, Martin; Teboul, Jean-Louis; Anguel, Nadia; Guerin, Laurent; Richard, Christian; Monnet, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    We tested whether the changes in extravascular lung water indexed for ideal body weight could detect weaning-induced pulmonary edema. We also studied the diagnostic value of blood volume contraction indices and B-type natriuretic peptide variations. Prospective study. Twenty-one patients who failed a first spontaneous breathing trial. None. We performed a second 60-minute T-tube spontaneous breathing trial. Before and at the end of spontaneous breathing trial, we recorded pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, the extravascular lung water indexed for ideal body weight, plasma B-type natriuretic peptide level, hemoglobin, and plasma protein concentrations. Weaning-induced pulmonary edema was defined by the association of signs of clinical intolerance and a pulmonary artery occlusion pressure greater than or equal to 18 mm Hg at the end of spontaneous breathing trial. Because some patients performed several spontaneous breathing trial, a primary analysis included all spontaneous breathing trial and a secondary analysis included only the first spontaneous breathing trial of each patient. In primary analysis, 36 spontaneous breathing trials were analyzed, 21 spontaneous breathing trial with weaning-induced pulmonary edema and 15 without. During spontaneous breathing trial, extravascular lung water indexed for ideal body weight increased only in cases with weaning-induced pulmonary edema (25% ± 23%). Plasma protein concentration, hemoglobin concentration, and B-type natriuretic peptide also significantly increased only in cases with weaning-induced pulmonary edema (9% ± 3%, 9% ± 4%, 21% ± 23%, respectively). The areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves to detect weaning-induced pulmonary edema were 0.89 (95% CI, 0.78-0.99) for extravascular lung water indexed for ideal body weight, 0.97 (0.93-1.01) for spontaneous breathing trial-induced changes in plasma protein concentration, 0.96 (0.90-1.01) for changes in hemoglobin concentration, and 0.76 (0

  18. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline Potassium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 3. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline Potassium Ferricyanide. Sangeeta Pandita Saral Baweja. Classroom Volume 21 Issue 3 March 2016 pp 285-288 ...

  19. Carbohydrates in pig nutrition - Recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Ingerslev, Anne Krog

    2016-01-01

    monomers. This approach divides carbohydrates into 3 main groups, sugars (DP1–2), oligosaccharides (DP3–9), and polysaccharides (DP ≥ 10), the latter being further divided into starch (α-1:4,1,6-D-glucans) and nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP). Dietary fiber (DF) recently has been defined as carbohydrate...... polymers with 3 and more monomeric units plus lignin, which are not hydrolyzed by the endogenous enzymes in the small intestine of humans. This physiologically based definition is broader than what classically has been considered fiber in animal nutrition and delimitates carbohydrates according...... to their potential for digestion by endogenous enzymes. Carbohydrates are the principal substrates for energy metabolism but also exert a number of other effects throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The starch structure as well as type and levels of DF influence, to a varying degree, the rate of starch digestion...

  20. The Role of Carbohydrate-Metabolizing Enzymes in Sugar Sensing and Differentiation in Sugar Beet Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hagége

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant development is influenced by changes in the levels and types of sugars produced metabolically. The normal (N, habituated organogenic (HO and habituated nonorganogenic (HNO sugar beet cell lines originate from the same mother plant but exhibit distinct levels of morphogenesis and differentiation, and contain different levels of simple carbohydrates. We aim to elucidate whether differences in the abundance and activity of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and sugar sensing/signalling help explain the different carbohydrate profiles and differentiation states of the cell lines. Using 13C NMR spectroscopy to analyze cultures of the cell lines over 28 days, we found that N cells accumulated sucrose; HO cells sucrose, glucose and fructose; and HNO cells glucose and fructose. Of three invertase isoforms, the activity of cell wall invertase (CWI was highest in all the cell lines, and CWI activity was greatest in HNO line. The specific accumulation of intracellular carbohydrates during subculture correlated strongly with CWI activity but less so with the vacuolar and cytoplasmic invertase isoforms, or with sucrose synthase activity. Cell lines showed differences in how sugars regulated invertase and sucrose synthase activity. The role of sugar sensing in the regulation of CWI activity was investigated in the cell lines using glucose and sucrose, as well as carbohydrate analogues such as mannitol, 2-O-deoxyglucose and 3-O-methylglucose. Differences in the regulation of CWI activity by carbohydrates across the three cell lines suggest that CWI can be fine-tuned according to the specific carbohydrate requirements of each line during growth. Differences in sugar signalling pathways across the cell lines were explored using glucose and sucrose in the presence of inhibitors of protein kinases or phosphatases. Taken together, our findings suggest that specific regulation of CWI activity plays an important role in determining the intracellular

  1. Conversion of carbohydrates to levulinic acid esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of converting carbohydrates into levulinic acid, a platform chemical for many chemical end products. More specifically the invention relates to a method for converting carbohydrates such as mono-, di- or polysaccharides, obtained from for example biomass...... production into a suitable levulinic acid ester in the presence of a zeolite or zeotype catalyst and a suitable alcohol, and the ester may be further converted into levulinic acid if desired....

  2. Structural and functional group transformations of carbohydrates

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    D.Sc. (Chemistry) The aim of this study was to develop new methodology for the transformation of unsaturated carbohydrates utilising organometallic compounds. The first half of the study was directed toward developing a general synthesis of complex allyltins and in determining their application to carbon-carbon bond formation. It was decided to utilise carbohydrate substrates in this regard to develop a novel method of producing glycosides...

  3. Characterization and carbohydrate specificity of pradimicin S

    OpenAIRE

    Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Dogo-Isonagie, Cajetan I.; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Balzarini, Jan; Bewley, Carole A.

    2012-01-01

    The pradimicin family of antibiotics is attracting attention due to its anti-infective properties and as a model for understanding the requirements for carbohydrate recognition by small molecules. Members of the pradimicin family are unique among natural products in their ability to bind sugars in a Ca2+-dependent manner, but the oligomerization to insoluble aggregates that occurs upon Ca2+ binding has prevented detailed characterization of their carbohydrate specificity and biologically rele...

  4. Molecular simulations of carbohydrates and protein-carbohydrate interactions: motivation, issues and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Elisa; Woods, Robert J

    2010-08-01

    The characterization of the 3D structure of oligosaccharides, their conjugates and analogs is particularly challenging for traditional experimental methods. Molecular simulation methods provide a basis for interpreting sparse experimental data and for independently predicting conformational and dynamic properties of glycans. Here, we summarize and analyze the issues associated with modeling carbohydrates, with a detailed discussion of four of the most recently developed carbohydrate force fields, reviewed in terms of applicability to natural glycans, carbohydrate-protein complexes and the emerging area of glycomimetic drugs. In addition, we discuss prospectives and new applications of carbohydrate modeling in drug discovery.

  5. Dietary Carbohydrates and Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) affect a large number of children throughout the world. Carbohydrates (which provide the majority of calories consumed in the Western diet) have been implicated both as culprits for the etiology of symptoms and as potential therapeutic agents (e.g., fiber) in childhood FGIDs. In this review, we detail how carbohydrate malabsorption may cause gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., bloating) via the physiologic effects of both increased osmotic activity and increased gas production from bacterial fermentation. Several factors may play a role, including: (1) the amount of carbohydrate ingested; (2) whether ingestion is accompanied by a meal or other food; (3) the rate of gastric emptying (how quickly the meal enters the small intestine); (4) small intestinal transit time (the time it takes for a meal to enter the large intestine after first entering the small intestine); (5) whether the meal contains bacteria with enzymes capable of breaking down the carbohydrate; (6) colonic bacterial adaptation to one's diet, and (7) host factors such as the presence or absence of visceral hypersensitivity. By detailing controlled and uncontrolled trials, we describe how there is a general lack of strong evidence supporting restriction of individual carbohydrates (e.g., lactose, fructose) for childhood FGIDs. We review emerging evidence suggesting that a more comprehensive restriction of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) may be effective. Finally, we review how soluble fiber (a complex carbohydrate) supplementation via randomized controlled intervention trials in childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders has demonstrated efficacy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Carbohydrate Nutrition and Team Sport Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Clyde; Rollo, Ian

    2015-11-01

    The common pattern of play in 'team sports' is 'stop and go', i.e. where players perform repeated bouts of brief high-intensity exercise punctuated by lower intensity activity. Sprints are generally 2-4 s long and recovery between sprints is of variable length. Energy production during brief sprints is derived from the degradation of intra-muscular phosphocreatine and glycogen (anaerobic metabolism). Prolonged periods of multiple sprints drain muscle glycogen stores, leading to a decrease in power output and a reduction in general work rate during training and competition. The impact of dietary carbohydrate interventions on team sport performance have been typically assessed using intermittent variable-speed shuttle running over a distance of 20 m. This method has evolved to include specific work to rest ratios and skills specific to team sports such as soccer, rugby and basketball. Increasing liver and muscle carbohydrate stores before sports helps delay the onset of fatigue during prolonged intermittent variable-speed running. Carbohydrate intake during exercise, typically ingested as carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions, is also associated with improved performance. The mechanisms responsible are likely to be the availability of carbohydrate as a substrate for central and peripheral functions. Variable-speed running in hot environments is limited by the degree of hyperthermia before muscle glycogen availability becomes a significant contributor to the onset of fatigue. Finally, ingesting carbohydrate immediately after training and competition will rapidly recover liver and muscle glycogen stores.

  7. Two weeks of metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle of AMPK kinase dead but not wild type mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jonas Møller; Larsen, Steen; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2013-01-01

    signaling. We investigated this by two weeks of oral metformin treatment of muscle specific kinase dead a(2) (KD) AMPK mice and wild type (WT) littermates. We measured mitochondrial respiration and protein activity and expressions of key enzymes involved in mitochondrial carbohydrate and fat metabolism...

  8. Discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction in the general population with dyspnea by plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogelvang, R; Goetze, JP; Schnohr, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to determine whether measurement of plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP) could be used in discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dyspnea in the general population. BACKGROUND: Natriuretic peptides are useful markers in ruling out acute cardiac...... the expected concentration of plasma proBNP based on age and gender was established for dyspneic subjects: an actual plasma proBNP concentration below half of the expected value ruled out left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction (sensitivity 100%, 95% CI 100% to 100%; specificity 15%, 95% CI 12...

  9. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...

  10. Functional interaction analysis of GM1-related carbohydrates and Vibrio cholerae toxins using carbohydrate microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Sup; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2012-08-07

    The development of analytical tools is important for understanding the infection mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria or viruses. In the present work, a functional carbohydrate microarray combined with a fluorescence immunoassay was developed to analyze the interactions of Vibrio cholerae toxin (ctx) proteins and GM1-related carbohydrates. Ctx proteins were loaded onto the surface-immobilized GM1 pentasaccharide and six related carbohydrates, and their binding affinities were detected immunologically. The analysis of the ctx-carbohydrate interactions revealed that the intrinsic selectivity of ctx was GM1 pentasaccharide ≫ GM2 tetrasaccharide > asialo GM1 tetrasaccharide ≥ GM3trisaccharide, indicating that a two-finger grip formation and the terminal monosaccharides play important roles in the ctx-GM1 interaction. In addition, whole cholera toxin (ctxAB(5)) had a stricter substrate specificity and a stronger binding affinity than only the cholera toxin B subunit (ctxB). On the basis of the quantitative analysis, the carbohydrate microarray showed the sensitivity of detection of the ctxAB(5)-GM1 interaction with a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 2 ng mL(-1) (23 pM), which is comparable to other reported high sensitivity assay tools. In addition, the carbohydrate microarray successfully detected the actual toxin directly secreted from V. cholerae, without showing cross-reactivity to other bacteria. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the functional carbohydrate microarray is suitable for analyzing toxin protein-carbohydrate interactions and can be applied as a biosensor for toxin detection.

  11. Analysis of Carbohydrate-Carbohydrate Interactions Using Sugar-Functionalized Silicon Nanoparticles for Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chian-Hui; Hütter, Julia; Hsu, Chien-Wei; Tanaka, Hidenori; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; De Cola, Luisa; Lepenies, Bernd; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-01-13

    Protein-carbohydrate binding depends on multivalent ligand display that is even more important for low affinity carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. Detection and analysis of these low affinity multivalent binding events are technically challenging. We describe the synthesis of dual-fluorescent sugar-capped silicon nanoparticles that proved to be an attractive tool for the analysis of low affinity interactions. These ultrasmall NPs with sizes of around 4 nm can be used for NMR quantification of coupled sugars. The silicon nanoparticles are employed to measure the interaction between the cancer-associated glycosphingolipids GM3 and Gg3 and the associated kD value by surface plasmon resonance experiments. Cell binding studies, to investigate the biological relevance of these carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions, also benefit from these fluorescent sugar-capped nanoparticles.

  12. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  13. Carbohydrates and T cells: A sweet twosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Fikri Y.; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates as T cell-activating antigens have been generating significant interest. For many years, carbohydrates were thought of as T-independent antigens, however, more recent research had demonstrated that mono- or oligosaccharides glycosidically-linked to peptides can be recognized by T cells. T cell recognition of these glycopeptides depends on the structure of both peptide and glycan portions of the antigen. Subsequently, it was discovered that natural killer T cells recognized glycolipids when presented by the antigen presenting molecule CD1d. A transformative insight into glycan-recognition by T cells occurred when zwitterionic polysaccharides were discovered to bind to and be presented by MHCII to CD4+ T cells. Based on this latter observation, the role that carbohydrate epitopes generated from glycoconjugate vaccines had in activating helper T cells was explored and it was found that these epitopes are presented to specific carbohydrate recognizing T cells through a unique mechanism. Here we review the key interactions between carbohydrate antigens and the adaptive immune system at the molecular, cellular and systems levels exploring the significant biological implications in health and disease. PMID:23757291

  14. Modifying the Dietary Carbohydrate-to-Protein Ratio Alters the Postprandial Macronutrient Oxidation Pattern in Liver of AMPK-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalvon-Demersay, Tristan; Even, Patrick C; Chaumontet, Catherine; Piedcoq, Julien; Viollet, Benoit; Gaudichon, Claire; Tomé, Daniel; Foretz, Marc; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila

    2017-09-01

    Background: Hepatic AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) activity is sensitive to the dietary carbohydrate-to-protein ratio. However, the role of AMPK in metabolic adaptations to variations in dietary macronutrients remains poorly understood. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the role of hepatic AMPK in the adaptation of energy metabolism in response to modulation of the dietary carbohydrate-to-protein ratio. Methods: Male 7-wk-old wild-type (WT) and liver AMPK-deficient (knockout) mice were fed either a normal-protein and normal-carbohydrate diet (NP-NC; 14% protein, 76% carbohydrate on an energy basis), a low-protein and high-carbohydrate diet (LP-HC; 5% protein, 85% carbohydrate), or a high-protein and low-carbohydrate diet (HP-LC; 55% protein, 35% carbohydrate) for 3 wk. During this period, after an overnight fast, metabolic parameters were measured and indirect calorimetry was performed in mice during the first hours after refeeding a 1-g calibrated meal of their own diet in order to investigate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Results: Knockout mice fed an LP-HC or HP-LC meal exhibited 24% and 8% lower amplitudes in meal-induced carbohydrate and lipid oxidation changes. By contrast, knockout mice fed an NP-NC meal displayed normal carbohydrate and lipid oxidation profiles. These mice exhibited a transient increase in hepatic triglycerides and a decrease in hepatic glycogen. These changes were associated with a 650% higher secretion of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) 2 h after refeeding. Conclusions: The consequences of hepatic AMPK deletion depend on the dietary carbohydrate-to-protein ratio. In mice fed the NP-NC diet, deletion of AMPK in the liver led to an adaptation of liver metabolism resulting in increased secretion of FGF21. These changes possibly compensated for the absence of hepatic AMPK, as these mice exhibited normal postprandial changes in carbohydrate and lipid oxidation. By contrast, in mice fed the LP-HC and HP-LC diets, the

  15. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  17. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin R. Johnson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (biomolecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Recently, interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. We focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.

  18. B-type natriuretic peptide after hormone therapy in postmenopausal women with chest pain and normal coronary angiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroaki; Nagayoshi, Yasuhiro; Soejima, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Hokamaki, Jun; Miyamoto, Shinzo; Miyazaki, Yuji; Yamabe, Hiroshige; Ogawa, Hisao

    2008-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is relatively uncommon in premenopausal women but shows a sharp increase after menopause. The decline of endogenous ovarian hormones is commonly assumed to be a major component of this phenomenon. The effects of estrogens on the vasculature have been investigated extensively in previous studies. However, the effects of estrogens on myocardial function have not been evaluated in humans. We sought to examine the effects of hormone therapy (HT) on myocardial function and cardiac natriuretic peptides in postmenopausal women with chest pain and a normal coronary angiogram. Transdermal HT (estradiol: 0.72 mg/2 d) was administered to 15 postmenopausal women with chest pain and a normal coronary angiogram (mean age, 53 y) for 12 weeks, and oral HT (conjugated equine estrogens: 0.625 mg/d) was administered to another 15 postmenopausal women (mean age, 54 y) for 12 weeks. Echocardiography or cardiac catheterization showed no cardiac dysfunction in any woman at baseline. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography, and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide was measured every 4 weeks. B-type natriuretic peptide levels increased after transdermal HT (baseline: 13.1 +/- 3.1, 4 wk: 22.1 +/- 2.9, 8 wk: 33.2 +/- 3.1, 12 wk: 38.4 +/- 3.3 pg/mL; P < 0.01 vs baseline). The levels were also augmented after oral HT (baseline: 14.1 +/- 3.8, 4 wk: 23.2 +/- 3.3, 8 wk: 35.6 +/- 3.9, 12 wk: 39.6 +/- 3.5 pg/mL; P < 0.01 vs baseline). Serial echocardiography showed no changes in ventricular function in either treatment group. At baseline the serum estradiol levels in the transdermal group were comparable with those in the oral group. The estradiol levels after HT increased in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. B-type natriuretic peptide levels increased without cardiac dysfunction, and the chest symptoms were relieved in some participants after HT. Thus, estrogen supplementation augments natriuretic peptide levels without

  19. Magnetic phase diagrams of the CrB- and FeB-type HoSi compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobinger-Papamantellos, P.; Buschow, K. H. J.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, J.

    2011-11-01

    The temperature magnetic phase diagrams of the dimorphic HoSi compound were studied by neutron diffraction. The sample comprises 35.5% CrB- ( Cmcm) and 64.5% FeB-type ( Pnma) of structure. Both phases order antiferromagnetically below TN=25 K and undergo first-order magnetic transitions at Tic=16.5 K. Their T-phase diagrams comprise a low temperature ( LT) 2.7 K- Tic and a high temperature ( HT) range Tic- TN with distinct wave vectors. The LT magnetic ordering of the CrB-type HoSi with the wave vector q1=(1/2, 0, 1/2) corresponds to a uniaxial magnetic structure, with the Ho moments along the shortest axis c. At 2.7 K the ordered moment value is 8.6(2) μ B/Ho atom. The HT ordering, described by the wave vector q2=( q2 x, 0, q2 z) with a T-variable length, corresponds to an amplitude modulated structure. The magnetic ordering of the FeB-type HoSi requires two symmetry independent vectors q3=(0, q3 y, q3 z) for the LT- and q4=( q4 x, q4 y, 0) for the HT range. Both vectors correspond to sine wave modulated structures with the Ho magnetic moments confined along the shortest axis b. The q3 vector has an almost invariable length vs. T close to ≈(0, 9/17, 1/11). At 2.7 K the amplitude of the wave is 10.9(1) μ B/Ho atom. At Ticq3 jumps to the wave vector q4=( q4 x, q4 y, 0) with a T-variable length. At 17 K q4=(0.092(1), 0.538(3), 0). Around Tic there is a narrow coexistence range of the q3 and q4 competing phases. Various models are discussed and compared with the isomorphic RSi ( R=rare earth) compounds counterparts of HoSi, a comparison that has led us to briefly review the magnetic structures available in the literature for this interesting class of compounds.

  20. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets

  1. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-06-09

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  2. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets. PMID:24212825

  3. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitha Sridharan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  4. Carbohydrate-based vaccines for oncotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Meng-Man; Wang, Yong-Shi; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2018-03-07

    Cancer is still one of the most serious threats to human worldwide. Aberrant patterns of glycosylation on the surface of cancer cells, which are correlated with various cancer development stages, can differentiate the abnormal tissues from the healthy ones. Therefore, tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) represent the desired targets for cancer immunotherapy. However, these carbohydrate antigens may not able to evoke powerful immune response to combat with cancer for their poor immunogenicity and immunotolerance. Different approaches have been developed to address these problems. In this review, we want to summarize the latest advances in TACAs based anticancer vaccines. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Carbocyclic Carbohydrate Mimics as Potential Glycosidase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanefjord, Mette; Lundt, Inge

    It has been proven that aminocyclopentanols having the aminogroup adjacent to a carbon sidechain could be potential anomer-selective glycosidase inhibitors [1]. A successful pathway for synthesising mimics to L-carbohydrates 2, by introducing nitrogen to the C6 position in compound 1, has been...... developed in our group. A similar strategy has been used for synthesising mimics of D-carbohydrates. The α,β-unsaturated lactone 3 was cyclised to compound 4 which was further transformed into 5. The nitrogen functionality in compound 7 is introduced by an Overman rearrangement of 6 and the hydroxyl...

  6. Minimally refined biomass fuel. [carbohydrate-water-alcohol mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1981-03-26

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water-solubilizes the carbohydrate; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the viscosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  7. Carbohydrates digestion and metabolism in the spiny lobster (Panulirus argus: biochemical indication for limited carbohydrate utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Rodríguez-Viera

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As other spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus is supposed to use preferentially proteins and lipids in energy metabolism, while carbohydrates are well digested but poorly utilized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate level on digestion and metabolism in the spiny lobster P. argus. We used complementary methodologies such as post-feeding flux of nutrients and metabolites, as well as measurements of α-amylase expression and activity in the digestive tract. Lobsters readily digested and absorbed carbohydrates with a time-course that is dependent on their content in diet. Lobster showed higher levels of free glucose and stored glycogen in different tissues as the inclusion of wheat flour increased. Modifications in intermediary metabolism revealed a decrease in amino acids catabolism coupled with a higher use of free glucose as carbohydrates rise up to 20%. However, this effect seems to be limited by the metabolic capacity of lobsters to use more than 20% of carbohydrates in diets. Lobsters were not able to tightly regulate α-amylase expression according to dietary carbohydrate level but exhibited a marked difference in secretion of this enzyme into the gut. Results are discussed to highlight the limitations to increasing carbohydrate utilization by lobsters. Further growout trials are needed to link the presented metabolic profiles with phenotypic outcomes.

  8. Dietary intakes, attitudes toward carbohydrates of postmenopausal women following low carbohydrate diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winham, Donna M; Collins, Courtney B; Hutchins, Andrea M

    2009-01-01

    Middle-aged women have the highest levels of obesity and comprise the largest group of dieters. Few investigators have examined how women apply weight-loss diet principles in an unsupervised setting. Dietary intakes and attitudes toward carbohydrates were examined in women who were self-reported low carbohydrate dieters (SRLCDs); these intakes and attitudes were compared with those of women who were following their normal diet (non-dieters [NDs]). A convenience sample of 29 postmenopausal women aged 45 to 65 was recruited. Data were obtained by interview, questionnaire, and direct anthropometric measurement. Descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis, and analysis of variance were used to compare groups. Although total energy and protein intakes were similar, SRLCDs consumed significantly more fat and less carbohydrate (expressed as a percentage of total energy) and more cholesterol and less fibre than did NDs. Both groups had unfavourable attitudes toward carbohydrates. The SRLCDs ate more fat than recommended. Women who are considering following a low carbohydrate diet need to know the nutritional risks of unbalanced self-designed low carbohydrate diets. Negative attitudes toward carbohydrates were not confined to dieters. Nutrition education is necessary to help consumers understand basic nutrition principles and to be more skeptical of fad diets.

  9. The ferric-reducing activity of duodenal brush-border membrane vesicles is associated with a b-type haem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pountney, D J; Raja, K B; Simpson, R J; Wrigglesworth, J M

    1999-03-01

    Rabbit brush-border membrane vesicles possess ferricyanide reducing activity. This activity is preferentially dependent on NADH as reductant, and can be stimulated by the addition of FMN. The latency of activity observed following vesicle solubilisation suggests that the responsible component is transmembranous, and partially sequestered on the inner-face of the vesicles prior to full solubilisation. Subsequent increases in detergent concentration (> 0.3% w/v lauryl maltoside) were found to be inhibitory. Ferricyanide reducing activity was effectively inhibited by the sulphydryl modifying reagents N-ethyl malemide and p-chloromercuribenzoate, but not by the flavin analogue diphenylene iodonium. The ferric-reducing activity co-purified with a b-type haem when applied to Sephacryl S-200 columns. The putative cytochrome was found to be immunologically distinct from neutrophil cytochrome b558.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Massive O- and B-type stars velocities (Simon-Diaz+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Diaz, S.; Godart, M.; Castro, N.; Herrero, A.; Aerts, C.; Puls, J.; Telting, J.; Grassitelli, L.

    2016-11-01

    The main observational sample discussed in this paper comprises high-resolution, single snapshot spectra of 431 O- and B-type Galactic stars. The IACOB database includes spectra from two different instruments: the FIES and HERMES spectrographs attached to the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope and the 1.2m Mercator telescope, respectively. Both instruments provide a complete wavelength coverage between 3800 and 7000Å (9000Å for the case of HERMES spectra), and the associated resolving power (R) of the spectra is 25000, 46000 (FIES) and 85000 (HERMES). By default, all the spectra in the IACOB database are reduced using the corresponding available pipelines (FIEStool and HermesDRS, respectively) and they are normalized by means of our own procedures implemented in IDL. (1 data file).

  11. Discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction in the general population with dyspnea by plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogelvang, R; Goetze, JP; Schnohr, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to determine whether measurement of plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP) could be used in discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dyspnea in the general population. BACKGROUND: Natriuretic peptides are useful markers in ruling out acute cardiac...... dyspnea in the emergency department, but their diagnostic significance in evaluating chronic dyspnea in the general population is unknown. METHODS: Within the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a large, community-based population study, dyspnea was evaluated by spirometry, oxygen saturation, echocardiography......, and plasma proBNP. RESULTS: Of 2,929 participants, 959 reported dyspnea. The plasma proBNP concentration was higher in the group with dyspnea (mean 17.8 pmol/l; 95% confidence interval [CI] 16.3 to 19.4 pmol/l) than in the group without (10.6 pmol/l; 95% CI 10.0 to 11.4 pmol/l; p

  12. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and long-term mortality in stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Charlotte; Grønning, Bjørn; Køber, Lars

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The level of the inactive N-terminal fragment of pro-brain (B-type) natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a strong predictor of mortality among patients with acute coronary syndromes and may be a strong prognostic marker in patients with chronic coronary heart disease as well. We assessed...... quartile was 2.4 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.5 to 4.0; Prisk factors, including the patient's age; sex; family history with respect to ischemic heart disease; the presence or absence of a history......-term mortality in patients with stable coronary disease and provides prognostic information above and beyond that provided by conventional cardiovascular risk factors and the degree of left ventricular systolic dysfunction....

  13. Natural versus commercial carbohydrate supplementation and endurance running performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Too Brandon W

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the metabolic, performance and gastrointestinal (GI effects of supplementation with a natural food product (raisins compared to a commercial product (sport chews. Methods Eleven male (29.3 ± 7.9 yrs; mean and SD runners completed three randomized trials (raisins, chews and water only separated by seven days. Each trial consisted of 80-min (75%VO2max treadmill running followed by a 5-km time trial (TT. Heart rate (HR, respiratory exchange ratio (RER, blood lactate, serum free fatty acids (FFA, glycerol and insulin, plasma glucose and creatine kinase, GI symptoms and rating of perceived exertion (RPE were recorded every 20-min. We employed a within-subject two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA for repeated measures with a Fisher’s post hoc analysis to determine significant differences. Results VO2, HR, lactate, glycerol and RPE did not differ due to treatment. Average plasma glucose was maintained at resting levels (5.3 ± 0.4 mmol·L-1 during the sub-maximal exercise bout (5.9 ± 0.6, 5.7 ± 0.6 and 5.5 ± 0.5 mmol·L-1 for chews, raisins and water respectively, and was significantly higher with chews than water only. RER and % of non-protein macronutrient oxidation derived from carbohydrate was highest with chews, followed by raisins and water was the lowest (74.4 ± 6.4, 70.0 ± 7.0 and 65.1 ± 8.7% for chews, raisins and water respectively during the sub-maximal exercise period. Serum FFA was higher in the water treatment versus both raisins and chews at 80 min of sub-maximal exercise. Serum insulin was higher with the chews than both raisins and water (5.1 ± 2.0, 3.1 ± 0.8, 1.9 ± 0.6 uU·ml-1 for chews, raisins and water respectively. Plasma creatine kinase, corrected for baseline values, for the last 40 min of the sub-maximal exercise bout, was higher with raisins compared to other treatments. The TT was faster for both carbohydrate supplements (20.6

  14. A universal protocol for photochemical covalent immobilization of intact carbohydrates for the preparation of carbohydrate microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huibin; Zhang, Yiming; Yuan, Xun; Chen, Yi; Yan, Mingdi

    2011-01-19

    A universal photochemical method has been established for the immobilization of intact carbohydrates and their analogues, and for the fabrication of carbohydrate microarrays. The method features the use of perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-modified substrates and the photochemical reaction of surface azido groups with printed carbohydrates. Various aldoses, ketoses, nonreducing sugars such as alditols, and their derivatives can be directly arrayed on the PFPA-modified chips. The lectin-recognition ability of arrayed mannose, glucose, and their oligo- and polysaccharides were confirmed using surface plasmon resonance imaging and laser-induced fluorescence imaging.

  15. A Universal Protocol for Photochemical Covalent Immobilization of Intact Carbohydrates for the Preparation of Carbohydrate Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huibin; Zhang, Yiming; Yuan, Xun; Chen, Yi; Yan, Mingdi

    2010-01-01

    A universal photochemical method has been established for the immobilization of intact carbohydrates and their analogues, and for the fabrication of carbohydrate microarrays. The method features the use of perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-modified substrates and the photochemical reaction of surface azido groups with printed carbohydrates. Various aldoses, ketoses, non-reducing sugars such as alditols and their derivatives can be directly arrayed on the PFPA-modified chips. The lectin-recognition ability of arrayed mannose, glucose and their oligo- and polysaccharides were confirmed using surface plasmon resonance imaging and laser-induced fluorescence imaging. PMID:21138274

  16. Effect of carbohydrate-protein supplement timing on acute exercise-induced muscle damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St John Noah

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To determine if timing of a supplement would have an effect on muscle damage, function and soreness. Methods Twenty-seven untrained men (21 ± 3 yrs were given a supplement before or after exercise. Subjects were randomly assigned to a pre exercise (n = 9, received carbohydrate/protein drink before exercise and placebo after, a post exercise (n = 9, received placebo before exercise and carbohydrate/protein drink after, or a control group (n = 9, received placebo before and after exercise. Subjects performed 50 eccentric quadriceps contractions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Tests for creatine kinase (CK, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC and muscle soreness were recorded before exercise and at six, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h post exercise. Repeated measures ANOVA were used to analyze data. Results There were no group by time interactions however, CK significantly increased for all groups when compared to pre exercise (101 ± 43 U/L reaching a peak at 48 h (661 ± 1178 U/L. MVC was significantly reduced at 24 h by 31.4 ± 14.0%. Muscle soreness was also significantly increased from pre exercise peaking at 48 h. Conclusion Eccentric exercise caused significant muscle damage, loss of strength, and soreness; however timing of ingestion of carbohydrate/protein supplement had no effect.

  17. Occurrence and Biocatalytic Potential of Carbohydrate Oxidases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellemond, van E.W.; Leferink, N.G.H.; Heuts, D.P.H.M.; Fraaije, M.W.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Carbohydrate oxidases are found in all kingdoms of life but are mostly found in fungi. Their natural role is not always clear. Usage of molecular oxygen as electron acceptor is not a logical choice when the enzyme is part of a catabolic pathway. This chapter provides an overview of the occurrence

  18. Carbohydrate Chemistry from Fischer to Now

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    men, are the carbohydrates, produced by plants. Green leaves produce glucose using atmospheric carbon dioxide and water with the help of chlorophyll and sunlight. ... the important milestones in the development of organic chemistry. This was preceded by the discovery of phenyl hydrazine by. Fischer in 1875. It is now ...

  19. STICS: surface-tethered iterative carbohydrate synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornsuriyasak, Papapida; Ranade, Sneha C; Li, Aixiao; Parlato, M Cristina; Sims, Charles R; Shulga, Olga V; Stine, Keith J; Demchenko, Alexei V

    2009-04-14

    A new surface-tethered iterative carbohydrate synthesis (STICS) technology is presented in which a surface functionalized 'stick' made of chemically stable high surface area porous gold allows one to perform cost efficient and simple synthesis of oligosaccharide chains; at the end of the synthesis, the oligosaccharide can be cleaved off and the stick reused for subsequent syntheses.

  20. Kiwifruit, carbohydrate availability, and the glycemic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monro, John A

    2013-01-01

    An appreciable proportion, about 10%, of the dry weight of kiwifruit consists of primary cell walls. About 80% of dry matter is available carbohydrate consisting of glucose, fructose, and sucrose, and about 10% is digestible protein. The cell wall component, being nonstarch polysaccharide, is undigested in the stomach and small intestine, so the component increases in relative concentration in the gut lumen where its physicochemical properties may be important in modulating carbohydrate digestion and absorption. Released from the constraint of fruit structure, the dietary fiber swells to four times its original volume during in vitro digestion. When the digested remnants are allowed to settle into a packed but uncompressed state, as in the gut, they reduce the rate of glucose diffusion by about 40% and profoundly reduce digesta mixing, especially in the presence of a low background of soluble viscous polysaccharide. An in vitro estimation of the glycemic index (GI) of carbohydrate in kiwifruit, and in vivo estimates show the carbohydrate to be of low GI. On a whole fruit basis because of the high water content of kiwifruit, a 100g kiwifruit would be equivalent to about 5g (1 teaspoon) of glucose in its effect on blood glucose; thus, kiwifruit have low glycemic impact and are suitable for those with diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Carbohydrate metabolism in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-27

    Jun 27, 2011 ... In order to clarify carbohydrate content and enzymes activities involved in sugar metabolism in tomato seedling leaves and yield and fruit quality under low night temperature and subsequent recovery, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Liaoyuanduoli) were grown in different climatic controlled-.

  2. Accumulation pattern of total nonstructural carbohydrate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pattern of total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) accumulation in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) nursery runner plants, cv. eCamarosaf, was determined for three growing seasons. Plant growth and fruit production patterns were also evaluated. The experiments were carried out on plants propagated in high ...

  3. Accumulation pattern of total nonstructural carbohydrate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Umukoro

    1977-09-09

    Sep 9, 1977 ... 1Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA), EEA Famaillá, Argentina. 2Department of Plant Sciences, University of California Davis, CA, USA. Accepted 17 October, 2012. The pattern of total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) accumulation in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa. Duch.) nursery ...

  4. The carbohydrate moiety of house dust allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morris, J.H.; Berrens, L.; Young, E.

    1965-01-01

    Purified house dust allergen has been found to contain monosaccharides of plant and animal origin, and has been partially fractionated by DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography. The carbohydrate is highly branched, suffering little attack during periodate oxidation. Furanose configuration for a

  5. Profiling of carbohydrate polymers in biotechnology using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analysis of carbohydrate polymers is very demanding and challenging because of the similar physical and chemical properties they possess. Enzymatic hydrolysis is employed to cleave the polymers. The use of enzymes in analytical chemistry requires an analytical system that has on-line capability, is fast, ...

  6. Carbohydrate Chemistry from Fischer to Now

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field of natural products chemistry is presented with appro- ..... of the group classified as modified monosaccharides. Its. N-acetyl derivative is the sole constituent of the polysaccharide, chitin, which occurs in the shell of the lobster, the cockroach ..... One of the earliest carbohydrate-based drugs to be used in clinical practice ...

  7. The clinical impact of carbohydrate malabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Malabsorption of carbohydrates such as fructose, lactose or sorbitol can often be detected among patients suffering from so-called non specific abdominal complaints. Sometimes the differential diagnosis may be difficult. So far successful treatment consists of dietary interventions only. Nevertheless, many questions are remaining still unanswered. Copyright © 2011 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of carbohydrate fractions and fermentation quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-29

    Aug 29, 2011 ... This experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of adding fast-sile (FS), previous fermented .... DM: Dry matter, WSC: water soluble carbohydrate, NDF: neutral detergent fiber, ADF: acid detergent fiber, ADL: acid detergent lignin, C: ..... ment, which included starch, cell wall and so on (Ohyama.

  9. Nutrient and carbohydrate partitioning in sorghum stover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.M.; Hons, F.M.; McBee, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] stover has been demonstrated to be a potential biomass energy source. Complete aboveground crop removal, however, can result in soil degradation. Differential dry matter, nutrient, and carbohydrate partitioning by sorghum cultivars may allow management strategies that return certain parts to the field while removing other portions for alternative uses, such as energy production. A field study was conducted to determine N,P,K, nonstructural carbohydrate, cellulose hemicellulose, and lignin distributions in stover of three diverse sorghum cultivars of differing harvest indices. Determinations were based on total vegetative biomass; total blades; total stalks; and upper middle, and lower blades and stalks. Concentrations of N and P were higher in blades than stalks and generally declines from upper to lower stover parts. Large carbohydrate and lignin concentration differences were observed on the basis of cultivar and stover part. Greater nutrient partitioning to the upper third of the intermediate and forage-type sorghum stovers was observed as compared to the conventional grain cultivar. Stover carbohydrates for all cultivars were mainly contained in the lower two-thirds of the stalk fraction. A system was proposed for returning upper stover portion to soil, while removing remaining portions for alternative uses

  10. Carbohydrates and gibberellins relationship in potato tuberization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ševčíková, H.; Mašková, P.; Tarkowská, Danuše; Mašek, T.; Lipavská, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 214, JUL (2017), s. 53-63 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-34792S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Carbohydrate distribution * Gibberellin * Photoautotrophic cultivation * Potato * Tuberization Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 3.121, year: 2016

  11. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline Potassium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    and yellow colour appears. Initial colour remains but fades. Orange colour appears. Yellow colour appears. Carbohydrates. Monosaccharide. Disaccharide. + Alkaline ferricyanide (shake for 5 minutes). Colour disappears. Colour does not disappear. Put the test tube in boiling water for 10 seconds. Put the test tube in boiling.

  12. Particulate carbohydrates in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Nandakumar, K.; Venkat, K.

    Particulate matter collected from 77 water samples over a 3000 m water column was analyzed for particulate carbohydrates (PCHO). PCHO in the surface waters ranged from 43 to 143 mu g.l-1, and below 250 m it was 16.PCHO showed large variations at all...

  13. Carbohydrate secretion by phototrophic communities in tidal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winder, B.; Staats, N.; Stal, L.J.; Paterson, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Two different benthic phototrophic communities on tidal flats were investigated for their carbohydrate content and distribution. Carbohydrates were analysed as two operationally defined fractions, related to the difficulty of extraction from the sediment matrix. Water-soluble (colloidal) and EDTA-

  14. Carbohydrate intake considerations for young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montfort-Steiger, Veronica; Williams, Craig A

    2007-09-01

    Good nutritional practices are important for exercise performance and health during all ages. Athletes and especially growing children engaged in heavy training have higher energy and nutrient requirements compared to their non-active counterparts. Scientific understanding of sports nutrition for the young athlete is lacking behind the growing number of young athletes engaged in sports. Most of the sports nutrition recommendations given to athletic children and adolescents are based on adult findings due to the deficiency in age specific information in young athletes. Therefore, this review reflects on child specific sports nutrition, particularly on carbohydrate intake and metabolism that distinguishes the child athlete from the adult athlete. Children are characterised to be in an insulin resistance stage during certain periods of maturation, have different glycolytic/metabolic responses during exercise, have a tendency for higher fat oxidation during exercise and show different heat dissipation mechanisms compared to adults. These features point out that young athletes may need different nutritional advice on carbohydrate for exercise to those from adult athletes. Sport drinks for example may need to be adapted to children specific needs. However, more research in this area is warranted to clarify sports nutrition needs of the young athlete to provide better and healthy nutritional guidance to young athletes. Key pointsAthletic girls show lower carbohydrate intakes compared to boys.Substrate oxidation during exercise appears to be maturity related, fat being the preferred fuel for oxidation in younger athletic children.Children appear to have lower endogenous but greater exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates during exercise.Carbohydrate intake during exercise appears to show no additional performance improvement in young athletes. Perhaps fat intake or a combination of both nutrients may be a better approach for nutrient supplementation during exercise

  15. Hyper-Assembly of Self-Assembled Glycoclusters Mediated by Specific Carbohydrate-Carbohydrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gengwei; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Yanaka, Saeko; Sato, Sota; Fujita, Makoto; Kato, Koichi

    2017-05-04

    Hybridization of a self-assembled, spherical complex with oligosaccharides containing Lewis X, a functional trisaccharide displayed on various cell surfaces, yielded well-defined glycoclusters. The self-assembled glycoclusters exhibited homophilic hyper-assembly in aqueous solution in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner through specific carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions, offering a structural scaffold for functional biomimetic systems. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Pyrrolic tripodal receptors for carbohydrates. Role of functional groups and binding geometry on carbohydrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciarini, Martina; Nativi, Cristina; Norcini, Martina; Staderini, Samuele; Francesconi, Oscar; Roelens, Stefano

    2011-02-21

    The contribution from several H-bonding groups and the impact of geometric requirements on the binding ability of benzene-based tripodal receptors toward carbohydrates have been investigated by measuring the affinity of a set of structures toward octyl β-D-glucopyranoside, selected as a representative monosaccharide. The results reported in the present study demonstrate that a judicious choice of correct geometry and appropriate functional groups is critical to achieve the complementary hydrogen bonding interactions required for an effective carbohydrate recognition.

  17. Chemoselective Reactions for the Synthesis of Glycoconjugates from Unprotected Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Klaus; Martos Maldonado, Manuel Cristo; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Glycobiology is the comprehensive biological investigation of carbohydrates. The study of the role and function of complex carbohydrates often requires the attachment of carbohydrates to surfaces, their tagging with fluorophores, or their conversion into natural or non-natural glycoconjugates......, such as glycopeptides or glycolipids. Glycobiology and its “omics”, glycomics, require easy and robust chemical methods for the construction of these glycoconjugates. This review gives an overview of the rapidly expanding field of chemical reactions that selectively convert unprotected carbohydrates...

  18. The effect of stereochemistry on carbohydrate hydration in aqueous solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galema, Saskia Alexandra

    1992-01-01

    Although-carbohydrates are widely used, not much is known about the stereochemical aspects of hydration of carbohydrates. For D-aldohexoses, for example, there are eight different stereoisomers. Just how the hydroxy topology of a carbohydrate molecule influences the hydration behaviour in water is

  19. Interactions of carbohydrates and proteins by fluorophore-assisted ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A sensitive, specific, and rapid method for the detection of carbohydrate-protein interactions is demonstrated by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE). The procedure is simple and the cost is low. The advantage of this method is that carbohydrate-protein interactions can be easily displayed by FACE, ...

  20. Medium-term carbohydrate tolerance improves and then ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It has been reported that carbohydrate metabolism does not deteriorate in pregnancy in the African, an observation at variance with general teaching. Objective: To determine the effect of pregnancy on medium term carbohydrate metabolism. Methods: Medium term carbohydrate metabolism was evaluated in ...

  1. Testing the Wind-shock Paradigm for B-Type Star X-Ray Production with θ Car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, T. F.; Petit, V.; Cohen, D.; Leutenegger, M.

    2017-11-01

    We present Chandra X-ray grating spectroscopy of the B0.2V star, θ Carina. θ Car is in a critical transition region between the latest O-type and earliest B-type stars, where some stars are observed to have UV-determined wind densities much lower than theoretically expected (e.g., Marcolino et al. 2009). In general, X-ray emission in this low-density wind regime should be less prominent than for O-stars (e.g., Martins et al. 2005), but observations suggest a higher than expected X-ray emission filling factor (Lucy 2012; Huenemoerder et al. 2012); if a larger fraction of the wind is shock-heated, it could explain the weak UV wind signature seen in weak wind stars, but this might severely challenge predictions of radiatively-driven wind theory. We measured the line widths of several He-, H-like and Fe ions and the f/i ratio of He-like ions in the X-ray spectrum, which improves upon the results from Nazé et al. (2008) (XMM-Newton RGS) with additional measurements (Chandra HETG) of Mgxi and Sixiii by further constraining the X-ray emission location. The f/i ratio is modified by the proximity to the UV-emitting stellar photosphere, and is therefore a diagnostic of the radial location of the X-ray emitting plasma. The measured widths of X-ray lines are narrow, <300 km s-1 and the f/i ratios place the X-rays relatively close to the surface, both implying θ Car is a weak wind star. The measured widths are also consistent with other later-type stars in the weak wind regime, β Cru (Cohen et al. 2008), for example, and are smaller on average than earlier weak wind stars such as μ Col (Huenemoerder et al. 2012). This could point to a spectral type divide, where one hypothesis, low density, works for early-B type stars and the other hypothesis, a larger fraction of shock-heated gas, explains weak winds in late-O type stars. Archival IUE data still needs to be analyzed to determine the mass loss rate and hydrodynamical simulations will be compared with observations to

  2. The Recruitment of AMP-activated Protein Kinase to Glycogen Is Regulated by Autophosphorylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Chanda, Dipanjan; Scholz, Roland; Thali, Ramon F.; Tuerk, Roland; Stapleton, David I.; Gooley, Paul R.; Neumann, Dietbert

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an obligatory αβγ heterotrimeric complex carrying a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) in the β-subunit (AMPKβ) capable of attaching AMPK to glycogen. Nonetheless, AMPK localizes at many different cellular compartments, implying the existence of mechanisms that prevent AMPK from glycogen binding. Cell-free carbohydrate binding assays revealed that AMPK autophosphorylation abolished its carbohydrate-binding capacity. X-ray structural data of the CBM displays the central positioning of threonine 148 within the binding pocket. Substitution of Thr-148 for a phospho-mimicking aspartate (T148D) prevents AMPK from binding to carbohydrate. Overexpression of isolated CBM or β1-containing AMPK in cellular models revealed that wild type (WT) localizes to glycogen particles, whereas T148D shows a diffuse pattern. Pharmacological AMPK activation and glycogen degradation by glucose deprivation but not forskolin enhanced cellular Thr-148 phosphorylation. Cellular glycogen content was higher if pharmacological AMPK activation was combined with overexpression of T148D mutant relative to WT AMPK. In summary, these data show that glycogen-binding capacity of AMPKβ is regulated by Thr-148 autophosphorylation with likely implications in the regulation of glycogen turnover. The findings further raise the possibility of regulated carbohydrate-binding function in a wider variety of CBM-containing proteins. PMID:25792737

  3. The recruitment of AMP-activated protein kinase to glycogen is regulated by autophosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Chanda, Dipanjan; Scholz, Roland; Thali, Ramon F; Tuerk, Roland; Stapleton, David I; Gooley, Paul R; Neumann, Dietbert

    2015-05-01

    The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an obligatory αβγ heterotrimeric complex carrying a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) in the β-subunit (AMPKβ) capable of attaching AMPK to glycogen. Nonetheless, AMPK localizes at many different cellular compartments, implying the existence of mechanisms that prevent AMPK from glycogen binding. Cell-free carbohydrate binding assays revealed that AMPK autophosphorylation abolished its carbohydrate-binding capacity. X-ray structural data of the CBM displays the central positioning of threonine 148 within the binding pocket. Substitution of Thr-148 for a phospho-mimicking aspartate (T148D) prevents AMPK from binding to carbohydrate. Overexpression of isolated CBM or β1-containing AMPK in cellular models revealed that wild type (WT) localizes to glycogen particles, whereas T148D shows a diffuse pattern. Pharmacological AMPK activation and glycogen degradation by glucose deprivation but not forskolin enhanced cellular Thr-148 phosphorylation. Cellular glycogen content was higher if pharmacological AMPK activation was combined with overexpression of T148D mutant relative to WT AMPK. In summary, these data show that glycogen-binding capacity of AMPKβ is regulated by Thr-148 autophosphorylation with likely implications in the regulation of glycogen turnover. The findings further raise the possibility of regulated carbohydrate-binding function in a wider variety of CBM-containing proteins. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Release kinetics of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in a clinical model of acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebetrau, Christoph; Gaede, Luise; Dörr, Oliver; Troidl, Christian; Voss, Sandra; Hoffmann, Jedrzej; Paszko, Agata; Weber, Michael; Rolf, Andreas; Hamm, Christian; Nef, Holger; Möllmann, Helge

    2014-02-15

    N-terminal segment of B-type natriuretic peptide prohormone (NT-proBNP) is elevated in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) thus providing both diagnostic information and prognostic information. The aim of the present study was to determine the time course of NT-proBNP release in patients undergoing transcoronary ablation of septal hypertrophy (TASH) a procedure mimicking AMI. We analyzed the release kinetics of NT-proBNP in 18 consecutive patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy undergoing TASH. Serum samples were collected prior to and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, and 105 min, and 2, 4, 8, and 24h after TASH. NT-proBNP concentrations showed a continuous increase during the first 75 min with a significant percent change compared to baseline value already 15 min after TASH (105.6% [IQR 102.2-112.7]; Pmax]: 103.5-137.2%; range of absolute increase [min-max]: 23.5-304.0 ng/L). NT-proBNP concentrations decreased below the baseline value until the 8th h after initiation of myocardial infarction. NT-proBNP concentration increases immediately after induction of myocardial infarction proving early evidence of myocardial injury despite the decrease of the left ventricular wall stress due to the TASH related reduction of the left ventricular outflow gradient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The A- and B-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from Drosophila melanogaster couple to different second messenger pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin; Folke, Jonas; Hauser, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine and blocked by several antagonists, among them atropine. In mammals five mAChRs (m1-m5) exist of which m1, m3, and m5 are coupled to members of the Gq...... to classical antagonists such as atropine. Here, we find that the D. melanogaster A-type mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 and D. melanogaster B-type mAChR to Gi/0. Furthermore, by comparing the second and third intracellular loops of all animal mAChRs for which the G protein coupling has been established, we could...... identify several amino acid residues likely to be specific for either Gq/11 or Gi/0 coupling. Using these hallmarks for specific mAChR G protein interaction we found that all protostomes with a sequenced genome have one mAChR coupled to Gq/11 and one to four mAChRs coupled to Gi/0. Furthermore...

  6. Troponin T and N-terminal pro B-Type natriuretic peptide and presence of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Mette R; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Carlsen, Christian M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the effects of exercise intensity, sampling intervals, degree of coronary artery stenosis, and demographic factors on circulating N-terminal pro B-Type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and cardiac Troponin T (cTnT) in subjects suspected of coronary artery disease (CAD......). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 242 subjects referred for diagnostic evaluation of possible CAD had blood samples obtained before, 5 min after, and again 20 h after a symptom-limited exercise test. RESULTS: Totally 40 subjects had CAD with ≥ 50% stenosis, 115 subjects had no stenosis and 87 subjects...... similarly after exercise in CAD-subjects, non-CAD-subjects, and controls (median increase 8.14 ng/L) and the increase was positively associated with baseline NT-pro-BNP but not presence of CAD. Median baseline cTnT was 6.25 ng/L in CAD-subjects and 3.00 ng/L in non-CAD-subjects as well as controls, both p...

  7. Synthesis of chiral dopants based on carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Toru; Koyama, Tetsuo; Yasutake, Mikio; Hatano, Ken; Matsuoka, Koji

    2014-07-01

    Chiral dopants based on carbohydrates for nematic liquid crystals were synthesized from D-glucose, and their helical twisting power (HTP) values were evaluated. The chiral dopants induced helices in the host nematic liquid crystals. An acetyl derivative having an ether-type glycosidic linkage between carbohydrate and a mesogenic moiety showed the highest HTP value of 10.4 μm(-1), while an acetyl derivative having an anomeric ester-type linkage did not show any HTP. It was surprising that this molecule had no HTP despite the presence of chirality in the molecule. A relationship between HTP and specific rotation was not observed in this study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of carbohydrate metabolism in grass tetany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.K.; Madsen, F.C.; Lentz, D.E.; Hansard, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Clinical hypomagnesemia is confined primarily to beef cattle in the United States but also occurs in dairy cattle in other countries, probably due to different management practices. During periods when grass tetany is likely, early vegetative temperate zone grasses are usually low in total readily available carbohydrates and magnesium but high in potassium and nitrogen. The tetany syndrome may include hypoglycemia and ketosis, suggesting an imbalance in intermediary energy metabolism. Many enzyme systems critical to cellular metabolism, including those which hydrolyze and transfer phosphate groups, are activated by Mg. Thus, by inference, Mg is required for normal glucose utilization, fat, protein, nucleic acid and coenzyme synthesis, muscle contraction, methyl group transfer, and sulfate, acetate, and formate activation. Numerous clinical and experimental studies suggest an intimate relationship between metabolism of Mg and that of carbohydrate, glucagon, and insulin. The objective is to review this literature and suggest ways in which these relationships might contribute to a chain of events leading to grass tetany.

  9. Carbohydrates and the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassard, Christophe; Lacroix, Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Due to its scale and its important role in maintaining health, the gut microbiota can be considered as a 'new organ' inside the human body. Many complex carbohydrates are degraded and fermented by the human gut microbiota in the large intestine to both yield basic energy salvage and impact gut health through produced metabolites. This review will focus on the gut microbes and microbial mechanisms responsible for polysaccharides degradation and fermentation in the large intestine. Gut microbes and bacterial metabolites impact the host at many levels, including modulation of inflammation, and glucose and lipid metabolisms. A complex relationship occurs in the intestine between the human gut microbiota, diet and the host. Research on carbohydrates and gut microbiota composition and functionality is fast developing and will open opportunities for prevention and treatment of obesity, diabetes and other related metabolic disorders through manipulation of the gut ecosystem.

  10. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials derived from carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Dinesh; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2010-02-01

    A tremendous growth in the field of carbon nanomaterials has led to the emergence of carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, mesoporous carbon and more recently graphene. Some of these materials have found applications in electronics, sensors, catalysis, drug delivery, composites, and so forth. The high temperatures and hydrocarbon precursors involved in their synthesis usually yield highly inert graphitic surfaces. As some of the applications require functionalization of their inert graphitic surface with groups like -COOH, -OH, and -NH(2), treatment of these materials in oxidizing agents and concentrated acids become inevitable. More recent works have involved using precursors like carbohydrates to produce carbon nanostructures rich in functional groups in a single-step under hydrothermal conditions. These carbon nanostructures have already found many applications in composites, drug delivery, materials synthesis, and Li ion batteries. The review aims to highlight some of the recent developments in the application of carbohydrate derived carbon nanostructures and also provide an outlook of their future prospects.

  11. Solubility of carbohydrates in heavy water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Marcus V C; Carvalho, Larissa V C; Sabadini, Edvaldo

    2012-05-15

    The solubility of several mono-(glucose and xylose), di-(sucrose and maltose), tri-(raffinose) and cyclic (α-cyclodextrin) saccharides in H(2)O and in D(2)O were measured over a range of temperatures. The solution enthalpies for the different carbohydrates in the two solvents were determined using the vant' Hoff equation and the values in D(2)O are presented here for the first time. Our findings indicate that the replacement of H(2)O by D(2)O remarkably decreases the solubilities of the less soluble carbohydrates, such as maltose, raffinose and α-cyclodextrin. On the other hand, the more soluble saccharides, glucose, xylose, and sucrose, are practically insensitive to the H/D replacement in water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 1 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2002-10-15

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 1 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

  13. Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2003-03-04

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

  14. A rapid stereoselective synthesis of fluorinated carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, M.J.; Neeser, J-R.; Hall, L.D.; Pate, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    Acetyl hypofluorite has been added to six unsaturated carbohydrates which contain the vinyl ether moiety. All reactions were rapid (less than 5 min.) at -78 degrees C and gave, with one exception, high yields of isomerically pure products. The hypofluorite was shown to add exclusively in a cis mode and with a strong preference for a particular 'face' of the double bond. As well as the syntheses, NMR data and preferred conformations for the fluorinated products are also discussed

  15. Hearing Loss, Dizziness, and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Albernaz, Pedro L. Mangabeira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Metabolic activity of the inner ear is very intense, and makes it sensitive to changes in the body homeostasis. This study involves a group of patients with inner ear disorders related to carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and episodes of vertigo. Objectives To describe the symptoms of metabolic inner ear disorders and the examinations required to establish diagnoses. These symptoms are often the first to allow for an e...

  16. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lütteke, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The article summarizes the information that is gained from and the errors that are found in carbohydrate structures in the Protein Data Bank. Validation tools that can locate these errors are described. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbohydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures

  17. Hearing Loss, Dizziness, and Carbohydrate Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albernaz, Pedro L Mangabeira

    2016-07-01

    Metabolic activity of the inner ear is very intense, and makes it sensitive to changes in the body homeostasis. This study involves a group of patients with inner ear disorders related to carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and episodes of vertigo. To describe the symptoms of metabolic inner ear disorders and the examinations required to establish diagnoses. These symptoms are often the first to allow for an early diagnosis of metabolic disorders and diabetes. Retrospective study of 376 patients with inner ear symptoms suggestive of disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism. The authors present patientś clinical symptoms and clinical evaluations, with emphasis on the glucose and insulin essays. Authors based their conclusions on otolaryngological findings, diagnostic procedures and treatment principles. They found that auditory and vestibular symptoms usually occur prior to other manifestations of metabolic changes, leading to an early diagnosis of hyperinsulinemia, intestinal sugar malabsorption or diabetes. Previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus type II was found in 39 patients. The identification of carbohydrate metabolism disturbances is important not only to minimize the patients' clinical symptoms, but also to help maintain their general health.

  18. Hearing Loss, Dizziness, and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albernaz, Pedro L. Mangabeira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Metabolic activity of the inner ear is very intense, and makes it sensitive to changes in the body homeostasis. This study involves a group of patients with inner ear disorders related to carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and episodes of vertigo. Objectives To describe the symptoms of metabolic inner ear disorders and the examinations required to establish diagnoses. These symptoms are often the first to allow for an early diagnosis of metabolic disorders and diabetes. Methods Retrospective study of 376 patients with inner ear symptoms suggestive of disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism. The authors present patientś clinical symptoms and clinical evaluations, with emphasis on the glucose and insulin essays. Results Authors based their conclusions on otolaryngological findings, diagnostic procedures and treatment principles. They found that auditory and vestibular symptoms usually occur prior to other manifestations of metabolic changes, leading to an early diagnosis of hyperinsulinemia, intestinal sugar malabsorption or diabetes. Previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus type II was found in 39 patients. Conclusions The identification of carbohydrate metabolism disturbances is important not only to minimize the patients' clinical symptoms, but also to help maintain their general health.

  19. Changes in plasma levels of B-type natriuretic peptide with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimura K

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Koichi Nishimura,1 Takashi Nishimura,2 Katsuya Onishi,3 Toru Oga,4 Yoshinori Hasegawa,5 Paul W Jones61Department of Pulmonary Medicine, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Japan; 2Kyoto-Katsura Hospital, Kyoto, Japan; 3Onishi Heart Clinic, Tsu, Japan; 4Department of Respiratory Care and Sleep Control Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; 5Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan; 6Division of Clinical Science, St George's Hospital Medical School, London, EnglandBackground: Elevated plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP levels and their association with heart failure have been reported in subjects with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD.Purpose: To examine and compare plasma BNP levels and diastolic and systolic dysfunction in subjects with AECOPD and stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Methods: In all, 87 unselected consecutive hospitalizations due to AECOPD in 61 subjects and a total of 190 consecutive subjects with stable COPD were recruited. Plasma BNP levels were compared cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Transthoracic echocardiographic examinations were also performed in the hospitalized subjects.Results: In the hospitalized subjects, the median plasma BNP level (interquartile range was 55.4 (26.9–129.3 pg/mL and was higher than that of patients with stable COPD: 18.3 (10.0–45.3 for Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease grade I; 25.8 (11.0–53.7 for grade II; 22.1 (9.1–52.6 for grade III; and 17.2 (9.6–22.9 pg/mL for grade IV, all P<0.001. In 15 subjects studied prospectively, the median plasma BNP level was 19.4 (9.8–32.2 pg/mL before AECOPD, 72.7 (27.7–146.3 pg/mL during AECOPD, and 14.6 (12.9–39.0 pg/mL after AECOPD (P<0.0033 and P<0.0013, respectively. Median plasma BNP levels during AECOPD were significantly higher in

  20. Glycosynapses: microdomains controlling carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senitiroh Hakomori

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of microdomains in plasma membranes was developed over two decades, following observation of polarity of membrane based on clustering of specific membrane components. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion with concurrent signal transduction that affect cellular phenotype are termed "glycosynapse". Three types of glycosynapse have been distinguished: "type 1" having glycosphingolipid associated with signal transducers (small G-proteins, cSrc, Src family kinases and proteolipids; "type 2" having O-linked mucin-type glycoprotein associated with Src family kinases; and "type 3" having N-linked integrin receptor complexed with tetraspanin and ganglioside. Different cell types are characterized by presence of specific types of glycosynapse or their combinations, whose adhesion induces signal transduction to either facilitate or inhibit signaling. E.g., signaling through type 3 glycosynapse inhibits cell motility and differentiation. Glycosynapses are distinct from classically-known microdomains termed "caveolae", "caveolar membrane", or more recently "lipid raft", which are not involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion. Type 1 and type 3 glycosynapses are resistant to cholesterol-binding reagents, whereas structure and function of "caveolar membrane" or "lipid raft" are disrupted by these reagents. Various data indicate a functional role of glycosynapses during differentiation, development, and oncogenic transformation.O conceito de microdomínios em membrana plasmática foi desenvolvido há mais de duas décadas, após a observação da polaridade da membrana baseada no agrupamento de componentes específicos da membrana. Microdomínios envolvidos na adesão celular dependente de carboidrato, com transdução de sinal que afeta o fenótipo celular são denominados ''glicosinapses''. Três tipos de glicosinapse foram observados: ''tipo 1'' que possue glicoesfingolipídio associado com transdutores de sinal

  1. Oriented growth due to topotactic replacement of antigorite by olivine as a mechanism for the formation of B-type olivine CPO in convergent margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, T.; Wallis, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Michibayashi, K.; Mizukami, T.

    2012-12-01

    B-type olivine (Ol) CPO patterns are characterized by an a-axis concentration parallel to the intermediate principle axis of strain and have been proposed by many workers as the cause of seismic anisotropy in the mantle wedge of subduction zones that shows the fast direction perpendicular to the plate movement direction. Experimental work has shown that B-type Ol CPO can form by dislocation creep at relatively high stresses and in the presence of water. Natural examples of B-type Ol CPO have also been reported, but there are several discrepancies with the experimental results. 1) Some natural B-type CPO formed at relatively high temperatures and low stress outside the ranges predicted by experiments. 2) Natural examples lack evidence for the c-slip expected for the formation of B-type Ol CPO by dislocation creep. 3) The high shear stresses expected along subduction boundaries promote the formation of B-type Ol CPO, but these regions are also expected to be associated with the formation of serpentine minerals and even relatively small amounts prevent strong CPO patterns from forming because of grain-boundary sliding occurring between Ol and serpentine. We show B-type Ol CPO can form as a result of static topotactic growth of olivine after high-temperature breakdown of antigorite (Atg) schist. In the Happo-One region of the Hida Marginal belt, Japan, dehydration of foliated Atg produces non-deformed secondary Ol formed in veins or patches and peridotite-hornfels where the conversion is complete.The CPO of non-deformed Ol in veins and in the hornfels shows a strong B-type fabric. The veins show consistent Ol CPO irrespective of the vein orientation, implying the CPO is not related to the vein opening direction. The CPO of Atg bordering the vein Ol shows a strong concentration of c-axes at a high angle to the foliation and a strong alignment of b-axes parallel to the lineation. Numerous recent studies have shown this type of Atg CPO is the most widespread in the

  2. Ultraviolet B-Induced Maturation of CD11b-Type Langerin- Dendritic Cells Controls the Expansion of Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells in the Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Odanaka, Mizuyu; Nishioka, Akiko; Kasuya, Saori; Shime, Hiroaki; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Imai, Masaki; Riethmacher, Dieter; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Ohkura, Naganari; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Morita, Akimichi

    2018-01-01

    Skin dendritic cells (DCs) are divided into several subsets with distinctive functions. This study shows a previously unappreciated role of dermal CD11b-type Langerin - DCs in maintaining immunological self-tolerance after UVB exposure. After UVB exposure, dermal CD11b-type Langerin - DCs upregulated surface CD86 expression, induced proliferation of Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells without exogenous Ags, and upregulated a set of genes associated with immunological tolerance. This Treg-expansion activity was significantly hampered by CD80/CD86 blockade in vivo. These results indicate that CD11b-type Langerin - DCs from the UVB-exposed skin are specialized to expand Treg cells in the skin, which suppress autoimmunity. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Biodesign of a renal-protective peptide based on alternative splicing of B-type natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuchong; Chen, Horng H; Dickey, Deborah M; Boerrigter, Guido; Lee, Candace; Kleppe, Laurel S; Hall, Jennifer L; Lerman, Amir; Redfield, Margaret M; Potter, Lincoln R; Burnett, John C; Simari, Robert D

    2009-07-07

    Alternative RNA splicing may provide unique opportunities to identify drug targets and therapeutics. We identified an alternative spliced transcript for B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) resulting from intronic retention. This transcript is present in failing human hearts and is reduced following mechanical unloading. The intron-retained transcript would generate a unique 34 amino acid (aa) carboxyl terminus while maintaining the remaining structure of native BNP. We generated antisera to this carboxyl terminus and identified immunoreactivity in failing human heart tissue. The alternatively spliced peptide (ASBNP) was synthesized and unlike BNP, failed to stimulate cGMP in vascular cells or vasorelax preconstricted arterial rings. This suggests that ASBNP may lack the dose-limiting effects of recombinant BNP. Given structural considerations, a carboxyl-terminal truncated form of ASBNP was generated (ASBNP.1) and was determined to retain the ability of BNP to stimulate cGMP in canine glomerular isolates and cultured human mesangial cells but lacked similar effects in vascular cells. In a canine-pacing model of heart failure, systemic infusion of ASBNP.1 did not alter mean arterial pressure but increased the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), suppressed plasma renin and angiotensin, while inducing natriuresis and diuresis. Consistent with its distinct in vivo effects, the activity of ASBNP.1 may not be explained through binding and activation of NPR-A or NPR-B. Thus, the biodesigner peptide ASBNP.1 enhances GFR associated with heart failure while lacking the vasoactive properties of BNP. These findings demonstrate that peptides with unique properties may be designed based on products of alternatively splicing.

  4. Expression and regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 in the rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalei; Meng, Chenling; Wei, Quanwei; Shi, Fangxiong; Mao, Dagan

    2015-04-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) preferentially mediates the selective uptake of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol ester and the delivery of cholesterol for steroidogenesis. Although multiple analyses have investigated the function of SR-B1 in the liver, adrenal and ovary, its expression in rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle is lacking. In the present study, real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to investigate SR-B1 expression in the rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle. The results demonstrated that ovarian SR-B1 expression was in a stage-dependent manner, continuously increased from proestrus and kept elevated during metoestrus, while uterine SR-B1 expression decreased from proestrus to diestrus. To determine whether ovarian and uterine SR-B1 expression were affected by sex steroid hormones, immature rats were treated with 17 β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), or their antagonists from postnatal days 24-26. Results showed that the levels of SR-B1 mRNA and protein were significantly up-regulated by E2 in both the ovary and uterus. IHC results showed that SR-B1 was primarily localized in the oocytes, theca internal cells (T-I) of follicles, interstitial cells (IC) as well as corpus luteum (CL), but not granulosa cells (GC) in the ovary during the estrous cycle. Uterine SR-B1 was highly expressed in the endometrial luminal epithelial cells (LEC) and glandular epithelial cells (GEC) as well as in the circular muscle (CM) cells, and weak staining in stromal cells (SC) through estrous cycle. Taken together, SR-B1 expression in the ovary and uterus across the estrous cycle demonstrate that SR-B1 may be involved in uterine function, follicular development as well as luteal function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Microsatellite instability and B-type Raf proto-oncogene mutation in colorectal cancer: Clinicopathological characteristics and effects on survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebnem Batur

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Prognostic significance of microsatellite instability (MSI status and B-type Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF mutation in colorectal cancer is controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and pathological characteristics associated with microsatellite stability and the effect of MSI and BRAF mutation on the survival of patients with colorectal cancer. The study included 145 colorectal cancer cases. All the patients were examined for DNA mismatch repair (MMR proteins with an immunohistochemical method. Molecular assessment of MSI was available in a subset of 41 patients. In addition, BRAF mutation analysis was performed in 30 cases. Immunohistochemically, MMR deficiency was present in 28 (19.3% patients. Female gender (p = 0.001, lesion size ≥5 cm (p = 0.013, Crohn-like response (p = 0.035, and right-sided localization (p < 0.001 were significantly more frequent among MMR-deficient patients. The overall survival was 44.1 ± 5.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 33.7-54.4. Multivariate analyses identified only high tumor grade as an independent predictor of poor overall survival: odd ratio, 6.7 (95% CI 2.1-21.7, p = 0.002. In the subset of patients with available BRAF assessment (n = 30, a negative BRAF status was associated with better survival when compared to a positive BRAF status (36.7 ± 2.1 vs. 34.1 ± 7.2 months, p = 0.048. The sensitivity and specificity of the immunohistochemical method in predicting positive MSI status, with the molecular method as a reference, were 85.7% (95% CI: 56.2%-97.5% and 88.9% (95% CI: 69.7%-97.1%, respectively. BRAF appears to be a significant predictor of a worse outcome in patients with colorectal cancer. Further studies with a large spectrum of clinical and biological variables are warranted.

  6. The elusive third subunit IIa of the bacterial B-type oxidases: the enzyme from the hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Prunetti

    Full Text Available The reduction of molecular oxygen to water is catalyzed by complicated membrane-bound metallo-enzymes containing variable numbers of subunits, called cytochrome c oxidases or quinol oxidases. We previously described the cytochrome c oxidase II from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus as a ba(3-type two-subunit (subunits I and II enzyme and showed that it is included in a supercomplex involved in the sulfide-oxygen respiration pathway. It belongs to the B-family of the heme-copper oxidases, enzymes that are far less studied than the ones from family A. Here, we describe the presence in this enzyme of an additional transmembrane helix "subunit IIa", which is composed of 41 amino acid residues with a measured molecular mass of 5105 Da. Moreover, we show that subunit II, as expected, is in fact longer than the originally annotated protein (from the genome and contains a transmembrane domain. Using Aquifex aeolicus genomic sequence analyses, N-terminal sequencing, peptide mass fingerprinting and mass spectrometry analysis on entire subunits, we conclude that the B-type enzyme from this bacterium is a three-subunit complex. It is composed of subunit I (encoded by coxA(2 of 59000 Da, subunit II (encoded by coxB(2 of 16700 Da and subunit IIa which contain 12, 1 and 1 transmembrane helices respectively. A structural model indicates that the structural organization of the complex strongly resembles that of the ba(3 cytochrome c oxidase from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, the IIa helical subunit being structurally the lacking N-terminal transmembrane helix of subunit II present in the A-type oxidases. Analysis of the genomic context of genes encoding oxidases indicates that this third subunit is present in many of the bacterial oxidases from B-family, enzymes that have been described as two-subunit complexes.

  7. Osteoblast and osteoclast responses to A/B type carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite ceramics for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaini, Marie-Michèle; Detsch, Rainer; Grünewald, Alina; Magnaudeix, Amandine; Lalloue, Fabrice; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Champion, Eric

    2017-06-06

    The influence of carbonate substitution (4.4 wt%, mixed A/B type) in hydroxyapatite ceramics for bone remodeling scaffolds was investigated by separately analyzing the response of pre-osteoblasts and osteoclast-like cells. Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) (Ca 9.5 (PO 4 ) 5.5 (CO 3 ) 0.5 (OH)(CO 3 ) 0.25 -CHA), mimicking the chemical composition of natural bone mineral, and pure hydroxyapatite (HA) (Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 -HA) porous ceramics were processed to obtain a similar microstructure and surface physico-chemical properties (grain size, porosity ratio and pore size, surface roughness and zeta potential). The biological behavior was studied using MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic and RAW 264.7 monocyte/macrophage cell lines. Chemical dissolution in the culture media and resorption lacunae produced by osteoclasts occur with both HA and CHA ceramics, but CHA exhibits much higher dissolution and greater bioresorption ability. CHA ceramics promoted a significantly higher level of pre-osteoblast proliferation. Osteoblastic differentiation, assessed by qRT-PCR of RUNX2 and COLIA2, and pre-osteoclastic proliferation and differentiation were not significantly different on CHA or HA ceramics but cell viability and metabolism were significantly greater on CHA ceramics. Thus, the activity of both osteoclast-like and osteoblastic cells was influenced by the carbonate substitution in the apatite structure. Furthermore, CHA showed a particularly interesting balance between biodegradation, by osteoclasts and chemical dissolution, and osteogenesis through osteoblasts' activity, to stimulate bone regeneration. It is hypothesized that this amount of 4.4 wt% carbonate substitution leads to an adapted concentration of calcium in the fluid surrounding the ceramic to stimulate the activity of cells. These results highlight the superior biological behavior of microporous 4.4 wt% A/B CHA ceramics that could beneficially replace the commonly used HA of biphasic calcium phosphates for future

  8. Prognostic value of B-type natriuretic peptide in elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis: the COFRASA-GENERAC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimadevilla, Claire; Cueff, Caroline; Hekimian, Guillaume; Dehoux, Monique; Lepage, Laurent; Iung, Bernard; Duval, Xavier; Huart, Virginie; Tubach, Florence; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies suggested an independent prognostic value of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in aortic valve stenosis (AS) but were impeded by small sample sizes and inclusion of relatively selected young patients. We aimed to evaluate the relationship among N-terminal fragment of proBNP (Nt-proBNP), AS severity, symptoms and outcome in a large cohort of elderly patients with AS. Observational cohort study, COhorte Française de Retrecissement Aortique du Sujet Agé (clinicalTrial.gov number-NCT00338676) and GENEtique du Retrecissement Aortique (clinicalTrial.gov number-NCT00647088). Single-centre study. Patients older than 70 years with at least mild AS. None. A comprehensive clinical, biological and echocardiographic evaluation was performed at study entry. Asymptomatic patients were prospectively followed on a 6-months basis and AS-related events (sudden death, congestive heart failure or new onset of AS-related symptoms) collected. We prospectively enrolled 361 patients (79±6 years, 230 severe AS). Nt-proBNP increased with the grade of AS severity and the NYHA class (all pvalue of Nt-proBNP for the diagnosis of severe symptomatic AS was only modest (area under the curve of the receiver operator characteristic analysis=0.73). At 2 years, 28 AS-related events occurred among 142 asymptomatic patients prospectively followed. Nt-proBNP was associated with outcome in univariate analysis (p=0.04) but not after adjustment for age, gender and AS severity (p=0.40). The present study clearly highlights the limitations of Nt-proBNP for the evaluation and management of AS patients. Our results suggest that Nt-proBNP should be considered cautiously, at least as a single criterion, in the decision-making process of AS patients especially in the elderly population.

  9. Proton transfer in the K-channel analog of B-type Cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelke, Anna Lena; Wagner, Anke; Galstyan, Gegham; Meyer, Tim; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2014-11-04

    A key enzyme in aerobic metabolism is cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), which catalyzes the reduction of molecular oxygen to water in the mitochondrial and bacterial membranes. Substrate electrons and protons are taken up from different sides of the membrane and protons are pumped across the membrane, thereby generating an electrochemical gradient. The well-studied A-type CcO uses two different entry channels for protons: the D-channel for all pumped and two consumed protons, and the K-channel for the other two consumed protons. In contrast, the B-type CcO uses only a single proton input channel for all consumed and pumped protons. It has the same location as the A-type K-channel (and thus is named the K-channel analog) without sharing any significant sequence homology. In this study, we performed molecular-dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to characterize the K-channel analog in terms of its energetic requirements and functionalities. The function of Glu-15B as a proton sink at the channel entrance is demonstrated by its rotational movement out of the channel when it is deprotonated and by its high pKA value when it points inside the channel. Tyr-244 in the middle of the channel is identified as the valve that ensures unidirectional proton transfer, as it moves inside the hydrogen-bond gap of the K-channel analog only while being deprotonated. The electrostatic energy landscape was calculated for all proton-transfer steps in the K-channel analog, which functions via proton-hole transfer. Overall, the K-channel analog has a very stable geometry without large energy barriers.

  10. Prognostic power of pre- and postoperative B-type natriuretic peptide levels in patients undergoing abdominal aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrugno, Luigi; Costa, Maria Gabriella; Pompei, Livia; Chiarandini, Paolo; Drigo, Daniela; Bassi, Flavio; Gonano, Nevio; Muzzi, Rodolfo; Della Rocca, Giorgio

    2012-08-01

    The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the pre- and postoperative B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in patients undergoing surgery for repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and analyze their power as a predictor of in-hospital cardiac events. The second aim was to evaluate the association among pre- and postoperative BNP levels, postoperative patient complications, and length of hospital stay. Prospective observational study. A university hospital. Forty-five patients undergoing elective surgery for an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The plasma BNP level was assessed just before surgery and then on postoperative day 1. Cardiac troponin I levels were measured postoperatively on arrival to the intensive care unit (time 0) and then 12, 48, and 72 hours later. The preoperative BNP concentration in patients who developed an acute myocardial infarction was 209 (IQR 84-346) pg/mL compared with 74 (IQR 28-142) pg/mL in those who did not. The difference between groups was statistically significant (p = 0.04). The Spearman correlation showed that postoperative BNP levels correlated significantly with preoperative BNP levels (r = 0.73, p = 0.0001), length of hospital stay (r = 0.35, p = 0.04), and troponin I concentration at 0 hour (r = 0.42, p = 0.02), 12 hours (r = 0.51, p = 0.0052), and 48 hours (r = 0.40, p = 0.033). In contrast, preoperative BNP levels correlated with troponin I at only 12 hours (r = 0.34, p = 0.02). Postoperative BNP levels were influenced significantly by transfusions (p = 0.035) and cross-clamping times (p = 0.038). The present results confirm the high negative predictive value of preoperative BNP levels; and postoperative BNP levels showed a better correlation with postoperative troponin levels, blood transfusion, and postoperative cardiac events. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The SMC B-type supergiant AzV322: a g-mode pulsator with a circumstellar disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennickent, R. E.; Kołaczkowski, Z.; Soszyński, I.; Cabezas, M.; Garrido, H. E.

    2018-01-01

    We present a photometric and spectroscopic study of AzV322, an emission line object located in the Small Magellanic Cloud previously classified between O9 and B0. We analyse 17.5 yr of I- and V-band OGLE-II, -III and -IV light curves and find four significant frequencies, viz. f1 = 0.386 549 ± 0.000 003, f2 = 0.101 177 ± 0.000 005, f3 = 0.487 726 ± 0.000 015 and f4 = 0.874 302 ± 0.000 020 cycles d-1 . The f1 frequency (period 2.587 00 ± 0.000 02 d) provides the stronger periodogram peak and gives a single wave light curve of full amplitude 0.066 mag in the I band. High-resolution optical spectroscopy confirms the early B-type spectral type and reveals prominent double peak Balmer, Paschen, O I 8446 and He I 5875 emissions. The spectral energy distribution shows significant colour excess towards long wavelengths possibly attributed to free-free emission in a disc -like envelope. Our analysis yields Teff = 23 000 ± 1500 K, log g = 3.0 ± 0.5, M = 16 ± 1 M⊙, R = 31.0 ± 1.1 R⊙ and Lbol = 104.87 ± 0.06 L⊙. AzV322 might be a member of the new class of slowly pulsating B supergiants introduced by Saio et al. and documented by Lefever, Puls & Aerts; however its circumstellar disc makes it an hither to unique object. Furthermore, we notice that an O-C analysis for f1 reveals quasi-cyclic changes for the times of maximum in a time-scale of 20 yr, which might indicate a light-travel time effect in a very wide orbit binary with an undetected stellar component.

  12. Performance of N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in critically ill patients: a prospective observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquet, Isaline; Darmon, Michael; Doise, Jean-Marc; Degrès, Michel; Blettery, Bernard; Schlemmer, Benoît; Gambert, Philippe; Quenot, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) as a diagnostic tool to recognize acute respiratory failure of cardiac origin in an unselected cohort of critically ill patients. We conducted a prospective observational study of medical ICU patients. NT-proBNP was measured at ICU admission, and diagnosis of cardiac dysfunction relied on the patient's clinical presentation and echocardiography. Of the 198 patients included in this study, 102 (51.5%) had evidence of cardiac dysfunction. Median NT-proBNP concentrations were 5,720 ng/L (1,430 to 15,698) and 854 ng/L (190 to 3,560) in patients with and without cardiac dysfunction, respectively (P < 0.0001). In addition, NT-proBNP concentrations were correlated with age (rho = 0.43, P < 0.0001) and inversely correlated with creatinine clearance (rho = -0.58, P < 0.0001). When evaluating the performance of NT-proBNP concentrations to detect cardiac dysfunction, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.76 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69 to 0.83). In addition, a stepwise logistic regression model revealed that NT-proBNP (odds ratio (OR) = 1.01 per 100 ng/L, 95% CI 1.002 to 1.02), electrocardiogram modifications (OR = 11.03, 95% CI 5.19 to 23.41), and severity assessed by organ system failure score (OR = 1.63 per point, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.41) adequately predicted cardiac dysfunction. The area under the ROC curve of this model was 0.83 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.90). NT-proBNP measured at ICU admission might represent a useful marker to exclude cardiac dysfunction in critically ill patients.

  13. [Retrospective analysis of AO 42A-B type tibia fractures treated with percutaneus locked plating and intramedullary nailing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, Fuat; Kılıç, Ayhan; Sökücü, Sami; Parmaksızoğlu, Atilla Sancar; Çepni, Kamil Serdar; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz Selim

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the results of AO 42A and 42B type tibia fractures treated with intramedullary nail (IMN) and percutaneus locking plate (PLP) were evaluated. The complications were examined, and it was questioned whether the type of fixation had an effect on union time and functional results. Forty-two patients with extraarticular distal tibial fractures were enrolled in this retrospective study. Eighteen patients were treated with closed IMN (Group I) and 24 patients were treated with PLP fixation (Group II). Mean age was 41 (range: 16-70) years; thirty-two of the patients were men. Fractures were classified according to the AO classification system. Union time, functional results and complications (malunion, malalignment, infection) were compared. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgery (AOFAS) scoring was used to compare functional results. The average follow-up period was 20 (12-32) months for Group I and 23 (13-36) months for Group II. The average union time was 16 (12-24) weeks in Group I and 19 (range: 16-24) weeks in Group II (p=0.002). The AOFAS scoring was 85 (range: 69-100) points in Group I and 81 (range: 60-95) points in Group II. The difference in AOFAS scoring was not significant (p=0.06). Two patients had nonunion in Group II. Two patients in Group I and three patients in Group II had malalignment. We suggest that IMN can provide early healing time. Although it is not statistically significant, complication rate was lower and functional results were better in patients treated with IMN.

  14. Pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation alleviates the negative effects of postanthesis heat stress on stem stored carbohydrates remobilization and grain starch accumulation in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiao; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai

    2012-01-01

    had much higher starch content, and caused less modified B-type starch granule size indicators than the CH plants. Our results indicated that, compared with the non-acclimated plants, the pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation effectively enhanced carbohydrate remobilization from stems to grains......The potential role of pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation in alleviating the negative effects of post-anthesis heat stress on stem stored carbohydrate remobilization and grain starch accumulation in wheat was investigated. The treatments included no heat-stress (CC), heat stress at pre......-anthesis only (HC), heat at post-anthesis only (CH), and heat stress at both stages (HH). Post-anthesis heat stress decreased grain starch content, reduced the content of fructans and depressed activities of related synthesis enzymes of sucrose:sucrose fructosyltransferase and fructan...

  15. REPEATED ACUTE STRESS INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM IN RAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama R.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute stress induced alterations in the activity levels of rate limiting enzymes and concentration of intermediates of different pathways of carbohydrate metabolism have been studied. Adult male Wistar rats were restrained (RS for 1 h and after an interval of 4 h they were subjected to forced swimming (FS exercise and appropriate controls were maintained. Five rats were killed before the commencement of the experiment (initial controls, 5 control and equal number of stressed rats were killed 2 h after RS and remaining 5 rats in each group were killed 4 h after FS. There was a significant increase in the adrenal 3β- hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase activity following RS, which showed further increase after FS compared to controls and thereby indicated stress response of rats. There was a significant increase in the blood glucose levels following RS which showed further increase and reached hyperglycemic condition after FS. The hyperglycemic condition due to stress was accompanied by significant increases in the activities of glutamate- pyruvate transaminase, glutamate- oxaloacetate transaminase, glucose -6- phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase and significant decrease in the glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities, whereas pyruvate kinase activity did not show any alteration compared to controls. Further, the glycogen and total protein contents of the liver were decreased whereas those of pyruvate and lactate showed significant increase compared to controls after RS as well as FS.The results put together indicate that acute stress induced hyperglycemia results due to increased gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis without alteration in glycolysis. The study first time reveals that after first acute stress exposure, the subsequent stressful experience augments metabolic stress response leading to hyperglycemia. The results have relevance to human health as human beings are exposed to several stressors in a day and

  16. The long underestimated carbonyl function of carbohydrates – an organocatalyzed shot into carbohydrate chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrwald, R

    2015-09-21

    The aggressive and strong development of organocatalysis provides several protocols for the convenient utilization of the carbonyl function of unprotected carbohydrates in C-C-bond formation processes. These amine-catalyzed mechanisms enable multiple cascade-protocols for the synthesis of a wide range of carbohydrate-derived compound classes. Several, only slightly different protocols, have been developed for the application of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds in the stereoselective chain-elongation of unprotected carbohydrates and the synthesis of highly functionalized C-glycosides of defined configuration. In addition, C-glycosides can also be accessed by amine-catalyzed reactions with methyl ketones. By a one-pot cascade reaction of isocyanides with unprotected aldoses and amino acids access to defined configured glycopeptide mimetics is achieved. Depending on the reaction conditions different origins to control the installation of configuration during the bond-formation process were observed.

  17. Multivalent interaction based carbohydrate biosensors for signal amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyan; Chalagalla, Srinivas; Li, Tiehai; Sun, Xue-long; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Peng; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2010-01-01

    Multivalent interaction between boronic acids immobilized on Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) sensor surface and the carbohydrates modified Au - nanoparticle (AuNP) has been demonstrated for the development of a sensitive carbohydrate biosensor. Briefly, a boronic acid - containing polymer (boropolymer) as multivalent carbohydrate receptor was oriented immobilized on the cysteamine coated electrode through isourea bond formation. Carbohydrates were conjugated to AuNPs to generate a multivalent carbohydrates moiety to amplify the response signal. Thus, the binding of the carbohydrate conjugated AuNPs to the boropolymer surface are multivalent which could simultaneously increase the binding affinity and specificity. We systematically studied the binding between five carbohydrate conjugated AuNPs and the boropolymer. Our studies show that the associate constant (Ka) was in the order of fucose carbohydrate analytes. Furthermore, the multivalent binding between carbohydrates and boronic acids are reversible and allow the regeneration of boropolymer surface by using 1M acetic acid so as to sequentially capture and release the carbohydrate analytes. PMID:20863680

  18. Discovery and design of carbohydrate-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Laura; Araújo, Ana C; Bini, Davide; Gabrielli, Luca; Russo, Laura; Shaikh, Nasrin

    2010-08-01

    Till now, the importance of carbohydrates has been underscored, if compared with the two other major classes of biopolymers such as oligonucleotides and proteins. Recent advances in glycobiology and glycochemistry have imparted a strong interest in the study of this enormous family of biomolecules. Carbohydrates have been shown to be implicated in recognition processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell-extracellular matrix adhesion and cell-intruder recognition phenomena. In addition, carbohydrates are recognized as differentiation markers and as antigenic determinants. Due to their relevant biological role, carbohydrates are promising candidates for drug design and disease treatment. However, the growing number of human disorders known as congenital disorders of glycosylation that are being identified as resulting from abnormalities in glycan structures and protein glycosylation strongly indicates that a fast development of glycobiology, glycochemistry and glycomedicine is highly desirable. The topics give an overview of different approaches that have been used to date for the design of carbohydrate-based therapeutics; this includes the use of native synthetic carbohydrates, the use of carbohydrate mimics designed on the basis of their native counterpart, the use of carbohydrates as scaffolds and finally the design of glyco-fused therapeutics, one of the most recent approaches. The review covers mainly literature that has appeared since 2000, except for a few papers cited for historical reasons. The reader will gain an overview of the current strategies applied to the design of carbohydrate-based therapeutics; in particular, the advantages/disadvantages of different approaches are highlighted. The topic is presented in a general, basic manner and will hopefully be a useful resource for all readers who are not familiar with it. In addition, in order to stress the potentialities of carbohydrates, several examples of carbohydrate-based marketed therapeutics are given

  19. Protein kinase CK2 in human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Barbara; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    . The catalytic alpha subunits are distantly related to the CMGC subfamily of kinases, such as the Cdk kinases. There are some peculiarities associated with protein kinase CK2, which are not found with most other protein kinases: (i) the enzyme is constitutively active, (ii) it can use ATP and GTP and (iii...

  20. Improved HDDR processing route for production of anisotropic powder from sintered NdFeB type magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, R.S.; Williams, A.J.; Harris, I.R.; Walton, A., E-mail: a.walton@bham.ac.uk

    2014-01-15

    The hydrogenation disproportionation desorption recombination (HDDR) process has been investigated as a possible means of producing bonded magnets from used NdFeB-type sintered magnets with compositions, Nd{sub 13.4}Dy{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.7}Nb{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 78.5}B{sub 6.3} and Nd{sub 12.5}Dy{sub 1.8}Al{sub 0.9}Nb{sub 0.6}Co{sub 5.0}Fe{sub 72.8}B{sub 6.4} (atomic%). It has been shown that by increasing the processing temperature, an increase in the equilibrium pressure for disproportionation and in the overall reaction time was observed. The magnetic properties of the lower Dy content magnet were affected significantly by the change in processing temperature with a peak in properties observed at 880 °C producing magnetic powder with a remanence of 1.08 (±0.02) T, a coercivity of 840 (±17) kA m{sup −1}, and a maximum energy product of 175 (±2.5) kJ m{sup −3}. Further work on magnets with a significantly higher Dy content has shown that simultaneous processing of sintered magnets with varying compositions can be achieved by increasing the hydrogen pressure, however a range of magnetic properties are produced depending on the initial compositions of the samples in the input feed. - Highlights: • Reduced oxidation during the HDDR processing in this work compared to the previous paper resulted in a powder with a higher coercivity. • Increasing the hydrogen pressure for disproportionation allowed for Dy, Co rich NdFeB compositions to be processed. • Mixed compositions (which will be typical from “real scrap”) can be processed simultaneously in the same equipment. • Mixed feeds produced lower magnetic properties due to overprocessing of the low Dy content compositions.

  1. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in the Emergency Department: The ICON-RELOADED Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januzzi, James L; Chen-Tournoux, Annabel A; Christenson, Robert H; Doros, Gheorghe; Hollander, Judd E; Levy, Phillip D; Nagurney, John T; Nowak, Richard M; Pang, Peter S; Patel, Darshita; Peacock, W Franklin; Rivers, E Joy; Walters, Elizabeth L; Gaggin, Hanna K

    2018-03-20

    Contemporary reconsideration of diagnostic N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) cutoffs for diagnosis of heart failure (HF) is needed. This study sought to evaluate the diagnostic performance of NT-proBNP for acute HF in patients with dyspnea in the emergency department (ED) setting. Dyspneic patients presenting to 19 EDs in North America were enrolled and had blood drawn for subsequent NT-proBNP measurement. Primary endpoints were positive predictive values of age-stratified cutoffs (450, 900, and 1,800 pg/ml) for diagnosis of acute HF and negative predictive value of the rule-out cutoff to exclude acute HF. Secondary endpoints included sensitivity, specificity, and positive (+) and negative (-) likelihood ratios (LRs) for acute HF. Of 1,461 subjects, 277 (19%) were adjudicated as having acute HF. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for diagnosis of acute HF was 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.90 to 0.93; p < 0.001). Sensitivity for age stratified cutoffs of 450, 900, and 1,800 pg/ml was 85.7%, 79.3%, and 75.9%, respectively; specificity was 93.9%, 84.0%, and 75.0%, respectively. Positive predictive values were 53.6%, 58.4%, and 62.0%, respectively. Overall LR+ across age-dependent cutoffs was 5.99 (95% CI: 5.05 to 6.93); individual LR+ for age-dependent cutoffs was 14.08, 4.95, and 3.03, respectively. The sensitivity and negative predictive value for the rule-out cutoff of 300 pg/ml were 93.9% and 98.0%, respectively; LR- was 0.09 (95% CI: 0.05 to 0.13). In acutely dyspneic patients seen in the ED setting, age-stratified NT-proBNP cutpoints may aid in the diagnosis of acute HF. An NT-proBNP <300 pg/ml strongly excludes the presence of acute HF. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic insertions and diversification of the PolB-type DNA polymerase (gp43) of T4-related phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Vasiliy M; Ratnayaka, Swarnamala; Karam, Jim D

    2010-01-22

    In Escherichia coli phage T4 and many of its phylogenetic relatives, gene 43 consists of a single cistron that encodes a PolB family (PolB-type) DNA polymerase. We describe the divergence of this phage gene and its protein product (gp43) (gene product 43) among 26 phylogenetic relatives of T4 and discuss our observations in the context of diversity among the widely distributed PolB enzymes in nature. In two T4 relatives that grow in Aeromonas salmonicida phages 44RR and 25, gene 43 is fragmented by different combinations of three distinct types of DNA insertion elements: (a) a short intercistronic untranslated sequence (IC-UTS) that splits the polymerase gene into two cistrons, 43A and 43B, corresponding to N-terminal (gp43A) and C-terminal (gp43B) protein products; (b) a freestanding homing endonuclease gene (HEG) inserted between the IC-UTS and the 43B cistron; and (c) a group I intron in the 43B cistron. Phage 25 has all three elements, whereas phage 44RR has only the IC-UTS. We present evidence that (a) the split gene of phage 44RR encodes a split DNA polymerase consisting of a complex between gp43A and gp43B subunits; (b) the putative HEG encodes a double-stranded DNA endonuclease that specifically cleaves intron-free homologues of the intron-bearing 43B site; and (c) the group I intron is a self-splicing RNA. Our results suggest that some freestanding HEGs can mediate the homing of introns that do not encode their own homing enzymes. The results also suggest that different insertion elements can converge on a polB gene and evolve into a single integrated system for lateral transfer of polB genetic material. We discuss the possible pathways for the importation of such insertion elements into the genomes of T4-related phages. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Subclinical Brain Damage in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, Hazel I; Ikram, M Arfan; Hofman, Albert; Niessen, Wiro J; van der Lugt, Aad; Krestin, Gabriel P; Franco, Oscar H; Vernooij, Meike W

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), which is a marker of heart disease, and markers of subclinical brain damage on magnetic resonance (MR) images in community-dwelling middle-aged and elderly subjects without dementia and without a clinical diagnosis of heart disease. Materials and Methods This prospective population-based cohort study was approved by a medical ethics committee overseen by the national government, and all participants gave written informed consent. Serum levels of NT-proBNP were measured in 2397 participants without dementia or stroke (mean age, 56.6 years; age range, 45.7-87.3 years) and without clinical diagnosis of heart disease who were drawn from the population-based Rotterdam Study. All participants were examined with a 1.5-T MR imager. Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association between NT-proBNP level and MR imaging markers of subclinical brain damage, including volumetric, focal, and microstructural markers. Results A higher NT-proBNP level was associated with smaller total brain volume (mean difference in z score per standard deviation increase in NT-proBNP level, -0.021; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.034, -0.007; P = .003) and was predominantly driven by gray matter volume (mean difference in z score per standard deviation increase in NT-proBNP level, -0.037; 95% CI: -0.057, -0.017; P < .001). Higher NT-proBNP level was associated with larger white matter lesion volume (mean difference in z score per standard deviation increase in NT-proBNP level, 0.090; 95% CI: 0.051, 0.129; P < .001), with lower fractional anisotropy (mean difference in z score per standard deviation increase in NT-proBNP level, -0.048; 95% CI: -0.088, -0.008; P = .019) and higher mean diffusivity (mean difference in z score per standard deviation increase in NT-proBNP level, 0.054; 95% CI: 0.018, 0.091; P = .004) of normal-appearing white matter

  4. Prospective evaluation of B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations and the risk of type 2 diabetes in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Brendan M; Cook, Nancy R; Chasman, Daniel I; Magnone, Maria C; Bobadilla, Maria; Rifai, Nader; Ridker, Paul M; Pradhan, Aruna D

    2013-03-01

    Animal data suggest that natriuretic peptides play an important role in energy metabolism, but prospective studies evaluating a relationship between these peptides and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in humans are few and results are conflicting. We used a prospective case-cohort approach (n = 491 T2DM cases, n = 561 reference subcohort) within the Women's Health Study to evaluate baseline N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and the risk of incident T2DM. We also tested for associations between 4 common variants in the natriuretic peptide A and B genes (NPPA and NPPB) and NT-proBNP concentrations (n = 458) and incident T2DM (n = 1372 cases among 22 607 women). Case subjects had higher median baseline body mass index (29.4 vs 25.0 kg/m(2), P < 0.001) and lower baseline median (interquartile range) NT-proBNP concentrations [46.8 ng/L (26.1-83.2) vs 66.7 ng/L (39.3-124.7), P < 0.001]. In proportional hazards models adjusting for established diabetes risk factors, women in the highest quartile of baseline NT-proBNP concentration (≥ 117.4 ng/L) had a 49% reduction in risk of T2DM [hazard ratio (HR) 0.51, 0.30-0.86, P = 0.01] relative to those in the lowest quartile. Two of the 4 tested variants in NPPA and NPPB (rs632793, rs198389) were associated with increased NT-proBNP concentrations and reduced risk of T2DM. For example, each copy of the minor allele of rs632793 was associated with increased NT-proBNP [β (SE) = 0.201 (0.063), P < 0.01] and decreased T2DM risk (HR 0.91, 0.84-0.989, P = 0.026). NT-proBNP concentrations that are high, but still within the reference interval, associate with reduced risk of incident diabetes in women and support a favorable role for natriuretic peptides in the prevention of T2DM.

  5. A Prospective Evaluation of B-type Natriuretic Peptide Concentrations and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Brendan M.; Cook, Nancy; Chasman, Daniel I.; Magnone, Maria C.; Bobadilla, Maria; Rifai, Nader; Ridker, Paul M; Pradhan, Aruna D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal data suggest that natriuretic peptides play an important role in energy metabolism, but prospective studies evaluating a relationship between these peptides and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in humans are few and results are conflicting. Methods We used a prospective case-cohort approach (n=491 T2DM cases, n=561 reference subcohort) within the Women's Health Study to evaluate baseline N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and the risk of incident T2DM. We also tested for associations between 4 common variants in the natriuretic peptide A and B genes (NPPA-NPPB) and NT-proBNP concentrations (n=458) and incident type 2 diabetes (n=1372 cases among 22607 women). Results Case subjects had higher median baseline body mass index (29.4 vs. 25.0 kg/m2, P<0.001) and lower baseline median (IQR) NT-proBNP concentrations [46.8 ng/L (26.1, 83.2) vs 66.7 ng/L (39.3, 124.7), P<0.001]. In proportional hazards models adjusting for established diabetes risk factors, women in the highest quartile of baseline NT-proBNP (≥117.4 ng/L) had a 49% reduction in risk of T2DM (HR 0.51, 0.30–0.86, P=0.01) relative to those in the lowest quartile. Two of the 4 tested variants in NPPA-NPPB (rs632793, rs198389) associated with increased NT-proBNP concentrations and reduced risk of T2DM. For example, each copy of the minor allele of rs632793 was associated with increased NT-proBNP (β (SE)=0.201 (0.063), P<0.01) and decreased T2DM risk (HR 0.91, 0.84–0.989, P=0.026). Conclusions NT-proBNP concentrations that are high, but still within the reference interval, associate with reduced risk of incident diabetes in women and support a favorable role for natriuretic peptides in the development of T2DM. PMID:23288489

  6. Mendelian randomization study of B-type natriuretic peptide and type 2 diabetes: evidence of causal association from population studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Pfister

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and epidemiological evidence suggests an inverse association between B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP levels in blood and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D, but the prospective association of BNP with T2D is uncertain, and it is unclear whether the association is confounded.We analysed the association between levels of the N-terminal fragment of pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP in blood and risk of incident T2D in a prospective case-cohort study and genotyped the variant rs198389 within the BNP locus in three T2D case-control studies. We combined our results with existing data in a meta-analysis of 11 case-control studies. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we compared the observed association between rs198389 and T2D to that expected from the NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association and the NT-pro-BNP difference per C allele of rs198389. In participants of our case-cohort study who were free of T2D and cardiovascular disease at baseline, we observed a 21% (95% CI 3%-36% decreased risk of incident T2D per one standard deviation (SD higher log-transformed NT-pro-BNP levels in analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, family history of T2D, history of hypertension, and levels of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The association between rs198389 and T2D observed in case-control studies (odds ratio = 0.94 per C allele, 95% CI 0.91-0.97 was similar to that expected (0.96, 0.93-0.98 based on the pooled estimate for the log-NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association derived from a meta-analysis of our study and published data (hazard ratio = 0.82 per SD, 0.74-0.90 and the difference in NT-pro-BNP levels (0.22 SD, 0.15-0.29 per C allele of rs198389. No significant associations were observed between the rs198389 genotype and potential confounders.Our results provide evidence for a potential causal role of the BNP system in the aetiology of T2D. Further studies

  7. Mendelian randomization study of B-type natriuretic peptide and type 2 diabetes: evidence of causal association from population studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Roman; Sharp, Stephen; Luben, Robert; Welsh, Paul; Barroso, Inês; Salomaa, Veikko; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Sattar, Naveed; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2011-10-01

    Genetic and epidemiological evidence suggests an inverse association between B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in blood and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the prospective association of BNP with T2D is uncertain, and it is unclear whether the association is confounded. We analysed the association between levels of the N-terminal fragment of pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP) in blood and risk of incident T2D in a prospective case-cohort study and genotyped the variant rs198389 within the BNP locus in three T2D case-control studies. We combined our results with existing data in a meta-analysis of 11 case-control studies. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we compared the observed association between rs198389 and T2D to that expected from the NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association and the NT-pro-BNP difference per C allele of rs198389. In participants of our case-cohort study who were free of T2D and cardiovascular disease at baseline, we observed a 21% (95% CI 3%-36%) decreased risk of incident T2D per one standard deviation (SD) higher log-transformed NT-pro-BNP levels in analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, family history of T2D, history of hypertension, and levels of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The association between rs198389 and T2D observed in case-control studies (odds ratio = 0.94 per C allele, 95% CI 0.91-0.97) was similar to that expected (0.96, 0.93-0.98) based on the pooled estimate for the log-NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association derived from a meta-analysis of our study and published data (hazard ratio = 0.82 per SD, 0.74-0.90) and the difference in NT-pro-BNP levels (0.22 SD, 0.15-0.29) per C allele of rs198389. No significant associations were observed between the rs198389 genotype and potential confounders. Our results provide evidence for a potential causal role of the BNP system in the aetiology of T2D. Further studies are needed

  8. Plasma B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP As a Marker of Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Zahurul Alam Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The first stage of diabetic cardiomyopathy is represented by left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD with preserved systolic function, in an asymptomatic patient. B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP is a cardiac neurohormone predominantly released from the cardiac ventricles in response to left ventricular volume expansion and pressure overload. The diagnostic role of BNP for detecting LVDD in asymptomatic diabetic patients is still debated and this study was undertaken to find out this relationship of plasma BNP level with LVDD in asymptomatic diabetic patients. First 100 patients who had type 2 diabetes for more than 5 years and had no known cardiac disease other than LVDD (grade-1 & 2, admitted in BIRDEM Hospital were recruited. Plasma BNP was measured by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA method using AXSYM auto analyzer. Two-dimensional, M-mode, spectral, and color flow Doppler echocardiograms was repeated on the same day of blood collection for plasma BNP measurement. After processing of all available data, statistical analysis of their significance was done with the help of computer based SPSS (Statistical Program for Social Science program. Male female distribution of the study participants was 46% and 54% respectively. Mean plasma BNP level in all participants was 150 pg/ml. In male and female participants the values were 168 and 135 pg/ml respectively. The distribution did not show any significant association (p=0.491. Of the 100 study participants 89% had E/A ratio <1. Distribution of participants with abnormal E/A and E/e did not show any significant association (p=0.955 and 0.844 respectively. Study participants with varying level of plasma BNP level were analyzed in terms of E/A and E/e ratio. Distribution of participants between BNP Groups and E/A and E/e groups did not show statistically significant association (p=0.529. We concluded that plasma BNP has no relation with LVDD (grade-1 and 2 in patients with type 2

  9. Carbohydrates/nucleosides/RNA-DNA-ligand interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaptein, R.; McConnell, B.; Serianni, A.S.; Silks, L.A. III.

    1994-01-01

    Carbohydrate and nucleotide structural determination using modern spectroscopic techniques is dependent on our ability to label oligonucleotides and oligosaccharides with stable isotopes. Uniform Carbon 13 and Nitrogen 15 labeling of oligonucleotides is important to present-day efforts, which are focused on determining the structure of relatively small oligosaccharides and oligonucleotides, which form the elements of larger structures. Because of the relatively recent interest in three-dimensional structure, the development of techniques used to label them has lagged behind parallel techniques used to label peptides and proteins. Therefore, this group's discussion focused primarily on problems faced today in obtaining oligonucleotides labeled uniformly with carbon 13 and nitrogen 15

  10. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) in alcoholic cirrhosis: a kinetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Grønbaek, M; Møller, Søren

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Carbohydrate deficient transferrin has been introduced as a marker of excessive alcohol intake. The present study was undertaken in order to measure the circulating level of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and to assess arteriovenous kinetics...... of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in liver and kidney. METHODS/RESULTS: The median value of serum carbohydrate deficient transferrin was 16.0 U/l in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 41), and this value was not significantly different from that of a normal control group (median 17.4 U/l, n = 55, ns......). Carbohydrate deficient transferrin was significantly higher in patients with cirrhosis and high current alcohol intake than in abstaining patients (20 vs. 14 U/l, p 50 g/day) had a significantly higher carbohydrate deficient transferrin...

  11. Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I Mediates Biliary Cholesterol Secretion Independent of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter g5/g8 in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, Harmen; Gatti, Alberto; Nijstad, Niels; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Kuipers, Folkert; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) mediates selective uptake of cholesterol from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles by the liver and influences biliary cholesterol secretion. However, it is not dear, if this effect is direct or indirect. The aim of this study was to determine the impact

  12. Relation of N-Terminal Pro B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels After Symptom-Limited Exercise to Baseline and Ischemia Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, P. Marc; Verberne, Hein J.; van Spijker, Rianne C.; van Straalen, Jan P.; Fischer, Johan C.; Sturk, Augueste; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L. F.; de Winter, Robbert J.

    2009-01-01

    Circulating levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the amino-terminal portion of the prohormone (NT-proBNP) have been reported to increase immediately after myocardial ischemia. The association between extent of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia measured using myocardial perfusion

  13. Usefulness of Serum B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Comatose Patients Resuscitated from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest to Predict Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frydland, Martin; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Erlinge, David; Stammet, Pascal; Nielsen, Niklas; Wanscher, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Friberg, Hans; Hovdenes, Jan; Horn, Janneke; Wetterslev, Jørn; Thomsen, Jakob H.; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Wise, Matthew P.; Kuiper, Michael; Cronberg, Tobias; Gasche, Yvan; Devaux, Yvan; Åneman, Anders; Hassager, Christian

    2016-01-01

    N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic (NT-proBNP) is expressed in the heart and brain, and serum levels are elevated in acute heart and brain diseases. We aimed to assess the possible association between serum levels and neurological outcome and death in comatose patients resuscitated from

  14. Exploiting Uniformly13C-Labeled Carbohydrates for Probing Carbohydrate-Protein Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Gustav; Anderson, Taigh; Oscarson, Stefan; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2017-05-03

    NMR of a uniformly 13 C-labeled carbohydrate was used to elucidate the atomic details of a sugar-protein complex. The structure of the 13 C-labeled Manα(1-2)Manα(1-2)ManαOMe trisaccharide ligand, when bound to cyanovirin-N (CV-N), was characterized and revealed that in the complex the glycosidic linkage torsion angles between the two reducing-end mannoses are different from the free trisaccharide. Distances within the carbohydrate were employed for conformational analysis, and NOE-based distance mapping between sugar and protein revealed that Manα(1-2)Manα(1-2)ManαOMe is bound more intimately with its two reducing-end mannoses into the domain A binding site of CV-N than with the nonreducing end unit. Taking advantage of the 13 C spectral dispersion of 13 C-labeled carbohydrates in isotope-filtered experiments is a versatile means for a simultaneous mapping of the binding interactions on both, the carbohydrate and the protein.

  15. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from pigmented Bacilli: a genomic approach to assess carbohydrate utilization and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrissat Bernard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spore-forming Bacilli are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in a variety of natural habitats, including soil, water and the gastro-intestinal (GI-tract of animals. Isolates of various Bacillus species produce pigments, mostly carotenoids, with a putative protective role against UV irradiation and oxygen-reactive forms. Results We report the annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes of two pigmented Bacilli isolated from the human GI-tract and belonging to the Bacillus indicus and B. firmus species. A high number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs were found in both isolates. A detailed analysis of CAZyme families, was performed and supported by growth data. Carbohydrates able to support growth as the sole carbon source negatively effected carotenoid formation in rich medium, suggesting that a catabolite repression-like mechanism controls carotenoid biosynthesis in both Bacilli. Experimental results on biofilm formation confirmed genomic data on the potentials of B. indicus HU36 to produce a levan-based biofilm, while mucin-binding and -degradation experiments supported genomic data suggesting the ability of both Bacilli to degrade mammalian glycans. Conclusions CAZy analyses of the genomes of the two pigmented Bacilli, compared to other Bacillus species and validated by experimental data on carbohydrate utilization, biofilm formation and mucin degradation, suggests that the two pigmented Bacilli are adapted to the intestinal environment and are suited to grow in and colonize the human gut.

  16. Carbohydrate modified polysiloxanes, 3 - Solution properties of carbohydrate-polysiloxane conjugates in toluene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, Katja; Jonas, Gerd; Stadler, Reimund

    2001-01-01

    High molecular weight poly(hydromethyl-co-dimethyl) siloxanes containing 0.6 and 3 mol-% of Si-H units are polar functionalized by the addition of various mono-, di- and oligosaccharides. Due to the hydrogen bond interaction between the carbohydrate moieties, the solution properties are strongly

  17. Citron kinase - renaissance of a neglected mitotic kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avino, Pier Paolo

    2017-05-15

    Cell division controls the faithful segregation of genomic and cytoplasmic materials between the two nascent daughter cells. Members of the Aurora, Polo and cyclin-dependent (Cdk) kinase families are known to regulate multiple events throughout cell division, whereas another kinase, citron kinase (CIT-K), for a long time has been considered to function solely during cytokinesis, the last phase of cell division. CIT-K was originally proposed to regulate the ingression of the cleavage furrow that forms at the equatorial cortex of the dividing cell after chromosome segregation. However, studies in the last decade have clarified that this kinase is, instead, required for the organization of the midbody in late cytokinesis, and also revealed novel functions of CIT-K earlier in mitosis and in DNA damage control. Moreover, CIT-K mutations have recently been linked to the development of human microcephaly, and CIT-K has been identified as a potential target in cancer therapy. In this Commentary, I describe and re-evaluate the functions and regulation of CIT-K during cell division and its involvement in human disease. Finally, I offer my perspectives on the open questions and future challenges that are necessary to address, in order to fully understand this important and yet unjustly neglected mitotic kinase. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Carbohydrate Recognition by Boronolectins, Small Molecules, and Lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shan; Cheng, Yunfeng; Reid, Suazette; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrates are known to mediate a large number of biological and pathological events. Small and macromolecules capable of carbohydrate recognition have great potentials as research tools, diagnostics, vectors for targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents, and therapeutic agents. However, this potential is far from being realized. One key issue is the difficulty in the development of “binders” capable of specific recognition of carbohydrates of biological relevance. This review discusses systematically the general approaches that are available in developing carbohydrate sensors and “binders/receptors,” and their applications. The focus is on discoveries during the last five years. PMID:19291708

  19. Renewable Hydrogen Carrier — Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Percival Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen economy presents an appealing energy future but its implementation must solve numerous problems ranging from low-cost sustainable production, high-density storage, costly infrastructure, to eliminating safety concern. The use of renewable carbohydrate as a high-density hydrogen carrier and energy source for hydrogen production is possible due to emerging cell-free synthetic biology technology—cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB. Assembly of numerous enzymes and co-enzymes in vitro can create complicated set of biological reactions or pathways that microorganisms or catalysts cannot complete, for example, C6H10O5 (aq + 7 H2O (l à 12 H2 (g + 6 CO2 (g (PLoS One 2007, 2:e456. Thanks to 100% selectivity of enzymes, modest reaction conditions, and high-purity of generated hydrogen, carbohydrate is a promising hydrogen carrier for end users. Gravimetric density of carbohydrate is 14.8 H2 mass% if water can be recycled from proton exchange membrane fuel cells or 8.33% H2 mass% without water recycling. Renewable carbohydrate can be isolated from plant biomass or would be produced from a combination of solar electricity/hydrogen and carbon dioxide fixation mediated by high-efficiency artificial photosynthesis mediated by SyPaB. The construction of this carbon-neutral carbohydrate economy would address numerous sustainability challenges, such as electricity and hydrogen storage, CO2 fixation and long-term storage, water conservation, transportation fuel production, plus feed and food production.

  20. Impact of Dietary Polyphenols on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Hanhineva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols, including flavonoids, phenolic acids, proanthocyanidins and resveratrol, are a large and heterogeneous group of phytochemicals in plant-based foods, such as tea, coffee, wine, cocoa, cereal grains, soy, fruits and berries. Growing evidence indicates that various dietary polyphenols may influence carbohydrate metabolism at many levels. In animal models and a limited number of human studies carried out so far, polyphenols and foods or beverages rich in polyphenols have attenuated postprandial glycemic responses and fasting hyperglycemia, and improved acute insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. The possible mechanisms include inhibition of carbohydrate digestion and glucose absorption in the intestine, stimulation of insulin secretion from the pancreatic b-cells, modulation of glucose release from the liver, activation of insulin receptors and glucose uptake in the insulin-sensitive tissues, and modulation of intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression. The positive effects of polyphenols on glucose homeostasis observed in a large number of in vitro and animal models are supported by epidemiological evidence on polyphenol-rich diets. To confirm the implications of polyphenol consumption for prevention of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and eventually type 2 diabetes, human trials with well-defined diets, controlled study designs and clinically relevant end-points together with holistic approaches e.g., systems biology profiling technologies are needed.

  1. CARBOHYDRATE INTAKE CONSIDERATIONS FOR YOUNG ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Montfort-Steiger

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Good nutritional practices are important for exercise performance and health during all ages. Athletes and especially growing children engaged in heavy training have higher energy and nutrient requirements compared to their non-active counterparts. Scientific understanding of sports nutrition for the young athlete is lacking behind the growing number of young athletes engaged in sports. Most of the sports nutrition recommendations given to athletic children and adolescents are based on adult findings due to the deficiency in age specific information in young athletes. Therefore, this review reflects on child specific sports nutrition, particularly on carbohydrate intake and metabolism that distinguishes the child athlete from the adult athlete. Children are characterised to be in an insulin resistance stage during certain periods of maturation, have different glycolytic/metabolic responses during exercise, have a tendency for higher fat oxidation during exercise and show different heat dissipation mechanisms compared to adults. These features point out that young athletes may need different nutritional advice on carbohydrate for exercise to those from adult athletes. Sport drinks for example may need to be adapted to children specific needs. However, more research in this area is warranted to clarify sports nutrition needs of the young athlete to provide better and healthy nutritional guidance to young athletes

  2. Interference of selenium and selenoproteins with the insulin-regulated carbohydrate and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrenner, Holger

    2013-12-01

    An assumed link between supranutritional intake of the micronutrient selenium (Se) and type 2 diabetes mellitus is discussed controversially. Se concentrations in the habitual diet and in dietary supplements are probably not sufficient to induce overt diabetes in healthy individuals. On the other hand, high plasma Se and selenoprotein P (Sepp1) levels have been found to be associated with biomarkers of an impaired carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis in humans. Moreover, abundant expression of antioxidant selenoproteins due to dietary Se oversupply resulted in hyperinsulinemia and decreased insulin sensitivity in animal models. This review discusses findings from animal and cell culture studies in search of molecular mechanisms underlying an interference of Se and selenproteins such as the Se transport and supply protein Sepp1 and the hydrogen peroxide-reducing selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1) with insulin-controlled metabolic pathways. A probable rationale derives from the positive and negative regulation of both glucose-induced insulin secretion and insulin-induced signaling by hydrogen peroxide. Se status and GPx1 expression have been reported to affect the activity of insulin-antagonistic phosphatases that are regulated by hydrogen peroxide-mediated reversible oxidation of catalytic cysteine residues. GPx1 and/or Sepp1 inhibited phosphorylation (activation) of key mediators in energy metabolism such as protein kinase B (Akt) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in liver and/or skeletal muscle. Conversely, a dys-regulated carbohydrate metabolism in diabetes might affect plasma Se and Sepp1 levels, as the hepatic biosynthesis of Sepp1 is suppressed by insulin and stimulated under hyperglycemic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adding Fish Oil to Whey Protein, Leucine, and Carbohydrate Over a Six-Week Supplementation Period Attenuates Muscle Soreness Following Eccentric Exercise in Competitive Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Jordan D; Donnelly, Chris; Walshe, Ian H; MacKinley, Elizabeth E; Dick, James; Galloway, Stuart D R; Tipton, Kevin D; Witard, Oliver C

    2018-01-01

    Soccer players often experience eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage given the physical demands of soccer match-play. Since long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3PUFA) enhance muscle sensitivity to protein supplementation, dietary supplementation with a combination of fish oil-derived n-3PUFA, protein, and carbohydrate may promote exercise recovery. This study examined the influence of adding n-3PUFA to a whey protein, leucine, and carbohydrate containing beverage over a six-week supplementation period on physiological markers of recovery measured over three days following eccentric exercise. Competitive soccer players were assigned to one of three conditions (2 × 200 mL): a fish oil supplement beverage (FO; n = 10) that contained n-3PUFA (1100 mg DHA/EPA-approximately 550 mg DHA, 550 mg EPA), whey protein (15 g), leucine (1.8 g), and carbohydrate (20 g); a protein supplement beverage (PRO; n = 10) that contained whey protein (15 g), leucine (1.8 g), and carbohydrate (20 g); and a carbohydrate supplement beverage (CHO; n = 10) that contained carbohydrate (24 g). Eccentric exercise consisted of unilateral knee extension/flexion contractions on both legs separately. Maximal force production was impaired by 22% during the 72-hour recovery period following eccentric exercise (p soccer performance, or blood c-reactive protein concentrations were observed between groups. In conclusion, the addition of n-3PUFA to a beverage containing whey protein, leucine, and carbohydrate ameliorates the increase in muscle soreness and blood concentrations of creatine kinase following eccentric exercise in competitive soccer players.

  4. Organotin-catalyzed highly regioselective thiocarbonylation of nonprotected carbohydrates and synthesis of deoxy carbohydrates in a minimum number of steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Wataru; Tanigawa, Satoko; Takemoto, Yuki; Yoshimatsu, Hirofumi; Onomura, Osamu

    2012-04-16

    Nonprotected carbohydrates: The catalytic regioselective thiocarbonylation of carbohydrates by using organotin dichloride under mild conditions was demonstrated. The reaction afforded various deoxy saccharides in high yields and excellent regioselectivity in a minimum number of steps. The regioselectivity of the thiocarbonylation is attributed to the intrinsic character of the carbohydrates based on the stereorelationship of their hydroxy groups (see scheme). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Florideophyceae) has a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Peter R; Schindler, Michael; Howles, Paul; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2010-10-01

    Cellulose synthases form rosette terminal complexes in the plasma membranes of Streptophyta and various linear terminal complexes in other taxa. The sequence of a putative CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Floridiophyceae) was deduced using a cloning strategy involving degenerate primers, a cDNA library screen, and 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). RACE identified two alternative transcriptional starts and four alternative polyadenylation sites. The first translation start codon provided an open reading frame of 2610 bp encoding 870 amino acids and was PCR amplified without introns from genomic DNA. Southern hybridization indicated one strongly hybridizing gene with possible weakly related genes or pseudogenes. Amino acid sequence analysis identified a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) upstream of the protein's first predicted transmembrane domain. There are broad similarities in predicted 3D structures of the family 48 modules from CESA, from several glycogen- and starch-binding enzymes, and from protein kinases, but there are substitutions at some residues thought to be involved in ligand binding. The module in G. monilis CESA will be on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane so that it could potentially bind either low molecular weight ligands or starch which is cytosolic rather than inside membrane-bound plastids in red algae. Possible reasons why red algal CESAs have evolved family 48 modules perhaps as part of a system to regulate cellulose synthase activity in relation to cellular carbohydrate status are briefly discussed.

  6. A CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Florideophyceae) has a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Peter R.; Schindler, Michael; Howles, Paul; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose synthases form rosette terminal complexes in the plasma membranes of Streptophyta and various linear terminal complexes in other taxa. The sequence of a putative CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Floridiophyceae) was deduced using a cloning strategy involving degenerate primers, a cDNA library screen, and 5′ and 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). RACE identified two alternative transcriptional starts and four alternative polyadenylation sites. The first translation start codon provided an open reading frame of 2610 bp encoding 870 amino acids and was PCR amplified without introns from genomic DNA. Southern hybridization indicated one strongly hybridizing gene with possible weakly related genes or pseudogenes. Amino acid sequence analysis identified a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) upstream of the protein's first predicted transmembrane domain. There are broad similarities in predicted 3D structures of the family 48 modules from CESA, from several glycogen- and starch-binding enzymes, and from protein kinases, but there are substitutions at some residues thought to be involved in ligand binding. The module in G. monilis CESA will be on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane so that it could potentially bind either low molecular weight ligands or starch which is cytosolic rather than inside membrane-bound plastids in red algae. Possible reasons why red algal CESAs have evolved family 48 modules perhaps as part of a system to regulate cellulose synthase activity in relation to cellular carbohydrate status are briefly discussed. PMID:20702566

  7. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B. Baker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h. Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1 potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2 the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3 what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports. Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before

  8. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-14

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  9. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay B.; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a

  10. Receptor-like kinase complexes in plant innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan eGreeff

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Receptor-like kinases (RLKs are surface localized, transmembrane receptors comprising a large family of well-studied kinases. RLKs signal through their transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains with the aid of various interacting partners and downstream components. The N-terminal extracellular domain defines ligand specificity, and RLK families are sub-classed according to this domain. The most studied of these subfamilies include those with 1 leucine rich repeat (LRR domains, 2 LysM domains (LYM and 3 the Catharanthus roseus RLK1-like (CrRLK1L domain. These proteins recognize distinct ligands of microbial origin or ligands derived from intracellular protein/carbohydrate signals. For example, the pattern recognition receptor (PRR AtFLS2 recognizes flg22 from flagellin, and the PRR AtEFR recognizes elf18 from elongation factor (EF-Tu. Upon binding of their cognate ligands, the aforementioned RLKs activate generic immune responses termed pattern triggered immunity (PTI. RLKs can form complexes with other family members and engage a variety of intracellular signaling components and regulatory pathways upon stimulation. This review focuses on interesting new data about how these receptors form protein complexes to exert their function.

  11. The use of carbohydrates during exercise as an ergogenic aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2013-11-01

    Carbohydrate and fat are the two primary fuel sources oxidized by skeletal muscle tissue during prolonged (endurance-type) exercise. The relative contribution of these fuel sources largely depends on the exercise intensity and duration, with a greater contribution from carbohydrate as exercise intensity is increased. Consequently, endurance performance and endurance capacity are largely dictated by endogenous carbohydrate availability. As such, improving carbohydrate availability during prolonged exercise through carbohydrate ingestion has dominated the field of sports nutrition research. As a result, it has been well-established that carbohydrate ingestion during prolonged (>2 h) moderate-to-high intensity exercise can significantly improve endurance performance. Although the precise mechanism(s) responsible for the ergogenic effects are still unclear, they are likely related to the sparing of skeletal muscle glycogen, prevention of liver glycogen depletion and subsequent development of hypoglycemia, and/or allowing high rates of carbohydrate oxidation. Currently, for prolonged exercise lasting 2-3 h, athletes are advised to ingest carbohydrates at a rate of 60 g·h⁻¹ (~1.0-1.1 g·min⁻¹) to allow for maximal exogenous glucose oxidation rates. However, well-trained endurance athletes competing longer than 2.5 h can metabolize carbohydrate up to 90 g·h⁻¹ (~1.5-1.8 g·min⁻¹) provided that multiple transportable carbohydrates are ingested (e.g. 1.2 g·min⁻¹ glucose plus 0.6 g·min⁻¹ of fructose). Surprisingly, small amounts of carbohydrate ingestion during exercise may also enhance the performance of shorter (45-60 min), more intense (>75 % peak oxygen uptake; VO(₂peak)) exercise bouts, despite the fact that endogenous carbohydrate stores are unlikely to be limiting. The mechanism(s) responsible for such ergogenic properties of carbohydrate ingestion during short, more intense exercise bouts has been suggested to reside in the central nervous

  12. Chitin and stress induced protein kinase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Azevedo da Silva, Raquel; Bressendorff, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The assays described here are pertinent to protein kinase studies in any plant. They include an immunoblot phosphorylation/activation assay and an in-gel activity assay for MAP kinases (MPKs) using the general protein kinase substrate myelin basic protein. They also include a novel in-gel peptide...... substrate assay for Snf1-related kinase family 2 members (SnRK2s). This kinase family-specific assay overcomes some limitations of in-gel assays and permits the identification of different types of kinase activities in total protein extracts....

  13. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    phosphorylation. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in bacteria is particular with respect to very low occupancy of phosphorylation sites in vivo; this has represented a major challenge for detection techniques. Only the recent breakthroughs in gel-free high resolution mass spectrometry allowed the systematic...... detection of phosphorylated tyrosines by phosphoprotomics studies in bacteria. Other pioneering studies conducted in recent years, such as the first structures of BY-kinases and biochemical and phyiological studies of new BY-kinase substrates significantly furthered our understanding of these enzymes...

  14. Bacterial carbohydrate structure database 3: principles and realization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toukach, Philip V

    2011-01-24

    Bacterial carbohydrate structure database (BCSDB) is an open-access project that collects primary publication data on carbohydrate structures originating from bacteria, their biological properties, bibliographic and taxonomic annotations, NMR spectra, etc. Almost complete coverage and outstanding data consistency are achieved. BCSDB version 3 and the principles lying behind it, including glycan description language, are reported.

  15. Effects of spermidine, proline and carbohydrate sources on somatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of spermidine, proline and carbohydrate sources on somatic embryogenesis from main root transverse thin cell layers of Vietnamese ginseng ( Panax ... To further optimize a culture medium for induction of embryo formation of P. vietnamensis, three carbohydrate sources (sucrose, glucose and fructose) at 10 to 60 ...

  16. Effects of Different Sources of Non-Fibrous Carbohydrate on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr.taimouri

    fibre carbohydrate .... Non-fibrous carbohydrate (NFC) was calculated as: ..... Food Res. 35, 99-112. O'Doherty, J.V., Maher, P.F. & Crosby, T.F., 1997. The performance of pregnant ewes and their progeny when offered grass silage, maize silage or ...

  17. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, J; Hahm, H S; Seeberger, P H; Pagel, K

    2015-10-08

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  18. Force fields and scoring functions for carbohydrate simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiuming; Chen, Zhaoqiang; Cossins, Benjamin P; Xu, Zhijian; Shao, Qiang; Ding, Kai; Zhu, Weiliang; Shi, Jiye

    2015-01-12

    Carbohydrate dynamics plays a vital role in many biological processes, but we are not currently able to probe this with experimental approaches. The highly flexible nature of carbohydrate structures differs in many aspects from other biomolecules, posing significant challenges for studies employing computational simulation. Over past decades, computational study of carbohydrates has been focused on the development of structure prediction methods, force field optimization, molecular dynamics simulation, and scoring functions for carbohydrate-protein interactions. Advances in carbohydrate force fields and scoring functions can be largely attributed to enhanced computational algorithms, application of quantum mechanics, and the increasing number of experimental structures determined by X-ray and NMR techniques. The conformational analysis of carbohydrates is challengeable and has gone into intensive study in elucidating the anomeric, the exo-anomeric, and the gauche effects. Here, we review the issues associated with carbohydrate force fields and scoring functions, which will have a broad application in the field of carbohydrate-based drug design. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dietary carbohydrates, components of energy balance, and associated health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harry A; Gonzalez, Javier T; Thompson, Dylan; Betts, James A

    2017-10-01

    The role of dietary carbohydrates in the development of obesity and associated metabolic dysfunction has recently been questioned. Within the last decade, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition carried out a comprehensive evaluation of the role of dietary carbohydrates in human health. The current review aims to complement and extend this report by providing specific consideration of the effects of the component parts of energy balance, their interactions, and their culmination on energy storage and health. PubMed was searched for all published trials that had a minimum follow-up period of 3 months and were designed to manipulate dietary carbohydrate intake, irrespective of resultant differences in absolute carbohydrate dose (grams per day). Dietary carbohydrate manipulation has little effect on the individual components of energy balance that have been assessed. However, the role of dietary carbohydrates in influencing physical activity has yet to be assessed using gold-standard measurement tools. Moreover, adherence to a diet of modified carbohydrate content has not been found to result in a consistent pattern of changes in weight or indirect measures of metabolic health. However, certain markers of cardiovascular disease risk (ie, blood triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) may respond positively to a reduction in dietary carbohydrates. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Determination of carbohydrate and β-carotene content of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out to determine the soluble carbohydrate and β-carotene content of some selected vegetables which include sorrel (Hibiscus subdariffa), carrot (Daucus carota) and Moringa (Moringa oleifera).Soluble carbohydrate was determined by Anthrone method Spectrophotometry at wavelength of 620nm.

  1. Carbohydrates in the waters of ponds of Ramanthuruthu Island, Cochin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Kumaran, S.; Balasubramanian, T.; Stephen, R.; Panampunnayil, S.U.

    Particulate and dissolved carbohydrates in 4 ponds of the Ramanthuruthu Island (9 degrees 58.5'N lat. and 76 degrees 15.4'E long.) were studied for 1 yr (1978-79). Particulate carbohydrate concentration varied from 0.2 to 2 mg/l. Dissolved...

  2. Multivalent carbohydrate inhibitors of bacterial lectins and toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, O.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria and their toxins often carry proteins on their surface binding to specific components of tissue cells or the extracellular matrix. In many cases the components are carbohydrate structures. The adhesion of these carbohydrate-binding proteins, named lectins, to human glycoconjugates is a

  3. Frankincense tapping reduces the carbohydrate storage of Boswellia trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengistu, T.; Sterck, F.J.; Fetene, M.; Bongers, F.

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates fixed by photosynthesis are stored in plant organs in the form of starch or sugars. Starch and sugars sum to the total non-structural carbohydrate pool (TNC) and may serve as intermediate pools between assimilation and utilization. We examined the impact of tapping on TNC

  4. The effect of carbohydrates on alpha-amylase activity measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baks, T.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Ceralpha method can be used for ¿-amylase activity measurements during the hydrolysis of starch at high substrate concentrations (>40 wt.%). However, the results are affected by the carbohydrates present in the samples. The effect of carbohydrates on the Ceralpha ¿-amylase activity

  5. Distribution of dissolved carbohydrates and uronic acids in a tropical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbohydrates including uronic acids are among the active components of dissolved organic carbon, and play an important role in biogeochemical cycling of organic carbon in marine environments. In order to understand their distribution, concentrations of total dissolved carbohydrate (TCHO), dissolved polysaccharide ...

  6. Mixed drink increased carbohydrate oxidation but not performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kathryn van Boom

    It is well-established that consuming exogenous carbohydrate during prolonged physical activity improves performance.[1,2] The role of exogenous carbohydrate intake is hypothesised to provide additional substrate for oxidation[3] specifically influencing performance by decreasing endogenous liver glycogen utilisation ...

  7. Mixed drink increased carbohydrate oxidation but not performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... improvement in 40 km time trial time between an isocaloric GP-only or a GP and fructose drink, and no differences in any of the measured variables other than exogenous carbohydrate oxidation at 90 minutes during the pre-time trial steady state ride. Keywords: multiple carbohydrate, cycling, endurance, glucose, fructose ...

  8. Chemical Changes in Carbohydrates Produced by Thermal Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseney, R. Carl

    1984-01-01

    Discusses chemical changes that occur in the carbohydrates found in food products when these products are subjected to thermal processing. Topics considered include browning reactions, starch found in food systems, hydrolysis of carbohydrates, extrusion cooking, processing of cookies and candies, and alterations in gums. (JN)

  9. Characterization of immobilized post-carbohydrate meal salivary α ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of experimental parameters like pH, temperature and substrate concentration on the activity of the immobilized post-carbohydrate meal salivary ... of immobilized post-carbohydrate meal salivary α-amylase in this study show that immobilization had no significant effect on the enzyme and compared to kinetic ...

  10. Attenuation measurements in solutions of some carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagandeep; Singh, K.; Lark, B.S.; Sahota, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    The linear attenuation coefficients in aqueous solutions of three carbohydrates, glucose (C 6 H 12 O 6 ), maltose monohydrate (C 12 H 22 O 11 ·H 2 O), and sucrose (C 12 H 22 O 11 ), were determined at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1,173, and 1,332 keV by the gamma-ray transmission method in a good geometry setup. From the precisely measured densities of these solutions, mass attenuation coefficients were then obtained that varied systematically with the corresponding changes in the concentrations (g/cm 3 ) of these solutions. The experimental results were used in terms of effective atomic numbers and electron densities. A comparison between experimental and theoretical values of attenuation coefficients has proven that the study has a potential application for the determination of attenuation coefficients of solid solutes from their solutions without obtaining them in pure crystalline form

  11. Attenuation Measurements in Solutions of Some Carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagandeep; Singh, Kulwant; Lark, B.S.; Sahota, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    The linear attenuation coefficients in aqueous solutions of three carbohydrates, glucose (C 6 H 12 O 6 ), maltose monohydrate (C 12 H 22 O 11 .H 2 O), and sucrose (C 12 H 22 O 11 ), were determined at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173, and 1332 keV by the gamma-ray transmission method in a good geometry setup. From the precisely measured densities of these solutions, mass attenuation coefficients were then obtained that varied systematically with the corresponding changes in the concentrations (g/cm 3 ) of these solutions. The experimental results were used in terms of effective atomic numbers and electron densities. A comparison between experimental and theoretical values of attenuation coefficients has proven that the study has a potential application for the determination of attenuation coefficients of solid solutes from their solutions without obtaining them in pure crystalline form

  12. Malabsorption of carbohydrate foods by urban blacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, I; Walker, A R; Naik, I; Riedel, L; Daya, B; de Beer, M

    1991-12-07

    Prevalences of non-infective bowel diseases are very low in South African urban blacks compared with the white population. In seeking elucidation, using breath hydrogen measurements in series of black and white subjects, small-bowel transit time was determined, and the malabsorption of maize, wheat, and rice investigated. Median transit times in both ethnic groups were similar. Rice was fully, but wheat incompletely absorbed by both groups. Maize, the staple food of blacks, was incompletely absorbed by them, although completely absorbed by the white subjects. Carbohydrate consumption is high in the black population (60-65% of total energy intake). It is probable that in blacks, despite their now eating a low-fibre diet, an expected increase in large-bowel diseases has been inhibited in part by the protective mechanism of fermentation of malabsorbed maize and wheat.

  13. Hydrophobicity of carbohydrates and related hydroxy compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttersack, Christoph

    2017-06-29

    The hydrophobic interaction of carbohydrates and other hydroxy compounds with a C18-modified silica gel column was measured with pure water as eluent, thereby expanding the range of measurements already published. The interaction is augmented by structure strengthening salts and decreasing temperature. Although the interaction of the solute with the hydrophobic interface is expected to only imperfectly reflect its state in aqueous bulk solution, the retention can be correlated to hydration numbers calculated from molecular mechanics studies given in the literature. No correlation can be established towards published hydration numbers obtained by physical methods (isentropic compressibility, O-17 NMR relaxation, terahertz spectroscopy, and viscosity). The hydrophobicity is discussed with respect to the chemical structure. It increases with the fraction and size of hydrophobic molecular surface regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Arabinogalactan proteins: focus on carbohydrate active enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eKnoch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant-microbe interaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their function. Numerous studies using monoclonal antibodies that recognize different AGP glycan epitopes have shown the appearance of a slightly altered AGP glycan in a specific stage of development in plant cells. Therefore, it is anticipated that the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycan is tightly regulated during development. Until recently, however, little was known about the enzymes involved in the metabolism of AGP glycans. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy; http://www.cazy.org/ involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycans, and we discuss the biological role of these enzymes in plant development.

  15. Structure of a streptococcal adhesion carbohydrate receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassels, F.J.; Fales, H.M.; London, J.; Carlson, R.W.; van Halbeek, H.

    1990-01-01

    Interactions between complementary protein and carbohydrate structures on different genera of human oral bacteria have been implicated in the formation of dental plaque. The carbohydrate receptor on Streptococcus sanguis H1 that is specific for the adhesion on Capnocytophaga ochracea ATCC 33596 has been isolated from the streptococcal cell wall, purified, and structurally characterized. The hexasaccharide repeating unit of the polysaccharide was purified by reverse-phase, amino-bonded silica, and gel permeation high performance liquid chromatography. Earlier studies established that the repeating unit was a hexasaccharide composed of rhamnose, galactose, and glucose in the ration of 2:3:1, respectively. In the present study, determination of absolute configuration by gas chromatography of the trimethylsilyl (+)-2-butyl glycosides revealed that the rhamnose residues were of the L configuration while the hexoses were all D. 252Californium plasma desorption mass spectrometry of the native, the acetylated and the reduced and acetylated hexasaccharide determined that the molecular mass of the native hexasaccharide was 959, and that the 2 rhamnose residues were linked to each other at the nonreducing terminus of the linear molecule. Methylation analysis revealed the positions of the glycosidic linkages in the hexasaccharide and showed that a galactose residue was present at the reducing end. The structural characterization of the hexasaccharide was completed by one and two dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Complete 1H and 13C assignments for each glycosyl residue were established by two-dimensional (1H,1H) correlation spectroscopy, homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn, and (13C,1H) correlation experiments. The configurations of the glycosidic linkages were inferred from the chemical shifts and coupling constants of the anomeric 1H and 13C resonances

  16. Boronate affinity saccharide electrophoresis: a novel carbohydrate analysis tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Thomas R; Springall, Jeremy S; Rogalle, Damien; Masumoto, Naoko; Ching Li, Hung; D'Hooge, François; Perera, Semali P; Jenkins, A Toby A; James, Tony D; Fossey, John S; van den Elsen, Jean M H

    2008-11-01

    The incorporation of specialised carbohydrate affinity ligand methacrylamido phenylboronic acid in polyacrylamide gels for fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis greatly improved the effective separation of saccharides that show similar mobilities in standard electrophoresis. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using methacrylamido phenylboronic acid in low loading (typically 0.5-1% dry weight) was unequivocally shown to alter retention of labelled saccharides depending on their boronate affinity. While conventional fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis of 2-aminoacridone labelled glucose oligomers showed an inverted parabolic migration, an undesired trait of small oligosaccharides labelled with this neutral fluorophore, boron affinity saccharide electrophoresis separation of these carbohydrates completely restored their predicted running order, based on their charge/mass ratio, and resulted in improved separation of the analyte saccharides. These results exemplify boron affinity saccharide electrophoresis as an important new technique for analysing carbohydrates and sugar-containing molecules.

  17. Carbohydrate CuAAC click chemistry for therapy and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Peng; Zeng, Ya-Li; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Field, Robert A; Chen, Guo-Rong

    2016-06-24

    Carbohydrates are important as signaling molecules and for cellular recognition events, therefore offering scope for the development of carbohydrate-mimetic diagnostics and drug candidates. As a consequence, the construction of carbohydrate-based bioactive compounds and sensors has become an active research area. While the advent of click chemistry has greatly accelerated the progress of medicinal chemistry and chemical biology, recent literature has seen an extensive use of such approaches to construct functionally diverse carbohydrate derivatives. Here we summarize some of the progress, covering the period 2010 to mid-2015, in Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition CuAAC "click chemistry" of carbohydrate derivatives, in the context of potential therapeutic and diagnostic tool development. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-farnesylated B-type lamin can tether chromatin inside the nucleus and its chromatin interaction requires the Ig-fold region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Ryo; Sugiyama, Shin; Katagiri, Motoi; Chuman, Yoshiro; Furukawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Lamins are thought to direct heterochromatin to the nuclear lamina (NL); however, this function of lamin has not been clearly demonstrated in vivo. To address this, we analyzed polytene chromosome morphology when artificial lamin variants were expressed in Drosophila endoreplicating cells. We found that the CaaX-motif-deleted B-type lamin Dm 0 , but not A-type lamin C, was able to form a nuclear envelope-independent layer that was closely associated with chromatin. Other nuclear envelope proteins were not detected in this "ectopic lamina," and the associated chromatin showed a repressive histone modification maker but not a permissive histone modification marker nor RNA polymerase II proteins. Furthermore, deletion of the C-terminal lamin-Ig-fold domain prevents chromatin association with this ectopic lamina. Thus, non-farnesylated B-type lamin Dm 0 can form an ectopic lamina and induce changes to chromatin structure and status inside the interphase nucleus.

  19. The effects of adding leucine to pre and postexercise carbohydrate beverages on acute muscle recovery from resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Matt S; Young, John C; Golding, Lawrence A; Kruskall, Laura J; Tandy, Richard D; Conway-Klaassen, Janice M; Beck, Travis W

    2010-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of adding leucine to pre and postexercise carbohydrate beverages on selected markers of muscle damage, delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and squat performance for up to 72 hours after lower-body resistance training. Seventeen resistance trained men (mean +/- SD age 22.9 +/- 2.9 years) and 3 resistance trained women (mean +/- SD age 21.6 +/- 2.6 years) performed 6 sets of squats to fatigue using 75% of the 1 repetition maximum. Each subject consumed a carbohydrate beverage 30 minutes before and immediately after exercise with or without the addition of 22.5 mgxkg (45 mgxkg total) of leucine in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Serum creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and DOMS were analyzed immediately before (TIME1), 24 (TIME2), 48 (TIME3), and 72 (TIME4) hours after exercise. The subjects repeated the squat protocol at TIME4 to test recovery. No differences were observed between groups for squat performance, defined as the total number of repetitions performed during 6 sets of squats, for both TIME1 and TIME4. The addition of leucine did not significantly decrease CK and LDH activity or DOMS. These results suggested that adding leucine to carbohydrate beverages did not affect acute muscle recovery and squat performance during both initial testing and during a subsequent exercise bout 72 hours later in resistance trained subjects.

  20. Renewable Hydrogen Carrier - Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    The production of hydrogen by purple bacteria or microalgae are difficult to scale up due to low energy concentration insolation (e.g., ~200 W/m2...Cycle Assessment Of Biodiesel Production From Microalgae . Environ. Sci. Technol. 2009, 43, 6475–6481. 28. Logan, B.E.; Regan, J.M. Microbial fuel...sustainable production , high-density storage, costly infrastructure, to eliminating safety concern. The use of renewable carbohydrate as a high-density

  1. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide for the prognostic prediction of severe enterovirus 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Qiu; Xiulan Lu; Pingping Liu; Xinping Zhang; Chao Zuo; Zhenghui Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) can predict impending brainstem encephalitis, pulmonary edema, pulmonary hemorrhage, cardiopulmonary failure, and death in children with severe enterovirus 71 (EV71)-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Methods: Plasma NT-proBNP levels of 282 children with severe EV71-associated HFMD were measured. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher in patients wit...

  2. Particulate carbohydrate in the euphotic zone of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N; De; Shirodkar, P.V.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    Particulate matter collected from the Bay of Bengal was analysed for carbohydrate and chlorophyll a. The distribution of chlorophyll a was different from that of carbohydrate. Chlorophyll a increased from north to south, whereas carbohydrate levels...

  3. Carbohydrate-enriched cyanobacterial biomass as feedstock for bio-methane production through anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markou, Giorgos; Angelidaki, Irini; Georgakakis, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion performance using carbohydrate-enriched biomass of Arthrospira platensis was studied. The carbohydrate enrichment was achieved after the cultivation of A. platensis under phosphorus limitation conditions. Three biomass compositions (60%, 40% and 20% carbohydrates content) ...

  4. Dietary non-digestible carbohydrates and the resistance to intestinal infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggencate, ten S.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords: Non-digestible carbohydrates, prebiotics, inulin, FOS, calcium, microflora, short-chain fatty acids, mucin, intestinal permeability, salmonella, infection, rat, humanDietary non-digestible carbohydrates and the resistance to intestinal infectionsNon-digestible carbohydrates (NDC) stimulate

  5. Effects of isocaloric carbohydrate vs. carbohydrate-protein supplements on cycling time to exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Kristy L; Coburn, Jared W; Beam, William C; Brown, Lee E

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of isocaloric carbohydrate (CHO) and carbohydrate-protein (CHO-Pro) supplements on time to exhaustion. Eleven moderately aerobically fit adults (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max= 48.3 ± 6.5 ml·kg·min) performed a maximal cycle ergometer test for the determination of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max. At least 72 hours later, the participants performed a time-to-exhaustion test at a power output equivalent to the power output when subjects were at 75% of their V[Combining Dot Above]O2max. Either the CHO or the CHO-Pro supplement was administered at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after this test. After 3 hours of recovery and supplement ingestion, a second time-to-exhaustion test was performed. This testing protocol was repeated for the third visit, but the supplement not given during the second visit was administered. The results indicated that there was no significant difference in time to exhaustion after isocaloric CHO (pretest 22.4 ± 2.84 minutes, posttest 25.4 ± 4.45 minutes) and CHO-Pro (pretest 22.3 ± 3.46 minutes, posttest 24.0 ± 5.08 minutes) supplementation. Carbohydrate and CHO-Pro ingestion after exercise appear to have similar effects on short-term recovery.

  6. [Performance enhancement by carbohydrate intake during sport: effects of carbohydrates during and after high-intensity exercise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beelen, Milou; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous carbohydrate availability does not provide sufficient energy for prolonged moderate to high-intensity exercise. Carbohydrate ingestion during high-intensity exercise can therefore enhance performance.- For exercise lasting 1 to 2.5 hours, athletes are advised to ingest 30-60 g of carbohydrates per hour.- Well-trained endurance athletes competing for longer than 2.5 hours at high intensity can metabolise up to 90 g of carbohydrates per hour, provided that a mixture of glucose and fructose is ingested.- Athletes participating in intermittent or team sports are advised to follow the same strategies but the timing of carbohydrate intake depends on the type of sport.- If top performance is required again within 24 hours after strenuous exercise, the advice is to supplement endogenous carbohydrate supplies quickly within the first few hours post-exercise by ingesting large amounts of carbohydrate (1.2 g/kg/h) or a lower amount of carbohydrate (0.8 g/kg/h) with a small amount of protein (0.2-0.4 g/kg/h).

  7. B-type esterases in the snail Xeropicta derbentina: An enzymological analysis to evaluate their use as biomarkers of pesticide exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguerre, Christel [Universite d' Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, UMR 406 UAPV/INRA, F-84914 Avignon (France); INRA, Laboratoire de Toxicologie Environnementale, UMR 406 UAPV/INRA, F-84914 Avignon (France); Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C. [Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Faculty of Environmental Science, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Carlos III s/n, 45071 Toledo (Spain); Koehler, Heinz R. [Animal Physiological Ecology, University of Tuebingen, Konrad-Adenauer-Strasse 20, D-72072 Tuebingen (Germany); Triebskorn, Rita [Animal Physiological Ecology, University of Tuebingen, Konrad-Adenauer-Strasse 20, D-72072 Tuebingen (Germany); Steinbeis-Transfer Center for Ecotoxicology and Ecophysiology, Blumenstrasse 13, D-72108 Rottenburg (Germany); Capowiez, Yvan [INRA, Unite PSH, F- 84914 Avignon (France); Rault, Magali [Universite d' Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, UMR 406 UAPV/INRA, F-84914 Avignon (France); INRA, Laboratoire de Toxicologie Environnementale, UMR 406 UAPV/INRA, F-84914 Avignon (France); Mazzia, Christophe [Universite d' Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, UMR 406 UAPV/INRA, F-84914 Avignon (France); INRA, Laboratoire de Toxicologie Environnementale, UMR 406 UAPV/INRA, F-84914 Avignon (France)], E-mail: mazzia@avignon.inra.fr

    2009-01-15

    The study was prompted to characterize the B-type esterase activities in the terrestrial snail Xeropicta derbentina and to evaluate its sensitivity to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. Specific cholinesterase and carboxylesterase activities were mainly obtained with acetylthiocholine (K{sub m} = 77.2 mM; V{sub max} = 38.2 mU/mg protein) and 1-naphthyl acetate (K{sub m} = 222 mM, V{sub max} = 1095 mU/mg protein) substrates, respectively. Acetylcholinesterase activity was concentration-dependently inhibited by chlorpyrifos-oxon, dichlorvos, carbaryl and carbofuran (IC50 = 1.35 x 10{sup -5}-3.80 x 10{sup -8} M). The organophosphate-inhibited acetylcholinesterase activity was reactivated in the presence of pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride. Carboxylesterase activity was inhibited by organophosphorus insecticides (IC50 = 1.20 x 10{sup -5}-2.98 x 10{sup -8} M) but not by carbamates. B-esterase-specific differences in the inhibition by organophosphates and carbamates are discussed with respect to the buffering capacity of the carboxylesterase to reduce pesticide toxicity. These results suggest that B-type esterases in X. derbentina are suitable biomarkers of pesticide exposure and that this snail could be used as sentinel species in field monitoring of Mediterranean climate regions. - Characterization of the B-type esterases in the terrestrial snail Xeropicta derbentina in order to evaluate pesticide exposure.

  8. B-type esterases in the snail Xeropicta derbentina: An enzymological analysis to evaluate their use as biomarkers of pesticide exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguerre, Christel; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C.; Koehler, Heinz R.; Triebskorn, Rita; Capowiez, Yvan; Rault, Magali; Mazzia, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    The study was prompted to characterize the B-type esterase activities in the terrestrial snail Xeropicta derbentina and to evaluate its sensitivity to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. Specific cholinesterase and carboxylesterase activities were mainly obtained with acetylthiocholine (K m = 77.2 mM; V max = 38.2 mU/mg protein) and 1-naphthyl acetate (K m = 222 mM, V max = 1095 mU/mg protein) substrates, respectively. Acetylcholinesterase activity was concentration-dependently inhibited by chlorpyrifos-oxon, dichlorvos, carbaryl and carbofuran (IC50 = 1.35 x 10 -5 -3.80 x 10 -8 M). The organophosphate-inhibited acetylcholinesterase activity was reactivated in the presence of pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride. Carboxylesterase activity was inhibited by organophosphorus insecticides (IC50 = 1.20 x 10 -5 -2.98 x 10 -8 M) but not by carbamates. B-esterase-specific differences in the inhibition by organophosphates and carbamates are discussed with respect to the buffering capacity of the carboxylesterase to reduce pesticide toxicity. These results suggest that B-type esterases in X. derbentina are suitable biomarkers of pesticide exposure and that this snail could be used as sentinel species in field monitoring of Mediterranean climate regions. - Characterization of the B-type esterases in the terrestrial snail Xeropicta derbentina in order to evaluate pesticide exposure

  9. Comparison of the backbone dynamics of wild-type Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c{sub 552} and its b-type variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozawa, Kaeko; Ferguson, Stuart J.; Redfield, Christina, E-mail: christina.redfield@bioch.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Smith, Lorna J., E-mail: lorna.smith@chem.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Cytochrome c{sub 552} from the thermophilic bacterium Hydrogenobacter thermophilus is a typical c-type cytochrome which binds heme covalently via two thioether bonds between the two heme vinyl groups and two cysteine thiol groups in a CXXCH sequence motif. This protein was converted to a b-type cytochrome by substitution of the two cysteine residues by alanines (Tomlinson and Ferguson in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 97:5156–5160, 2000a). To probe the significance of the covalent attachment of the heme in the c-type protein, {sup 15}N relaxation and hydrogen exchange studies have been performed for the wild-type and b-type proteins. The two variants share very similar backbone dynamic properties, both proteins showing high {sup 15}N order parameters in the four main helices, with reduced values in an exposed loop region (residues 18–21), and at the C-terminal residue Lys80. Some subtle changes in chemical shift and hydrogen exchange protection are seen between the wild-type and b-type variant proteins, not only for residues at and neighbouring the mutation sites, but also for some residues in the heme binding pocket. Overall, the results suggest that the main role of the covalent linkages between the heme group and the protein chain must be to increase the stability of the protein.

  10. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Lenskjold, Toke; Jacoby, Anne Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates a role for glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and in cognitive disturbances; however, the natural variation in GSK-3β activity over time is unknown. We aimed to investigate GSK-3β activity over time and its possible correlation...

  11. Non-Viral Deoxyribonucleoside Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Louise Slot; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides to their corresponding monophosphate compounds. dNks also phosphorylate deoxyribonucleoside analogues that are used in the treatment of cancer or viral infections. The study of the mammalian dNKs has therefore always been of gr...

  12. The alpha-kinase family: an exceptional branch on the protein kinase tree.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelbeek, J.A.J.; Clark, K.; Venselaar, H.; Huynen, M.A.; Leeuwen, F.N. van

    2010-01-01

    The alpha-kinase family represents a class of atypical protein kinases that display little sequence similarity to conventional protein kinases. Early studies on myosin heavy chain kinases in Dictyostelium discoideum revealed their unusual propensity to phosphorylate serine and threonine residues in

  13. Vancomycin-resistant vanB-type Enterococcus faecium isolates expressing varying levels of vancomycin resistance and being highly prevalent among neonatal patients in a single ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Guido

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vancomycin-resistant isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium are of special concern and patients at risk of acquiring a VRE colonization/infection include also intensively-cared neonates. We describe here an ongoing high prevalence of VanB type E. faecium in a neonatal ICU hardly to identify by routine diagnostics. Methods During a 10 months’ key period 71 E. faecium isolates including 67 vanB-type isolates from 61 patients were collected non-selectively. Vancomycin resistance was determined by different MIC methods (broth microdilution, Vitek® 2 including two Etest® protocols (McFarland 0.5/2.0. on Mueller-Hinton/Brain Heart Infusion agars. Performance of three chromogenic VRE agars to identify the vanB type outbreak VRE was evaluated (BrillianceTM VRE agar, chromIDTM VRE agar, CHROMagarTM VRE. Isolates were genotyped by SmaI- and CeuI-macrorestriction analysis in PFGE, plasmid profiling, vanB Southern hybridisations as well as MLST typing. Results Majority of vanB isolates (n = 56, 79% belonged to a single ST192 outbreak strain type showing an identical PFGE pattern and analyzed representative isolates revealed a chromosomal localization of a vanB2-Tn5382 cluster type. Vancomycin MICs in cation-adjusted MH broth revealed a susceptible value of ≤4 mg/L for 31 (55% of the 56 outbreak VRE isolates. Etest® vancomycin on MH and BHI agars revealed only two vanB VRE isolates with a susceptible result; in general Etest® MIC results were about 1 to 2 doubling dilutions higher than MICs assessed in broth and values after the 48 h readout were 0.5 to 1 doubling dilutions higher for vanB VRE. Of all vanB type VRE only three, three and two isolates did not grow on BrillianceTM VRE agar, chromIDTM VRE agar and CHROMagarTM VRE, respectively. Permanent cross contamination via the patients’ surrounding appeared as a possible risk factor for permanent VRE colonization/infection. Conclusions Low level expression of van

  14. Influence of carbohydrates on the isolation of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, A; Futagawa-Endo, Y; Dicks, L M T

    2011-04-01

      To determine the influence of carbohydrates on enrichment isolation of lactic acid bacteria from different niches.   Lactic acid bacteria in three traditional fermented products in southern Africa (amasi, mahewu and tshwala) and in three fresh samples (two flowers and a fruit) were enrichment cultured in media supplemented with 13 different carbohydrates. Diversity of lactic acid bacteria was determined by PCR-denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis. Carbohydrates used in enrichment media had a big impact on the isolation of lactic acid bacteria from fermented products. Depending on the carbohydrates tested, the number of species detected ranged from one to four in amasi, one to five in mahewu and one to three in tshwala. Fructose and mannitol selected for relatively higher numbers of lactic acid bacteria in fermented products. Specific relationships between substrates and lactic acid bacteria have been noted. On the other hand, small influences were found among carbohydrates tested in flowers and fruit.   Carbohydrates have a big impact on the isolation of a variety of lactic acid bacteria in fermented food.   This is the first study that reports the influence of carbohydrates on the enrichment of lactic acid bacteria. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. WURCS 2.0 Update To Encapsulate Ambiguous Carbohydrate Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Masaaki; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Aoki, Nobuyuki P; Yamada, Issaku; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2017-04-24

    Accurate representation of structural ambiguity is important for storing carbohydrate structures containing varying levels of ambiguity in the literature and databases. Although many representations for carbohydrates have been developed in the past, a generalized but discrete representation format did not exist. We had previously developed the Web3 Unique Representation of Carbohydrate Structures (WURCS) in an attempt to define a generalizable and unique linear representation for carbohydrate structures. However, it lacked sufficient rules to uniquely describe ambiguous structures. In this work, we updated WURCS to handle such ambiguous monosaccharide structures. In particular, to handle structural ambiguity around (potential) carbonyl groups incidental to the carbohydrate analysis, we defined a representation of backbone carbons containing atomic-level ambiguity. As a result, we show that WURCS 2.0 can represent a wider variety of carbohydrate structures containing ambiguous monosaccharides, such as those whose ring closure is undefined or whose anomeric information is only known. This new format provides a representation of carbohydrates that was not possible before, and it is currently being used by the International Glycan Structure Repository GlyTouCan.

  16. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warda, Alicja K; Siezen, Roland J; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed.

  17. Degradation properties of protein and carbohydrate during sludge anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Anqi

    2015-09-01

    Degradation of protein and carbohydrate is vital for sludge anaerobic digestion performance. However, few studies focused on degradation properties of protein and carbohydrate. This study investigated detailed degradation properties of sludge protein and carbohydrate in order to gain insight into organics removal during anaerobic digestion. Results showed that carbohydrate was more efficiently degraded than protein and was degraded prior to protein. The final removal efficiencies of carbohydrate and protein were 49.7% and 32.2%, respectively. The first 3 days were a lag phase for protein degradation since rapid carbohydrate degradation in this phase led to repression of protease formation. Kinetics results showed that, after initial lag phase, protein degradation followed the first-order kinetic with rate constants of 0.0197 and 0.0018 d(-1) during later rapid degradation phase and slow degradation phase, respectively. Carbohydrate degradation also followed the first-order kinetics with a rate constant of 0.007 d(-1) after initial quick degradation phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Flannery

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii whole mucin microarrays; and (iii microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments.

  19. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja K Warda

    Full Text Available We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed.

  20. Characterization of carbohydrates in rainwater from the southeastern North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaugh, Katherine M; Byrd, Jade N; Avery, G Brooks; Mead, Ralph N; Willey, Joan D; Kieber, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    Carbohydrates have been widely reported in atmospheric aerosols, but have not previously been quantified in rainwater. We have identified and quantified a series of 11 specific compounds including monosaccharides (glucose, fructose, arabinose, galactose and pinitol), disaccharides (sucrose and trehalose), sugar alcohols (arabitol, dulcitol and mannitol) and the anhydrosaccharide levoglucosan. Rainwater analyzed in this study includes 52 distinct precipitation events in Wilmington, NC between June 2011 and October 2012. Our analysis indicates carbohydrates typically contribute carbohydrates reached as high as 5.8 μM, with glucose and sucrose typically being the predominant species. The distribution of carbohydrates exhibited a distinct seasonal pattern, with higher concentrations of most carbohydrates, especially sucrose, in spring and summer, driven primarily by increased biogenic inputs during the growing season. Concentrations of carbohydrates were an order of magnitude higher in storms of terrestrial origin compared to marine events, further supporting a terrestrial biogenic origin of most species. Sequential sampling of Hurricane Irene showed significant quantities of carbohydrates present at the end of the storm when air mass back trajectories traversed over land. The highest level of levoglucosan, a compound associated with biomass burning, was detected in rain with an air mass back trajectory that traveled over a region affected by wildfires. When compared to aerosol concentrations reported by others, the sugar concentrations in rain demonstrate wet deposition is an important removal mechanism of this water-soluble and bioavailable fraction of atmospheric particulate organic matter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens in major salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Thorn, J

    1994-01-01

    Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens Tn, sialosyl-Tn and T are often markers of neoplastic transformation and have very limited expression in normal tissues. We performed an immunohistological study of simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens, including H and A variants, with well......-defined monoclonal antibodies (MAb) on frozen and paraffin-embedded normal salivary gland tissue from 22 parotid, 14 submandibular, six sublingual, and 13 labial glands to elucidate the simple mucin-type glycosylation pattern in relation to cyto- and histodifferentiation. The investigated carbohydrate structures...

  2. Cerebral carbohydrate cost of physical exertion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Dawson, Ellen A

    2004-01-01

    Above a certain level of cerebral activation the brain increases its uptake of glucose more than that of O(2), i.e., the cerebral metabolic ratio of O(2)/(glucose + 12 lactate) decreases. This study quantified such surplus brain uptake of carbohydrate relative to O(2) in eight healthy males who...... to exhaustion (15.8 +/- 1.7 min; P carbohydrate was not substantiated...... and, consequently, exhaustive exercise involves a brain surplus carbohydrate uptake of a magnitude comparable with its glycogen content....

  3. PREPARATION OF CHEMICALLY WELL-DEFINED CARBOHYDRATE DENDRIMER CONJUGATES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    . Subsequently, the immunomodulating substance is also bound in a chemoselective manner, to give a dendrimer conjugate with a well-defined structure and connectivity and containing a precise, pre-determined ratio of carbohydrate to immunomodulating substance. The invention also relates to novel dendrimer......A method for the synthesis of dendrimer conjugates having a well-defined chemical structure, comprising one or more carbohydrate moieties and one or more immunomodulating substances coupled to a dendrimer, is presented. First, the carbohydrate is bound to the dendrimer in a chemoselective manner...

  4. [Soil carbohydrates: their determination methods and indication functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Hongtu; He, Hongbo; Zheng, Lichen; Wang, Ge

    2006-08-01

    Soil carbohydrates are the important component of soil organic matter, and play an important role in soil aggregation formation. Their hydrolysis methods involve sulfur acid (H2SO4), hydrochloric acid (HCl), and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) hydrolysis, and their determination methods include colorimetry, gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) , high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and high performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD). This paper summarized the methods of carbohydrates' hydrolysis, purification and detection, with focus on the derived methods of GLC, and briefly introduced the indication functions of carbohydrates in soil organic matter turnover.

  5. Effect of γ-irradiated carbohydrates on isolated synaptic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaler, G.V.; Lyskova, T.I.; Shadyro, O.I.; Samoilenko, S.G.; Edimecheva, I.P.; Aksentsev, S.L.; Konev, S.V.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of γ-irradiated solutions of carbohydrates, mainly glucose, upon Na + , K + -ATPase and lipid peroxidation in rat brain synaptosomal membranes was studied. The membrane damage by irradiated glucose was enhanced in the presence of Fe 2+ and was diminished when a free-radical scavenger (BHT) or metal chelators (EDTA, EGTA) were present. It is suggested that a key element in the free-radical membrane damage by irradiated carbohydrates is an Fe 2+ -complex of some species of the radiolysis products. Participation of radiotoxins of carbohydrate origin in radiogbiological effects is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Carbohydrate degrading polypeptide and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagt, Cornelis Maria Jacobus; Schooneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Roubos, Johannes Andries; Los, Alrik Pieter

    2015-10-20

    The invention relates to a polypeptide having carbohydrate material degrading activity which comprises the amino acid sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2 or an amino acid sequence encoded by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 1 or SEQ ID NO: 4, or a variant polypeptide or variant polynucleotide thereof, wherein the variant polypeptide has at least 96% sequence identity with the sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2 or the variant polynucleotide encodes a polypeptide that has at least 96% sequence identity with the sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2. The invention features the full length coding sequence of the novel gene as well as the amino acid sequence of the full-length functional protein and functional equivalents of the gene or the amino acid sequence. The invention also relates to methods for using the polypeptide in industrial processes. Also included in the invention are cells transformed with a polynucleotide according to the invention suitable for producing these proteins.

  7. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms . Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  8. Application of radiation degraded carbohydrates for plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshu, F.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation degraded carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carageenan, cellulose, pectin, etc. were applied for plant cultivation. Chitosan (poly-β -D-glucosamine) was easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbacterial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress on plants, phytoalexins induction, etc. Pectic fragments obtained from degraded pectin also induced the phytoalexins such as glyceollins in soybean and pisafin in pea. The irradiated chitosan shows the higher elicitor activity for pisafin than that of pectin. For the plant growth promotion, alginate derived from brown marine algae, chitosan and ligno-cellulosic extracts show a strong activity. The hot water and ethanol extracts from EFB and sugar cane bagasse were increased by irradiation. These extracts promoted the growth of plants and suppressed the damage on barley with salt and Zn stress. The results show that the degraded polysaccharides by radiation have the potential to induce various biological activities and the products can be use for agricultural and medical fields

  9. Growth factors and kinases in glioblastoma growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Peña-Ortiz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive type of brain cancer, having the highest invasion, migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis rates. Several signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of these processes including growth factors and their tyrosine kinase receptors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, and insulin-like growth factor–I (IGF–I. Different kinases and regulators also participate in signaling pathways initiated by growth factors, such as mitogen-activated kinases (MAPK, protein kinases C (PKC, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinases (PI3K, protein kinase B (PKB or Akt, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β, the mTOR complex, and Bcl-2. In this review, we will focus on the role of these proteins as possible therapeutic targets in GBM.

  10. DMPD: Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk)-the critical tyrosine kinase in LPS signalling? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15081522 Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk)-the critical tyrosine kinase in LPS signall...ruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk)-the critical tyrosine kinase in LPS signalling? PubmedID 15081522 Title Bruton...'s tyrosine kinase (Btk)-the critical tyrosine kinase in LPS signalling? Authors

  11. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.

    2006-01-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The....... The TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  12. Magneto structural transition in the DySi CrB- and micro-structural changes in the FeB-type compounds by XRPD and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schobinger-Papamantellos, P.; Brunelli, M.; Rodriguez-Carvajal, J.; Buschow, K.H.J.; Ritter, C.; Gramm, F.

    2011-01-01

    We present the magnetic temperature phase diagrams of the CrB- and FeB-type orthorhombic phases of the DySi compound, determined from high-quality powder XRPD and neutron diffraction, as well as the sample microstructure as determined by HRTEM. Both phase diagrams comprise a HT (T c1 , T c2 -T N ) and a LT range (5 K-T c1 , T c2 ) separated by a monoclinic phase transition at T c1 =T c2 =23.5 K well below the second-order Neel transition (T N =40 K). The transition paths are for CrB-type Cmcm (HT) T c1 →C2/m11 (LT), and for FeB Pnma (HT) T c2 →P2 1 /n11 (LT). The transitions are related to non-monotonous changes of the lattice and structural parameters displaying anomalies at T c1 , T c2 and slight volume changes. For the CrB-type the monoclinic angle decreases smoothly from T c1 down to 5 K and the maximum strain experienced by the crystal lattice in the (0 2 1) direction was found at T c1 . In the FeB-type, in addition to the magneto-elastic transition at T c2 =23.5 K, minor anomalies are found at 13.5 K in the temperature dependence of the monoclinic angle and the maximum strain along (0 1 1). Both temperatures mark the sequence of changes in the magnetic domain microstructure observed in FeB: below T 2 =23.5 K the incommensurate HT magnetic phase with q 3 ∼(01/2 1/7 ) disproportionates into two LT phases q 3 ∼(01/2 1/(11) )T 2 and q 2 ∼(01/2 1/6 ) coexisting in the form of domains with portions varying with T going from T 2 down to 13.5 K (q 2 increasing at the cost of q 3 ). This behaviour could be related to structural inhomogeneities below the first-order magneto-elastic transition T c2 , if one assumes a broad two phase range, where the HT (Pnma) phase coexists with (P2 1 /n) as a metastable phase at LT in the form of domains with different magnetic behaviour. - Research highlights: → Unusual magneto structural transition in dimorphic DySi (FeB- and CrB-type, T N =40 K) at T 2 =23.5 K. → Electron microscopy shows no intergrowth domains of the

  13. Spinach Pyruvate Kinase Isoforms 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysdorfer, Chris; Bassham, James A.

    1984-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves consists of two isoforms, separable by blue agarose chromatography. Both isoforms share similar pH profiles and substrate and alternate nucleotide Km values. In addition, both isoforms are inhibited by oxalate and ATP and activated by AMP. The isoforms differ in their response to three key metabolites; citrate, aspartate, and glutamate. The first isoform is similar to previously reported plant pyruvate kinases in its sensitivity to citrate inhibition. The Ki for this inhibition is 1.2 millimolar citrate. The second isoform is not affected by citrate but is regulated by aspartate and glutamate. Aspartate is an activator with a Ka of 0.05 millimolar, and glutamate is an inhibitor with a Ki of 0.68 millimolar. A pyruvate kinase with these properties has not been previously reported. Based on these considerations, we suggest that the activity of the first isoform is regulated by respiratory metabolism. The second isoform, in contrast, may be regulated by the demand for carbon skeletons for use in ammonia assimilation. PMID:16663425

  14. Associations of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide with kidney function decline in persons without clinical heart failure in the Heart and Soul Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Meyeon; Vittinghoff, Eric; Shlipak, Michael G; Mishra, Rakesh; Whooley, Mary; Bansal, Nisha

    2014-12-01

    Subclinical volume overload in the absence of diagnosed heart failure (HF) may be an underrecognized contributor to kidney function decline in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. We evaluated associations of circulating N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a marker of ventricular stretch, with change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We evaluated 535 patients with stable CAD and no history of HF, who were enrolled in the Heart and Soul Study and followed for 5 years. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide was measured at baseline. We evaluated the associations of NT-proBNP with change in kidney function over 5 years: (a) annual percent change in eGFR, (b) rapid kidney function loss (> 3% per year for 5 years), and (c) incident eGFR 280.9 pg/mL) had a greater odds of rapid kidney function loss after full adjustment (odds ratio 2.95; 95% CI 1-8.65; P = .0492). Associations with incident eGFR < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 were also significant (adjusted odds ratio 4.23; 95% CI 1.05-16.98; P = .0422). Results were similar when analyzed using BNP as the predictor. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and BNP are strongly and independently associated with accelerated kidney function loss, even in the absence of clinical HF. These findings suggest that subclinical cardiovascular dysfunction may contribute to elevated kidney disease risk in persons with CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of nonmagnetic d{sup 0} vs. d{sup 10}B-type cations on the magnetic exchange interactions in osmium double perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Hai L., E-mail: Hai.Feng@cpfs.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden 01187 (Germany); Yamaura, Kazunari [Research Center for Functional Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Tjeng, Liu Hao [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden 01187 (Germany); Jansen, Martin, E-mail: M.Jansen@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden 01187 (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart 70569 (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Polycrystalline samples of double perovskites Ba{sub 2}BOsO{sub 6} (B=Sc, Y, In) were synthesized by solid state reactions. They adopt the cubic double perovskite structures (space group, Fm-3m) with ordered B and Os arrangements. Ba{sub 2}BOsO{sub 6} (B=Sc, Y, In) show antiferromagnetic transitions at 93 K, 69 K, and 28 K, respectively. The Weiss-temperatures are −590 K for Ba{sub 2}ScOsO{sub 6}, −571 K for Ba{sub 2}YOsO{sub 6}, and −155 K for Ba{sub 2}InOsO{sub 6}. Sc{sup 3+} and Y{sup 3+} have the open-shell d{sup 0} electronic configuration, while In{sup 3+} has the closed-shell d{sup 10}. This indicates that a d{sup 0} B-type cation induces stronger overall magnetic exchange interactions in comparison to a d{sup 10}. Comparison of Ba{sub 2}BOsO{sub 6} (B=Sc, Y, In) to their Sr and Ca analogues shows that the structural distortions weaken the overall magnetic exchange interactions. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic properties of osmium double perovskites Ba{sub 2}BOsO{sub 6} (B=Sc, Y, In) were studied. Comparison of Ba{sub 2}BOsO{sub 6}indicates that a d{sup 0} B-type cation induces stronger overall magnetic exchange interactions in comparison to a d{sup 10}. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties of double perovskites Ba{sub 2}BOsO{sub 6} (B=Sc, Y, In) were studied. • A d{sup 0}B-type cation induces stronger magnetic interactions than a d{sup 10}. • Structural distortions weaken the overall Os{sup 5+}-Os{sup 5+} magnetic interactions.

  16. cycMs3, a novel B-type alfalfa cyclin gene, is induced in the G0-to-G1 transition of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskiene, I; Bögre, L; Dahl, M; Pirck, M; Ha, D T; Swoboda, I; Heberle-Bors, E; Ammerer, G; Hirt, H

    1995-06-01

    Cyclins are key regulators of the cell cycle in all eukaryotes. We have previously isolated two B-type cyclin genes, cycMs1 and cycMs2, from alfalfa that are primarily expressed during the G2-to-M phase transition and are most likely mitotic cyclin genes. Here, we report the isolation of a novel alfalfa cyclin gene, termed cycMs3 (for cyclin Medicago sativa), by selecting for mating type alpha-pheromone-induced cell cycle arrest suppression in yeast. The central region of the predicted amino acid sequence of the cycMs3 gene is most similar to the cyclin box of yeast B-type and mammalian A- and B-type cyclins. In situ hybridization showed that cycMs3 mRNA can be detected only in proliferating cells and not in differentiated alfalfa cells. When differentiated G0-arrested cells were induced to reenter the cell cycle in the G1 phase and resume cell division by treatment with plant hormones, cycMs3 transcript levels increased long before the onset of DNA synthesis. In contrast, histone H3-1 mRNA and cycMs2 transcripts were not observed before DNA replication and mitosis, respectively. In addition, cycMs3 mRNA was found in all stages of the cell cycle in synchronously dividing cells, whereas the cycMs2 and histone H3-1 genes showed a G2-to-M phase- or S phase-specific transcription pattern, respectively. These data suggest that the role of cyclin CycMs3 differs from that of CycMs1 and CycMs2. We propose that CycMs3 helps control reentry of quiescent G0-arrested cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle.

  17. CARBOHYDRATE-BASED CELL ADHESION: ANALYSIS OF SPHEROID FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Vieira Macedo Grinet

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are vast constituents of cell surfaces and in many systems where cell adhesion plays a critical role, carbohydrate binding proteins have been shown to bind to cell surface carbohydrates and participate in cell-cell interactions. Jurkat cells are suspension cells that grow in clumps and have 20.7 (± 2.2 hours of population doubling time (PDT. In this experiment, Jurkat cells are studied to compare the effects of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA lectin, and Maackia amurensis (MAA lectin, for clumping and spheroid formation studies, as well as carbohydrate analog solutions in ethanol (C2H6O Ac4ManNAc, and Ac5ManNTGc for concentration effect studies.

  18. Influence of soil drought stress on photosynthesis, carbohydrates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    grown 1-year-old potted. M.9EMLA apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.) (after growing for 6 weeks) were subjected to drought stress by withholding water for an additional six-week period. The photosynthesis, carbohydrates ...

  19. β-thalassemia minor, carbohydrate malabsorption and histamine intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnedl, Wolfgang J.; Schenk, Michael; Lackner, Sonja; Holasek, Sandra J.; Mangge, Harald

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: β-thalassemia minor is characterized by reduced β-haemoglobin chain synthesis and sometimes mild anaemia, although carriers of β-thalassemia minorare usually clinically asymptomatic.Nonspecific abdominal complaints may be caused by gastrointestinal carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose and fructose) and/or malabsorption of biogenic amines (histamine), or proteins (gluten). Objectives: We report on two patients with β-thalassemia minor suffering nonspecific abdominal symptoms due to a carbohydrate and histamine malabsorption. Design/methods: The diagnosis of β-thalassemia minorwas done with peripheral blood smear and cellulose acetate electrophoresis. Carbohydrate malabsorption was diagnosed with hydrogen breath tests and, histamine intolerance (HIT) with a serum diamine oxidase value malabsorption in these two patients with β-thalassemia minor were treated successfully with an individually-tailored diet free of symptom causing carbohydrates and histamine. PMID:29046748

  20. Photoswitchable carbohydrate-based fluorosurfactants as tuneable ice recrystallization inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Madeleine K; Hu, Yingxue; Poisson, Jessica S; Pottage, Matthew J; Ben, Robert N; Wilkinson, Brendan L

    2017-02-01

    Cryopreservation is an important technique employed for the storage and preservation of biological tissues and cells. The limited effectiveness and significant toxicity of conventionally-used cryoprotectants, such as DMSO, have prompted efforts toward the rational design of less toxic alternatives, including carbohydrate-based surfactants. In this paper, we report the modular synthesis and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity of a library of variably substituted, carbohydrate-based fluorosurfactants. Carbohydrate-based fluorosurfactants possessed a variable mono- or disaccharide head group appended to a hydrophobic fluoroalkyl-substituted azobenzene tail group. Light-addressable fluorosurfactants displayed weak-to-moderate IRI activity that could be tuned through selection of carbohydrate head group, position of the trifluoroalkyl group on the azobenzene ring, and isomeric state of the azobenzene tail fragment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chiral reagents in glycosylation and modification of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao-Yuan; Blaszczyk, Stephanie A; Xiao, Guozhi; Tang, Weiping

    2018-02-05

    Carbohydrates play a significant role in numerous biological events, and the chemical synthesis of carbohydrates is vital for further studies to understand their various biological functions. Due to the structural complexity of carbohydrates, the stereoselective formation of glycosidic linkages and the site-selective modification of hydroxyl groups are very challenging and at the same time extremely important. In recent years, the rapid development of chiral reagents including both chiral auxiliaries and chiral catalysts has significantly improved the stereoselectivity for glycosylation reactions and the site-selectivity for the modification of carbohydrates. These new tools will greatly facilitate the efficient synthesis of oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates. In this tutorial review, we will summarize these advances and highlight the most recent examples.

  2. Recent Progress in Chemical and Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthana, Saddam; Cao, Hongzhi; Chen, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Summary The important roles that carbohydrates play in biological processes and their potential application in diagnosis, therapeutics, and vaccine development have made them attractive synthetic targets. Despite ongoing challenges, tremendous progresses have been made in recent years for the synthesis of carbohydrates. The chemical glycosylation methods have become more sophisticated and the synthesis of oligosaccharides has become more predictable. Simplified one-pot glycosylation strategy and automated synthesis are increasingly used to obtain biologically important glycans. On the other hand, chemoenzymatic synthesis continues to be a powerful alternative for obtaining complex carbohydrates. This review highlights recent progress in chemical and chemoenzymatic synthesis of carbohydrates with a particular focus on the methods developed for the synthesis of oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, glycolipids, and glycosylated natural products. PMID:19833544

  3. Hydrolysis of Brewers' Spent Grain by Carbohydrate Degrading Enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forssell, P.; Kontkanen, H.; Schols, H.A.; Hinz, S.W.A.; Eijsink, V.G.H.; Treimo, J.; Robertson, J.A.; Waldron, K.W.; Faulds, C.B.; Buchert, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work four commercial cellulase-hemicellulase mixtures with different activity profiles were used for solubilization of carbohydrates from brewers' spent grain (BSG). After the enzyme treatment, both the solubilised fraction and the unhydrolysed residue were characterized. Treatment with

  4. Prognostic Value of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Heart Failure Patients With and Without Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Jhund, Pardeep S; Mogensen, Ulrik M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF) have higher circulating levels of NT-proBNP (N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide) than HF patients without AF. There is uncertainty about the prognostic importance of a given concentration of NT-proBNP in HF patients...... patients with AF had higher NT-proBNP than those without AF. However, above a concentration of 400 pg/mL (representing most patients in each group), NT-proBNP had similar predictive value for adverse cardiovascular outcomes, irrespective of AF status. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https...

  5. cycMs3, a novel B-type alfalfa cyclin gene, is induced in the G0-to-G1 transition of the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Meskiene, I.; Bogre, L.; Dahl, M.; Pirck, M.; Ha, D. T.; Swoboda, I.; Heberle-Bors, E.; Ammerer, G.; Hirt, H.

    1995-01-01

    Cyclins are key regulators of the cell cycle in all eukaryotes. We have previously isolated two B-type cyclin genes, cycMs1 and cycMs2, from alfalfa that are primarily expressed during the G2-to-M phase transition and are most likely mitotic cyclin genes. Here, we report the isolation of a novel alfalfa cyclin gene, termed cycMs3 (for cyclin Medicago sativa), by selecting for mating type alpha-pheromone-induced cell cycle arrest suppression in yeast. The central region of the predicted amino ...

  6. Supramaximal elevation in B-type natriuretic peptide and its N-terminal fragment levels in anephric patients with heart failure: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting John YC

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Little is known about the responses of natriuretic peptides to developing congestive heart failure in ‘anephric’ end-stage kidney disease. Case presentation We present three consecutive cases of surgically-induced anephric patients in a critical care environment: a 28-year-old Caucasian woman (with congestive heart failure, a 42-year-old Caucasian woman (without congestive heart failure, and a 23-year-old Caucasian woman (without congestive heart failure. Our limited study data indicate that cut-off values advocated for B-type natriuretic peptide and its N-terminal fragment to ‘rule out’ congestive heart failure in two of our end-stage kidney disease patients (without congestive heart failure are largely appropriate for anephric patients. However, our index (first patient developed congestive heart failure accompanied by the phenomenon of massive and persistent elevation of these natriuretic levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that patients from the anephric subclass suffering from congestive heart failure will develop supramaximal elevation of B-type natriuretic peptide and its N-terminal fragment, implying the need for dramatically higher cut-off values with respective magnitudes of the order of 50-fold (B-type natriuretic peptide ~5780pmol/L; 20,000ng/L to 100-fold (N-terminal fragment ~11,800pmol/L; 100,000ng/L higher than current values used to ‘rule in’ congestive heart failure. Further research will be required to delineate those cut-off values. The role of our devised ‘Blood Volume – B-type natriuretic peptide feedback control system’ on ‘anatomical’ and ‘functional’ anephric patients led to significant mathematically-enriched arguments supporting our proposal that this model provides plausible explanations for the study findings, and the model lends support to the important hypothesis that these two groups of anephric patients inflicted with congestive heart failure should effectively

  7. Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in pig enterocytes: trafficking from the brush border to lipid droplets during fat absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte W; Immerdal, Lissi

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) is known to mediate cellular uptake of cholesterol from high density lipoprotein particles and is particularly abundant in liver and steroidogenic tissues. In addition, SR-BI expression in the enterocyte brush border has also been reported but...... fat, SR-BI is endocytosed from the enterocyte brush border and accumulates in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Internalisation of the receptor occurs mainly by clathrin coated pits rather than by a caveolae/lipid raft based mechanism....

  8. A proteomic approach for comprehensively screening substrates of protein kinases such as Rho-kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuki Amano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein kinases are major components of signal transduction pathways in multiple cellular processes. Kinases directly interact with and phosphorylate downstream substrates, thus modulating their functions. Despite the importance of identifying substrates in order to more fully understand the signaling network of respective kinases, efficient methods to search for substrates remain poorly explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We combined mass spectrometry and affinity column chromatography of the catalytic domain of protein kinases to screen potential substrates. Using the active catalytic fragment of Rho-kinase/ROCK/ROK as the model bait, we obtained about 300 interacting proteins from the rat brain cytosol fraction, which included the proteins previously reported as Rho-kinase substrates. Several novel interacting proteins, including doublecortin, were phosphorylated by Rho-kinase both in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This method would enable identification of novel specific substrates for kinases such as Rho-kinase with high sensitivity.

  9. Bioinformatic mining of kinase inhibitors that regulate autophagy through kinase signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Biao; Jin, Ye; Ben, Wei; Zhang, Dandan; Jiang, Keping; Feng, Shujun; Huang, Lu; Zheng, Jianhua

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the kinase inhibitors that may regulate autophagy. A total of 62 kinases were obtained through text mining by importing the keyword 'autophagy' and a 'protein kinase' Excel file to PubMed. Subsequently, 146 kinases were derivated through screening in the PubMed database by importing the 'autophagy‑associated gene' and 'protein kinase' files. Following intersection of the above two methods, 54 candidate autophagy‑associated kinases were obtained. Enrichment analysis indicated that these candidate autophagy‑associated kinases were mainly enriched in pathways such as the calcium, Wnt, HIF‑1 and mTOR signaling pathways. Among the 54 kinases, 24 were identified through text mining to have specific kinase inhibitors that regulate the corresponding functions; a total of 56 kinase inhibitors were found to be involved in the regulation of these 24 kinases. In total, nine of these 56 kinase inhibitors identified had been widely reported in autophagy regulation studies, 23 kinase inhibitors had been seldom reported and 24 had never been reported. Therefore, introducing these kinases into autophagy regulation analysis in subsequent studies may produce important results.

  10. [The carbohydrate metabolic end products of trematodes parasitic in cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenina, E A

    2000-01-01

    The trematodes Eurytrema pancreaticum and Calicophoron ijimai during the incubation in vitro assimilated glucose from the incubation medium and utilized the endogenous glycogen. Final products of the carbohydrate metabolism in the calicophorones were lactic, acatic, propionic, isobutyric and alpha-methylbutyric acids; in the eurytremes they were lactic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, alpha-methylbutyric, valerianic and capronic acids. The effect of anthelminthic preparations on the carbohydrate metabolism and its final products was investigated.

  11. Carbohydrate phenotyping of human and animal milk glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Anki; Kacskovics, Imre; Breimer, Michael E; Hammarström, Lennart; Holgersson, Jan

    2005-03-01

    Breast-milk has a well-known anti-microbial effect, which is in part due to the many different carbohydrate structures expressed. This renders it a position as a potential therapeutic for treatment of infection by different pathogens, thus avoiding the drawbacks of many antibiotics. The plethora of carbohydrate epitopes in breast-milk is known to differ between species, with human milk expressing the most complex one. We have investigated the expression of protein-bound carbohydrate epitopes in milk from man, cow, goat, sheep, pig, horse, dromedary and rabbit. Proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and the presence of carbohydrate epitopes on milk proteins were analysed by Western blotting using different lectins and carbohydrate-specific antibodies. We show that ABH, Lewis (Le)x, sialyl-Lex, Lea, sialyl-Lea and Leb carbohydrate epitopes are expressed mainly on man, pig and horse milk proteins. The blood group precursor structure H type 1 is expressed in all species investigated, while only pig, dromedary and rabbit milk proteins carry H type 2 epitopes. These epitopes are receptors for Helicobacter pylori (Leb and sialyl-Lex), enteropathogenic (H type 1, Lea and Lex) and enterotoxic Escherichia coli (heat-stable toxin; H type 1 and 2), and Campylobacter jejuni (H type 2). Thus, milk from these animals or their genetically modified descendants could have a therapeutic effect by inhibiting pathogen colonization and infection.

  12. A carbohydrate-anion recognition system in aprotic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Bo; Dong, Hai; Ramström, Olof

    2014-05-01

    A carbohydrate-anion recognition system in nonpolar solvents is reported, in which complexes form at the B-faces of β-D-pyranosides with H1-, H3-, and H5-cis patterns similar to carbohydrate-π interactions. The complexation effect was evaluated for a range of carbohydrate structures; it resulted in either 1:1 carbohydrate-anion complexes, or 1:2 complex formation depending on the protection pattern of the carbohydrate. The interaction was also evaluated with different anions and solvents. In both cases it resulted in significant binding differences. The results indicate that complexation originates from van der Waals interactions or weak CH⋅⋅⋅A(-) hydrogen bonds between the binding partners and is related to electron-withdrawing groups of the carbohydrates as well as increased hydrogen-bond-accepting capability of the anions. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

  13. Computational carbohydrate chemistry: what theoretical methods can tell us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Computational methods have had a long history of application to carbohydrate systems and their development in this regard is discussed. The conformational analysis of carbohydrates differs in several ways from that of other biomolecules. Many glycans appear to exhibit numerous conformations coexisting in solution at room temperature and a conformational analysis of a carbohydrate must address both spatial and temporal properties. When solution nuclear magnetic resonance data are used for comparison, the simulation must give rise to ensemble-averaged properties. In contrast, when comparing to experimental data obtained from crystal structures a simulation of a crystal lattice, rather than of an isolated molecule, is appropriate. Molecular dynamics simulations are well suited for such condensed phase modeling. Interactions between carbohydrates and other biological macromolecules are also amenable to computational approaches. Having obtained a three-dimensional structure of the receptor protein, it is possible to model with accuracy the conformation of the carbohydrate in the complex. An example of the application of free energy perturbation simulations to the prediction of carbohydrate-protein binding energies is presented. PMID:9579797

  14. Carbohydrate-based vaccine adjuvants - discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Qiu, Liying; Wang, Xiaoli; Zou, Xiaopeng; Lu, Mengji; Yin, Jian

    2015-10-01

    The addition of a suitable adjuvant to a vaccine can generate significant effective adaptive immune responses. There is an urgent need for the development of novel po7tent and safe adjuvants for human vaccines. Carbohydrate molecules are promising adjuvants for human vaccines due to their high biocompatibility and good tolerability in vivo. The present review covers a few promising carbohydrate-based adjuvants, lipopolysaccharide, trehalose-6,6'-dibehenate, QS-21 and inulin as examples, which have been extensively studied in human vaccines in a number of preclinical and clinical studies. The authors discuss the current status, applications and strategies of development of each adjuvant and different adjuvant formulation systems. This information gives insight regarding the exciting prospect in the field of carbohydrate-based adjuvant research. Carbohydrate-based adjuvants are promising candidates as an alternative to the Alum salts for human vaccines development. Furthermore, combining two or more adjuvants in one formulation is one of the effective strategies in adjuvant development. However, further research efforts are needed to study and develop novel adjuvants systems, which can be more stable, potent and safe. The development of synthetic carbohydrate chemistry can improve the study of carbohydrate-based adjuvants.

  15. Validation of lignocellulosic biomass carbohydrates determination via acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shengfei; Runge, Troy M

    2014-11-04

    This work studied the two-step acid hydrolysis for determining carbohydrates in lignocellulosic biomass. Estimation of sugar loss based on acid hydrolyzed sugar standards or analysis of sugar derivatives was investigated. Four model substrates (starch, holocellulose, filter paper and cotton) and three levels of acid/material ratios (7.8, 10.3 and 15.4, v/w) were studied to demonstrate the range of test artifacts. The method for carbohydrates estimation based on acid hydrolyzed sugar standards having the most satisfactory carbohydrate recovery and relative standard deviation. Raw material and the acid/material ratio both had significant effect on carbohydrate hydrolysis, suggesting the acid to have impacts beyond a catalyst in the hydrolysis. Following optimal procedures, we were able to reach a carbohydrate recovery of 96% with a relative standard deviation less than 3%. The carbohydrates recovery lower than 100% was likely due to the incomplete hydrolysis of substrates, which was supported by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitrate Activation of Cytosolic Protein Kinases Diverts Photosynthetic Carbon from Sucrose to Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champigny, Marie-Louise; Foyer, Christine

    1992-01-01

    The regulation of carbon partitioning between carbohydrates (principally sucrose) and amino acids has been only poorly characterized in higher plants. The hypothesis that the pathway of sucrose and amino acid biosynthesis compete for carbon skeletons and energy is widely accepted. In this review, we suggest a mechanism involving the regulation of cytosolic protein kinases whereby the flow of carbon is regulated at the level of partitioning between the pathways of carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism via the covalent modulation of component enzymes. The addition of nitrate to wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum) grown in the absence of exogenous nitrogen has a dramatic, if transient, impact on sucrose formation and on the activities of sucrose phosphate synthase (which is inactivated) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (which is activated). The activities of these two enzymes are modulated by protein phosphorylation in response to the addition of nitrate, but they respond in an inverse fashion. Sucrose phosphate synthase in inactivated and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase is activated. Nitrate functions as a signal metabolite activating the cytosolic protein kinase, thereby modulating the activities of at least two of the key enzymes in assimilate partitioning and redirecting the flow of carbon away from sucrose biosynthesis toward amino acid synthesis. PMID:16653003

  17. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas, E-mail: tke@uams.edu [Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute and Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  18. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses

  19. Signal Amplification by Glyco-qPCR for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carbohydrates: Applications in Glycobiology**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seok Joon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Solakyildirim, Kemal; Masuko, Sayaka; Ly, Mellisa; Zhang, Fuming; Li, Lingyun; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Tiny amounts of carbohydrates (ca. 1 zmol) can be detected quantitatively by a real-time method based on the conjugation of carbohydrates with DNA markers (see picture). The proposed method (glyco-qPCR) provides uniform, ultrasensitive detection of carbohydrates, which can be applied to glycobiology, as well as carbohydrate-based drug discovery. PMID:23073897

  20. Cause of impaired carbohydrate metabolism in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foeldes, J.; Megyesi, K.; Koranyi, L.

    1984-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism (HT) affects glucose metabolism in various ways. The role of insulin, glucagon and growth-hormone (GH) was determined. After glucose loading the insulin response is weaker in HT than in euthyroid subjects. Enhanced degradation of insulin has been reported. It is suggested that in HT the serum insulin concentration declines at a slightly accelerated rate. In HT the deranged carbohydrate metabolism might be a consequence of altered tissue sensitivity to insulin. To elucidate this problem insulin receptors on erythrocytes obtained from hyperthyroid women were investigated. The maximal specific binding of 125 I-insulin to RBC of hyperthyroid patients was decreased and the analysis refers to a decreased receptor concentration in RBC. The nature of glucagon secretion and its influence on glucose metabolism in HT was investigated. The basal plasma glucagon is elevated in hyperthyroid patients. The suppression of glucagon secretion induced by an oral glucose loading was of significantly lesser degree in hyperthyroid patients than in controls. Applying the erythrocyte receptor assay a decreased specific binding of 125 I-glucagon to RBC of hyperthyroid patients has been found and data indicate a significantly less glucagon receptor concentration in thyrotoxicosis. Physiological elevations of serum GH levels led to a significant impairment of glucose metabolism. Beside the GH-RH and somatostatin, the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system participates in the regulation of GH secretion too. It has been demonstrated that after administration of the dopamine agonist l-dopa the GH response was weaker in HT than in controls. This indicates that in thyrotoxicosis the GH secretion can not be stimulated in such a degree as in euthyroidism. (author)

  1. [Abnormalities of carbohydrate metabolism in acromegaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagetti, Betina; Obiols, Gabriel; Valladares, Silvia; Arnez, Lorena; Dalama, Belén; Mesa, Jordi

    2013-11-16

    Carbohydrate metabolism (CHM) is impaired in over 50% of acromegalic patients. Natural history of acromegaly and treatment modalities may impact in a different way on CHM. We assessed CHM alterations in acromegaly and their relationship with clinical features and treatment options. Retrospective study with 55 patients with acromegaly. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), tumor size, insulin growth factor type 1 (IGF-1) levels and the presence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or diabetes mellitus (DM) were analyzed before and after surgery or medical treatment. There were 30 men and 25 women. Mean age was 50 ± 17 years and mean BMI was 27.9 ± 3.8 Kg/m(2). Impaired CHM was found in 50.9% (n = 28) (DM in 27% and IFG in 24%). In diabetic patients, we found no differences in age, sex, BMI and IGF-1 levels between IFG/DM and patients without CHM impairment. However, IFG/DM patients had macroadenomas more commonly. In diabetic patients, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) decreased after surgery from 7.6 to 6.7% and after somatostatin analogues from 7.1 to 6.6%; in patients on pegvisomant we observed a significant reduction of HbA1c: from 9.8 to 5.6% (P < .005). Furthermore, only in the pegvisomant group, insulin and/or oral agents had to be lowered. Up to 50% of patients with active acromegaly have CHM impairment which correlates with tumor size. Only pegvisomant is associated with significant improvement in glycemic control and a reduction in hypoglycemic treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinases Involved in Both Autophagy and Mitosis

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    Zhiyuan Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Both mitosis and autophagy are highly regulated dynamic cellular processes and involve various phosphorylation events catalysed by kinases, which play vital roles in almost all physiological and pathological conditions. Mitosis is a key event during the cell cycle, in which the cell divides into two daughter cells. Autophagy is a process in which the cell digests its own cellular contents. Although autophagy regulation has mainly been studied in asynchronous cells, increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is in fact tightly regulated in mitosis. Here in this review, we will discuss kinases that were originally identified to be involved in only one of either mitosis or autophagy, but were later found to participate in both processes, such as CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases, Aurora kinases, PLK-1 (polo-like kinase 1, BUB1 (budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles 1, MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases, mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1, AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphoinositide-3 kinase and protein kinase B (AKT. By focusing on kinases involved in both autophagy and mitosis, we will get a more comprehensive understanding about the reciprocal regulation between the two key cellular events, which will also shed light on their related therapeutic investigations.

  3. Modified carbohydrate-chitosan compounds, methods of making the same and methods of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Richard A; Pawlak, Joel J; Salam, Abdus; El-Tahlawy, Khaled Fathy

    2015-03-10

    Compositions of matter are provided that include chitosan and a modified carbohydrate. The modified carbohydrate includes a carbohydrate component and a cross linking agent. The modified carbohydrate has increased carboxyl content as compared to an unmodified counterpart carbohydrate. A carboxyl group of the modified carbohydrate is covalently bonded with an amino group of chitosan. The compositions of matter provided herein may include cross linked starch citrate-chitosan and cross linked hemicellulose citrate-chitosan, including foams thereof. These compositions yield excellent absorbency and metal chelation properties. Methods of making cross linked modified carbohydrate-chitosan compounds are also provided.

  4. Scavenger Receptor Class B, Type I, a CD36 Related Protein in Macrobrachium nipponense: Characterization, RNA Interference, and Expression Analysis with Different Dietary Lipid Sources

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    Zhili Ding

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI, is a member of the CD36 superfamily comprising transmembrane proteins involved in mammalian and fish lipid homeostasis regulation. We hypothesize that this receptor plays an important role in Macrobrachium nipponense lipid metabolism. However, little attention has been paid to SR-BI in commercial crustaceans. In the present study, we report a cDNA encoding M. nipponense scavenger receptor class B, type I (designated as MnSR-BI, obtained from a hepatopancreas cDNA library. The complete MnSR-BI coding sequence was 1545 bp, encoding 514 amino acid peptides. The MnSR-BI primary structure consisted of a CD36 domain that contained two transmembrane regions at the N- and C-terminals of the protein. SR-BI mRNA expression was specifically detected in muscle, gill, ovum, intestine, hepatopancreas, stomach, and ovary tissues. Furthermore, its expression in the hepatopancreas was regulated by dietary lipid sources, with prawns fed soybean and linseed oils exhibiting higher expression levels. RNAi-based SR-BI silencing resulted in the suppression of its expression in the hepatopancreas and variation in the expression of lipid metabolism-related genes. This is the first report of SR-BI in freshwater prawns and provides the basis for further studies on SR-BI in crustaceans.

  5. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis

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    Daisuke Hayashi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis.

  6. Effects of Carbohydrate Source on Genetic Competence in Streptococcus mutans

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    Moye, Zachary D.; Son, Minjun; Rosa-Alberty, Ariana E.; Zeng, Lin; Ahn, Sang-Joon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The capacity to internalize and catabolize carbohydrates is essential for dental caries pathogens to persist and cause disease. The expression of many virulence-related attributes by Streptococcus mutans, an organism strongly associated with human dental caries, is influenced by the peptide signaling pathways that control genetic competence. Here, we demonstrate a relationship between the efficiency of competence signaling and carbohydrate source. A significant increase in the activity of the promoters for comX, comS, and comYA after exposure to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) was observed in cells growing on fructose, maltose, sucrose, or trehalose as the primary carbohydrate source, compared to cells growing on glucose. However, only cells grown in the presence of trehalose or sucrose displayed a significant increase in transformation frequency. Notably, even low concentrations of these carbohydrates in the presence of excess glucose could enhance the expression of comX, encoding a sigma factor needed for competence, and the effects on competence were dependent on the cognate sugar:phosphotransferase permease for each carbohydrate. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter fusions, we observed that growth in fructose or trehalose resulted in a greater proportion of the population activating expression of comX and comS, encoding the precursor of comX-inducing peptide (XIP), after addition of CSP, than growth in glucose. Thus, the source of carbohydrate significantly impacts the stochastic behaviors that regulate subpopulation responses to CSP, which can induce competence in S. mutans. IMPORTANCE The signaling pathways that regulate development of genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans are intimately intertwined with the pathogenic potential of the organism, impacting biofilm formation, stress tolerance, and expression of known virulence determinants. Induction of the gene for the master regulator of competence, ComX, by competence

  7. Stimulation of MAP kinase and S6 kinase by vanadium and selenium in rat adipocytes.

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    Hei, Y J; Farahbakhshian, S; Chen, X; Battell, M L; McNeill, J H

    1998-01-01

    To explore the mechanism underlying the insulin-mimetic actions of vanadium and selenium we examined their effects on the mitogen activated protein/myelin basic protein kinases (MAPK) and ribosomal S6 protein kinases, which are among the best characterized of the kinases that comprise the phosphorylation cascade in insulin signal transduction. We observed a transient activation of MAPK and S6 kinases by insulin in rat adipocytes, while both sodium selenate and vanadyl sulphate produced prolonged activation of the kinases. Vanadyl sulphate stimulated the activity of MAPK and S6 kinase by as much as 6 fold and 15 fold, respectively. Pretreatment of the cells with genistein did not affect the activation of MAPK by insulin, but partially blocked the effects of sodium selenate and vanadyl sulphate. Genistein did not change the activation of S6 kinase by insulin, but blocked the activation in vanadyl sulphate- and sodium selenate-treated-cells, suggesting that a genistein sensitive tyrosine kinase may be involved in the activation by these two compounds. Rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of the p70s6k isoform of S6 kinase, partially reduced the activation of S6 kinase activity by sodium selenate, indicating a role for this kinase in the overall activity of the S6 kinase in sodium selenate-treated cells. A similar trend was noted in vanadyl sulphate-treated cells. Thus, this study supports the involvement of MAPK and S6 kinases in the insulin-mimetic actions of vanadium and selenium.

  8. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  9. Conformational snapshots of Tec kinases during signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Raji E; Andreotti, Amy H

    2009-03-01

    The control of cellular signaling cascades is of utmost importance in regulating the immune response. Exquisitely precise protein-protein interactions and chemical modification of substrates by enzymatic catalysis are the fundamental components of the signals that alert immune cells to the presence of a foreign antigen. In particular, the phosphorylation events induced by protein kinase activity must be spatially and temporally regulated by specific interactions to maintain a normal and effective immune response. High resolution structures of many protein kinases along with supporting biochemical data are providing significant insight into the intricate regulatory mechanisms responsible for controlling cellular signaling. The Tec family kinases are immunologically important kinases for which regulatory details are beginning to emerge. This review focuses on bringing together structural insights gained over the years to develop an understanding of how domain interactions both within the Tec kinases and between the Tec kinases and other signaling molecules control immune cell function.

  10. Structures of Staphylococcus aureus D-tagatose-6-phosphate kinase implicate domain motions in specificity and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miallau, Linda; Hunter, William N; McSweeney, Sean M; Leonard, Gordon A

    2007-07-06

    High resolution structures of Staphylococcus aureus d-tagatose-6-phosphate kinase (LacC) in two crystal forms are herein reported. The structures define LacC in apoform, in binary complexes with ADP or the co-factor analogue AMP-PNP, and in a ternary complex with AMP-PNP and D-tagatose-6-phosphate. The tertiary structure of the LacC monomer, which is closely related to other members of the pfkB subfamily of carbohydrate kinases, is composed of a large alpha/beta core domain and a smaller, largely beta "lid." Four extended polypeptide segments connect these two domains. Dimerization of LacC occurs via interactions between lid domains, which come together to form a beta-clasp structure. Residues from both subunits contribute to substrate binding. LacC adopts a closed structure required for phosphoryl transfer only when both substrate and co-factor are bound. A reaction mechanism similar to that used by other phosphoryl transferases is proposed, although unusually, when both substrate and co-factor are bound to the enzyme two Mg(2+) ions are observed in the active site. A new motif of amino acid sequence conservation common to the pfkB subfamily of carbohydrate kinases is identified.

  11. Carbohydrate Supplementation Influences Serum Cytokines after Exercise under Hypoxic Conditions

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    Aline Venticinque Caris

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exercise performed at the hypoxia equivalent of an altitude of 4200 m is associated with elevated inflammatory mediators and changes in the Th1/Th2 response. By contrast, supplementation with carbohydrates has an anti-inflammatory effect when exercise is performed under normoxic conditions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of carbohydrate supplementation on cytokines and cellular damage markers after exercise under hypoxic conditions at a simulated altitude of 4200 m. Methods: Seven adult male volunteers who exercised for 60 min at an intensity of 50% VO2Peak were randomly evaluated under three distinct conditions; normoxia, hypoxia and hypoxia + carbohydrate supplementation. Blood samples were collected at rest, at the end of exercise and after 60 min of recovery. To evaluate hypoxia + carbohydrate supplementation, volunteers received a solution of 6% carbohydrate (maltodextrin or a placebo (strawberry-flavored Crystal Light®; Kraft Foods, Northfield, IL, USA every 20 min during exercise and recovery. Statistical analyses comprised analysis of variance, with a one-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey post hoc test with a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, there was a significant increase in the concentration of IL-6 after exercise and after recovery compared to at rest (p < 0.05, while in the hypoxia + carbohydrate group, there was a significant increase in the concentration of IL-6 and TNF-α after exercise compared to at rest (p < 0.05. Furthermore, under this condition, TNF-α, IL-2 and the balance of IL-2/IL-4 were increased after recovery compared to at rest (p < 0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that carbohydrate supplementation modified the IL-6 and TNF-α serum concentrations and shifted the IL-2/IL-4 balance towards Th1 in response without glycemic, glutaminemia and cell damage effects.

  12. Measuring Kinase Activity-A Global Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Marissa L; McDonald, Ian M; East, Michael P; Johnson, Gary L; Graves, Lee M

    2017-11-01

    The kinase enzymes within a cell, known collectively as the kinome, play crucial roles in many signaling pathways, including survival, motility, differentiation, stress response, and many more. Aberrant signaling through kinase pathways is often linked to cancer, among other diseases. A major area of scientific research involves understanding the relationships between kinases, their targets, and how the kinome adapts to perturbations of the cellular system. This review will discuss many of the current and developing methods for studying kinase activity, and evaluate their applications, advantages, and disadvantages. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3595-3606, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Tec family kinases in inflammation and disease.

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    Horwood, Nicole J; Urbaniak, Ania M; Danks, Lynett

    2012-04-01

    Over the last decade, the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Btk, Tec, Bmx, Itk, and Rlk) have been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied due to the critical role of this kinase in B-cell development and recent evidence showing that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. This review will examine the role of TFK in myeloid cell function and the potential of targeting these kinases as a therapeutic intervention in autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Predicting water-soluble carbohydrates and ethanol-soluble carbohydrates in cool-season grasses with near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazing animals may require a high or low total nonstructural carbohydrate diet for optimal health and production. Understanding how nonstructural carbohydrates fluctuate in Kentucky pastures and being able to quantify and monitor nonstructural carbohydrates in a timely manner will greatly aid in m...

  15. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    prostate cancer patients have abnormalities in the AKT signaling pathway. These abnormalities are driven by mutations in the PTEN and AKT proteins as...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0560 TITLE: Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase

  16. The chemical composition of the Orion star forming region. III. C, N, Ne, Mg, and Fe abundances in B-type stars revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieva, M.-F.; Simón-Díaz, S.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Early B-type stars are invaluable indicators of elemental abundances of their birth environments. In contrast to the surrounding neutral interstellar matter (ISM) and H ii regions, their chemical composition is unaffected by depletion onto dust grains and the derivation of different abundances from recombination and collisional lines. In combination with ISM or nebular gas-phase abundances, they facilitate the otherwise inaccessible dust-phase composition to be constrained. Aims: We determine precise abundances of C, N, Mg, Ne, and Fe in early B-type stars in the Orion star-forming region to: a) review previous determinations using a self-consistent quantitative spectral analysis based on modern stellar atmospheres and recently updated model atoms; b) complement our previous results for oxygen and silicon; and c) establish an accurate and reliable set of stellar metal abundances to constrain the dust-phase composition of the Orion H ii region. Methods: A detailed, self-consistent spectroscopic study of a sample of 13 narrow-lined B0 V-B2 V stars in Ori OB1 is performed. High-quality spectra obtained with FIES at the NOT are analysed using both a hybrid non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) method (i.e., classical line-blanketed LTE model atmospheres and non-LTE line formation) and line-profile fitting techniques, validating the approach by comparison with previous results obtained using line-blanketed non-LTE model atmospheres and a curve-of-growth analysis. Results: The two independent analysis strategies provide consistent results for basic stellar parameters and the abundances of oxygen and silicon. The extended analysis to C, N, Mg, Ne, and Fe finds a high degree of chemical homogeneity, with the 1σ-scatter typically being 0.03-0.07 dex around the mean for the various elements. The present-day abundances of B-type stars in Ori OB1 are compatible at similar precision with cosmic abundance standard values as recently established from early

  17. Feasibility, safety, and tolerance of subcutaneous synthetic canine B-type natriuretic peptide (syncBNP) in healthy dogs and dogs with stage B1 mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, M A; Solter, P F; Thorn, C L; Stern, J A

    2017-06-01

    An important aspect of heart failure is the progressive ineffectiveness of the salutary natriuretic peptide system and its secondary messenger, 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In humans with acute heart failure, administration of exogenous natriuretic peptide is associated with improvement in clinical signs and reduction of cardiac filling pressures. This study aimed to determine the feasibility, tolerance, and safety of subcutaneous (SC) synthetic canine B-type natriuretic peptide (syncBNP) administration in dogs. Six privately owned dogs. Dogs were enrolled in a modified 3 + 3 phase I trial. Three dogs initially received doses of 2.5 and 5 μg/kg SC syncBNP followed by an additional three dogs dosed at 5 and 10 μg/kg. Hemodynamic monitoring was performed for 120 min after each injection. Blood and urine samples were collected at 45 and 120 min after injection of 5 μg/kg. Major adverse clinical events that would potentially halt testing were pre-defined. Four healthy dogs and two dogs with stage B1 mitral valve disease were recruited. Synthetic canine B-type natriuretic peptide was well tolerated at all doses. Synthetic canine B-type natriuretic peptide at 5 μg/kg significantly increased median plasma cGMP (baseline cGMP, 131.5 pmol/mL [range, 91.9-183.6 pmol/mL]; 45 min, 153.6 pmol/mL [140.3-214.3 pmol/mL]; 120 min, 192.7 pmol/mL [139.1-240.1 pmol/mL]; p=0.041). We report for the first time administration of syncBNP in privately owned dogs. Administration of SC syncBNP was feasible, well tolerated, safe, and increased plasma cGMP concentration. Further studies using exogenous syncBNP for treatment of heart disease are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Synergic chemoprevention with dietary carbohydrate restriction and supplementation of AMPK-activating phytochemicals: the role of SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Choi, Min-Ah; Ro, Simon Weonsang; Yang, Woo Ick; Cho, Arthur E H; Ju, Hye-Lim; Baek, Sinhwa; Chung, Sook In; Kang, Won Jun; Yun, Mijin; Park, Jeon Han

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction or a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) can increase life span in normal cells while inhibiting carcinogenesis. Various phytochemicals also have calorie restriction-mimetic anticancer properties. We investigated whether an isocaloric carbohydrate-restriction diet and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-activating phytochemicals induce synergic tumor suppression. We used a mixture of AMPK-activating phytochemical extracts including curcumin, quercetin, catechins, and resveratrol. Survival analysis was carried out in a B16F10 melanoma model fed a control diet (62.14% kcal carbohydrate, 24.65% kcal protein and 13.2% kcal fat), a control diet with multiple phytochemicals (MP), LCD (16.5, 55.2, and 28.3% kcal, respectively), LCD with multiple phytochemicals (LCDmp), a moderate-carbohydrate diet (MCD, 31.9, 62.4, and 5.7% kcal, respectively), or MCD with phytochemicals (MCDmp). Compared with the control group, MP, LCD, or MCD intervention did not produce survival benefit, but LCDmp (22.80±1.58 vs. 28.00±1.64 days, P=0.040) and MCDmp (23.80±1.08 vs. 30.13±2.29 days, P=0.008) increased the median survival time significantly. Suppression of the IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, activation of the AMPK/SIRT1/LKB1pathway, and NF-κB suppression were the critical tumor-suppression mechanisms. In addition, SIRT1 suppressed proliferation of the B16F10 and A375SM cells under a low-glucose condition. Alterations in histone methylation within Pten and FoxO3a were observed after the MCDmp intervention. In the transgenic liver cancer model developed by hydrodynamic transfection of the HrasG12V and shp53, MCDmp and LCDmp interventions induced significant cancer-prevention effects. Microarray analysis showed that PPARα increased with decreased IL-6 and NF-κB within the hepatocytes after an MCDmp intervention. In conclusion, an isocaloric carbohydrate-restriction diet and natural AMPK-activating agents induce synergistic anticancer effects. SIRT1 acts as a

  19. Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinases in Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cancer Yu-Ming Chang

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carcinoma of the prostate (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men in the United States. Signal transduction molecules such as tyrosine kinases play important roles in CaP. Src, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK and the first proto-oncogene discovered is shown to participate in processes such as cell proliferation and migration in CaP. Underscoring NRTK's and, specifically, Src's importance in cancer is the recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration of dasatinib, the first commercial Src inhibitor for clinical use in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML. In this review we will focus on NRTKs and their roles in the biology of CaP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Publicly available literature from PubMed regarding the topic of members of NRTKs in CaP was searched and reviewed. RESULTS: Src, FAK, JaK1/2, and ETK are involved in processes indispensable to the biology of CaP: cell growth, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Src emerges as a common signaling and regulatory molecule in multiple biological processes in CaP. Src's relative importance in particular stages of CaP, however, required further definition. Continued investigation of NRTKs will increase our understanding of their biological function and potential role as new therapeutic targets.

  20. Effect of Carbohydrate, Caffeine, and Carbohydrate + Caffeine Mouth Rinsing on Intermittent Running Performance in Collegiate Male Lacrosse Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Patrick; Witherbee, Kyle E; Peterson, Kimi M; Kerksick, Chad M

    2017-09-01

    Dolan, P, Witherbee, KE, Peterson, KM, and Kerksick, CM. Effect of carbohydrate, caffeine, and carbohydrate + caffeine mouth rinsing on intermittent running performance in collegiate male lacrosse athletes. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2473-2479, 2017-Recently, an interest has developed in the potential to rinse the oral cavity with key nutrients to impact various types of exercise and presumably sporting performance. Although multiple studies examining carbohydrate mouth rinsing have been completed, conflicting evidence surrounding caffeine mouth rinsing persists, and no research has explored its ability to impact high-intensity, intermittent running performance. This study investigated the independent and synergistic ability of carbohydrate and caffeine mouth rinsing to improve intermittent running performance. The Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test-Level 1 (Yo-Yo Level 1) was completed in 10 collegiate (National Collegiate Athletic Association [NCAA] Division II) male lacrosse players after a 10-second mouth rinse with a solution of either carbohydrate (CHO), caffeine (CAF), carbohydrate + caffeine (CHO + CAF), placebo (H2O), or a no rinse control (CON). No significant improvements in Yo-Yo IRT-1 performance were found (p > 0.05). Perceptual indications of effort (i.e., rating of their perceived exertion [RPE]) were significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) in CHO and CHO + CAF when compared with CON after speed level 11. Interestingly, RPE levels were nonsignificantly lower in all but one level of the Yo-Yo Level 1 for CHO in comparison with other groups. Carbohydrate and caffeine mouth rinsing seems to exert no impact on running performance before maximal intermittent running in a group of male collegiate lacrosse players.

  1. The statolith compartment in Chara rhizoids contains carbohydrate and protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Cahill, F.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to higher plants, the alga Chara has rhizoids with single membrane-bound compartments that function as statoliths in gravity perception. Previous work has demonstrated that these statoliths contain barium sulfate crystals. In this study, we show that statoliths in Chara rhizoids react with a Coomassie Brilliant Blue cytochemical stain for proteins. While statoliths did not react with silver methenamine carbohydrate cytochemistry, the monoclonal antibody CCRC-M2, which is against a carbohydrate (sycamore-maple rhamnogalacturonan I), labeled the statolith compartment. These results demonstrate that in addition to barium sulfate, statoliths in Chara rhizoids have an organic matrix that consists of protein and carbohydrate moieties. Since the statoliths were silver methenamine negative, the carbohydrate in this compartment could be a 3-linked polysaccharide. CCRC-M2 also labeled Golgi cisternae, Golgi-associated vesicles, apical vesicles, and cell walls in the rhizoids. The specificity of CCRC-M2 immunolabeling was verified by several control experiments, including the demonstration that labeling was abolished when the antibody was preabsorbed with its antigen. Since in this and a previous study (John Z. Kiss and L. Andrew Staehelin, American Journal of Botany 80: 273-282, 1993) antibodies against higher plant carbohydrates crossreacted with cell walls of Chara in a specific manner, Characean algae may be a useful model system in biochemical and molecular studies of cell walls.

  2. Lignocentric analysis of a carbohydrate-producing lignocellulosic biorefinery process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narron, Robert H; Han, Qiang; Park, Sunkyu; Chang, Hou-Min; Jameel, Hasan

    2017-10-01

    A biologically-based lignocellulosic biorefinery process for obtaining carbohydrates from raw biomass was investigated across six diverse biomasses (three hardwoods & three nonwoods) for the purpose of decoding lignin's influence on sugar production. Acknowledging that lignin could positively alter the economics of an entire process if valorized appropriately, we sought to correlate the chemical properties of lignin within the process to the traditional metrics associated with carbohydrate production-cellulolytic digestibility and total sugar recovery. Based on raw carbohydrate, enzymatic recovery ranged from 40 to 64% w/w and total recovery ranged from 70 to 87% w/w. Using nitrobenzene oxidation to quantify non-condensed lignin structures, it was found that raw hardwoods bearing increasing non-condensed S/V ratios (2.5-5.1) render increasing total carbohydrate recovery from hardwood biomasses. This finding indicates that the chemical structure of hardwood lignin influences the investigated biorefinery process' ability to generate carbohydrates from a given raw hardwood feedstock. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Phosphorous Nutritional Level, Carbohydrate Reserves and Flower Quality in Olives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Erel

    Full Text Available The olive tree is generally characterized by relatively low final fruit set consequential to a significant rate of undeveloped pistils, pistil abortion, and flower and fruitlet abscission. These processes are acknowledged to be governed by competition for resources between the developing vegetative and reproductive organs. To study the role of phosphorus (P nutritional level on reproductive development, trees were grown under four levels of P for three years in large containers. Phosphorus nutritional level was positively related to rate of reproductive bud break, inflorescence weight, rate of hermaphrodite flowers, pistil weight, fruitlet persistence, fruit set and the consequential total number of fruits. The positive impact of P nutrition on the productivity parameters was not related to carbohydrate reserves or to carbohydrate transport to the developing inflorescence. Phosphorous deficient trees showed significant impairment of assimilation rate, and yet, carbohydrates were accumulated in inflorescences at levels comparable to or higher than trees receiving high P. In contrast to female reproductive organs, pollen viability was consistently higher in P deficient trees, possibly due to the enhanced carbohydrate availability. Overall, the positive effect of P on female reproductive development was found to be independent of the total carbohydrate availability. Hence, P is speculated to have a direct influence on reproductive processes.

  4. Physiochemical Characteristics and Molecular Structures for Digestible Carbohydrates of Silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Basim; Prates, Luciana L; Khan, Nazir A; Lei, Yaogeng; Christensen, David A; McKinnon, John J; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-10-18

    The main objectives of this study were (1) to assess the magnitude of differences among new barley silage varieties (BS) selected for varying rates of in vitro neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibility (ivNDFD; Cowboy BS with higher ivNDFD, Copeland BS with intermediate ivNDFD, and Xena BS with lower ivNDFD) with regard to their carbohydrate (CHO) molecular makeup, CHO chemical fractions, and rumen degradability in dairy cows in comparison with a new corn silage hybrid (Pioneer 7213R) and (2) to quantify the strength and pattern of association between the molecular structures and digestibility of carbohydrates. The carbohydrate-related molecular structure spectral data was measured using advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy (FT/IR). In comparison to BS, corn silage showed a significantly (P carbohydrates were significantly (P carbohydrate content of the silages. In conclusion, the univariate approach with only one-factor consideration (ivNDFD) might not be a satisfactory method for evaluating and ranking BS quality. FT/IR molecular spectroscopy can be used to evaluate silage quality rapidly, particularly the digestible fiber content.

  5. Carbohydrate digestion in Lutzomyia longipalpis' larvae (Diptera - Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Vladimir F; Moreira, Bruno H; Moraes, Caroline S; Pereira, Marcos H; Genta, Fernando A; Gontijo, Nelder F

    2012-10-01

    Lutzomyia longipalpis is the principal species of phlebotomine incriminated as vector of Leishmania infantum, the etiological agent of visceral leishmaniasis in the Americas. Despite its importance as vector, almost nothing related to the larval biology, especially about its digestive system has been published. The objective of the present study was to obtain an overview of carbohydrate digestion by the larvae. Taking in account that phlebotomine larvae live in the soil rich in decaying materials and microorganisms we searched principally for enzymes capable to hydrolyze carbohydrates present in this kind of substrate. The principal carbohydrases encountered in the midgut were partially characterized. One of them is a α-amylase present in the anterior midgut. It is probably involved with the digestion of glycogen, the reserve carbohydrate of fungi. Two other especially active enzymes were present in the posterior midgut, a membrane bound α-glucosidase and a membrane bound trehalase. The first, complete the digestion of glycogen and the other probably acts in the digestion of trehalose, a carbohydrate usually encountered in microorganisms undergoing hydric stress. In a screening done with the use of p-nitrophenyl-derived substrates other less active enzymes were also observed in the midgut. A general view of carbohydrate digestion in L. longipalpis was presented. Our results indicate that soil microorganisms appear to be the main source of nutrients for the larvae. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnostic Value of N Terminal Pro B Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-pro BNP in Cardiac Involvement in Patients with Beta- Thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Mohammad Noori

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Heart failure is a major cause of death in thalassemia. The study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of N Terminal Pro B Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-pro BNP, to early diagnose the cardiac involvement in beta- thalassemia major patients. Materials and Methods  80 thalassemia patients aged 7 to 18 years old (patients group, and 80 healthy age and gender matched controls were enrolled in the case-control study. Patients were selected from those attending to the clinic of Aliasghar hospital, Zahedan-Iran. They were subjected to echo-Doppler tissue and conventional examination for both right and left heart function. Data were analysis using SPSS 18.0 software. Results  NT-pro BNP increased in patients compared the controls (P

  7. Mixed lump-kink and rogue wave-kink solutions for a (3 + 1) -dimensional B-type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cong-Cong; Tian, Bo; Wu, Xiao-Yu; Yuan, Yu-Qiang; Du, Zhong

    2018-02-01

    Under investigation is a (3 + 1) -dimensional B-type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation, which describes the weakly dispersive waves in a fluid. Via the Hirota method and symbolic computation, we obtain the mixed lump-kink and mixed rogue wave-kink solutions. Through the mixed lump-kink solutions, we observe three different phenomena between a lump and one kink. For the fusion phenomenon, a lump and a kink are merged with the lump's energy transferring into the kink gradually, until the lump merges into the kink completely. Fission phenomenon displays that a lump separates from a kink. The last phenomenon shows that a lump travels together with a kink with their amplitudes unchanged. In addition, we graphically study the interaction between a rogue wave and a pair of the kinks. It can be observed that the rogue wave arises from one kink and disappears into the other kink. At certain time, the amplitude of the rogue wave reaches the maximum.

  8. Isolated single coronary artery (RII-B type presenting as an inferior wall myocardial infarction: A rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur C. Thummar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Isolated single coronary artery without other congenital cardiac anomalies is very rare among the different variations of anomalous coronary patterns. The prognosis in patients with single coronary varies according to the anatomic distribution and associated coronary atherosclerosis. If the left main coronary artery travels between the aorta and pulmonary arteries, it may be a cause of sudden cardiac death. We present multimodality images of a single coronary artery, in which the whole coronary system originated by a single trunk from the right sinus of Valsalva with inter-arterial course of left main coronary artery. This rare type of single coronary artery was classified as RII-B type according to Lipton's scheme of classification. A significant flow-limiting lesions were found in the right coronary artery that was successfully treated with percutaneous coronary intervention.

  9. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide for the prognostic prediction of severe enterovirus 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jun; Lu, Xiulan; Liu, Pingping; Zhang, Xinping; Zuo, Chao; Xiao, Zhenghui

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) can predict impending brainstem encephalitis, pulmonary edema, pulmonary hemorrhage, cardiopulmonary failure, and death in children with severe enterovirus 71 (EV71)-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Plasma NT-proBNP levels of 282 children with severe EV71-associated HFMD were measured. NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher in patients with elevated blood glucose (>7.8 mmol/l) and increased white blood cell counts (>14×10 9 /l). HFMD patients who had no complications had significantly lower NT-proBNP values than patients who died or had complications (pdisease in the intensive care unit. Serum NT-proBNP values ≥1300pg/ml on admission could be indicative of circulatory failure and increased mortality. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. N-Terminal Pro-B Type Natriuretic Peptide as a Marker of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia or Death in Very Preterm Neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellmer, Anna; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth; Bjerre, Jesper Vandborg

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a serious complication of preterm birth. Plasma N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) has been suggested as a marker that may predict BPD within a few days after birth. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between NT-proBNP day...... three and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death and further to assess the impact of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) on this association in neonates born before 32 gestational weeks. METHODS: A cohort study of 183 neonates born before 32 gestational weeks consecutively admitted to the Neonatal...... Intensive Care Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. On day three plasma samples were collected and echocardiography carried out. NT-proBNP was measured by routine immunoassays. The combined outcome BPD or death was assessed at 36 weeks of postmenstrual age. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC...

  11. [Spontaneous changes in carbohydrate tolerance and insulin secretion in persons with indications of disturbed carbohydrate tolerance. Preliminary results and follow-up observations for 7 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzmann, K P; Schulz, B; Witt, S; Heinke, P; Michaelis, D

    1980-03-15

    115 patients with normal weight and 15 adipose persons with suspicion of a disturbance of the carbohydrate metabolism were characterized by means of a glucose infusion test lasting two hours concerning the carbohydrate tolerance and insulin secretion. Longitudinal analyses of the spontaneous behaviour of the carbohydrate tolerance and insulin secretion depending on the degree of the carbohydrate tolerance up to duration of the observation of 7 years. A deterioration of the carbohydrate tolerance was to be proved in 21% of 87 persons with normal carbohydrate tolerance within two years. With normal carbohydrate tolerance within two years. With an increase of the duration of the observation up to 7 years the frequency of disturbances of the carbohydrate tolerance increases to 30%. This development cannot be coordinated to a certain type of insulin secretion. In the individual case a deterioration of the carbohydrate tolerance may be associated with an increase or reduction of the glucose stimulated insuline secretion. An improvement of the carbohydrate tolerance was observed in 15 (54%) of 28 patients with disturbed carbohydrate tolerance within 2 years. In a group with pathological carbohydrate tolerance this development was associated with a significant reduction of the basic and glucose stimulated insulin secretion. In all patients with improved carbohydrate tolerance on the side of the insulin secretion primarily the type of "normal response" was present. The lacking relation between changes of the B-cell function and the carbohydrate tolerance emphasizes the importance of other factors, such as a peripheral insulin resistance, for the development of disturbances in the carbohydrate metabolism.

  12. Substrate Promiscuity of N-Acetylhexosamine 1-Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Cao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available N-Acetylhexosamine 1-kinase (NahK catalyzes the direct addition of a phosphate from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP to the anomeric position of N-acetylhexosamine and shows similar activity towards N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc. Herein we report the cloning, characterization, and substrate specificity studies of two NahKs from Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC15697 and Bifidobacterium longum ATCC55813, respectively. A new capillary electrophoresis assay method has been developed for enzyme activity assays. Both enzymes have a good expression level in E. coli (180–185 mg/L culture and can tolerate diverse modifications at C2 of GlcNAc and GalNAc. Various GlcNAc derivatives with C6, both C2 and C6, as well as both C2 and C3 modifications are tolerable substrates for the newly cloned NahKs. Quite interestingly, despite of their low activities toward glucose and galactose, the activities of both NahKs are much higher for mannose and some of its C2, C4, and C6 derivatives. These NahKs are excellent catalysts for enzymatic and chemoenzymatic synthesis of carbohydrates.

  13. A candidate liquid chromatography mass spectrometry reference method for the quantification of the cardiac marker 1-32 B-type natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torma, Attila F; Groves, Kate; Biesenbruch, Sabine; Mussell, Chris; Reid, Alan; Ellison, Steve; Cramer, Rainer; Quaglia, Milena

    2017-08-28

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a 32 amino acid cardiac hormone routinely measured by immunoassays to diagnose heart failure. While it is reported that immunoassay results can vary up to 45%, no attempt of standardization and/or harmonization through the development of certified reference materials (CRMs) or reference measurement procedures (RMPs) has yet been carried out. B-type natriuretic peptide primary calibrator was quantified traceably to the International System of Units (SI) by both amino acid analysis and tryptic digestion. A method for the stabilization of BNP in plasma followed by protein precipitation, solid phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography (LC) mass spectrometry (MS) was then developed and validated for the quantification of BNP at clinically relevant concentrations (15-150 fmol/g). The candidate reference method was applied to the quantification of BNP in a number of samples from the UK NEQAS Cardiac Markers Scheme to demonstrate its applicability to generate reference values and to preliminary evaluate the commutability of a potential CRM. The results from the reference method were consistently lower than the immunoassay results and discrepancy between the immunoassays was observed confirming previous data. The application of the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method to the UK NEQAS samples and the correlation of the results with the immunoassay results shows the potential of the method to support external quality assessment schemes, to improve understanding of the bias of the assays and to establish RMPs for BNP measurements. Furthermore, the method has the potential to be multiplexed for monitoring circulating truncated forms of BNP.

  14. During Cytochrome c Maturation CcmI Chaperones the Class I Apocytochromes until the Formation of Their b-Type Cytochrome Intermediates*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verissimo, Andreia F.; Shroff, Namita P.; Daldal, Fevzi

    2015-01-01

    The c-type cytochromes are electron transfer proteins involved in energy transduction. They have heme-binding (CXXCH) sites that covalently ligate heme b via thioether bonds and are classified into different classes based on their protein folds and the locations and properties of their cofactors. Rhodobacter capsulatus produces various c-type cytochromes using the cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) System I, formed from the CcmABCDEFGHI proteins. CcmI, a component of the heme ligation complex CcmFHI, interacts with the heme-handling protein CcmE and chaperones apocytochrome c2 by binding its C-terminal helix. Whether CcmI also chaperones other c-type apocytochromes, and the effects of heme on these interactions were unknown previously. Here, we purified different classes of soluble and membrane-bound c-type apocytochromes (class I, c2 and c1, and class II c′) and investigated their interactions with CcmI and apoCcmE. We report that, in the absence of heme, CcmI and apoCcmE recognized different classes of c-type apocytochromes with different affinities (nm to μm KD values). When present, heme induced conformational changes in class I apocytochromes (e.g. c2) and decreased significantly their high affinity for CcmI. Knowing that CcmI does not interact with mature cytochrome c2 and that heme converts apocytochrome c2 into its b-type derivative, these findings indicate that CcmI holds the class I apocytochromes (e.g. c2) tightly until their noncovalent heme-containing b-type cytochrome-like intermediates are formed. We propose that these intermediates are subsequently converted into mature cytochromes following the covalent ligation of heme via the remaining components of the Ccm complex. PMID:25979338

  15. During Cytochrome c Maturation CcmI Chaperones the Class I Apocytochromes until the Formation of Their b-Type Cytochrome Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verissimo, Andreia F; Shroff, Namita P; Daldal, Fevzi

    2015-07-03

    The c-type cytochromes are electron transfer proteins involved in energy transduction. They have heme-binding (CXXCH) sites that covalently ligate heme b via thioether bonds and are classified into different classes based on their protein folds and the locations and properties of their cofactors. Rhodobacter capsulatus produces various c-type cytochromes using the cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) System I, formed from the CcmABCDEFGHI proteins. CcmI, a component of the heme ligation complex CcmFHI, interacts with the heme-handling protein CcmE and chaperones apocytochrome c2 by binding its C-terminal helix. Whether CcmI also chaperones other c-type apocytochromes, and the effects of heme on these interactions were unknown previously. Here, we purified different classes of soluble and membrane-bound c-type apocytochromes (class I, c2 and c1, and class II c') and investigated their interactions with CcmI and apoCcmE. We report that, in the absence of heme, CcmI and apoCcmE recognized different classes of c-type apocytochromes with different affinities (nM to μM KD values). When present, heme induced conformational changes in class I apocytochromes (e.g. c2) and decreased significantly their high affinity for CcmI. Knowing that CcmI does not interact with mature cytochrome c2 and that heme converts apocytochrome c2 into its b-type derivative, these findings indicate that CcmI holds the class I apocytochromes (e.g. c2) tightly until their noncovalent heme-containing b-type cytochrome-like intermediates are formed. We propose that these intermediates are subsequently converted into mature cytochromes following the covalent ligation of heme via the remaining components of the Ccm complex. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Some seasonal carbohydrate fluctuations in coppiced rootstocks of Platanus occidentalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, M.R.; Steinbeck, K.

    Carbohydrate concentrations were determined in 11-year-old rootstocks of American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) which had been coppiced on one- or two-year rotations for the preceding eight years. Sixty rootstocks were destructively sampled periodically between September 1976 and April 1977. Root starch concentrations declined erratically from 21 percent of dry weight in autumn to 14 percent by late April. Sugar levels rose from 1.5 percent in autumn to 5 percent in winter and declined to 3 percent in spring. Considerable variation in root starch levels from tree to tree was observed, and differences in starch and sugar concentrations between rootstocks coppiced on an annual or biannual basis were unimportant. These data suggest that while differences in above-ground biomass yields encountered in short rotation coppice forestry are not due to differences in rootstocks carbohydrate concentrations, the total quantity of reserve carbohydrate stored in a root system is probably a controlling factor for sprout regrowth potential.

  17. Separation of carbohydrates using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qing; Liang, Tu; Li, Zhenyu; Xu, Xiaoyong; Ke, Yanxiong; Jin, Yu; Liang, Xinmiao

    2013-09-20

    A strategy was developed to rapidly evaluate chromatographic properties of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) columns for separating carbohydrates. Seven HILIC columns (Silica, Diol, TSK Amide-80, XAmide, Click Maltose, Click β-CD, and Click TE-Cys columns) were evaluated by using three monosaccharide and seven disaccharides as probes. The influence of column temperature on the peak shape and tautomerization of carbohydrates, as well as column selectivity were investigated. The influence of surface charge property on the retention was also studied by using glucose, glucuronic acid, and glucosamine, which indicated that buffer salt concentration and pH value in mobile phase was necessary to control the ionic interactions between ionic carbohydrates and HILIC columns. According to evaluation results, the XAmide column was selected as an example to establish experimental schemes for separation of complex mixtures of oligosaccharide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of polymeric carbohydrates on growth and development in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric carbohydrates, starch and nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP), quantitatively represent the largest portion of the diets for pigs and are, therefore, the largest energy contributor. The 2 types of polysaccharides, however, have different fates and functions in the gastrointestinal tract...... carbohydrates influence growth and development through different mechanisms. First, the proportion of starch to NSP plays an important role for the content of available energy (i.e., DE, ME, and NE); available energy relative to protein is crucial for performance and carcass quality. Second, the proportion...... of starch to NSP will influence rate and type of metabolites (i.e., glucose vs. SCFA) deriving from carbohydrate assimilation. Third and finally, the type of starch (i.e., types A, B, and C) and soluble NSP will influence the release of insulin, the hormone that facilitates nutrient uptake by tissues...

  19. Effects of polymeric carbohydrates on growth and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    The main objective of the presentation is to provide insight into the role of polymeric carbohydrates in growth and development of pigs. Polymeric carbohydrates—starch and non-starch polysaccharides (NSP)—quantitatively represent the largest portion of the diets for pigs and are therefore...... at a slower and more constant rate and with SCFA being absorbed by passive diffusion. Type and levels of polymeric carbohydrates influence growth and development through different mechanisms; first, the proportion of starch to NSP plays an important role for the content of available energy (digestible......, metabolized and net energy); available energy relative to protein is crucial for performance and carcass quality; second, the proportion of starch to NSP will influence rate and type of metabolites (glucose vs. SCFA) deriving from carbohydrate assimilation, and finally, type of starch (types A, B, and C...

  20. Microalgal carbohydrates. An overview of the factors influencing carbohydrates production, and of main bioconversion technologies for production of biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markou, Giorgos; Georgakakis, Dimitris [Agricultural Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Natural Resources Management and Agricultural Engineering; Angelidaki, Irini [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2012-11-15

    Microalgal biomass seems to be a promising feedstock for biofuel generation. Microalgae have relative high photosynthetic efficiencies, high growth rates, and some species can thrive in brackish water or seawater and wastewater from the food- and agro-industrial sector. Today, the main interest in research is the cultivation of microalgae for lipids production to generate biodiesel. However, there are several other biological or thermochemical conversion technologies, in which microalgal biomass could be used as substrate. However, the high protein content or the low carbohydrate content of the majority of the microalgal species might be a constraint for their possible use in these technologies. Moreover, in the majority of biomass conversion technologies, carbohydrates are the main substrate for production of biofuels. Nevertheless, microalgae biomass composition could be manipulated by several cultivation techniques, such as nutrient starvation or other stressed environmental conditions, which cause the microalgae to accumulate carbohydrates. This paper attempts to give a general overview of techniques that can be used for increasing the microalgal biomass carbohydrate content. In addition, biomass conversion technologies, related to the conversion of carbohydrates into biofuels are discussed. (orig.)

  1. A multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase from plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders R.; Girandon, Lenart; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    and biochemical properties suggest that this deoxyribonucleoside kinase represents a living fossil resembling the progenitor of the modern animal deoxycytidine, deoxyguanosine and thymidine 2 kinases. The broad substrate specificity makes this enzyme an interesting candidate to be evaluated as a suicide gene...

  2. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-03-10

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment.

  3. Importance of low carbohydrate diets in diabetes management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall RM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rosemary M Hall, Amber Parry Strong, Jeremy D KrebsCentre for Endocrine, Diabetes and Obesity Research, Capital and Coast District Health Board, Wellington, New Zealand Abstract: Dietary strategies are fundamental in the management of diabetes. Historically, strict dietary control with a low carbohydrate diet was the only treatment option. With increasingly effective medications, the importance of dietary change decreased. Recommendations focused on reducing dietary fat to prevent atherosclerotic disease, with decreasing emphasis on the amount and quality of carbohydrate. As the prevalence of obesity and diabetes escalates, attention has returned to the macronutrient composition of the diet. Very low carbohydrate diets (VLCD's have demonstrated effective initial weight loss and improvement in glycemic control, but difficult long-term acceptability and worsening lipid profile. Modifications to the very low carbohydrate (VLC have included limiting saturated fat and increasing carbohydrate (CHO and protein. Reducing saturated fat appears pivotal in reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol and may mitigate adverse effects of traditional VLCD's. Increased dietary protein enhances satiety, reduces energy intake, and improves glycemic homeostasis, but without sustained improvements in glycemic control or cardiovascular risk over and above the effect of weight loss. Additionally, recent studies in type 1 diabetes mellitus suggest promising benefits to diabetes control with low carbohydrate diets, without concerning effects on ketosis or hypoglycemia. Dietary patterns may highlight pertinent associations. For example, Mediterranean-style and paleolithic-type diets, low in fat and carbohydrate, are associated with reduced body weight and improved glycemic and cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. A feature of these dietary patterns is low refined CHO and sugar and higher fiber, and it is possible that increasing sugar

  4. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment. PMID:26978392

  5. Hydrogen and methane breath tests for evaluation of resistant carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    carbohydrates. Methane breath tests may supplement the information gained from hydrogen measurements, but further evaluations are needed. The hydrogen breath technique is rapid, simple and non-invasive as well as non-radioactive. It may be carried out in a large number of intact individuals under physiological...... circumstances, and it may be used for studies in children and for field studies. Compared to classical tolerance tests the hydrogen breath test is more sensitive. It is concluded that the hydrogen breath test is a useful tool for investigations of dietary carbohydrates....

  6. Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens in pleomorphic adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Christensen, M

    1993-01-01

    Simple mucin-type carbohydrate structures, T, Tn and sialosyl-Tn, are regarded as general markers of carcinomas in several epithelial tissues as a result of incomplete synthesis with precursor accumulation. The structures have a very limited distribution in normal tissues and secretions, including...... saliva and salivary glands. The expression of simple mucin-type carbohydrate structures and ABH(O) variants was studied in paraffin-embedded and frozen tissue sections from 37 pleomorphic adenomas with associated normal parotid tissue, using immunohistology and a panel of MAbs with well...

  7. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Berni Canani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment.

  8. Investigations of Reactive Carbohydrates in Glycosidic Bond Formation and Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuckendorff, Mads

    was to develop new synthetic methods to evolve the field of synthetic carbohydrate chemistry. In addition, easy methods for obtaining complex oligosaccharides are needed to accommodate biochemical research and drug development. Furthermore, the aim was to shed light on the complex mechanisms of glycosylation...... and hy rolysis of glycosides. This mechanistic insight can then be used to develop new synthetic methods and obtain a better understanding of already existing methods. In Chapter 1 general aspects of synthetic carbohydrate chemistry is described with an emphasis on elements that affects reactivity...

  9. Action of ionizing radiation on the carbohydrate metabolism enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkasova, L.S.; Mironova, T.M.

    1976-01-01

    It follows from data reported in literature and those obtained in our laboratory that ionizing radiation does not drastically change the activity of enzymes of the carbohydrate metabolism in tissues of an animal organism. The data are reported on the effect of a whole-body single, fractionated or continuous irradiation of the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and the accompanying interrelated co-operative redistributions within the processes of aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis, and the pentose route of their conversion. The dependence of the postirradiation changes in the activity of enzymes on the neuroendocrine system response to irradiation has been demonstrated

  10. Interactions of polyphenols with carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobek, Lidija

    2015-05-15

    Polyphenols are secondary metabolites in plants, investigated intensively because of their potential positive effects on human health. Their bioavailability and mechanism of positive effects have been studied, in vitro and in vivo. Lately, a high number of studies takes into account the interactions of polyphenols with compounds present in foods, like carbohydrates, proteins or lipids, because these food constituents can have significant effects on the activity of phenolic compounds. This paper reviews the interactions between phenolic compounds and lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and their impact on polyphenol activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Modification of carbohydrate composition of confectionery for diabetics type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyeva, V M; Vorobyeva, I S; Kochetkova, A A; Sharafetdinov, Kh Kh; Zorina, E E

    2014-01-01

    Confectionery products are not staple foods, however, are an integral part of the daily diet of almost all age groups of population, including children and the elderly. Traditional confectionery are high-calorie foods that contain significant amounts of carbohydrates, the bulk of which is sucrose. One of the main requirements to the diet of patients with diabetes mellitus type 2, is limiting of easily digestible carbohydrates in the diet. Modification of the ingredient composition of confectionery products by eliminating or replacing sugar by other functional food ingredients should help to reduce the glycemic index and calorie content of these products.

  12. Affinity Electrophoresis for Analysis of Catalytic Module-Carbohydrate Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis has long been used to study the interaction between proteins and large soluble ligands. The technique has been found to have great utility for the examination of polysaccharide binding by proteins, particularly carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). In recent years, carbohy......Affinity electrophoresis has long been used to study the interaction between proteins and large soluble ligands. The technique has been found to have great utility for the examination of polysaccharide binding by proteins, particularly carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). In recent years...

  13. Carbohydrate conjugation through microwave-assisted functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes using perfluorophenyl azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Na; Shimpi, Manishkumar R; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-03-20

    Carbohydrate-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized using microwave-assisted reaction of perfluorophenyl azide with the nanotubes. The results showed that microwave radiation provides a rapid and effective means to covalently attach carbohydrates to SWNTs, producing carbohydrate-SWNT conjugates for biorecognition. The carbohydrate-functionalized SWNTs were furthermore shown to interact specifically with cognate carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins), resulting in predicted recognition patterns. The carbohydrate-presenting SWNTs constitute a new platform for sensitive protein- or cell recognition, which pave the way for glycoconjugated carbon nanomaterials in biorecognition applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Role of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Intestinal and Hepatic Fructose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Katsumi

    2017-02-22

    Many articles have discussed the relationship between fructose consumption and the incidence of obesity and related diseases. Fructose is absorbed in the intestine and metabolized in the liver to glucose, lactate, glycogen, and, to a lesser extent, lipids. Unabsorbed fructose causes bacterial fermentation, resulting in irritable bowl syndrome. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intestinal and hepatic fructose metabolism is important for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and fructose malabsorption. Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-activated transcription factor that controls approximately 50% of de novo lipogenesis in the liver. ChREBP target genes are involved in glycolysis (Glut2, liver pyruvate kinase), fructolysis (Glut5, ketohexokinase), and lipogenesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase). ChREBP gene deletion protects against high sucrose diet-induced and leptin-deficient obesity, because Chrebp -/- mice cannot consume fructose or sucrose. Moreover, ChREBP contributes to some of the physiological effects of fructose on sweet taste preference and glucose production through regulation of ChREBP target genes, such as fibroblast growth factor-21 and glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. Thus, ChREBP might play roles in fructose metabolism. Restriction of excess fructose intake will be beneficial for preventing not only metabolic syndrome but also irritable bowl syndrome.

  15. The Role of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Intestinal and Hepatic Fructose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi Iizuka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Many articles have discussed the relationship between fructose consumption and the incidence of obesity and related diseases. Fructose is absorbed in the intestine and metabolized in the liver to glucose, lactate, glycogen, and, to a lesser extent, lipids. Unabsorbed fructose causes bacterial fermentation, resulting in irritable bowl syndrome. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intestinal and hepatic fructose metabolism is important for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and fructose malabsorption. Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP is a glucose-activated transcription factor that controls approximately 50% of de novo lipogenesis in the liver. ChREBP target genes are involved in glycolysis (Glut2, liver pyruvate kinase, fructolysis (Glut5, ketohexokinase, and lipogenesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase. ChREBP gene deletion protects against high sucrose diet-induced and leptin-deficient obesity, because Chrebp−/− mice cannot consume fructose or sucrose. Moreover, ChREBP contributes to some of the physiological effects of fructose on sweet taste preference and glucose production through regulation of ChREBP target genes, such as fibroblast growth factor-21 and glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. Thus, ChREBP might play roles in fructose metabolism. Restriction of excess fructose intake will be beneficial for preventing not only metabolic syndrome but also irritable bowl syndrome.

  16. Kinase activity and specificity assay using synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu Na; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of substrate proteins by protein kinases can lead to activation or inactivation of signaling pathways or metabolic processes. Precise understanding of activity and specificity of protein kinases are important questions in characterization of kinase functions. Here, we describe a procedure to study kinase activity and specificity using kinase-GFP complexes purified from plant material and synthetic peptides as substrates. Magnetic GFP beads allow purifying receptor-like kinase-GFP complexes from microsomal fractions. Kinase-GFP complexes are then incubated with ATP and the synthetic peptides for kinase reaction. Phosphorylation of substrate peptides is then identified and quantified by mass spectrometry.

  17. Comments on the reactions of carbohydrate peroxy radicals in relation to the lyoluminescent behaviour of irradiated carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugh, P.J.; Mahjani, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to recent work on lyoluminescence: the emission of visible light from irradiated tissue equivalent solids such as carbohydrates when dissolved in aqueous solutions (Atari et al., Radiat. Effects; 17:45(1973); and ibid.; 20: 135 (1973); and Baugh et al., Int.J.Radiat.Phys. Chem.(in press)). In the present communication the consequences of the fast elimination of the hydroperoxy radicals from carbohydrate peroxy radicals are considered in a further study of the chemical reactions involved. (U.K.)

  18. Mitotic regulation by NIMA-related kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blot Joelle

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The NIMA-related kinases represent a family of serine/threonine kinases implicated in cell cycle control. The founding member of this family, the NIMA kinase of Aspergillus nidulans, as well as the fission yeast homologue Fin1, contribute to multiple aspects of mitotic progression including the timing of mitotic entry, chromatin condensation, spindle organization and cytokinesis. Mammals contain a large family of eleven NIMA-related kinases, named Nek1 to Nek11. Of these, there is now substantial evidence that Nek2, Nek6, Nek7 and Nek9 also regulate mitotic events. At least three of these kinases, as well as NIMA and Fin1, have been localized to the microtubule organizing centre of their respective species, namely the centrosome or spindle pole body. Here, they have important functions in microtubule organization and mitotic spindle assembly. Other Nek kinases have been proposed to play microtubule-dependent roles in non-dividing cells, most notably in regulating the axonemal microtubules of cilia and flagella. In this review, we discuss the evidence that NIMA-related kinases make a significant contribution to the orchestration of mitotic progression and thereby protect cells from chromosome instability. Furthermore, we highlight their potential as novel chemotherapeutic targets.

  19. The clinical impact of mild carbohydrate intolerance in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Damm, P; Sørensen, B

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study the clinical impact of mild carbohydrate intolerance in pregnant women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. STUDY DESIGN: This was a historical cohort study of 2904 pregnant women examined for gestational diabetes on the basis of risk factors...

  20. Effect of salinity and inoculation with Azosprillium on carbohydrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The measured parameters were chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthesis (Ps) rates, carbohydrates, nitrate, ammonium and protein content, nitrogenase activity, yield and yield components. The results showed that salinity decreased plant height and grain yield (GY) in all levels. GY reduction in the inoculated treatment was ...

  1. Expression of an expansin carbohydrate-binding module affects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expansins are believed to be involved in disrupting the non-covalent adhesion of cellulose to matrix polysaccharides, thereby promoting wall creep. We have targeted a putative potato expansin (EXPA) carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) to the cell walls of tobacco plants. Histological examinations and electron ...

  2. Sublethal effects of manganese on the carbohydrate metabolism of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the gills after exposure. The enzymes involved in the carbohydrate metabolism are sensitive to metal exposure and therefore enzyme concentrations fluctuated after the exposure to manganese. Enzyme function plays an ..... in nickel t:xposed Co/isa/asciallis (Chaudhry & Nath 1985). The significant increase in the lactmt: ...

  3. CONSIDERATIONS IN UTILIZING BY-PRODUCT CARBOHYDRATES IN RUMINANT NUTRITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    By-product feeds provide a variety of carbohydrates that can vary greatly in their content, digestibility, and physical effects. Variation in the composition and quality of by-product feeds needs to be evaluated to assess whether the variation poses an acceptable risk for inclusion of small or larg...

  4. A 100-year review: Carbohydrates - characterization, digestion, and utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our knowledge of the role of carbohydrates in dairy cattle nutrition has advanced substantially during the 100 years in which the Journal of Dairy Science has been published. In this review, we traced the history of scientific investigation and discovery from crude fiber, nitrogen-free extract, and ...

  5. Carcass glycogen repletion on carbohydrate re-feeding after starvation.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D J; Palmer, T N

    1987-01-01

    In mice, the response of carcass glycogen to glucose re-feeding after starvation is biphasic. The initial repletive phase is followed by partial (greater than 50%) glycogen mobilization. This turnover of carcass glycogen in response to carbohydrate re-feeding may play an important role in the provision of C3 precursors for hepatic glycogen synthesis.

  6. Radial distribution of non-structural carbohydrates in Malaysian teak ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-structural carbohydrates are primary compounds whose distribution in the wood affects its properties. During the two last decades, a high variability of natural durability of plantation teak wood properties has been found with consequences for industry and consumers. In order to further investigate chemical traits for ...

  7. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warda, Alicja K.; Siezen, Roland J.; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H.J.; Jong, de Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Nierop Groot, Masja N.; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with

  8. Biomass Yield and Carbohydrate Composition in Sugarcane and Energy Cane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane and energy cane are important crops for sugar and bio-ethanol production. A better understanding their carbohydrate composition and concentrations in addition to biomass yields can improve knowledge in biomass processing and utilization. There were two objectives for this study. The first ...

  9. Evaluation of growth and protein and carbohydrate utilizations using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-04-03

    Apr 3, 2013 ... Golden apple snail meat was a good source for both protein and carbohydrate. The crude enzyme extracts from different growth stages and sexes had different abilities to digest the same feeds and feedstuffs. This will make it possible to preliminarily study the authenticated nutritional quality of raw materials ...

  10. Click-generated triazole based ferrocene-carbohydrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two Cu2+-specific colorimetric sensors, based on ferrocene-carbohydrate bioconjugates, 2, C46H56O20N6Fe and 3, C28H33O10N3Fe were designed and synthesized in good yields. Both the compounds, 2 and 3, behave as very selective and sensitive chromogenic and electrochemical chemosensor for Cu2+ ion in ...

  11. Linking Bacillus cereus genotypes and carbohydrate utilization capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warda, Alicja K.; Siezen, Roland J.; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H.J.; Jong, de Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Nierop Groot, Masja N.; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together

  12. Effect of processing on in vitro glycemic indices and carbohydrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of processing on in vitro glycemic indices and carbohydrate catabolizing enzyme inhibitory properties of some tropical grain legumes. ... used as a measure of how a particular food can elicit rise in blood glucose and low GI foods have often been advocated as therapeutically important in managing hyperglycemia.

  13. Molar extinction coefficients of some carbohydrates in aqueous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    useful in the development of semi-empirical formulations of high accuracy, possibly along the lines detailed by Jackson and Hawkes [1]. Carbohydrates play a vital role in the lives of plants and animals, both as structural elements and in the maintenance of functional activity. These in the form of sugar and starch represent a ...

  14. Influence of soil drought stress on photosynthesis, carbohydrates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Greenhouse-grown 1-year-old potted M.9EMLA apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.) (after growing for 6 weeks) were subjected to drought stress by withholding water for an additional six-week period. The photosynthesis, carbohydrates and the nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) absorb in the upper, middle and lower leaves of ...

  15. A carbohydrate-rich diet increases social immunity in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Adam D; Bruning, Abbie J; van Alst, Andy; Abrahamson, Tyler T; Hughes, W O H; Kaspari, Michael

    2014-03-07

    Increased potential for disease transmission among nest-mates means living in groups has inherent costs. This increased potential is predicted to select for disease resistance mechanisms that are enhanced by cooperative exchanges among group members, a phenomenon known as social immunity. One potential mediator of social immunity is diet nutritional balance because traits underlying immunity can require different nutritional mixtures. Here, we show how dietary protein-carbohydrate balance affects social immunity in ants. When challenged with a parasitic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, workers reared on a high-carbohydrate diet survived approximately 2.8× longer in worker groups than in solitary conditions, whereas workers reared on an isocaloric, high-protein diet survived only approximately 1.3× longer in worker groups versus solitary conditions. Nutrition had little effect on social grooming, a potential mechanism for social immunity. However, experimentally blocking metapleural glands, which secrete antibiotics, completely eliminated effects of social grouping and nutrition on immunity, suggesting a causal role for secretion exchange. A carbohydrate-rich diet also reduced worker mortality rates when whole colonies were challenged with Metarhizium. These results provide a novel mechanism by which carbohydrate exploitation could contribute to the ecological dominance of ants and other social groups.

  16. Polysaccharide Biocatalysis : From Synthesizing Carbohydrate Standards to Establishing Characterization Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciric, Jelena; Petrovic, Dejan M.; Loos, Katja

    Starch, glycogen, and cellulose are all around us. They are eaten and used on a daily basis but they are not understood completely. Even though these carbohydrates are simple, concerning their repeating unit, they are hard to characterize. In order to try to understand as much as possible about

  17. Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quentin, Audrey G.; Pinkard, Elizabeth A.; Ryan, Michael G.; Tissue, David T.; Baggett, Scott L.; Adams, Henry D.; Maillard, Pascale; Marchand, Jacqueline; Landhäusser, Simon M.; Lacointe, André; Gibon, Yves; Anderegg, William R.L.; Asao, Shinichi; Atkin, Owen K.; Bonhomme, Marc; Claye, Caroline; Chow, Pak S.; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Davies, Noel W.; Dickman, Turin L.; Dumbur, Rita; Ellsworth, David S.; Falk, Kristen; Galiano, Lucía; Grünzweig, José M.; Hartmann, Henrik; Hoch, Günter; Hood, Sharon; Jones, Joanna E.; Koike, Takayoshi; Kuhlmann, Iris; Lloret, Francisco; Maestro, Melchor; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Maucourt, Mickael; McDowell, Nathan G.; Moing, Annick; Muller, Bertrand; Nebauer, Sergio G.; Niinemets, Ülo; Palacio, Sara; Piper, Frida; Raveh, Eran; Richter, Andreas; Rolland, Gaëlle; Rosas, Teresa; Joanis, Brigitte Saint; Sala, Anna; Smith, Renee A.; Sterck, Frank; Stinziano, Joseph R.; Tobias, Mari; Unda, Faride; Watanabe, Makoto; Way, Danielle A.; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K.; Wild, Birgit; Wiley, Erin; Woodruff, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in plant tissue are frequently quantified to make inferences about plant responses to environmental conditions. Laboratories publishing estimates of NSC of woody plants use many different methods to evaluate NSC. We asked whether NSC estimates in the recent

  18. Co-occurrence of carbohydrate malabsorption and primary epiploic appendagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnedl, Wolfgang J; Kalmar, Peter; Mangge, Harald; Krause, Robert; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra J

    2015-09-21

    Unspecific abdominal complaints including bloating and irregular bowel movements may be caused by carbohydrate malabsorption syndromes, e.g., lactose and fructose malabsorption. These symptoms were investigated with hydrogen (H2) breath tests and correlated to carbohydrate malabsorption. During performing these H2-breath tests the patient presented with an acute, localized, non-migratory pain in the left lower abdominal quadrant. Primary epiploic appendagitis is a rare cause of abdominal acute or subacute complaints and diagnosis of primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA) is made when computed tomography reveals a characteristic lesion. We report on a patient with co-occurrence of lactose and fructose malabsorption, which was treated successfully with a diet free of culprit carbohydrates, with PEA recovering without medication or surgical treatment within few days. Since the abdominal unspecific symptoms had been present for months, they appeared not to be correlated to the acute localized abdominal pain, therefore we speculate on a random co-occurrence of combined carbohydrate malabsorption and PEA.

  19. Carbohydrates – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The main role of carbohydrates in the human body is to provide energy. Carbohydrates should always be infused with PN (parenteral nutrition in combination with amino acids and lipid emulsions to improve nitrogen balance. Glucose should be provided as a standard carbohydrate for PN, whereas the use of xylite is not generally recommended. Fructose solutions should not be used for PN. Approximately 60% of non-protein energy should be supplied as glucose with an intake of 3.0–3.5 g/kg body weight/day (2.1–2.4 mg/kg body weight/min. In patients with a high risk of hyperglycaemia (critically ill, diabetes, sepsis, or steroid therapy an lower initial carbohydrate infusion rate of 1–2 g/kg body weight/day is recommended to achieve normoglycaemia. One should aim at reaching a blood glucose level of 80–110 mg/dL, and at least a glucose level <145 mg/dL should be achieved to reduce morbidity and mortality. Hyperglycaemia may require addition of an insulin infusion or a reduction (2.0–3.0 g/kg body weight/day or even a temporary interruption of glucose infusion. Close monitoring of blood glucose levels is highly important.

  20. Effects of a novel carbohydrate fraction on broiler performance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was performed to determine the effects of a natural yeast-based feed ingredient (natural carbohydrate fraction (NCF) isolated from a specific strain of yeast) on broiler chickens, and to examine its mode of action. The trial was set up as a complete randomized design with three treatments and eight replicates (38 ...

  1. Cell surface carbohydrate changes during embryonic and fetal skin development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Holbrook, K; Clausen, H

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to four type 2 chain carbohydrate antigens were used for immunohistochemical studies of embryonic and fetal skin. The antibodies detected N-acetyllactosamine and 3 fucosyl substitutes of this, blood group antigen H, Lex, and Ley. Periderm consistently stained for N-acetyllac...

  2. Differential effects of carbohydrates on arabidopsis pollen germination

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirsche, J.; Fernández, J. M. G.; Stabentheiner, E.; Großkinsky, D.K.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2017), s. 691-701 ISSN 0032-0781 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Carbohydrates * Metabolic regulation * Pollen germination * Signaling * Structure-function relationship Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.760, year: 2016

  3. EVALUATION OF pH OF COMMON CARBOHYDRATE FOOD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    A balanced diet or a combination of food substances to keep an optimal body pH balance is recommended so as to discourage the growth of microforms and organisms which give rise to these problems. It is recommended also that other non-carbohydrate food items such as proteins and vegetables be increased in the ...

  4. Environmental stability of carbohydrate profiles in different soybean genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean is an important annual crop. The raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFO) raffinose and stachyose are anti-nutritional carbohydrates present in soybean seeds. Consumption of soybean seed products with low RFO reduced flatulence in humans and increased metabolizable energy efficiency in chi...

  5. Human growth hormone alters carbohydrate storage in blood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone that plays vital roles in cell growth and metabolism. Aim: The study investigates the effect of GH on carbohydrate metabolism using Indian bird, Acridotheres tristis. Methods: Three different doses (0.4, 0.6, and 0.8mg/100g body weight) of human growth hormone ...

  6. Carbohydrates – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolder, U.; Ebener, C.; Hauner, H.; Jauch, K. W.; Kreymann, G.; Ockenga, J.; Traeger, K.

    2009-01-01

    The main role of carbohydrates in the human body is to provide energy. Carbohydrates should always be infused with PN (parenteral nutrition) in combination with amino acids and lipid emulsions to improve nitrogen balance. Glucose should be provided as a standard carbohydrate for PN, whereas the use of xylite is not generally recommended. Fructose solutions should not be used for PN. Approximately 60% of non-protein energy should be supplied as glucose with an intake of 3.0–3.5 g/kg body weight/day (2.1–2.4 mg/kg body weight/min). In patients with a high risk of hyperglycaemia (critically ill, diabetes, sepsis, or steroid therapy) an lower initial carbohydrate infusion rate of 1–2 g/kg body weight/day is recommended to achieve normoglycaemia. One should aim at reaching a blood glucose level of 80–110 mg/dL, and at least a glucose level <145 mg/dL should be achieved to reduce morbidity and mortality. Hyperglycaemia may require addition of an insulin infusion or a reduction (2.0–3.0 g/kg body weight/day) or even a temporary interruption of glucose infusion. Close monitoring of blood glucose levels is highly important. PMID:20049080

  7. Sublethal effects of manganese on the carbohydrate metabolism of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbohydrate metabolism variables of Oreochromis mossambicuswere investigated after acute and chronic sublethal manganese exposure. The sublethal concentrations were determined from the LC50 value of manganese. After the exposures, the fish were carefully netted and blood was drawn from the caudal aorta.

  8. Science Study Aids 3: Carbohydrates - Nature's Energy Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Bill

    This publication is the third of a series of seven supplementary investigative materials for use in secondary science classes providing up-to-date research-related investigations. This unit is structured for grade levels 7 through 12. It is concerned with the role of carbohydrates as important nutrients for consumers. This guide will enable…

  9. Dry matter and nonstructural carbohydrate content as quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Lolium multiflorum cv. Midmar pasture and ninety individual plants (both Italian and Westerwolds types), from 15 different Lolium multiflorum cultivars in a spaced-plant trial, were assessed for total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) content, TNC yield, dry matter (DM) content, DM yield and nitrogen (N) content. Maximum ...

  10. Method Development in the Regioselective Glycosylation of Unprotected Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niedbal, Dominika Alina

    and the glycosylations were promoted by tetrabutylammonium bromide. The couplings were completely selective and gave rise to a number of 1,6-linked disaccharides with 1,2- cis-linked orientation. Project 2: Boron-mediated glycosylation of unprotected carbohydrates Boron-mediated regioselective Koenigs...

  11. Effect of Carbohydrate and Caffeine Ingestion on Badminton Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Neil D; Duncan, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of ingesting carbohydrate and caffeine solutions on measures that are central to success in badminton. Twelve male badminton players performed a badminton serve-accuracy test, coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT), and a choice reaction-time sprint test 60 min before exercise. Participants then consumed 7 mL/kg body mass of either water (PLA), 6.4% carbohydrate solution (CHO), a solution containing a caffeine dose of 4 mg/kg, or 6.4% carbohydrate and 4 mg/kg caffeine (C+C). All solutions were flavored with orange-flavored concentrate. During the 33-min fatigue protocol, participants were provided with an additional 3 mL/kg body mass of solution, which was ingested before the end of the protocol. As soon as the 33-min fatigue protocol was completed, all measures were recorded again. Short-serve accuracy was improved after the ingestion of CHO and C+C compared with PLA (P = .001, η(p)(2) = .50). Long-serve accuracy was improved after the ingestion of C+C compared with PLA (P caffeinated carbohydrate solution before and during a badminton match can maintain serve accuracy, anticipation timing, and sprinting actions around the court.

  12. Human growth hormone alters carbohydrate storage in blood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-06-02

    Jun 2, 2015 ... [1] The roles of growth hormone (GH) in regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in Indian birds have scantly been studied. GH is a polypeptide hormone ..... growth hormones. Endocrinology 1974;95:1560-1565. 24. Higgs D.A,. Sutton J.N, Kim H, Oakes J.D, Smith J, Biagi. C, Devlin R.H. Influence of dietary.

  13. Distribution of dissolved carbohydrates and uronic acids in a tropical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In order to understand their distribution, concentrations of total dissolved carbohydrate (TCHO), dissolved polysaccharide (PCHO), dissolved ... of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in seawater. (Romankevich 1984; Thurman 1985; Pakulski ... of metal ions (Decho 1990; Santschi et al 1998;. Quigley et al 2002), production of ...

  14. Protease-induced solubilisation of carbohydrates from brewers' spent grain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faulds, C.B.; Collins, S.; Robertson, J.A.; Treimo, J.; Eijsink, V.G.H.; Hinz, S.W.A.; Schols, H.A.; Buchert, J.; Waldron, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of microbial proteases on the release of carbohydrates from BSG was studied. The proteases were able to release the non-cellulosic glucose, a portion of feruloylated arabinoxylan and over 50% of the protein from brewers' spent grain (BSG) after 24 h hydrolysis. The non-cellulosic glucose

  15. Long-term salt stress responsive growth, carbohydrate metabolism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the long-term responses of tobacco tissues to salt stress, with a particular interest for growth parameters, proline (Pro) accumulation, and carbohydrate metabolism. Exposure of 17-day-old tobacco plants to 0.2 M NaCl was followed by a higher decrease in dry matter in roots than shoots with a decrease of ...

  16. Glycaemic index of selected staple carbohydrate-rich foods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-28

    Jan 28, 2013 ... Original Research: Glycaemic index of selected staple carbohydrate-rich foods commonly consumed in Botswana. 2013;26(4) ... United Nations (FAO)/World Health Organization (WHO).5,6,17 However, the practical ... test, to fast for 10 hours, be at the testing site at 08h00 once a week over a period of six ...

  17. Distribution of particulate carbohydrate species in the Bay of Bengal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    composition of carbohydrates are influenced by several factors including nutrient levels, compo- sition of organisms, growth phase, etc. Carbo- .... particulate uronic acids (TPURA) and TPURA/TPCHO ratio in suspended particulate matter of the surface seawater collected at various locations of the Bay of Bengal. TPURA/.

  18. Carbohydrate maldigestion induces necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major gastrointestinal disorder in preterm infants. Key risk factors for NEC are enteral feeding and microbial colonization. Maldigestion of carbohydrate secondary to immature digestive function has been suspected to cause bacterial overgrowth and NEC. We investi...

  19. Carbohydrate Reserves And Metal Accumulation Of The Nile Tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the carbohydrate reserves and metal accumulation of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus after exposure to sublethal concentrations of heavy metals such as copper, lead and zinc for a 12-week period, using static renewable toxicity tests. The concentrations of the metals accumulated in the tissue ...

  20. Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feinman, Richard D; Pogozelski, Wendy K; Astrup, Arne

    2015-01-01

    side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs. Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They represent the best-documented, least...

  1. Radiation degradation of carbohydrates and their biological activities for plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Matsuhashi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation effects on carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated to improve the biological activities. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities such as anti-bacterial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction. Pectic fragments obtained from degraded pectin induced the phytoalexins such as glyceollins in soybean and pisatin in pea. The irradiated chitosan shows the higher elicitor activity for pisatin than that of pectin. For the plant growth promotion, alginate derived from brown marine algae, chitosan and ligno-cellulosic extracts show a strong activity. Kappa and iota carrageenan derived from red marine algae can promote growth of rice and the highest effect was obtained with kappa irradiated at 100 kGy. Some radiation degraded carbohydrates suppressed the damage of heavy metals on plants. The effects of irradiated carbohydrates on transportation of heavy metals have been investigated by PETIS (Positron Emitting Tracer Imaging System) and autoradiography using 48 V and 62 Zn. (author)

  2. Radiation degradation of carbohydrates and their biological activities for plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Matsuhashi, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-03-01

    Radiation effects on carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated to improve the biological activities. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities such as anti-bacterial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction. Pectic fragments obtained from degraded pectin induced the phytoalexins such as glyceollins in soybean and pisatin in pea. The irradiated chitosan shows the higher elicitor activity for pisatin than that of pectin. For the plant growth promotion, alginate derived from brown marine algae, chitosan and ligno-cellulosic extracts show a strong activity. Kappa and iota carrageenan derived from red marine algae can promote growth of rice and the highest effect was obtained with kappa irradiated at 100 kGy. Some radiation degraded carbohydrates suppressed the damage of heavy metals on plants. The effects of irradiated carbohydrates on transportation of heavy metals have been investigated by PETIS (Positron Emitting Tracer Imaging System) and autoradiography using {sup 48}V and {sup 62}Zn. (author)

  3. Predictive Values of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Cardiac Troponin I for Myocardial Fibrosis in Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlin Zhang

    Full Text Available Both high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T and B-type natriuretic peptide are useful in detecting myocardial fibrosis, as determined by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, in patients with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, their values to predict myocardial fibrosis in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM remain unclear. We investigated the role of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP and cardiac troponin I (cTnI to identify LGE-CMR in patients with HOCM.Peripheral concentrations of NT-proBNP and cTnI were determined in patients with HOCM (n = 163; age = 47.2 ± 10.8 years; 38.7% females. Contrast-enhanced CMR was performed to identify and quantify myocardial fibrosis.LGE was detected in 120 of 163 patients (73.6%. Patients with LGE had significantly higher levels of NT-proBNP and cTnI than those without LGE (1386.2 [904.6-2340.8] vs. 866.6 [707.2-1875.2] pmol/L, P = 0.003; 0.024 [0.010-0.049] vs. 0.010 [0.005-0.021] ng/ml, P <0.001, respectively. The extent of LGE was positively correlated with log cTnI (r = 0.371, P <0.001 and log NT-proBNP (r = 0.211, P = 0.007. On multivariable analysis, both log cTnI and maximum wall thickness (MWT were independent predictors of the presence of LGE (OR = 3.193, P = 0.033; OR = 1.410, P < 0.001, respectively, whereas log NT-proBNP was not. According to the ROC curve analysis, combined measurements of MWT ≥21 mm and/or cTnI ≥0.025 ng/ml indicated good diagnostic performance for the presence of LGE, with specificity of 95% or sensitivity of 88%.Serum cTnI is an independent predictor useful for identifying myocardial fibrosis, while plasma NT-proBNP is only associated with myocardial fibrosis on univariate analysis. Combined measurements of serum cTnI with MWT further improve its value in detecting myocardial fibrosis in patients with HOCM.

  4. The lanthanoid(III) chloride oxoselenates(IV) MCl[SeO3] (M = Sm - Lu) with HoCl[TeO3]- or B-type structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipp, C.; Schleid, T.

    2008-01-01

    The B-type lanthanoid(III) chloride oxoselenates(IV) MCl[SeO 3 ] (M = Sm - Lu) crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pnma (no. 62) with Z = 4 in the structure type of HoCl[TeO 3 ]. Their lattice constants are decreasing following the lanthanoid contraction from a = 730.01(7), b = 707.90(7), c 895.64(9) pm for SmCl[SeO 3 ] to a = 714.63(7), b = 681.76(7), c = 864.05(9) pm for LuCl[SeO 3 ]. In contrast to NdCl[SeO 3 ], the only representative of the A-type structure, where the coordination numbers of the Nd 3+ cations are 7+2 and 8, the B-type structure is dominated by pentagonal bipyramids [MO 5 Cl 2 ] 9- (CN(M 3+ ) = 7), which are connected via trans-oriented O..O edges to ∞ 1 {[MO 4/2 e O 1/1 t Cl 2/1 t ] 5- } chains (e = edge-sharing, t = terminal) running parallel to the [010] direction. Their inclination relative to each other allows for an alternating interconnection of these chains via Cl - and ψ 1 -tetrahedral [SeO 3 ] 2- anions to form a three-dimensional structure. The distances within the [SeO 3 ] 2- groups are in the normal range (d(Se-O) = 165 - 172 pm), while those of the O 2- and Cl - anions to the central M 3+ cation diminish in dependence of the increasing atomic number (d(M-O) = 226 - 244 pm / 216 - 232 pm, d(M-Cl) 277 - 278 pm / 266 - 270 pm, M = Sm / Lu). For the synthesis of the chloride oxoselenates(IV) MCl[SeO 3 ] the respective lanthanoid sesquioxide (M 2 O 3 ) and selenium dioxide (SeO 2 ) were reacted with either an eutectic mixture of RbCl and LiCl or with the corresponding lanthanoid trichloride (MCl 3 ) in evacuated silica ampoules for either five weeks at 500 C or one week at 850 C. (orig.)

  5. Selecting and Effectively Using Sports Drinks, Carbohydrate Gels and Energy Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Effectively Using Sports Drinks, Carbohydrate Gels and Energy Bars Depending upon the length of your workout ... can hinder performance. Sports drinks, carbohydrate gels and energy bars can help restore your body’s fluids and ...

  6. Water and carbohydrate content at leafs of plants used in medicine during vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhivetev M.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Increase of carbohydrate content with cryoprotective function to the end of vegetation period was shown. The accumulation of carbohydrates in plants on Lake Baikal shores region was greater than it in Irkutsk region.

  7. Isocaloric carbohydrate deprivation induces protein catabolism despite a low T3-syndrome in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, P. H.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Endert, E.; Romijn, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Dietary carbohydrate content is a major factor determining endocrine and metabolic regulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between thyroid hormone levels and metabolic parameters during eucaloric carbohydrate deprivation. We measured thyroid hormone levels, resting energy

  8. Switching of bacterial adhesion to a glycosylated surface by reversible reorientation of the carbohydrate ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Theresa; Chrasekaran, Vijayan; Stamer, Insa

    2014-01-01

    The surface recognition in many biological systems is guided by the interaction of carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins) with carbohydrate epitopes (ligands) located within the unordered glycoconjugate layer (glycocalyx) of cells. Thus, for recognition, the respective ligand has to reorient...

  9. [Systematic evaluation of retention behavior of carbohydrates in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qing; Wang, Jun; Liang, Tu; Xu, Xiaoyong; Jin, Yu

    2013-11-01

    A systematic evaluation of retention behavior of carbohydrates in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was performed. The influences of mobile phase, stationary phase and buffer salt on the retention of carbohydrates were investigated. According to the results, the retention time of carbohydrates decreased as the proportion of acetonitrile in mobile phase decreased. Increased time of carbohydrates was observed as the concentration of buffer salt in mobile phase increased. The retention behavior of carbohydrates was also affected by organic solvent and HILIC stationary phase. Furthermore, an appropriate retention equation was used in HILIC mode. The retention equation lnk = a + blnC(B) + cC(B) could quantitatively describe the retention factors of carbohydrates of plant origin with good accuracy: the relative error of the predicted time to actual time was less than 0.3%. The evaluation results could provide guidance for carbohydrates to optimize the experimental conditions in HILIC method development especially for carbohydrate separation

  10. Nickel-catalyzed proton-deuterium exchange (HDX) procedures for glycosidic linkage analysis of complex carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structural analysis of complex carbohydrates typically requires the assignment of three parameters: monosaccharide composition, the position of glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and the position and nature of non-carbohydrate substituents. The glycosidic linkage positions are often de...

  11. Quality of Vegetable Waste Silages Treated with Various Carbohydrate Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ridwan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the quality of vegetable waste silages, using rice bran, onggok (cassava flour waste and pollard as carbohydrate sources. Vegetable waste was collected from local traditional market, consisted of corn husk, chinese cabbage and cabbage. Research was held in randomized block design consisted of six treatments with 3 replications. Treatments were (T1 vegetable waste + rice bran, (T2 vegetable waste + rice bran + rice straw, (T3 vegetable waste + onggok, (T4 vegetable waste + onggok + rice straw, (T5 vegetable waste + pollard, (T6 vegetable waste + pollard + rice straw. Lactobacillus plantarum 1A-2 was used as innoculant. The quality of silages was evaluated by measuring pH, temperature, population of lactic acid bacteria and lactic acid production. Nutrient characteristic was determined by proximate and fiber analysis. Results showed that pH of silages were not affected by treatments, but silage treated with rice bran, with or without rice straw addition, had higher temperature compared with others (29 oC or 28.3 oC. The highest population of lactic acid bacteria (1.65 x 109 cfu/g was found in silage using rice straw and onggok (T4, but the highest lactic acid production (0.41% was measured in silage using rice straw and rice bran (T2. In general, the use of rice bran as carbohydrate sources gave the highest lactic acid production followed by pollard and onggok. Different carbohydrate source gave different nutrients characteristic. Although the result was not significantly different, silage with highest protein content was measured in silage with pollard as carbohydrate source, followed with rice bran and onggok. The result showed that all carbohydrate sources used in this experiment can be used as silage ingredient resulting in good vegetable waste silage.

  12. The carbohydrate sensitive rat as a model of obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachiket A Nadkarni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sensitivity to obesity is highly variable in humans, and rats fed a high fat diet (HFD are used as a model of this inhomogeneity. Energy expenditure components (basal metabolism, thermic effect of feeding, activity and variations in substrate partitioning are possible factors underlying the variability. Unfortunately, in rats as in humans, results have often been inconclusive and measurements usually made after obesity onset, obscuring if metabolism was a cause or consequence. Additionally, the role of high carbohydrate diet (HCD has seldom been studied. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Rats (n=24 were fed for 3 weeks on HCD and then 3 weeks on HFD. Body composition was tracked by MRI and compared to energy expenditure components measured prior to obesity. RESULTS: 1 under HFD, as expected, by adiposity rats were variable enough to be separable into relatively fat resistant (FR and sensitive (FS groups, 2 under HCD, and again by adiposity, rats were also variable enough to be separable into carbohydrate resistant (CR and sensitive (CS groups, the normal body weight of CS rats hiding viscerally-biased fat accumulation, 3 HCD adiposity sensitivity was not related to that under HFD, and both HCD and HFD adiposity sensitivities were not related to energy expenditure components (BMR, TEF, activity cost, and 4 only carbohydrate to fat partitioning in response to an HCD test meal was related to HCD-induced adiposity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The rat model of human obesity is based on substantial variance in adiposity gains under HFD (FR/FS model. Here, since we also found this phenomenon under HCD, where it was also linked to an identifiable metabolic difference, we should consider the existence of another model: the carbohydrate resistant (CR or sensitive (CS rat. This new model is potentially complementary to the FR/FS model due to relatively greater visceral fat accumulation on a low fat high carbohydrate diet.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of the carbohydrate utilization network in Thermotoga maritima

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    Dmitry A Rodionov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermophilic bacteria from the Thermotogales lineage can produce hydrogen by fermenting a wide range of carbohydrates. Previous experimental studies identified a large fraction of genes committed to carbohydrate degradation and utilization in the model bacterium Thermotoga maritima. Knowledge of these genes enabled comprehensive reconstruction of biochemical pathways comprising the carbohydrate utilization network. However, transcriptional factors (TFs and regulatory mechanisms driving this network remained largely unknown. Here, we used an integrated approach based on comparative analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data for the reconstruction of the carbohydrate utilization regulatory networks in 11 Thermotogales genomes. We identified DNA-binding motifs and regulons for 19 orthologous TFs in the Thermotogales. The inferred regulatory network in T. maritima contains 181 genes encoding TFs, sugar catabolic enzymes and ABC-family transporters. In contrast to many previously described bacteria, a transcriptional regulation strategy of Thermotoga does not employ global regulatory factors. The reconstructed regulatory network in T. maritima was validated by gene expression profiling on a panel of mono- and disaccharides and by in vitro DNA-binding assays. The observed upregulation of genes involved in catabolism of pectin, trehalose, cellobiose, arabinose, rhamnose, xylose, glucose, galactose, and ribose showed a strong correlation with the UxaR, TreR, BglR, CelR, AraR, RhaR, XylR, GluR, GalR, and RbsR regulons. Ultimately, this study elucidated the transcriptional regulatory network and mechanisms controlling expression of carbohydrate utilization genes in T. maritima. In addition to improving the functional annotations of associated transporters and catabolic enzymes, this research provides novel insights into the evolution of regulatory networks in Thermotogales.

  14. Whey or Casein Hydrolysate with Carbohydrate for Metabolism and Performance in Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuyse, T; Carstens, M; Millen, A M E

    2015-07-01

    The protein type most suitable for ingestion during endurance exercise is undefined. This study compared co-ingestion of either 15 g/h whey or casein hydrolysate with 63 g/h fructose: maltodextrin (0.8:1) on exogenous carbohydrate oxidation, exercise metabolism and performance. 2 h postprandial, 8 male cyclists ingested either: carbohydrate-only, carbohydrate-whey hydrolysate, carbohydrate-casein hydrolysate or placebo-water in a crossover, double-blind design during 2 h of exercise at 60%W max followed by a 16-km time trial. Data were evaluated by magnitude-based inferential statistics. Exogenous carbohydrate oxidation, measured from (13)CO2 breath enrichment, was not substantially influenced by co-ingestion of either protein hydrolysate. However, only co-ingestion of carbohydrate-casein hydrolysate substantially decreased (98% very likely decrease) total carbohydrate oxidation (mean±SD, 242±44; 258±47; 277±33 g for carbohydrate-casein, carbohydrate-whey and carbohydrate-only, respectively) and substantially increased (93% likely increase) total fat oxidation (92±14; 83±27; 73±19 g) compared with carbohydrate-only. Furthermore, only carbohydrate-casein hydrolysate ingestion resulted in a faster time trial (-3.6%; 90% CI: ±3.2%) compared with placebo-water (95% likely benefit). However, neither protein hydrolysate enhanced time trial performance when compared with carbohydrate-only. Under the conditions of this study, ingesting carbohydrate-casein, but not carbohydrate-whey hydrolysate, favourably alters metabolism during prolonged moderate-strenuous cycling without substantially altering cycling performance compared with carbohydrate-only. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Commercial-scale recycling of NdFeB-type magnets with grain boundary modification yields products with 'designer properties' that exceed those of starting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakotnik, M; Tudor, C O

    2015-10-01

    NdFeB-type magnets dominate the market for high performance magnetic materials, yet production of 'virgin' magnets via mining is environmentally, financially and energetically costly. Hence, interest is growing in 'magnet to magnet' recycling schemes that offer the potential for cheaper, more environmentally-friendly solutions to the world's growing appetite for rare-earth based magnetic materials. Unfortunately, previously described recycling processes only partially capitalise on this potential, because the methods described to date are limited to 'laboratory scale' or operate only under ideal conditions and result in products that fail to recapture the coercivity of the starting, scrap materials. Herein, we report a commercial scale process (120 kg batches) that completely recovers the properties of the starting scrap magnets. Indeed, 'grain boundary modification', via careful addition of a proprietary mix of blended elements, produces magnets with 'designer properties' that can exceed those of the starting materials and can be closely tailored to meet a wide variety of end-user applications, including high-coercivity (>2000 kA/m), sintered magnets suitable for motor applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of Relationship between Serum Level of Aminoterminal pro B-type Natriuretic Peptide and Prognosis in Patients with Respiratory Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hoseini Kasnavieh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between serum level of aminoterminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide and prognosis in patients with respiratory distress in emergency ward of Rasoul Akram Hospital(Tehran, Iran. Methods: In this cohort study which was conducted in the emergency ward of Rasoul Akram hospital, after considering inclusion ad exclusion criteria, 62 subjects with respiratory distress entered the study. Blood samples of these patients were used for assessment of NT-Pro-BNP levels; Finally, the survival of the patients was defined after 15 days and the levels of NT-Pro-BNP was compared between alive and dead patients. Data was analyzed by SPSS (Ver. 16. Results: Mean NT-Pro-BNP level was 8141.41(SD=10403.95. 10 patients (16.1% died (8 females and 2 males and 52 patients (83.9% survived after 15 days. Mean NT-Pro-BNP level was 4674.34 (SD=6680.23 and 26170.20 (SD = 7073.80 among survived and died patients, respectively and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.001. Conclusion: Serum NT-Pro-BNP level can predict the prognosis of patients with respiratory distress due to such diseases as pulmonary edema, COPD exacerbation and CHF.

  17. Short sleep duration is associated with B-type natriuretic peptide levels and predicts the death of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Sako, Akahito; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the associations of sleep duration with all-cause mortality, glycemic control, and other clinical parameters of patients with type 2 diabetes. From April 2013 to December 2015, we conducted a retrospective cohort study. Study participants were divided into three groups according to their sleep duration. Multiple regression analysis and Cox proportional hazards analysis were performed to assess the independent associations of sleep duration with clinical parameters and all-cause mortality. We enrolled 1233 patients who were then followed for 860 ± 264 days. During the follow-up period, 20 patients (1.6%) died. Sleep duration inversely associated with plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels (β = -0.203, p = 0.012) in short (<7 h) sleepers, whereas it was positively associated with hemoglobin A1c levels (β = 0.156, p = 0.021) in long (≥9 h) sleepers. Moreover, Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that short sleep duration was a significant predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 0.473; confidence interval 0.248-0.905, p = 0.024). Short sleep duration may serve as a prognostic indicator of mortality in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes and may increase cardiovascular stress. Adequate sleep is essential for the management of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Addition of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels to electrocardiography criteria for detection of left ventricular hypertrophy: the ARIRANG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Min-Soo; Yoo, Byung-Su; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jun-Won; Youn, Young Jin; Ahn, Sung Gyun; Kim, Jang-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Junghan; Park, Jong-Ku; Ahn, Song Vogue; Choi, Eunhee

    2015-04-01

    The utility of electrocardiography (ECG) in screening for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in general populations is limited mainly because its low sensitivity. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is released due to the remodeling processes of LVH and could improve the diagnostic accuracy for the ECG criteria for LVH. We hypothesized that addition of BNP levels to ECG criteria could aid LVH detection compared with ECG alone in a general population. We enrolled consecutive 343 subjects from a community-based cohort. LVH was defined as LV mass index > 95 g/m(2) for females and > 115 g/m(2) for males according to echocardiography. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve to detect LVH was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.61) in Sokolow-Lyon criteria and 0.53 (0.47-0.59) in the Cornell voltage criteria. After addition of N-terminal-proBNP levels to the model, the corresponding areas under the ROC were 0.63 (0.58-0.69) and 0.64 (0.59-0.69), respectively. P values for the comparison in areas under the ROC for models with and without N-terminal-proBNP levels were < 0.001. These data suggest that addition of N-terminal-proBNP levels to ECG criteria could significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy of LVH in general populations.

  19. Cholesterol trafficking and raft-like membrane domain composition mediate scavenger receptor class B type 1-dependent lipid sensing in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Etienne; Ghezzal, Sara; Lucchi, Géraldine; Truntzer, Caroline; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Demignot, Sylvie; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W; Leturque, Armelle; Rousset, Monique; Carrière, Véronique

    2018-02-01

    Scavenger receptor Class B type 1 (SR-B1) is a lipid transporter and sensor. In intestinal epithelial cells, SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing is associated with SR-B1 recruitment in raft-like/ detergent-resistant membrane domains and interaction of its C-terminal transmembrane domain with plasma membrane cholesterol. To clarify the initiating events occurring during lipid sensing by SR-B1, we analyzed cholesterol trafficking and raft-like domain composition in intestinal epithelial cells expressing wild-type SR-B1 or the mutated form SR-B1-Q445A, defective in membrane cholesterol binding and signal initiation. These features of SR-B1 were found to influence both apical cholesterol efflux and intracellular cholesterol trafficking from plasma membrane to lipid droplets, and the lipid composition of raft-like domains. Lipidomic analysis revealed likely participation of d18:0/16:0 sphingomyelin and 16:0/0:0 lysophosphatidylethanolamine in lipid sensing by SR-B1. Proteomic analysis identified proteins, whose abundance changed in raft-like domains during lipid sensing, and these included molecules linked to lipid raft dynamics and signal transduction. These findings provide new insights into the role of SR-B1 in cellular cholesterol homeostasis and suggest molecular links between SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing and cell cholesterol and lipid droplet dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High scavenger receptor class B type I expression is related to tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma: A STROBE compliant article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hong; Wang, Minghui; Wu, Changshun; Yu, Jinyu; Wang, Dan; Ma, Jian; Han, Junqing

    2018-03-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) is highly expressed in a variety of cancers, including prostate, breast and ovarian. However, the relationship between SR-B1 and lung adenocarcinoma is unknown. We analyzed the expression of SR-B1 in a well-characterized lung adenocarcinoma tissue microarray by immunohistochemistry, in 90 cancerous and 90 adjacent normal lung tissues. Results showed that the positive expression rate of SR-B1 in cancer tissues (86/90, 96%) was significantly higher than that of adjacent tissues (50/90, 56%) (P < .001). And SR-B1 overexpression in lung adenocarcinoma tissue was significantly higher than that of adjacent normal tissue (P < .001), accounting for 67% of cases. This elevated SR-B1 expression was associated with AJCC stage (P < .001), T stage (P = .012), N stage (P = .002), and lymph node positivity (P < .001). The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated that patients with high SR-B1 expression had a shorter overall survival (P < .001). On the multivariate analysis, SR-B1 was an independent prognostic factor for outcomes after adjustment for other prognostic factors (P = .038). In conclusion, high SR-B1 expression is associated with conventional pathologic parameters that represent tumor aggressiveness and may purport a poor clinical prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma.