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Sample records for b-cell dominant lymphocytic

  1. Alvocidib in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  2. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-09

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  3. B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Haeri, Sina; Baker, Arthur M; Boles, Jeremiah; Brown, Mark

    2011-08-01

    Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is a rare occurrence in pregnancy and can be rapidly fatal if left untreated. The need for immediate treatment of ALL, coupled with the maternal-fetal risks from the chemotherapy regimen render a therapeutic dilemma in pregnant women with ALL. We report a case of ALL diagnosed in the 24th week of pregnancy to outline our management strategy, to demonstrate the feasibility of treatment with multi-agent chemotherapy, and to provide a review of the literature.

  4. Small B cell lymphocytic lymphoma presenting as obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Weng-Cheng

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most lymphomas that involve the tonsil are large B cell lymphomas. Large B-cell lymphoma is a high grade malignancy which progresses rapidly. Tonsillar lymphoma usually presents as either a unilaterally enlarged palatine tonsil or as an ulcerative and fungating lesion over the tonsillar area. Small lymphocytic lymphomas (SLL of the Waldeyer's ring are uncommon. Case presentation We report a 41-year-old male who presented with a ten-year history of snoring. Physical examination revealed smooth bilateral symmetrically enlarged tonsils without abnormal surface change or cervical lymphadenopathy. Palatal redundancy and a narrowed oropharyngeal airway were also noted. The respiratory disturbance index (RDI was 66 per hour, and severe obstruction sleep apnea (OSA was suspected. No B symptoms, sore throat, odynophagia or dysphagia was found. We performed uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP and pathological examination revealed incidental small B-cell lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL. Conclusion It is uncommon for lymphoma to initially present as OSA. SLL is an indolent malignancy and is not easy to detect in the early stage. We conclude that SLL may be a contributing factor of OSA in the present case.

  5. Natural History Study of Monoclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), and Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma (SMZL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-05

    B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis; Lymhoma, Small Lymphocytic; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  6. Evidence for progenitors of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells that undergo intraclonal differentiation and diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dono, M; Hashimoto, S; Fais, F; Trejo, V; Allen, S L; Lichtman, S M; Schulman, P; Vinciguerra, V P; Sellars, B; Gregersen, P K; Ferrarini, M; Chiorazzi, N

    1996-02-15

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from five patients with IgG+ B-type chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) were analyzed for the presence of clone-specific Ig H chain variable region gene mRNA transcripts linked to C mu and/or C alpha. This was assessed by (1) comparing the lengths of portions of the VHDJH of the IgG+ CLL clones with those of the mu and alpha isotype-expressing B cells, (2) performing clone-specific endonuclease digestion studies, and (3) determining the DNA sequences of the mu and alpha isotype-expressing cDNA. Thus, when B-cell mRNA from these five patients were reverse transcribed with C gamma-specific primers and then amplified by polymerase chain reaction, dominant cDNA were found with lengths corresponding to those of the IgG+ CLL B cell. In addition, in four cases, cDNA of lengths identical to those of the CLL B cell were detected when mRNA was reverse transcribed and amplified using c mu- and/or C alpha-specific primers, strongly suggesting clonal relatedness. These CLL-related mu- and alpha-expressing cDNA were present in greater amounts that unrelated (non-CLL) mu- and alpha-expressing cDNA from normal B cells that used genes of the same VH family. When the sequences of these CLL-related C mu- and C alpha-expressing cDNA were compared with those of the IgG+ CLL clones, it was clear that they were derived from the same ancestral gene as the IgG-expressing CLL B cell, thus documenting their common origin. Finally, nucleotide point mutations were observed in the mu- and alpha-expressing cDNA of certain patients, indicating divergence with the CLL. These data suggest that IgM+ B cells, which are precursors of the leukemic B cells, exist in increased numbers in the blood of most patients with IgG+ B-CELL and that these cells may differentiate, accumulate V genes mutations, and undergo isotype switching in vivo. In addition, the data are consistent with a sequential-hit model for the evolution of CLL.

  7. Selection of reference genes for quantitative PCR studies in purified B cells from B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Valceckiene, Vilma; Kontenyte, Rima; Jakubauskas, Arturas; Griskevicius, Laimonas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Clinical heterogeneity of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) makes it necessary to identify potent prognostic indicators to predict individual clinical course and select risk-adapted therapy. During the last years numerous gene expression models have been suggested as prognostic factors of B-CLL. Today quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a preferred method for rapid quantification of gene expression and validation of microarray data. Reliability of q...

  8. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma: another neoplasm related to the B-cell follicle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Bevan; Swerdlow, Steven H; Hasserjian, Robert P; Surti, Urvashi; Gibson, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been increased attention paid to the critical nature of nodal involvement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), the B-cell compartment it is most closely related to and its relationship to the follicle remain uncertain. A clinicopathologic investigation of 60 extramedullary biopsies of LEF1+ CLL/SLL, including 29 cases with perifollicular/follicular (PF/F) growth, was therefore performed. A subset of PF/F cases demonstrated inner mantle zone preservation or intra-mantle zone growth. All PF/F and 16/31 other cases contained CD21+ follicular dendritic cells. No cytogenetic, IGHV mutational or gene usage differences were seen between PF/F and diffuse cases. PF/F cases were more often kappa positive (p<0.03) and had fewer involved nodal sites (p=0.0004). These findings suggest that at least a subset of bona fide CLL/SLL is related to the follicle, most likely the outer mantle zone, and that at least a subset of the diffuse cases may represent "later" disease.

  9. EBI2 overexpression in mice leads to B1 B cell expansion and chronic lymphocytic leukemia-(CLL)-like B cell malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss Arfelt, Kristine; Barington, Line; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2017-01-01

    Human and mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) develop from CD5+ B cells that in mice and macaques are known to define the distinct B1a B cell lineage. B1a cells are characterized by lack of germinal center development and the B1a cell population is increased in mice with reduced germinal...... center formation. As a major mediator of follicular B cell migration, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Epstein Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2 or GPR183) directs B cell migration in the lymphoid follicles in response to its endogenous ligands, oxysterols. Thus, upregulation of EBI2 drives the B...... cells towards the extrafollicular area, whereas downregulation is essential for germinal center formation. We therefore speculated whether increased expression of EBI2 would lead to an expanded B1 cell subset and, ultimately, progression to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Here we demonstrate that B cell...

  10. B-Cell Receptor Epitope Recognition Correlates With the Clinical Course of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binder, Mascha; Mueller, Fabian; Jackst, Antje; Lechenne, Barbara; Pantic, Milena; Bacher, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Christine Zu; Veelken, Hendrik; Mertelsmann, Roland; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Trepel, Martin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: B-cell receptors (BCRs) and their recognition of specific epitopes may play a pivotal role in the development and progression of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In this study, the authors set up a model system to explore epitope reactivity and its clinical relevance in CLL. METHODS:

  11. Idelalisib therapy of indolent B-cell malignancies: chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic or follicular lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madanat YF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yazan F Madanat,1 Mitchell R Smith,2 Alexandru Almasan,3 Brian T Hill2 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, 3Department of Cancer Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, small lymphocytic lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma are indolent B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that mainly affect an older population. Although the majority of patients in need of treatment derive significant benefit from conventional chemotherapeutic agents as well as monoclonal antibodies, less toxic and more effective treatments are needed. Novel agents that inhibit the B-cell receptor signaling pathway have shown promising outcomes in these disorders. Idelalisib is a potent selective oral inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase delta and has shown significant clinical activity in B-cell malignancies. In this review, we summarize the clinical trial data using idelalisib as monotherapy or in combination with rituximab for the treatment of relapsed/refractory disease. The adverse effect profile includes autoimmune disorders such as transaminitis, colitis, and pneumonitis. Given the efficacy and manageable toxicity profile of idelalisib, it is being increasingly incorporated into the management of indolent B-cell malignancies. Keywords: idelalisib, PI3Kδ inhibitors, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, follicular lymphoma

  12. MicroRNA expression profiling identifies activated B cell status in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqiang Li

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is thought to be a disease of resting lymphocytes. However, recent data suggest that CLL cells may more closely resemble activated B cells. Using microRNA (miRNA expression profiling of highly-enriched CLL cells from 38 patients and 9 untransformed B cells from normal donors before acute CpG activation and 5 matched B cells after acute CpG activation, we demonstrate an activated B cell status for CLL. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA identified statistically-significant similarities in miRNA expression between activated B cells and CLL cells including upregulation of miR-34a, miR-155, and miR-342-3p and downregulation of miR-103, miR-181a and miR-181b. Additionally, decreased levels of two CLL signature miRNAs miR-29c and miR-223 are associated with ZAP70(+ and IgV(H unmutated status and with shorter time to first therapy. These data indicate an activated B cell status for CLL cells and suggest that the direction of change of individual miRNAs may predict clinical course in CLL.

  13. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) with normal lymphocyte counts is associated with decreased numbers of normal circulating B-cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, Alexander W; Almeida, Julia; Nieto, Wendy G; Teodosio, Cristina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Arancha; Romero, Alfonso; López, Antonio; Fernandez-Navarro, Paulino; Vega, Tomas; Perez-Andres, Martin; Valent, Peter; Jäger, Ulrich; Orfao, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) with normal lymphocyte counts is associated with decreased numbers of normal circulating B-cell subsets.Little is known about the distribution of normal lymphoid cells and their subsets in the peripheral blood (PB) of subjects with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). In our study, we compared the absolute number of PB lymphoid cells and their subpopulations in 95 MBL cases with normal lymphocyte counts vs. 617 age-/sex-matched non-MBL healthy subjects (controls), using highly sensitive flow cytometry. MBL cases showed significantly reduced numbers of normal circulating B-cells, at the expense of immature and naive B-cells; in addition, CD4+CD8+ double-positive T-cells and CD8+ T-cells were significantly lower and higher vs. controls, respectively. Moreover, most normal B-cell subsets were significantly decreased in PB at >1% MBL-counts, vs. "low-count" MBL cases, and lower amounts of immature/naive B-cells were detected in biclonal (particularly in cases with coexisting CLL-like- and non-CLL-like B-cell clones) vs. monoclonal MBL subjects. In summary, our results show imbalanced (reduced) absolute numbers of recently produced normal circulating B-cells (e.g., immature and naıve B-cells) in MBL, which becomes more pronounced as the MBL cell count increases.

  14. The meaning and relevance of B-cell receptor structure and function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Freda K; Forconi, Francesco; Packham, Graham

    2014-07-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) is of critical importance for normal B cells and for the majority of B-cell malignancies, especially chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The two major subsets of CLL are biologically distinct, being derived from B cells at different stages of differentiation and carrying unmutated (U-CLL) or mutated (M-CLL) IGHV genes. U-CLL, which has a poorer prognosis, often has relatively conserved (stereotypic) IGHV-HD-HJ sequences, indicative of interaction with large (super)antigens and similar to those in normal naive innate B cells. Conserved sequences are less evident in M-CLL, in keeping with its postfollicular origin. However, both subsets exhibit features of chronic antigen exposure in tissue sites, with local proliferative events, but also downregulation of surface immunoglobulin M but not surface immunoglobulin D, a characteristic of normal anergic B cells. BCR-mediated anergy can spread to other receptors such as CXCR4. Circulating CLL cells retain a shadow of tissue-based events that can reverse over time, but the overall extent of anergy is greater in M-CLL. Despite this stereotypic variety and more genomic complexity, BCR-mediated responses in vitro appear relatively homogeneous in U-CLL, but M-CLL is more heterogeneous. The differential balance between antigen-induced proliferation or anergy is the likely determinant of clinical behavior and possibly of response to kinase inhibitors.

  15. B Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Presenting as a Bile Duct Stricture Diagnosed With Cholangioscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Michael J.; Jiang, Liuyan; Lukens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Indeterminate biliary strictures represent a diagnostic challenge requiring further work-up, which encompasses a variety of diagnostic modalities. We report a very rare case of B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia presenting as a biliary stricture following remission of acute myeloid leukemia, which was initially treated with allogenic stem cell transplant. After multiple diagnostic modalities were implemented with no success, the use of cholangioscopy-guided biopsies was the key for the final diagnosis.

  16. Activated allogeneic NK cells preferentially kill poor prognosis B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA mismatched Natural Killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cell...

  17. Bone marrow aplasia in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: successful treatment with antithymocyte globulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Singal, R; Winfield, D A; Greaves, M.

    1991-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is a rare but well known association of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). Pancytopenia due to bone marrow aplasia has not been previously described in CLL. A 42 year old man with B cell CLL became severely pancytopenic with bone marrow aplasia. Bone marrow culture resulted in a greatly reduced colony formation. High dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment were unsuccessful. Prompt and complete marrow recovery ensued after administration of antith...

  18. A recurrent dominant negative E47 mutation causes agammaglobulinemia and BCR(-) B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, Bertrand; Wang, Yong-Dong; Bosompem, Amma; Ma, Cindy S; Lim, Annick; Kochetkov, Tatiana; Tangye, Stuart G; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Conley, Mary Ellen

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 90% of patients with isolated agammaglobulinemia and failure of B cell development have mutations in genes required for signaling through the pre–B cell and B cell receptors. The nature of the gene defect in the majority of remaining patients is unknown. We recently identified 4 patients with agammaglobulinemia and markedly decreased numbers of peripheral B cells. The B cells that could be detected had an unusual phenotype characterized by the increased expression of CD19 but the absence of a B cell receptor. Genetic studies demonstrated that all 4 patients had the exact same de novo mutation in the broadly expressed transcription factor E47. The mutant protein (E555K) was stable in patient-derived EBV-transformed cell lines and cell lines transfected with expression vectors. E555K in the transfected cells localized normally to the nucleus and resulted in a dominant negative effect when bound to DNA as a homodimer with wild-type E47. Mutant E47 did permit DNA binding by a tissue-specific heterodimeric DNA-binding partner, myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD). These findings document a mutational hot-spot in E47 and represent an autosomal dominant form of agammaglobulinemia. Further, they indicate that E47 plays a critical role in enforcing the block in development of B cell precursors that lack functional antigen receptors.

  19. Genetically Engineered Lymphocytes, Cyclophosphamide, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-04

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Cyclophosphamide, Alvocidib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With High Risk B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  1. Exhaustion of CTL memory and recrudescence of viremia in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected MHC class II-deficient mice and B cell-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Johansen, J; Marker, O

    1996-01-01

    To study the contribution of CD4+ T cells and B cells to antiviral immunity and long term virus control, MHC class II-deficient and B cell-deficient mice were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. In class II-deficient mice, which lack CD4+ T cells, the primary CTL response is virtually...... this phenomenon could reflect participation of B cells and/or Abs in long term virus control, similar experiments were performed with mice that do not have mature B cells because of a disrupted membrane exon of the mu chain gene. In these mice, the cell-mediated immune response was slightly delayed, but transient...... and that in their absence, the virus-specific CTL potential becomes exhausted. Together our results indicate that while CD8+ cells play a dominant role in acute virus control, all three major components of the immune system are required for long term virus control....

  2. Cutaneous B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia resembling a granulomatous rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Meo, Nicola; Stinco, Giuseppe; Trevisan, Giusto

    2013-10-16

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is a low-grade lymphoproliferative disease. Cutaneous involvement of B-CLL is limited and, in most cases, it represents non-specific manifestations related to an impaired immune system. Leukemic skin infiltrates (leukemia cutis) occur in 4-20% of patients. Herein we report the case of a 65-year-old woman with B-CLL presenting with papular, nodular, and plaque skin infiltrates affecting the nose, mimicking granulomatous rosacea. We discuss several aspects of rare cutaneous manifestations of B-CLL involving the face.

  3. Recognition of antigen-specific B-cell receptors from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients by synthetic antigen surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Mohosin; Liu, Yun; Morimoto, Jumpei; Peng, Haiyong; Aquino, Claudio; Rader, Christoph; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Kodadek, Thomas

    2014-12-18

    In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a single neoplastic antigen-specific B cell accumulates and overgrows other B cells, leading to immune deficiency. CLL is often treated with drugs that ablate all B cells, leading to further weakening of humoral immunity, and a more focused therapeutic strategy capable of targeting only the pathogenic B cells would represent a significant advance. One approach to this would be to develop synthetic surrogates of the CLL antigens allowing differentiation of the CLL cells and healthy B cells in a patient. Here, we describe nonpeptidic molecules capable of targeting antigen-specific B cell receptors with good affinity and selectivity using a combinatorial library screen. We demonstrate that our hit compounds act as synthetic antigen surrogates and recognize CLL cells and not healthy B cells. Additionally, we argue that the technology we developed can be used to identify other classes of antigen surrogates.

  4. Ongoing in vivo immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination in chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Andrea; Zan, Hong; Kim, Edmund C; Shah, Shefali; Schattner, Elaine J; Schaffer, András; Casali, Paolo

    2002-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) results from the expansion of malignant CD5(+) B cells that usually express IgD and IgM. These leukemic cells can give rise in vivo to clonally related IgG(+) or IgA(+) elements. The requirements and modalities of this process remain elusive. Here we show that leukemic B cells from 14 of 20 CLLs contain the hallmarks of ongoing Ig class switch DNA recombination (CSR), including extrachromosomal switch circular DNAs and circle transcripts generated by direct S micro -->Sgamma, S micro -->Salpha, and S micro -->Sepsilon as well as sequential Sgamma-->Salpha and Sgamma-->Sepsilon CSR. Similar CLL B cells express transcripts for activation-induced cytidine deaminase, a critical component of the CSR machinery, and contain germline I(H)-C(H) and mature V(H)DJ(H)-C(H) transcripts encoded by multiple Cgamma, Calpha, and Cepsilon genes. Ongoing CSR occurs in only a fraction of the CLL clone, as only small proportions of CD5(+)CD19(+) cells express surface IgG or IgA and lack IgM and IgD. In vivo class-switching CLL B cells down-regulate switch circles and circle transcripts in vitro unless exposed to exogenous CD40 ligand and IL-4. In addition, CLL B cells that do not class switch in vivo activate the CSR machinery and secrete IgG, IgA, or IgE upon in vitro exposure to CD40 ligand and IL-4. These findings indicate that in CLL at least some members of the malignant clone actively differentiate in vivo along a pathway that induces CSR. They also suggest that this process is elicited by external stimuli, including CD40 ligand and IL-4, provided by bystander immune cells.

  5. B-cell differentiation in the chicken: expression of immunoglobulin genes in the bursal and peripheral lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansikka, A; Veromaa, T; Vainio, O; Toivanen, P

    1989-03-01

    We have studied the expression of immunoglobulin genes in the chicken B-cell precursors, and of a B-cell surface marker (Bu-1) on the bursal and peripheral B cells during normal ontogeny. Since there is no way of distinguishing the precursor cells from the more mature bursal lymphocytes on the basis of surface markers, we chose to study the total bursal lymphocyte population at ages when the numbers of the various precursor cells (bursal, early post-bursal, and post-bursal stem cells) in the bursa are estimated to be at their highest. Thereafter, comparisons with the more mature lymphocytes in the peripheral organs were made. As a result, levels of the lambda and mu transcripts and expression of Bu-1 antigen in the chicken B-cell precursors were found to be unchanged during the post-hatching period. In the light of these experiments, the later events of B-cell differentiation, i.e. the development from the bursal to post-bursal B lymphocytes, occurs without the lambda, mu, and Bu-1 gene loci involved. On the other hand, the higher level of lambda and mu expression in the splenic B lymphocytes indicates that the post-bursal stem cells mature into highly active plasma cells after seeding to the peripheral organs.

  6. The Spectrum of Kidney Pathology in B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia / Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: A 25-Year Multicenter Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitou-Verkinder, Anne-Laure; Francois, Arnaud; Drieux, Fanny; Lepretre, Stéphane; Legallicier, Bruno; Moulin, Bruno; Godin, Michel; Guerrot, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma are 2 different presentations of the most common B-cell neoplasm in western countries (CLL/SLL). In this disease, kidney involvement is usually silent, and is rarely reported in the literature. This study provides a clinicopathological analysis of all-cause kidney disease in CLL/SLL patients. Methods Fifteen CLL/SLL patients with kidney biopsy were identified retrospectively. Demographic, clinical, pathological and laboratory data were assessed at biopsy, and during follow-up. Results At biopsy 11 patients presented impaired renal function, 7 patients nephrotic syndrome, 6 patients dysproteinemia, and 3 patients cryoglobulinemia. Kidney pathology revealed CLL/SLL-specific monoclonal infiltrate in 10 biopsies, glomerulopathy in 9 biopsies (5 membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, 2 minimal change disease, 1 glomerulonephritis with organized microtubular monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits, 1 AHL amyloidosis). Five patients presented interstitial granulomas attributed to CLL/SLL. After treatment of the hematological disease, improvement of renal function was observed in 7/11 patients, and remission of nephrotic syndrome in 5/7 patients. During follow-up, aggravation of the kidney disease systematically occurred in the absence of favorable response to hematological treatment. Conclusions A broad spectrum of kidney diseases is associated with CLL/SLL. In this setting, kidney biopsy can provide important information for diagnosis and therapeutic guidance. PMID:25811382

  7. Study of Safety,Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of CT-1530 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, and Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Relapsed or Refractory B Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia; Mantle Zone Lymphoma Refractory/Recurrent; Follicle Centre Lymphoma Diffuse; Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

  8. Rho and Rap guanosine triphosphatase signaling in B cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Silvia; Devereux, Stephen; Ridley, Anne J

    2014-09-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells proliferate predominantly in niches in the lymph nodes, where signaling from the B cell receptor (BCR) and the surrounding microenvironment are critical for disease progression. In addition, leukemic cells traffic constantly from the bloodstream into the lymph nodes, migrate within lymphatic tissues and egress back to the bloodstream. These processes are driven by chemokines and their receptors, and depend on changes in cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion. Here we describe how Rho and Rap guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) contribute to both BCR signaling and chemokine receptor signaling, particularly by regulating cytoskeletal dynamics and integrin activity. We propose that new inhibitors of BCR-activated kinases are likely to affect CLL cell trafficking via Rho and Rap GTPases, and that upstream regulators or downstream effectors could be good targets for therapeutic intervention in CLL.

  9. A high rate of telomeric sister chromatid exchange occurs in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medves, Sandrine; Auchter, Morgan; Chambeau, Laetitia; Gazzo, Sophie; Poncet, Delphine; Grangier, Blandine; Verney, Aurélie; Moussay, Etienne; Ammerlaan, Wim; Brisou, Gabriel; Morjani, Hamid; Géli, Vincent; Palissot, Valérie; Berchem, Guy; Salles, Gilles; Wenner, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cells protect their telomere ends from erosion through reactivation of telomerase or by using the Alternative Lengthening of Telomere (ALT) mechanism that depends on homologous recombination. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) B cells are characterized by almost no telomerase activity, shelterin deregulation and telomere fusions. To characterize telomeric maintenance mechanisms in B-CLL patients, we measured their telomere length, telomerase expression and the main hallmarks of the ALT activity i.e. C-circle concentration, an extra-chromosomal telomere repeat (ECTR), and the level of telomeric sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE) rate. Patients showed relative homogenous telomere length although almost no TERT transcript and nearly no C-circle were evidenced. Nevertheless, compared with normal B cells, B-CLL cells showed an increase in T-SCE rate that was correlated with a strong down-regulation of the topoisomerase III alpha (TOP3A) expression, involved in the dissolution of Holliday Junctions (HJ), together with an increased expression of SLX1A, SLX4, MUS81 and GEN1, involved in the resolution of HJ. Altogether, our results suggest that the telomere maintenance mechanism of B-CLL cells do not preferentially use telomerase or ALT. Rather, the rupture of the dissolvasome/resolvasome balance may increase telomere shuffling that could homogenize telomere length, slowing telomere erosion in this disease.

  10. Mutation Pattern of Paired Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Variable Domains in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ghiotto, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients display leukemic clones bearing either germline or somatically mutated immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV ) genes. Most information on CLL immunoglobulins (Igs), such as the definition of stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs), was derived from germline unmutated Igs. In particular, detailed studies on the distribution and nature of mutations in paired heavy- and light-chain domains of CLL clones bearing mutated Igs are lacking. To address the somatic hyper-mutation dynamics of CLL Igs, we analyzed the mutation pattern of paired IGHV-diversity-joining (IGHV-D-J ) and immunoglobulin kappa/lambda variable-joining (IGK/LV-J ) rearrangements of 193 leukemic clones that displayed ≥ 2% mutations in at least one of the two immunoglobulin variable (IGV ) genes (IGHV and/or IGK/LV ). The relationship between the mutation frequency in IGHV and IGK/LV complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and framework regions (FRs) was evaluated by correlation analysis. Replacement (R) mutation frequency within IGK/LV chain CDRs correlated significantly with mutation frequency of paired IGHV CDRs in λ but not κ isotype CLL clones. CDRs of IGKV-J rearrangements displayed a lower percentage of R mutations than IGHVs. The frequency/pattern of mutations in kappa CLL Igs differed also from that in κ-expressing normal B cells described in the literature. Instead, the mutation frequency within the FRs of IGHV and either IGKV or IGLV was correlated. Notably, the amount of diversity introduced by replaced amino acids was comparable between IGHVs and IGKVs. The data indicate a different mutation pattern between κ and λ isotype CLL clones and suggest an antigenic selection that, in κ samples, operates against CDR variation.

  11. High mitochondrial DNA stability in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cerezo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL leads to progressive accumulation of lymphocytes in the blood, bone marrow, and lymphatic tissues. Previous findings have suggested that the mtDNA could play an important role in CLL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control-region was analyzed in lymphocyte cell DNA extracts and compared with their granulocyte counterpart extract of 146 patients suffering from B-Cell CLL; B-CLL (all recruited from the Basque country. Major efforts were undertaken to rule out methodological artefacts that would render a high false positive rate for mtDNA instabilities and thus lead to erroneous interpretation of sequence instabilities. Only twenty instabilities were finally confirmed, most of them affecting the homopolymeric stretch located in the second hypervariable segment (HVS-II around position 310, which is well known to constitute an extreme mutational hotspot of length polymorphism, as these mutations are frequently observed in the general human population. A critical revision of the findings in previous studies indicates a lack of proper methodological standards, which eventually led to an overinterpretation of the role of the mtDNA in CLL tumorigenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that mtDNA instability is not the primary causal factor in B-CLL. A secondary role of mtDNA mutations cannot be fully ruled out under the hypothesis that the progressive accumulation of mtDNA instabilities could finally contribute to the tumoral process. Recommendations are given that would help to minimize erroneous interpretation of sequencing results in mtDNA studies in tumorigenesis.

  12. Nuclear overexpression of lymphoid-enhancer-binding factor 1 identifies chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma in small B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Bevan; Peterson, Loann; Gao, Juehua; Nelson, Beverly; Ma, Shuo; Rosen, Steven; Chen, Yi-Hua

    2011-11-01

    Lymphoid-enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1), coupling with β-catenin, functions as a key nuclear mediator of WNT/β-catenin signaling, which regulates cell proliferation and survival. LEF1 has an important role in lymphopoiesis, and is normally expressed in T and pro-B cells but not mature B cells. However, gene expression profiling demonstrates overexpression of LEF1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and knockdown of LEF1 decreases the survival of the leukemic cells. So far, the data on LEF1 expression in B-cell lymphomas are limited. This study represents the first attempt to assess LEF1 by immunohistochemistry in a large series (290 cases) of B-cell lymphomas. Strong nuclear staining of LEF1 was observed in virtually all neoplastic cells in 92 of 92 (100%) chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphomas including two CD5- cases, with strongest staining in cells with Richter's transformation. LEF1 also highlighted the morphologically inconspicuous small lymphocytic lymphoma component in three composite lymphomas. All 53 mantle cell lymphomas, 31 low-grade follicular lymphomas and 31 marginal zone lymphomas, including 3 CD5+ cases, were negative. In 12 grade 3 follicular lymphomas, LEF1 was positive in a small subset (5-15%) of cells. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, however, demonstrated significant variability in LEF1 expression with overall positivity in 27 of 71 (38%) cases. Our results demonstrate that nuclear overexpression of LEF1 is highly associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, and may serve as a convenient marker for differential diagnosis of small B-cell lymphomas. The expression of β-catenin, the coactivator of LEF1 in WNT signaling, was examined in 50 chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphomas, of which 44 (88%) showed negative nuclear staining. The findings of universal nuclear overexpression of LEF1 but lack of nuclear β-catenin in the majority of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic

  13. Pretreatment T lymphocyte numbers are contributing to the prognostic significance of absolute lymphocyte numbers in B-cell non-Hodgkins lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, Lajos; Váncsa, Andrea; Miltényi, Zsófia; Simon, Zsófia; Baráth, Sándor; Illés, Árpád

    2011-06-01

    Targeted immuno-chemotherapy resulted in greatly improved survival of B cell lymphoma patients. Several prognostic markers are investigated, amongst them the pretreatment absolute lymphocyte numbers. We investigated lymphocyte subpopulations and correlated this data with prognosis of patients. 88 patients (mean age: 56 years, 18-88, median follow up 32 months) with B cell lymphomas were investigated. There were 51 DLBCL, 16 Follicular NHL, 4 MALT, 7 Marginal Zone NHL, 10 Small lymphocytic cases were investigated. Our data showed that overall survival was statistically significant up to the 0.9 G/l absolute lymphocyte numbers as dividers between the subgroups. The CD19+ B cell numbers, or the CD56+/CD3- NK cell numbers did not represent any significant differences between subgroups. However CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were differentiating statistically significant subgroups. Pretreatment CD3+ cell number less than 700/ul and CD8+ cell number less than 200/ul were corresponding with significantly inferior overall survival. These could be verified in the bad prognostic IPI group as well. Our data further support the importance of pretreatment lymphocyte numbers and highlight CD3+ and CD8+ lymphocytes to be the key factors in predicting outcome.

  14. Recirculation of lymphocyte subsets (CD5+, CD4+, CD8+, T19+ and B cells) through fetal lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpton, W G; Washington, E A; Cahill, R N

    1989-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper examine the cell-surface phenotype (CD5, CD4, CD8, T19, MHC class II and sIg) and cell output of lymphocyte subsets circulating through a subcutaneous lymph node in the sheep fetus, in an environment unaffected by foreign antigen and circulating immunoglobulins. CD4+ lymphocytes were the major T-cell subset in fetal lymph and were clearly enriched in lymph compared with blood, whereas T19+, CD8+ and B lymphocytes were not. It seems likely that in the fetus CD4+ lymphocytes are extracted from the blood at a faster rate than are other T-cell subsets and B cells. There was a much higher percentage of CD8+ and T null cells and a lower percentage of MHC class II+ and B cells circulating in the fetal lymph than in adult lymph, while the percentage of T19+ lymphocytes in fetal blood was twice that in the adult. Although the hourly cell output from an adult prescapular lymph node was far higher than that from a fetal lymph node, the circulation of lymphocytes through fetal lymph nodes was much greater per gram lymph node weight than that through adult lymph nodes. The wholesale recirculation in the fetus of all the major T-cell subsets found in the adult is paradoxical because it is not known what function they serve in the fetus in the absence of antigen and ongoing immune responses, although clearly they are not memory cells. PMID:2481644

  15. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-29

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  16. Activated allogeneic NK cells preferentially kill poor prognosis B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Sanchez-Martinez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild type (wt IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA mismatched Natural Killer (NK cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments.□

  17. Stereotypical chronic lymphocytic leukemia B-cell receptors recognize survival promoting antigens on stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascha Binder

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common leukemia in the Western world. Survival of CLL cells depends on their close contact with stromal cells in lymphatic tissues, bone marrow and blood. This microenvironmental regulation of CLL cell survival involves the stromal secretion of chemo- and cytokines as well as the expression of adhesion molecules. Since CLL survival may also be driven by antigenic stimulation through the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR, we explored the hypothesis that these processes may be linked to each other. We tested if stromal cells could serve as an antigen reservoir for CLL cells, thus promoting CLL cell survival by stimulation through the BCR. As a proof of principle, we found that two CLL BCRs with a common stereotyped heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (previously characterized as "subset 1" recognize antigens highly expressed in stromal cells--vimentin and calreticulin. Both antigens are well-documented targets of autoantibodies in autoimmune disorders. We demonstrated that vimentin is displayed on the surface of viable stromal cells and that it is present and bound by the stereotyped CLL BCR in CLL-stroma co-culture supernatant. Blocking the vimentin antigen by recombinant soluble CLL BCR under CLL-stromal cell co-culture conditions reduces stroma-mediated anti-apoptotic effects by 20-45%. We therefore conclude that CLL BCR stimulation by stroma-derived antigens can contribute to the protective effect that the stroma exerts on CLL cells. This finding sheds a new light on the understanding of the pathobiology of this so far mostly incurable disease.

  18. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations...... in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia...... subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s)....

  19. The dual Syk/JAK inhibitor cerdulatinib antagonises B-cell receptor and microenvironmental signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Blunt, Matthew; Koehrer, S.; Dobson, R; Larrayoz, M; Wilmore, S.; Hayman, A.; Parnell, J; Smith, L D; Davies, A.; Johnson, P. W.; Conley, P B; Pandey, A.; Strefford, J C; Stevenson, F.K. (Freda K.); Packham, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: B-cell receptor (BCR)-associated kinase inhibitors such as ibrutinib have revolutionised the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, these agents are not curative and resistance is already emerging in a proportion of patients. Interleukin-4 (IL-4), expressed in CLL lymph nodes, can augment BCR-signalling and reduce the effectiveness of BCR-kinase inhibitors. Therefore simultaneous targeting of the IL-4- and BCR-signalling pathways by cerdulatinib, a novel dual Syk/J...

  20. Silenced B-Cell Receptor Response To Autoantigen In A Poor-Prognostic Subset Of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergh, Ann-Charlotte; Evaldsson, Chamilly; Pedersen, Lone Bredo

    2014-01-01

    receptor-signal transduction events, since it is more faithful to B-cell physiology than anti-IgM. Multivalent oxidized low-density lipoprotein showed specific binding to subset #1 IgM/IgD B-cell receptors, whereas native low-density lipoprotein did not. The antigen binding induced prompt receptor...... clustering followed by internalization. However, the receptor-signal transduction was silenced, revealing no Ca(2+) mobilization or cell-cycle entry, while phosphorylated extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 basal levels were high and could not be elevated further by oxidized low-density lipoprotein......Chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells express auto/xeno antigen-reactive antibodies that bind to self-epitopes and resemble natural IgM antibodies in their repertoire. One of the antigenic structures recognized is oxidation-induced malonedialdehyde that is present on low-density lipoprotein...

  1. T-bet+ B cells are induced by human viral infections and dominate the HIV gp140 response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James J.; Buggert, Marcus; Kardava, Lela; Seaton, Kelly E.; Eller, Michael A.; Canaday, David H.; Robb, Merlin L.; Ostrowski, Mario A.; Slifka, Mark K.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Moir, Susan; Moody, M. Anthony; Betts, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Humoral immunity is critical for viral control, but the identity and mechanisms regulating human antiviral B cells are unclear. Here, we characterized human B cells expressing T-bet and analyzed their dynamics during viral infections. T-bet+ B cells demonstrated an activated phenotype, a distinct transcriptional profile, and were enriched for expression of the antiviral immunoglobulin isotypes IgG1 and IgG3. T-bet+ B cells expanded following yellow fever virus and vaccinia virus vaccinations and also during early acute HIV infection. Viremic HIV-infected individuals maintained a large T-bet+ B cell population during chronic infection that was associated with increased serum and cell-associated IgG1 and IgG3 expression. The HIV gp140–specific B cell response was dominated by T-bet–expressing memory B cells, and we observed a concomitant biasing of gp140-specific serum immunoglobulin to the IgG1 isotype. These findings suggest that T-bet induction promotes antiviral immunoglobulin isotype switching and development of a distinct T-bet+ B cell subset that is maintained by viremia and coordinates the HIV Env–specific humoral response. PMID:28422752

  2. The loss of Gnai2 and Gnai3 in B cells eliminates B lymphocyte compartments and leads to a hyper-IgM like syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il-Young Hwang

    Full Text Available B lymphocytes are compartmentalized within lymphoid organs. The organization of these compartments depends upon signaling initiated by G-protein linked chemoattractant receptors. To address the importance of the G-proteins Gαi2 and Gαi3 in chemoattractant signaling we created mice lacking both proteins in their B lymphocytes. While bone marrow B cell development and egress is grossly intact; mucosal sites, splenic marginal zones, and lymph nodes essentially lack B cells. There is a partial block in splenic follicular B cell development and a 50-60% reduction in splenic B cells, yet normal numbers of splenic T cells. The absence of Gαi2 and Gαi3 in B cells profoundly disturbs the architecture of lymphoid organs with loss of B cell compartments in the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, and gastrointestinal tract. This results in a severe disruption of B cell function and a hyper-IgM like syndrome. Beyond the pro-B cell stage, B cells are refractory to chemokine stimulation, and splenic B cells are poorly responsive to antigen receptor engagement. Gαi2 and Gαi3 are therefore critical for B cell chemoattractant receptor signaling and for normal B cell function. These mice provide a worst case scenario of the consequences of losing chemoattractant receptor signaling in B cells.

  3. Curcumin inhibits prosurvival pathways in chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells and may overcome their stromal protection in combination with EGCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Asish K; Kay, Neil E; Secreto, Charla R; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2009-02-15

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is incurable with current chemotherapy treatments. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), an active ingredient in the spice turmeric, inhibits tumor metastasis, invasion, and angiogenesis in tumor cell lines. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the viability of primary CLL B cells and its ability to overcome stromal mediated protection. The in vitro effect of curcumin on primary CLL B cells was evaluated using fluorescence activated cell sorter analysis and Western blotting. For some experiments, CLL B cells were cocultured with human stromal cells to evaluate the effects of curcumin on leukemia cells cultured in their microenvironment. Finally, the effect of curcumin in combination with the green tea extract epigallocatechin-3 gallate (EGCG) was evaluated. Curcumin induced apoptosis in CLL B cells in a dose-dependent (5-20 micromol/L) manner and inhibited constitutively active prosurvival pathways, including signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3), AKT, and nuclear factor kappaB. Moreover, curcumin suppressed expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and up-regulated the pro-apoptotic protein BIM. Coculture of CLL B cells with stromal cells resulted in elevated levels of STAT3, increased expression of Mcl-1 and XIAP, and decreased sensitivity to curcumin. When curcumin was administered simultaneously with EGCG, antagonism was observed for most patient samples. In contrast, sequential administration of these agents led to substantial increases in CLL B-cell death and could overcome stromal protection. Curcumin treatment was able to overcome stromal protection of CLL B cells on in vitro testing and to synergize with EGCG when administered in a sequential fashion. Additional evaluation of curcumin as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of CLL seems warranted.

  4. Lack of galectin-3 up-regulates IgA expression by peritoneal B1 lymphocytes during B cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Felipe L; Bernardes, Emerson S; Brand, Camila; dos Santos, Sofia N; Cabanel, Mariana P; Arcanjo, Kátia D; Brito, José M; Borojevic, Radovan; Chammas, Roger; El-Cheikh, Márcia C

    2016-02-01

    Galectin-3 is a β-galactoside-binding protein with an inhibitory role in B cell differentiation into plasma cells in distinct lymphoid tissues. We use a model of chronic schistosomiasis, a well-characterized experimental disease hallmarked by polyclonal B cell activation, in order to investigate the role of galectin-3 in controlling IgA production through peritoneal B1 cells. Chronically infected, galectin-3-deficient mice (Lgals3(-/-)) display peritoneal fluid hypercellularity, increased numbers of atypical peritoneal IgM(+)/IgA(+) B1a and B1b lymphocytes and histological disturbances in plasma cell niches when compared with Lgals3(+/+) mice. Similar to our infection model, peritoneal B1 cells from uninfected Lgals3(-/-) mice show enhanced switching to IgA after in vitro treatment with interleukin-5 plus transforming growth factor-β (IL-5 + TGF-β1). A higher number of IgA(+) B1a lymphocytes was found in the peritoneal cavity of Lgals3(-/-)-uninfected mice at 1 week after i.p. injection of IL-5 + TGF-β1; this correlates with the increased levels of secreted IgA detected in the peritoneal fluid of these mice after cytokine treatment. Interestingly, a higher number of degranulated mast cells is present in the peritoneal cavity of uninfected and Schistosoma mansoni-infected Lgals3(-/-) mice, indicating that, at least in part, mast cells account for the enhanced differentiation of B1 into IgA-producing B cells found in the absence of galectin-3. Thus, a novel role is revealed for galectin-3 in controlling the expression of surface IgA by peritoneal B1 lymphocytes; this might have important implications for manipulating the mucosal immune response.

  5. Antigen receptors and somatic hypermutation in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia with Richter's transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Smit; F. van Maldegem; A.W. Langerak; C.E. van der Schoot; M.J. de Wit; S. Bea; E. Campo; R.J. Bende; C.J.M. van Noesel

    2006-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase is essential for somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the immunoglobulin genes in B cells. It has been proposed that aberrant targeting of the somatic hypermutation machinery is instrumental in initiation and progres

  6. Molecular characterization of neoplastic and normal "sister" lymphoblastoid B-cell lines from chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanemo Myhrinder, Anna; Hellqvist, Eva; Bergh, Ann-Charlotte;

    2013-01-01

    /short tandem repeat (STR) fingerprinting. Innate B-cell features, i.e. natural Ab production and CD5 receptors, were present in most CLL cell lines, but in none of the normal LCLs. This panel of immortalized CLL-derived cell lines is a valuable reference representing a renewable source of authentic Abs and DNA....

  7. Corruption of Human Follicular B-Lymphocyte Trafficking by a B-Cell Superantigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhis, Gwenoline; Viau, Muriel; Badr, Gamal; Richard, Yolande; Zouali, Moncef

    2012-01-01

    Protein A (SpA) of Staphylococcus aureus is known to target the paratope of immunoglobulins expressing VH3 genes, and to delete marginal zone B cells and B-1a in vivo. We have discovered that SpA endows S. aureus with the potential to subvert B-cell trafficking in the host. We found that SpA, whose Fc-binding site has been inactivated, binds essentially to naïve B cells and induces a long-lasting decrease in CXCR4 expression and in B-cell chemotaxis to CXCL12. Competition experiments indicated that SpA does not interfere with binding of CXCR4 ligands and does not directly bind to CXCR4. This conclusion is strongly supported by the inability of SpA to modulate clathrin-mediated CXCR4 internalization, which contrasts with the potent effect of anti-immunoglobin M (IgM) antibodies. Microscopy and biochemical experiments confirmed that SpA binds to the surface IgM/IgD complex and induces its clathrin-dependent internalization. Concomitantly, the SpA-induced signaling leads to protein kinase C–dependent CXCR4 downmodulation, suggesting that SpA impairs the recycling of CXCR4, a postclathrin process that leads to either degradation into lysozomes or de novo expression at the cell surface. In addition to providing novel insight into disruption of B-cell trafficking by an infectious agent, our findings may have therapeutic implications. Because CXCR4 has been associated with cancer metastasis and with certain autoimmune diseases, SpA behaves as an evolutionary tailored highly specific, chemokine receptor inhibitor that may have value in addition to conventional cytotoxic therapy in patients with various malignancies and immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22367177

  8. Regulation of Mitochondria Function by TRAF3 in B Lymphocytes and B Cell Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Aim 2. To identify novel TRAF3- interacting proteins in mitochondria of B lymphocytes 1 PI: Ping Xie, PhD Considering that TRAF3 does not...mitochondrial proteins. To test this, we propose to identify novel mitochondrial TRAF3- interacting proteins using biochemical affinity purification...mitochondrial TRAF3- interacting proteins : 100% completed. 2c. Mass spectrometry-based sequencing of purified proteins: 100% completed. 2d. Proteomic

  9. Successful long-term monotherapy with rituximab in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia of the B-cell-lineage: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturm Isrid

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia of the B-cell-lineage is strongly based upon clinical staging because of the heterogeneous clinical course of this disease. Case presentation We describe a 62-year-old patient with newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia of the B-cell-lineage who did not respond to several chemotherapy regimens including chlorambucil, fludarabine and cyclophosphamide, developing a marked neutropenia and thrombocytopenia with life-threatening infections. Further chemotherapy appeared not feasible because of bone marrow toxicity. The patient was treated with 600 mg/m2 rituximab weekly followed by eight courses of biweekly therapy and then by long-term maintenance therapy, achieving almost complete remission of the symptoms and disease control. Conclusion After resistance to standard chemotherapy with chlorambucil and fludarabine, a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia of the B-cell-lineage was successfully treated with rituximab.

  10. Autoantigenic targets of B-cell receptors derived from chronic lymphocytic leukemias bind to and induce proliferation of leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Carsten; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Kemele, Maria; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Bühler, Andreas; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-06-06

    Antigenic targets of the B-cell receptor (BCR) derived from malignant cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) might play a role in the pathogenesis of this neoplasm. We screened human tissue-derived protein macroarrays with antigen-binding fragments derived from 47 consecutive cases of CLL. An autoantigenic target was identified for 12/47 (25.5%) of the cases, with 3 autoantigens being the target of the BCRs from 2 patients each. Recombinantly expressed autoantigens bound specifically to the CLL cells from which the BCR used for the identification of the respective autoantigen was derived. Moreover, binding of the autoantigen to the respective leukemic cells induced a specific activation and proliferation of these cells. In conclusion, autoantigens are frequent targets of CLL-BCRs. Their specific binding to and induction of proliferation in the respective leukemic cells provide the most convincing evidence to date for the long-time hypothesized role of autoantigens in the pathogenesis of CLL.

  11. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (Pimmunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  12. MicroRNA-155 influences B-cell receptor signaling and associates with aggressive disease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bing; Chen, Liguang; Zhang, Suping; Mraz, Marek; Fecteau, Jessie-F; Yu, Jian; Ghia, Emanuela M; Zhang, Ling; Bao, Lei; Rassenti, Laura Z; Messer, Karen; Calin, George A; Croce, Carlo M; Kipps, Thomas J

    2014-07-24

    High-level leukemia cell expression of micro-RNA 155 (miR-155) is associated with more aggressive disease in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), including those cases with a low-level expression of ζ-chain-associated protein of 70 kD. CLL with high-level miR-155 expressed lower levels of Src homology-2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 1 and were more responsive to B-cell receptor (BCR) ligation than CLL with low-level miR-155. Transfection with miR-155 enhanced responsiveness to BCR ligation, whereas transfection with a miR-155 inhibitor had the opposite effect. CLL in lymphoid tissue expressed higher levels of miR155HG than CLL in the blood of the same patient. Also, isolated CD5(bright)CXCR4(dim) cells, representing CLL that had been newly released from the microenvironment, expressed higher levels of miR-155 and were more responsive to BCR ligation than isolated CD5(dim)CXCR4(bright) cells of the same patient. Treatment of CLL or normal B cells with CD40-ligand or B-cell-activating factor upregulated miR-155 and enhanced sensitivity to BCR ligation, effects that could be blocked by inhibitors to miR-155. This study demonstrates that the sensitivity to BCR ligation can be enhanced by high-level expression of miR-155, which in turn can be induced by crosstalk within the tissue microenvironment, potentially contributing to its association with adverse clinical outcome in patients with CLL.

  13. Microenvironment interactions and B-cell receptor signaling in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: implications for disease pathogenesis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hacken, Elisa; Burger, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is a malignancy of mature B lymphocytes which are highly dependent on interactions with the tissue microenvironment for their survival and proliferation. Critical components of the microenvironment are monocyte-derived nurselike cells (NLCs), mesenchymal stromal cells, T cells and NK cells, which communicate with CLL cells through a complex network of adhesion molecules, chemokine receptors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family members, and soluble factors. (Auto-) antigens and/or autonomous mechanisms activate the B-cell receptor (BCR) and its downstream signaling cascade in secondary lymphatic tissues, playing a central pathogenetic role in CLL. Novel small molecule inhibitors, including the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor idelalisib, target BCR signaling and have become the most successful new therapeutics in this disease. We here review the cellular and molecular characteristics of CLL cells, and discuss the cellular components and key pathways involved in the cross-talk with their microenvironment. We also highlight the relevant novel treatment strategies, focusing on immunomodulatory agents and BCR signaling inhibitors and how these treatments disrupt CLL-microenvironment interactions. PMID:26193078

  14. Feasibility of Telomerase-Specific Adoptive T-cell Therapy for B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Solid Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Sara; Bobisse, Sara; Moxley, Kelly; Lamolinara, Alessia; De Sanctis, Francesco; Boschi, Federico; Sbarbati, Andrea; Fracasso, Giulio; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Hendriks, Rudi W; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Sartoris, Silvia; Iezzi, Manuela; Nishimura, Michael I; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Telomerase (TERT) is overexpressed in 80% to 90% of primary tumors and contributes to sustaining the transformed phenotype. The identification of several TERT epitopes in tumor cells has elevated the status of TERT as a potential universal target for selective and broad adoptive immunotherapy. TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been detected in the peripheral blood of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients, but display low functional avidity, which limits their clinical utility in adoptive cell transfer approaches. To overcome this key obstacle hindering effective immunotherapy, we isolated an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) with high avidity for human TERT from vaccinated HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Using several relevant humanized mouse models, we demonstrate that TCR-transduced T cells were able to control human B-CLL progression in vivo and limited tumor growth in several human, solid transplantable cancers. TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy selectively eliminated tumor cells, failed to trigger a self-MHC-restricted fratricide of T cells, and was associated with toxicity against mature granulocytes, but not toward human hematopoietic progenitors in humanized immune reconstituted mice. These data support the feasibility of TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy in clinical oncology, highlighting, for the first time, the possibility of utilizing a high-avidity TCR specific for human TERT. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2540-51. ©2016 AACR.

  15. Microenvironment interactions and B-cell receptor signaling in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Implications for disease pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hacken, Elisa; Burger, Jan A

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is a malignancy of mature B lymphocytes which are highly dependent on interactions with the tissue microenvironment for their survival and proliferation. Critical components of the microenvironment are monocyte-derived nurselike cells (NLCs), mesenchymal stromal cells, T cells and NK cells, which communicate with CLL cells through a complex network of adhesion molecules, chemokine receptors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family members, and soluble factors. (Auto-) antigens and/or autonomous mechanisms activate the B-cell receptor (BCR) and its downstream signaling cascade in secondary lymphatic tissues, playing a central pathogenetic role in CLL. Novel small molecule inhibitors, including the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor idelalisib, target BCR signaling and have become the most successful new therapeutics in this disease. We here review the cellular and molecular characteristics of CLL cells, and discuss the cellular components and key pathways involved in the cross-talk with their microenvironment. We also highlight the relevant novel treatment strategies, focusing on immunomodulatory agents and BCR signaling inhibitors and how these treatments disrupt CLL-microenvironment interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stereotyped B-cell receptors in one-third of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agathangelidis, Andreas; Darzentas, Nikos; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that grouping of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) into distinct subsets with stereotyped BCRs is functionally and prognostically relevant. However, several issues need revisiting, including the criteria for identification of BCR stereotypy and its actual frequency...... as well as the identification of "CLL-biased" features in BCR Ig stereotypes. To this end, we examined 7596 Ig VH (IGHV-IGHD-IGHJ) sequences from 7424 CLL patients, 3 times the size of the largest published series, with an updated version of our purpose-built clustering algorithm. We document that CLL may...... be subdivided into 2 distinct categories: one with stereotyped and the other with nonstereotyped BCRs, at an approximate ratio of 1:2, and provide evidence suggesting a different ontogeny for these 2 categories. We also show that subset-defining sequence patterns in CLL differ from those underlying BCR...

  17. Impaired removal of Vβ8(+) lymphocytes aggravates colitis in mice deficient for B cell lymphoma-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucht, K; Caj, M; Fried, M; Rogler, G; Hausmann, M

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the role of B cell lymphoma (BCL)-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) for lymphocyte homeostasis in intestinal mucosa. Lymphocytes lacking Bim are refractory to apoptosis. Chronic colitis was induced in Bim-deficient mice (Bim(-/-) ) with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Weight loss and colonoscopic score were increased significantly in Bim(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice. As Bim is induced for the killing of autoreactive cells we determined the role of Bim in the regulation of lymphocyte survival at mucosal sites. Upon chronic dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, Bim(-/-) animals exhibited an increased infiltrate of lymphocytes into the mucosa compared to wild-type mice. The number of autoreactive T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ8(+) lymphocytes was significantly higher in Bim(-/-) mice compared to wild-type controls. Impaired removal of autoreactive lymphocytes in Bim(-/-) mice upon chronic DSS-induced colitis may therefore contribute to aggravated mucosal inflammation.

  18. A Nanoparticle Based Sp17 Peptide Vaccine Exposes New Immuno-Dominant and Species Cross-reactive B Cell Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue D. Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sperm protein antigen 17 (Sp17, expressed in primary as well as in metastatic lesions in >83% of patients with ovarian cancer, is a promising ovarian cancer vaccine candidate. Herein we describe the formulation of nanoparticle based vaccines based on human Sp17 (hSp17 sequence derived peptides, and map the immuno-dominant T cell and antibody epitopes induced using such formulations. The primary T and B cell immuno-dominant region within Sp17 was found to be the same when using biocompatible nanoparticle carriers or the conventional “mix-in” pro-inflammatory adjuvant CpG, both mapping to amino acids (aa 111–142. However, delivery of hSp17111–142 as a nanoparticle conjugate promoted a number of new properties, changing the dominant antibody isotype induced from IgG2a to IgG1 and the fine specificity of the B cell epitopes within hSp17111–142, from an immuno-dominant region 134–142 aa for CpG, to region 121–138 aa for nanoparticles. Associated with this change in specificity was a substantial increase in antibody cross-reactivity between mouse and human Sp17. These results indicate conjugation of antigen to nanoparticles can have major effects on fine antigen specificity, which surprisingly could be beneficially used to increase the cross-reactivity of antibody responses.

  19. Alemtuzumab in the treatment of fludarabine refractory B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Montillo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Marco Montillo, Francesca Ricci, Sara Miqueleiz, Alessandra Tedeschi, Enrica MorraDepartment of Oncology/Hematology, Division of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Niguarda Ca’ Granda Hospital, Milan, ItalyAbstract: The introduction of immunotherapeutic agents has provided renewed hope for Chronic lymphocytic leukemia fludarabine-refractory patients. Several clinical trials have shown that alemtuzumab is a more effective option compared to combination chemotherapy for treatment of patients who have relapsed or who are refractory to fludarabine, including those with poor prognostic factors. Although there are significant potential toxicities associated with alemtuzumab, such as infusional reactions and the risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV reactivation, most are manageable. Pre-treatment anti-pyretics and anti-histamines are recommended to prevent or mitigate the acute infusional reactions associated with intravenous infusion. Recent use of alemtuzumab via the subcutaneous route has been shown to be well tolerated and has yielded similar response rates to the infusional method of administration. Prophylaxis with thrimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ as well as valacyclovir or a similar anti-viral can prevent many of the opportunistic infections seen in early trials. Reactivation of CMV infection can be effectively managed with monitoring and early treatment. Chemo-immunotherapy combination with alemtuzumab has been tested and demonstrated unprecedented clinical results in relapsed and refractory patients. The use of this agent earlier in the algorithm of patients with these characteristics should be considered. Future areas of research will include the use of alemtuzumab in combination with other monoclonal antibodies and other targeted therapies.Keywords: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, fludarabine, alemtuzumab

  20. PEG10 Activation by Co-Stimulation of CXCR5 and CCR7 Essentially Contributes to Resistance to Apoptosis in CD19+CD34+ B Cells from Patients with B Cell Lineage Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChunsongHu; JeiXiong; LinjeiZhang; BaojunHuang; QiupingZhang; QunLi; MingzhenYang; YaouWu; QunWu; QianShen; QingpingGao; KejianZhang; ZhiminSun; JunyanLin; YouxinJin

    2004-01-01

    We investigated CD19+CD34+ and CD19+CD34 B cells from cord blood (CB) and typical patients with B cell lineage acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL and B-CLL) in terms of expression and functions of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19. CXCR5 and CCR7 were selectively frequent expressed on B-ALL, B-CLL and CB CD19+CD34+ B cells, but not on CD19+CD34- B cells. Instead of induction of impressive chemotactic responsiveness, CXCL13 and CCL19 together induced significant resistance to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis in B-ALL and B-CLL but not CB CD19+CD34+ B cells. B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells expressed elevatedlevel of Paternally Expressed Gene 10 (PEG10), and CXCL13 and CCL19 together significantly up-regulated PEG10 expression in the cells. We found that CXCL13 and CCL19 together by means of activation of CXCR5 and CCR7 up-regulated PEG10 expression and function, subsequent stabilized caspase-3 and caspase-8 in B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells, and rescued the cells from TNF-α-mediated apoptosis. We suggested that normal lymphocytes, especially naive B and T cells, utilized CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for migration, homing, maturation, and cell homeostasis as well as secondary lymphoid tissues organogenesis. Meanwhile certain malignant cells took advantages of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for infiltration, resistance to apoptosis, and inappropriate proliferation. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  1. PEG10 Activation by Co-Stimulation of CXCR5 and CCR7 Essentially Contributes to Resistance to Apoptosis in CD19+CD34+ B Cells from Patients with B Cell Lineage Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunsong Hu; Qian Shen; Qingping Gao; Kejian Zhang; Zhimin Sun; Junyan Liu; Youxin Jin; Jinquan Tan; Jei Xiong; Linjei zhang; Baojun Huang; Qiuping Zhang; Qun Li; Mingzhen Yang; Yaou Wu; Qun Wu

    2004-01-01

    We investigated CD19+CD34+ and CD19+CD34- B cells from cord blood (CB) and typical patients with B cell lineage acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL and B-CLL) in terms of expression and functions of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19. CXCR5 and CCR7 were selectively frequent expressed on B-ALL, B-CLL and CB CD19+CD34+ B cells, but not on CD19+CD34- B cells. Instead of induction of impressive chemotactic responsiveness, CXCL13 and CCL19 together induced significant resistance to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis in B-ALL and B-CLL but not CB CD19+CD34+ B cells. B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells expressed elevated level of Paternally Expressed Gene 10 (PEG10), and CXCL13 and CCL19 together significantly up-regulated PEG10 expression in the cells. We found that CXCL13 and CCL19 together by means of activation of CXCR5 and CCR7 up-regulated PEG10 expression and function, subsequent stabilized caspase-3 and caspase-8 in B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells, and rescued the cells from TNF-α-mediated apoptosis. We suggested that normal lymphocytes, especially na(I)ve B and T cells, utilized CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for migration, homing, maturation, and cell homeostasis as well as secondary lymphoid tissues organogenesis.Meanwhile certain malignant cells took advantages of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for infiltration,resistance to apoptosis, and inappropriate proliferation.

  2. Igs Expressed by Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells Show Limited Binding-Site Structure Variability

    KAUST Repository

    Marcatili, P.

    2013-05-01

    Ag selection has been suggested to play a role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) pathogenesis, but no large-scale analysis has been performed so far on the structure of the Ag-binding sites (ABSs) of leukemic cell Igs. We sequenced both H and L chain V(D)J rearrangements from 366 CLL patients and modeled their three-dimensional structures. The resulting ABS structures were clustered into a small number of discrete sets, each containing ABSs with similar shapes and physicochemical properties. This structural classification correlates well with other known prognostic factors such as Ig mutation status and recurrent (stereotyped) receptors, but it shows a better prognostic value, at least in the case of one structural cluster for which clinical data were available. These findings suggest, for the first time, to our knowledge, on the basis of a structural analysis of the Ab-binding sites, that selection by a finite quota of antigenic structures operates on most CLL cases, whether mutated or unmutated. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. SPECIFIC UPTAKE OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY-CONJUGATED METHOTREXATE BY HUMAN LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIC B CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhenping; Yang Chunzheng; Tarunendu Ghose; Jaroslav Kralovec

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To analysis the uptake of free MTX and MTX conjugated to tumor specific monoclonal antibody by target and non-target cells. Methods: The folate antagonist methotrexate (MTX) was conjugated to two monoclonal antibodies (Mab) directed against human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), Dal B01 and Dal B02, by an active ester method. Both conjugates were more cytotoxic toward the target tumor cell line D10-1than to the non-target cell line MOLT-3, and Dal B02-MTX conjugate was more inhibitory to D10-1 cells than free MTX in a 6 h pulse exposure assay. Results: Drug uptake studies revealed that D10-1 cells took up much more Dal B01 and Dal B02-conjugated MTX than free MTX. The amounts of drug taken up by D10-1 cells incubated with Dal B01 and Dal B02-conjugated MTX were always 3 to 5-fold higher than that taken up by MOLT-3 cells, although the latter took up more drug when incubated with free MTX. Furthermore, tumor cells incubated with Dal B01 or Dal B02-conjugated MTX retained much larger amounts of drug for a prolonged period of time than those incubated with free MTX.Conclusion: The enhanced specific cytotoxicity of Dal B01 and Dal B02-MTX conjugates toward target tumor cells is therefore likely due to (Ⅰ) delivery of larger amounts of MTX to target cells when the drug is conjugated to Mab;(ii) longer retention of Mab-conjugated MTX by target cells; and (iii) slow, prolonged release of MTX from the surface-bound or endocytosed conjugates, rendering them into a sustained release dosage form.

  4. Overexpression of the VAV proto-oncogene product is associated with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia displaying loss on 13q

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Sánchez, Rosario M.; Hernández, José A.; García, Juan L.; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; Miguel, Jesús San; Bustelo, Xosé R.; Hernández, Jesús M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The expression of the VAV proto-oncogene in 57 patients with chronic myeloproliferative disease (CMD), B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BALL) and B-cell non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL), and 61 with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) was analysed. VAV overexpression was observed in 19.5% of cases and 81% of VAV-positive tumours also displayed VAV phosphorylation. Overexpression was not observed in B-ALL or CMD, but 13% of B-NHL and 34.4% of B-CLL patients (P = 0.002) overexpressed VAV. The overexpression and phosphorylation of VAV was detected more frequently in 13q- chronic lymphocytic leukaemias (71.4%) versus other B-CLLs (23.4%, P = 0.001). Overexpression of VAV protein is a frequent event in patients with B-CLL displaying loss of 13q sequences. PMID:16704440

  5. The human fetal lymphocyte lineage: identification by CD27 and LIN28B expression in B cell progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Laurie; Su, Kuei-Ying; Liang, Xiaoe; Liao, Dongmei; Floyd, Serina; Amos, Joshua; Moody, M. Anthony; Kelsoe, Garnett; Kuraoka, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    CD27, a member of the TNFR superfamily, is used to identify human memory B cells. Nonetheless, CD27+ B cells are present in patients with HIGM1 syndrome who are unable to generate GCs or memory B cells. CD27+IgD+ fetal B cells are present in umbilical cord blood, and CD27 may also be a marker of the human B1-like B cells. To define the origin of naïve CD27+IgD+ human B cells, we studied B cell development in both fetal and adult tissues. In human FL, most CD19+ cells coexpressed CD10, a marker of human developing B cells. Some CD19+CD10+ B cells expressed CD27, and these fetal CD27+ cells were present in the pro-B, pre-B, and immature/transitional B cell compartments. Lower frequencies of phenotypically identical cells were also identified in adult BM. CD27+ pro-B, pre-B, and immature/transitional B cells expressed recombination activating gene-1, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and Vpre-B mRNA comparably to their CD27− counterparts. CD27+ and CD27− developing B cells showed similar Ig heavy chain gene usage with low levels of mutations, suggesting that CD27+ developing B cells are distinct from mutated memory B cells. Despite these similarities, CD27+ developing B cells differed from CD27− developing B cells by their increased expression of LIN28B, a transcription factor associated with the fetal lymphoid lineages of mice. Furthermore, CD27+ pro-B cells efficiently generated IgM+IgD+ immature/transitional B cells in vitro. Our observations suggest that CD27 expression during B cell development identifies a physiologic state or lineage for human B cell development distinct from the memory B cell compartment. PMID:23901121

  6. Prognostic role of pretreatment neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with RCHOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Min; Xu, Jing-Yan; Yang, Yong-Gong; Zhang, Qi-Guo; Zhou, Rong-Fu; Chen, Bing; Ouyang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to investigate whether neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is an independent predictor in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients in the rituximab era. Data from newly diagnosed DLBCL patients at Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital from 2006 to 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. We used the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to generate the optimal cutoff value for NLR. Among those 156 patients enrolled, the NLR was < 3.0 in 46.8% (73/156) of the patients, and the remaining 53.2% (83/156) had an NLR ≥ 3.0. Patients with higher pretreatment NLR were found to correlate with poorer OS and PFS than these with lower NLR (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.43–4.97, P = 0.002 and HR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.05–3.07, P = 0.034, respectively). The multivariate Cox proportional hazard model analysis further showed that high NLR was found independently predictive of poor OS (HR = 0.40; CI = 0.19–0.84, P = 0.015) and PFS (HR = 0.57; CI = 0.33–0.98, P = 0.042). Consequently, pretreatment NLR was an independent prognostic predictor in patients with DLBCL in the rituximab era. PMID:27661033

  7. Successful alemtuzumab retreatment in progressive B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a multicenter survey in 30 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegl, Michael; Falkner, Florian; Steurer, Michael; Zojer, Niklas; Hopfinger, Georg; Haslbauer, Ferdinand; Winder, Guntram; Voskova, Daniela; Andel, Johannes; Lang, Alois; Brychtova, Yvona; Mayer, Jiri; Greil, Richard; Gastl, Günther

    2011-09-01

    Although retreatment with alemtuzumab in relapsing B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may be beneficial, there has thus far been no thorough analysis available on this topic. Data were collected from 30 chemotherapy-pretreated patients with progressive CLL who had received alemtuzumab twice in consecutive, distinct therapy lines. The median dose of alemtuzumab retreatment was 402 mg (range, 43-1,090 mg). Retreatment with alemtuzumab induced an overall response rate of 47%. From the start of alemtuzumab retreatment, median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 6.3 and 20.0 months, respectively. Response rates, PFS and OS upon alemtuzumab retreatment were correlated with response to initial alemtuzumab treatment, the time interval between the initial course of alemtuzumab and start of retreatment, and the hemoglobin concentration prior to retreatment. Reported toxicities from 24 cases included infections (50%), febrile reactions upon alemtuzumab administration (38%), exanthema (21%), and grade 4 neutropenia (13%) and thrombocytopenia (17%). We conclude that alemtuzumab retreatment represents an effective and tolerable therapeutic option for selected patients with CLL.

  8. Multipronged functional proteomics approaches for global identification of altered cell signalling pathways in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Paula; Lorenzo, Seila; Dégano, Rosa M; Ibarrola, Nieves; González-González, María; Nieto, Wendy; Almeida, Julia; González, Marcos; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a malignant B cell disorder characterized by its high heterogeneity. Although genomic alterations have been broadly reported, protein studies are still in their early stages. Herein, a 224-antibody microarray has been employed to study the intracellular signalling pathways in a cohort of 14 newly diagnosed B-CLL patients as a preliminary study for further investigations. Several protein profiles were differentially identified across the cytogenetic and molecular alterations presented in the samples (deletion 13q14 and 17p13.1, trisomy 12, and NOTCH1 mutations) by a combination of affinity and MS/MS proteomics approaches. Among others altered cell signalling pathways, PKC family members were identified as down-regulated in nearly 75% of the samples tested with the antibody arrays. This might explain the rapid progression of the disease when showing p53, Rb1, or NOTCH1 mutations due to PKC-proteins family plays a critical role favouring the slowly progressive indolent behaviour of CLL. Additionally, the antibody microarray results were validated by a LC-MS/MS quantification strategy and compared to a transcriptomic CLL database. In summary, this research displays the usefulness of proteomic strategies to globally evaluate the protein alterations in CLL cells and select the possible biomarkers to be further studied with larger sample sizes.

  9. Stimulation of the B-cell receptor activates the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozovski, Uri; Wu, Ji Yuan; Harris, David M; Liu, Zhiming; Li, Ping; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Burger, Jan A; O'Brien, Susan; Jain, Nitin; Verstovsek, Srdan; Wierda, William G; Keating, Michael J; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-06-12

    In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), stimulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) triggers survival signals. Because in various cells activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway provides cells with survival advantage, we wondered whether BCR stimulation activates the JAK/STAT pathway in CLL cells. To stimulate the BCR we incubated CLL cells with anti-IgM antibodies. Anti-IgM antibodies induced transient tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear localization of phosphorylated (p) STAT3. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed that anti-JAK2 antibodies coimmunoprecipitated pSTAT3 and pJAK2 in IgM-stimulated but not unstimulated CLL cells, suggesting that activation of the BCR induces activation of JAK2, which phosphorylates STAT3. Incubation of CLL cells with the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib inhibited IgM-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and induced apoptosis of IgM-stimulated but not unstimulated CLL cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Whether ruxolitinib treatment would benefit patients with CLL remains to be determined.

  10. T-cell population of primary and secondary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas does not express the cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, R M; Hausmann, G; Estrach, T; Cid, M C; Palou, J; Herrero, C; Mascaro, J M

    1997-05-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (CBCL) are a group of malignant lymphomas with apparently distinct clinicopathological and immunophenotypical features. As in other B-cell lymphomas, the accompanying benign cell population in CBCL includes a variable number of T lymphocytes whose role is not well understood. In the present study we characterized the immunophenotype of these T cells and compared it with that of the reactive T-cell population in specific skin involvement by noncutaneous B-cell malignancies. Our results indicated that most T cells in both primary and secondary B-cell lymphomas were CLA+ memory/effector helper T cells which differed from the currently known CLA+ memory/effector helper T lymphocytes of the skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) system. However, the endothelial CLA ligand, E-selectin, was expressed on dermal vessels. These results suggest that a B cell environment and/or a lack of epidermal involvement promote(s) the recruitment into the skin of a different, apparently less specific, subset of memory helper T cells from those seen in T-cell-mediated dermatoses.

  11. Clinico-pathological impact of cytogenetic subgroups in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: Experience from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PS Kadam Amare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study of 238 B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (B-CLL patients were undertaken to seek the prevalence and to evaluate clinico-pathological significance of recurrent genetic abnormalities such as del(13q14.3, trisomy 12, del(11q22.3 (ATM, TP53 deletion, del(6q21 and IgH translocation/deletion. Materials and Methods: We applied interphase - fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH on total 238 cases of B-CLL. Results: Our study disclosed 69% of patients with genetic aberrations such as 13q deletion (63%, trisomy 12 (28%, 11q deletion (18%, 6q21 deletion (11% with comparatively higher frequency of TP53 deletion (22%. Deletion 13q displayed as a most frequent sole abnormality. In group with coexistence of ≥2 aberrations, 13q deletion was a major clone indicating del(13q as a primary event followed by 11q deletion, TP53 deletion, trisomy 12, 6q deletion as secondary progressive events. In comparison with del(13q, trisomy 12, group with coexistence of ≥2 aberrations associated with poor risk factors such as hyperleukocytosis, advanced stage, and multiple nodes involvement. In a separate study of 116 patients, analysis of IgH abnormalities revealed either partial deletion (24% or translocation (5% and were associated with del(13q, trisomy 12, TP53 and ATM deletion. Two of 7 cases had t(14;18, one case had t(8;14, and four cases had other variant IgH translocation t(?;14. Conclusion: Detail characterization and clinical impact are necessary to ensure that IgH translocation positive CLL is a distinct pathological entity. Our data suggests that CLL with various cytogenetic subsets, group with coexistence of ≥2 aberrations seems to be a complex cytogenetic subset, needs more attention to understand biological significance and to seek clinical impact for better management of disease.

  12. Clonal dominance among T-lymphocyte infiltrates in arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamenkovic, I.; Stegagno, M.; Wright, K.A.; Krane, S.M.; Amento, E.P.; Colvin, R.B.; Duquesnoy, R.J.; Kurnick, J.T.

    1988-02-01

    Synovial membranes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as other types of chronic destructive inflammatory arthritis contain infiltrates of activated T lymphocytes that probably contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. In an effort to elucidate the nature of these infiltrates, interleukin 2 (IL-2)-responsive T lymphocytes were grown out of synovial fragments from 14 patients undergoing surgery for advanced destructive inflammatory joint disease. Eleven of the samples examined were from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis, while three others were obtained from individuals with clinical osteoarthritis. Southern blot analysis of T-cell receptor (TCR) ..beta..-chain genes in 13 of 14 cultures showed distinct rearrangements, indicating that each culture was characterized by the predominance of a limited number of clones. T-cell populations from peripheral blood stimulated with a variety of activators and expanded with IL-2 did not demonstrate evidence of similar clonality in long-term culture. These results suggest that a limited number of activated T-cell clones predominate at the site of tissue injury in rheumatoid synovial membranes as well as in other types of destructive inflammatory joint disease. Further characterization of these T-cell clones may aid our understanding of the pathogenesis of these rheumatic disorders.

  13. CD137 is induced by the CD40 signal on chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells and transduces the survival signal via NF-κB activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukana Nakaima

    Full Text Available CD137 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family that is expressed on activated T cells. This molecule provides a co-stimulatory signal that enhances the survival, and differentiation of cells, and has a crucial role in the development of CD8 cytotoxic T cells and anti-tumor immunity. Here we report that CD137 expression is also induced on normal or malignant human B cells by CD40 ligation by its ligand CD154. This CD137 induction was more prominent in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL cells than in other types of B cells. CD137 stimulation on B cells by its ligand induced the nuclear translocation of p52 (a non-canonical NF-κB factor. In agreement with this finding, expression of the survival factor BCL-XL was upregulated. Consequently, the CD137 signal augmented the survival of CD154-stimulated CLL B cells in vitro. This unexpected induction of CD137 on B cells by CD40 signal may influence the clinical course of CLL.

  14. Prognostic value of miR-155 in individuals with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and patients with B chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Shanafelt, Tait D; Ivan, Cristina; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Rabe, Kari G; Nouraee, Nazila; Ikuo, Mariko; Ghosh, Asish K; Lerner, Susan; Rassenti, Laura Z; Xiao, Lianchun; Hu, Jianhua; Reuben, James M; Calin, Steliana; You, M James; Manning, John T; Wierda, William G; Estrov, Zeev; O'Brien, Susan; Kipps, Thomas J; Keating, Michael J; Kay, Neil E; Calin, George A

    2013-09-12

    Noncoding RNAs play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRs) are involved in the transition from monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) to CLL and tested miR-15a/16-1 cluster, miR-21, and miR-155 expression in purified B cells of normal individuals, individuals with MBL, and patients with CLL. When we analyzed 224 samples from 2 independent training and validation cohorts, we found that miR-155 was overexpressed in B cells from individuals with MBL, and even more so in B cells from patients with CLL, when compared with B cells from normal individuals. Furthermore, we were able to identify miR-155 in circulating microvesicles from both individuals with MBL and patients with CLL. Next, to examine the prognostic role of miR-155, we measured its expression level in plasma samples collected before treatment initiation in 228 patients with CLL. We found significantly higher miR-155 expression levels in patients who failed to achieve a complete response compared with those who experienced complete response. Our findings support the use of cellular and plasma levels of miR-155 as biomarkers for the risk of progression in individuals with MBL, as well as to identify patients with CLL who may not respond well to therapy.

  15. Cytogenetic characteristics of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 275 Chinese patients by fluorescence in situ hybridization: a multicenter study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Yue-yun; HUANG Xiao-jun

    2011-01-01

    Background Under conventional cytogenetic (CC) analysis, only 30%-50% of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cases show clonal aberrations. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the percentage of patients with abnormalities rises to almost 80%, among them, the most frequent abnormalities were 13q14, 11q22, p53 deletions and trisomy 12. The aim of this study was to explore the incidence of cytogenetic changes in Chinese patients with B-CLL.Methods We used FISH methods to detect the cytogenetic features in 275 cases of B-CLL from 48 hospitals. The correlation between FISH abnormalities and clinical characteristics such as age, gender, white blood cell count,peripheral hemoglobin (Hb) level, peripheral platelet count (PLT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, Rai stage, Binet stage, and overall survival was analyzed, and the relationship between them and overall survival was also analyzed to evaluate their prognostic implications.Results Of the 275 patients, genetic aberrations were found in 77.8% using FISH. The frequencies of abnormalities were as follows: 13q deletion (56.4%), trisomy 12 (34.5%), p53 deletion (33.5%) and 11q22 deletion (30.5%). It was obvious that the patients with p53 deletion had lower level of Hb (P=0.001) and PLT (P=0.003) when compared to patients without p53 deletion. Significant differences were obtained in the distribution of p53 deletion according to Rai and Binet classification systems (P=0.016 and 0.008 respectively). Significant differences were also observed when the overall survival was correlated with p53 deletion (P=0.043), Rai stage (P=0.006), Binet stage (P=0.013), Hb level (P=0.004) and PLT level (P=0.010).Conclusions Chinese CLL patients have the similar frequencies of del(13q), trisomy 12, del(11q) and a higher frequency of del(17p) when compared to literatures. Del(17p) is associated with advanced stage and low levels of Hb and PLT. Patients with p53 deletion, or advanced stage probably have poor survival in

  16. Methylation changes of SIRT1, KLF4, DAPK1 and SPG20 in B-lymphocytes derived from follicular and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzi, Raffaele; Zanetti, Eleonora; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Tamagnini, Ione; Valli, Riccardo; Braglia, Luca; Merli, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    Diffuse large-B cell lymphomas (DLBCL) and follicular lymphomas (FL) are the most represented subtypes among mature B-cell neoplasms and originate from malignant B lymphocytes. Methylation represents one of the major epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is a class III lysine-deacetylase playing several functions and considered to be a context-dependent tumor promoter. We present the quantitative methylation, gene expression and tissue distribution of SIRT1 and some key mediators related to lymphoma pathogenesis in B lymphocytes purified from biopsies of follicular hyperplasias, FL and DLBCL. SIRT1 mRNA levels are higher in FL than follicular hyperplasias and DLBCL. B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) positively correlates with SIRT1. SIRT1 promoter shows a methylation decrease in the order: follicular hyperplasia - FL - DLBCL. Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), Death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) and Spastic Paraplegia 20 (SPG20) methylation increase significantly in FL and DLBCL compared to follicular hyperplasias. Gene expression of DAPK1 and SPG20 inversely correlates with their degree of methylation. Our findings evidence a positive correlation between SIRT1 and BCL6 expression increase in FL. SIRT1 methylation decreases in FL and DLBCL accordingly and this parallels the increase of KLF4, DAPK1 and SPG20 methylation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. CD47 agonist peptides induce programmed cell death in refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells via PLCγ1 activation: evidence from mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Carolina Martinez-Torres

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, the most common adulthood leukemia, is characterized by the accumulation of abnormal CD5+ B lymphocytes, which results in a progressive failure of the immune system. Despite intense research efforts, drug resistance remains a major cause of treatment failure in CLL, particularly in patients with dysfunctional TP53. The objective of our work was to identify potential approaches that might overcome CLL drug refractoriness by examining the pro-apoptotic potential of targeting the cell surface receptor CD47 with serum-stable agonist peptides.In peripheral blood samples collected from 80 patients with CLL with positive and adverse prognostic features, we performed in vitro genetic and molecular analyses that demonstrate that the targeting of CD47 with peptides derived from the C-terminal domain of thrombospondin-1 efficiently kills the malignant CLL B cells, including those from high-risk individuals with a dysfunctional TP53 gene, while sparing the normal T and B lymphocytes from the CLL patients. Further studies reveal that the differential response of normal B lymphocytes, collected from 20 healthy donors, and leukemic B cells to CD47 peptide targeting results from the sustained activation in CLL B cells of phospholipase C gamma-1 (PLCγ1, a protein that is significantly over-expressed in CLL. Once phosphorylated at tyrosine 783, PLCγ1 enables a Ca2+-mediated, caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD pathway that is not down-modulated by the lymphocyte microenvironment. Accordingly, down-regulation of PLCγ1 or pharmacological inhibition of PLCγ1 phosphorylation abolishes CD47-mediated killing. Additionally, in a CLL-xenograft model developed in NOD/scid gamma mice, we demonstrate that the injection of CD47 agonist peptides reduces tumor burden without inducing anemia or toxicity in blood, liver, or kidney. The limitations of our study are mainly linked to the affinity of the peptides targeting CD47

  18. Obinutuzumab (GA101) for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell non-hodgkin's lymphomas: a glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Valentin; Klein, Christian; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a humanized, monoclonal type II CD20 antibody modified by glycoengineering. The glycoengineered Fc portion enhances the binding affinity to the FcγRIII receptor on immune effector cells, resulting in increased antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis. In addition, the type II antibody binding characteristics of obinutuzumab to CD20 lead to an efficient induction of direct non-apoptotic cell death. Preclinical data demonstrated more efficient B-cell depletion in whole blood and superior antitumor activity in xenograft models of obinutuzumab as compared to the type I CD20 antibody rituximab. In previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and comorbidities, obinutuzumab plus chlorambucil increased response rates and prolonged progression-free survival compared with rituximab plus chlorambucil. Obinutuzumab had an acceptable and manageable safety profile, with infusion-related reactions during the first infusion as the most common adverse event. Further phase I/II clinical trials have also shown promising activity in other CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Therefore, several clinical studies are planned or ongoing to investigate obinutuzumab with different combination partners in both untreated and relapsed/refractory patients with different B-cell NHL entities, which in addition to CLL include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  19. Protein kinase c-β-dependent activation of NF-κB in stromal cells is indispensable for the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzny, Gloria; Kocher, Thomas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Rudelius, Martina; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Finch, Andrew J; Dürig, Jan; Wagner, Michaela; Haferlach, Claudia; Kohlmann, Alexander; Schnittger, Susanne; Seifert, Marc; Wanninger, Stefan; Zaborsky, Nadja; Oostendorp, Robert; Ruland, Jürgen; Leitges, Michael; Kuhnt, Toni; Schäfer, Yvonne; Lampl, Benedikt; Peschel, Christian; Egle, Alexander; Ringshausen, Ingo

    2013-01-14

    Tumor cell survival critically depends on heterotypic communication with benign cells in the microenvironment. Here, we describe a survival signaling pathway activated in stromal cells by contact to B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The expression of protein kinase C (PKC)-βII and the subsequent activation of NF-κB in bone marrow stromal cells are prerequisites to support the survival of malignant B cells. PKC-β knockout mice are insusceptible to CLL transplantations, underscoring the in vivo significance of the PKC-βII-NF-κB signaling pathway in the tumor microenvironment. Upregulated stromal PKC-βII in biopsies from patients with CLL, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and mantle cell lymphoma suggests that this pathway may commonly be activated in a variety of hematological malignancies.

  20. Phenotypic modulation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by phorbol ester: induction of IgM secretion and changes in the expression of B cell-associated surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J; Mellstedt, H; Aman, P; Biberfeld, P; Klein, G

    1984-01-01

    Freshly explanted neoplastic populations from 22 cases of phenotypically well-characterized chronic type B lymphocytic leukemia were studied for their capacity to respond to the phorbol ester TPA in vitro. In all but four cases the secretion of IgM was either induced or increased, often to a high level. In contrast, the export of free immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains, an almost consistent feature of the B lymphocytic leukemias, remained relatively constant after TPA treatment. Parallel changes in leukemic cell surface phenotype were probed with both "conventional" and monoclonal antibodies, revealing some modulation of markers in every case investigated. A diminution in the level of surface Ig (preferentially IgD) and the accumulation of cytoplasmic Ig observed after phorbol ester treatment were accompanied by a corresponding reduction or loss of the B1 antigen and usually of B2 when present. The most consistent change induced by TPA was the appearance of BB-1, a marker of activated B lymphocytes, which was rarely expressed on fresh leukemic cells. Another marker of activated lymphocytes, LB-1, was also often induced or increased in its expression after exposure of the cells to TPA. The magnitude of the TPA response appeared to relate to the stage of maturation arrest of the individual leukemic clones rather than to any clinical parameter explored. The significance of the findings to normal B cell differentiation and their potential clinical utility are discussed.

  1. Multidimensional single-cell analysis of BCR signaling reveals proximal activation defect as a hallmark of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Lia Palomba

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL is defined by a perturbed B-cell receptor-mediated signaling machinery. We aimed to model differential signaling behavior between B cells from CLL and healthy individuals to pinpoint modes of dysregulation. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We developed an experimental methodology combining immunophenotyping, multiplexed phosphospecific flow cytometry, and multifactorial statistical modeling. Utilizing patterns of signaling network covariance, we modeled BCR signaling in 67 CLL patients using Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR. Results from multidimensional modeling were validated using an independent test cohort of 38 patients. RESULTS: We identified a dynamic and variable imbalance between proximal (pSYK, pBTK and distal (pPLCγ2, pBLNK, ppERK phosphoresponses. PLSR identified the relationship between upstream tyrosine kinase SYK and its target, PLCγ2, as maximally predictive and sufficient to distinguish CLL from healthy samples, pointing to this juncture in the signaling pathway as a hallmark of CLL B cells. Specific BCR pathway signaling signatures that correlate with the disease and its degree of aggressiveness were identified. Heterogeneity in the PLSR response variable within the B cell population is both a characteristic mark of healthy samples and predictive of disease aggressiveness. CONCLUSION: Single-cell multidimensional analysis of BCR signaling permitted focused analysis of the variability and heterogeneity of signaling behavior from patient-to-patient, and from cell-to-cell. Disruption of the pSYK/pPLCγ2 relationship is uncovered as a robust hallmark of CLL B cell signaling behavior. Together, these observations implicate novel elements of the BCR signal transduction as potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) distinguishes CD27+ germinal center B lymphocytes from non-germinal center cells and constitutes a new diagnostic tool for B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ody, C; Jungblut-Ruault, S; Cossali, D; Barnet, M; Aurrand-Lions, M; Imhof, B A; Matthes, T

    2007-06-01

    Differentiation of naïve B cells into plasma cells or memory cells occurs in the germinal centers (GCs) of lymph follicles or alternatively via a GC- and T-cell-independent pathway. It is currently assumed that B-cell lymphomas correlate to normal B-cell differentiation stages, but the precise correlation of several B-cell lymphomas to these two pathways remains controversial. In the present report, we describe the junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C), currently identified at the cell-cell border of endothelial cells, as a new B-cell marker with a tightly regulated expression during B-cell differentiation. Expression of JAM-C in tonsils allows distinction between two CD27+ B-cell subpopulations: JAM-C- GC B cells and JAM-C+ non-germinal B cells. The expression of JAM-C in different B-cell lymphomas reveals a disease-specific pattern and allows a clear distinction between JAM-C- lymphoproliferative syndromes (chronic lymphocytic leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma) and JAM-C+ ones (hairy cell leukemia, marginal zone B-cell lymphoma). Therefore, we propose JAM-C as a new identification tool in B-cell lymphoma diagnosis.

  3. An improved technique for obtaining E rosettes with human lymphocytes and its use for B cell purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, P; Hokland, M; Heron, I

    1977-01-01

    The standard E rosette method and two previously described methods claimed to give improved E rosetting for enumeration of human T lymphocytes have been compared with respect to the speed of rosette formation, and the mechanical stability of the rosettes formed. Following rosette formation with t...

  4. Roscovitine triggers apoptosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with similar efficiency as combinations of conventional purine analogs with cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolnierczyk, Jolanta D; Błoński, Jerzy Z; Robak, Tadeusz; Kiliańska, Zofia M; Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa

    2009-08-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by an accumulation in peripheral blood of many long-lived lymphocytes that do not die because of the deregulation of apoptosis. Most CLL cells are quiescent, and therefore the leukemic lymphocytes are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the chemosensitivity of CLL cells to cladribine or fludarabine used alone or in combinations with mafosfamide (Mf; the active form of cyclophosphamide) as well as to roscovitine, a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases with proapoptotic potential. The results of flow cytometry revealed that tested agents differentially reduced the viability of leukemic cells. Interestingly, roscovitine exerts a similar cytotoxic effect as the combinations of the used purine analogs with Mf, but with other kinetics. Roscovitine kills leukemic cells after a much shorter exposure time. Immunoblotting analysis showed that the reduction of the number of living cells coincides with marked changes of the balance between pro- and antiapoptotic factors. The latter were markedly reduced. The activation of proapoptotic proteins became evident especially after exposure of cells to roscovitine alone or to combinations of purine analogs and Mf. Furthermore, exposure of CLL cells to tested drugs degraded p27(KIP1) protein. Our findings demonstrate that roscovitine alone significantly reduces the number of viable CLL cells by inducing them to undergo apoptosis, and it acts earlier than clinically applied combinations of purine analogs with Mf/cyclophosphamide. These results confirm the high efficacy of roscovitine against CLL cells.

  5. Circulating sCD138 and Some Angiogenesis-Involved Cytokines Help to Anticipate the Disease Progression of Early-Stage B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Syndecan-1 (CD138 is a transmembrane heparin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on distinct stages of differentiation of B-lymphoid cells. Its prognostic value in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL has not been evaluated so far. The serum concentration of sCD138 and some angiogenesis-involved cytokines: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, basis fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, and endostatin were studied in 52 previously untreated patients with B-CLL. We found that bFGF and sCD138 levels were significantly higher in B-CLL patients than in controls. In patients with sCD138 level or endostatin level below the median value the lymphocyte count was higher than in patients with serum level of those cytokines above the median value. In patients with progressive disease bFGF level was significantly higher and sCD138 level significantly lower than in patients with stable one. Moreover, high sCD138 level was associated with longer lymphocyte doubling-free survival, and, on the limit of statistical significance, a high endostatin level was associated with shorter progression-free survival. We conclude that serum sCD138 level is increased in early stage B-CLL patients and may have a positive prognostic value as to the dynamics of the disease.

  6. B-cell transcription factors Pax-5, Oct-2, BOB.1, Bcl-6, and MUM1 are useful markers for the diagnosis of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbeck, Rosemarie; Teodorescu Brînzeu, D; Giubelan, Marioara; Lazăr, Elena; Dema, Alis; Ioniţă, Hortensia

    2011-01-01

    In some instances, the overlap in morphologic features and antigen expression between nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) can cause confusion in the diagnosis. In these cases, the transcription factors (TFs) B-cell specific activator protein (BSAP)/Pax-5, octamer binding protein-2 (Oct-2), B-lymphocyte-specific co-activator BOB.1/OBF.1, Bcl-6 protein and multiple myeloma-1/interferon regulatory factor-4 (MUM1/IRF-4) may aid in clarifying the diagnosis. Twenty-two cases of NLPHL were studied for the immunohistochemical expression of Pax-5, Oct-2, BOB.1, Bcl-6 protein and MUM1/IRF-4. Our results sustain the usefulness of the selected set of TFs to diagnose and distinguish NLPHL from cHL since Pax-5, Oct-2, BOB.1 and Bcl-6 are consistently expressed by lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells and reported by others to be often unexpressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells. By contrast, MUM1/IRF-4 protein scored negative in the majority of LP cells, but is reported to be expressed in almost all cases of cHL. Thus, although the expression of transcription factors is very heterogeneous, their simultaneous implementation for positive and differential diagnosis may be useful.

  7. B cell helper assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  8. Memory B cells and CD8⁺ lymphocytes do not control seasonal influenza A virus replication after homologous re-challenge of rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D Carroll

    Full Text Available This study sought to define the role of memory lymphocytes in the protection from homologous influenza A virus re-challenge in rhesus macaques. Depleting monoclonal antibodies (mAb were administered to the animals prior to their second experimental inoculation with a human seasonal influenza A virus strain. Treatment with either anti-CD8α or anti-CD20 mAbs prior to re-challenge had minimal effect on influenza A virus replication. Thus, in non-human primates with pre-existing anti-influenza A antibodies, memory B cells and CD8α⁺ T cells do not contribute to the control of virus replication after re-challenge with a homologous strain of influenza A virus.

  9. Prognostic performance of lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: an updated meta-analysis of eleven reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun HL

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hui-Ling Sun,1,* Yu-Qin Pan,1,* Bang-Shun He,1 Zhen-Lin Nie,2 Kang Lin,1 Hong-Xin Peng,1,3 William C Cho,4 Shu-Kui Wang1 1Central Laboratory, 2Laboratory Medicine, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 3Medical College, Southeast University, Nanjing, 4Department of Clinical Oncology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The findings on the prognostic value of lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL are inconsistent. This meta-analysis was conducted to more precisely evaluate the prognostic significance of LMR in DLBCL. Methods: This analysis combined eleven studies with 4,578 patients aiming to assess the association of LMR with overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS in DLBCL. Data from studies directly reporting a hazard ratio (HR with 95% corresponding confidence interval (CI in multivariate analysis were pooled to estimate the effect. Results: Our results suggested that patients with decreased LMR had shorter OS (HR =1.79, 95% CI =1.54–2.08, P<0.001 and PFS (HR =2.21, 95% CI =1.80–2.72, P<0.001 in DLBCL. Stratified analyses indicated that each confounder showed consistent prognostic value in DLBCL. There was no significant heterogeneity for PFS (PH=0.192 and OS (PH=0.212 among the enrolled studies. Conclusion: This meta-analysis indicated that decreased LMR might be a marker in the prediction of poor prognosis for patients with DLBCL. Keywords: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio, meta-analysis, prognosis

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of DAPI-stained nuclei as a novel diagnostic tool for the detection and classification of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, Gilad; Hirshberg, Abraham; Salomon, Ophira; Amariglio, Ninette; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Fixler, Dror

    2016-07-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) and B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) are the most common type of leukaemia in adults and children, respectively. Today, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the standard for detecting chromosomal aberrations that reflect adverse and favorable outcome. This study revealed a new, simple, and fast diagnostic tool to detect pathological cells by measuring and imaging the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) using FLT imaging microscopy (FLIM) of the peripheral blood (PB) cells of B-CLL samples that were labeled with the DNA binder, DAPI. The FLT of DAPI in healthy individuals was found to be 2.66 ± 0.12 ns. In contrast, PB cells of B-CLL and BM cells of B-ALL patients were characterized by a specific group distribution of the FLT values. The FLT of DAPI was divided into four subgroups, relative to 2.66 ns: short+, normal, prolonged, and prolonged+. These alterations could be related to different chromatin arrangements of B-CLL and B-ALL interphase nuclei. Notably, extremely long FLT of nuclear DAPI correlate with the presence of extra chromosome 12, while moderate increases compared to normal characterize the deletion of p53. Such correlations potentially enable a FLT-based rapid automatic diagnosis and classification of B-CLL even when the frequency of genetic and chromosomal abnormalities is low. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  11. B lymphocyte differentiation in lethally irradiated and reconstituted mice. I. The effect of strontium-89 induced bone marrow aplasia on the recovery of the B cell compartment in the spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozing, J.; Buurman, W.A.; Benner, R.

    1976-06-01

    The influence of /sup 89/Sr-treatment on the recovery of the B cell compartment in lethally irradiated, fetal liver reconstituted mice was studied by means of membrane fluorescence, /sup 89/Sr is a bone-seeking radio-isotope which causes in a dose of 3 ..mu..Ci /sup 89/Sr/g body weight a depletion of all nucleated cells, including immunoglobulin-bearing (B) cells, of the bone marrow. Treatment of irradiated and fetal liver reconstituted mice with 3 ..mu..Ci /sup 89/Sr/g body weight immediately and at 17 days after irradiation and reconstitution prevented recovery of the nucleated cell population, including B cells, in the bone marrow. In the spleen of such mice both nucleated cells and B cells reappeared at day 7 and 14 respectively. The B cell population in the spleen did not recover up to normal values during the experimental period of 45 days. It is concluded that B cell differentiation in lethally irradiated, fetal liver reconstituted mice can take place outside the bone marrow. The efficiency of this extra-medullary differentiation is discussed. The conclusion was drawn that mice with a /sup 89/Sr-induced bone marrow aplasia are able to generate B lymphocytes. Consequently the bone marrow microenvironment seems not to be obligate to the differentiation of B lymphocytes. The peripheral lymphoid organs of such mice were found to be unable to compensate completely for the absence of B lymphocyte production in the bone marrow.

  12. Good prognosis cytogenetics in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia is associated in vitro with low susceptibility to apoptosis and enhanced immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahrsdörfer, B; Wooldridge, J E; Blackwell, S E; Taylor, C M; Link, B K; Weiner, G J

    2005-05-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) have been shown to correlate with prognosis. Little is known about the relationship between chromosomal abnormalities and biological behavior of B-CLL cells in vitro. The present study was designed to explore the impact of chromosomal abnormalities determined by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the in vitro survival and immunogenicity of B-CLL. Considerable heterogeneity was noted in the in vitro survival and expression of costimulatory, adhesion, and antigen-presenting molecules by B-CLL cells. Spontaneous apoptosis of B-CLL cells in vitro was significantly lower in samples with good prognosis cytogenetics when compared to samples with poor prognosis cytogenetics. In contrast, B-CLL cells from samples with good prognosis cytogenetics exhibited higher basal expression of molecules involved in costimulation, cellular adhesion, and antigen presentation, and induced significantly more T-cell proliferation in mixed lymphocyte cultures. We conclude that chromosomal aberrations of B-CLL cells correlate with the in vitro biological behavior of B-CLL. Our data indicate that good prognosis cytogenetics correlates with less spontaneous apoptosis but greater in vitro immunogenicity. These findings could have significant implications on the design of future therapeutic approaches in patients with CLL, and the likelihood of response based on cytogenetics.

  13. An in vitro study of liposomal curcumin: stability, toxicity and biological activity in human lymphocytes and Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changguo; Johnston, Thomas D; Jeon, Hoonbae; Gedaly, Roberto; McHugh, Patrick P; Burke, Thomas G; Ranjan, Dinesh

    2009-01-21

    Curcumin is a multi-functional and pharmacologically safe natural agent. Used as a food additive for centuries, it also has anti-inflammatory, anti-virus and anti-tumor properties. We previously found that it is a potent inhibitor of cyclosporin A (CsA)-resistant T-cell co-stimulation pathway. It inhibits mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, NFkappaB activation and IL-2 signaling. In spite of its safety and efficacy, the in vivo bioavailability of curcumin is poor, and this may be a major obstacle to its utility as a therapeutic agent. Liposomes are known to be excellent carriers for drug delivery. In this in vitro study, we report the effects of different liposome formulations on curcumin stability in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), human blood, plasma and culture medium RPMI-1640+10% FBS (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C). Liposomal curcumin had higher stability than free curcumin in PBS. Liposomal and free curcumin had similar stability in human blood, plasma and RPMI-1640+10% FBS. We looked at the toxicity of non-drug-containing liposomes on (3)H-thymidine incorporation by concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated human lymphocytes, splenocytes and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human B-cell lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). We found that dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) were toxic to the tested cells. However, addition of cholesterol to the lipids at DMPC:DMPG:cholesterol=7:1:8 (molar ratio) almost completely eliminated the lipid toxicity to these cells. Liposomal curcumin had similar or even stronger inhibitory effects on Con A-stimulated human lymphocyte, splenocyte and LCL proliferation. We conclude that liposomal curcumin may be useful for intravenous administration to improve the bioavailability and efficacy, facilitating in vivo studies that could ultimately lead to clinical application of curcumin.

  14. Peptide vaccination induces profound changes in the immune system in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schmitt

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the immune status of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL patients is mostly characterized by immunosuppression, there is an accumulation of in vivo (graft-versus-leukemia effect and in vitro (spontaneous remissions after infections data that indicates that CLL might be effectively targeted by T-cell based immunotherapy. Recently, we characterized receptor for hyaluronic acid mediated motility (RHAMM as a preferential target for immunotherapy of CLL. We also completed a RHAMM-derived peptide vaccination phase I/II clinical trial in CLL. Here, we present a detailed immunological analysis of six CLL patients vaccinated with HLA-A2 restricted RHAMM-derived epitope R3 (ILSLELMKL. Beside effective induction of R3-specific cytotoxic T-cells, peptide vaccination caused profound changes in different T-cell subsets as well as cytokines. We present longitudinal analyses of Th17, CD8+CD103+, CD8+CD137+ and IL-17 producing CD8+ T cells (CD8+IL- -17+ as well as important cytokines involved in regulation of immune response such as TGF-β, IL-10, IL-2 and TNF throughout the peptide vaccination period. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 1, 161–167

  15. Patterns of resistance to B cell-receptor pathway antagonists in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and strategies for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyach, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Small-molecule kinase inhibitors, especially the two Food and Drug Administration-approved agents idelalisib and ibrutinib, have changed the treatment landscape for patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, with these positive changes comes the new challenge of managing patients who relapse after these agents. The number of patients who have relapsed after taking idelalisib and ibrutinib is low, but as the drugs gain wider use and patients are treated for longer, this number is likely to grow. Because these patients can be challenging to manage effectively, coordinated efforts now to determine how and why patients relapse along with optimal treatment strategies are required to better serve our patients in the future. As well, identification of mechanisms of resistance is crucial to develop rational strategies for management. Current work has identified mechanisms of resistance to ibrutinib, and resistance to idelalisib is also under active investigation. In this review, we will discuss these mechanisms of resistance, as well as current and potential strategies for the management of kinase inhibitor-resistant CLL. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  16. Integrative genomics analyses reveal molecularly distinct subgroups of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with 13q14 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Laura; Fabris, Sonia; Lionetti, Marta; Todoerti, Katia; Agnelli, Luca; Morabito, Fortunato; Cutrona, Giovanna; Andronache, Adrian; Matis, Serena; Ferrari, Francesco; Gentile, Massimo; Spriano, Mauro; Callea, Vincenzo; Festini, Gianluca; Molica, Stefano; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi; Bicciato, Silvio; Ferrarini, Manlio; Neri, Antonino

    2010-12-01

    Chromosome 13q14 deletion occurs in a substantial number of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and it is believed to play a pathogenetic role. The exact mechanisms involved in this lesion have not yet been fully elucidated because of its heterogeneity and the imprecise knowledge of the implicated genes. This study was addressed to further contribute to the molecular definition of this lesion in CLL. We applied single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-array technology and gene expression profiling data to investigate the 13q14 deletion occurring in a panel of 100 untreated, early-stage (Binet A) patients representative of the major genetics, molecular, and biological features of the disease. Concordantly with FISH analysis, SNP arrays identified 44 patients with del(13)(q14) including 11 cases with a biallelic deletion. The shorter monoallelic deletion was 635-kb long. The loss of the miR-15a/16-1 cluster occurred in all del(13)(q14) cases except in 2 patients with a monoallelic deletion, who retained both copies. MiR-15a/16 expression was significantly downregulated only in patients with the biallelic loss of the miRNA cluster compared to 13q normal cases. Finally, the natural grouping of SNP profiles by nonnegative matrix factorization algorithm showed that patients could be classified into 2 separate clusters, mainly characterized by short/biallelic versus wide/monoallelic 13q14 deletions. Supervised analyses of expression data showed that specific transcriptional profiles are correlated with these 2 genomic subgroups. Overall, our data highlight the presence of 2 distinct molecular types of 13q14 deletions, which may be of clinical relevance in CLL. ©2010 AACR.

  17. A yeast artificial chromosome contig that spans the RB1-D13S31 interval on human chromosome 13 and encompasses the frequently deleted region in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawthorn, L; Roberts, T; Verlind, E; Kooy, RF; Cowell, JK

    1995-01-01

    Abnormalities involving chromosome 13 have been reported as the only cytogenetic change in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (BCLL). Deletions are the most common cytogenetic abnormality and always involve 13q14, but when translocations are seen, the consistent breakpoint is always in 13q14. It is

  18. Surface localization of high-mobility group nucleosome-binding protein 2 on leukemic B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia is related to secondary autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morande, Pablo E; Borge, Mercedes; Abreu, Cecilia; Galletti, Jeremías; Zanetti, Samanta R; Nannini, Paula; Bezares, Raimundo F; Pantano, Sergio; Dighiero, Guillermo; Oppezzo, Pablo; Gamberale, Romina; Giordano, Mirta

    2015-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the main cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AHA). However, the cellular basis underlying this strong association remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that leukemic B cells from patients with CLL recognize the erythrocyte protein Band 3, a prevalent autoantigen in AHA. Here we show that the major binding site of Band 3 on leukemic cells is an extrinsic protein identified as high-mobility group nucleosome binding protein 2 (HMGN2), a nucleosome-interacting factor which has not been previously reported at the cell surface. T lymphocytes do not express HMGN2 or bind Band 3. Removal of HMGN2 from the cell membrane abrogated the capacity of Band 3-pulsed CLL cells to induce CD4 + T cell proliferation. We conclude that surface HMGN2 in leukemic B cells is involved in Band 3 binding, uptake and presentation to CD4 + T lymphocytes, and as such may favor the initiation of AHA secondary to CLL.

  19. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia family-shared peptides derived from immunoglobulin heavy chain framework region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ying; ZHU Ping; HU Ya-mei

    2007-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IgHV) is a well-characterized tumor antigen for B-cell malignancies. It can function as a target for T cell-mediated immune response. Clinical trials of IgHV protein vaccines against lymphoma have demonstrated induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. However,complementary determining regions-based individual vaccines have disadvantages for wide clinical application. Although a recent study demonstrated that immunogenic peptides are derived from framework regions (FR) shared among patients with B-cell lymphoma, how to choose the appropriate peptides for each patient is still unsolved. The aim of this study was to investigate whether immunoglobulin heavy chain FR-derived peptides shared in each IgHV family are potential CTL epitopes presented by B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Such CTL epitopes might be beneficial to shifting vaccination strategies against B-ALL from individual specificity to family specificity.Methods Seven IgHV gene families were amplified respectively by PCR and sequenced directly from 71 childhood B-ALL cases. Bioinformatics was applied in analyzing characteristics of sequences available and predicting HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes for each IgHV family. An antigen-specific T cell expansion system was used to generate peptide-specific CTLs. The cytotoxicity of CTLs against B-ALL cells was assessed in the lactate dehydrogenase release assay.Results Complete IgHV rearrangements were identified in all of the 71 B-ALL cases. All of 40 sequences available showed ≥98% homology with the nearest germline IgHV genes, indicating IgHV genes in B-ALL of germline nature.Twelve nonapeptides of high HLA-A*0201-binding scores were obtained from 26 productive IgHV protein sequences. Ten (83%) of the peptides were located in FR1 and FR3 shared among the corresponding IgHV family. CTLs specific for the peptide QLVQSGAEV located in FR1 (3-11) shared among the IgHV1

  20. Association of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 genetic polymorphism, hepatitis C viral infection and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: an Egyptian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshied, Mervat Mamdooh; Gouda, Heba Mahmoud; Khorshid, Ola M Reda

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Genetic and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The present study aimed to investigate the association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) genetic polymorphism, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell NHL risk in Egypt. Genotyping of CTLA-4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay for 181 adult patients with B-NHL and 200 controls. Our study revealed that CTLA-4 + 49 A/G polymorphism conferred increased risk of B-NHL (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36-2.565). The prevalence of HCV infection in individuals harboring the mutant genotype + 49 A/G and - 318 C/T SNPs was higher in patients with B-NHL and was associated with increased risk of B-NHL (OR = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.24-6.93 for + 49 A/G and OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.01-15.98 for - 318 C/T). In conclusion, some SNPs of CTLA-4 are genetic risk factors for B-NHL. Moreover, this study identified an association of CTLA-4 + 49 A/G and - 318 C/T promoter polymorphisms with HCV infection.

  1. Treatment of severe refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia with alemtuzumab (humanized CD52 monoclonal antibody).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, C; Hansson, L; Celsing, F; Lundin, J

    2007-03-01

    Progressive B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is often complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which in some cases may be refractory to conventional therapy such as corticosteroids, rituximab and splenectomy. We report here on 5 patients (median age 66 years, range 59-69) with advanced B-CLL, all of whom developed severe transfusion-dependent AIHA resistant to conventional therapy and received subcutaneous (SC) or intravenous (IV) alemtuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the CD52 antigen as salvage treatment for AIHA. Alemtuzumab was well tolerated with only minor 'first dose' reactions. All 5 patients responded with a >or=2.0 g/dl rise in hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, in the absence of further transfusions, after a median time of 5 weeks (range 4-7), and the mean Hb increased from 7.2 g/dl at baseline to 11.9 g/dl at end of treatment. All patients remained stable, without further AIHA episodes, after a median follow-up time of 12 months with a mean Hb of 12.5 g/dl (range 12.2-12.9). For patients with severe, refractory CLL-related AIHA, who have not previously responded to conventional therapy, alemtuzumab is an effective agent.

  2. Soluble mediators can replace helper T cells in the activation of resting B lymphocytes: evidence for a human B cell activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Février, M; Moreau, J L; Gougeon, M L; Abadie, A; Thèze, J

    1988-01-01

    We were interested in studying the participation of T cell-derived soluble factors in the early steps of B cell activation. Thus supernatants containing such factors were obtained following activation of human T cell clones and their effects on isolated B cells investigated. These supernatants induced activation, blastogenesis and proliferation of purified resting human B cells. Our results strongly suggest the existence of a B cell Activating Factor (BCAF) of apparent molecular weight (m.w.) of 12,000-15,000 daltons which acts directly on resting B cells and replaces helper T cells in B cell activation.

  3. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  4. Human peripheral blood B-Cell compartments: A crossroad in B-cell traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Perez-Andres; B. Paiva; W.G. Nieto (Wendy); A. Caraux; A. Schmitz; J. Almeida (Julia); R.F. Vogt; G.E. Marti; A.C. Rawstron; M.C. van Zelm (Menno); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); H.E. Johnsen (Hans); B. Klein (Binie); A. Orfao (Alberto)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA relatively high number of different subsets of B-cells are generated through the differentiation of early B-cell precursors into mature B-lymphocytes in the bone marrow (BM) and antigen-triggered maturation of germinal center B-cells into memory B-lymphocytes and plasmablasts in lympho

  5. Human Peripheral Blood B-Cell Compartments : A Crossroad in B-Cell Traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Andres, M.; Paiva, B.; Nieto, W. G.; Caraux, A.; Schmitz, A.; Almeida, J.; Vogt, R. F.; Marti, G. E.; Rawstron, A. C.; Van Zelm, M. C.; Van Dongen, J. J. M.; Johnsen, H. E.; Klein, B.; Orfao, A.

    2010-01-01

    A relatively high number of different subsets of B-cells are generated through the differentiation of early B-cell precursors into mature B-lymphocytes in the bone marrow (BM) and antigen-triggered maturation of germinal center B-cells into memory B-lymphocytes and plasmablasts in lymphoid tissues.

  6. Human Peripheral Blood B-Cell Compartments : A Crossroad in B-Cell Traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Andres, M.; Paiva, B.; Nieto, W. G.; Caraux, A.; Schmitz, A.; Almeida, J.; Vogt, R. F.; Marti, G. E.; Rawstron, A. C.; Van Zelm, M. C.; Van Dongen, J. J. M.; Johnsen, H. E.; Klein, B.; Orfao, A.

    2010-01-01

    A relatively high number of different subsets of B-cells are generated through the differentiation of early B-cell precursors into mature B-lymphocytes in the bone marrow (BM) and antigen-triggered maturation of germinal center B-cells into memory B-lymphocytes and plasmablasts in lymphoid tissues.

  7. Serum Levels of IL-6 Type Cytokines and Soluble IL-6 Receptors in Active B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and in Cladribine Induced Remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Robak

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and two IL-6 family cytokines-oncostatin M (OSM and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF-in 63 patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL and 17 healthy controls using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. Simultaneously, we measured the serum levels of the soluble forms of two subunits of the IL-6 receptor complex-ligand binding glycoprotein 80 (sIL-6R and glycoprotein 130 (sgp130. The cytokines and receptors were evaluated in 25 untreated patients and 38 patients treated with cladribine (2-CdA, as well as in 17 healthy controls. We have correlated the serum levels of these proteins with Rai's clinical stage of the disease, the response to 2-CdA treatment and some hematological parameters. We have also evaluated the correlation of the IL-6 serum level with the concentration of OSM and IL-6 soluble receptors. IL-6 was measurable in 62/63 (98.4%, OSM in 20/25 (80% of untreated and 14/38 (37.8% of the treated patients. sIL-6R and sgp130 were detectable in all 63 patients and LIF in none of the CLL patients. IL-6 serum level in untreated patients was not significantly different as compared to its concentration in the control group (P>0.05. However, in the patients treated with 2-CdA the IL-6 level was significantly lower (P0.05. We have found significant positive correlation between the levels of sIL6R and the lymphocytes count in CLL patients (Ρ=0.423; P<0.001. In addition, sIL-6R and OSM serum concentrations correlated also with CLL Rai stage. In conclusion, the serum level of IL-6, OSM and sIL-6R, but not LIF and sgp130, are useful indicators of CLL activity.

  8. Nodular lymphocyte predominant hodgkin lymphoma and T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma--endpoints of a spectrum of one disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Hartmann

    Full Text Available In contrast to the commonly indolent clinical behavior of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL, T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma (THRLBCL is frequently diagnosed in advanced clinical stages and has a poor prognosis. Besides the different clinical presentations of these lymphoma entities, there are variants of NLPHL with considerable histopathologic overlap compared to THRLBCL. Especially THRLBCL-like NLPHL, a diffuse form of NLPHL, often presents a histopathologic pattern similar to THRLBCL, suggesting a close relationship between both lymphoma entities. To corroborate this hypothesis, we performed gene expression profiling of microdissected tumor cells of NLPHL, THRLBCL-like NLPHL and THRLBCL. In unsupervised analyses, the lymphomas did not cluster according to their entity. Moreover, even in supervised analyses, very few consistently differentially expressed transcripts were found, and for these genes the extent of differential expression was only moderate. Hence, there are no clear and consistent differences in the gene expression of the tumor cells of NLPHL, THRLBCL-like NLPHL and THRLBCL. Based on the gene expression studies, we identified BAT3/BAG6, HIGD1A, and FAT10/UBD as immunohistochemical markers expressed in the tumor cells of all three lymphomas. Characterization of the tumor microenvironment for infiltrating T cells and histiocytes revealed significant differences in the cellular composition between typical NLPHL and THRLBCL cases. However, THRLBCL-like NLPHL presented a histopathologic pattern more related to THRLBCL than NLPHL. In conclusion, NLPHL and THRLBCL may represent a spectrum of the same disease. The different clinical behavior of these lymphomas may be strongly influenced by differences in the lymphoma microenvironment, possibly related to the immune status of the patient at the timepoint of diagnosis.

  9. Relevance of stereotyped B-cell receptors in the context of the molecular, cytogenetic and clinical features of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Maura

    Full Text Available Highly homologous B-cell receptors, characterized by non-random combinations of immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (IGHV genes and heavy-chain complementarity determining region-3 (HCDR3, are expressed in a recurrent fraction of patients affected by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. We investigated the IGHV status of 1131 productive IG rearrangements from a panel of 1126 CLL patients from a multicenter Italian study group, and correlated the presence and class of HCDR3 stereotyped subsets with the major cytogenetic alterations evaluated by FISH, molecular prognostic factors, and the time to first treatment (TTFT of patients with early stage disease (Binet A. Stereotyped HCDR3 sequences were found in 357 cases (31.7%, 231 of which (64.7% were unmutated. In addition to the previously described subsets, 31 new putative stereotypes subsets were identified. Significant associations between different stereotyped HCDR3 sequences and molecular prognostic factors, such as CD38 and ZAP-70 expression, IGHV mutational status and genomic abnormalities were found. In particular, deletion of 17p13 was significantly represented in stereotype subset #1. Notably, subset #1 was significantly correlated with a substantially reduced TTFT compared to other CLL groups showing unmutated IGHV, ZAP-70 or CD38 positivity and unfavorable cytogenetic lesions including del(17(p13. Moreover, subset #2 was strongly associated with deletion of 13q14, subsets #8 and #10 with trisomy 12, whereas subset #4 was characterized by the prevalent absence of the common cytogenetic abnormalities. Our data from a large and representative panel of CLL patients indicate that particular stereotyped HCDR3 sequences are associated with specific cytogenetic lesions and a distinct clinical outcome.

  10. Subclass of individual IgA-secreting human lymphocytes. Investigation of in vivo pneumococcal polysaccharide-induced and in vitro mitogen-induced blood B cells by monolayer plaque-forming cell assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, C; Barington, T; Sigsgaard, T

    1988-01-01

    The subclass of individual human IgA B cells was investigated by means of monolayer plaque-forming cell assays permitting analysis of all IgA-secreting cells as well as of cells secreting IgA anti-pneumococcal polysaccharide antibody. Center cells were examined by indirect immunofluorescence...... that these Ag have an unusually high ability to activate IgA2 B cells, or that the B cells stimulated originate from lymphatic tissues with a high frequency of IgA2 committed cells....... staining with mouse mAb against either of the two IgA subclasses as primary antibodies and FITC-conjugated rabbit anti-mouse Ig as the second antibody. Blood lymphocytes spontaneously secreting IgA (mean 399/10(6) mononuclear cells) produced mainly IgA1 (73%). A similar distribution of subclasses...

  11. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of direct rhenium-188-labeled anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab for radioimmunotherapy of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, Mario de [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: mario.dedecker@health.wa.gov.au; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Slegers, Guido [Department of Medical Imaging of Domestic Animals, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Dierckx, Rudi A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Vos, Filip de [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-07-15

    Alemtuzumab (Campath, Berlex) is a humanized IgG1 rat monoclonal antibody directed against the cell surface CD52 antigen, found on lymphocytes and monocytes. It is being developed for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), autoimmune disease and for the prevention of transplant rejection. This study focused on synthesis, quality control, in vitro evaluation and biodistrubution of {sup 188}Re-labeled alemtuzumab for radioimmunotherapy of B-cell CLL. {sup 188}Re-alemtuzumab was synthesized using a direct radiolabeling method. Reduction of the intramolecular disulfide bonds of the antibody was performed with tris-(carboxyethyl)-phosphine (Pierce), using a 1:60 molar excess. Reaction took place at room temperature for 20 min. A PD-10 desalting column was used to purify the reduced antibody from excess phospine. Complexation and transchelation of {sup 188}ReO{sub 4}{sup -} was achieved using sodium gluconate as weak chelator and SnCl{sub 2} as reducing agent. Quality control was done using instant thin-layer chromatography. Binding assays were performed on a CD52-positive cell line (HuT-78). Female NMRI mice were injected intravenously with 20 {mu}g radiolabeled alemtuzumab and killed at preset time intervals for biodistribution studies. Tissues were dissected, weighed and counted for determination of radioactivity. Data were expressed as percentage injected activity per gram of tissue (% IA/g tissue) or as percentage injected activity (% IA). {sup 188}Re-alemtuzumab was prepared achieving high radiochemical yields. Labeling efficiency of more than 95% can be obtained using optimal reaction conditions. {sup 188}Re-alemtuzumab showed good in vitro stability, remaining intact at 24 h after radiolabeling. In mice, {sup 188}Re-alemtuzumab showed high uptake in the blood (25.10{+-}1.36% IA at 1 h p.i.), followed by a biexponential clearance (t{sub 1/2{alpha}}=4.790 h and t{sub 1/2{beta}}=55.45 h). Increased uptake was observed in kidneys and heart (9

  12. Rapid screening and identification of dominant B cell epitopes of HBV surface antigen by quantum dot-based fluorescence polarization assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhongji; Song, Ruihua; Chen, Yue; Zhu, Yang; Tian, Yanhui; Li, Ding; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-03-01

    A method for quickly screening and identifying dominant B cell epitopes was developed using hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen as a target. Eleven amino acid fragments from HBV surface antigen were synthesized by 9-fluorenylmethoxy carbonyl solid-phase peptide synthesis strategy, and then CdTe quantum dots were used to label the N-terminals of all peptides. After optimizing the factors for fluorescence polarization (FP) immunoassay, the antigenicities of synthetic peptides were determined by analyzing the recognition and combination of peptides and standard antibody samples. The results of FP assays confirmed that 10 of 11 synthetic peptides have distinct antigenicities. In order to screen dominant antigenic peptides, the FP assays were carried out to investigate the antibodies against the 10 synthetic peptides of HBV surface antigen respectively in 159 samples of anti-HBV surface antigen-positive antiserum. The results showed that 3 of the 10 antigenic peptides may be immunodominant because the antibodies against them existed more widely among the samples and their antibody titers were higher than those of other peptides. Using three dominant antigenic peptides, 293 serum samples were detected for HBV infection by FP assays; the results showed that the antibody-positive ratio was 51.9% and the sensitivity and specificity were 84.3% and 98.2%, respectively. In conclusion, a quantum dot-based FP assay is a very simple, rapid, and convenient method for determining immunodominant antigenic peptides and has great potential in applications such as epitope mapping, vaccine designing, or clinical disease diagnosis in the future.

  13. Assessment of expression of selected Bcl-2 family proteins in lymphoid infiltration in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia treated with nucleoside analogues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Kłoczko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL is characterized by clonal growth and accumulation of mature lymphoid cells due to disturbance in genetically regulated form of cell death called apoptosis. The intrinsic mechanism of apoptosis is controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins. Purine nucleoside analogues induce the apoptosis in cells in a state of quiescence. The aim of the study was to assess expression of selected Bcl-2 family proteins in neoplastic infiltration in bone marrow in patients with B-CLL treated with nucleoside analogues. The study comprised examination of bone marrow obtained routinely by trephine biopsy from 18 patients with B-CLL diagnosed before administration of purine nucleoside analogues treatment and after its completion. Expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-x and Bax proteins was examined. Lymphoid cells in bone marrow were present in all patients before administration of treatment. After treatment in two patients bone marrow was infiltrated in diffuse pattern, whereas other patients presented nodular pattern of infiltration. The difference between stage of infiltration before and after treatment was statistically significant (p<0.002. High percentage of infiltration cells with positive anti Bcl-2 reaction from 42.0% in one patient to 85.33+/-3.06% in four patients before treatment was observed. After treatment percentage of infiltration cells with positive anti Bcl-2 antibody reaction was from 33.0+/-18.38% in two patients to 99.0% in one patient. Positive correlation between stage of infiltration and expression of Bcl-2 protein was confirmed before and after treatment. Such correlations were not observed in case of Bax and Bcl-x. Strong staining of immunohistochemical reaction of cells in lymphoid infiltration with Bcl-2 antibody was confirmed. There was a difference between Bcl-/Bax ratio before and after treatment. Immunohistochemical assessment of expression of Bcl-2 family proteins in cells of lymphoid infiltration in bone

  14. Regulatory B cells inhibit cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity and elimination of infected CD4 T cells after in vitro reactivation of HIV latent reservoirs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basile Siewe

    Full Text Available During HIV infection, IL-10/IL-10 receptor and programmed death-1 (PD-1/programmed death-1-ligand (PD-L1 interactions have been implicated in the impairment of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity. Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART, attenuated anti-HIV CTL functions present a major hurdle towards curative measures requiring viral eradication. Therefore, deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying impaired CTL is crucial before HIV viral eradication is viable. The generation of robust CTL activity necessitates interactions between antigen-presenting cells (APC, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We have shown that in vitro, IL-10hiPD-L1hi regulatory B cells (Bregs directly attenuate HIV-specific CD8+-mediated CTL activity. Bregs also modulate APC and CD4+ T cell function; herein we characterize the Breg compartment in uninfected (HIVNEG, HIV-infected "elite controllers" (HIVEC, ART-treated (HIVART, and viremic (HIVvir, subjects, and in vitro, assess the impact of Bregs on anti-HIV CTL generation and activity after reactivation of HIV latent reservoirs using suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA. We find that Bregs from HIVEC and HIVART subjects exhibit comparable IL-10 expression levels significantly higher than HIVNEG subjects, but significantly lower than HIVVIR subjects. Bregs from HIVEC and HIVART subjects exhibit comparable PD-L1 expression, significantly higher than in HIVVIR and HIVNEG subjects. SAHA-treated Breg-depleted PBMC from HIVEC and HIVART subjects, displayed enhanced CD4+ T-cell proliferation, significant upregulation of antigen-presentation molecules, increased frequency of CD107a+ and HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, associated with efficient elimination of infected CD4+ T cells, and reduction in integrated viral DNA. Finally, IL-10-R and PD-1 antibody blockade partially reversed Breg-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Our data suggest that, possibly, via an IL-10 and PD-L1 synergistic mechanism; Bregs likely inhibit APC

  15. J chain and myocyte enhancer factor 2B are useful in differentiating classical Hodgkin lymphoma from nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Erika M; Swerdlow, Steven H; Gibson, Sarah E

    2017-08-26

    Although most classical Hodgkin lymphomas (CHL) are easily distinguished from nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBL), cases with significant CD20 expression cause diagnostic confusion. Although the absence of OCT-2 and BOB.1 are useful in these circumstances, a variable proportion of CHL are positive for these antigens. We investigated the utility of J chain and MEF2B in the diagnosis of CHL, NLPHL, PMBL, T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma (TCRLBL), and B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and CHL (BCLU, DLBCL/CHL) compared to OCT-2 and BOB.1. J chain and MEF2B highlighted lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells in 20/20 (100%) NLPHL and were negative in 43/43 (100%) CHL. 14/15 (93%) PMBL and 4/4 (100%) TCRLBL were MEF2B-positive, while 67% of PMBL and 50% of TCRLBL were J chain-positive. 3/3 BCLU, DLBCL/CHL were negative for J chain and MEF2B. J chain and MEF2B were 100% sensitive and specific for NLPHL versus CHL. MEF2B was 100% sensitive and 98% specific for PMBL versus CHL. Whereas loss of OCT-2 and/or BOB.1 expression had a sensitivity of only 86% and specificity of 100% for CHL versus NLPHL, PMBL, and TCRLBL, lack of both J chain and MEF2B expression was 100% sensitive and 97% specific. J chain and MEF2B are highly sensitive and specific markers of NLPHL versus CHL, are particularly useful in highlighting LP cells, and, with rare exception, are of greater utility than OCT-2 and BOB.1 in differentiating CHL from NLPHL and other large B-cell lymphomas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Ofatumumab, Pentostatin, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  17. The IgH 3′ regulatory region governs μ chain transcription in mature B lymphocytes and the B cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintamand, Alexis; Rouaud, Pauline; Garot, Armand; Saad, Faten; Carrion, Claire; Oblet, Christelle; Cogné, Michel; Pinaud, Eric; Denizot, Yves

    2015-01-01

    We report that the IgH 3′ regulatory region (3′RR) has no role on μ chain transcription and pre-BCR expression in B cell progenitors. In contrast, analysis of heterozygous IgH aΔ3′RR/bwt mice indicated that the 3′RR controls μ chain transcripts in mature splenocytes and impacts membrane IgM density without obvious effect on BCR signals (colocalisation with lipid rafts and phosphorylation of Erk and Akt after BCR crosslinking). Deletion of the 3′RR modulates the B cell fate to less marginal zone B cells. In conclusion, the 3′RR is dispensable for pre-BCR expression and necessary for optimal commitments toward the marginal zone B cell fate. These results reinforce the concept of a dual regulation of the IgH locus transcription and accessibility by 5′ elements at immature B cell stages, and by the 3′RR as early as the resting mature B cell stage and then along further activation and differentiation. PMID:25742787

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of direct rhenium-188-labeled anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab for radio immunotherapy of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Decker, Mario; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert; Slegers, Guido; Dierckx, Rudi A.; De Vos, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Alemtuzumab (Campath, Berlex) is a humanized IgG1 rat monoclonal antibody directed against the cell surface CD52 antigen, found on lymphocytes and monocytes. It is being developed for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), autoinumme disease and for the prevention of transplant rejecti

  19. Smudge cells in peripheral blood smears did not differentiate chronic lymphocytic leukemia from other B-cell chronic lymphoprolipherative diseases Sombras nucleares no esfregaço do sangue periférico não diferenciam a leucemia linfocítica crônica das outras doenças linfoproliferativas B crônicas

    OpenAIRE

    Matos,Daniel M.; Guilherme Perini; Carlos Kruzich; Rego, Eduardo M.; Falcão, Roberto P.

    2009-01-01

    Smudge cells has been classically associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but they are found in peripheral blood tests for other chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (CLD). We investigated whether the percentage of smudge cells in peripheral blood smears can be used in the clinical practice to differentiate CLL from other B-cell CLD. The peripheral blood smears of 63 patients with the diagnosis of CLL and 62 with other B-cell CLD were analyzed. Three hundred cells (both lym...

  20. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, B-Cell, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available UTR Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute... B-Cell Leukemia; Acute B-Cell Leukemias; Acute B-Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute... B-Lymphocytic Leukemias; Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leuka...emia, mature B-cell type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mature... B-cell type; B Cell Leukemia, Acute; B Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; B-ALL; B-Cell Leukemia, Acute

  1. Absolute lymphocyte count predicts response to rituximab-containing salvage treatment for relapsed/refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with prior rituximab exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Hsin Hung

    2013-04-01

    Conclusion: Our study results show that for patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell NHL, rituximab-containing salvage treatment is feasible and generally tolerable. A high ALC-R value was significantly associated with a better response to this treatment.

  2. ABT-737 resistance in B-cells isolated from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and leukemia cell lines is overcome by the pleiotropic kinase inhibitor quercetin through Mcl-1 down-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Maria; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Volpe, Silvestro; Tedesco, Idolo; Bilotto, Stefania; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2013-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most frequent form of leukemia in adult population and despite numerous studies, it is considered an incurable disease. Since CLL is characterized by overexpression of pro-survival Bcl-2 family members, treatments with their antagonists, such as ABT-737, represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. ABT-737 is a BH3 mimetic agent which binds Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bcl-w with high affinity, while weakly interacts with Mcl-1 and Bfl-1. Previous studies demonstrated that quercetin, a flavonoid naturally present in food and beverages, was able to sensitize B-cells isolated from CLL patients to apoptosis when associated with death ligands or fludarabine, through a mechanism involving Mcl-1 down-regulation. Here, we report that the association between ABT-737 and quercetin synergistically induces apoptosis in B-cells and in five leukemic cell lines (Combination Index quercetin treatment. The molecular pathways triggered by quercetin have been investigated in HPB-ALL cells, characterized by the highest resistance to both ABT-737 and quercetin when applied as single molecules, but highly sensitivity to the co-treatment. In this cell line, quercetin down-regulated Mcl-1 through the inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, leading to Mcl-1 instability. The same mechanism was confirmed in B-cells. These results may open new clinical perspectives based on a translational approach in CLL therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lymphocytes and macrophages are infected by Theileria equi, but T cells and B cells are not required to establish infection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Joshua D; Ueti, Massaro W; Johnson, Wendell C; Scoles, Glen A; Knowles, Donald P; Mealey, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Theileria equi has a biphasic life cycle in horses, with a period of intraleukocyte development followed by patent erythrocytic parasitemia that causes acute and sometimes fatal hemolytic disease. Unlike Theileria spp. that infect cattle (Theileria parva and Theileria annulata), the intraleukocyte stage (schizont) of Theileria equi does not cause uncontrolled host cell proliferation or other significant pathology. Nevertheless, schizont-infected leukocytes are of interest because of their potential to alter host cell function and because immune responses directed against this stage could halt infection and prevent disease. Based on cellular morphology, Theileria equi has been reported to infect lymphocytes in vivo and in vitro, but the specific phenotype of schizont-infected cells has yet to be defined. To resolve this knowledge gap in Theileria equi pathogenesis, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected in vitro and the phenotype of infected cells determined using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. These experiments demonstrated that the host cell range of Theileria equi was broader than initially reported and included B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages. To determine if B and T lymphocytes were required to establish infection in vivo, horses affected with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), which lack functional B and T lymphocytes, were inoculated with Theileria equi sporozoites. SCID horses developed patent erythrocytic parasitemia, indicating that B and T lymphocytes are not necessary to complete the Theileria equi life cycle in vivo. These findings suggest that the factors mediating Theileria equi leukocyte invasion and intracytoplasmic differentiation are common to several leukocyte subsets and are less restricted than for Theileria annulata and Theileria parva. These data will greatly facilitate future investigation into the relationships between Theileria equi leukocyte tropism and pathogenesis, breed

  4. Lymphocytes and macrophages are infected by Theileria equi, but T cells and B cells are not required to establish infection in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Ramsay

    Full Text Available Theileria equi has a biphasic life cycle in horses, with a period of intraleukocyte development followed by patent erythrocytic parasitemia that causes acute and sometimes fatal hemolytic disease. Unlike Theileria spp. that infect cattle (Theileria parva and Theileria annulata, the intraleukocyte stage (schizont of Theileria equi does not cause uncontrolled host cell proliferation or other significant pathology. Nevertheless, schizont-infected leukocytes are of interest because of their potential to alter host cell function and because immune responses directed against this stage could halt infection and prevent disease. Based on cellular morphology, Theileria equi has been reported to infect lymphocytes in vivo and in vitro, but the specific phenotype of schizont-infected cells has yet to be defined. To resolve this knowledge gap in Theileria equi pathogenesis, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected in vitro and the phenotype of infected cells determined using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. These experiments demonstrated that the host cell range of Theileria equi was broader than initially reported and included B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages. To determine if B and T lymphocytes were required to establish infection in vivo, horses affected with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID, which lack functional B and T lymphocytes, were inoculated with Theileria equi sporozoites. SCID horses developed patent erythrocytic parasitemia, indicating that B and T lymphocytes are not necessary to complete the Theileria equi life cycle in vivo. These findings suggest that the factors mediating Theileria equi leukocyte invasion and intracytoplasmic differentiation are common to several leukocyte subsets and are less restricted than for Theileria annulata and Theileria parva. These data will greatly facilitate future investigation into the relationships between Theileria equi leukocyte tropism and pathogenesis

  5. IgD production and other lymphocyte functions in HIV infection: immaturity and activation of B cells at different clinical stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, L A; Forster, S M; Pinching, A J

    1989-01-01

    T and B cell function, in particular IgD production in vitro, were studied across the spectrum of HIV infection in homosexual men and compared with seronegative homosexual and heterosexual male controls. Proliferation to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) was reduced most strikingly in symptomatic HIV infection; it was also impaired in HIV seronegative homosexual men and there was no difference between these and asymptomatic HIV seropositives or those with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy (PGL). Spontaneous IgG and IgM production were increased in patients with PGL and Kaposi's sarcoma; pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced production of IgG and IgM was reduced in all HIV infected subjects. Spontaneous production of IgD was highest in asymptomatic HIV infection, with raised values also seen in PGL and AIDS with opportunist infection; IgD production was suppressed by PWM in the same groups. These data indicate an increase in circulating immature B cells. Markers of B cell immaturity and polyclonal activation are apparent to differing degrees at different stages of HIV infection. PMID:2784730

  6. Separate Developmental Programs for HLA-A and -B Cell Surface Expression during Differentiation from Embryonic Stem Cells to Lymphocytes, Adipocytes and Osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabir, Hardee J; Nehlin, Jan O; Qanie, Diyako

    2013-01-01

    hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC), human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and their fully-differentiated progenies such as lymphocytes, adipocytes and osteoblasts. hESC showed extremely low levels of HLA-A and no -B. In contrast, multipotent hMSC and hHSC generally expressed higher levels of HLA-A and clearly HLA...

  7. Screening of YAC clones and building a map of the chromosome 13 region often deleted during chronic B-cell lymphocytic leucosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brodyanskii, VM; Sulimova, GE; Udina, IG; Aitova, SS; Shaikhaev, GO; Sharikova, OA; Zakharev, VM; Fedorova, LI; Zelenin, AV; Eikhorn, S; Baush, C; Laland, M; Ross, M; Yankovskii, NK

    1995-01-01

    Pools of YAC clones from the ICRF library were analyzed by PCR using PBKpt, MGG15, and D13S25 markers that flank the chromosome 13 region often deleted during chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Ten clones were found and described. Nine mega-YAC clones from the CEPH library flanking the region of interest

  8. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  9. B cell subsets in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Perry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease.

  10. Frequent epigenetic inactivation of KIBRA, an upstream member of the Salvador/Warts/Hippo (SWH) tumor suppressor network, is associated with specific genetic event in B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Victoria K; Dunwell, Thomas L; Catchpoole, Daniel; Krex, Dietmar; Brini, Anna T; Griffiths, Mike; Craddock, Charles; Maher, Eamonn R; Latif, Farida

    2011-03-01

    The WW-domain containing protein KIBRA has recently been identified as a new member of the Salvador/Warts/Hippo (SWH) pathway in Drosophila and is shown to act as a tumor suppressor gene in Drosophila. This pathway is conserved in humans and members of the pathway have been shown to act as tumor suppressor genes in mammalian systems. We determined the methylation status of the 5' CpG island associated with the KIBRA gene in human cancers. In a large panel of cancer cell lines representing common epithelial cancers KIBRA was unmethylated. But in pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) cell lines KIBRA showed frequent hypermethylation and silencing of gene expression, which could be reversed by treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. In ALL patient samples KIBRA was methylated in 70% B-ALL but was methylated in < 20% T-ALL leukemia (p = 0.0019). In B-ALL KIBRA methylation was associated with ETV6/RUNX1 [t(12;21) (p13;q22)] chromosomal translocation (p = 0.0082) phenotype, suggesting that KIBRA may play an important role in t(12;21) leukemogenesis. In ALL paired samples at diagnosis and remission KIBRA methylation was seen in diagnostic but not in any of the remission samples accompanied by loss of KIBRA expression in disease state compared to patients in remission. Hence KIBRA methylation occurs frequently in B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia but not in epithelial cancers and is linked to specific genetic event in B-ALL.

  11. HCV Infection and B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. It has been suggested that HCV infects not only hepatocytes but also mononuclear lymphocytes including B cells that express the CD81 molecule, a putative HCV receptor. HCV infection of B cells is the likely cause of B-cell dysregulation disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, rheumatoid factor production, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that may evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. Epidemiological data indicate an association between HCV chronic infection and the occurrence of B-cell NHL, suggesting that chronic HCV infection is associated at least in part with B-cell lymphomagenesis. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of recent literature, including our own, to elucidate a possible role of HCV chronic infection in B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  12. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor P1446A Induces Apoptosis in a JNK/p38 MAPK-Dependent Manner in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Paiva

    Full Text Available CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors have shown remarkable activity in CLL, where its efficacy has been linked to inhibition of the transcriptional CDKs (7 and 9 and deregulation of RNA polymerase and short-lived pro-survival proteins such as MCL1. Furthermore, ER (endoplasmic reticulum stress has been implicated in CDK inhibition in CLL. Here we conducted a pre-clinical study of a novel orally active kinase inhibitor P1446A in CLL B-cells. P1446A inhibited CDKs at nanomolar concentrations and induced rapid apoptosis of CLL cells in vitro, irrespective of chromosomal abnormalities or IGHV mutational status. Apoptosis preceded inactivation of RNA polymerase, and was accompanied by phosphorylation of stress kinases JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase. Pharmacologic inhibitors of JNK/p38 MAPK conferred protection from P1446A-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with P1446A led to a dramatic induction of NOXA in a JNK-dependent manner, and sensitized CLL cells to ABT-737, a BH3-mimetic. We observed concurrent activation of apoptosis stress-inducing kinase 1 (ASK1 and its interaction with inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2 in CLL cells treated with P1446A, providing insights into upstream regulation of JNK in this setting. Consistent with previous reports on limited functionality of ER stress mechanism in CLL cells, treatment with P1446A failed to induce an extensive unfolded protein response. This study provides rationale for additional investigations of P1446A in CLL.

  13. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor P1446A Induces Apoptosis in a JNK/p38 MAPK-Dependent Manner in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Cody; Godbersen, J Claire; Soderquist, Ryan S; Rowland, Taylor; Kilmarx, Sumner; Spurgeon, Stephen E; Brown, Jennifer R; Srinivasa, Sreesha P; Danilov, Alexey V

    2015-01-01

    CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitors have shown remarkable activity in CLL, where its efficacy has been linked to inhibition of the transcriptional CDKs (7 and 9) and deregulation of RNA polymerase and short-lived pro-survival proteins such as MCL1. Furthermore, ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress has been implicated in CDK inhibition in CLL. Here we conducted a pre-clinical study of a novel orally active kinase inhibitor P1446A in CLL B-cells. P1446A inhibited CDKs at nanomolar concentrations and induced rapid apoptosis of CLL cells in vitro, irrespective of chromosomal abnormalities or IGHV mutational status. Apoptosis preceded inactivation of RNA polymerase, and was accompanied by phosphorylation of stress kinases JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). Pharmacologic inhibitors of JNK/p38 MAPK conferred protection from P1446A-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with P1446A led to a dramatic induction of NOXA in a JNK-dependent manner, and sensitized CLL cells to ABT-737, a BH3-mimetic. We observed concurrent activation of apoptosis stress-inducing kinase 1 (ASK1) and its interaction with inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) in CLL cells treated with P1446A, providing insights into upstream regulation of JNK in this setting. Consistent with previous reports on limited functionality of ER stress mechanism in CLL cells, treatment with P1446A failed to induce an extensive unfolded protein response. This study provides rationale for additional investigations of P1446A in CLL.

  14. Coming full circle: 70 years of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell redistribution, from glucocorticoids to inhibitors of B-cell receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Jan A; Montserrat, Emili

    2013-02-28

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells proliferate in pseudofollicles within the lymphatic tissues, where signals from the microenvironment and BCR signaling drive the expansion of the CLL clone. Mobilization of tissue-resident cells into the blood removes CLL cells from this nurturing milieu and sensitizes them to cytotoxic drugs. This concept recently gained momentum after the clinical activity of kinase inhibitors that target BCR signaling (spleen tyrosine kinase, Bruton tyrosine kinase, PI3Kδ inhibitors) was established. Besides antiproliferative activity, these drugs cause CLL cell redistribution with rapid lymph node shrinkage, along with a transient surge in lymphocytosis, before inducing objective remissions. Inactivation of critical CLL homing mechanism (chemokine receptors, adhesion molecules), thwarting tissue retention and recirculation into the tissues, appears to be the basis for this striking clinical activity. This effect of BCR-signaling inhibitors resembles redistribution of CLL cells after glucocorticoids, described as early as in the 1940s. As such, we are witnessing a renaissance of the concept of leukemia cell redistribution in modern CLL therapy. Here, we review the molecular basis of CLL cell trafficking, homing, and redistribution and similarities between old and new drugs affecting these processes. In addition, we outline how these discoveries are changing our understanding of CLL biology and therapy.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cells as efficient antigen presenting cells to propagate Aspergillus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Gamal

    2008-01-01

    To overcome the cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) expansion limitations imposed by the lack of sufficient dendritic cells (DC) alternative sources of autologous antigen presenting cells (APC) such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCL), which are easy to establish in vitro, have been considered and studied in the present work. Non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells of three healthy donors were repeatedly primed with autologous Aspergillus fumigatus commercial culture-filtrate antigen-pulsed fast monocyte-derived DC (Aspf-CFA-DC) alone, Aspf-CFA-pulsed BLCL (Aspf-CFA-BLCL) alone or Aspf-CFA-BLCL after one, two, or three primings with Aspf-CFA-DC (1DC/BLCL, 2DC/BLCL or 3DCIBLCL; respectively). After 5th priming, lines generated by Aspf-CFA-BLCL only showed strong/weak lytic activity for EBV/Aspf; respectively. Aspf-specific lytic activity in all donors was increased by increasing the number of primings with Aspf-CFA-DC before switching to Aspf-CFA-BLCL (18.20 +/- 1.65% versus 35.67 +/- 1.02% and 40.03 +/- 1.41% in bulk cultures generated by 1DC/BLCL versus 2DC/BLCL and 3DC/BLCL, respectively). Bulk cultures generated by Aspf-CFA-BLCL after at least two primings with Aspf-CFA-DC showed approximately the same Aspf-specific lytic activity, effector cell phenotype, expansion level and percentage expression of IFN-gamma, CD69 and CD107a without any significant differences (p > 0.05) as standard bulk cultures generated by only Aspf-CFA-DC. Thus, this study explored the use of a combined DC/BLCL protocol to establish/propagate Aspf-specific CTL for adoptive immunotherapy to prevent or treat invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

  16. Immunophenotypic and DNA genotypic analysis of T-cell and NK-cell subpopulations in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, E A; Richards, S J; Jones, R A; Rawstron, A; Master, P S; Teasdale, J; Short, M; Jack, A S; Scott, C S

    1995-01-01

    Absolute numbers and distributions of peripheral blood T-cells and NK cells were immunophenotypically determined in 21 patients with B-CLL and compared with those obtained from a series of 13 elderly normal controls with an age range of 60-87 years. For absolute CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell, and CD16+ NK subpopulation numbers, there were no consistent differences between the normal and B-CLL groups although some individual patient variation was seen. Immunophenotypic analyses did however reveal that CD3+ T-cells in almost half (10/21) of the B-CLL patients were Ia+ (defined as > 20% positive cells), compared to 0/13 of the elderly control group (p 20%) proportions of CD3+ T-cells co-expressing Ia further showed that CD45RO expression by CD4+ fractions was particularly prominent in the Ia+ subgroup, and that the relative increase of CD4+CD45RO+ cells was primarily a consequence of decreased absolute numbers of CD4+CD45RA+ lymphocytes. This study also examined extracted DNA from enriched CD3+ T-cell fractions (obtained by immunomagnetic bead selection in 9 of the B-CLL cases) by PCR analysis with two primers for the T-cell gamma gene locus. With the V gamma C (consensus) primer, 8/9 cases were polyclonal and the remaining case was oligoclonal. For comparison, 7/9 CD3+ fractions were oligoclonal with the V gamma 9 primer with the other two cases being polyclonal. No monoclonal CD3+ components were found. It is suggested that the observed increased Ia expression by CD3+ cells and the predominance of CD4+ cells expressing membrane CD45RO in patients with B-CLL may be of potential relevance to understanding the pathogenesis and patterns of disease progression.

  17. A case of composite classical and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma with progression to diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Diagnostic difficulty in fine-needle aspiration cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dilip K; Sheikh, Zafar A; Al-Shama'a, Mariam H; John, Bency; Alawi, Abdulla M S; Junaid, Thamradeen A

    2017-03-01

    A small percentage of nodular lymphocytic predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) progresses to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). There have also been rare reports of gray zone lymphoma with features intermediate between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and DLBCL. We report a very rare case of composite lymphoma (CHL and NLPHL) progressing to DLBCL, and highlight the diagnostic difficulty faced during its fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology diagnosis. A 65-year-old woman presented with a right axillary swelling which was subjected to FNA cytology. The routine FNA cytology diagnosis was anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) but immunocytochemistry did not support this diagnosis completely. The histopathological diagnosis of the excised lymph node was NLPHL with progression to DLBCL in our hospital but in a hospital abroad where the patient was treated, the reviewed diagnosis was CHL. The patient had a rapid downhill course with development of terminal pleural effusion and died approximately one year from initial diagnosis.The review of the cyto-histologic material along with additional immunocyto/histochemical studies and the clinical course of the disease support the diagnosis of a composite lymphoma (CHL and NLPHL) with progression to DLBCL. It is suggested that all the three lesions were clonally related. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:262-266. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Exposure to negatively charged-particle dominant air-conditions on human lymphocytes in vitro activates immunological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Mase, Akinori; Kotani, Muneo; Ami, Kazuhisa; Maeda, Megumi; Shirahama, Takashi; Lee, Suni; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Yoshitome, Kei; Otsuki, Takemi

    2015-12-01

    Indoor air-conditions may play an important role in human health. Investigation of house conditions that promote health revealed that negatively charged-particle dominant indoor air-conditions (NAC) induced immune stimulation. NAC was established using fine charcoal powder on walls and ceilings and utilizing forced negatively charged particles (approximate diameter: 20 nm) dominant in indoor air-conditions created by applying an electric voltage (72 V) between the backside of the walls and the ground. We reported previously that these conditions induced a slight and significant increase of interleukin-2 during 2.5 h stay, and an increase of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity, when examining human subjects after a two-week night stay under these conditions. In the present study, we investigated whether exposure to NAC in vitro affects immune conditions. Although the concentrations of particles were different, an incubator for cell culture with NAC was set and cellular compositions and functions of various freshly isolated human lymphocytes derived from healthy donors were assayed in the NAC incubator and compared with those of cultures in a standard (STD) incubator. Results showed that NAC cultivation caused an increase of CD25 and PD-1 expressing cells in the CD4 positive fraction, enhancement of NK cell cytotoxicity, production of interferon-y (IFNγ), and slight enhancement of regulatory T cell function. In addition, the formula designated as the "immune-index" clearly differed between STD and NAC culture conditions. Thus, NAC conditions may promote human health through slight activation of the immune system against cancer cells and virus infection as shown by this in vitro study and our previously reported human studies.

  19. Propionibacterium acnes overabundance and natural killer group 2 member D system activation in corpus-dominant lymphocytic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalban-Arques, Ana; Wurm, Philipp; Trajanoski, Slave; Schauer, Silvia; Kienesberger, Sabine; Halwachs, Bettina; Högenauer, Christoph; Langner, Cord; Gorkiewicz, Gregor

    2016-12-01

    Corpus-dominant lymphocytic gastritis (LyG) is characterized by CD8(+) T-cell infiltration of the stomach epithelium by a so far uncharacterized mechanism. Although Helicobacter pylori is typically undetectable in LyG, patients respond to H. pylori antibiotic eradication therapy, suggesting a non-H. pylori microbial trigger for the disease. Comparative microbiota analysis of specimens from LyG, H. pylori gastritis and healthy controls precluded involvement of H. pylori in LyG but identified Propionibacterium acnes as a possible disease trigger. In addition, the natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) system and the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-15 are significantly upregulated in the gastric mucosa of LyG patients, and gastric epithelial cells respond to microbe-derived stimuli, including live P. acnes and the microbial products short-chain fatty acids, with induction of NKG2D ligands. In contrast, H. pylori infection does not activate or even repress NKG2D ligands. Together, our findings identify P. acnes as a possible causative agent for LyG, which is dependent on the NKG2D system and IL-15 activation. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. B-cell-independent lymphoid tissue infection by a B-cell-tropic rhadinovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Brittany; Frederico, Bruno; Stevenson, Philip G

    2015-09-01

    Lymphocytes provide gammaherpesviruses with a self-renewing substrate for persistent infection and with transport to mucosal sites for host exit. Their role in the initial colonization of new hosts is less clear. Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4), an experimentally accessible, B-cell-tropic rhadinovirus (gamma-2 herpesvirus), persistently infects both immunocompetent and B-cell-deficient mice. A lack of B-cells did not compromise MuHV-4 entry into lymphoid tissue, which involved myeloid cell infection. However, it impaired infection amplification and MuHV-4 exit from lymphoid tissue, which involved myeloid to B-cell transfer.

  1. B Cell Tolerance in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Gururajan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available B lymphocyte receptors are generated randomly during the bone marrow developmental phase of B cells. Hence, the B cell repertoire consists of both self and foreign antigen specificities necessitating specific tolerance mechanisms to eliminate self-reactive B cells. This review summarizes the major mechanisms of B cell tolerance, which include clonal deletion, anergy and receptor editing. In the bone marrow presentation of antigen in membrane bound form is more effective than soluble form and the role of dendritic cells in this process is discussed. Toll like receptor derived signals affect activation of B cells by certain ligands such as nucleic acids and have been shown to play crucial roles in the development of autoimmunity in several animal models. In the periphery availability of BAFF, a B cell survival factor plays a critical role in the survival of self-reactive B cells. Antibodies against BAFF have been found to be effective therapeutic agents in lupus like autoimmune diseases. Recent developments are targeting anergy to control the growth of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

  2. Bryostatin induces protein kinase C modulation, Mcl-1 up-regulation and phosphorylation of Bcl-2 resulting in cellular differentiation and resistance to drug-induced apoptosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alun; Pepper, Chris; Hoy, Terry; Bentley, Paul

    2004-05-01

    Bryostatin, a macrocyclic lactone and protein kinase C (PKC) modulator, has been shown to have differentiation and anti-tumor activity against several leukemia cell lines in vitro. In this study, we demonstrated Bryostatin-induced differentiation in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells, characterized by an increase in cell size and a marked up-regulation of CD11c expression. The specific inhibitors of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase C pathways, PD98059 and GF 109203X respectively, each completely blocked Bryostatin-induced differentiation of B-CLL cells, suggesting that activation of the ERK pathway plays a direct role in this process in a PKC-dependent manner. Furthermore, Bryostatin reduced both spontaneous and drug-induced apoptosis with chlorambucil, fludarabine and 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-Cda) in B-CLL cells. This resistance was associated with an early up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and post-translational phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at serine 70. The anti-apoptotic effects of Bryostatin were abrogated by GF 109203X, and to a lesser extent by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) inhibitor, LY294002. Interestingly, the ERK inhibitor, PD98059 inhibited Mcl-1 expression but had little effect on Bryostatin-induced survival suggesting that the ERK pathway predominantly affects differentiation. Taken together these results present an explanation for Bryostatin-induced B-CLL cell survival in which modulation of the PKC pathway couples differentiation with an increase in antiapoptotic protein expression and calls into question the rationale for its use in the treatment of B-CLL.

  3. Comparative In Vitro Immune Stimulation Analysis of Primary Human B Cells and B Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Belle, Kristien; Herman, Jean; Boon, Louis; Waer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    B cell specific immunomodulatory drugs still remain an unmet medical need. Utilisation of validated simplified in vitro models would allow readily obtaining new insights in the complexity of B cell regulation. For this purpose we investigated which human B lymphocyte stimulation assays may be ideally suited to investigate new B lymphocyte immunosuppressants. Primary polyclonal human B cells underwent in vitro stimulation and their proliferation, production of immunoglobulins (Igs) and of cytokines, and expression of cell surface molecules were analysed using various stimuli. ODN2006, a toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist, was the most potent general B cell stimulus. Subsequently, we investigated on which human B cell lines ODN2006 evoked the broadest immunostimulatory effects. The Namalwa cell line proved to be the most responsive upon TLR9 stimulation and hence may serve as a relevant, homogeneous, and stable B cell model in an in vitro phenotypic assay for the discovery of new targets and inhibitors of the B cell activation processes. As for the read-out for such screening assay, it is proposed that the expression of activation and costimulatory surface markers reliably reflects B lymphocyte activation. PMID:28116319

  4. The early history of B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Max D

    2015-03-01

    The separate development of functionally intertwined lineages of lymphocytes known as B cells and T cells is now recognized as a fundamental organizing principle of the adaptive immune system in all vertebrates. Immunologists strive to define the different sublineages of the clonally diverse B cells and T cells, how they interact with each other and how they interact with innate lymphoid cells and other elements of the innate immune system to counter infections, cancer and the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. On the 50th anniversary of the recognition of B cells as a discrete cell lineage, this Timeline article recounts some of the milestones marking the development of the concept that B cells are a functionally and developmentally distinct arm of the adaptive immune system.

  5. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  6. Pembrolizumab Alone or With Idelalisib or Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Other Low-Grade B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Refractory Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Richter Syndrome; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. Persistent Polyclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis B Cells Can Be Activated through CD40-CD154 Interaction

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    Emmanuelle Dugas-Bourdages

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis (PPBL is a rare disorder, diagnosed primarily in adult female smokers and characterized by an expansion of CD19+CD27+IgM+ memory B cells, by the presence of binucleated lymphocytes, and by a moderate elevation of serum IgM. The clinical course is usually benign, but it is not known whether or not PPBL might be part of a process leading to the emergence of a malignant proliferative disorder. In this study we sought to investigate the functional response of B cells from patients with PPBL by use of an optimal memory B cell culture model based on the CD40-CD154 interaction. We found that the proliferation of PPBL B cells was almost as important as that of B cells from normal controls, resulting in high immunoglobulin secretion with in vitro isotypic switching. We conclude that the CD40-CD154 activation pathway is functional in the memory B cell population of PPBL patients, suggesting that the disorder may be due to either a dysfunction of other cells in the microenvironment or a possible defect in another B cell activation pathway.

  8. Advances in human B cell phenotypic profiling

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    Denise A Kaminski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (Big Biology, necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort.

  9. Transcriptional networks in developing and mature B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Patrick; Rolink, Antonius G

    2005-06-01

    The development of B cells from haematopoietic stem cells proceeds along a highly ordered, yet flexible, pathway. At multiple steps along this pathway, cells are instructed by transcription factors on how to further differentiate, and several check-points have been identified. These check-points are initial commitment to lymphocytic progenitors, specification of pre-B cells, entry to the peripheral B-cell pool, maturation of B cells and differentiation into plasma cells. At each of these regulatory nodes, there are transcriptional networks that control the outcome, and much progress has recently been made in dissecting these networks. This article reviews our current understanding of this exciting field.

  10. The rap GTPases regulate B cell morphology, immune-synapse formation, and signaling by particulate B cell receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kevin B L; Freeman, Spencer A; Zabetian, Saba; Brugger, Hayley; Weber, Michele; Lei, Victor; Dang-Lawson, May; Tse, Kathy W K; Santamaria, Rene; Batista, Facundo D; Gold, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    B lymphocytes spread and extend membrane processes when searching for antigens and form immune synapses upon contacting cells that display antigens on their surface. Although these dynamic morphological changes facilitate B cell activation, the signaling pathways underlying these processes are not fully understood. We found that activation of the Rap GTPases was essential for these changes in B cell morphology. Rap activation was important for B cell receptor (BCR)- and lymphocyte-function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-induced spreading, for BCR-induced immune-synapse formation, and for particulate BCR ligands to induce localized F-actin assembly and membrane-process extension. Rap activation and F-actin assembly were also required for optimal BCR signaling in response to particulate antigens but not soluble antigens. Thus by controlling B cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization, Rap might play a key role in the activation of B cells by particulate and cell-associated antigens.

  11. [The role of IRA B cells in selected inflammatory processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasada, Magdalena; Rutkowska-Zapała, Magdalena; Lenart, Marzena; Kwinta, Przemko

    2016-03-16

    The first report about the discovery of new, previously unknown immune cells named IRA B cells (innate response activator B cells) appeared in 2012. So far, their presence has been verified in both mice and humans. However, IRA B cells belong to the family of B lymphocytes and have a number of characteristics unique to this group of cells. IRA B cells are formed from activated B1a lymphocytes after their contact with a pathogen. B1a lymphocytes mainly reside within body cavities. Activated by the pathogen, they move on into secondary lymphoid organs (spleen, lymph nodes) where they differentiate into IRA B cells. IRA B cells are a rich source of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF can stimulate IRA B cells in an autocrine manner for the secretion of intracellular stocks of immunoglobulin M (IgM), which can facilitate pathogens' phagocytosis by neutrophils. GM-CSF also stimulates neutrophils into active phagocytosis. Rapid eradication of the pathogen can prevent the development of an excessive inflammatory response, which can be dangerous for the organism. Until now the involvement of IRA B lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia has been proven, as well as their role in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions in mice. There is research in progress on the possibility of increasing the number of IRA B cells, for example by intravenous supply of modified immunoglobulins. It is necessary to characterize human IRA B cells and to determine their role in the functioning of the immune system.

  12. Detection of CD5 in B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative diseases by flow cytometry: a strong expression in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia Detecção do CD5 em doenças linfoproliferativas crônicas de células B por citometria de fluxo: uma importante expressão em leucemia linfocítica crônica

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    Geraldo Barroso Cavalcanti Júnior

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: CD5 is a T cell marker, aberrantly express in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL. Other chronic B cell malignancies including hairy cell leukemia (HCL and B cell prolymphocytic leukemia (B-PLL are CD5 negative or express this antigen in a weak way. In this study, CD5 expression was investigated in leukemic cells from 42 patients with chronic B cell lymphoproliferative disease. METHODS: We studied the CD5 expression in leukemic cells from 42 patients with chronic B-cell malignancies by flow cytometry. Demographic features such as age, sex and clinical date were also analyzed. RESULTS: There were 22 males and 20 females. The immunophenotyping showed that 35 cases were B-CLL, 3 B-PLL and HCL and one patient was MCL. CD5 expression was present in all B-CLL and MCL. Low expression of CD5 was observed in one patient with B-PLL and negative in all cases of HCL. CONCLUSION: Our date demonstrated that CD5 expression can help distinguish among B-CLL from HCL and B-PLL, but is similar expressed in MCL.OBJETIVOS: CD5 é um marcador normalmente expresso nas células T e de forma aberrante nas células B da leucemia linfocítica crônica (LLC e no linfoma de células do manto (LCM. Outras doenças linfoproliferativas crônicas como a hairy cell leukemia (HCL e leukemia prolinfocítica de células B (LPL-B, são geralmente CD5 negativas ou expressam fracamente este antígeno. Neste trabalho investigou-se o padrão de expressão do CD5 em 42 pacientes com doenças linfoproliferativas crônicas de células B (DLC-B. METODOS: Investigamos a expressão de CD5 em células leucêmicas de 42 pacientes com DLC-B através da citometria de fluxo. Dados demográficos, tais como idade e sexo, bem como dados clínicos e laboratoriais também foram analisados. RESULTADOS: A imunofenotipagem mostrou que 35 casos foram LLC, 3 LPL-B, 3 HCL e um caso de LMC. O CD5 mostrou-se fortemente expresso em todos os casos de LLC e LMC. Baixa

  13. Trafficking of B cell antigen in lymph nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Santiago F.; Degn, Søren Egedal; Pitcher, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    The clonal selection theory first proposed by Macfarlane Burnet is a cornerstone of immunology ( 1 ). At the time, it revolutionized the thinking of immunologists because it provided a simple explanation for lymphocyte specificity, immunological memory, and elimination of self-reactive clones ( 2......, 5 ) have provided new insights into the trafficking of B cells and their antigen. In this review, we summarize these advances in the context of our current view of B cell circulation and activation....

  14. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  15. B cell follicle-like structures in multiple sclerosis-with focus on the role of B cell activating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morten, Haugen; Frederiksen, Jette L; Vinter, Matilda Degn

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Follicle-like structures (FLS) have recently been found in the subarachnoid space in the leptomeninges in some patients with secondary progressive MS (SPMS). They contain proliferating B lymphocytes, plasma cells....... In this review, we will discuss the role of FLS in MS pathogenesis and disease course and the possible influence by B cell activating factor (BAFF) and C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13)....

  16. Intravascular large B cell lymphoma

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    Ricardo García-Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B cell lymphoma (IVBCL is a rare type of extranodal large B cell lymphoma characterized by selective growth of lymphoma cells within the microvasculature. We present an illustrative case of intravascular B cell lymphoma suspected by the presence of a very small monoclonal B cell population identified by immunophenotype and polymerase chain reaction in bone marrow. The diagnosis was confirmed by skin biopsy.

  17. BAFF enhances chemotaxis of primary human B cells: a particular synergy between BAFF and CXCL13 on memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Gamal; Borhis, Gwenoline; Lefevre, Eric A; Chaoul, Nada; Deshayes, Frederique; Dessirier, Valérie; Lapree, Genevieve; Tsapis, Andreas; Richard, Yolande

    2008-03-01

    B-cell-activating factor of the TNF family, (BAFF), and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) regulate B-lymphocyte survival and activation. We report that BAFF, but not APRIL, increased the chemotactic response of primary human B cells to CCL21, CXCL12, and CXCL13. The BAFF-induced increase in B-cell chemotaxis was totally abolished by blockade of BAFF-R and was strongly dependent on the activation of PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, and p38MAPK pathways. BAFF had similar effects on the chemotaxis of naive and memory B cells in response to CCL21 but increased more strongly that of memory B cells to CXCL13 than that of naive B cells. Our findings indicate a previously unreported role for the BAFF/BAFF-R pair in mature B-cell chemotaxis. The synergy between CXCL13 and BAFF produced by stromal cells and follicular dendritic cells may have important implications for B-cell homeostasis, the development of normal B-cell areas, and for the formation of germinal center-like follicles that may be observed in various autoimmune diseases.

  18. Adhesion of Human B Cells to Germinal Centers in Vitro Involves VLA-4 and INCAM-110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Arnold S.; Munro, J. Michael; Rice, G. Edgar; Bevilacqua, Michael P.; Morimoto, Chikao; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Rhynhart, Kurt; Pober, Jordan S.; Nadler, Lee M.

    1990-08-01

    Human B lymphocytes localize and differentiate within the microenvironment of lymphoid germinal centers. A frozen section binding assay was developed for the identification of those molecules involved in the adhesive interactions between B cells and lymphoid follicles. Activated human B cells and B cell lines were found to selectively adhere to germinal centers. The VLA-4 molecule on the lymphocyte and the adhesion molecule INCAM-110, expressed on follicular dendritic cells, supported this interaction. This cellular interaction model can be used for the study of how B cells differentiate.

  19. A critical role of Rap1b in B-cell trafficking and marginal zone B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Podd, Andrew; Wen, Renren; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; White, Gilbert C; Wang, Demin

    2008-05-01

    B-cell development is orchestrated by complex signaling networks. Rap1 is a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins and has 2 isoforms, Rap1a and Rap1b. Although Rap1 has been suggested to have an important role in a variety of cellular processes, no direct evidence demonstrates a role for Rap1 in B-cell biology. In this study, we found that Rap1b was the dominant isoform of Rap1 in B cells. We discovered that Rap1b deficiency in mice barely affected early development of B cells but markedly reduced marginal zone (MZ) B cells in the spleen and mature B cells in peripheral and mucosal lymph nodes. Rap1b-deficient B cells displayed normal survival and proliferation in vivo and in vitro. However, Rap1b-deficient B cells had impaired adhesion and reduced chemotaxis in vitro, and lessened homing to lymph nodes in vivo. Furthermore, we found that Rap1b deficiency had no marked effect on LPS-, BCR-, or SDF-1-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and AKT but clearly impaired SDF-1-mediated activation of Pyk-2, a key regulator of SDF-1-mediated B-cell migration. Thus, we have discovered a critical and distinct role of Rap1b in mature B-cell trafficking and development of MZ B cells.

  20. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

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    Kari Hemminki

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis. By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation.

  1. An intrinsic B cell defect is required for the production of autoantibodies in the lpr model of murine systemic autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobel, E.S.; Katagiri, T.; Katagiri, K.; Morris, S.C.; Cohen, P.L.; Eisenberg, R.A. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Mice homozygous for the gene lpr develop marked lymphadenopathy and a spectrum of autoantibodies closely resembling that of human systemic lupus erythematosus. The unusual T cell phenotype of the expanded lymphocyte population and the T-dependence of several antibodies in this strain have suggested that primary T cell abnormalities underlie the autoimmune syndrome. Using double chimeras, we now show that expression of the lpr gene in B cells is absolutely necessary for autoantibody production. Combinations of anti-Thy 1.2 + C' treated bone marrow from congenic strains of C57BL/6 mice, differing only at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) and lpr loci, were transferred into lethally irradiated B6/lpr mice. Double chimerism was documented by allotype-specific surface IgD and IgM immunofluorescence assay of peripheral blood and by allotype-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for total IgM in serum. Despite the presence of both +/+ and lpr B cells, IgM and IgG2a anti-chromatin as well as IgM anti-IgG were entirely the products of lpr B cells. Total serum IgG2a and IgG1 were also dominated by the lpr phenotype but not to the same extent. A similar experiment using B6/lpr-Igha recipients confirmed these findings. Additional experiments in which B6/lpr recipients were infused with ratios of donor bone marrow favoring B6.C20 +/+ over B6/lpr showed that even though +/+ B cells were overrepresented, autoantibodies were only of the lpr allotype. In addition, in the presence of lpr B cells, normal B cells showed little response to an exogenous, T cell-dependent antigen. The data thus indicate that lpr B cells manifest an intrinsic abnormality which is essential for autoantibody production in the lpr model.

  2. Marginal zone B-cells, a gatekeeper of innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouali, Moncef; Richard, Yolande

    2011-01-01

    To maintain the integrity of an organism constantly challenged by pathogens, the immune system is endowed with a variety of cell types. B lymphocytes were initially thought to only play a role in the adaptive branch of immunity. However, a number of converging observations revealed that two B-cell subsets, marginal zone (MZ) and B1 cells, exhibit unique developmental and functional characteristics, and can contribute to innate immune responses. In addition to their capacity to mount a local antibody response against type-2 T-cell-independent (TI-2) antigens, MZ B-cells can participate to T-cell-dependent (TD) immune responses through the capture and import of blood-borne antigens to follicular areas of the spleen. Here, we discuss the multiple roles of MZ B-cells in humans, non-human primates, and rodents. We also summarize studies - performed in transgenic mice expressing fully human antibodies on their B-cells and in macaques whose infection with Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) represents a suitable model for HIV-1 infection in humans - showing that infectious agents have developed strategies to subvert MZ B-cell functions. In these two experimental models, we observed that two microbial superantigens for B-cells (protein A from Staphylococcus aureus and protein L from Peptostreptococcus magnus) as well as inactivated AT-2 virions of HIV-1 and infectious SIV preferentially deplete innate-like B-cells - MZ B-cells and/or B1 B-cells - with different consequences on TI and TD antibody responses. These data revealed that viruses and bacteria have developed strategies to deplete innate-like B-cells during the acute phase of infection and to impair the antibody response. Unraveling the intimate mechanisms responsible for targeting MZ B-cells in humans will be important for understanding disease pathogenesis and for designing novel vaccine strategies.

  3. Smudge cells in peripheral blood smears did not differentiate chronic lymphocytic leukemia from other B-cell chronic lymphoprolipherative diseases Sombras nucleares no esfregaço do sangue periférico não diferenciam a leucemia linfocítica crônica das outras doenças linfoproliferativas B crônicas

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    Daniel M. Matos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Smudge cells has been classically associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, but they are found in peripheral blood tests for other chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (CLD. We investigated whether the percentage of smudge cells in peripheral blood smears can be used in the clinical practice to differentiate CLL from other B-cell CLD. The peripheral blood smears of 63 patients with the diagnosis of CLL and 62 with other B-cell CLD were analyzed. Three hundred cells (both lymphoid cells and smudge cells were counted for each peripheral blood smear. A comparison of the percentage of smudge cells between the two groups was performed and, subsequently, 5 cut-off values were fixed (10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% of smudge cells with the aim of defining cases as "positive" or "negative" for smudge cells and verifying whether there are any differences between CLL and the other B-cell CLD. The percentage of smudge cells in patients with CLL (median 26%, 4%-86% was higher than in patients with B-cell CLD (median 14%, 1%-64%. However, none of the cut-off values tested presented suitable values of sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value to separate the two groups. As it is necessary to have a single cut-off value with high sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value to infer the diagnosis of CLL in the clinical practice, we concluded that smudge cells are not fitting to differentiate CLL from other B-cell CLD.As sombras nucleares têm sido classicamente associadasà leucemia linfocítica crônica (LLC, embora possam ser encontradas nos esfregaços do sangue periférico de outras doenças linfoproliferativas B crônicas (DLBC. Nesse estudo, nós investigamos se a porcentagem de sombras nucleares nos esfregaços do sangue periférico pode ser utilizada na prática clínica da hematologia para diferenciar a LLC das outras DLBC. Foram analisados os esfregaços do sangue periférico de 63 pacientes com o diagnóstico de LLC

  4. Expression of Bruton's tyrosine kinase in B-cell neoplasms evaluated by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, Natália Aydos; Fernandes, Flavo Beno; Alegretti, Ana Paula; Faulhaber, Gustavo Adolpho Moreira

    2016-12-27

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a cytoplasmatic protein that is part of the B-cell antigen receptor signaling pathway. Our aim was to evaluate the expression of BTK in B-cell neoplasms and compare it to normal B-cell lymphocytes. After surface staining with CD19 and CD45, flow cytometry staining for intracellular BTK was performed in leukemic or mature B-cells from bone marrow or peripheral blood samples. No differences in BTK expression were identified between groups, or in comparison to control samples, there was no association between BTK expression and the clinical variables evaluated. BTK expression in B-cell neoplasms was similar to that of normal B-cell lymphocytes.

  5. Addition of Rice Bran Arabinoxylan to Curcumin Therapy May Be of Benefit to Patients With Early-Stage B-Cell Lymphoid Malignancies (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance, Smoldering Multiple Myeloma, or Stage 0/1 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia): A Preliminary Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2016-06-01

    Hypothesis Prior studies on patients with early B-cell lymphoid malignancies suggest that early intervention with curcumin may lead to delay in progressive disease and prolonged survival. These patients are characterized by increased susceptibility to infections. Rice bran arabinoxylan (Ribraxx) has been shown to have immunostimulatory, anti-inflammatory, and proapoptotic effects. We postulated that addition of Ribraxx to curcumin therapy may be of benefit. Study design Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)/smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) or stage 0/1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who had been on oral curcumin therapy for a period of 6 months or more were administered both curcumin (as Curcuforte) and Ribraxx. Methods Ten MGUS/SMM patients and 10 patients with stage 0/1 CLL were administered 6 g of curcumin and 2 g Ribraxx daily. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 2-month intervals for a period of 6 months, and various markers were monitored. MGUS/SMM patients included full blood count (FBC); paraprotein; free light chains/ratio; C-reactive protein (CRP)and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR); B2 microglobulin and immunological markers. Markers monitored for stage 0/1 CLL were FBC, CRP and ESR, and immunological markers. Results Of 10 MGUS/SMM patients,5 (50%) were neutropenic at baseline, and the Curcuforte/Ribraxx combination therapy showed an increased neutrophil count, varying between 10% and 90% among 8 of the 10 (80%) MGUS/SMM patients. An additional benefit of the combination therapy was the potent effect in reducing the raised ESR in 4 (44%) of the MGUS/SMM patients. Conclusion Addition of Ribraxx to curcumin therapy may be of benefit to patients with early-stage B-cell lymphoid malignancies.

  6. Marginal zone B-cells, a gatekeeper of innate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncef eZOUALI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To maintain the integrity of an organism constantly challenged by pathogens, the immune system is endowed with a variety of cell types. B-lymphocytes were initially thought to only play a role in the adaptative branch of immunity. However, a number of converging observations revealed that two B-cell subsets, marginal zone (MZ and B1 cells, exhibit unique developmental and functional characteristics, and can contribute to innate immune responses. In addition to their capacity to mount local antibody response against type 2 T-independent (TI-2 antigens, MZ B-cells can participate to T-dependent (TD immune response through the capture and import of blood-borne antigens to follicular areas of the spleen. Here, we discuss the multiple roles of MZ B-cells in rodents and primates. We also summarize studies —performed in transgenic mice expressing fully human antibodies on their B-cells and macaques whose infection with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV represents a suitable model for HIV-1 infection in humans— showing that infectious agents have developed strategies to subvert MZ B-cell functions. In these two experimental models, we observed that two microbial superantigens for B-cells (protein A from Staphylococcus aureus and protein L from Peptostreptococcus magnus as well as inactivated AT-2 virions of HIV-1 and infectious SIV preferentially deplete innate-like B-cells —MZ B-cells and/or B1 B-cells— with different consequences on TI and TD antibody responses. These data revealed that viruses and bacteria have developed strategies to deplete innate-like B-cells during the acute phase of infection and to impair the antibody response. Unraveling the intimate mechanisms responsible for targeting MZ B-cells in humans will be important for understanding disease pathogenesis and for designing novel vaccine strategies.

  7. T-dependent B-cell activation is signalled by an early increase in potassium influx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Kaplan, J G

    1982-01-01

    (previously demonstrated when B and T lymphocytes were separately stimulated) also occurs when B cells are stimulated through cooperation with mitogen-activated T cells, and is also detectable early in culture. T-dependent activation of B cells is therefore detectable considerably earlier than by conventional...

  8. Control of memory B cell responses by extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-10-01

    Following primary activation, B lymphocytes generate a long-lived memory compartment to harness the organism for future reinfections by the same pathogen species. Only recently the composition and signaling signature of the scarce memory B cell pool could be explored in more detail. This review highlights current concepts of how B cells preserve their antigen experience at the cellular and molecular level.

  9. T-dependent B-cell activation is signalled by an early increase in potassium influx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Kaplan, J G

    1982-01-01

    (previously demonstrated when B and T lymphocytes were separately stimulated) also occurs when B cells are stimulated through cooperation with mitogen-activated T cells, and is also detectable early in culture. T-dependent activation of B cells is therefore detectable considerably earlier than by conventional...

  10. Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  11. Entry of Francisella tularensis into Murine B Cells: The Role of B Cell Receptors and Complement Receptors.

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    Lenka Plzakova

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is an intracellular pathogen that dominantly infects and proliferates inside phagocytic cells but can be seen also in non-phagocytic cells, including B cells. Although protective immunity is known to be almost exclusively associated with the type 1 pathway of cellular immunity, a significant role of B cells in immune responses already has been demonstrated. Whether their role is associated with antibody-dependent or antibody-independent B cell functions is not yet fully understood. The character of early events during B cell-pathogen interaction may determine the type of B cell response regulating the induction of adaptive immunity. We used fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to identify the basic requirements for the entry of F. tularensis into B cells within in vivo and in vitro infection models. Here, we present data showing that Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strain LVS significantly infects individual subsets of murine peritoneal B cells early after infection. Depending on a given B cell subset, uptake of Francisella into B cells is mediated by B cell receptors (BCRs with or without complement receptor CR1/2. However, F. tularensis strain FSC200 ΔiglC and ΔftdsbA deletion mutants are defective in the ability to enter B cells. Once internalized into B cells, F. tularensis LVS intracellular trafficking occurs along the endosomal pathway, albeit without significant multiplication. The results strongly suggest that BCRs alone within the B-1a subset can ensure the internalization process while the BCRs on B-1b and B-2 cells need co-signaling from the co receptor containing CR1/2 to initiate F. tularensis engulfment. In this case, fluidity of the surface cell membrane is a prerequisite for the bacteria's internalization. The results substantially underline the functional heterogeneity of B cell subsets in relation to F. tularensis.

  12. Entospletinib and Obinutuzumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Anemia; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Fatigue; Fever; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3a Follicular Lymphoma; Hairy Cell Leukemia; Lymphadenopathy; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Night Sweats; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Richter Syndrome; Splenomegaly; Thrombocytopenia; Weight Loss

  13. Revisiting the B-cell compartment in mouse and humans: more than one B-cell subset exists in the marginal zone and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garraud Olivier

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The immunological roles of B-cells are being revealed as increasingly complex by functions that are largely beyond their commitment to differentiate into plasma cells and produce antibodies, the key molecular protagonists of innate immunity, and also by their compartmentalisation, a more recently acknowledged property of this immune cell category. For decades, B-cells have been recognised by their expression of an immunoglobulin that serves the function of an antigen receptor, which mediates intracellular signalling assisted by companion molecules. As such, B-cells were considered simple in their functioning compared to the other major type of immune cell, the T-lymphocytes, which comprise conventional T-lymphocyte subsets with seminal roles in homeostasis and pathology, and non-conventional T-lymphocyte subsets for which increasing knowledge is accumulating. Since the discovery that the B-cell family included two distinct categories — the non-conventional, or extrafollicular, B1 cells, that have mainly been characterised in the mouse; and the conventional, or lymph node type, B2 cells — plus the detailed description of the main B-cell regulator, FcγRIIb, and the function of CD40+ antigen presenting cells as committed/memory B-cells, progress in B-cell physiology has been slower than in other areas of immunology. Cellular and molecular tools have enabled the revival of innate immunity by allowing almost all aspects of cellular immunology to be re-visited. As such, B-cells were found to express “Pathogen Recognition Receptors” such as TLRs, and use them in concert with B-cell signalling during innate and adaptive immunity. An era of B-cell phenotypic and functional analysis thus began that encompassed the study of B-cell microanatomy principally in the lymph nodes, spleen and mucosae. The novel discovery of the differential localisation of B-cells with distinct phenotypes and functions revealed the compartmentalisation of B-cells

  14. Quantification of B cells and T lymphocyte subsets in bovine leukemia virus infected dairy cowsQuantificação da população de linfócitos B e das subpopulações de linfócitos T em bovinos infectados pelo vírus da leucose enzoótica bovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claúdia Regina Stricagnolo

    2012-08-01

    , 15 animals were selected and divided uniformly in three groups (negative, AL, PL. The BLV infection was detected by agar gel immunodiffusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent-assay. The lymphocytes subsets were evaluated using monoclonal antibodies by flow cytometry. The results of the present study pointed out to an increase in B lymphocytes, and also an augment in CD5+ and CD11b+ cells in animals showing PL. Consequently, it can be observed a decrease in the percentage of T cells subsets in these animals. Conversely, no significant alterations in the absolute number of the T lymphocytes, T CD4+ cells and T CD8+ lymphocytes were found in BLV-infected dairy cows with PL. Therefore, the correlation between the absolute numbers of B- and T cell subsets in the peripheral blood applied to each group showed a significant and positive strong correlation between numbers of B cells and T cells or T CD8+ cells in the PL animals, although the same cannot be predicted for T CD4+ lymphocytes. No such correlation was encountered for the AL and negative-control animals.

  15. B cells responses and cytokine production are regulated by their immune microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Monica I; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Zlotnik, Albert

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of two types of lymphocytes: T and B cells. These two lymphocytes originate from a common precursor, yet are fundamentally different with B cells mediating humoral immunity while T cells mediate cell mediated immunity. In cytokine production, naïve T cells produce multiple cytokines upon activation while naïve activated B cells do not. B cells are capable of producing cytokines, but their cytokine production depends on their differentiation state and activation conditions. Hence, unlike T cells that can produce a large amount of cytokines upon activation, B cells require specific differentiation and activation conditions to produce cytokines. Many cytokines act on B cells as well. Here, we discuss several cytokines and their effects on B cells including: Interleukins, IL-7, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and Interferons, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ. These cytokines play important roles in the development, survival, differentiation and/or proliferation of B cells. Certain chemokines also play important roles in B cell function, namely antibody production. As an example, we discuss CCL28, a chemokine that directs the migration of plasma cells to mucosal sites. We conclude with a brief overview of B cells as cytokine producers and their likely functional consequences on the immune response.

  16. Induction of polyclonal B cell activation and differentiation by the AIDS retrovirus (HTLV-III/LAV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, S.E.; Schnittman, S.M.; Lane, H.C.; Folks, T.; Koenig, S.; Fauci, A.S.

    1986-03-05

    The immune systems of individuals infected with HTLV-III/LAV are characterized by a profound defect in cellular immunity together with paradoxical polyclonal B cell activation. The present study examined the direct effects of HTLV-III/LAV on B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells from healthy donors were incubated with a variety of HTLV-III/LAV isolates for 1 h and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation was measured at multiple time points. Responses ranged from 9000-28,000 cpm and peaked on day 4. This B cell activation was not enhanced by the addition of interleukin-2 to culture, was not synergistic with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, was not modulated by the addition of T lymphocytes to culture, and was not associated with B cell transformation. Supernatant Ig could first be detected in virus-activated cultures at day 4, plateaued by day 8, and yielded a mean of 12,500 ng IgG+IgM/ml/50,000 B cells. Thus, HTLV-III/LAV is a potent T cell independent B cell mitogen capable of inducing B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation comparable in magnitude to that of the most potent B cell activators. This biological property of HTLV-III/LAV may help explain the profound polyclonal B cell activation observed in patients with AIDS and may provide investigators with another probe for investigating the mechanisms of B cell activation.

  17. NKT Cell Responses to B Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxin Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a unique subset of CD1d-restricted T lymphocytes that express characteristics of both T cells and natural killer cells. NKT cells mediate tumor immune-surveillance; however, NKT cells are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in lymphoma patients. Many hematologic malignancies express CD1d molecules and co-stimulatory proteins needed to induce anti-tumor immunity by NKT cells, yet most tumors are poorly immunogenic. In this study, we sought to investigate NKT cell responses to B cell lymphoma. In the presence of exogenous antigen, both mouse and human NKT cell lines produce cytokines following stimulation by B cell lymphoma lines. NKT cell populations were examined ex vivo in mouse models of spontaneous B cell lymphoma, and it was found that during early stages, NKT cell responses were enhanced in lymphoma-bearing animals compared to disease-free animals. In contrast, in lymphoma-bearing animals with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, NKT cells were functionally impaired. In a mouse model of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a potent NKT cell agonist, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, resulted in a significant decrease in disease pathology. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that NKT cells from α-GalCer treated mice produced IFN-γ following α-GalCer restimulation, unlike NKT cells from vehicle-control treated mice. These data demonstrate an important role for NKT cells in the immune response to an aggressive hematologic malignancy like mantle cell lymphoma.

  18. [Eosinophilic pneumonia revealing B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikal, Siham; Sajiai, Hafsa; Serhane, Hind; Aitbatahar, Salma; Amro, Lamyae

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of eosinophilic pneumonia is rare and malignant etiology remains exceptional. Eosinophilic pneumonia etiology varies and is mainly dominated by allergic and drug causes. We report the case of a 61-year-old patient with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma revealed by eosinophilic pneumonia. The diagnosis of eosinophilic pneumonia was confirmed by eosinophil count of 56% in bronchoalveolar lavage. Immunohistochemical examination of bone marrow biopsy revealed malignant Small B cells non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  19. B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia in a Young Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirana Pailoor

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia [B-PLL] is a neoplasm of B prolymphocytes affecting the peripheral blood, bone marrow and spleen. The principal disease characteristics are massive splenomegaly with absent or minimal peripheral lymphadenopathy and a rapidly rising lymphocyte count. Here, we report a case of B-PLL in a 42 year old male who had come for routine health check up.

  20. Intrinsic Plasma Cell Differentiation Defects in B Cell Expansion with NF-κB and T Cell Anergy Patient B Cells

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    Swadhinya Arjunaraja

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available B cell Expansion with NF-κB and T cell Anergy (BENTA disease is a novel B cell lymphoproliferative disorder caused by germline, gain-of-function mutations in the lymphocyte scaffolding protein CARD11, which drives constitutive NF-κB signaling. Despite dramatic polyclonal expansion of naive and immature B cells, BENTA patients also present with signs of primary immunodeficiency, including markedly reduced percentages of class-switched/memory B cells and poor humoral responses to certain vaccines. Using purified naive B cells from our BENTA patient cohort, here we show that BENTA B cells exhibit intrinsic defects in B cell differentiation. Despite a profound in vitro survival advantage relative to normal donor B cells, BENTA patient B cells were severely impaired in their ability to differentiate into short-lived IgDloCD38hi plasmablasts or CD138+ long-lived plasma cells in response to various stimuli. These defects corresponded with diminished IgG antibody production and correlated with poor induction of specific genes required for plasma cell commitment. These findings provide important mechanistic clues that help explain both B cell lymphocytosis and humoral immunodeficiency in BENTA disease.

  1. B cells moderate inflammatory progression and enhance bacterial containment upon pulmonary challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John

    2007-06-01

    Though much is known about the function of T lymphocytes in the adaptive immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, comparably little is understood regarding the corresponding role of B lymphocytes. Indicating B cells as components of lymphoid neogenesis during pulmonary tuberculosis, we have identified ectopic germinal centers (GCs) in the lungs of infected mice. B cells in these pulmonary lymphoid aggregates express peanut agglutinin and GL7, two markers of GC B cells, as well as CXCR5, and migrate in response to the lymphoid-associated chemokine CXCL13 ex vivo. CXCL13 is negatively regulated by the presence of B cells, as its production is elevated in lungs of B cell-deficient (B cell(-/-)) mice. Upon aerosol with 100 CFU of M. tuberculosis Erdman, B cell(-/-) mice have exacerbated immunopathology corresponding with elevated pulmonary recruitment of neutrophils. Infected B cell(-/-) mice show increased production of IL-10 in the lungs, whereas IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-10R remain unchanged from wild type. B cell(-/-) mice have enhanced susceptibility to infection when aerogenically challenged with 300 CFU of M. tuberculosis corresponding with elevated bacterial burden in the lungs but not in the spleen or liver. Adoptive transfer of B cells complements the phenotypes of B cell(-/-) mice, confirming a role for B cells in both modulation of the host response and optimal containment of the tubercle bacillus. As components of ectopic GCs, moderators of inflammatory progression, and enhancers of local immunity against bacterial challenge, B cells may have a greater role in the host defense against M. tuberculosis than previously thought.

  2. Signaling and Dynamic Actin Responses of B Cells on Topographical Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, Christina; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells become activated upon physical contact with antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells. Binding of the B cell receptor with antigen initiates actin-mediated spreading of B cells, signaling cascades and eventually infection fighting antibodies. Lymphocytes, including B cells and T cells, have been shown to be responsive to the physical parameters of the contact surface, such as antigen mobility and substrate stiffness. However the roll of surface topography on lymphocyte function is unknown. Here we investigate the degree to which substrate topography controls actin-mediated spreading and B cell activation using nano-fabricated surfaces and live cell imaging. The model topographical system consists of 600 nanometer tall ridges with spacing varying between 800 nanometers and 5 micrometers. Using TIRF imaging we observe actin dynamics, B cell receptor motion and calcium signaling of B cells as they spread on the ridged substrates. We show that the spacing between ridges had a strong effect on the dynamics of actin and calcium influx on B cells. Our results indicate that B cells are highly sensitive to surface topography during cell spreading and signaling activation.

  3. Early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1) is critical for transcriptional control of SLAMF1 gene in human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Anton M; Putlyaeva, Lidia V; Covich, Milica; Klepikova, Anna V; Akulich, Kseniya A; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Korneev, Kirill V; Dmitriev, Sergey E; Polanovsky, Oleg L; Sidorenko, Svetlana P; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Kuprash, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family member 1 (SLAMF1)/CD150 is a co-stimulatory receptor expressed on a variety of hematopoietic cells, in particular on mature lymphocytes activated by specific antigen, costimulation and cytokines. Changes in CD150 expression level have been reported in association with autoimmunity and with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We characterized the core promoter for SLAMF1 gene in human B-cell lines and explored binding sites for a number of transcription factors involved in B cell differentiation and activation. Mutations of SP1, STAT6, IRF4, NF-kB, ELF1, TCF3, and SPI1/PU.1 sites resulted in significantly decreased promoter activity of varying magnitude, depending on the cell line tested. The most profound effect on the promoter strength was observed upon mutation of the binding site for Early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1). This mutation produced a 10-20 fold drop in promoter activity and pinpointed EBF1 as the master regulator of human SLAMF1 gene in B cells. We also identified three potent transcriptional enhancers in human SLAMF1 locus, each containing functional EBF1 binding sites. Thus, EBF1 interacts with specific binding sites located both in the promoter and in the enhancer regions of the SLAMF1 gene and is critical for its expression in human B cells.

  4. Molecular programming of B cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHeyzer-Williams, Michael; Okitsu, Shinji; Wang, Nathaniel; McHeyzer-Williams, Louise

    2011-12-09

    The development of high-affinity B cell memory is regulated through three separable phases, each involving antigen recognition by specific B cells and cognate T helper cells. Initially, antigen-primed B cells require cognate T cell help to gain entry into the germinal centre pathway to memory. Once in the germinal centre, B cells with variant B cell receptors must access antigens and present them to germinal centre T helper cells to enter long-lived memory B cell compartments. Following antigen recall, memory B cells require T cell help to proliferate and differentiate into plasma cells. A recent surge of information - resulting from dynamic B cell imaging in vivo and the elucidation of T follicular helper cell programmes - has reshaped the conceptual landscape surrounding the generation of memory B cells. In this Review, we integrate this new information about each phase of antigen-specific B cell development to describe the newly unravelled molecular dynamics of memory B cell programming.

  5. B-cell activation in cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) by FIP-virus-induced B-cell differentiation/survival factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomomi; Azuma, Natsuko; Hashida, Yoshikiyo; Satoh, Ryoichi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that antibody overproduction plays a role in the pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). However, only a few studies on the B-cell activation mechanism after FIP virus (FIPV) infection have been reported. The present study shows that: (1) the ratio of peripheral blood sIg(+) CD21(-) B-cells was higher in cats with FIP than in SPF cats, (2) the albumin-to-globulin ratio has negative correlation with the ratio of peripheral blood sIg(+) CD21(-) B-cell, (3) cells strongly expressing mRNA of the plasma cell master gene, B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1), were increased in peripheral blood in cats with FIP, (4) mRNA expression of B-cell differentiation/survival factors, IL-6, CD40 ligand, and B-cell-activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF), was enhanced in macrophages in cats with FIP, and (5) mRNAs of these B-cell differentiation/survival factors were overexpressed in antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE)-induced macrophages. These data suggest that virus-infected macrophages overproduce B-cell differentiation/survival factors, and these factors act on B-cells and promote B-cell differentiation into plasma cells in FIPV-infected cats.

  6. KINETICS OF B-CELL SUBPOPULATIONS IN PERIPHERAL LYMPHOID-TISSUES - EVIDENCE FOR THE PRESENCE OF PHENOTYPICALLY DISTINCT SHORT-LIVED AND LONG-LIVED B-CELL SUBSETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEENEN, GJ; KROESE, FGM

    1993-01-01

    A small proportion of the sIg+ B lymphocytes in peripheral lymphoid organs [22% in spleen and 6% in lymph node (LN)] in rat carries the Thy-1 antigen. These Thy-1 + B cells represent newly formed bone marrow (BM) derived (or immature) B cells. In this study we investigated the kinetic behavior of Th

  7. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-06

    CD19-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  8. Genetic alterations in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magić Zvonko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the patients with diagnosed B-NHL are classified into the same disease stage on the basis of clinical, histopathological, and immunological parameters, they respond significantly different to the applied treatment. This points out the possibility that within the same group of lymphoma there are different diseases at molecular level. For that reason many studies deal with the detection of gene alterations in lymphomas to provide a better framework for diagnosis and treatment of these hematological malignancies. Aim. To define genetic alterations in the B-NHL with highest possibilities for diagnostic purposes and molecular detection of MRD. Methods. Formalin fixed and paraffin embedded lymph node tissues from 45 patients were examined by different PCR techniques for the presence of IgH and TCR γ gene rearrangement; K-ras and H-ras mutations; c-myc amplification and bcl-2 translocation. There were 34 cases of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (B-NHL, 5 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (T-NHL and 6 cases of chronic lymphadenitis (CL. The mononuclear cell fraction of the peripheral blood of 12 patients with B-NHL was analyzed for the presence of monoclonality at the time of diagnosis and in 3 to 6 months time intervals after an autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Results. The monoclonality of B-lymphocytes, as evidenced by DNA fragment length homogeneity, was detected in 88 % (30/34 of B-NHL, but never in CL, T-NHL, or in normal PBL. Bcl-2 translocation was detected in 7/31 (22.6% B-NHL specimens, c-myc amplification 9/31 (29%, all were more than doubled, K-ras mutations in 1/31 (3.23% and H-ras mutations in 2/31 (6.45% of the examined B-NHL samples. In the case of LC and normal PBL, however, these gene alterations were not detected. All the patients (12 with B-NHL had dominant clone of B-lymphocyte in the peripheral blood at the time of diagnosis while only in 2 of 12 patients MRD was detected 3 or 6 months after

  9. Non-CLL-like monoclonal B-Cell lymphocytosis in the general population: Prevalence and phenotypic/genetic characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Nieto (Wendy); C. Teodosio (Cristina); A. López (Antonio); A. Rodríguez-Caballero (Arancha); A. Romero (Alfonso); P. Bárcena (Paloma); M.L. Gutierrez; A.W. Langerak (Anton); P. Fernandez-Navarro (Paulino); A. Orfao; J. Almeida (Julia); A.O.M.C.C.S. Santa Marta de Tormes; B.H.P.C.S. Garrido Sur; C.L.M.T.C.S. Ledesma; C.R.J.M.C.S. Alba de Tormes; C.L.R.C.S.F. Villalobos; D.V.P.J.C.S. Peñaranda; F.E.E.C.S. Pizarrales-Vidal; G.R.B.L.C.S. La Alberca; G.S.F.C.S. Periurbana Norte; G.M.J.C.S. Guijuelo; G.M.J.M.C.S. Vitigudino; J.R.M.J.C.S. Garrido Norte; J.C.T.B.C.S. Elena Ginel Diez; M.P.M.C.S. Fuentes de Oñoro; M.L.J.C.S. San Juan; M.D.M.P.C.S. Miguel Armijo; S.A.B.C.S. Aldeadavila de La Ribera; S.P.R.C.S. San Jose

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) indicates <5 × 109peripheral blood (PB) clonal B-cells/L in healthy individuals. In most cases, MBL cells show similar phenotypic/genetic features to chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells - CLL-like MBL - but little is known about

  10. Non-CLL-like monoclonal B-Cell lymphocytosis in the general population: Prevalence and phenotypic/genetic characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Nieto (Wendy); C. Teodosio (Cristina); A. López (Antonio); A. Rodríguez-Caballero (Arancha); A. Romero (Alfonso); P. Bárcena (Paloma); M.L. Gutierrez; A.W. Langerak (Ton); P. Fernandez-Navarro (Paulino); A. Orfao; J. Almeida (Julia); A.O.M.C.C.S. Santa Marta de Tormes; B.H.P.C.S. Garrido Sur; C.L.M.T.C.S. Ledesma; C.R.J.M.C.S. Alba de Tormes; C.L.R.C.S.F. Villalobos; D.V.P.J.C.S. Peñaranda; F.E.E.C.S. Pizarrales-Vidal; G.R.B.L.C.S. La Alberca; G.S.F.C.S. Periurbana Norte; G.M.J.C.S. Guijuelo; G.M.J.M.C.S. Vitigudino; J.R.M.J.C.S. Garrido Norte; J.C.T.B.C.S. Elena Ginel Diez; M.P.M.C.S. Fuentes de Oñoro; M.L.J.C.S. San Juan; M.D.M.P.C.S. Miguel Armijo; S.A.B.C.S. Aldeadavila de La Ribera; S.P.R.C.S. San Jose

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) indicates <5 × 109peripheral blood (PB) clonal B-cells/L in healthy individuals. In most cases, MBL cells show similar phenotypic/genetic features to chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells - CLL-like MBL - but little is known about non-CLL-li

  11. IL-4Rα-Associated Antigen Processing by B Cells Promotes Immunity in Nippostrongylus brasiliensis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, Jennifer C.; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie; McSorley, Henry J.; Ndlovu, Hlumani; Bobat, Saeeda; Kimberg, Matti; Kirstein, Frank; Cutler, Anthony J.; DeWals, Benjamin; Cunningham, Adam F.; Brombacher, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In this study, B cell function in protective TH2 immunity against N. brasiliensis infection was investigated. Protection against secondary infection depended on IL-4Rα and IL-13; but not IL-4. Protection did not associate with parasite specific antibody responses. Re-infection of B cell-specific IL-4Rα−/− mice resulted in increased worm burdens compared to control mice, despite their equivalent capacity to control primary infection. Impaired protection correlated with reduced lymphocyte IL-13 production and B cell MHC class II and CD86 surface expression. Adoptive transfer of in vivo N. brasiliensis primed IL-4Rα expressing B cells into naïve BALB/c mice, but not IL-4Rα or IL-13 deficient B cells, conferred protection against primary N. brasiliensis infection. This protection required MHC class II compatibility on B cells suggesting cognate interactions by B cells with CD4+ T cells were important to co-ordinate immunity. Furthermore, the rapid nature of these protective effects by B cells suggested non-BCR mediated mechanisms, such as via Toll Like Receptors, was involved, and this was supported by transfer experiments using antigen pulsed Myd88−/− B cells. These data suggest TLR dependent antigen processing by IL-4Rα-responsive B cells producing IL-13 contribute significantly to CD4+ T cell-mediated protective immunity against N. brasiliensis infection. PMID:24204255

  12. How B cells shape the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Chan, John

    2009-03-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B-cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against non-viral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against non-viral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought.

  13. Circulating clonotypic B cells in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiago, Leandro S; Perez-Andres, Martin; Balanzategui, Ana; Sarasquete, Maria E; Paiva, Bruno; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Barcena, Paloma; Sanchez, Maria Luz; Almeida, Julia; González, Marcos; San Miguel, Jesus F; Garcia-Sanz, Ramón; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The B-cell compartment in which multiple myeloma stem cells reside remains unclear. We investigated the potential presence of mature, surface-membrane immunoglobulin-positive B lymphocytes clonally related to the tumor bone marrow plasma cells among different subsets of peripheral blood B cells from ten patients (7 with multiple myeloma and 3 with monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance). The presence of clonotypic immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements was determined in multiple highly-purified fractions of peripheral blood B-lymphocytes including surface-membrane IgM(+) CD27(-) naïve B-lymphocytes, plus surface-membrane IgG(+), IgA(+) and IgM(+) memory CD27(+) B cells, and normal circulating plasma cells, in addition to (mono)clonal plasma cells, by a highly-specific and sensitive allele-specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction directed to the CDR3 sequence of the rearranged IGH gene of tumor plasma cells from individual patients. Our results showed systematic absence of clonotypic rearrangements in all the different B-cell subsets analyzed, including M-component isotype-matched memory B-lymphocytes, at frequencies undetermined significance are usually devoid of clonotypic B cells while the presence of immunophenotypically aberrant myeloma plasma cells in peripheral blood of myeloma patients is a relatively frequent finding.

  14. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipps, Thomas J.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Wu, Catherine J.; Croce, Carlo M.; Packham, Graham; Wierda, William G.; O’Brien, Susan; Gribben, John; Rai, Kanti

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a malignancy of CD5+ B cells that is characterized by the accumulation of small, mature-appearing lymphocytes in the blood, marrow and lymphoid tissues. Signalling via surface immunoglobulin, which constitutes the major part of the B cell receptor, and several genetic alterations play a part in CLL pathogenesis, in addition to interactions between CLL cells and other cell types, such as stromal cells, T cells and nurse-like cells in the lymph nodes. The clinical progression of CLL is heterogeneous and ranges from patients who require treatment soon after diagnosis to others who do not require therapy for many years, if at all. Several factors, including the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region gene (IGHV) mutational status, genomic changes, patient age and the presence of comorbidities, should be considered when defining the optimal management strategies, which include chemotherapy, chemoimmunotherapy and/or drugs targeting B cell receptor signalling or inhibitors of apoptosis, such as BCL-2. Research on the biology of CLL has profoundly enhanced our ability to identify patients who are at higher risk for disease progression and our capacity to treat patients with drugs that selectively target distinctive phenotypic or physiological features of CLL. How these and other advances have shaped our current understanding and treatment of patients with CLL is the subject of this Primer. PMID:28102226

  15. Early B-cell-specific inactivation of ATM synergizes with ectopic CyclinD1 expression to promote pre-germinal center B-cell lymphomas in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Lee, B J; Li, C; Dubois, R L; Hobeika, E; Bhagat, G; Zha, S

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B cells causes cell autonomous, clonal mature B-cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly, naive B-cell-specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. Although EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increases the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas toward pre-GC-derived small lymphocytic neoplasms, sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naive B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.e. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-GC B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL.

  16. Early B-cell Specific Inactivation of ATM Synergizes with Ectopic CyclinD1 Expression to Promote Pre-germinal center B-cell Lymphomas in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Lee, Brian J.; Li, Chen; Dubois, Richard L.; Hobeika, Elias; Bhagat, Govind; Zha, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (B-NHL), including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B-cells causes cell-autonomous, clonal mature B cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly naïve B cell specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. While EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increased the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas towards pre-GC derived small lymphocytic neoplasms sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naïve B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.g. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-germinal center B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL. PMID:25676421

  17. Myeloid infection links epithelial and B cell tropisms of Murid Herpesvirus-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Frederico

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-herpesviruses persist in lymphocytes and cause disease by driving their proliferation. Lymphocyte infection is therefore a key pathogenetic event. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 is a rhadinovirus that like the related Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus persists in B cells in vivo yet infects them poorly in vitro. Here we used MuHV-4 to understand how virion tropism sets the path to lymphocyte colonization. Virions that were highly infectious in vivo showed a severe post-binding block to B cell infection. Host entry was accordingly an epithelial infection and B cell infection a secondary event. Macrophage infection by cell-free virions was also poor, but improved markedly when virion binding improved or when macrophages were co-cultured with infected fibroblasts. Under the same conditions B cell infection remained poor; it improved only when virions came from macrophages. This reflected better cell penetration and correlated with antigenic changes in the virion fusion complex. Macrophages were seen to contact acutely infected epithelial cells, and cre/lox-based virus tagging showed that almost all the virus recovered from lymphoid tissue had passed through lysM(+ and CD11c(+ myeloid cells. Thus MuHV-4 reached B cells in 3 distinct stages: incoming virions infected epithelial cells; infection then passed to myeloid cells; glycoprotein changes then allowed B cell infection. These data identify new complexity in rhadinovirus infection and potentially also new vulnerability to intervention.

  18. Myeloid infection links epithelial and B cell tropisms of Murid Herpesvirus-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederico, Bruno; Milho, Ricardo; May, Janet S; Gillet, Laurent; Stevenson, Philip G

    2012-09-01

    Gamma-herpesviruses persist in lymphocytes and cause disease by driving their proliferation. Lymphocyte infection is therefore a key pathogenetic event. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) is a rhadinovirus that like the related Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus persists in B cells in vivo yet infects them poorly in vitro. Here we used MuHV-4 to understand how virion tropism sets the path to lymphocyte colonization. Virions that were highly infectious in vivo showed a severe post-binding block to B cell infection. Host entry was accordingly an epithelial infection and B cell infection a secondary event. Macrophage infection by cell-free virions was also poor, but improved markedly when virion binding improved or when macrophages were co-cultured with infected fibroblasts. Under the same conditions B cell infection remained poor; it improved only when virions came from macrophages. This reflected better cell penetration and correlated with antigenic changes in the virion fusion complex. Macrophages were seen to contact acutely infected epithelial cells, and cre/lox-based virus tagging showed that almost all the virus recovered from lymphoid tissue had passed through lysM(+) and CD11c(+) myeloid cells. Thus MuHV-4 reached B cells in 3 distinct stages: incoming virions infected epithelial cells; infection then passed to myeloid cells; glycoprotein changes then allowed B cell infection. These data identify new complexity in rhadinovirus infection and potentially also new vulnerability to intervention.

  19. Treatment of Relapsed and/or Chemotherapy Refractory B-cell Malignancy by CART19

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-26

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  20. B-CELLS SPECIFIC FOR BROMELAIN-TREATED ERYTHROCYTES ORE NOT DERIVED FROM ADULT-RAT BONE-MARROW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, NK; MEEDENDORP, B; AMMERLAAN, WAM; DEBOER, T; NIEUWENHUIS, P; KROESE, FGM

    1994-01-01

    As part of an evolutionary layered hematopoietic system, the B lymphocyte compartment consists of different lineages of B lymphocytes, which evolve sequentially during ontogeny. In mice, there is ample evidence for the existence of at least two lineages, a layer of B-1 cells (Ly-1 B cells) and the e

  1. Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase Promotes Persistence of Mature Anti-Insulin B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonami, Rachel H.; Sullivan, Allison M.; Case, James B.; Steinberg, Hannah E.; Hoek, Kristen L.; Khan, Wasif N.; Kendall, Peggy L.

    2014-01-01

    Autoreactive B lymphocytes are essential for the development of T cell–mediated type 1 diabetes (T1D). Cytoplasmic Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a key component of B cell signaling, and its deletion in T1D-prone NOD mice significantly reduces diabetes. However, the role of BTK in the survival and function of autoreactive B cells is not clear. To evaluate the contributions of BTK, we used mice in which B cells express an anti-insulin BCR (125Tg) and promote T1D, despite being anergic. Crossing Btk deficiency onto 125Tg mice reveals that, in contrast to immature B cells, mature anti-insulin B cells are exquisitely dependent upon BTK, because their numbers are reduced by 95%. BTK kinase domain inhibition reproduces this effect in mature anti-insulin B cells, with less impact at transitional stages. The increased dependence of anti-insulin B cells on BTK became particularly evident in an Igκ locus site–directed model, in which 50% of B cells edit their BCRs to noninsulin specificities; Btk deficiency preferentially depletes insulin binders from the follicular and marginal zone B cell subsets. The persistent few Btk-deficient anti-insulin B cells remain competent to internalize Ag and invade pancreatic islets. As such, loss of BTK does not significantly reduce diabetes incidence in 125Tg/NOD mice as it does in NOD mice with a normal B cell repertoire. Thus, BTK targeting may not impair autoreactive anti-insulin B cell function, yet it may provide protection in an endogenous repertoire by decreasing the relative availability of mature autoreactive B cells. PMID:24453243

  2. Syk Inhibition with Fostamatinib Leads to Transitional B Lymphocyte Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Paul M.; Wei, Chungwen; Roger, James; Schaefer-Cutillo, Julia; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Jung, John; Sanz, Iñaki; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Cell signaling initiated by the B cell receptor is critical to normal development of B lymphocytes, most notably at the transitional B cell stage. Inhibition of this signaling pathway with the syk inhibitor, fostamatinib, has produced significant efficacy in lymphoid malignancies and autoimmune conditions. Here, we demonstrate that short-term use of fostamatinib impairs B lymphocyte development at the transitional stage without affecting mature B cell populations. Additionally, IL-10 producing B cells remained relatively constant throughout the treatment period. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of action of B cell receptor inhibition in autoimmune disease. As the development of agents targeting B cell receptor signaling proceeds, monitoring for long-term consequences as well as functional evaluation of B cell subsets may further improve our understanding of this rapidly growing class of novel agents. PMID:22284392

  3. HIV-associated memory B cell perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Wan, Zhuang; Wu, Hao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Tong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-05-21

    Memory B-cell depletion, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and impaired vaccine responses are the hallmark of B cell perturbations inhuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Although B cells are not the targets for HIV infection, there is evidence for B cell, especially memory B cell dysfunction in HIV disease mediated by other cells or HIV itself. This review will focus on HIV-associated phenotypic and functional alterations in memory B cells. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanism underlying these perturbations and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on these perturbations.

  4. Plasma-cell-predominant B-cell pseudolymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nervi, Stephen J; Schwartz, R A

    2008-10-15

    A 46-year-old woman with no history of foreign travel presented to the New Jersey Medical School Dermatology Clinic in July, 2007, with pruritic ulcerating facial masses that had been present since October, 2006. Clinical and histopathologic findings were most consistent with a diagnosis of cutaneous plasma cell predominant B cell pseudolymphoma. An extensive search using special stains for an etiologic organism was negative. The term cutaneous pseudolymphoma has been coined to describe the accumulation of either T or B cell lymphocytes in the skin that is caused by a nonmalignant stimulus and encompasses several different terms depending on etiology. In cases of cutaneous pseudolymphoma where a cause is identified, treatment entails removing the underlying causative agent. Idiopathic cases tend to be recalcitrant to treatment.

  5. Relevance of P-glycoprotein on CXCR4(+) B cells to organ manifestation in highly active rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Shizuyo; Adachi, Tomoko; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Kawabe, Akio; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2017-07-11

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression on activated B cells is associated with active efflux of intracellular drugs, resulting in drug resistance. CXCR4 is associated with migration of B cells. This study was designed to elucidate the relevance of P-gp expression on CXCR4(+) B cells to clinical manifestations in refractory RA. CD19(+) B cells were analyzed using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. P-gp was highly expressed especially on CXCR4(+)CD19(+) B cells in RA. The proportion of P-gp-expressing CXCR4(+) B cells correlated with disease activity, estimated by Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI), and showed marked expansion in RA patients with high SDAI and extra-articular involvement. In highly active RA, massive infiltration of P-gp(+)CXCR4(+)CD19(+) B cells was noted in CXCL12-expressing inflammatory lesions of RA synovitis and RA-associated interstitial pneumonitis. In RA patient with active extra-articular involvement, intracellular dexamethasone level (IDL) in lymphocytes diminished with expansion of P-gp(+)CXCR4(+) CD19(+) B cells. Adalimumab reduced P-gp(+)CXCR4(+) CD19(+) B cells, increased IDL in lymphocytes, and improved the clinical manifestation and allowed tapering of concomitant medications. Expansion of P-gp(+)CXCR4(+) B cells seems to be associated with drug resistance, disease activity and progressive destructive arthritis with extra-articular involvement in RA.

  6. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor agonist FTY720-phosphate causes marginal zone B cell displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Kalpit A; Nichols, Elizabeth; Porter, Gene; Cui, Yan; Keohane, Carol Ann; Hajdu, Richard; Hale, Jeffery; Neway, William; Zaller, Dennis; Mandala, Suzanne

    2005-08-01

    FTY720 is an immunosuppressive agent that modulates lymphocyte trafficking. It is phosphorylated in vivo to FTY720-phosphate (FTY-P) and binds to a family of G protein-coupled receptors recognizing sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) as the natural ligand. It has previously been reported that FTY-P blocks egress of lymphocytes from the thymus and lymph nodes, resulting in peripheral blood lymphopenia. We now report that FTY-P also causes displacement of marginal zone (MZ) B cells to the splenic follicles, an effect that is similar to that observed after in vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide. This effect is specific to B cells in the MZ, as treatment with FTY-P does not cause redistribution of the resident macrophage population. A small but statistically significant decrease in the expression of beta1 integrin on MZ B cells was observed with FTY-P treatment. The redistribution of MZ B cells from the MZ sinuses does not abolish the ability of these cells to respond to the T-independent antigen, trinitrophenol-Ficoll. It has been proposed that the displacement of MZ B cells to the follicles is an indication of cell activation. Consistent with this, FTY-P caused an increase in percentage of MZ B cells expressing activation markers CD9, CD1d, and CD24. These results suggest that S1P receptors on MZ B cells are responsible for their mobilization to follicles.

  7. B-CELL SUBPOPULATIONS OF PERIPHERAL BLOOD IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Budkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct changes of B-cell subpopulations are observed in most systemic rheumatic diseases associated with polyclonal B cell hyperreactivity. Immunosuppressive and cytostatic therapy may also differentially influence B lymphocyte subsets in these. We studied subpopulations of B cells in systemic rheumatic patients along treatment with cytostatics. We analyzed B cell phenotypes in ninety-nine blood samples from the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 25, systemic sclerosis (n = 27, Sjogren’s syndrome (n = 47 in the course of their hospital treatment. Control group consisted of 49 healthy blood donors. Phenotyping of blood B-cell subpopulations was performed by means of flow cytometry (Beckman Coulter, USA. Naïve B-cell subpopulations in SLE patients who underwent cyclophosphan treatment, were underrepresented, if compared with normal control group, whereas plasmablast levels were increased irrespectively of medication mode. B cell population exhibits a natural heterogeneity, thus making it necessary to analyze distinct B cell subpopulations as independent functional units, when studying different rheumatic diseases. The levels of plasmablasts which are active antibody producers, remain high, despite immunosuppressive therapy performed in SLE. Thus, therapy targeted against certain B cell subsets, could be able to provide a more effective treatment for the patients with systemic rheumatic diseases.

  8. High levels of SOX5 decrease proliferative capacity of human B cells, but permit plasmablast differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzokhid Rakhmanov

    Full Text Available Currently very little is known about the differential expression and function of the transcription factor SOX5 during B cell maturation. We identified two new splice variants of SOX5 in human B cells, encoding the known L-SOX5B isoform and a new shorter isoform L-SOX5F. The SOX5 transcripts are highly expressed during late stages of B-cell differentiation, including atypical memory B cells, activated CD21low B cells and germinal center B cells of tonsils. In tonsillar sections SOX5 expression was predominantly polarized to centrocytes within the light zone. After in vitro stimulation, SOX5 expression was down-regulated during proliferation while high expression levels were permissible for plasmablast differentiation. Overexpression of L-SOX5F in human primary B lymphocytes resulted in reduced proliferation, less survival of CD138neg B cells, but comparable numbers of CD138+CD38hi plasmablasts compared to control cells. Thus, our findings describe for the first time a functional role of SOX5 during late B cell development reducing the proliferative capacity and thus potentially affecting the differentiation of B cells during the germinal center response.

  9. B cell activating factor (BAFF) selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qilin; Wang, Zhiding; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Gaizhi; Yu, Dandan; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Tianxiao; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Xiao, He; Wang, Renxi

    2017-02-12

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) regulates B cell maturation, survival, function, and plays a critical pathogenic role in autoimmune diseases. It remains unclear how BAFF affects IL-10(-)B cells versus regulatory B cells (Bregs) in inflammatory responses. In this study, we found that IL-10-expressing Bregs decreased in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. On blockade of the effects of BAFF with TACI-IgG, IL-10(+) Bregs were upregulated in MRL/lpr and EAE mice. In addition, BAFF expanded IL-10(+)B cells over IL-10(-)B cells under noninflammatory conditions in vitro, whereas it expanded IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses, such as stimulation with autoantigen and LPS. Finally, the selection of IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells by BAFF was dependent on BAFF receptors (BAFFR, TACI, and BCMA) that were upregulated by inflammatory responses. This study suggests that BAFF selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+) regulatory B cells via BAFF receptors in inflammatory responses.

  10. Mechanisms of Idelalisib-Associated Diarrhea in Patients With Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Indolent Non-hodgkin Lymphoma, or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-06

    Absence of Signs or Symptoms; B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Digestive System Signs and Symptoms; Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Human Lyb-2 homolog CD72 is a marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarting, R; Castello, R; Moldenhauer, G; Pezzutto, A; von Hoegen, I; Ludwig, W D; Parnes, J R; Dörken, B

    1992-11-01

    S-HCL 2 is the prototype antibody of the recently defined CD72 cluster (human Lyb-2). Under nonreducing conditions, S-HCL 2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) precipitates a glycoprotein of 80-86 kDa. Under reducing conditions, a dimer of 43 and 39 kDa, with core proteins of 40 and 36 kDa, is precipitated. CD72 expression in normal and malignant tissues is different from expression of all other previously described human B-cell antigens. In peripheral blood and bone marrow, the antigen appears to be present on all B lymphocytes, with the exception of plasma cells. In tissue, immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity for all known B-cell compartments; however, pulpa macrophages of the spleen and von Kupffer cells exhibited distinct positivity for CD72 also. Among 83 malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas examined by immunohistochemistry (alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique), all 54 B-cell lymphomas, including precursor B-cell lymphomas, Burkitt's lymphomas, germinal center lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemias, and hairy cell leukemias, were CD72 positive, but no T-cell lymphomas were. Flow cytometry study of more than 80 mainly acute leukemias (52 B-cell leukemias) showed reactivity with S-HCL 2 mAb over the full range of B-cell differentiation. In particular, very early B cells in cytoplasmic Ig (cIg)-negative, CD19-positive pre-pre-B-cell leukemias and hybrid leukemias (mixed myeloid and B-cell type) were consistently positive for CD72 on the cell surface. Therefore, CD72 may become an important marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

  12. Targeting of Ly9 (CD229) Disrupts Marginal Zone and B1 B Cell Homeostasis and Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Marta; Romero, Xavier; Sintes, Jordi; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo

    2016-01-15

    Marginal zone (MZ) and B1 B cells have the capacity to respond to foreign Ags more rapidly than conventional B cells, providing early immune responses to blood-borne pathogens. Ly9 (CD229, SLAMF3), a member of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family receptors, has been implicated in the development and function of innate T lymphocytes. In this article, we provide evidence that in Ly9-deficient mice splenic transitional 1, MZ, and B1a B cells are markedly expanded, whereas development of B lymphocytes in bone marrow is unaltered. Consistent with an increased number of these B cell subsets, we detected elevated levels of IgG3 natural Abs and a striking increase of T-independent type II Abs after immunization with 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl-Ficoll in the serum of Ly9-deficient mice. The notion that Ly9 could be a negative regulator of innate-like B cell responses was supported by the observation that administering an mAb directed against Ly9 to wild-type mice selectively eliminated splenic MZ B cells and significantly reduced the numbers of B1 and transitional 1 B cells. In addition, Ly9 mAb dramatically diminished in vivo humoral responses and caused a selective downregulation of the CD19/CD21/CD81 complex on B cells and concomitantly an impaired B cell survival and activation in an Fc-independent manner. We conclude that altered signaling caused by the absence of Ly9 or induced by anti-Ly9 may negatively regulate development and function of innate-like B cells by modulating B cell activation thresholds. The results suggest that Ly9 could serve as a novel target for the treatment of B cell-related diseases.

  13. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors.

  14. Ikaros in B cell development and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MacLean; Sellars; Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor,Ikaros,is a central regulator of hematopoiesis.It is required for the development of the earliest B cell progenitors and at later stages for VDJ recombination and B cell receptor expression.Mature B cells rely on Ikaros to set the activation threshold for various stimuli,and to choose the correct antibody isotype during class switch recombination.Thus,Ikaros contributes to nearly every level of B cell differentiation and function.

  15. Frequent occurrence of highly expanded but unrelated B-cell clones in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah N; Debes Marun, Carina S; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Gibson, Spencer B; Venner, Christopher P; Johnston, James B; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2013-01-01

    Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM) includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16%) being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%), suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in MM and the

  16. Frequent occurrence of highly expanded but unrelated B-cell clones in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitra Kriangkum

    Full Text Available Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3 peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16% being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%, suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in

  17. Cloning non-transformed sheep B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, P J; Beskorwayne, T; Godson, D L; Popowych, Y; Hein, W

    2000-04-03

    The capacity to clone B cells and establish permanent B cell lines has greatly facilitated a wide variety of studies characterising the growth, differentiation, and gene expression of murine and human B cells. Similar investigations of B cell biology for other species have been severely restricted by an inability to culture or clone B cells. This is the first report of a method to clone non-transformed sheep B cells using a culture system based on murine CD154 and a combination of human gamma chain-common cytokines. Sheep Peyer's patch B cells were cultured for 120 days and then cloned by limiting dilution culture. The parental B cell culture contained both surface immunoglobulin (sIg)M(+) and sIgG1(+) B cells and both types of B cell were cloned. Clonality was confirmed by PCR analysis of Ig heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) expression and DNA sequencing of HC V genes. There was agreement between the PCR and flow cytometric analyses of HC isotype expression on the B cell clones but the available monoclonal antibodies specific for sheep lambda and kappa LC did not react with all clones. Soluble Ig was detected in the culture supernatant of sIgG1(+) clones but not sIgM(+) clones. The B cell clones remained dependent upon CD154 and gamma chain-common cytokine co-stimulation for sustained growth and maintained stable Ig expression. The cloning of non-transformed sheep B cells should provide a valuable tool for studying sheep B cell biology, establishing Ig HC- and LC-specific monoclonal antibodies, analysing the B cell Ig repertoire, and may be used to produce sheep monoclonal antibodies.

  18. Inducible resistance to Fas—mediated apoptosis in B cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ROTHSTEINTHOMASL

    2000-01-01

    Apoptosis produced in B cells through Fas(APO-1,CD95) triggering is regulated by signals derived from other surface receptors:CD40 engagement produces upregulation of Fas expression and marked susceptibility to Fas-induced cell death,whereas antigen receptor engagement,or IL-4R engagement,inhibits Fas killing and in so doing induces a state of Fas-resistance,even in otherwise sensitive,CD40-stimulated targets.Surface immunoglobulin and IL-4R utilize at least partially distinct path ways to produce Fas-resistance that differentially depend on PKC and STAT6,respectively.Further,surface immunoglobulin signaling for inducible Fas-resistance bypasses Btk,requires NF-κB,and entails new macromolecular synthesis.Terminal effectors of B cell Fas-resistance include the known anti-apoptotic gene products,Bcl-XL and FLIP,and a novel anti-apoptotic gene that encodes FAIM (Fas Apoptosis Inhibitory Molecule).faim was identified by differential display and exists in two alternatively spliced forms;faim-S is broadly expressed,but faim-L expression is tissue-specific.The FAIM sequence is highly evolu tionarily conserved,suggesting an important role for this molecule throughout phylogeny.Inducible resistance to Fas killing is hypothesized to protect foreign antigen-specific B cells during potentially hazardous interactions with FasL-bearing T cells,whereas autoreactive B cells fail to become Fas-resistant and are deleted via Fas-dependent cytotoxicity.Inadvertent or aberrant acquisition of Fas-resistance may permit autoreactive B cells to escape Fas deletion,and malignant lymphocytes to impede anti-tumor immunity.

  19. Inducible resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis in B cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Apoptosis produced in B cells through Fas (APO-1, CD95) triggering is regulated by signals derived from other surface receptors: CD40 engagement produces upregulation of Fas expression and marked susceptibility to Fas-induced cell death, whereas antigen receptor engagement, or IL-4R engagement, inhibits Fas killing and in so doing induces a state of Fas-resistance, even in otherwise sensitive, CD40-stimulated targets. Surface immunoglobulin and IL-4R utilize at least partially distinct pathways to produce Fas-resistance that differentially depend on PKC and STAT6, respectively. Further, surface immunoglobulin signaling for inducible Fas-resistance bypasses Btk, requires NF-кB, and entails new macromolecular synthesis. Terminal effectors of B cell Fas-resistance include the known anti-apoptotic gene products, Bcl-xL and FLIP, and a novel anti-apoptotic gene that encodes FAIM (Fas Apoptosis Inhibitory Molecule). faim was identified by differential display and exists in two alternatively spliced forms; faim-S is broadly expressed, but faim-L expression is tissue-specific. The FAIM sequence is highly evolutionarily conserved, suggesting an important role for this molecule throughout phylogeny. Inducible resistance to Fas killing is hypothesized to protect foreign antigen-specific B cells during potentially hazardous interactions with FasL-bearing T cells, whereas autoreactive B cells fail to become Fas-resistant and are deleted via Fas-dependent cytotoxicity. Inadvertent or aberrant acquisition of Fas-resistance may permit autoreactive B cells to escape Fas deletion, and malignant lymphocytes to impede anti-tumor immunity.

  20. B Cell Autonomous TLR Signaling and Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut; Rawlings, David J

    2009-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases and the recognition of importance of B cells in these disorders has grown dramatically in association with the remarkable success of B-cell depletion as a treatment for autoimmunity. The precise mechanisms that promote alterations in B cell tolerance remain incompletely defined. There is increasing evidence, however, that TLRs play a major role in these events. Stimulation of B cells via the TLR pathway not only leads to an increase in antibody production but also promotes additional changes including cytokine production and upregulation of activation markers increasing the effectiveness of B cells as APCs. Understanding the role of TLRs in systemic autoimmunity will not only provide insight into the disease pathogenesis but may also lead to the development of novel therapies. This article gives an overview of TLR signaling in B cells and the possible involvement of such signals in autoimmune diseases. PMID:18295736

  1. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  2. Antigen-specific memory B cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHeyzer-Williams, Louise J; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G

    2005-01-01

    Helper T (Th) cell-regulated B cell immunity progresses in an ordered cascade of cellular development that culminates in the production of antigen-specific memory B cells. The recognition of peptide MHC class II complexes on activated antigen-presenting cells is critical for effective Th cell selection, clonal expansion, and effector Th cell function development (Phase I). Cognate effector Th cell-B cell interactions then promote the development of either short-lived plasma cells (PCs) or germinal centers (GCs) (Phase II). These GCs expand, diversify, and select high-affinity variants of antigen-specific B cells for entry into the long-lived memory B cell compartment (Phase III). Upon antigen rechallenge, memory B cells rapidly expand and differentiate into PCs under the cognate control of memory Th cells (Phase IV). We review the cellular and molecular regulators of this dynamic process with emphasis on the multiple memory B cell fates that develop in vivo.

  3. Rationale for B cell targeting in SLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Iñaki

    2014-01-01

    B cells are central pathogenic players in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and multiple other autoinmune diseases through antibody production as well as antibody independent functiona. At the same time, B cells are known to play important regulatory functions that may protect against autoimmune manifestations. Yet, the functional role of different B cell populations and their contribution to disease remain to be understood. The advent of agents that specifically target B cells, in particular anti-CD20 and ant-BLyS antibodies, have demonstrated the efficacy of this approach for the treatment of human autoimmunity. The analysis of patients treated with these and other B cell agents provide a unique opportunity to understand the correlates of clinical response and the significance of different B cell subsets. Here we discuss this information and how it could be used to better understand SLE and improve the rational design of B cell directed therapies in this disease. PMID:24763533

  4. Transcription factor ABF-1 suppresses plasma cell differentiation but facilitates memory B cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yi-Kai; Lin, I-Ying; Su, Shin-Tang; Wang, Kuan-Hsiung; Yang, Shii-Yi; Tsai, Dong-Yan; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Lin, Kuo-I

    2014-09-01

    Ag-primed B cells that result from an immune response can form either memory B cells or Ab-secreting plasma cells; however, the molecular machinery that controls this cellular fate is poorly understood. In this study, we show that activated B cell factor-1 (ABF-1), which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor, participates in this regulation. ABF-1 was prevalently expressed in purified memory B cells and induced by T follicular helper cell-mediated signals. ABF-1 expression declined by the direct repression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 during differentiation. Ectopic expression of ABF-1 reduced the formation of Ab-secreting cells in an in vitro differentiation system of human memory B cells. Accordingly, knockdown of ABF-1 potentiates the formation of Ab-secreting cells. A transgenic mouse that expresses inducible ABF-1 in a B cell-specific manner was generated to demonstrate that the formation of germinal center and memory B cells was augmented by induced ABF-1 in an immune response, whereas the Ag-specific plasma cell response was dampened. This effect was associated with the ability of ABF-1 to limit cell proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that ABF-1 facilitates formation of memory B cells but prevents plasma cell differentiation.

  5. Interactions between fibroblastic reticular cells and B cells promote mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Karempudi, Praneeth; Luther, Sanjiv A; Ludewig, Burkhard; Harris, Nicola L

    2017-08-28

    Lymphatic growth (lymphangiogenesis) within lymph nodes functions to promote dendritic cell entry and effector lymphocyte egress in response to infection or inflammation. Here we demonstrate a crucial role for lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LTβR) signaling to fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) by lymphotoxin-expressing B cells in driving mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis following helminth infection. LTβR ligation on fibroblastic reticular cells leads to the production of B-cell-activating factor (BAFF), which synergized with interleukin-4 (IL-4) to promote the production of the lymphangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF)-A and VEGF-C, by B cells. In addition, the BAFF-IL-4 synergy augments expression of lymphotoxin by antigen-activated B cells, promoting further B cell-fibroblastic reticular cell interactions. These results underlie the importance of lymphotoxin-dependent B cell-FRC cross talk in driving the expansion of lymphatic networks that function to promote and maintain immune responsiveness.The growth of lymph nodes in response to infection requires lymphangiogenesis. Dubey et al. show that the mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis upon helminth infection depends on the signaling loop between the B and fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), whereby the FRCs respond to lymphotoxin secreted by B cells by releasing B cell activating factor.

  6. Innate Response Activator (IRA) B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, Nico; Cantisani, Rocco; Pancotto, Laura; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rosa, Domenico; Manetti, Andrea; Romano, Antonio; Montagnani, Francesca; Bertholet, Sylvie; Castellino, Flora; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA) B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁺ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁻ B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM⁺IgD⁺, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils.

  7. Innate Response Activator (IRA B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Chiappini

    Full Text Available Innate response activator (IRA B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁺ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁻ B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM⁺IgD⁺, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils.

  8. The B cell antigen receptor and overexpression of MYC can cooperate in the genesis of B cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Refaeli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A variety of circumstantial evidence from humans has implicated the B cell antigen receptor (BCR in the genesis of B cell lymphomas. We generated mouse models designed to test this possibility directly, and we found that both the constitutive and antigen-stimulated state of a clonal BCR affected the rate and outcome of lymphomagenesis initiated by the proto-oncogene MYC. The tumors that arose in the presence of constitutive BCR differed from those initiated by MYC alone and resembled chronic B cell lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma (B-CLL, whereas those that arose in response to antigen stimulation resembled large B-cell lymphomas, particularly Burkitt lymphoma (BL. We linked the genesis of the BL-like tumors to antigen stimulus in three ways. First, in reconstruction experiments, stimulation of B cells by an autoantigen in the presence of overexpressed MYC gave rise to BL-like tumors that were, in turn, dependent on both MYC and the antigen for survival and proliferation. Second, genetic disruption of the pathway that mediates signaling from the BCR promptly killed cells of the BL-like tumors as well as the tumors resembling B-CLL. And third, growth of the murine BL could be inhibited by any of three distinctive immunosuppressants, in accord with the dependence of the tumors on antigen-induced signaling. Together, our results provide direct evidence that antigenic stimulation can participate in lymphomagenesis, point to a potential role for the constitutive BCR as well, and sustain the view that the constitutive BCR gives rise to signals different from those elicited by antigen. The mouse models described here should be useful in exploring further the pathogenesis of lymphomas, and in preclinical testing of new therapeutics.

  9. Dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulation frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Arévalo, Héctor; Castaño, Diana; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny; Rojas, Mauricio; Vásquez, Gloria; Correa, Luis A; Ramírez-Pineda, José R; Yassin, Lina M

    2016-04-01

    Lymphocytes, the cellular effectors of adaptive immunity, are involved in the chronic inflammatory process known as atherosclerosis. Proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been ascribed to B cells. However, information regarding the role of B cells during atherosclerosis is scarce. Both the frequency and the phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied by flow cytometry in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice fed a high-fat (HFD) or control diet. Whereas the proportion of follicular cells was decreased, transitional 1-like cells were increased in mice with advanced atherosclerotic lesions (apoE(-/-) HFD). B cells in atherosclerotic mice were more activated, indicated by their higher surface expression of CD80, CD86, CD40 and CD95 and increased serum IgG1 levels. In the aorta, a decreased frequency of B cells was observed in mice with advanced atherosclerosis. Low expression of CD19 was observed on B cells from the spleen, aorta and lymph nodes of apoE(-/-) HFD mice. This alteration correlated with serum levels of IgG1 and cholesterol. A reduction in CD19 expression was induced in splenic cells from young apoE(-/-) mice cultured with lipemic serum. These results show that mice with advanced atherosclerosis display a variety of alterations in the frequency and phenotype of B lymphocytes, most of which are associated with dyslipidemia.

  10. A comparison between protein profiles of B cell subpopulations and mantle cell lymphoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehtiö Janne

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background B-cell lymphomas are thought to reflect different stages of B-cell maturation. Based on cytogenetics and molecular markers, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is presumed to derive predominantly from naïve, pre-germinal centre (pre-GC B lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to investigate the similarity between MCL cells and different B-cell compartments on a protein expression level. Methods Subpopulations of B cells representing the germinal centre (GC, the pre-GC mantle zone and the post-GC marginal zone were isolated from tonsils using automated magnetic cell sorting (AutoMACS of cells based on their expression of CD27 and IgD. Protein profiling of the B cell subsets, of cell lines representing different lymphomas and of primary MCL samples was performed using top-down proteomics profiling by surface-enhanced laser detection/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS. Results Quantitative MS data of significant protein peaks (p-value Conclusion AutoMACS sorting generates sufficient purity to enable a comparison between protein profiles of B cell subpopulations and malignant B lymphocytes applying SELDI-TOF-MS. Further validation with an increased number of patient samples and identification of differentially expressed proteins would enable a search for possible treatment targets that are expressed during the early development of MCL.

  11. In vivo, multimodal imaging of B cell distribution and response to antibody immunotherapy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L J Thorek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: B cell depletion immunotherapy has been successfully employed to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In recent years, increasing attention has been directed towards also using B-cell depletion therapy as a treatment option in autoimmune disorders. However, it appears that the further development of these approaches will depend on a methodology to determine the relation of B-cell depletion to clinical response and how individual patients should be dosed. Thus far, patients have generally been followed by quantification of peripheral blood B cells, but it is not apparent that this measurement accurately reflects systemic B cell dynamics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cellular imaging of the targeted population in vivo may provide significant insight towards effective therapy and a greater understanding of underlying disease mechanics. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles in concert with near infrared (NIR fluorescent dyes were used to label and track primary C57BL/6 B cells. Following antibody mediated B cell depletion (anti-CD79, NIR-only labeled cells were expeditiously cleared from the circulation and spleen. Interestingly, B cells labeled with both SPIO and NIR were not depleted in the spleen. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Whole body fluorescent tracking of B cells enabled noninvasive, longitudinal imaging of both the distribution and subsequent depletion of B lymphocytes in the spleen. Quantification of depletion revealed a greater than 40% decrease in splenic fluorescent signal-to-background ratio in antibody treated versus control mice. These data suggest that in vivo imaging can be used to follow B cell dynamics, but that the labeling method will need to be carefully chosen. SPIO labeling for tracking purposes, generally thought to be benign, appears to interfere with B cell functions and requires further examination.

  12. Higher incidence of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphocyte transformation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Caroline Winther; Andreasen, Charlotte; Gehr, Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    and methods MS patients and controls were examined for their B-cell subsets and during 16 weeks for spontaneous lymphocyte transforming events. Results MS patients had normal distribution of B-cell subsets, but a significantly higher incidence of B-cell transforming events, which occurred with kinetics...

  13. CLONAL CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA-LIKE B-LYMPHOCYTES IN THE BLOOD OF PATIENTS WITH CUTANEOUS T-CELL DISORDERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAENEN, S; VADER, PCV; BLOM, N; PIETENS, J; HOLLEMA, H; SMIT, JW

    1993-01-01

    A population of B cells with characteristics of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia was found in the peripheral blood of four patients who presented with cutaneous infiltration of atypical CD4+ T cells with cerebriform nuclei. The B cells had a low density of immunoglobulin on their surface membrane, expr

  14. Spondylarthritis in the absence of B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Dominique; Kruithof, Elli; Breban, Maxime; Tak, Paul P

    2008-03-01

    The highly effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis by B cell depletion and the presence of B cells in the peripheral and axial lesions of patients with spondylarthritis (SpA) raise the question as to whether B lymphocytes could also be an appropriate therapeutic target in the latter disease. We describe 2 male HLA-B27-positive patients who had active SpA despite absence of B cells. One patient developed SpA with sacroiliitis and asymmetric oligoarthritis after having been diagnosed as having severe Bruton agammaglobulinemia. Since extensive investigations excluded an infectious origin of the SpA, this case illustrates that functional B cells and/or gamma globulins are not strictly required for SpA pathogenesis. The second patient had severe axial and peripheral SpA that was treated successfully with etanercept. After discontinuation of etanercept treatment because of non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma, both axial and peripheral SpA symptoms relapsed rapidly, and this exacerbation of articular disease activity was not modulated by successful B cell depletion therapy for the lymphoma. Although case reports have obvious limitations, our clinical observations provide evidence that active SpA can occur in the absence of functional mature B cells and thus emphasize the need for systematic studies of the exact role and function of B lymphocytes in this disease.

  15. Targeting of Ly9 (CD229) disrupts marginal zone and B1 B cell homeostasis and antibody responses1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Marta; Romero, Xavier; Sintes, Jordi; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Marginal zone and B1 B-cells have the capacity to respond to foreign antigens more rapidly than conventional B-cells, providing early immune responses to blood-borne pathogens. Ly9 (CD229, SLAMF3), a member of the SLAM family receptors, has been implicated in the development and function of innate T lymphocytes. Here, we provide evidence that in Ly9-deficient mice splenic transitional T1, marginal zone and B1a B cells are markedly expanded, whilst development of B lymphocytes in bone marrow is unaltered. Consistent with an increased number of these B cell subsets, we detect elevated levels of IgG3 natural antibodies, and a striking increase of T-independent type II antibodies following immunization with TNP-Ficoll in the serum of Ly9-deficient mice. The notion that Ly9 could be a negative regulator of innate-like B cell responses was supported by the observation that administering a mAb directed against Ly9 to WT mice selectively eliminated splenic marginal zone B cells and significantly reduced the numbers of B1 and transitional T1 B cells. Additionally, Ly9 mAb dramatically diminished in vivo humoral responses and caused a selective down-regulation of the CD19/CD21/CD81 complex on B cells and concomitantly an impaired B cell survival and activation in a Fc-independent manner. We conclude that altered signaling due to the absence of Ly9 or induced by anti-Ly9 may negatively regulate development and function of innate-like B cells by modulating B cell activation thresholds. The results suggest that Ly9 could serve as a novel target for the treatment of B cell related diseases. PMID:26667173

  16. Enforced expression of the transcriptional coactivator OBF1 impairs B cell differentiation at the earliest stage of development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Bordon

    Full Text Available OBF1, also known as Bob.1 or OCA-B, is a B lymphocyte-specific transcription factor which coactivates Oct1 and Oct2 on B cell specific promoters. So far, the function of OBF1 has been mainly identified in late stage B cell populations. The central defect of OBF1 deficient mice is a severely reduced immune response to T cell-dependent antigens and a lack of germinal center formation in the spleen. Relatively little is known about a potential function of OBF1 in developing B cells. Here we have generated transgenic mice overexpressing OBF1 in B cells under the control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain promoter and enhancer. Surprisingly, these mice have greatly reduced numbers of follicular B cells in the periphery and have a compromised immune response. Furthermore, B cell differentiation is impaired at an early stage in the bone marrow: a first block is observed during B cell commitment and a second differentiation block is seen at the large preB2 cell stage. The cells that succeed to escape the block and to differentiate into mature B cells have post-translationally downregulated the expression of transgene, indicating that expression of OBF1 beyond the normal level early in B cell development is deleterious. Transcriptome analysis identified genes deregulated in these mice and Id2 and Id3, two known negative regulators of B cell differentiation, were found to be upregulated in the EPLM and preB cells of the transgenic mice. Furthermore, the Id2 and Id3 promoters contain octamer-like sites, to which OBF1 can bind. These results provide evidence that tight regulation of OBF1 expression in early B cells is essential to allow efficient B lymphocyte differentiation.

  17. Bruton's tyrosine kinase: from X-linked agammaglobulinemia toward targeted therapy for B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponader, Sabine; Burger, Jan A

    2014-06-10

    Discovery of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) mutations as the cause for X-linked agammaglobulinemia was a milestone in understanding the genetic basis of primary immunodeficiencies. Since then, studies have highlighted the critical role of this enzyme in B-cell development and function, and particularly in B-cell receptor signaling. Because its deletion affects mostly B cells, BTK has become an attractive therapeutic target in autoimmune disorders and B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is the most advanced BTK inhibitor in clinical testing, with ongoing phase III clinical trials in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma. In this article, we discuss key discoveries related to BTK and clinically relevant aspects of BTK inhibitors, and we provide an outlook into clinical development and open questions regarding BTK inhibitor therapy.

  18. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase: From X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia Toward Targeted Therapy for B-Cell Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponader, Sabine; Burger, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) mutations as the cause for X-linked agammaglobulinemia was a milestone in understanding the genetic basis of primary immunodeficiencies. Since then, studies have highlighted the critical role of this enzyme in B-cell development and function, and particularly in B-cell receptor signaling. Because its deletion affects mostly B cells, BTK has become an attractive therapeutic target in autoimmune disorders and B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is the most advanced BTK inhibitor in clinical testing, with ongoing phase III clinical trials in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma. In this article, we discuss key discoveries related to BTK and clinically relevant aspects of BTK inhibitors, and we provide an outlook into clinical development and open questions regarding BTK inhibitor therapy. PMID:24778403

  19. Activation of resting human B cells by helper T-cell clone supernatant: characterization of a human B-cell-activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Gougeon, M L; Moreau, J L; Reinherz, E L; Thèze, J

    1987-12-01

    The effects of helper T-cell clone supernatants on resting human B cells were investigated. Four different helper T-cell clones (two T4+ and two T8+) were stimulated by anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies on Sepharose beads or anti-T11(2) plus anti-T11(3) monoclonal antibodies. The supernatants from these activated clones induced the proliferation of highly purified resting B lymphocytes from the peripheral blood. The B cells exhibited a cell size and a surface-antigen pattern (4F2 antigen and transferrin receptor) of phase G0 B cells, and they were functionally resting. In response to T-cell supernatants a large fraction of the B cells enlarged and expressed 4F2 antigens and transferrin receptors. In gel filtration, the corresponding activity migrated with an apparent Mr of 12,000-15,000. Our findings strongly support the existence of a human B-cell-activating factor acting on resting B cells and causing them to enter phase G1 of the cell cycle.

  20. [Significance of regulatory B cells in nosogenesis of immune thrombocytopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Fang; Ding, Kai Yang; Dai, Lan

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the role of regulatory B cells (Breg) in pathogenesis of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and its clinical significance. A total of 35 ITP patients and 20 normal controls were enrolled in this study. The expression of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells was detected by flow cytometry and the expression of IL-10 mRNA and TGF-β1 mRNA was assayed by RT-PCR. The results indicated that the expression level of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells in peripheral blood of newly diagnosed ITP patients was obviously lower than that in normal controls (P < 0.05); the expression level of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells in ITP patients with increased platelet count after treatment was higher than that before treatment (P < 0.05); the expression level of IL-10 mRNA in newly diagnosed ITP patients was significantly lower than that the in normal controls (P < 0.05), the expression level of TGF-β1 mRNA in newly diagnosed ITP patients increases as compared with normal controls (P < 0.05), after treatment with DXM the expression of IL-10 mRNA was enhanced, the expression of TGF-β1 mRNA was reduced as compared with expression level before treatment (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the Breg cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ITP via humoral immunity and its regulation of T lymphocytes.

  1. IL-35-producing B cells are critical regulators of immunity during autoimmune and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ping; Roch, Toralf; Lampropoulou, Vicky; O'Connor, Richard A; Stervbo, Ulrik; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Ries, Stefanie; Dang, Van Duc; Jaimes, Yarúa; Daridon, Capucine; Li, Rui; Jouneau, Luc; Boudinot, Pierre; Wilantri, Siska; Sakwa, Imme; Miyazaki, Yusei; Leech, Melanie D; McPherson, Rhoanne C; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus; Hoehlig, Kai; Meinl, Edgar; Grützkau, Andreas; Grün, Joachim R; Horn, Katharina; Kühl, Anja A; Dörner, Thomas; Bar-Or, Amit; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Anderton, Stephen M; Fillatreau, Simon

    2014-03-20

    B lymphocytes have critical roles as positive and negative regulators of immunity. Their inhibitory function has been associated primarily with interleukin 10 (IL-10) because B-cell-derived IL-10 can protect against autoimmune disease and increase susceptibility to pathogens. Here we identify IL-35-producing B cells as key players in the negative regulation of immunity. Mice in which only B cells did not express IL-35 lost their ability to recover from the T-cell-mediated demyelinating autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In contrast, these mice displayed a markedly improved resistance to infection with the intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as shown by their superior containment of the bacterial growth and their prolonged survival after primary infection, and upon secondary challenge, compared to control mice. The increased immunity found in mice lacking IL-35 production by B cells was associated with a higher activation of macrophages and inflammatory T cells, as well as an increased function of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs). During Salmonella infection, IL-35- and IL-10-producing B cells corresponded to two largely distinct sets of surface-IgM(+)CD138(hi)TACI(+)CXCR4(+)CD1d(int)Tim1(int) plasma cells expressing the transcription factor Blimp1 (also known as Prdm1). During EAE, CD138(+) plasma cells were also the main source of B-cell-derived IL-35 and IL-10. Collectively, our data show the importance of IL-35-producing B cells in regulation of immunity and highlight IL-35 production by B cells as a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune and infectious diseases. This study reveals the central role of activated B cells, particularly plasma cells, and their production of cytokines in the regulation of immune responses in health and disease.

  2. Differential Effects of Tacrolimus versus Sirolimus on the Proliferation, Activation and Differentiation of Human B Cells.

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    Opas Traitanon

    Full Text Available The direct effect of immunosuppressive drugs calcineurin inhibitor (Tacrolimus, TAC and mTOR inhibitor (Sirolimus, SRL on B cell activation, differentiation and proliferation is not well documented. Purified human B cells from healthy volunteers were stimulated through the B Cell Receptor with Anti-IgM + anti-CD40 + IL21 in the absence / presence of TAC or SRL. A variety of parameters of B cell activity including activation, differentiation, cytokine productions and proliferation were monitored by flow cytometry. SRL at clinically relevant concentrations (6 ng/ml profoundly inhibited CD19(+ B cell proliferation compared to controls whereas TAC at similar concentrations had a minimal effect. CD27(+ memory B cells were affected more by SRL than naïve CD27- B cells. SRL effectively blocked B cell differentiation into plasma cells (CD19(+CD138(+ and Blimp1(+/Pax5(low cells even at low dose (2 ng/ml, and totally eliminated them at 6 ng/ml. SRL decreased absolute B cell counts, but the residual responding cells acquired an activated phenotype (CD25(+/CD69(+ and increased the expression of HLA-DR. SRL-treated stimulated B cells on a per cell basis were able to enhance the proliferation of allogeneic CD4(+CD25(- T cells and induce a shift toward the Th1 phenotype. Thus, SRL and TAC have different effects on B lymphocytes. These data may provide insights into the clinical use of these two agents in recipients of solid organ transplants.

  3. B cell activation by outer membrane vesicles--a novel virulence mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidakovics, Maria Laura A Perez; Jendholm, Johan; Mörgelin, Matthias; Månsson, Anne; Larsson, Christer; Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2010-01-15

    Secretion of outer membrane vesicles (OMV) is an intriguing phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria and has been suggested to play a role as virulence factors. The respiratory pathogens Moraxella catarrhalis reside in tonsils adjacent to B cells, and we have previously shown that M. catarrhalis induce a T cell independent B cell response by the immunoglobulin (Ig) D-binding superantigen MID. Here we demonstrate that Moraxella are endocytosed and killed by human tonsillar B cells, whereas OMV have the potential to interact and activate B cells leading to bacterial rescue. The B cell response induced by OMV begins with IgD B cell receptor (BCR) clustering and Ca(2+) mobilization followed by BCR internalization. In addition to IgD BCR, TLR9 and TLR2 were found to colocalize in lipid raft motifs after exposure to OMV. Two components of the OMV, i.e., MID and unmethylated CpG-DNA motifs, were found to be critical for B cell activation. OMV containing MID bound to and activated tonsillar CD19(+) IgD(+) lymphocytes resulting in IL-6 and IgM production in addition to increased surface marker density (HLA-DR, CD45, CD64, and CD86), whereas MID-deficient OMV failed to induce B cell activation. DNA associated with OMV induced full B cell activation by signaling through TLR9. Importantly, this concept was verified in vivo, as OMV equipped with MID and DNA were found in a 9-year old patient suffering from Moraxella sinusitis. In conclusion, Moraxella avoid direct interaction with host B cells by redirecting the adaptive humoral immune response using its superantigen-bearing OMV as decoys.

  4. B Cell Activation by Outer Membrane Vesicles—A Novel Virulence Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Vidakovics, Maria Laura A.; Jendholm, Johan; Mörgelin, Matthias; Månsson, Anne; Larsson, Christer; Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Secretion of outer membrane vesicles (OMV) is an intriguing phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria and has been suggested to play a role as virulence factors. The respiratory pathogens Moraxella catarrhalis reside in tonsils adjacent to B cells, and we have previously shown that M. catarrhalis induce a T cell independent B cell response by the immunoglobulin (Ig) D-binding superantigen MID. Here we demonstrate that Moraxella are endocytosed and killed by human tonsillar B cells, whereas OMV have the potential to interact and activate B cells leading to bacterial rescue. The B cell response induced by OMV begins with IgD B cell receptor (BCR) clustering and Ca2+ mobilization followed by BCR internalization. In addition to IgD BCR, TLR9 and TLR2 were found to colocalize in lipid raft motifs after exposure to OMV. Two components of the OMV, i.e., MID and unmethylated CpG-DNA motifs, were found to be critical for B cell activation. OMV containing MID bound to and activated tonsillar CD19+ IgD+ lymphocytes resulting in IL-6 and IgM production in addition to increased surface marker density (HLA-DR, CD45, CD64, and CD86), whereas MID-deficient OMV failed to induce B cell activation. DNA associated with OMV induced full B cell activation by signaling through TLR9. Importantly, this concept was verified in vivo, as OMV equipped with MID and DNA were found in a 9-year old patient suffering from Moraxella sinusitis. In conclusion, Moraxella avoid direct interaction with host B cells by redirecting the adaptive humoral immune response using its superantigen-bearing OMV as decoys. PMID:20090836

  5. B cell activation by outer membrane vesicles--a novel virulence mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura A Perez Vidakovics

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of outer membrane vesicles (OMV is an intriguing phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria and has been suggested to play a role as virulence factors. The respiratory pathogens Moraxella catarrhalis reside in tonsils adjacent to B cells, and we have previously shown that M. catarrhalis induce a T cell independent B cell response by the immunoglobulin (Ig D-binding superantigen MID. Here we demonstrate that Moraxella are endocytosed and killed by human tonsillar B cells, whereas OMV have the potential to interact and activate B cells leading to bacterial rescue. The B cell response induced by OMV begins with IgD B cell receptor (BCR clustering and Ca(2+ mobilization followed by BCR internalization. In addition to IgD BCR, TLR9 and TLR2 were found to colocalize in lipid raft motifs after exposure to OMV. Two components of the OMV, i.e., MID and unmethylated CpG-DNA motifs, were found to be critical for B cell activation. OMV containing MID bound to and activated tonsillar CD19(+ IgD(+ lymphocytes resulting in IL-6 and IgM production in addition to increased surface marker density (HLA-DR, CD45, CD64, and CD86, whereas MID-deficient OMV failed to induce B cell activation. DNA associated with OMV induced full B cell activation by signaling through TLR9. Importantly, this concept was verified in vivo, as OMV equipped with MID and DNA were found in a 9-year old patient suffering from Moraxella sinusitis. In conclusion, Moraxella avoid direct interaction with host B cells by redirecting the adaptive humoral immune response using its superantigen-bearing OMV as decoys.

  6. B cell receptor-induced growth arrest and apoptosis in WEHI-231 immature B lymphoma cells involve cyclic AMP and Epac proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grandoch, Maria; de Jesus, Maider Lopez; Weernink, Paschal A. Oude; Weber, Artur-Aron; Jakobs, Karl H.; Schmidt, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Signaling by the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is essential for B lymphocyte homeostasis and immune function. In immature B cells, ligation of the BCR promotes growth arrest and apoptosis, and BCR-driven balancing between pro-apoptotic extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and antia

  7. Ibrutinib-induced lymphocytosis in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herman, S E M; Niemann, C U; Farooqui, M

    2014-01-01

    Ibrutinib and other targeted inhibitors of B-cell receptor signaling achieve impressive clinical results for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). A treatment-induced rise in absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) has emerged as a class effect of kinase inhibitors in CLL and warrants further...

  8. B-cell receptor signalling and its crosstalk with other pathways in normal and malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Vaclav; Mraz, Marek

    2015-03-01

    The physiology of B cells is intimately connected with the function of their B-cell receptor (BCR). B-cell lymphomas frequently (dys)regulate BCR signalling and thus take advantage of this pre-existing pathway for B-cell proliferation and survival. This has recently been underscored by clinical trials demonstrating that small molecules (fosfamatinib, ibrutinib, idelalisib) inhibiting BCR-associated kinases (SYK, BTK, PI3K) have an encouraging clinical effect. Here we describe the current knowledge of the specific aspects of BCR signalling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and normal B cells. Multiple factors can contribute to BCR pathway (dys)regulation in these malignancies and the activation of 'chronic' or 'tonic' BCR signalling. In lymphoma B cells, the balance of initiation, amplitude and duration of BCR activation can be influenced by a specific immunoglobulin structure, the expression and mutations of adaptor molecules (like GAB1, BLNK, GRB2, CARD11), the activity of kinases (like LYN, SYK, PI3K) or phosphatases (like SHIP-1, SHP-1 and PTEN) and levels of microRNAs. We also discuss the crosstalk of BCR with other signalling pathways (NF-κB, adhesion through integrins, migration and chemokine signalling) to emphasise that the 'BCR inhibitors' target multiple pathways interconnected with BCR, which might explain some of their clinical activity.

  9. High fat diet deviates PtC-specific B1 B cell phagocytosis in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Hung; Chiu, Joanna; Allaimo, Danielle; Mao, Changchuin; Wang, Yaqi; Gong, Yuefei; Ow, Hooisweng; Porter, Tyrone; Zhong, Xuemei

    2014-12-01

    Phagocytosis had been attributed predominantly to "professional" phagocytes such as macrophages, which play critical roles in adipose tissue inflammation. However, recently, macrophage-like phagocytic activity has been reported in B1 B lymphocytes. Intrigued by the long-established correlation between high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and immune dysfunction, we investigated how HFD affects B1 B cell phagocytosis. A significant number of B1 B cells recognize phosphatidylcholine (PtC), a common phospholipid component of cell membrane. We report here that unlike macrophages, B1 B cells have a unique PtC-specific phagocytic function. In the presence of both PtC-coated and non-PtC control fluorescent nano-particles, B1 B cells from healthy lean mice selectively engulfed PtC-coated beads, whereas B1 B cells from HFD-fed obese mice non-discriminately phagocytosed both PtC-coated and control beads. Morphologically, B1 B cells from obese mice resembled macrophages, displaying enlarged cytosol and engulfed more beads. Our study suggests for the first time that HFD can affect B1 B cell phagocytosis, substantiating the link of HFD-induced obesity and immune deviation.

  10. Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase with ibrutinib in B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Zhang, L L; Champlin, R E; Wang, M L

    2015-05-01

    The B-cell receptor signaling pathway, which is critical to the development and maturation of normal B-cells, is emerging as an attractive therapeutic target in B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib is a potent irreversible inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), a key kinase important for signal transduction in the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway. In preclinical studies, ibrutinib potently bound to Btk, inhibited BCR signaling, and decreased tumor cell proliferation and survival in many B-cell malignancy models. Excellent safety and efficacy data in clinical trials have led to US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of ibrutinib for previously treated mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), as well as CLL with 17p deletion. Ongoing clinical studies have also demonstrated great potency of ibrutinib in treating other types of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). Combination of ibrutinib with chemoimmunotherapy and other promising novel agents in B-cell malignancy therapy has also been under clinical investigation. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  11. Congenital B cell lymphocytosis explained by novel germline CARD11 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Andrew L; Xiao, Wenming; Stinson, Jeffrey R; Lu, Wei; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Zheng, Lixin; Pittaluga, Stefania; Matthews, Helen F; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Kuchen, Stefan; Kardava, Lela; Wang, Wei; Lamborn, Ian T; Jing, Huie; Raffeld, Mark; Moir, Susan; Fleisher, Thomas A; Staudt, Louis M; Su, Helen C; Lenardo, Michael J

    2012-11-19

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) controls genes involved in normal lymphocyte functions, but constitutive NF-κB activation is often associated with B cell malignancy. Using high-throughput whole transcriptome sequencing, we investigated a unique family with hereditary polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis. We found a novel germline heterozygous missense mutation (E127G) in affected patients in the gene encoding CARD11, a scaffolding protein required for antigen receptor (AgR)-induced NF-κB activation in both B and T lymphocytes. We subsequently identified a second germline mutation (G116S) in an unrelated, phenotypically similar patient, confirming mutations in CARD11 drive disease. Like somatic, gain-of-function CARD11 mutations described in B cell lymphoma, these germline CARD11 mutants spontaneously aggregate and drive constitutive NF-κB activation. However, these CARD11 mutants rendered patient T cells less responsive to AgR-induced activation. By reexamining this rare genetic disorder first reported four decades ago, our findings provide new insight into why activating CARD11 mutations may induce B cell expansion and preferentially predispose to B cell malignancy without dramatically perturbing T cell homeostasis.

  12. SnapShot: chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

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    Ciccone, Maria; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J; Calin, George A

    2014-11-10

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia among adults in western countries. This SnapShot depicts the origins and evolution of this B cell malignancy, describes prognostic factors and CLL animal models, and illustrates therapies in preclinical and clinical development against CLL.

  13. Pre-existing T- and B-cell defects in one progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy patient.

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    Alessandra Sottini

    Full Text Available Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML usually occurs in patients with severe immunosuppression, hematological malignancies, chronic inflammatory conditions or receiving organ transplant. Recently, PML has also been observed in patients treated with monoclonal antibodies. By taking advantage of the availability of samples from a multiple sclerosis (MS patient treated with natalizumab, the antibody anti-α4 integrin, who developed PML and was monitored starting before therapy initiation, we investigated the fate of T and B lymphocytes in the onset of PML. Real-time PCR was used to measure new T- and B-cell production by means of T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC and K-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC analysis and to quantify transcripts for CD34, terminal-deoxynucleotidyltransferase, and V pre-B lymphocyte gene 1. T- and B-cell subsets and T-cell heterogeneity were measured by flow cytometry and spectratyping. The data were compared to those of untreated and natalizumab-treated MS patients and healthy donors. Before therapy, a patient who developed PML had a low TREC and KREC number; TRECs remained low, while KRECs and pre-B lymphocyte gene 1 transcripts peaked at 6 months of therapy and then decreased at PML diagnosis. Flow cytometry confirmed the deficient number of newly produced T lymphocytes, counterbalanced by an increase in TEMRA cells. The percentage of naive B cells increased by approximately 70% after 6 months of therapy, but B lymphocyte number remained low for the entire treatment period. T-cell heterogeneity and immunoglobulins were reduced. Although performed in a single patient, all results showed that an immune deficit, together with an increase in newly produced B cells a few months after therapy initiation, may predispose the patient to PML. These findings indicate the TREC/KREC assay is a potential tool to identify patients at risk of developing PML and may provide insights into the immunological

  14. Cyclin D1 (Bcl-1, PRAD1) protein expression in low-grade B-cell lymphomas and reactive hyperplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, W. I.; Zukerberg, L R; Motokura, T.; Arnold, A.; Harris, N. L.

    1994-01-01

    Mantle cell (centrocytic) lymphoma (MCL) and occasional cases of B-cell small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-SLL/CLL) show a characteristic translocation, t(11:14)(q13;q32) involving rearrangement of the Bcl-1 region. Recently it was shown that the key Bcl-1 region oncogene is cyclin D1/PRAD1; cyclin D1 mRNA was shown to be overexpressed in cases of MCL. We examined cyclin D1 protein expression in low-grade B-cell lymphomas and reactive lymphoid hyperplasias using polycl...

  15. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma presenting with fulminant pseudomembranous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ghaffar, Hasan; Grin, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma is a rare entity that usually presents in late stages with non-specific symptoms. We present a case of an incidentally discovered intravascular large B-cell lymphoma in a 78-year-old man who underwent colectomy for medically refractory pseudomembranous colitis. The malignant lymphocytes were preferentially localized to small colonic submucosal vasculature, without any evidence of an extravascular tumor mass. The gastrointestinal system is an exceeding rare initial diagnostic site for intravascular lymphoma, and presentation with pseudomembranous colitis has not been previously reported. We discuss the current definition of intravascular lymphoma, clinicopathological variants, differential diagnoses, as well as current therapy.

  17. Phospho-specific flow cytometry identifies aberrant signaling in indolent B-cell lymphoma

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    Blix Egil S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about signaling pathways in malignant cells may provide prognostic and diagnostic information in addition to identify potential molecular targets for therapy. B-cell receptor (BCR and co-receptor CD40 signaling is essential for normal B cells, and there is increasing evidence that signaling via BCR and CD40 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate basal and induced signaling in lymphoma B cells and infiltrating T cells in single-cell suspensions of biopsies from small cell lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL patients. Methods Samples from untreated SLL/CLL and MZL patients were examined for basal and activation induced signaling by phospho-specific flow cytometry. A panel of 9 stimulation conditions targeting B and T cells, including crosslinking of the B cell receptor (BCR, CD40 ligand and interleukins in combination with 12 matching phospho-protein readouts was used to study signaling. Results Malignant B cells from SLL/CLL patients had higher basal levels of phosphorylated (p-SFKs, p-PLCγ, p-ERK, p-p38, p-p65 (NF-κB, p-STAT5 and p-STAT6, compared to healthy donor B cells. In contrast, anti-BCR induced signaling was highly impaired in SLL/CLL and MZL B cells as determined by low p-SFK, p-SYK and p-PLCγ levels. Impaired anti-BCR-induced p-PLCγ was associated with reduced surface expression of IgM and CD79b. Similarly, CD40L-induced p-ERK and p-p38 were also significantly reduced in lymphoma B cells, whereas p-p65 (NF-κB was equal to that of normal B cells. In contrast, IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15 induced p-STAT5 in tumor-infiltrating T cells were not different from normal T cells. Conclusions BCR signaling and CD40L-induced p-p38 was suppressed in malignant B cells from SLL/CLL and MZL patients. Single-cell phospho-specific flow cytometry for detection of basal as well as activation

  18. Nonrandon X chromosome inactivation in B cells from carriers of X chromosome-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

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    Conley, M.E.; Lavoie, A.; Briggs, C.; Brown, P.; Guerra, C.; Puck, J.M.

    1988-05-01

    X chromosome-linked sever combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by markedly reduced numbers of T cells, the absence of proliferative responses to mitogens, and hypogammaglobulinemia but normal or elevated number of B cells. To determine if the failure of the B cells to produce immunoglobulin might be due to expression of the XSCID gene defect in B-lineage cells as well as T cells, the authors analyzed patterns of X chromosome inactivation in B cells from nine obligate carriers of this disorder. A series of somatic cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X chromosome was produced from Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated B cells from each woman. To distinguish between the two X chromosome, the hybrids from each woman were analyzed using an X-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism for which the woman in question was heterozygous. In all obligate carriers of XSCID, the B-cell hybrids demonstrated preferential use of a single X chromosome, the nonmutant X, as the active X. To determine if the small number of B-cell hybrids that contained the mutant X were derived from an immature subset of B cells, lymphocytes from three carriers were separated into surface IgM positive and surface IgM negative B cells prior to exposure to Epstein-Barr virus and production of B-cell hybrids. The results demonstrated normal random X chromosome inactivation in B-cell hybrids derived from the less mature surface IgM positive B cells. These results suggest that the XSCID gene product has a direct effect on B cells as well as T cells and is required during B-cell maturation.

  19. B Cells and Autoantibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

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    Anne-Katrin Pröbstel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While over the past decades T cells have been considered key players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS, it has only recently become evident that B cells have a major contributing role. Our understanding of the role of B cells has evolved substantially following the clinical success of B cell-targeting therapies and increasing experimental evidence for significant B cell involvement. Rather than mere antibody-producing cells, it is becoming clear that they are team players with the capacity to prime and regulate T cells, and function both as pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. However, despite tremendous efforts, the target antigen(s of B cells in MS have yet to be identified. The first part of this review summarizes the clinical evidence and results from animal studies pointing to the relevance of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS. The second part gives an overview of the currently known potential autoantigen targets. The third part recapitulates and critically appraises the currently available B cell-directed therapies.

  20. Regulatory B lymphocyte functions should be considered in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Audrey; Renaudineau, Yves; Bagacean, Cristina; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe; Bordron, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by an abnormal expansion of mature B cells in the bone marrow and their accumulation in blood and secondary lymphoid organs. Tumor CLL cells share expression of various surface molecules with many subsets of B cells and have several common characteristics with regulatory B cells (B regs). However, the identification of B regs and their role in CLL remain elusive. The aim of this review is to summarize recent works regarding the regulatory and phenotypic characteristic of B regs and their associated effects on the immune system. It is also meant to highlight their potential importance with regards to the immunotherapeutic response.

  1. The Effect of Prolonged Treatment with Belimumab on B cells in Human SLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Annett M; Huang, Weiqing; Wang, Tao; Freimuth, William; Sanz, Inaki; Furie, Richard; Mackay, Meggan; Aranow, Cynthia; Diamond, Betty; Davidson, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To understand the effects of prolonged BLyS inhibition in human SLE. Methods 17 SLE patients enrolled in a clinical trial of belimumab, a BLyS-specific inhibitor, plus standard of care therapy were studied. Phenotypic analysis of lymphocytes was performed using flow cytometry. Circulating antibody-secreting cells were enumerated using ELISpot assay. Serum was analyzed by ELISA using an antibody that recognizes products of the VH4-34 gene. Lymphocyte counts, Ig levels and anti-dsDNA antibody levels were available as part of the clinical trial analyses. Results Samples were collected at days 0, 84, 168, 365, 532 and >730. The total B cell number decreased from baseline starting between days 84–168. This was due to a decrease in naïve and transitional B cells. CD27+/IgD+memory B cells and plasmablasts decreased only after 532 days, whereas CD27+/IgD− memory B cells were not affected, and there were no changes in T cells. Serum IgM levels began to decline between days 84–168, but there were no changes in serum levels of IgG, IgG anti-DNA antibodies or VH4-34 antibodies during the study. SLE patients had more IgM-, IgG-, and autoantibody-producing B cells than normal controls at Day 0. There was only a modest decrease in the frequency of total IgM-producing but not IgG-producing cells at Days 365 and 532, consistent with the phenotypic and serologic data. Conclusions Our data confirm the dependence of newly formed B cells on BLyS for survival in humans. In contrast, memory B cells and plasma cells are less susceptible to selective BLyS inhibition. PMID:20039404

  2. N-wasp is essential for the negative regulation of B cell receptor signaling.

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    Chaohong Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative regulation of receptor signaling is essential for controlling cell activation and differentiation. In B-lymphocytes, the down-regulation of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR signaling is critical for suppressing the activation of self-reactive B cells; however, the mechanism underlying the negative regulation of signaling remains elusive. Using genetically manipulated mouse models and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP, which is coexpressed with WASP in all immune cells, is a critical negative regulator of B-cell signaling. B-cell-specific N-WASP gene deletion causes enhanced and prolonged BCR signaling and elevated levels of autoantibodies in the mouse serum. The increased signaling in N-WASP knockout B cells is concurrent with increased accumulation of F-actin at the B-cell surface, enhanced B-cell spreading on the antigen-presenting membrane, delayed B-cell contraction, inhibition in the merger of signaling active BCR microclusters into signaling inactive central clusters, and a blockage of BCR internalization. Upon BCR activation, WASP is activated first, followed by N-WASP in mouse and human primary B cells. The activation of N-WASP is suppressed by Bruton's tyrosine kinase-induced WASP activation, and is restored by the activation of SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase that inhibits WASP activation. Our results reveal a new mechanism for the negative regulation of BCR signaling and broadly suggest an actin-mediated mechanism for signaling down-regulation.

  3. Reprogramming human B cells into induced pluripotent stem cells and its enhancement by C/EBPα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, C; Sardina, J L; Di Stefano, B; Romero-Moya, D; Muñoz-López, A; Ariza, L; Chillón, M C; Balanzategui, A; Castaño, J; Herreros, A; Fraga, M F; Fernández, A; Granada, I; Quintana-Bustamante, O; Segovia, J C; Nishimura, K; Ohtaka, M; Nakanishi, M; Graf, T; Menendez, P

    2016-03-01

    B cells have been shown to be refractory to reprogramming and B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have only been generated from murine B cells engineered to carry doxycycline-inducible Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc (OSKM) cassette in every tissue and from EBV/SV40LT-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines. Here, we show for the first time that freshly isolated non-cultured human cord blood (CB)- and peripheral blood (PB)-derived CD19+CD20+ B cells can be reprogrammed to iPSCs carrying complete VDJH immunoglobulin (Ig) gene monoclonal rearrangements using non-integrative tetracistronic, but not monocistronic, OSKM-expressing Sendai Virus. Co-expression of C/EBPα with OSKM facilitates iPSC generation from both CB- and PB-derived B cells. We also demonstrate that myeloid cells are much easier to reprogram than B and T lymphocytes. Differentiation potential back into the cell type of their origin of B-cell-, T-cell-, myeloid- and fibroblast-iPSCs is not skewed, suggesting that their differentiation does not seem influenced by 'epigenetic memory'. Our data reflect the actual cell-autonomous reprogramming capacity of human primary B cells because biased reprogramming was avoided by using freshly isolated primary cells, not exposed to cytokine cocktails favoring proliferation, differentiation or survival. The ability to reprogram CB/PB-derived primary human B cells offers an unprecedented opportunity for studying developmental B lymphopoiesis and modeling B-cell malignancies.

  4. Heterogeneity of CD44 expression among human B-cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremmidiotis, G; Ridings, J; Hicks, M; Beckman, I G; Bryson, G; Collins, R; Zola, H

    1998-03-01

    CD44 is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein that participates in a number of cellular adhesion and signal transduction processes. Germinal center B cells express very low levels of CD44, whereas their precursors and differentiation products express much higher levels. In immunofluorescence studies comparing 20 antibodies classified as being against the hematopoietic isoform of CD44, one antibody, A1G3, was unreactive with germinal center B cells, whereas the other antibodies showed low intensity but definite reactivity. Western blotting and sequential immunoprecipitation studies of lysates from density-separated lymphocyte fractions showed two bands that were differentially expressed and reacted differently with A1G3 compared with the other CD44 antibodies. These results suggest that germinal center B cells and non-germinal center B cells express different forms of CD44. Of 21 malignant B-cell populations examined, 5 showed reactivity with a "standard" CD44 reagent and significantly reduced reactivity with A1G3, while one sample showed the opposite pattern and the remainder were positive for both reagents. Of 10 cell lines studied, 5 were differentially stained by A1G3 and a standard CD44 antibody. PCR amplification of reverse transcribed mRNA from sorted human tonsil B-cell subpopulations and Southern blotting showed that B cells express a number of splice isoforms of CD44. These results demonstrate that B cells express multiple forms of CD44; both splice insert isoforms and variants distinguished by A1G3; the form of CD44 expressed depends on B-cell differentiation state.

  5. Normal and malignant B-cell development with special reference to Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajewsky, K; Kanzler, H; Hansmann, M L; Küppers, R

    1997-01-01

    During their development, B lymphocytes are repeatedly selected for the expression of an appropriate surface receptor: the pre-B-cell receptor at the pre-B-cell stage and surface immunoglobulin (Ig) at the transition from a pre-B cell to a mature B cell. Furthermore, stringent selection for B cells expressing high affinity antibodies operates when antigen-activated B cells proliferate within germinal centers (GC). Here, somatic point mutations are introduced into rearranged V region genes at a high rate, and B cells acquiring favorable mutations are selected to differentiate into memory B cells or plasma cells. In the frame of this developmental scheme, extending a recent analysis, we investigated 10 primary cases of Hodgkin's disease (HD) for B-lineage origin and clonality [1]. Single Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (H-RS) cells were micromanipulated from frozen tissue sections and analyzed by PCR for rearranged V genes. Clonal VH and/or V kappa/ V delta gene rearrangements were obtained from 9 of the cases. This shows that H-RS cells represent a clonal, B-lineage-derived population of tumor cells. Somatic mutations were found in all clonal VH gene rearrangements. Interestingly, mutations leading to stop codons in in-frame V gene rearrangements were detected in four cases. Since GC B cells acquiring such crippling mutations are usually efficiently eliminated within the GC, the finding of those mutations indicates that H-RS cells are derived from precursors within the GC that escaped apoptosis by a transforming event.

  6. B-cell-targeted therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Changhai; Foote, Simon; Jones, Graeme

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a classic autoimmune disease characterized by a myriad of immune system aberrations, most likely resulting from pathogenic autoantibody production, immune complex deposition, and subsequent end-organ damage. B cells play a key role in the pathogenesis; therefore, B-cell-targeted therapies, including B-cell depletion and blockage of B-cell survival factors such as B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), are potential therapeutic targets for SLE. In uncontrolled clinical trials from approximately 20 studies, rituximab--a mouse-human chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that effectively depletes B cells--has been demonstrated to reduce disease activity and decrease serum autoantibodies, with a clinical response of 86% in a case series of approximately 400 SLE patients with refractory disease, with or without concomitant use of cyclophosphamide. Epratuzumab, a humanized anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody that partially depletes B cells, has also been shown to reduce disease activity but not to decrease autoantibody levels in patients with moderately active SLE. Randomized controlled phase I/II trials in patients with active SLE have documented that belimumab, a humanized anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody, reduces B-cell numbers, inhibits disease activity and decreases anti-double-stranded DNA autoantibody in SLE patients. All these therapies are well tolerated, but accompanying infectious complications have been observed. Other B-cell-targeted therapies such as 'humanized' monoclonal antibodies to CD20 (e.g. ocrelizumab) and agents that interrupt B-cell/T-cell interactions also have potential, and the efficacy of these, along with rituximab, belimumab and epratuzumab, needs to be determined by randomized controlled trials.

  7. Affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells for generation of phage display-derived human monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells of interest for subsequent generation of immune antibody phage display libraries. This approach should overcome the problem of low yields of monoclonal antibodies of interest in the libraries generated from...... peripheral blood lymphocytes caused by the low abundance of antigen-specific B cells in the circulation. The preselection of B cells is based on the specificity of the surface Ig receptor and is accomplished using the antigen of interest conjugated to magnetic beads. This method should significantly increase...

  8. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors and their clinical potential in the treatment of B-cell malignancies: focus on ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalipour, Amin; Advani, Ranjana H

    2014-08-01

    Aberrant signaling of the B-cell receptor pathway has been linked to the development and maintenance of B-cell malignancies. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a protein early in this pathway, has emerged as a new therapeutic target in a variety of such malignancies. Ibrutinib, the most clinically advanced small molecule inhibitor of BTK, has demonstrated impressive tolerability and activity in a range of B-cell lymphomas which led to its recent approval for relapsed mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of ibrutinib and discusses its therapeutic potential.

  9. Chemokine receptor CXCR5 supports solitary intestinal lymphoid tissue formation, B cell homing, and induction of intestinal IgA responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaga, Sarvari; Herbrand, Heike; Friedrichsen, Michaela; Jiong, Tian; Dorsch, Martina; Hoffmann, Matthias W; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver

    2009-03-01

    Solitary intestinal lymphoid tissue (SILT) comprises a spectrum of phenotypically diverse lymphoid aggregates interspersed throughout the small intestinal mucosa. Manifestations of SILT range from tiny lymphoid aggregates almost void of mature lymphocytes to large structures dominated by B cells. Large SILT phenotypically resemble a single Peyer's patch follicle, suggesting that SILT might contribute to intestinal humoral immune responses. In this study, we track the fate of individual SILT in vivo over time and analyze SILT formation and function in chemokine receptor CXCR5-deficient mice. We show that, in analogy to Peyer's patches, formation of SILT is invariantly determined during ontogeny and depends on CXCR5. Young CXCR5-deficient mice completely lack SILT, suggesting that CXCR5 is essential for SILT formation during regular postnatal development. However, microbiota and other external stimuli can induce the formation of aberrant SILT distinguished by impaired development of B cell follicles in CXCR5-deficient mice. Small intestinal transplantation and bone marrow transplantation reveal that defect follicle formation is due to impaired B cell homing. Moreover, oral immunization with cholera toxin or infection with noninvasive Salmonella fail to induce efficient humoral immune responses in CXCR5-deficient mice. Bone marrow transplantation of CXCR5-deficient recipients with wild-type bone marrow rescued B cell follicle formation in SILT but failed to restore full humoral immune responses. These results reveal an essential role of CXCR5 in Peyer's patch and SILT development and function and indicate that SILT do not fully compensate for the lack of Peyer's patches in T cell-dependent humoral immune responses.

  10. kappa+lambda+ dual receptor B cells are present in the human peripheral repertoire

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    It is a common notion that mature B lymphocytes express either kappa or lambda light (L) chains, although the mechanism that leads to such isotypic exclusion is still debated. We have investigated the extent of L chain isotypic exclusion in normal human peripheral blood B lymphocytes. By three-color staining with anti-CD19, anti-kappa, and anti-lambda antibodies we could estimate that 0.2-0.5% of peripheral blood B cells from healthy adults express both kappa and lambda on the cell surface. T...

  11. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells diversify and differentiate in vivo via a nonclassical Th1-dependent, Bcl-6–deficient process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Piers E.M.; Ferrer, Gerardo; Chen, Shih-Shih; Simone, Rita; Marsilio, Sonia; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Gitto, Zachary; Yuan, Chaohui; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Barrientos, Jacqueline; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.; MacCarthy, Thomas; Chu, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Xenografting primary tumor cells allows modeling of the heterogeneous natures of malignant diseases and the influences of the tissue microenvironment. Here, we demonstrate that xenografting primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B lymphocytes with activated autologous T cells into alymphoid mice results in considerable CLL B cell division and sizable T cell expansion. Nevertheless, most/all CD5+CD19+ cells are eventually lost, due in part to differentiation into antibody-secreting plasmablasts/plasma cells. CLL B cell differentiation is associated with isotype class switching and development of new IGHV-D-J mutations and occurs via an activation-induced deaminase-dependent pathway that upregulates IRF4 and Blimp-1 without appreciable levels of the expected Bcl-6. These processes were induced in IGHV-unmutated and IGHV-mutated clones by Th1-polarized T-bet+ T cells, not classical T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Thus, the block in B cell maturation, defects in T cell action, and absence of antigen-receptor diversification, which are often cardinal characteristics of CLL, are not inherent but imposed by external signals and the microenvironment. Although these activities are not dominant features in human CLL, each occurs in tissue proliferation centers where the mechanisms responsible for clonal evolution operate. Thus, in this setting, CLL B cell diversification and differentiation develop by a nonclassical germinal center–like reaction that might reflect the cell of origin of this leukemia. PMID:27158669

  12. B Cell Epitope-Based Vaccination Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie Kametani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many peptide vaccines are undergoing clinical studies. Most of these vaccines were developed to activate cytotoxic T cells; however, the response is not robust. Unlike vaccines, anti-cancer antibodies based on passive immunity have been approved as a standard treatment. Since passive immunity is more effective in tumor treatment, the evidence suggests that limited B cell epitope-based peptide vaccines may have similar activity. Nevertheless, such peptide vaccines have not been intensively developed primarily because humoral immunity is thought to be preferable to cancer progression. B cells secrete cytokines, which suppress immune functions. This review discusses the possibility of therapeutic antibody induction by a peptide vaccine and the role of active and passive B cell immunity in cancer patients. We also discuss the use of humanized mice as a pre-clinical model. The necessity of a better understanding of the activity of B cells in cancer is also discussed.

  13. Nature versus nurture: contributions of developmental programming and the microenvironment to B cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazekas de St Groth, B

    1998-08-01

    The original Burnet Lederberg and Bretscher Cohn models of immunological tolerance are essentially incompatible, one considering tolerance to be the obligatory outcome of antigen recognition by an immature lymphocyte and the other considering it as one of two possible responses to antigen, the crucial determinant being interaction with a second antigen-reactive cell. The early experimental evidence was confusing, in that it appeared to support both theories. In response to this situation, a hybrid model retaining some of the features of the original models was proposed. In particular, immature B cells were regarded as 'hypersensitive to tolerance induction', but could also make a positive response to antigen under some circumstances. More recent data from B cell transgenic mice have challenged even these hybrid models, stimulating renewed interest in the question of how B cell tolerance is regulated in vivo. This article presents a new interpretation of the data, in which the increased resistance of mature B cells to tolerance induction is postulated to result from partial receptor desensitization in response to environmental antigen, rather than from a developmentally programmed change in B cell signalling. Thus, it is suggested that Burnet's 'window of tolerance induction' is determined by the environment rather than developmental pre-programming. If this postulate is accepted, induction of B cell self-tolerance in both the bone marrow and periphery follows the simple and elegant rules originally laid down by Bretscher and Cohn.

  14. The AP-1 transcription factor Fra1 inhibits follicular B cell differentiation into plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grötsch, Bettina; Brachs, Sebastian; Lang, Christiane; Luther, Julia; Derer, Anja; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Bozec, Aline; Fillatreau, Simon; Berberich, Ingolf; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Wagner, Erwin F; Schett, Georg; Mielenz, Dirk; David, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-20

    The cornerstone of humoral immunity is the differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells. This process is tightly controlled by a regulatory gene network centered on the transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1). Proliferation of activated B cells is required to foster Blimp1 expression but needs to be terminated to avoid overshooting immune reactions. Activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factors become quickly up-regulated upon B cell activation. We demonstrate that Fra1, a Fos member of AP-1, enhances activation-induced cell death upon induction in activated B cells. Moreover, mice with B cell-specific deletion of Fra1 show enhanced plasma cell differentiation and exacerbated antibody responses. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of Fra1 blocks plasma cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production, which cannot be rescued by Bcl2. On the molecular level, Fra1 represses Blimp1 expression and interferes with binding of the activating AP-1 member c-Fos to the Blimp1 promoter. Conversely, overexpression of c-Fos in Fra1 transgenic B cells releases Blimp1 repression. As Fra1 lacks transcriptional transactivation domains, we propose that Fra1 inhibits Blimp1 expression and negatively controls plasma cell differentiation through binding to the Blimp1 promoter. In summary, we demonstrate that Fra1 negatively controls plasma cell differentiation by repressing Blimp1 expression.

  15. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinari, L; Quinion, C; Blum, K A

    2015-05-01

    The B-cell receptor pathway (BCR) is aberrantly activated in select B-cell malignancies. This knowledge has allowed for the development of inhibitors of different crucial steps of this pathway. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a key component of BCR signaling and functions as an important regulator of multiple cell functions including differentiation, proliferation, and survival in various B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib is a potent, selective BTK inhibitor that has shown significant activity in specific subtypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). Given the high response rates, tolerability, and acceptable toxicities, ibrutinib was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with relapsed mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. It is also currently being evaluated in combination with chemotherapy and as frontline therapy in B-cell NHL. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical development of ibrutinib in the treatment of B-cell NHL. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  16. MYSM1-dependent checkpoints in B cell lineage differentiation and B cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Michael; Farrington, Kyo; Petrov, Jessica C; Belle, Jad I; Mindt, Barbara C; Witalis, Mariko; Duerr, Claudia U; Fritz, Jörg H; Nijnik, Anastasia

    2017-03-01

    MYSM1 is a chromatin-binding histone deubiquitinase. MYSM1 mutations in humans result in lymphopenia whereas loss of Mysm1 in mice causes severe hematopoietic abnormalities, including an early arrest in B cell development. However, it remains unknown whether MYSM1 is required at later checkpoints in B cell development or for B cell-mediated immune responses. We analyzed conditional mouse models Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre, Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre, and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre with inactivation of Mysm1 at prepro-B, pre-B, and follicular B cell stages of development. We show that loss of Mysm1 at the prepro-B cell stage in Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre mice results in impaired B cell differentiation, with an ∼2-fold reduction in B cell numbers in the lymphoid organs. Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre B cells also showed increased expression of activation markers and impaired survival and proliferation. In contrast, Mysm1 was largely dispensable from the pre-B cell stage onward, with Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre mice showing no alterations in B cell numbers and largely normal responses to stimulation. MYSM1, therefore, has an essential role in B cell lineage specification but is dispensable at later stages of development. Importantly, MYSM1 activity at the prepro-B cell stage of development is important for the normal programming of B cell responses to stimulation once they complete their maturation process.

  17. Comprehensive gene expression profiling and immunohistochemical studies support application of immunophenotypic algorithm for molecular subtype classification in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visco, C; Xu-Monette, Z Y; Miranda, R N

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) has stratified diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) into molecular subgroups that correspond to different stages of lymphocyte development-namely germinal center B-cell like and activated B-cell like. This classification has prognostic significance, but GEP...... on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Sections were stained with antibodies reactive with CD10, GCET1, FOXP1, MUM1 and BCL6 and cases were classified following a rationale of sequential steps of differentiation of B cells. Cutoffs for each marker were obtained using receiver...

  18. Modulation of B-cell receptor and microenvironment signaling by a guanine exchange factor in B-cell malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Liao; Sanjai Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells over-express a guanine exchange factor (GEF), Rasgrf-1. This GEF increases active Ras as it catalyzes the removal of GDP from Ras so that GTP can bind and activate Ras. This study aims to study the mechanism of action of Rasgrf-1 in B-cell malignancies. Methods: N-terminus truncated Rasgrf-1 variants have a higher GEF activity as compared to the full-length transcript therefore a MCL cell line with stable over-expression of truncated Rasgrf-1 was established. The B-cell receptor (BCR) and chemokine signaling pathways were compared in the Rasgrf-1 over-expressing and a control transfected cell line. Results: Cells over-expressing truncated form of Rasgrf-1 have a higher proliferative rate as compared to control transfected cells. BCR was activated by lower concentrations of anti-IgM antibody in Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells as compared to control cells indicating that these cells are more sensitive to BCR signaling. BCR signaling also phosphorylates Rasgrf-1 that further increases its GEF function and amplifies BCR signaling. This activation of Rasgrf-1 in over-expressing cells resulted in a higher expression of phospho-ERK, AKT, BTK and PKC-alpha as compared to control cells. Besides BCR, Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells were also more sensitive to microenvironment stimuli as determined by resistance to apoptosis, chemotaxis and ERK pathway activation. Conclusions: This GEF protein sensitizes B-cells to BCR and chemokine mediated signaling and also upregulates a number of other signaling pathways which promotes growth and survival of these cells.

  19. Anti-CD20 B-cell depletion enhances monocyte reactivity in neuroimmunological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohlfeld Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials evaluating anti-CD20-mediated B-cell depletion in multiple sclerosis (MS and neuromyelitis optica (NMO generated encouraging results. Our recent studies in the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE attributed clinical benefit to extinction of activated B-cells, but cautioned that depletion of naïve B-cells may be undesirable. We elucidated the regulatory role of un-activated B-cells in EAE and investigated whether anti-CD20 may collaterally diminish regulatory B-cell properties in treatment of neuroimmunological disorders. Methods Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide-immunized C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of B-cells. Functional consequences for regulatory T-cells (Treg and cytokine production of CD11b+ antigen presenting cells (APC were assessed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 22 patients receiving anti-CD20 and 23 untreated neuroimmunological patients were evaluated for frequencies of B-cells, T-cells and monocytes; monocytic reactivity was determined by TNF-production and expression of signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM. Results We observed that EAE-exacerbation upon depletion of un-activated B-cells closely correlated with an enhanced production of pro-inflammatory TNF by CD11b+ APC. Paralleling this pre-clinical finding, anti-CD20 treatment of human neuroimmunological disorders increased the relative frequency of monocytes and accentuated pro-inflammatory monocyte function; when reactivated ex vivo, a higher frequency of monocytes from B-cell depleted patients produced TNF and expressed the activation marker SLAM. Conclusions These data suggest that in neuroimmunological disorders, pro-inflammatory APC activity is controlled by a subset of B-cells which is eliminated concomitantly upon anti-CD20 treatment. While this observation does not conflict with the general concept of B-cell depletion in human autoimmunity, it implies that its safety and

  20. Loss of signalling via Gα13 in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muppidi, Jagan R; Schmitz, Roland; Green, Jesse A; Xiao, Wenming; Larsen, Adrien B; Braun, Sterling E; An, Jinping; Xu, Ying; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D; Rimsza, Lisa M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Braziel, Rita M; Tubbs, Raymond R; Cook, J R; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Staudt, Louis M; Cyster, Jason G

    2014-12-11

    Germinal centre B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (GCB-DLBCL) is a common malignancy, yet the signalling pathways that are deregulated and the factors leading to its systemic dissemination are poorly defined. Work in mice showed that sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-2 (S1PR2), a Gα12 and Gα13 coupled receptor, promotes growth regulation and local confinement of germinal centre B cells. Recent deep sequencing studies of GCB-DLBCL have revealed mutations in many genes in this cancer, including in GNA13 (encoding Gα13) and S1PR2 (refs 5,6, 7). Here we show, using in vitro and in vivo assays, that GCB-DLBCL-associated mutations occurring in S1PR2 frequently disrupt the receptor's Akt and migration inhibitory functions. Gα13-deficient mouse germinal centre B cells and human GCB-DLBCL cells were unable to suppress pAkt and migration in response to S1P, and Gα13-deficient mice developed germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma. Germinal centre B cells, unlike most lymphocytes, are tightly confined in lymphoid organs and do not recirculate. Remarkably, deficiency in Gα13, but not S1PR2, led to germinal centre B-cell dissemination into lymph and blood. GCB-DLBCL cell lines frequently carried mutations in the Gα13 effector ARHGEF1, and Arhgef1 deficiency also led to germinal centre B-cell dissemination. The incomplete phenocopy of Gα13- and S1PR2 deficiency led us to discover that P2RY8, an orphan receptor that is mutated in GCB-DLBCL and another germinal centre B-cell-derived malignancy, Burkitt's lymphoma, also represses germinal centre B-cell growth and promotes confinement via Gα13. These findings identify a Gα13-dependent pathway that exerts dual actions in suppressing growth and blocking dissemination of germinal centre B cells that is frequently disrupted in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma.

  1. Regulation of B Cell to Plasma Cell Transition within the Follicular B Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nera, K-P; Kyläniemi, M K; Lassila, O

    2015-09-01

    Persistent humoral immunity depends on the follicular B cell response and on the generation of somatically mutated high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. Upon activation by an antigen, cognately activated follicular B cells and follicular T helper (TFH ) cells initiate germinal centre (GC) reaction during which high-affinity effector cells are generated. The differentiation of activated follicular B cells into plasma cells and memory B cells is guided by complex selection events, both at the cellular and molecular level. The transition of B cell into a plasma cell during the GC response involves alterations in the microenvironment and developmental state of the cell, which are guided by cell-extrinsic signals. The developmental cell fate decisions in response to these signals are coordinated by cell-intrinsic gene regulatory network functioning at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  2. AID-induced remodeling of immunoglobulin genes and B cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffleur, Brice; Denis-Lagache, Nicolas; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Moreau, Jeanne; Cogné, Michel

    2014-03-15

    Survival and phenotype of normal and malignant B lymphocytes are critically dependent on constitutive signals by the B cell receptor (BCR) for antigen. In addition, either antigen ligation of the BCR or various mitogenic stimuli result in B cell activation and induction of activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID activity can in turn mediate somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) V regions and also deeply remodel the Ig heavy chain locus through class switch recombination (CSR) or locus suicide recombination (LSR). In addition to changes linked to affinity for antigen, modifying the class/isotype (i.e. the structure and function) of the BCR or suddenly deleting BCR expression also modulates the fate of antigen-experienced B cells.

  3. BP8, a novel peptide from avian immune system, modulates B cell developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Bin; Feng, Xiu-Li; Cao, Rui-Bing; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2014-12-01

    The bursa of Fabricius (BF) is the key humoral immune organ unique to birds, and is critical for early B-lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms through which the BF regulates B cell development are not fully understood. In this study, we isolated and identified a new bursal peptide (BP8, AGHTKKAP) by RP-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. BP8 promoted colony-forming pre-B formation, bound B cell precursor, regulated B cell development in vitro as well as in vivo, upstream of the EBF-E2A-Pax5 regulatory complex and increased immunoglobulin secretion. These data revealed a bursal-derived multifunctional factor BP8 as a novel biomaterial which is essential for the development of the immune system. This study elucidates further the mechanisms involved in humoral immune system and has implications in treating human diseases.

  4. Prenatal ontogeny of lymphocyte subpopulations in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkora, M; Sinkora, J; Reháková, Z; Splíchal, I; Yang, H; Parkhouse, R M; Trebichavsk, I

    1998-12-01

    Although porcine lymphocytes have been classified into numerous subpopulations in postnatal animals, little is known about the ontogeny of these complex cell subsets. Using double- and triple-colour flow cytometry (FCM), we investigated the surface phenotype of fetal lymphoid cells in the thymus, cord blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes at different stages of gestation. It was found that the major lymphocyte subpopulations started to appear at the beginning of the second third of the gestation period, with B cells being the earliest lymphocyte subpopulation to appear in the periphery. The T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma delta+ cells were the earliest detectable T-cell subset, developing first in the thymus and subsequently arriving in the periphery. Later in ontogeny, however, the number of TCRalpha beta+ lymphocytes rapidly increased, becoming the predominant T cells both in the thymus and in the periphery. Cells with the phenotype of adult natural killer cells were also identified in pig fetuses, though their nature and functional roles remain to be investigated. In addition, CD2 was expressed on most B cells whilst very few CD4+ TCRalpha beta+ cells or CD2+ TCRgamma delta+ cells expressed CD8, suggesting that the expression of CD2 and CD8 may reflect the functional status of the cells in postnatal animals. Taken together, this study has provided a systematic analysis of fetal porcine lymphocyte subpopulations and may provide the base for studies to establish the physiological roles of these lymphocyte subsets.

  5. B-cell lymphomas with features intermediate between distinct pathologic entities. From pathogenesis to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Antonino; Gloghini, Annunziata; Aiello, Antonella; Testi, Adele; Cabras, Antonello

    2010-05-01

    Published in September 2008, the updated World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues introduces provisional borderline categories for lymphoma cases that demonstrate overlapping clinical, morphological, and/or immunophenotypic features between well-established entities. These overlapping features pose real diagnostic challenges especially in identifying atypical cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and Burkitt lymphoma. Lymphoma cases showing borderline features between T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma are not included within the borderline categories provisionally recognized by the updated classification. Within the borderline categories, there are cases combining features of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Many of these cases resemble classical Hodgkin lymphoma but have a large number of tumor cells expressing CD20, CD45, and B-cell transcription factors. Alternatively, these cases may resemble primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma but contain tumor cells resembling Reed-Sternberg cells and displaying an aberrant phenotype such as CD20(-), CD15(-/+) CD45(+), CD30(+), Pax5(+), OCT2(+/-), and BOB1(+/-). Another new borderline category defining B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma, represents a biologically heterogeneous group. Cases with morphologic features intermediate and with CD10/BCL6 coexpression should be placed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma/Burkitt lymphoma category if tumor cells also show strong BCL2 staining and/or a Ki67 proliferation index of less than 90%. When MYC rearrangements are present in these cases, the lymphomas often have atypical features, including concurrent rearrangements of BCL2 and/or BCL6 genes (so-called double/triple-hit lymphomas) and more aggressive behavior. For the

  6. Increased levels of prolactin receptor expression correlate with the early onset of lupus symptoms and increased numbers of transitional-1 B cells after prolactin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledesma-Soto Yadira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolactin is secreted from the pituitary gland and other organs, as well as by cells such as lymphocytes. Prolactin has an immunostimulatory effect and is associated with autoimmune diseases that are characterised by abnormal B cell activation, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Our aim was to determine if different splenic B cell subsets express the prolactin receptor and if the presence of prolactin influences these B cell subsets and correlates with development of lupus. Results Using real-time PCR and flow cytometry, we found that different subsets of immature (transitional and mature (follicular, marginal zone B cells express different levels of the prolactin receptor and are differentially affected by hyperprolactinaemia. We found that transitional B cells express the prolactin receptor at higher levels compared to mature B cells in C57BL/6 mice and the lupus-prone MRL/lpr and MRL mouse strains. Transitional-1 (T1 B cells showed a higher level of prolactin receptor expression in both MRL/lpr and MRL mice compared to C57BL/6 mice. Hyperprolactinaemia was induced using metoclopramide, which resulted in the development of early symptoms of SLE. We found that T1 B cells are the main targets of prolactin and that prolactin augments the absolute number of T1 B cells, which reflects the finding that this B cell subpopulation expresses the highest level of the prolactin receptor. Conclusions We found that all B cell subsets express the prolactin receptor but that transitional B cells showed the highest prolactin receptor expression levels. Hyperprolactinaemia in mice susceptible to lupus accelerated the disease and increased the absolute numbers of T1 and T3 B cells but not of mature B cells, suggesting a primary effect of prolactin on the early stages of B cell maturation in the spleen and a role of prolactin in B cell differentiation, contributing to SLE onset.

  7. Complement Receptor Type 1 Suppresses Human B Cell Functions in SLE Patients

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    Mariann Kremlitzka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement receptors (CRs play an integral role in innate immunity and also function to initiate and shape the adaptive immune response. Our earlier results showed that complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35 is a potent inhibitor of the B cell receptor- (BCR- induced functions of human B lymphocytes. Here we show that this inhibition occurs already at the initial steps of B cell activation since ligation of CR1 reduces the BCR-induced phosphorylation of key signaling molecules such as Syk and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs. Furthermore, our data give evidence that although B lymphocytes of active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients express lower level of CR1, the inhibitory capacity of this complement receptor is still maintained and its ligand-induced clustering results in significant inhibition of the main B cell functions, similar to that found in the case of healthy individuals. Since we have found that reduced CR1 expression of SLE patients does not affect the inhibitory capacity of the receptor, our results further support the therapeutical potential of CD35 targeting the decrease of B cell activation and autoantibody production in autoimmune patients.

  8. Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH-R) in Treating Patients With MYC-Associated B-Cell Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic

  9. Human BLyS facilitates engraftment of human PBL derived B cells in immunodeficient mice.

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    Madelyn R Schmidt

    Full Text Available The production of fully immunologically competent humanized mice engrafted with peripheral lymphocyte populations provides a model for in vivo testing of new vaccines, the durability of immunological memory and cancer therapies. This approach is limited, however, by the failure to efficiently engraft human B lymphocytes in immunodeficient mice. We hypothesized that this deficiency was due to the failure of the murine microenvironment to support human B cell survival. We report that while the human B lymphocyte survival factor, B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS/BAFF enhances the survival of human B cells ex vivo, murine BLyS has no such protective effect. Although human B cells bound both human and murine BLyS, nuclear accumulation of NF-kappaB p52, an indication of the induction of a protective anti-apoptotic response, following stimulation with human BLyS was more robust than that induced with murine BLyS suggesting a fundamental disparity in BLyS receptor signaling. Efficient engraftment of both human B and T lymphocytes in NOD rag1(-/- Prf1(-/- immunodeficient mice treated with recombinant human BLyS is observed after adoptive transfer of human PBL relative to PBS treated controls. Human BLyS treated recipients had on average 40-fold higher levels of serum Ig than controls and mounted a de novo antibody response to the thymus-independent antigens in pneumovax vaccine. The data indicate that production of fully immunologically competent humanized mice from PBL can be markedly facilitated by providing human BLyS.

  10. Early detection of dominant Env-specific and subdominant Gag-specific CD8+ lymphocytes in equine infectious anemia virus-infected horses using major histocompatibility complex class I/peptide tetrameric complexes.

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    Mealey, Robert H; Sharif, Amin; Ellis, Shirley A; Littke, Matt H; Leib, Steven R; McGuire, Travis C

    2005-08-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are critical for control of lentiviruses, including equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Measurement of equine CTL responses has relied on chromium-release assays, which do not allow accurate quantitation. Recently, the equine MHC class I molecule 7-6, associated with the ELA-A1 haplotype, was shown to present both the Gag-GW12 and Env-RW12 EIAV CTL epitopes. In this study, 7-6/Gag-GW12 and 7-6/Env-RW12 MHC class I/peptide tetrameric complexes were constructed and used to analyze Gag-GW12- and Env-RW12-specific CTL responses in two EIAV-infected horses (A2164 and A2171). Gag-GW12 and Env-RW12 tetramer-positive CD8+ cells were identified in nonstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells as early as 14 days post-EIAV inoculation, and frequencies of tetramer-positive cells ranged from 0.4% to 6.7% of nonstimulated peripheral blood CD8+ cells during the 127-day study period. Although both horses terminated the initial viremic peak, only horse A2171 effectively controlled viral load. Neutralizing antibody was present during the initial control of viral load in both horses, but the ability to maintain control correlated with Gag-GW12-specific CD8+ cells in A2171. Despite Env-RW12 dominance, Env-RW12 escape viral variants were identified in both horses and there was no correlation between Env-RW12-specific CD8+ cells and control of viral load. Although Gag-GW12 CTL escape did not occur, a Gag-GW12 epitope variant arose in A2164 that was recognized less efficiently than the original epitope. These data indicate that tetramers are useful for identification and quantitation of CTL responses in horses, and suggest that the observed control of EIAV replication and clinical disease was associated with sustained CTL recognition of Gag-specific epitopes.

  11. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

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    Nagata, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Murata, Kazuko, E-mail: murata-k@iwakimu.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Murata, Ryo [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Sun, Shu-lan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Moriya, Kunihiko [Department of Pediatrics, Tohoku University School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kasai, Noriyuki [Institute for Animal Experimentation, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Sugamura, Kazuo [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Ishii, Naoto [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs{sup flox/flox};mb1{sup cre/+}:Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes.

  12. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signalling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions

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    Samantha D Pauls

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunogloblulin isotype switch, germinal center responses and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  13. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Samantha D; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  14. Immunophenotypic lymphocyte profiles in human african trypanosomiasis.

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    Caroline Boda

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is a deadly vector-born disease caused by an extracellular parasite, the trypanosome. Little is known about the cellular immune responses elicited by this parasite in humans. We used multiparameter flow cytometry to characterize leukocyte immunophenotypes in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 33 HAT patients and 27 healthy controls identified during a screening campaign in Angola and Gabon. We evaluated the subsets and activation markers of B and T lymphocytes. Patients had a higher percentage of CD19+ B lymphocytes and activated B lymphocytes in the blood than did controls, but lacked activated CD4+ T lymphocytes (CD25+. Patients displayed no increase in the percentage of activated CD8+ T cells (HLA-DR+, CD69+ or CD25+, but memory CD8 T-cell levels (CD8+CD45RA2 were significantly lower in patients than in controls, as were effector CD8 T-cell levels (CD8+CD45RA+CD62L2. No relationship was found between these blood immunophenotypes and disease severity (stage 1 vs 2. However, CD19+ B-cell levels in the CSF increased with disease severity. The patterns of T and B cell activation in HAT patients suggest that immunomodulatory mechanisms may operate during infection. Determinations of CD19+ B-cell levels in the CSF could improve disease staging.

  15. Hematopoietic overexpression of FOG1 does not affect B-cells but reduces the number of circulating eosinophils.

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    Camille Du Roure

    Full Text Available We have identified expression of the gene encoding the transcriptional coactivator FOG-1 (Friend of GATA-1; Zfpm1, Zinc finger protein multitype 1 in B lymphocytes. We found that FOG-1 expression is directly or indirectly dependent on the B cell-specific coactivator OBF-1 and that it is modulated during B cell development: expression is observed in early but not in late stages of B cell development. To directly test in vivo the role of FOG-1 in B lymphocytes, we developed a novel embryonic stem cell recombination system. For this, we combined homologous recombination with the FLP recombinase activity to rapidly generate embryonic stem cell lines carrying a Cre-inducible transgene at the Rosa26 locus. Using this system, we successfully generated transgenic mice where FOG-1 is conditionally overexpressed in mature B-cells or in the entire hematopoietic system. While overexpression of FOG-1 in B cells did not significantly affect B cell development or function, we found that enforced expression of FOG-1 throughout all hematopoietic lineages led to a reduction in the number of circulating eosinophils, confirming and extending to mammals the known function of FOG-1 in this lineage.

  16. Homing of human B cells to lymphoid organs and B-cell lymphoma engraftment are controlled by cell adhesion molecule JAM-C.

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    Doñate, Carmen; Ody, Christiane; McKee, Thomas; Ruault-Jungblut, Sylvie; Fischer, Nicolas; Ropraz, Patricia; Imhof, Beat A; Matthes, Thomas

    2013-01-15

    Junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) is expressed by vascular endothelium and human but not mouse B lymphocytes. The level of JAM-C expression defines B-cell differentiation stages and allows the classification of marginal zone-derived (JAM-C-positive) and germinal center-derived (JAM-C-negative) B-cell lymphomas. In the present study, we investigated the role of JAM-C in homing of human B cells, using a xenogeneic nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mouse model. Treatment with anti-JAM-C antibodies in short-term experiments reduced migration of normal and malignant JAM-C-expressing B cells to bone marrow, lymph nodes, and spleen. Blocking homing to the spleen is remarkable, as most other antiadhesion antibodies reduce homing of B cells only to bone marrow and lymph nodes. Long-term administration of anti-JAM-C antibodies prevented engraftment of JAM-Cpos lymphoma cells in bone marrow, spleen, and lymph nodes of mice. Plasmon resonance studies identified JAM-B as the major ligand for JAM-C, whereas homotypic JAM-C interactions remained at background levels. Accordingly, anti-JAM-C antibodies blocked adhesion of JAM-C-expressing B cells to their ligand JAM-B, and immunofluorescence analysis showed the expression of JAM-B on murine and human lymphatic endothelial cells. Targeting JAM-C could thus constitute a new therapeutic strategy to prevent lymphoma cells from reaching supportive microenvironments not only in the bone marrow and lymph nodes but also in the spleen.

  17. VNAR single-domain antibodies specific for BAFF inhibit B cell development by molecular mimicry.

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    Häsler, Julien; Flajnik, Martin F; Williams, Gareth; Walsh, Frank S; Rutkowski, J Lynn

    2016-07-01

    B cell-activating factor (BAFF) plays a dominant role in the B cell homeostasis. However, excessive BAFF promotes the development of autoreactive B-cells and several antibodies have been developed to block its activity. Bispecific antibodies with added functionality represent the next wave of biologics that may be more effective in the treatment of complex autoimmune disease. The single variable domain from the immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (VNAR) is one of the smallest antibody recognition units that could be combined with monospecific antibodies to develop bispecific agents. We isolated a panel of BAFF-binding VNARs with low nM potency from a semi-synthetic phage display library and examined their functional activity. The anti-BAFF VNARs blocked the binding of BAFF to all three of its receptors (BR3, TACI and BCMA) and the presence of the conserved DXL receptor motif found in the CDR3 regions suggests molecular mimicry as the mechanism of antagonism. One clone was formatted as an Fc fusion for functional testing and it was found to inhibit both mouse and human BAFF with equal potency ex vivo in a splenocyte proliferation assay. In mice, subchronic administration reduced the number of immature and transitional intermediates B cells and mature B cell subsets. These results indicate that VNAR single domain antibodies function as selective B-cell inhibitors and offer an alternative molecular format for targeting B-cell disorders.

  18. Differing Requirements for MALT1 Function in Peripheral B Cell Survival and Differentiation.

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    Lee, Peishan; Zhu, Zilu; Hachmann, Janna; Nojima, Takuya; Kitamura, Daisuke; Salvesen, Guy; Rickert, Robert C

    2017-02-01

    During a T cell-dependent immune response, formation of the germinal center (GC) is essential for the generation of high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. The canonical NF-κB pathway has been implicated in the initiation of GC reaction, and defects in this pathway have been linked to immune deficiencies. The paracaspase MALT1 plays an important role in regulating NF-κB activation upon triggering of Ag receptors. Although previous studies have reported that MALT1 deficiency abrogates the GC response, the relative contribution of B cells and T cells to the defective phenotype remains unclear. We used chimeric mouse models to demonstrate that MALT1 function is required in B cells for GC formation. This role is restricted to BCR signaling where MALT1 is critical for B cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, the proapoptotic signal transmitted in the absence of MALT1 is dominant to the prosurvival effects of T cell-derived stimuli. In addition to GC B cell differentiation, MALT1 is required for plasma cell differentiation, but not mitogenic responses. Lastly, we show that ectopic expression of Bcl-2 can partially rescue the GC phenotype in MALT1-deficient animals by prolonging the lifespan of BCR-activated B cells, but plasma cell differentiation and Ab production remain defective. Thus, our data uncover previously unappreciated aspects of MALT1 function in B cells and highlight its importance in humoral immunity.

  19. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of human newborns' B lymphocytes.

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    Durandy, A; Thuillier, L; Forveille, M; Fischer, A

    1990-01-01

    It has been demonstrated two major facts concerning human newborns' B lymphocytes: 1) they differentiate poorly into Ig-producing cells and 2) they express CD5 and CD1c membrane proteins. We have further analyzed human newborns' B cell characteristics and found that approximately half of them express activation Ag, i.e., 4F2 and IL-2R, both associated in significant proportions with CD23 and Bac-1. These membrane Ag were found both on CD5(+) and CD5(-) B cells. Newborns' B cells do not exhibit other activation markers because they express surface IgD, and because their size, RNA, and DNA contents do not differ from those of adults' B cells, indicating that they are in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Newborns' B cell proliferation can be induced by rIL-2, rIL-4, low m.w. B cell growth factor, and by Staphylococcus aureus protein A. It is presently difficult to build a hypothesis accounting for all the specific findings made on newborns' B cells. It is not known for instance whether CD5(+) and (-) B cells belong to distinct subsets as suggested by the fluorescence intensity curve obtained with an anti-CD5 antibody or to distinct stages in a unique pattern of B cell maturation during fetal and newborn life. This may indicate that partially activated B cells actually produce natural polyspecific autoantibodies of the IgM isotype found in newborns' human serum.

  20. The microprocessor component, DGCR8, is essential for early B-cell development in mice.

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    Brandl, Andreas; Daum, Patrick; Brenner, Sven; Schulz, Sebastian R; Yap, Desmond Yat-Hin; Bösl, Michael R; Wittmann, Jürgen; Schuh, Wolfgang; Jäck, Hans-Martin

    2016-12-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are important posttranscriptional regulators during hematopoietic lineage commitment and lymphocyte development. Mature miRNAs are processed from primary miRNA transcripts in two steps by the microprocessor complex, consisting of Drosha and its partner DiGeorge Critical Region 8 (DGCR8), and the RNAse III enzyme, Dicer. Conditional ablations of Drosha and Dicer have established the importance of both RNAses in B- and T-cell development. Here, we show that a cre-mediated B-cell specific deletion of DGCR8 in mice results in a nearly complete maturation block at the transition from the pro-B to the pre-B cell stage, and a failure to upregulate Ig μ heavy chain expression in pro-B cells. Furthermore, we found that the death of freshly isolated DGCR8-deficient pro-B cells could be partially prevented by enforced Bcl2 expression. We conclude from these findings that the microprocessor component DGCR8 is essential for survival and differentiation of early B-cell progenitors.

  1. A human follicular lymphoma B cell line hypermutates its functional immunoglobulin genes in vitro.

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    Wu, H; Pelkonen, E; Knuutila, S; Kaartinen, M

    1995-12-01

    The functional immunoglobulin (Ig) genes of B lymphocytes undergo somatic mutations during immune responses. These mutations modify the antigen binding site of the immunoglobulins, thereby enhancing the average affinity of the antibodies produced. The molecular mechanism underlying these B cell hypermutations remains unresolved, partly because it is difficult to grow normal B cells in long-term cell cultures and because there is no suitable transformed or malignant B cell line which generates mutations in its immunoglobulin genes in vitro. Here, we show that the recently established follicular lymphoma line HF-1.3.4 generates somatic hypermutations in vitro at a high frequency of 0.7 x 10(-6) mutations per base pair per generation in standard cell cultures (RPMI 1640 + 5% fetal calf serum). This shows for the first time that B cell hypermutation can occur without T cells or T cell factors. The mutation frequency increased approximately tenfold to 1 x 10(-5) mutations/base pair/generation with B cell-specific growth factors (interleukins-2 and -4 and three antibodies stimulatory to HF-1.3.4 cells). This HF-1.3.4 lymphoma line may help to elucidate the molecular mechanism of Ig gene hypermutation.

  2. T- and B-lymphocyte chimerism in the marmoset

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    Niblack, G.D.; Kateley, J.R.; Gengozian, N.

    1977-01-01

    Marmosets are natural blood chimeras, this condition resulting from the high frequency of fraternal twinning and the consistent development of placental vascular anastomoses between the two embryos. Identification of chimerism by sex-chromosome analysis of cultured blood lymphocytes provided a means of determining the proportion of chimerism among T and B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were enriched for T or B cells by filtration through a nylon column (yields >95% T-cells) or inactivation of T lymphocytes by treatment with a goat anti-marmoset thymocyte antiserum in the presence of complement (yields >95% B cells). Mitogenic stimulation of these separated, enriched cell populations yielded metaphase plates which could be scored for percentage male and female cells. Tests on five different blood chimeras showed the T- and B-lymphocyte chimerism to be the same. Stimulation of blood lymphocytes with cells from another species of marmoset in a mixed lymphocyte culture test revealed the chimeric T-cell response (i.e., host and co-twin cells) to be similar to that obtained with a mitogenic lectin. The demonstration of equivalent T- and B-cell chimerism in these animals suggests derivation of these cells from a common stem cell pool and the response of both T-cell populations to an antigenic stimulus in proportions similar to their percentage chimerism suggests complete immunologic tolerance exists in this species for co-twin histocompatibility antigens.

  3. The presence of local and circulating autoreactive B cells in patients with advanced periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglundh, Tord; Liljenberg, Birgitta; Tarkowski, Andrej; Lindhe, Jan

    2002-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the local (gingival) and systemic occurrence of autoreactive B cells (CD5+CD19 positive) in subjects with a high or low susceptibility to periodontitis. 2 groups of subjects (Group A and B) susceptible to periodontitis were included. Group A consisted of 22 adult patients (7 females and 15 males, aged 24-66 years) with advanced and generalized chronic periodontitis and group B comprised 7 children (4 girls and 3 boys aged 9-13 years) with localized aggressive periodontitis. 26 periodontally healthy subjects, Group C (aged 23-80 years, mean 49.6+/-16.3), were also recruited. Assessment of clinical and radiographical characteristics of periodontal disease was performed. Gingival biopsies and peripheral blood samples were obtained and prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. Blood samples only were obtained from the periodontally healthy subjects (group C). The proportion of autoreactive B cells (CD5+CD19 positive) of peripheral blood lymphocytes was about 6 times higher in group A and 4 times higher in group B than in the samples from the control subjects (group C). About 40-50% of the B cells in the peripheral blood of the periodontitis susceptible individuals expressed markers for autoreactive features while less than 15% of the circulating B cells in the subjects of group C exhibited such markers. The periodontitis lesion in the adult periodontitis patients contained a substantial number of B cells out of which about 30% demonstrated autoreactive features. It is suggested that both circulating and local B cells in periodontitis susceptible individuals have a higher propensity to autoreactive properties than B cells of patients with a low susceptibility to periodontitis.

  4. Identification of highly methylated genes across various types of B-cell non-hodgkin lymphoma.

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    Nicole Bethge

    Full Text Available Epigenetic alterations of gene expression are important in the development of cancer. In this study, we identified genes which are epigenetically altered in major lymphoma types. We used DNA microarray technology to assess changes in gene expression after treatment of 11 lymphoma cell lines with epigenetic drugs. We identified 233 genes with upregulated expression in treated cell lines and with downregulated expression in B-cell lymphoma patient samples (n = 480 when compared to normal B cells (n = 5. The top 30 genes were further analyzed by methylation specific PCR (MSP in 18 lymphoma cell lines. Seven of the genes were methylated in more than 70% of the cell lines and were further subjected to quantitative MSP in 37 B-cell lymphoma patient samples (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (activated B-cell like and germinal center B-cell like subtypes, follicular lymphoma and Burkitt`s lymphoma and normal B lymphocytes from 10 healthy donors. The promoters of DSP, FZD8, KCNH2, and PPP1R14A were methylated in 28%, 67%, 22%, and 78% of the 36 tumor samples, respectively, but not in control samples. Validation using a second series of healthy donor controls (n = 42; normal B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, bone marrow, tonsils and follicular hyperplasia and fresh-frozen lymphoma biopsies (n = 25, confirmed the results. The DNA methylation biomarker panel consisting of DSP, FZD8, KCNH2, and PPP1R14A was positive in 89% (54/61 of all lymphomas. Receiver operating characteristic analysis to determine the discriminative power between lymphoma and healthy control samples showed a c-statistic of 0.96, indicating a possible role for the biomarker panel in monitoring of lymphoma patients.

  5. B-cell responses to HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2017-01-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has received considerable attention in recent years, in part driven by renewed interest and opportunities for antibody-based strategies for prevention such as passive transfer of antibodies and the development of preventive vaccines, as well as immune-based therapeutic interventions. Advances in the ability to screen, isolate, and characterize HIV-specific antibodies have led to the identification of a new generation of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). The majority of these antibodies have been isolated from B cells of chronically HIV-infected individuals with detectable viremia. In this review, we provide insight into the phenotypic and functional attributes of human B cells, with a focus on HIV-specific memory B cells and plasmablasts/cells that are responsible for sustaining humoral immune responses against HIV. We discuss the abnormalities in B cells that occur in HIV infection both in the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues, especially in the setting of persisting viremia. Finally, we consider the opportunities and drawbacks of intensively interrogating antibodies isolated from HIV-infected individuals to guide strategies aimed at developing effective antibody-based vaccine and therapeutic interventions for HIV. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Ileal Peyer's patches are not necessary for systemic B cell development and maintenance and do not contribute significantly to the overall B cell pool in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkora, Marek; Stepanova, Katerina; Butler, John E; Francis, David; Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Potockova, Hana; Karova, Kristyna; Sinkorova, Jana

    2011-11-15

    Based on studies of sheep, ileal Peyer's patches (IPP) have been regarded as a type of primary lymphoid tissue similar to the bursa of Fabricius in chicken. Because bursectomy results in B cell deficiency, we wondered whether resection of the IPP of piglets would have a similar effect. Comparison of IPP-resected, surgical shams and untreated germ-free piglets, all of which were later colonized with a defined commensal flora, demonstrated that resection of the IPP did not alter the level and phenotype of B and T cells in lymphoid tissues and the blood 10 wk after surgery. Additionally, colonization of IPP caused a shift from the fetal type of lymphocyte distribution to the adult type that is characterized by prevalence of B cells, with many of them representing IgA(+) switched B cells or displaying a more mature CD2(-)CD21(+) and CD2(-)CD21(-) phenotype. Moreover, colonization leads to appearance of effector CD4(+)CD8(+) αβ T helper and CD2(+)CD8(-) γδ T cells. Comparison of germ-free with colonized pigs and experiments utilizing surgical transposition of jejunal Peyer's patch into terminal ileum or construction of isolated ileal loops indicated that lymphocyte development in IPP is dependent on colonization. Although our studies confirmed higher mitotic and apoptotic rates in IPP, they failed to identify any cell populations that resemble developing B lineage cells in the bone marrow. These results indicate that porcine IPP are not required for systemic B cell generation or maintenance, but they are secondary lymphoid tissue that appears important in immune responses to colonizing bacteria.

  7. Tolerance without clonal expansion: self-antigen-expressing B cells program self-reactive T cells for future deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Friederike; Heinen, Tobias J A J; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Yogev, Nir; Buch, Thorsten; Roers, Axel; Bettelli, Estelle; Müller, Werner; Anderton, Stephen M; Waisman, Ari

    2008-10-15

    B cells have been shown in various animal models to induce immunological tolerance leading to reduced immune responses and protection from autoimmunity. We show that interaction of B cells with naive T cells results in T cell triggering accompanied by the expression of negative costimulatory molecules such as PD-1, CTLA-4, B and T lymphocyte attenuator, and CD5. Following interaction with B cells, T cells were not induced to proliferate, in a process that was dependent on their expression of PD-1 and CTLA-4, but not CD5. In contrast, the T cells became sensitive to Ag-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that B cells participate in the homeostasis of the immune system by ablation of conventional self-reactive T cells.

  8. Specific blockade by CD54 and MHC II of CD40-mediated signaling for B cell proliferation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyle, I S; Hollmann, C A; Crispe, I N;

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of B lymphocyte proliferation is critical to maintenance of self-tolerance, and intercellular interactions are likely to signal such regulation. Here, we show that coligation of either the adhesion molecule ICAM-1/CD54 or MHC II with CD40 inhibited cell cycle progression and promoted...... apoptosis of mouse splenic B cells. This resulted from specific blockade of NF-kappa B induction, which normally inhibits apoptosis. LPS- or B cell receptor (BCR)-induced proliferation was not inhibited by these treatments, and mAb-induced association of CD40 with other B cell surface molecules did not have...... these effects. Addition of BCR or IL-4 signals did not overcome the effect of ICAM-1 or MHC II on CD40-induced proliferation. FasL expression was not detected in B cell populations. These results show that MHC II and ICAM-1 specifically modulate CD40-mediated signaling, so inhibiting proliferation...

  9. B-cell superantigens: definition and potential impact on the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, A I; Kozlowski, L; Zheng, Y; Wheatley, L

    1995-11-01

    Superantigens have been extremely helpful tools in exploring fundamental questions in immunobiology including mechanisms of cell activation, tolerance, and autoimmunity. Until recently, attention has been focused exclusive on T-cell superantigens. However, new data suggest that there are superantigens that directly activate B cells. By definition, these agents (1) stimulate a high frequency of B cells, (2) target B cells that have restricted usage of VH or VL family genes, and (3) bind to immunoglobulins outside the sites that bind conventional antigens. A candidate B-cell superantigen that has received considerable attention in this laboratory is staphylococcal protein A. This agent is best known to the immunologist because of its ability to bind to the Fc fragment of IgG. This binding has been localized to two alpha-helical structures on each of four or five homologous regions that comprise the extracellular domain of protein A. However, it is now clear that protein A contains a second site that binds to determinants on the Fab regions of certain immunoglobulins independently of their heavy-chain isotype. In man this so-called alternative site appears to bind only to immunoglobulins that utilize heavy-chain genes of the VH3 subfamily. In the mouse this type of binding is restricted to immunoglobulins using heavy chains belonging to the S107 and J606 VH families. In this review, we examine the growing list of microbial products that dominate B-cell superantigenic properties. Using staphylococcal protein A as a model for a B-cell superantigen, we consider the potential impact of this novel class of antigens on the immune response. We focus on the ability of B-cell superantigens to influence the expression of the B-cell repertoire. In addition, we consider the hypothesis that the interaction of a B-cell superantigen with its reactive serum immunoglobulins activates the classical complement cascade and thus represents a powerful stimulant of tissue inflammation.

  10. The Pre-B Cell Receptor and Its Function during B Cell Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MinZhang; GopeshSrivastava; LiweiLu

    2004-01-01

    The process of B cell development in the bone marrow occurs by the stepwise rearrangements of the V, D, and J segments of the Ig H and L chain gene loci. During early B cell genesis, productive IgH chain gene rearrangement leads to assembly of the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR), which acts as an important checkpoint at the pro-B/preB transitional stage. The pre-BCR, transiently expressed by developing precursor B cells, comprises the Ig μH chain, surrogate light (SL) chains VpreB and λ5, as well as the signal-transducing hetero-dimer Igα/Igβ. Signaling through the pre-BCR regulates allelic exclusion at the Ig H locus, stimulates cell proliferation, and induces differentiation to small post-mitotic pre-B cells that further undergo the rearrangement of the IgL chain genes. Recent advances in elucidating the key roles of pre-BCR in B cell development have provided a better understanding of normal B lymphopoiesis and its dysregulated state leading to B cell neoplasia. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):89-94.

  11. The Pre-B Cell Receptor and Its Function during B Cell Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhang; Gopesh Srivastava1; Liwei Lu

    2004-01-01

    The process of B cell development in the bone marrow occurs by the stepwise rearrangements of the V, D, and Jsegments of the Ig H and L chain gene loci. During early B cell genesis, productive IgH chain generearrangement leads to assembly of the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR), which acts as an important checkpointat the pro-B/preB transitional stage. The pre-BCR, transiently expressed by developing precursor B cells,comprises the Ig μH chain, surrogate light (SL) chains VpreB and λ5, as well as the signal-transducing heterodimer Igα/Igβ. Signaling through the pre-BCR regulates allelic exclusion at the Ig H locus, stimulates cell proliferation, and induces differentiation to small post-mitotic pre-B cells that further undergo the rearrangement of the IgL chain genes. Recent advances in elucidating the key roles of pre-BCR in B cell development have provided a better understanding of normal B lymphopoiesis and its dysregulated state leading to B cell neoplasia.

  12. Immature B Cell Egress from Bone Marrow Is SOCS3 Independent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Nadrah

    Full Text Available Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-3 has been suggested to regulate CXCR4 signaling in a variety of human cell lines. In mice, conditional SOCS3 inactivation in hematopoietic cells including B-lineage lymphocytes has been reported to exacerbate CXCR4-signaling and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, which resulted in altered immature B cell distribution in bone marrow (BM due to sustained α4β1 integrin-mediated adhesion to the extracellular matrix. However, a recent study examining conditional SOCS3 deletion specifically in B-lineage cells failed to detect significant roles in B-lineage cell retention in BM. In this study we carefully examined the role played by SOCS3 in CXCR4 signaling in developing B cell subsets. We show that in mice conditionally deficient in SOCS3 exclusively in B cells (Socs3fl/fl Mb1cre/+ there was no detectable difference in B cell development in BM and in periphery. We show that SOCS3 deficient and sufficient immature B cell subsets are similarly distributed between BM parenchyma and sinusoids, and are equally competent at exiting BM into peripheral blood. Furthermore, we found no significant differences in CXCR4 desensitization upon ligand exposure in developing B lymphocyte subsets. Consequently, SOCS3-deficient and sufficient B-lineage cell migration towards CXCL12 in vitro was undistinguishable, and B-lineage cell amoeboid motility within BM parenchyma was also unaffected by SOCS3-deficiency. Thus we conclude that SOCS3 has no detectable influence on biological processes known to be controlled by CXCR4 signaling.

  13. Changes in percentage of lymphocyte subsets after 131I treatment in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Quan-Yong; CHEN Li-Bo; YU Yong-Li; LU Han-Kui; ZHU Rui-Sen

    2005-01-01

    To monitor the extent and the duration of lymphocyte subset changes in patients with thyroid carcinoma undergoing therapeutic 131I administration, the percentage of lymphocyte subsets were serially analyzed before and after 131I treatment. In patients who received 1850 MBq of 131I for ablation of thyroid remnants, only for NK cells and B cells showed a significant reduction. In patients received 3700 MBq of 131I for treatment of local lymph node metastases, NK cells, B cells and CD4+ were found decreased. In patients received 7400 MBq of 131I for treatment of distant metastases, NK cells, B cells and CD4+ and CD8+ were all affected. However, there is no significant reduction compared to the baseline in the percentage of all lymphocyte subsets three months after 131I treatment. The results show that the sensitivity of lymphocytes to 131I internal radiation depends upon lymphocyte phenotype and 131I activity. The immunosuppression effects are temporary and reversible.

  14. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases.

  15. Responses to recipient and donor B cells by genetically donor T cells from human haploidentical chimeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiff, S.; Sampson, H.; Buckley, R.

    1986-03-01

    Following administration of haploidentical stem cells to infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), mature T cells of donor karyotype appear later in the recipient without causing graft-versus-host disease. To investigate the effect of the host environment on the responsiveness of these genetically donor T cells, blood B and T lymphocytes from 6 SCID recipients, their parental donors and unrelated controls were purified by double SRBC rosetting. T cells were stimulated by irradiated B cells at a 1:1 ratio in 6 day cultures. Engrafted T cells of donor karyotype gave much smaller responses to irradiated genetically recipient B cells than did fresh donor T cells. Moreover, engrafted T cells of donor karyotype from two of the three SCIDs who are longest post-transplantation responded more vigorously (14,685 and 31,623 cpm) than fresh donor T cells (5141 and 22,709 cpm) to donor B cells. These data indicate that T lymphocytes which have matured from donor stem cells in the recipient microenvironment behave differently from those that have matured in the donor.

  16. Primary Hepatosplenic Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Morales-Polanco

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common form of lymphoma. It usually begins in the lymph nodes; up to 40% may have an extranodal presentation. According to a definition of primary extranodal lymphoma with presentation only in extranodal sites, there are reports of large B-cell lymphomas limited to liver or spleen as separate entities, and to date there have been only three documented cases of primary hepatosplenic presentation. This paper reports a fourth case. Due to a review of the literature and the clinical course of the case reported, we conclude that primary hepatosplenic large B-cell lymphoma has been found predominantly in females older than 60 years. The patients reported had <2 months of evolution prior to diagnosis, prominent B symptoms, splenomegaly in three and hepatomegaly in two, none with lymph node involvement. All had thrombocytopenia and abnormal liver function tests; three had anemia and elevated serum lactic dehydrogenase levels, two with hemophagocytosis in bone marrow. Because of the previously mentioned data, it can be stated that primary hepatosplenic lymphoma is an uncommon and aggressive form of disease that requires immediate recognition and treatment.

  17. Organizing pneumonia appearing in B-cell chronic leukemia malignancy progression - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polaczek, Mateusz Marek; Zych, Jacek; Opoka, Lucyna; Maksymiuk, Beata; Roszkowski-Sliż, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma are at risk of infectious diseases of respiratory system because of immunodeficiency. Occurrence of organizing pneumonia in leukemic patients is most commonly correlated with bone marrow transplant or treatment with antimitotic agents. There have been only four reported cases of organizing pneumonia related solitarily to leukemia or lymphoma. We present a case of 65-year old gentlemen, diagnosed 8 months earlier with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia with no previous hematologic treatment, who presented symptoms of persistent pneumonia with no significant reaction to antibiotics. Chest computed tomography scans showed well-localized consolidation with ground glass opacities and some air bronchogram, suggesting infectious disease. All results of microbiological examinations were negative. Due to radiological progression of parenchymal consolidation despite two intravenous courses of antibiotics open lung biopsy was performed. The histologic examination of lung specimen revealed structures typical for organizing pneumonia pattern. There was no evidence for leukemic involvement in lung tissue, as no sign for infectious factors from histological staining was observed. In the inferior mediastinal lymph node sample progression of chronic lymphatic leukemia to mixed cell lymphoma was diagnosed. Patient was commenced on prednisone 60 mg/daily with fast improvement. We believe that this is the first case of organizing pneumonia as a reaction to the conversion of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia progression to more malignant stage.

  18. Abnormal B-cell activation associated with TALL-1 over-expression and SOCS-1 suppression during chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Jonathan; Dong, Zhi P; Ni, Lei; Zhang, Chunlan; Borthwick, Thomas; Yao, Zhi Q

    2009-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with cirrhosis, autoimmunity and lymphoproliferative disorders. We have previously reported a differential regulation of T and B lymphocytes by HCV core protein in vitro. In this report, we employed a translational approach to characterize the activation status of peripheral B cells from individuals with chronic HCV infection and to explore potential mechanisms for B-cell dysregulation in the setting of HCV infection. In contrast to the T-cell suppression observed in HCV-infected individuals, B cells exhibit a non-specific polyclonal activation phenotype, characterized by significantly higher levels of (1) the early activation marker, CD69, (2) the costimulatory molecule, CD86, and (3) the CCR5 chemokine receptor, CD195, when compared with B cells from healthy donors in response to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation. Importantly, tumour necrosis factor- and Apo-L-related leucocyte-expressed ligand-1 (TALL-1), also known as B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLYS), was found to be up-regulated on the surface of B cells from HCV patients in response to PHA as well as HCV core antigen stimulation. This up-regulation of TALL-1 was associated with vigorous memory B-cell responses to viral antigenic stimulation. Additionally, suppressor of cytokine signalling-1 (SOCS-1), a negative feedback immunoregulator that is inhibited in B lymphocytes by HCV core in vitro, was also inhibited in B cells from HCV patients when compared with healthy donors. These findings suggest that TALL-1 over-expression and SOCS-1 suppression are associated with aberrant B-cell activation, providing a plausible basis for the B-cell clonal expansion underlying the lymphoproliferative disorders and autoimmune phenomena observed during chronic HCV infection.

  19. The predictive significance of CD20 expression in B-cell lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvat Mateja

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our recent study, we determined the cut-off value of CD20 expression at the level of 25 000 molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome (MESF to be the predictor of response to rituximab containing treatment in patients with B-cell lymphomas. In 17.5% of patients, who had the level of CD20 expression below the cut-off value, the response to rituximab containing treatment was significantly worse than in the rest of the patients with the level of CD20 expression above the cut-off value. The proportion of patients with low CD20 expression who might not benefit from rituximab containing treatment was not necessarily representative. Therefore the aim of this study was to quantify the CD20 expression in a larger series of patients with B-cell lymphomas which might allow us to determine more reliably the proportion of patients with the CD20 expression below the cut-off. Methods Cytological samples of 64 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL, 56 follicular lymphomas (FL, 31 chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL, 34 mantle cell lymphomas (MCL, 18 marginal zone lymphomas (MZL and 15 B-cell lymphomas unclassified were analyzed for CD20 expression by quantitative four-color flow cytometric measurements using FACSCalibur flow cytometer (BD Biosciences. Results The range of CD20 expression in different B-cell lymphomas was very broad, varying from 2 737 to 115 623 MESF in CLL and 3 549 to 679 577 MESF in DLBCL. However, when we compared the CD20 expression in the groups of patients with DLBCL, FL, MCL, MZL, CLL and B-cell lymphomas unclassified, it was found to be significantly lower (p = 0.002 only in CLL but did not significantly differ in other lymphoma types (p = NS. Fifty-three out of 218 (24.3% patients with B-cell lymphomas had the CD20 expression below the cut-off value. Conclusions The CD20 expression in CLL is significantly lower than in most histological types of mature B-cell lymphomas in which it appears to be comparable

  20. Disodium cromoglycate inhibits S mu-->S epsilon deletional switch recombination and IgE synthesis in human B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    IgE synthesis requires interleukin 4 (IL-4) and a T-B cell interaction that involves the B cell antigen CD40 and its ligand expressed on activated T cells. IL-4 induces epsilon germline transcription whereas ligation of CD40 results in deletional S mu-->S epsilon switch recombination, expression of mature epsilon transcripts, and IgE synthesis and secretion. We demonstrate that disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), a drug commonly used for the prophylactic treatment of allergic disease, inhibits T cell-driven IgE synthesis by human B cells at concentrations readily achievable in the course of inhaled therapy for asthma. Inhibition of IgE synthesis by DSCG was not the result of drug toxicity because DSCG did not affect the viability of T and B cells or their proliferation to mitogens. DSCG did not interfere with CD40 ligand expression by T cells but clearly targeted the B cells because it inhibited IgE synthesis induced by anti-CD40 and IL-4 in populations of highly purified B cells. DSCG had no effect on the induction of epsilon germline transcripts by IL-4 but strongly inhibited CD40 mediated S mu-->S epsilon deletional switch recombination in IL-4- treated B cells as assayed by nested primer PCR. The effect of DSCG was not specific for CD40-mediated induction of IgE isotype switching because DSCG inhibited IgE synthesis as well as S mu-->S epsilon deletional switch recombination induced by hydrocortisone and IL-4 in B cells. Moreover, the effect of DSCG was not specific for IgE isotype switching because DSCG inhibited the synthesis of IgG4 by B cells sorted for lack of surface expression of IgG4 and stimulated with anti- CD40 and IL-4. DSCG caused only minimal inhibition (< 15%) of spontaneous IgE synthesis by lymphocytes from patients with the hyper- IgE syndrome and did not affect pokeweed mitogen-induced IgG and IgA synthesis by lymphocytes suggesting that it has little effect on B cells that have already undergone isotype switching. These results indicate that DSCG

  1. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  2. Type I interferon suppresses virus-specific B cell responses by modulating CD8+ T cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseman, E. Ashley; Wu, Tuoqi; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have established a role for T cells in resolving persistent viral infections, yet emerging evidence indicates that both T and B cells are required to control some viruses. During persistent infection, a marked lag or failure to generate neutralizing antibodies is commonly observed and likely contributes to an inability to control certain pathogens. Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) as a model, we have examined how a persistent viral infection can suppress neutralizing humoral immunity. By tracking the fate of virus-specific B cells in vivo, we report that LCMV-specific B cells were rapidly deleted within a few days of persistent infection, and this deletion was completely reversed by blockade of type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling. Early interference with IFN-I signaling promoted survival and differentiation of LCMV-specific B cells, which accelerated the generation of neutralizing antibodies. This marked improvement in antiviral humoral immunity did not rely on the cessation of IFN-I signaling in B cells but on alterations in the virus-specific CD8+ T cell response. Using two-photon microscopy and in vivo calcium imaging, we observed that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) productively engaged and killed LCMV-specific B cells in a perforin-dependent manner within the first few days of infection. Blockade of IFN-I signaling protected LCMV-specific B cells by promoting CTL dysfunction. Therapeutic manipulation of this pathway may facilitate efforts to promote humoral immunity during persistent viral infection in humans. Our findings illustrate how events that occur early after infection can disturb the resultant adaptive response and contribute to viral persistence.

  3. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors in B-cell lymphoma: current experience and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, T; Dreyling, M

    2017-08-01

    The Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a central hub in the B cell receptor (BCR) pathway and strongly influences B cell maturation, differentiation and proliferation. Not surprisingly, BTK plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of various B cell lymphomas. Inhibitors of BTK have broadened our therapeutic options in several B cell lymphomas and already are an integral element in the treatment of Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Waldenström's marcoglobulinemia. Several second generation BTK inhibitors are in clinical development and might further improve tolerability and efficacy of therapy in advanced stage CLL and MCL. Areas covered: This review illustrates the mechanism of action of BTK inhibitors and provides a comprehensive summary of key clinical trials in the development of BTK inhibitors. Characteristics of second generation BTK-inhibitors are described. Expert opinion: With accumulation of clinical experience after drug approval, longer patient follow-up and larger numbers of treated patients, future development will focus on the identification of intelligent treatment combinations. Individual selection of patients with distinct biologically properties might guide treatment decisions. While BTK inhibitors are moving to earlier treatment lines, the incorporation of these drugs into a comprehensive therapeutic strategy is still difficult to date.

  4. Development of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib for B cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayko, Urte; Fung, Mann; Clow, Fong; Sun, Steven; Faust, Elizabeth; Price, Samiyeh; James, Danelle; Doyle, Margaret; Bari, Samina; Zhuang, Sen Hong

    2015-11-01

    Ibrutinib is a first-in-class oral covalent inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase that has demonstrated clinical benefit for many patients with B cell malignancies. Positive results in initial trials led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to grant ibrutinib three breakthrough therapy designations for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), del17p chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). Ibrutinib was approved for these three cancers within 14 months of the original U.S. approval. Additionally, ibrutinib is approved for patient subsets with MCL and/or CLL in >45 other countries. Via a unique mechanism of action, ibrutinib inhibits B cell signaling pathways that regulate the survival, proliferation, adhesion, and homing of cancerous cells. This marks a paradigm shift from the conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy approach to treating B cell malignancies. Ibrutinib continues to be evaluated across a range of B cell malignancies, either as single-agent therapy or in combination with other therapies, and continues to transform the lives of these patients. © 2015 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Central tolerance regulates B cells reactive with Goodpasture antigen alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Su, Susan C; Hecox, Douglas B; Brady, Graham F; Mackin, Katherine M; Clark, Amy G; Foster, Mary H

    2008-11-01

    Patients and rodents with Goodpasture's syndrome (GPS) develop severe autoimmune crescentic glomerulonephritis, kidney failure, and lung hemorrhage due to binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to the NC1 domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. Target epitopes are cryptic, normally hidden from circulating Abs by protein-protein interactions and the highly tissue-restricted expression of the alpha3(IV) collagen chain. Based on this limited Ag exposure, it has been suggested that target epitopes are not available as B cell tolerogens. To determine how pathogenic anti-GPS autoantibody responses are regulated, we generated an Ig transgenic (Tg) mouse model that expresses an Ig that binds alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen epitopes recognized by serum IgG of patients with GPS. Phenotypic analysis reveals B cell depletion and L chain editing in Tg mice. To determine the default tolerance phenotype in the absence of receptor editing and endogenous lymphocyte populations, we crossed Tg mice two generations with mice deficient in Rag. Resulting Tg Rag-deficient mice have central B cell deletion. Thus, development of Tg anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen B cells is halted in the bone marrow, at which point the cells are deleted unless rescued by a Rag enzyme-dependent process, such as editing. The central tolerance phenotype implies that tolerizing self-Ag is expressed in bone marrow.

  6. Essential role for CAML in follicular B cell survival and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zane, Nicholas A; Gundelach, Justin H; Lindquist, Lonn D; Bram, Richard J

    2012-04-01

    Calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAML) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that is important during thymopoiesis. However, whether it serves a function in mature lymphocytes is unknown. In this article, we show that CAML is essential for survival of peripheral follicular (Fo) B cells. Conditional deletion of CAML in CD19-Cre transgenic mice caused a significant reduction in Fo cell numbers and increased rates of homeostatic proliferation. CAML-deficient Fo cells showed increased cellular turnover and normal proliferative ability. Although CAML-deficient Fo cells responded to AgR stimulation and to B cell activating factor, they displayed decreased survival and increased apoptosis following stimulation with LPS and IL-4 in vitro. Failure to survive was not due to aberrant B cell development in the absence of CAML, because induced deletion of the gene in mature cells resulted in a similar phenotype. These data establish an essential and ongoing role for CAML in the long-term survival of mature B cells.

  7. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors and their clinical potential in the treatment of B-cell malignancies: focus on ibrutinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalipour, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant signaling of the B-cell receptor pathway has been linked to the development and maintenance of B-cell malignancies. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), a protein early in this pathway, has emerged as a new therapeutic target in a variety of such malignancies. Ibrutinib, the most clinically advanced small molecule inhibitor of BTK, has demonstrated impressive tolerability and activity in a range of B-cell lymphomas which led to its recent approval for relapsed mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of ibrutinib and discusses its therapeutic potential. PMID:25360238

  8. [Genetic bases of diversity of the repertoire of immunoglobulins in application to diagnostics of clonality of B-cell lymphoid populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, E S; Kazilo, N A; Stefanov, D N; Sinitsina, M N; Kovrigina, A M

    2011-06-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of B-cell lymphomas in connection with processes associated with the maturation of B lymphocytes are reviewed. The currently used diagnostic methods do not always distinguish lymphomas from reactive changes of the lymphoid tissue. The principle of the molecular genetic method ofclonality detection in lymphocyte populations, technical problems, and the strategy of its application in clinical diagnostics of lymphomas are described in detail.

  9. PAX8 Distinguishes Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S. Hirsch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available PAX8 is important for embryogenesis of the thyroid, Müllerian system, and upper urinary/renal tract, and expression of PAX8 has been described in carcinomas from each of these sites. The sensitivity and specificity of the polyclonal PAX8 antibody in a large cohort of epithelial tumors as well as lymphomas have been previously determined, the latter because polyclonal PAX8 is known to be immunoreactive in nonneoplastic B-cell lymphocytes which are often used as the positive internal control for immunohistochemistry. In this case report, PAX8 was a diagnostic clue for revising a previous diagnosis of unclassified high grade sarcoma to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This case report demonstrates a pitfall for PAX8 immunoreactivity and acts as a reminder that lymphoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a PAX8 positive, epithelial cell marker negative tumor of unknown primary origin.

  10. The BALB/c mouse B-cell response to pigeon cytochrome c initiates as a heteroclitic response specific for the self antigen mouse cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnerath, J M; Wakem, L P; Comfort, L L; Sherman, F; Jemmerson, R

    1995-01-01

    Direct evidence is presented in support of the longstanding but unproven hypothesis that B lymphocytes specific for self antigens (Ags) can be used in the immune response to foreign Ags. We show that the B cells in BALB/c mic responding early to pigeon cytochrome c (CYT) produce antibodies that recognize and bind the major antigenic site on mouse CYT with greater affinity than they bind pigeon CYT i.e., they are heteroclitic for the self Ag. Furthermore, these B cells express the same combination of immunoglobulin variable region (V) genes that are known to be used in B-cell recognition of mouse CYT. Over time, the response to pigeon CYT becomes more specific for the foreign Ag through the recruitment of B cells expressing different combinations of V genes and, possibly, somatic mutation of the mouse CYT specific B cells from early in the response. Cross-recognition of pigeon CYT by mouse CYT-specific B cells results from the sharing of critical amino acid residues by the two Ags. Although B-cell recognition of the self Ag, mouse CYT, is very specific, which limits the extent to which foreign Ags can cross-activate the autoreactive B cells, it is possible that polyreactive B cells to other self Ags may be used more frequently in response to foreign Ags. PMID:8618905

  11. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with combined TP53 mutation and MIR34A methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Fazila; Hother, Christoffer; Kulosman, Gorjan

    2014-01-01

    MiR34A, B and C have been implicated in lymphomagenesis, but information on their role in normal CD19+ B-cells (PBL-B) and de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is limited. We show that in normal and activated B-cells miR34A-5p plays a dominant role compared to other miR34 family members....

  12. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) remains a curable lymphoma, with improved outcome due in large part to incorporation of rituximab in standard regimens. The disease is heterogeneous clinically, morphologically, and molecularly. Recent insights into the molecular heterogeneity of DLBCL are beginning to yield novel therapeutics with significant promise for key subsets of patients. Although CHOP chemotherapy with rituximab remains a standard therapeutic approach for most patients with DLBCL, we anticipate that novel agents will be included in treatment regimens for many patients in the near future. PMID:18954744

  13. Dynamics of B cells in germinal centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Nilushi S; Klein, Ulf

    2015-03-01

    Humoral immunity depends on the germinal centre (GC) reaction during which somatically mutated high-affinity memory B cells and plasma cells are generated. Recent studies have uncovered crucial cues that are required for the formation and the maintenance of GCs and for the selection of high-affinity antibody mutants. In addition, it is now clear that these events are promoted by the dynamic movements of cells within and between GCs. These findings have resolved the complexities of the GC reaction in greater detail than ever before. This Review focuses on these recent advances and discusses their implications for the establishment of humoral immunity.

  14. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Chronic B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange Veterans who ... receive VA health care and disability compensation. About chronic B-cell leukemias Leukemia is a cancer of ...

  15. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia with Mutated IGHV4-34 Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xochelli, Aliki; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Kavakiotis, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to investigate whether B cell receptor immunoglobulin (BcR IG) stereotypy is associated with particular clinicobiological features among chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients expressing mutated BcR IG (M-CLL) encoded by the IGHV4-34 gene, and also ascertain whether...

  16. Dectin-1 agonist selectively induces IgG1 class switching by LPS-activated mouse B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Beom-Seok; Park, Ha-Yan; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Park, Seok-Rae

    2016-10-01

    Heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HKSC) is an agonist for Dectin-1, a major fungal cell wall β-glucan receptor. We previously reported that HKSC selectively enhances IgG1 production by LPS-activated mouse B cells. To determine if this IgG1 selectivity is caused by selective IgG1 class switching, we performed RT-PCRs for measuring germline transcripts (GLTs), flow cytometric analyses for detecting Ig-expressing cells, and ELISPOT assays for measuring the number of Ig-secreting cells in HKSC/LPS-stimulated mouse B cell cultures. HKSC selectively enhanced expression of GLTγ1, the number of IgG1-expressing cells, and the number of IgG1-secreting B cells in the presence of LPS stimulation. In addition, HKSC induced the expression of CD69, an activation marker for B lymphocytes, and the expression of surface Dectin-1. Two Dectin-1 antagonists, laminarin and a neutralizing Dectin-1 antibody, selectively diminished HKSC-reinforced IgG1 production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, depleted zymosan (dzn), a Dectin-1 agonist with increased selectivity, also selectively enhanced GLTγ1 transcription. The Dectin-1 antagonists blocked dzn-induced IgG1 production by LPS-activated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Dectin-1 agonists selectively induce IgG1 class switching by direct stimulation of Dectin-1 on LPS-activated B cells resulting in selective production of IgG1.

  17. Antigen-engaged B cells undergo chemotaxis toward the T zone and form motile conjugates with helper T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaharu Okada

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between B and T cells are essential for most antibody responses, but the dynamics of these interactions are poorly understood. By two-photon microscopy of intact lymph nodes, we show that upon exposure to antigen, B cells migrate with directional preference toward the B-zone-T-zone boundary in a CCR7-dependent manner, through a region that exhibits a CCR7-ligand gradient. Initially the B cells show reduced motility, but after 1 d, motility is increased to approximately 9 microm/min. Antigen-engaged B cells pair with antigen-specific helper T cells for 10 to more than 60 min, whereas non-antigen-specific interactions last less than 10 min. B cell-T cell conjugates are highly dynamic and migrate extensively, being led by B cells. B cells occasionally contact more than one T cell, whereas T cells are strictly monogamous in their interactions. These findings provide evidence of lymphocyte chemotaxis in vivo, and they begin to define the spatiotemporal cellular dynamics associated with T cell-dependent antibody responses.

  18. A Paradigm Shift on the Question of B Cells in Transplantation? Recent Insights on Regulating the Alloresponse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firl, Daniel J; Benichou, Gilles; Kim, James I; Yeh, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    B lymphocytes contribute to acute and chronic allograft rejection through their production of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). In addition, B cells present allopeptides bound to self-MHC class II molecules and provide costimulation signals to T cells, which are essential to their activation and differentiation into memory T cells. On the other hand, both in laboratory rodents and patients, the concept of effector T cell regulation by B cells is gaining traction in the field of transplantation. Specifically, clinical trials using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies to deplete B cells and reverse DSA had a deleterious effect on rates of acute cellular rejection; a peculiar finding that calls into question a central paradigm in transplantation. Additional work in humans has characterized IL-10-producing B cells (IgM memory and transitional B cells), which suppress the proliferation and inflammatory cytokine productions of effector T cells in vitro. Understanding the mechanisms of regulating the alloresponse is critical if we are to achieve operational tolerance across transplantation. This review will focus on recent evidence in murine and human transplantation with respect to non-traditional roles for B cells in determining clinical outcomes.

  19. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase B controls survival and prevents anergy in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchal, Yoann; Quéant, Séverine; Polizzi, Selena; Pouillon, Valérie; Schurmans, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase B (or Itpkb) and inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (Ins(1,3,4,5)P4), its reaction product, play an important role in the control of B lymphocyte fate and function in vivo. In order to investigate the fine mechanisms of Itpkb and Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 action in B cells, we crossed Itpkb(-/-) mice with transgenic mice expressing a 3-83μδ B cell receptor (BCR) specific for membrane-bound MHC-I H2-K(b) and H2-K(k) molecules. On a non-deleting H2-K(d) genetic background, we show that Itpkb is important for the control of Bim protein expression and B cell survival rather than for the control of B cell development from one stage to another. Analyses of cell surface markers expression, proapoptotic Bim protein expression, in vitro survival and in vivo turnover demonstrated that BCR transgenic Itpkb(-/-) B cells exhibit an anergic phenotype with the notable exception of their enhanced antigen-induced calcium signalling. On a deleting H2-K(b) genetic background, we show that Itpkb is not essential for BCR editing or negative selection. These data establish Itpkb as an important regulator of B cell survival and anergy in vivo.

  20. V(D)J recombination in mature B cells: a mechanism for altering antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavasiliou, F; Casellas, R; Suh, H; Qin, X F; Besmer, E; Pelanda, R; Nemazee, D; Rajewsky, K; Nussenzweig, M C

    1997-10-10

    The clonal selection theory states that B lymphocytes producing high-affinity immunoglobulins are selected from a pool of cells undergoing antibody gene mutation. Somatic hypermutation is a well-documented mechanism for achieving diversification of immune responses in mature B cells. Antibody genes were also found to be modified in such cells in germinal centers by recombination of the variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments. The ability to alter immunoglobulin expression by V(D)J recombination in the selective environment of the germinal center may be an additional mechanism for inactivation or diversification of immune responses.

  1. The origin of marginal zone B cells in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammers, PM; de Boer, NK; Deenen, GJ; Nieuwenhuis, P; Kroese, FGM

    1999-01-01

    The marginal zone is a unique compartment that is only found in the spleen. Rat marginal zone B cells (MZ-B) can be distinguished from other B cells, e.g. recirculating follicular B cells (RF-B), by several phenotypic characteristics. Typically MZ-B cells are surface (s)IgM(hi), sIgD(lo) and CD45R(B

  2. Identification of chromosomal abnormalities relevant to prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens-Kroef, M.J.P.L.; Simons, A.; Gorissen, H.; Feuth, A.B.; Weghuis, D.O.; Buijs, A.J.; Raymakers, R.A.P.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a highly variable clinical course. Characteristic genomic abnormalities provide clinically important prognostic information. Because karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are laborious techniques, we investigated the d

  3. Sustained NF-kappaB activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is independent of genetic and epigenetic alterations in the TNFAIP3 (A20) locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Lukas P; Claus, Rainer; Plume, Nadine; Schwamb, Janine; Konermann, Carolin; Pallasch, Christian P; Claasen, Julia; Brinker, Reinhild; Wollnik, Bernd; Plass, Christoph; Wendtner, Clemens-Martin

    2011-05-15

    Inappropriate nuclear factor (NF) κB activity is one major hallmark of B-cell malignancies and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). NFκB-dependent genes are involved in antiapoptosis, cell proliferation and metastasis and are responsible for survival and proliferation of tumors. However, the mechanisms of NFκB activity in CLL still need to be elucidated. Previously, we identified translocations in a region on chromosome 6q that encodes tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3, which is a key player in negative feedback loop regulation of NFκB. Inactivation of this ubiquitin-editing enzyme is involved in immunopathologies and in tumorigenesis. Frequent mutations in the A20 locus--leading to sustained NFκB activity--could be shown to play a dominant role in development of different B-cell malignancies. To check if A20 is involved in upregulation of NFκB activity in CLL, we sequenced Exons 2-9 of the A20 gene in 55 CLL DNA samples. Furthermore, we determined the methylation status of the promoter region in 63 CLL DNA samples and compared to 10 control DNAs of B cells from healthy donors. Contrary to reports from other B-cell malignancies, the A20 region showed neither mutations nor aberrant DNA methylation. Moreover, its expression could be confirmed by immunoblotting and showing comparable results to healthy B cells. These results indicate that malignant development in CLL differs from most of other B-cell malignancies, which show frequent inactivation of A20.

  4. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  5. Pathway-selective suppression of chemokine receptor signaling in B cells by LPS through downregulation of PLC-β2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Aiko-Konno; Liao, Fang; Zhang, Hongwei H; Hedrick, Michael N; Singh, Satya P; Wu, Dianqing; Farber, Joshua M

    2010-11-01

    Lymphocyte activation leads to changes in chemokine receptor expression. There are limited data, however, on how lymphocyte activators can alter chemokine signaling by affecting downstream pathways. We hypothesized that B cell-activating agents might alter chemokine responses by affecting downstream signal transducers, and that such effects might differ depending on the activator. We found that activating mouse B cells using either anti-IgM or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the surface expression of CCR6 and CCR7 with large increases in chemotaxis to their cognate ligands. By contrast, while anti-IgM also led to enhanced calcium responses, LPS-treated cells showed only small changes in calcium signaling as compared with cells that were freshly isolated. Of particular interest, we found that LPS caused a reduction in the level of B-cell phospholipase C (PLC)-β2 mRNA and protein. Data obtained using PLC-β2(-/-) mice showed that the β2 isoform mediates close to one-half the chemokine-induced calcium signal in resting and anti-IgM-activated B cells, and we found that calcium signals in the LPS-treated cells were boosted by increasing the level of PLC-β2 using transfection, consistent with a functional effect of downregulating PLC-β2. Together, our results show activator-specific effects on responses through B-cell chemokine receptors that are mediated by quantitative changes in a downstream signal-transducing protein, revealing an activity for LPS as a downregulator of PLC-β2, and a novel mechanism for controlling chemokine-induced signals in lymphocytes.

  6. Pathway-selective suppression of chemokine receptor signaling in B cells by LPS through downregulation of PLC-β2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Aiko-Konno; Liao, Fang; Zhang, Hongwei H; Hedrick, Michael N; Singh, Satya P; Wu, Dianqing; Farber, Joshua M

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocyte activation leads to changes in chemokine receptor expression. There are limited data, however, on how lymphocyte activators can alter chemokine signaling by affecting downstream pathways. We hypothesized that B cell-activating agents might alter chemokine responses by affecting downstream signal transducers, and that such effects might differ depending on the activator. We found that activating mouse B cells using either anti-IgM or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the surface expression of CCR6 and CCR7 with large increases in chemotaxis to their cognate ligands. By contrast, while anti-IgM also led to enhanced calcium responses, LPS-treated cells showed only small changes in calcium signaling as compared with cells that were freshly isolated. Of particular interest, we found that LPS caused a reduction in the level of B-cell phospholipase C (PLC)-β2 mRNA and protein. Data obtained using PLC-β2−/− mice showed that the β2 isoform mediates close to one-half the chemokine-induced calcium signal in resting and anti-IgM-activated B cells, and we found that calcium signals in the LPS-treated cells were boosted by increasing the level of PLC-β2 using transfection, consistent with a functional effect of downregulating PLC-β2. Together, our results show activator-specific effects on responses through B-cell chemokine receptors that are mediated by quantitative changes in a downstream signal-transducing protein, revealing an activity for LPS as a downregulator of PLC-β2, and a novel mechanism for controlling chemokine-induced signals in lymphocytes. PMID:20871625

  7. mTOR Promotes Antiviral Humoral Immunity by Differentially Regulating CD4 Helper T Cell and B Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lilin; Lee, Junghwa; Xu, Lifan; Mohammed, Ata-Ur-Rasheed; Li, Weiyan; Hale, J Scott; Tan, Wendy G; Wu, Tuoqi; Davis, Carl W; Ahmed, Rafi; Araki, Koichi

    2017-02-15

    mTOR has important roles in regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity, but whether and how mTOR modulates humoral immune responses have yet to be fully understood. To address this issue, we examined the effects of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, on B cell and CD4 T cell responses during acute infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Rapamycin treatment resulted in suppression of virus-specific B cell responses by inhibiting proliferation of germinal center (GC) B cells. In contrast, the number of memory CD4 T cells was increased in rapamycin-treated mice. However, the drug treatment caused a striking bias of CD4 T cell differentiation into Th1 cells and substantially impaired formation of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, which are essential for humoral immunity. Further experiments in which mTOR signaling was modulated by RNA interference (RNAi) revealed that B cells were the primary target cells of rapamycin for the impaired humoral immunity and that reduced Tfh formation in rapamycin-treated mice was due to lower GC B cell responses that are essential for Tfh generation. Additionally, we found that rapamycin had minimal effects on B cell responses activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which stimulates B cells in an antigen-independent manner, suggesting that rapamycin specifically inhibits B cell responses induced by B cell receptor stimulation with antigen. Together, these findings demonstrate that mTOR signals play an essential role in antigen-specific humoral immune responses by differentially regulating B cell and CD4 T cell responses during acute viral infection and that rapamycin treatment alters the interplay of immune cell subsets involved in antiviral humoral immunity. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase involved in a variety of cellular activities. Although its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, is currently used as an immunosuppressive drug in transplant patients, it has been reported that rapamycin can also stimulate pathogen

  8. The B Cell-Stimulatory Cytokines BLyS and APRIL Are Elevated in Human Periodontitis and Are Required for B Cell-Dependent Bone Loss in Experimental Murine Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Toshiharu; AlSarhan, Mohammed; Benakanakere, Manjunatha R; Maekawa, Tomoki; Kinane, Denis F; Cancro, Michael P; Korostoff, Jonathan M; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-08-15

    B-lineage cells (B lymphocytes and plasma cells) predominate in the inflammatory infiltrate of human chronic periodontitis. However, their role in disease pathogenesis and the factors responsible for their persistence in chronic lesions are poorly understood. In this regard, two cytokines of the TNF ligand superfamily, a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), are important for the survival, proliferation, and maturation of B cells. Thus, we hypothesized that APRIL and/or BLyS are upregulated in periodontitis and contribute to induction of periodontal bone loss. This hypothesis was addressed in both human and mouse experimental systems. We show that, relative to healthy controls, the expression of APRIL and BLyS mRNA and protein was upregulated in natural and experimental periodontitis in humans and mice, respectively. The elevated expression of these cytokines correlated with increased numbers of B cells/plasma cells in both species. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS partially colocalized with κ L chain-expressing B-lineage cells at the epithelial-connective tissue interface. Ligature-induced periodontitis resulted in significantly less bone loss in B cell-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. Ab-mediated neutralization of APRIL or BLyS diminished the number of B cells in the gingival tissue and inhibited bone loss in wild-type, but not in B cell-deficient, mice. In conclusion, B cells and specific cytokines involved in their growth and differentiation contribute to periodontal bone loss. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS have been identified as potential therapeutic targets in periodontitis.

  9. Requirement for CD40 ligand, CD4(+) T cells, and B cells in an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, J W; Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, J P

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory challenge with the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (gammaHV-68) results in productive infection of the lung, the establishment of latency in B lymphocytes and other cell types, transient splenomegaly, and prolonged clonal expansion of activated CD8(+) CD62L(lo) T cells, particularly a Vbeta4......(+) CD8(+) population that is found in mice with different major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes. Aspects of the CD8(+)-T-cell response are substantially modified in mice that lack B cells, CD4(+) T cells, or the CD40 ligand (CD40L). The B-cell-deficient mice show no increase in Vbeta4(+) CD8......(+) CD8(+) population remains unexpanded. Apparently B-cell-CD4(+)-T-cell interactions play a part in the gammaHV-68 induction of both splenomegaly and non-MHC-restricted Vbeta4(+) CD8(+)-T-cell expansion....

  10. Human memory B cells originate from three distinct germinal center-dependent and -independent maturation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowska, Magdalena A; Driessen, Gertjan J A; Bikos, Vasilis; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Cerutti, Andrea; He, Bing; Biermann, Katharina; Lange, Johan F; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques J M; van Zelm, Menno C

    2011-08-25

    Multiple distinct memory B-cell subsets have been identified in humans, but it remains unclear how their phenotypic diversity corresponds to the type of responses from which they originate. Especially, the contribution of germinal center-independent responses in humans remains controversial. We defined 6 memory B-cell subsets based on their antigen-experienced phenotype and differential expression of CD27 and IgH isotypes. Molecular characterization of their replication history, Ig somatic hypermutation, and class-switch profiles demonstrated their origin from 3 different pathways. CD27⁻IgG⁺ and CD27⁺IgM⁺ B cells are derived from primary germinal center reactions, and CD27⁺IgA⁺ and CD27⁺IgG⁺ B cells are from consecutive germinal center responses (pathway 1). In contrast, natural effector and CD27⁻IgA⁺ memory B cells have limited proliferation and are also present in CD40L-deficient patients, reflecting a germinal center-independent origin. Natural effector cells at least in part originate from systemic responses in the splenic marginal zone (pathway 2). CD27⁻IgA⁺ cells share low replication history and dominant Igλ and IgA2 use with gut lamina propria IgA+ B cells, suggesting their common origin from local germinal center-independent responses (pathway 3). Our findings shed light on human germinal center-dependent and -independent B-cell memory formation and provide new opportunities to study these processes in immunologic diseases.

  11. B cell repertoires in HLA-sensitized kidney transplant candidates undergoing desensitization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F; Fan, H Christina; Sit, Rene; Hutchins, Maria U; Jirage, Kshama; Curtis, Rachael; Hutchins, Edward; Quake, Stephen R; Yabu, Julie M

    2017-01-13

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. Sensitization refers to pre-existing antibodies against human leukocyte antigen (HLA) protein and remains a major barrier to successful transplantation. Despite implementation of desensitization strategies, many candidates fail to respond. Our objective was to determine whether measuring B cell repertoires could differentiate candidates that respond to desensitization therapy. We developed an assay based on high-throughput DNA sequencing of the variable domain of the heavy chain of immunoglobulin genes to measure changes in B cell repertoires in 19 highly HLA-sensitized kidney transplant candidates undergoing desensitization and 7 controls with low to moderate HLA sensitization levels. Responders to desensitization had a decrease of 5% points or greater in cumulated calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) levels, and non-responders had no decrease in cPRA. Dominant B cell clones were not observed in highly sensitized candidates, suggesting that the B cells responsible for sensitization are either not present in peripheral blood or present at comparable levels to other circulating B cells. Candidates that responded to desensitization therapy had pre-treatment repertoires composed of a larger fraction of class-switched (IgG and IgA) isotypes compared to non-responding candidates. After B cell depleting therapy, the proportion of switched isotypes increased and the mutation frequencies of the remaining non-switched isotypes (IgM and IgD) increased in both responders and non-responders, perhaps representing a shift in the repertoire towards memory B cells or plasmablasts. Conversely, after transplantation, non-switched isotypes with fewer mutations increased, suggesting a shift in the repertoire towards naïve B cells. Relative abundance of different B cell isotypes is strongly perturbed by desensitization therapy and transplantation, potentially reflecting changes in the relative

  12. Cell of origin associated classification of B-cell malignancies by gene signatures of the normal B-cell hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gaihede, Michael; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Bødker, Julie Støve; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings have suggested biological classification of B-cell malignancies as exemplified by the "activated B-cell-like" (ABC), the "germinal-center B-cell-like" (GCB) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and "recurrent translocation and cyclin D" (TC) classification of multiple myeloma. Biological classification of B-cell derived cancers may be refined by a direct and systematic strategy where identification and characterization of normal B-cell differentiation subsets are used to define the cancer cell of origin phenotype. Here we propose a strategy combining multiparametric flow cytometry, global gene expression profiling and biostatistical modeling to generate B-cell subset specific gene signatures from sorted normal human immature, naive, germinal centrocytes and centroblasts, post-germinal memory B-cells, plasmablasts and plasma cells from available lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, peripheral blood and bone marrow. This strategy will provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation, which prospectively can be used to classify any B-cell malignancy and eventually purify tumor cells. This report briefly describes the current models of the normal B-cell subset differentiation in multiple tissues and the pathogenesis of malignancies originating from the normal germinal B-cell hierarchy.

  13. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Khan MD, FACP

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Hispanic male, with a past history of diabetes and coronary disease, was admitted for fever, diarrhea, and confusion of 4 weeks duration. Physical examination showed a disoriented patient with multiple ecchymoses, possible ascites, and bilateral scrotal swelling. Hemoglobin was 6.7, prothrombin time (PT 21.4 seconds with international normalized ratio 2.1, partial thromboplastin time (PTT 55.6 seconds, fibrin split 10 µg/L, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH 1231 IU/L. Except for a positive DNA test for Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection, extensive diagnostic workup for infections, malignancy, or a neurological cause was negative. Mixing studies revealed a nonspecific inhibitor of PT and PTT but Factor VIII levels were normal. The patient was empirically treated with antibiotics but developed hypotension and died on day 27 of admission. At autopsy, patient was found to have intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving skin, testes, lung, and muscles. The malignant cells were positive for CD20, CD791, Mum-1, and Pax-5 and negative for CD3, CD5, CD10, CD30, and Bcl-6. The malignant cells were 100% positive for Ki-67. Discussion. Intravascular large cell B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL is rare form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules. The cause of its affinity for vascular bed remains unknown. In many reports, IVLBCL was associated with HIV, HHV8, and EBV infections. The fact that our case showed evidence of EBV infection lends support to the association of this diagnosis to viral illness. The available literature on this subject is scant, and in many cases, the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The typical presentation of this disorder is with B symptoms, progressive neurologic deficits, and skin findings. Bone marrow, spleen, and liver are involved in a minority of patients. Nearly all patients have elevated LDH

  14. Targeting B cells in immune-mediated inflammatory disease: a comprehensive review of mechanisms of action and identification of biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, Thomas; Kinnman, Nils; Tak, Paul P

    2010-03-01

    B cell-depletion therapy, particularly using anti-CD20 treatment, has provided proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response may result in clinical improvements in immune-mediated inflammatory disease. In this review, the mechanisms of action of B cell-targeting drugs are investigated, and potential biomarkers associated with response to treatment in patients with autoimmune diseases are identified. Most available data relate to B cell depletion using anti-CD20 therapy (rituximab) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Treatment leads to significant clinical benefit, but apparently fails to deplete long-lived plasma cells, and discontinuation is associated with relapse. Biomarkers commonly used in studies of B cell-targeted therapies include rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies, and immunoglobulin (Ig) levels. More recently, there has been interest in markers such as B cell phenotype analysis, and B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS)/a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), the latter particularly in studies of the IgG Fc-transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) fusion protein (atacicept) and anti-BLyS therapy (belimumab). Data from clinical trials of B cell-depleting agents in RA suggest that specific autoantibodies, BLyS, APRIL, and circulating and synovial B lineage cell levels may have potential as biomarkers predictive of response to treatment. Further trials validating these markers against clinical outcomes in RA are required. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Fc receptors and levels of circulating immune cells (including B cells and natural killer cells) may be relevant markers.

  15. Role of prolactin in B cell regulation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Jorge; Farez, Mauricio F; Ysrraelit, María Célica

    2014-04-15

    The role of prolactin in MS pathogenesis was investigated. Prolactin levels were higher in MS subjects both during remission and exacerbation compared to control subjects. Prolactin increased JAK2 expression and Stat phosphorylation on B cells, up-regulated anti-MOG antibody secreting cell numbers, BAFF levels, and Bcl-2expression, and down-regulated expression of Trp63. Prolactin levels correlated positively with anti-MOG secreting cell numbers, and negatively with induced apoptotic B cells. Additionally, prolactin decreased B cell receptor-mediated activation threshold, and induced CD40 expression in B cells. These findings suggest that prolactin promotes B cell autoreactivity in MS through different mechanisms.

  16. Clinical Consequences of Defects in B cell Development

    OpenAIRE

    Vale, Andre M.; Schroeder, Harry (Trey) W

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in humoral immunity typically reflect a generalized or selective failure of effective B cell development. The developmental processes can be followed through analysis of cell surface markers such as IgM, IgD, CD10, CD19, CD20, CD21, and CD38. Early phases of B cell development are devoted to the creation of immunoglobulin and testing B cell antigen receptor signaling. Failure leads to the absence of B cells and immunoglobulin in the blood from birth. As the developing B cells be...

  17. B cell lymphomas express CX3CR1 a non-B cell lineage adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, U.; Ek, S.; Merz, H.

    2008-01-01

    To study the differential expression of cell membrane-bound receptors and their potential role in growth and/or survival of the tumor cells, highly purified follicular lymphoma cells were analyzed, using gene expression analysis, and compared to non-malignant B cell populations. Filtering...... the genome for overexpressed genes coding for cell membrane-bound proteins/receptors resulted in a hit list of 27 identified genes. Among these, we have focused on the aberrant over expression of CX3CR1, in different types of B cell lymphoma, as compared to non-malignant B cells. We show that CX3CR1, which...... normally is not expressed on B cells, is expressed both at the mRNA and protein level in several subtypes of lymphoma. CX3CR1 has also shown to be involved in the homing to specific tissues that express the ligand, CX3CL1, in breast and prostate cancer and may thus be involved in dissemination of lymphoma...

  18. Effect of B-cell receptor engagement on CD40-stimulated B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilizzi, BM; Boonstra, R; The, TH; deLeij, LFMH

    1997-01-01

    Activation of human B cells in vitro either by cross-linking of surface immunoglobulins (sig) or by triggering CD40 antigen, in the presence of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-2 (IL-2), may result in high levels of immunoglobulin secretion in vitro. We studied the combined effects of ligation

  19. Rationally designed BCL6 inhibitors target activated B cell diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Mariano G; Yu, Wenbo; Beguelin, Wendy; Teater, Matthew R; Geng, Huimin; Goldstein, Rebecca L; Oswald, Erin; Hatzi, Katerina; Yang, Shao-Ning; Cohen, Joanna; Shaknovich, Rita; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Cheng, Huimin; Liang, Dongdong; Cho, Hyo Je; Abbott, Joshua; Tam, Wayne; Du, Wei; Leonard, John P; Elemento, Olivier; Cerchietti, Leandro; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Xue, Fengtian; MacKerell, Alexander D; Melnick, Ari M

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) arise from proliferating B cells transiting different stages of the germinal center reaction. In activated B cell DLBCLs (ABC-DLBCLs), a class of DLBCLs that respond poorly to current therapies, chromosomal translocations and amplification lead to constitutive expression of the B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) oncogene. The role of BCL6 in maintaining these lymphomas has not been investigated. Here, we designed small-molecule inhibitors that display higher affinity for BCL6 than its endogenous corepressor ligands to evaluate their therapeutic efficacy for targeting ABC-DLBCL. We used an in silico drug design functional-group mapping approach called SILCS to create a specific BCL6 inhibitor called FX1 that has 10-fold greater potency than endogenous corepressors and binds an essential region of the BCL6 lateral groove. FX1 disrupted formation of the BCL6 repression complex, reactivated BCL6 target genes, and mimicked the phenotype of mice engineered to express BCL6 with corepressor binding site mutations. Low doses of FX1 induced regression of established tumors in mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. Furthermore, FX1 suppressed ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as primary human ABC-DLBCL specimens ex vivo. These findings indicate that ABC-DLBCL is a BCL6-dependent disease that can be targeted by rationally designed inhibitors that exceed the binding affinity of natural BCL6 ligands.

  20. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a useful marker for Hodgkin and B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vega, Iván; Quirós, Luis M; Santos-Juanes, Jorge; Pane-Foix, María; Marafioti, Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec family of protein tyrosine kinases involved in B cell development and proliferation in neoplastic human lymphoid tissues. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate a polyclonal anti-Btk antibody on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks. The tested samples included normal lymphoid tissues, tissue samples of 395 different lymphomas and 14 malignant lymphoid cell lines. Btk was expressed more often in B cell lymphomas than in T cell lymphomas. This correlated well with the results obtained on B cell lymphoma cell lines, which strongly expressed Btk, in contrast to T cell lymphoma cell lines. More than 60% of myelomas expressed Btk. Among Hodgkin lymphomas, the nodular lymphocyte predominant variant was more often positive (14/16) than the classical variant (6/27). Only one out of three Hodgkin lymphoma-derived cell lines showed a few atypical large cells expressing Btk. Btk represents a useful marker to identify B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Furthermore, Btk might help to distinguish the nodular lymphocyte predominant variant of Hodgkin lymphomas from the classical form. Finally, in view of the recently discovered therapeutic potential of Btk inhibitors in lymphoma, we report the pattern of expression of Btk in a large collection of different types of lymphoma.

  1. Homeostatic 'bystander' proliferation of human peripheral blood B cells in response to polyclonal T-cell stimulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Pietruczuk, Krzysztof; Frąckowiak, Joanna; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of maintenance of adequate numbers of B lymphocytes and of protective levels of immunoglobulins in the absence of antigenic (re)stimulation remain not fully understood. Meanwhile, our results presented here show that both peripheral blood naive and memory B cells can be activated strongly and non-specifically (in a mitogen-like fashion) in 5-day in vitro cultures of anti-CD3- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy people. This polyclonal, bystander activation of the B cells includes multiple divisions of most of them (assessed here by the flow cytometric technique of dividing cell tracking) and significant antibody [immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG] secretion. Observed proliferation of the CD19(+) B cells depends on contact with stimulated T helper (Th) cells (via CD40-CD40L interaction) and on the response of B cells to secreted interleukins IL-5, IL-10 and IL-4, and is correlated with the levels of these Th-derived molecules, while it does not involve the ligation of the BCR/CD19 complex. We suggest that the effect might reflect the situation occurring in vivo as the homeostatic proliferation of otherwise non-stimulated, peripheral B lymphocytes, providing an always ready pool for efficient antibody production to any new (or cognate) antigen challenge.

  2. Distinct morphophenotypic features of chronic B-cell leukaemias identified with CD1c and CD23 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orazi, A; Cattoretti, G; Polli, N; Delia, D; Rilke, F

    1991-07-01

    Morphological criteria usually applied to diagnose various subtypes of B-cell chronic lymphoid leukaemia are largely subjective. Immunophenotyping of 61 relevant cases using a selected panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb), showed that CD1c and CD23 mAb were able to separate B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) from other chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Lymphocytes of B-CLL were CD1c-, CD23+, whereas those of other types of chronic B-cell leukaemia were CD1c+/-, CD23-, and CD38/-. Non-B-CLL cases had a significantly higher amount of large peroxidase-negative (unstained) cells analyzed with an automated blood cell counter (Technicon H6000). This type of volumetric assessment allowed a separation between typical and "atypical" B-CLL, which otherwise were both CD1c-, and CD23+. These combinations of phenotypic markers corresponded to well-defined haematopathologic entities, conventionally diagnosed on peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow smears, and on histologic sections of lymph nodes and spleen.

  3. Short-term Curative Efficacy of Autologous Cytokine Induced Killer Cells Combined with Low-dose IL-2 Regimen Containing Immune Enhancement by Thymic Peptide in Elderly Patients with B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia%含胸腺肽增强免疫的自体CIK细胞输注联合小剂量IL-2方案治疗老年人B-CLL的近期疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡力力; 代汉仁; 韩为东; 范辉; 李素霞; 刘洋; 冉海红; 林洁; 脱帅; 脱朝伟; 张峰; 杨洋; 曹军平; 姚善谦; 杨波; 朱宏丽; 卢学春; 张文英; 于睿莉; 迟小华; 王瑶

    2012-01-01

    patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia ( B-CLL). Thymic peptide al was subcutaneously given as the immunoenhancement agent at a dose of 1.6 mg/d, 14 days as one cycle. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC} from 5 patients with B-CLL were isolated once a week to induce ex vivo CIK cells through culture in the context of interferon (IFN)-"y, interleukin (EL)-2 and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. The PBMNC were separated from patients before and after 14 days as one cycle of thymic peptide al administration. Parameters of amplification ability, effector cells quantity, lymphocyte subgroups percentage and antitumor cytotoxicity were compared before and after thymic peptide administration. The 5 patients were treated with CIK cells combined with low-dose IL-2 regimen immediately after injection of thymic peptide al. The CIK cells plus low-dose IL-2 regimen containing thymic peptide enhancement was defined as: thymic peptide al 1.6 mg/d was subcutaneously administered once every other day; (4-6) x I09 of CIK cells were transfused followed by IL-2 subcutaneous administration of 1 mU/d on days 1 - 10, 28 days as one cycle. Clinical evaluation parameters including cellular immunity function, CLL related biomarkers, disease state and infectious frequency and degree were investigated before and after CIK cells infusion puls IL-2. The results showed that the amount of amplified CIK cells, the percentage and amplification times of effector cells and antitoumor cytotoxicity more significantly increased after thymic peptide al treatment than before its use (P < 0.05). The total 46 cycles of CIK cells infusion plus IL-2 were completed in the 5 CLL patients. No adverse reaction was observed. After treatment of CIK cells plus IL-2, the general conditions of 5 CLL patients were to different extent improved. Simultaneously, percentages of CD3 + , CD3 + CD8 + , and CD3 + CD56 + cells in peripheral blood remarkedly raised (P < 0.05), the serum level of £2 microglobulin was

  4. Multiple dysfunctions in developmental and activational stages of T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes and monocytes in ARC and AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, Y; Tsang, P H; Petrella, R J; Bekesi, J G

    1987-11-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes from ARC and AIDS patients were examined before and after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation by dual color flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies which identify developmental and activational stages of T lymphocytes, B cells and monocytes. There was a persistent elevation in the total number of circulating Ia+ lymphocytes with progressive selection for B1+ Ia+ lymphocytes and T suppressor cells and a concurrent reduction in the antigen-presenting monocytes. Following PHA stimulation there was a marked decrease in all subsets of Ia+ lymphocytes and monocytes. These results indicate (a) multicellular dysfunctions in the immunosurveillance mechanisms in AIDS, and (b) that many functional subsets of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were already activated and therefore poorly responsive to additional antigenic or mitogenic stimuli.

  5. Rheumatoid factors, B cells and immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferis, R

    1995-04-01

    The paradigm of self, non-self discrimination in the immune system is under review as autoreactive B or T cells are increasingly delineated within normal individuals. The products of autoreactive B cells are, mostly, polyspecific IgM antibodies of low affinity. These 'natural' antibodies include rheumatoid factors (RF) encoded by unmutated germline immunoglobulin genes. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the RF may be of the IgM, IgG or IgA isotype, show evidence of somatic mutation and have increased affinity; consistent with maturation of an antigen driven immune response. This response could be initiated or driven by an auto-immunogenic form of IgG or an exogenous cross-reactive antigen. Changes in galactosylation of IgG have been reported to be a valuable diagnostic and prognostic indicator in RA. Speculation that these changes may precipitate some of the disease processes is critically reviewed.

  6. Evolutionary and functional relationships of B cells from fish and mammals: insights into their novel roles in phagocytosis and presentation of particulate antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyer, J Oriol

    2012-06-01

    The evolutionary origins of Ig-producing B cells appear to be linked to the emergence of fish in this planet. There are three major classes of living fish species, which from most primitive to modern they are referred to as agnathan (e.g., lampreys), Chondrichthyes (e.g., sharks), and teleost fish (e.g., rainbow trout). Agnathans do not have immunoglobulin- producing B cells, however these fish contain a subset of lymphocytes-like cells producing type B variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRBs) that appear to act as functional analogs of immunoglobulins. Chondrichthyes fish represent the most primitive living species containing bona-fide immunoglobulin-producing B cells. Their B cells are known to secrete three types of antibodies, IgM, IgW and IgNAR. Teleost fish are also called bony fish since they represent the most ancient living species containing true bones. Teleost B cells produce three different immunoglobulin isotypes, IgM, IgD and the recently described IgT. While teleost IgM is the principal player in systemic immunity, IgT appears to be a teleost immunoglobulin class specialized in mucosal immune responses. Thus far, three major B cell lineages have been described in teleost, those expressing either IgT or IgD, and the most common lineage which co-expresses IgD and IgM. A few years ago, the study of teleost fish B cells revealed for the first time in vertebrates the existence of B cell subsets with phagocytic and intracellular bactericidal capacities. This finding represented a paradigm shift as professional phagocytosis was believed to be exclusively performed by some cells of the myeloid lineage (i.e., macrophages, monocytes, neutrophils). This phagocytic capacity was also found in amphibians and reptiles, suggesting that this innate capacity was evolutionarily conserved in certain B cell subsets of vertebrates. Recently, the existence of subsets of B cells with phagocytic and bactericidal abilities have also been confirmed in mammals. Moreover, it has

  7. Multiple layers of B cell memory with different effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Ismail; Bertocci, Barbara; Vilmont, Valérie; Delbos, Frédéric; Mégret, Jérome; Storck, Sébastien; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Weill, Jean-Claude

    2009-12-01

    Memory B cells are at the center of longstanding controversies regarding the presence of antigen for their survival and their re-engagement in germinal centers after secondary challenge. Using a new mouse model of memory B cell labeling dependent on the cytidine deaminase AID, we show that after immunization with a particulate antigen, B cell memory appeared in several subsets, comprising clusters of immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM(+)) and IgG1(+) B cells in germinal center-like structures that persisted up to 8 months after immunization, as well as IgM(+) and IgG1(+) B cells with a memory phenotype outside of B cell follicles. After challenge, the IgG subset differentiated into plasmocytes, whereas the IgM subset reinitiated a germinal center reaction. This model, in which B cell memory appears in several layers with different functions, reconciles previous conflicting propositions.

  8. Mutations in the HLA class II genes leading to loss of expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordanova, ES; Philippo, K; Giphart, MJ; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    2003-01-01

    Loss of expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules on tumor cells affects the onset and modulation of the immune response through lack of activation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Previously, we showed that the frequent loss of expression of HLA class II in diffuse large B-cell lymphom

  9. Enteroantigen (eAg)-binding B lymphocytes in the mouse - phenotype, distribution, function and eAg-specific antibody secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venning, Freja Albjerg; Trempenau, Mette Louise; Schmidt, Esben

    2013-01-01

    Studies reporting beneficial effects of B lymphocytes in autoimmune diseases have been accumulating and a regulatory role for certain B cell subsets is hence getting more and more recognition. Recently, B cells were shown to exhibit a regulatory effect in a T cell transfer model of colitis. Here,...

  10. Engagement of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules up-regulates intercellular adhesion of human B cells via a CD11/CD18-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcover, A; Juillard, V; Acuto, O

    1992-02-01

    We have studied the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the regulation of intercellular adhesion of human B cells. We found that molecules able to bind to MHC class II molecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or staphylococcal enterotoxins, induced rapid and sustained homotypic adhesion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cell lines as well as peripheral blood B lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-MHC class I monoclonal antibodies also stimulated intercellular adherence. Adhesion induced upon MHC engagement was faster and stronger than that triggered by phorbol esters. It needed active metabolism, but divalent cations were not required. Monoclonal antibodies directed against LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) or its ligand ICAM-1 (CD54) did not inhibit MHC class II-induced homotypic adhesion of various EBV-transformed B cell lines, nor of a variant of the B cell line Raji expressing very low LFA-1 surface levels. Moreover, EBV-transformed B cells from a severe lymphocyte adhesion deficiency patient, lacking surface CD11/CD18, also aggregated in response to anti-MHC class I or class II monoclonal antibodies. Together these data indicate that engagement of MHC molecules may transduce signals to B cells resulting in up-regulation of intercellular adhesion, via an LFA-1-independent mechanism. This may play a role in the stabilization of T cell/antigen-presenting cell conjugates at the moment of antigen recognition.

  11. The RP105/MD-1 complex is indispensable for TLR4/MD-2-dependent proliferation and IgM-secreting plasma cell differentiation of marginal zone B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoshinori; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Yasuharu; Ikutani, Masashi; Kariyone, Ai; Ohta, Shoichiro; Hirai, Yoshikatsu; Kimoto, Masao; Miyake, Kensuke; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2012-06-01

    Marginal zone (MZ) B cells mount rapid T-cell-independent (T-I) immune responses against microbial components such as LPS. While Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is essential for LPS responses, MZ B cells uniquely express high levels of another LPS sensor Radioprotective 105 (RP105). However, little is known about how RP105 is used by MZ B cells. In this study, we investigated TLR4- or RP105-dependent MZ B cell responses by utilizing agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to each receptor. Cross-linking TLR4 and RP105 at the same time with the mAbs induced robust IgM-secreting plasma cell generation as lipid A moiety of LPS. In contrast, stimulation with either mAb alone did not elicit such responses. RP105-deficient MZ B cells failed to produce IgM-secreting plasma cells in response to lipid A. TLR4 or lipid A stimulation of MZ B cells up-regulated their B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1) and X-box-binding protein 1 (Xbp-1) mRNA expression. RP105 stimulation alone did not give these responses and in fact decreased TLR4-mediated their expression. Compared with wild-type (WT) MZ B cells, RP105-deficient MZ B cells exhibited increased levels of Blimp-1 and Xbp-1 mRNA expression in response to lipid A. Lipid A or TLR4 plus RP105 stimulation induced massive proliferation and expression of Bcl-xL and c-Myc in WT but not RP105-deficient MZ B cells. These responses contributed to TLR4-mediated anti-apoptotic responses in MZ B cells. Thus, RP105 contributes in a unique way to the TLR4-dependent survival, proliferation and plasma cell generation of MZ B cells.

  12. The majority of human memory B cells recognizing RhD and tetanus resides in IgM+ B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Valle, Luciana; Dohmen, Serge E; Verhagen, Onno J H M; Berkowska, Magdalena A; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ellen van der Schoot, C

    2014-08-01

    B cell memory to T cell-dependent (TD) Ags are considered to largely reside in class-switched CD27(+) cells. However, we previously observed that anti-RhD (D) Igs cloned from two donors, hyperimmunized with D(+) erythrocytes, were predominantly of the IgM isotype. We therefore analyzed in this study the phenotype and frequency of D- and tetanus toxoid-specific B cells by culturing B cells in limiting dilution upon irradiated CD40L-expressing EL4.B5 cells and testing the culture supernatant. Most Ag-specific B cells for both TD Ags were found to reside in the IgM-expressing B cells, including CD27(-) B cells, in both hyperimmunized donors and nonhyperimmunized volunteers. Only shortly after immunization a sharp increase in Ag-specific CD27(+)IgG(+) B cells was observed. Next, B cells were enriched with D(+) erythrocyte ghosts and sorted as single cells. Sequencing of IGHV, IGLV, IGKV, and BCL6 genes from these D-specific B cell clones demonstrated that both CD27(-)IgM(+) and CD27(+)IgM(+) B cells harbored somatic mutations, documenting their Ag-selected nature. Furthermore, sequencing revealed a clonal relationship between the CD27(-)IgM(+), CD27(+)IgM(+), and CD27(+)IgG(+) B cell subsets. These data strongly support the recently described multiple layers of memory B cells to TD Ags in mice, where IgM(+) B cells represent a memory reservoir which can re-enter the germinal center and ensure replenishment of class-switched memory CD27(+) B cells from Ag-experienced precursors.

  13. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Alok R. [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Peirce, Susan K. [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Joshi, Shweta [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Durden, Donald L., E-mail: ddurden@ucsd.edu [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, UCSD Rady Children' s Hospital, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-09-10

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), e.g. toll receptors (TLRs) that bind ligands within the microbiome have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. LPS is a ligand for two TLR family members, TLR4 and RP105 which mediate LPS signaling in B cell proliferation and migration. Although LPS/TLR/RP105 signaling is well-studied; our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms controlling these PRR signaling pathways remains incomplete. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for PTEN/PI-3K signaling in B cell selection and survival, however a role for PTEN/PI-3K in TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the B cell compartment has not been reported. Herein, we crossed a CD19cre and PTEN{sup fl/fl} mouse to generate a conditional PTEN knockout mouse in the CD19+ B cell compartment. These mice were further crossed with an IL-14α transgenic mouse to study the combined effect of PTEN deletion, PI-3K inhibition and expression of IL-14α (a cytokine originally identified as a B cell growth factor) in CD19+ B cell lymphoproliferation and response to LPS stimulation. Targeted deletion of PTEN and directed expression of IL-14α in the CD19+ B cell compartment (IL-14+PTEN-/-) lead to marked splenomegaly and altered spleen morphology at baseline due to expansion of marginal zone B cells, a phenotype that was exaggerated by treatment with the B cell mitogen and TLR4/RP105 ligand, LPS. Moreover, LPS stimulation of CD19+ cells isolated from these mice display increased proliferation, augmented AKT and NFκB activation as well as increased expression of c-myc and cyclinD1. Interestingly, treatment of LPS treated IL-14+PTEN-/- mice with a pan PI-3K inhibitor, SF1126, reduced splenomegaly, cell proliferation, c-myc and cyclin D1 expression in the CD19+ B cell compartment and normalized the splenic histopathologic architecture. These findings provide the direct evidence that PTEN and PI-3K inhibitors control TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the CD19+ B cell compartment and that pan PI

  14. Impairment of B-cell functions during HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amu, Sylvie; Ruffin, Nicolas; Rethi, Bence; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-09-24

    A variety of B-cell dysfunctions are manifested during HIV-1 infection, as reported early during the HIV-1 epidemic. It is not unusual that the pathogenic mechanisms presented to elucidate impairment of B-cell responses during HIV-1 infection focus on the impact of reduced T-cell numbers and functions, and lack of germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues. To our understanding, however, perturbation of B-cell phenotype and function during HIV-1 infection may begin at several different B-cell developmental stages. These impairments can be mediated by intrinsic B-cell defects as well as by the lack of proper T-cell help. In this review, we will highlight some of the pathways and molecular interactions leading to B-cell impairment prior to germinal center formation and B-cell activation mediated through the B-cell receptor in response to HIV-1 antigens. Recent studies indicate a regulatory role for B cells on T-cell biology and immune responses. We will discuss some of these novel findings and how these regulatory mechanisms could potentially be affected by the intrinsic defects of B cells taking place during HIV-1 infection.

  15. Idelalisib for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Jacqueline C

    2016-09-01

    Idelalisib is a first-in-class selective oral PI3Kδ inhibitor for the treatment of patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma, a predominantly elderly population with high comorbidity. The drug promotes apoptosis in primary CLL cells ex vivo, independent of common prognostic markers and inhibits CLL cell homing, migration and adhesion to cells in the microenvironment. Idelalisib has shown efficacy with acceptable safety as monotherapy and combination therapy in relapsed/refractory CLL. Idelalisib has clinical activity in patients with CLL with del(17p). The development of other novel B-cell-targeted agents provides the opportunity to evaluate additional idelalisib treatment combinations for their potential to further improve outcomes in CLL/small lymphocytic lymphoma.

  16. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  17. Role of Toll-like receptors in regulatory functions of T and B cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG ZongLiang

    2008-01-01

    Pathogens can find their ways to most sites in the host. Pathogen sensors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), must be equally and broadly distributed on immune cells to combat them through innate and adaptive immunity. Most classes of TLRs are found in innate immune cells to obtain an immediate re-sponse against pathogens, but recent studies indicate that a number of TLRs are wildly expressed in T and B cells, suggesting TLRs also directly regulate adaptive immune responses. Due to the rapid in-crease of new information on the multiple roles of TLRs, in this paper we aim to review several main properties of TLRs and their direct role in T and B cells. This review consists of 6 parts: (ⅰ) Characteris-tics of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and signaling; (ⅱ) signalling pathways of TLRs; (ⅲ) TLR expressions on human leukocytes; (ⅳ) TLR expressions and functions in the Th1, CD4+CD45RO+ memory T cells and regulatory/suppressor T as well as B cell populations; (ⅴ) therapeutic potential of TLR agonists; (ⅵ) discussion and perspective. The latest findings and potential therapeutic applications are discussed. There is growing evidence supporting the concept that TLR activation contributes not only to innate immunity but also to adaptive immunity, including direct regulation of both T and B lymphocytes by TLRs.

  18. The role of pregnancy-associated hormones in the development and function of regulatory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzio, Damián; Zygmunt, Marek; Jensen, Federico

    2014-01-01

    During mammalian pregnancy, highly specialized mechanisms of immune tolerance are triggered in order to allow the semi-allogeneic fetus to grow within the maternal uterus in harmony with the maternal immune system. Among other mechanisms, changes in the endocrine status have been proposed to be at least part of the machinery responsible for the induction of immune tolerance during pregnancy. Indeed, pregnancy-associated hormones, estradiol, progesterone, and human chorionic gonadotropin are known to confer immune suppressive capacity to innate as well as adaptive immune cells. Regulatory B cells, a subpopulation of B lymphocytes with strong immunosuppressive functions, were shown to expand during pregnancy. Furthermore, it is well-known that some women suffering from multiple sclerosis, significantly improve their symptoms during pregnancy and this was attributed to the effect of female sex hormones. Accordingly, estradiol protects mice from developing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by triggering the expansion and activation of regulatory B cells. In this review, we discuss different mechanisms associated with the development, activation, and function of regulatory B cells with a special focus on those involving pregnancy-associated hormones.

  19. Network-of-queues approach to B-cell-receptor affinity discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felizzi, Federico; Comoglio, Federico

    2012-06-01

    The immune system is one of the most complex signal processing machineries in biology. The adaptive immune system, consisting of B and T lymphocytes, is activated in response to a large spectrum of pathogen antigens. B cells recognize and bind the antigen through B-cell receptors (BCRs) and this is fundamental for B-cell activation. However, the system response is dependent on BCR-antigen affinity values that span several orders of magnitude. Moreover, the ability of the BCR to discriminate between affinities at the high end (e.g., 109M-1-1010M-1) challenges the formulation of a mathematical model able to robustly separate these affinity-dependent responses. Queuing theory enables the analysis of many related processes, such as those resulting from the stochasticity of protein binding and unbinding events. Here we define a network of queues, consisting of BCR early signaling states and transition rates related to the propensity of molecular aggregates to form or disassemble. By considering the family of marginal distributions of BCRs in a given signaling state, we report a significant separation (measured as Jensen-Shannon divergence) that arises from a broad spectrum of antigen affinities.

  20. Adipose Tissue Inflammation Induces B Cell Inflammation and Decreases B Cell Function in Aging

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    Daniela Frasca

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the greatest risk factor for developing chronic diseases. Inflamm-aging, the age-related increase in low-grade chronic inflammation, may be a common link in age-related diseases. This review summarizes recent published data on potential cellular and molecular mechanisms of the age-related increase in inflammation, and how these contribute to decreased humoral immune responses in aged mice and humans. Briefly, we cover how aging and related inflammation decrease antibody responses in mice and humans, and how obesity contributes to the mechanisms for aging through increased inflammation. We also report data in the literature showing adipose tissue infiltration with immune cells and how these cells are recruited and contribute to local and systemic inflammation. We show that several types of immune cells infiltrate the adipose tissue and these include macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells, innate lymphoid cells, eosinophils, T cells, B1, and B2 cells. Our main focus is how the adipose tissue affects immune responses, in particular B cell responses and antibody production. The role of leptin in generating inflammation and decreased B cell responses is also discussed. We report data published by us and by other groups showing that the adipose tissue generates pro-inflammatory B cell subsets which induce pro-inflammatory T cells, promote insulin resistance, and secrete pathogenic autoimmune antibodies.

  1. Brucella abortus-infected B cells induce osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterium that establishes lifelong infections in livestock and humans although the mechanisms of its chronicity are poorly understood. Activated B cells have long lifespan and B. abortus infection activates B cells. Our results indicate that the direct infection of B cells with B. abortus induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), receptor activator for NF κB ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells induced bone marrow-derived monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using osteoprotegerin, RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that RANKL is involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with B cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of brucellar osteoarticular disease.

  2. Regulation of Mitochondria Function by TRAF3 in B Lymphocytes and B Cell Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    rich region (PRR), several TRAF-interacting motifs, and a C-terminal transmem- brane domain, which anchors the protein on the outer membranes of...signaling complexes at mitochondrial outer membranes [123,124,128,129]. These signalingy cytokines TRAF4 6 MAPKs AP-1 ARD9 MDP MAVS TRAF3? Viral...2 FUBP2_HUMAN 3 7.5 No 82 Q9P0L0 Vesicle -associated membrane protein-associated protein A VAPA_HUMAN 3 6 No 83 Q15181 Inorganic pyrophosphatase

  3. Presentation of antigen by B cell subsets. Pt. 4. Defective T-B cell signalling causes inability to present antigen by B cells from immunodeficient mice

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    Zimecki, Michal [Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland). Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy; Kapp, Judith A. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Medicine

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in T-B cell signalling between B cells from normal and immunodeficient mice. B cell blasts from normal and immunodeficient mice expressed comparable levels of membrane-associated IL-1. B cells from normal, but not immunodeficient mice, prefixed with glutar-aldehyde and cultured with thymocytes or a T cell line BK33, induce in T cells production of a factor which causes release of IL-1 by macrophages. This factor, preincubated with B cells from immunodeficient mice significantly enhances their APC function. Furthermore, this cytokine induces expression of Lyb-5 alloantigen on B cells from immunodeficient mice. This effect could be blocked by neutralizing antibodies to IL-6 but not to IL-2, IL-4 or GM-CSF. We conclude that immature B cells from immunodeficient (CBA/N x BALB/c)F{sub 1} mice are unable to stimulate interacting T cells to produce IL-6 and therefore are inefficient antigen presenting cells. (author). 30 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs.

  4. B cells play key roles in th2-type airway immune responses in mice exposed to natural airborne allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Li Yin; Iijima, Koji; Hara, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M; Kita, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    Humans are frequently exposed to various airborne allergens. In addition to producing antibodies, B cells participate in immune responses via various mechanisms. The roles of B cells in allergic airway inflammation and asthma have been controversial. We examined the functional importance of B cells in a mouse model of asthma, in which mice were exposed repeatedly to common airborne allergens. Naïve wild-type BALB/c mice or B cell-deficient JH-/- mice were exposed intranasally to a cocktail of allergen extracts, including Alternaria, Aspergillus, and house dust mite, every other day for two weeks. Ovalbumin was included in the cocktail to monitor the T cell immune response. Airway inflammation, lung pathology, and airway reactivity were analyzed. The airway exposure of naïve wild type mice to airborne allergens induced robust eosinophilic airway inflammation, increased the levels of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the lung, and increased the reactivity to inhaled methacholine. These pathological changes and immune responses were attenuated in B cell-deficient JH-/- mice. The allergen-induced expansion of CD4+ T cells was impaired in the lungs and draining lymph nodes of JH-/- mice. Furthermore, lymphocytes from JH-/- mice failed to produce Th2 cytokines in response to ovalbumin re-stimulation in vitro. Our results suggest that B cells are required for the optimal development of Th2-type immune responses and airway inflammation when exposed to common airborne allergens. The therapeutic targeting of B cells may be beneficial to treat asthma in certain patients.

  5. B cells play key roles in th2-type airway immune responses in mice exposed to natural airborne allergens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yin Drake

    Full Text Available Humans are frequently exposed to various airborne allergens. In addition to producing antibodies, B cells participate in immune responses via various mechanisms. The roles of B cells in allergic airway inflammation and asthma have been controversial. We examined the functional importance of B cells in a mouse model of asthma, in which mice were exposed repeatedly to common airborne allergens. Naïve wild-type BALB/c mice or B cell-deficient JH-/- mice were exposed intranasally to a cocktail of allergen extracts, including Alternaria, Aspergillus, and house dust mite, every other day for two weeks. Ovalbumin was included in the cocktail to monitor the T cell immune response. Airway inflammation, lung pathology, and airway reactivity were analyzed. The airway exposure of naïve wild type mice to airborne allergens induced robust eosinophilic airway inflammation, increased the levels of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the lung, and increased the reactivity to inhaled methacholine. These pathological changes and immune responses were attenuated in B cell-deficient JH-/- mice. The allergen-induced expansion of CD4+ T cells was impaired in the lungs and draining lymph nodes of JH-/- mice. Furthermore, lymphocytes from JH-/- mice failed to produce Th2 cytokines in response to ovalbumin re-stimulation in vitro. Our results suggest that B cells are required for the optimal development of Th2-type immune responses and airway inflammation when exposed to common airborne allergens. The therapeutic targeting of B cells may be beneficial to treat asthma in certain patients.

  6. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  7. B-Cell Response during Protozoan Parasite Infections

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    María C. Amezcua Vesely

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss how protozoan parasites alter immature and mature B cell compartment. B1 and marginal zone (MZ B cells, considered innate like B cells, are activated during protozoan parasite infections, and they generate short lived plasma cells providing a prompt antibody source. In addition, protozoan infections induce massive B cell response with polyclonal activation that leads to hypergammaglobulnemia with serum antibodies specific for the parasites and self and/or non related antigens. To protect themselves, the parasites have evolved unique ways to evade B cell immune responses inducing apoptosis of MZ and conventional mature B cells. As a consequence of the parasite induced-apoptosis, the early IgM response and an already establish humoral immunity are affected during the protozoan parasite infection. Moreover, some trypanosomatides trigger bone marrow immature B cell apoptosis, influencing the generation of new mature B cells. Simultaneously with their ability to release antibodies, B cells produce cytokines/quemokines that influence the characteristic of cellular immune response and consequently the progression of parasite infections.

  8. Invited article: inhibition of B cell functions: implications for neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-06-01

    B cells are involved in the pathophysiology of many neurologic diseases, either in a causative or contributory role, via production of autoantibodies, cytokine secretion, or by acting as antigen-presenting cells leading to T cell activation. B cells are clonally expanded in various CNS disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), paraneoplastic CNS disorders, or stiff-person syndrome, and are activated to produce pathogenic autoantibodies in demyelinating neuropathies and myasthenia. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferating inducing ligand (APRIL), key cytokines for B cell survival, are strongly unregulated in MS brain and in muscles of inflammatory myopathies. Modulation of B cell functions using a series of monoclonal antibodies against CD20+ B cells or the molecules that increase B cell survival, such as BAFF/APRIL and their receptors BAFF-R, TACI, and BCMA, provide a rational approach to the treatment of the aforementioned neurologic disorders. In controlled studies, rituximab, a B cell-depleting monoclonal antibody, has been encouraging in MS and paraproteinemic anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, exerting long-lasting remissions. In uncontrolled series, benefit has been reported in several disorders. B cell depletion is a well-tolerated therapeutic option currently explored in the treatment of several autoimmune neurologic disorders.

  9. B cells as a target of immune modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawker Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available B cells have recently been identified as an integral component of the immune system; they play a part in autoimmunity through antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and complement activation. Animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS suggest that myelin destruction is partly mediated through B cell activation (and plasmablasts. MS patients with evidence of B cell involvement, as compared to those without, tend to have a worse prognosis. Finally, the significant decrease in new gadolinium-enhancing lesions, new T2 lesions, and relapses in MS patients treated with rituximab (a monoclonal antibody against CD20 on B cells leads us to the conclusion that B cells play an important role in MS and that immune modulation of these cells may ameliorate the disease. This article will explore the role of B cells in MS and the rationale for the development of B cell-targeted therapeutics. MS is an immune-mediated disease that affects over 2 million people worldwide and is the number one cause of disability in young patients. Most therapeutic targets have focused on T cells; however, recently, the focus has shifted to the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS and the potential of B cells as a therapeutic target.

  10. Negative regulation of lymphocyte activation by the adaptor protein LAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minghua; Granillo, Olivia; Wen, Renren; Yang, Kaiyong; Dai, Xuezhi; Wang, Demin; Zhang, Weiguo

    2005-05-01

    The membrane-associated adaptor protein LAX is a linker for activation of T cells (LAT)-like molecule that is expressed in lymphoid tissues. Upon stimulation of T or B cells, it is phosphorylated and interacts with Grb2 and the p85 subunit of PI3K. LAX, however, is not capable of replacing LAT in the TCR signaling pathway. In this study we report that upon T or B cell activation, the LAX protein was up-regulated dramatically. Although disruption of the LAX gene by homologous recombination had no major impact on lymphocyte development, it caused a significant reduction in CD23 expression on mature B cells. Interestingly, naive LAX(-/-) mice had spontaneous germinal center formation. Compared with normal T and B cells, LAX(-/-) T and B cells were hyperresponsive and had enhanced calcium flux, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, MAPK and Akt activation, and cell survival upon engagement of the T or B AgRs. Our data demonstrate that LAX functions as a negative regulator in lymphocyte signaling.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus positive B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder/polymorphous B-cell lymphoma of the urinary bladder: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Sundaram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of a localized Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-positive B cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD/polymorphous B cell lymphoma of the urinary bladder in a 67 years old female patient. She had no known predisposing immunodeficiencies and presented with recent onset of hematuria. The CT and cystoscopic examination revealed a localized 2.5 cm polypoid or plaque-like mucosal mass on the right posterior and lateral wall of the bladder. The biopsy sample showed a diffuse and densely polymorphous atypical lymphoid infiltrate admixed with numerous small lymphocytes, histiocytes and occasional plasma cells and neutrophils. The large atypical cells were CD20+, CD79a+, CD30+, CD43+ and they were strongly positive for EBV by in situ hybridization using anti-EBER-1 probe. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR for immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement study showed a clonal gene rearrangement. The findings indicated EBV+LPD of the bladder. Primary lymphoma of bladder is rare and primary EBV+LPD of the bladder has not been previously described. Potential misdiagnosis of poorly differentiated urothelial carcinoma can occur and accurate diagnosis depends on comprehensive immunohistochemical and molecular workups.

  12. A single autosomal gene defect severely limits IgG but not IgM responses in B lymphocyte-deficient A/WySnJ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D J; Hanson, K D; Carman, J A; Hayes, C E

    1992-02-01

    Antigen-stimulated B lymphocytes either differentiate into IgM-secreting plasma cells or into memory B cells that secrete other immunoglobulin isotypes upon antigen restimulation. The mechanisms that generate and maintain memory B cells are poorly understood. Previously, we described a severe B lymphocyte deficiency in adult strain A/WySnJ mice compared to subline A/J. Here we show that the single, autosomal co-dominant locus responsible for the deficiency also diminishes IgG-secreting B cell formation without interfering with IgM-secreting plasma cell differentiation. A/WySnJ secondary IgG1 responses to the protein antigens hemocyanin, bovine gamma-globulin, ovalbumin, lysozyme and beta-galactosidase were 6- to 50-fold lower than A/J responses. The defect also decreased secondary IgG2a and IgG3 responses, and primary IgG1 and IgG2a responses. The reduced A/WySnJ secondary IgG1 response was not due to differential response kinetics or dose responsiveness, and could not be augmented to A/J levels by repeated immunizations. Serum IgG1, IgG2a and IgG3 levels from nonimmune A/WySnJ mice were similarly reduced. The secondary IgG1 response and splenic B cell percentage showed significant positive correlation (r = 0.72) in F2 mice, suggesting that a single locus controlled both traits. In contrast, A/WySnJ mice made good primary IgM responses to hemocyanin, beta-galactosidase, and the thymus-independent antigen trinitrophenyl-Ficoll. The A/WySnJ splenic adherent cells were competent in antigen-presenting function, and A/WySnJ immune T cells proliferated in response to antigen and provided the requisite B cell stimulatory signals for an IgG1 response. Together, our results suggest that A/WySnJ mice have a genetic lesion that causes a selective IgG immune response dysfunction. The absence of IgG-secreting cell precursors or a defect in precursor activation or differentiation are two possible mechanisms which could precipitate a selective IgG response dysfunction. We propose

  13. Recent advances in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

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    N Vyas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL was largely considered to be a disease of slow progression, standard treatment with Chlorambucil and having almost similar prognosis. With the introduction of molecular methods for understanding the disease pathophysiology in CLL there has been a remarkable change in the approach towards the disease. The variation in B-cell receptor response and immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV mutation, genetic aberration and defect in apoptosis and proliferation has had an impact on therapy initiation and prognosis. Early diagnosis of molecular variant is therefore necessary in CLL.

  14. In vivo tungsten exposure alters B-cell development and increases DNA damage in murine bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Alexander D R; Lemaire, Maryse; Young, Yoon Kow; Eustache, Jules H; Guilbert, Cynthia; Molina, Manuel Flores; Mann, Koren K

    2013-02-01

    High environmental tungsten levels were identified near the site of a childhood pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cluster; however, a causal link between tungsten and leukemogenesis has not been established. The major site of tungsten deposition is bone, the site of B-cell development. In addition, our in vitro data suggest that developing B lymphocytes are susceptible to tungsten-induced DNA damage and growth inhibition. To extend these results, we assessed whether tungsten exposure altered B-cell development and induced DNA damage in vivo. Wild-type mice were exposed to tungsten in their drinking water for up to 16 weeks. Tungsten concentration in bone was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and correlated with B-cell development and DNA damage within the bone marrow. Tungsten exposure resulted in a rapid deposition within the bone following 1 week, and tungsten continued to accumulate thereafter albeit at a decreased rate. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a transient increase in mature IgD(+) B cells in the first 8 weeks of treatment, in animals of the highest and intermediate exposure groups. Following 16 weeks of exposure, all tungsten groups had a significantly greater percentage of cells in the late pro-/large pre-B developmental stages. DNA damage was increased in both whole marrow and isolated B cells, most notably at the lowest tungsten concentration tested. These findings confirm an immunological effect of tungsten exposure and suggest that tungsten could act as a tumor promoter, providing leukemic "hits" in multiple forms to developing B lymphocytes within the bone marrow.

  15. The astonishing diversity of Ig classes and B cell repertoires in teleost fish

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    Simon eFillatreau

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With lympoid tissue anatomy different than mammals, and diverse adaptations to all aquatic environments, fish constitute a fascinating group of vertebrate to study the biology of B cell repertoires in a comparative perspective. Fish B lymphocytes express immunoglobulin (Ig on their surface and secrete antigen-specific antibodies in response to immune challenges. Three antibody classes have been identified in fish, namely IgM, IgD and IgT, while IgG, IgA and IgE are absent. IgM and IgD have been found in all fish species analyzed, and thus seem to be primordial antibody classes. IgM and IgD are normally co-expressed from the same mRNA through alternative splicing, as in mammals. Tetrameric IgM is the main antibody class found in serum. Some species of fish also have IgT, which seems to exist only in fish and is specialized in mucosal immunity. IgM/IgD and IgT are expressed by two different sub-populations of B cells. The tools available to investigate B cell responses at the cellular level in fish are limited, but the progress of fish genomics has started to unravel a rich diversity of IgH and IgL locus organization, which might be related to the succcession of genome remodellings that occured during fish evolution. Moreover, the development of deep sequencing techniques has allowed the investigation of the global features of the expressed fish B cell repertoires in zebrafish and rainbow trout, in steady state or after infection. This review provides a description of the organization of fish Ig loci, with a particular emphasis on their heterogeneity between species, and presents recent data on the structure of the expressed Ig repertoire in healthy and infected fish.

  16. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Esteban R; Olivera, Gabriela C; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P; González, Mariela N; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  17. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban R Fernández

    Full Text Available Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  18. MicroRNA-126-mediated control of cell fate in B-cell myeloid progenitors as a potential alternative to transcriptional factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Kazuki; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Gentner, Bernhard; Hozumi, Katsuto; Harnprasopwat, Ratanakanit; Lu, Jun; Yamashita, Riu; Ha, Daon; Toyoshima, Takae; Chanda, Bidisha; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Yokoyama, Kazuaki; Wang, Shusheng; Ando, Kiyoshi; Lodish, Harvey F; Tojo, Arinobu; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kotani, Ai

    2013-08-13

    Lineage specification is thought to be largely regulated at the level of transcription, where lineage-specific transcription factors drive specific cell fates. MicroRNAs (miR), vital to many cell functions, act posttranscriptionally to decrease the expression of target mRNAs. MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia exhibits both myeloid and B-cell surface markers, suggesting that the transformed cells are B-cell myeloid progenitor cells. Through gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrated that microRNA 126 (miR-126) drives B-cell myeloid biphenotypic leukemia differentiation toward B cells without changing expression of E2A immunoglobulin enhancer-binding factor E12/E47 (E2A), early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1), or paired box protein 5, which are critical transcription factors in B-lymphopoiesis. Similar induction of B-cell differentiation by miR-126 was observed in normal hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo in uncommitted murine c-Kit(+)Sca1(+)Lineage(-) cells, with insulin regulatory subunit-1 acting as a target of miR-126. Importantly, in EBF1-deficient hematopoietic progenitor cells, which fail to differentiate into B cells, miR-126 significantly up-regulated B220, and induced the expression of B-cell genes, including recombination activating genes-1/2 and CD79a/b. These data suggest that miR-126 can at least partly rescue B-cell development independently of EBF1. These experiments show that miR-126 regulates myeloid vs. B-cell fate through an alternative machinery, establishing the critical role of miRNAs in the lineage specification of multipotent mammalian cells.

  19. Obinutuzumab for previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jame; Stegner, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Obinutuzumab was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in late 2013 for use in combination with chlorambucil for the treatment of patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The approval was based on results of an open-label phase 3 trial that showed improved progression-free survival (PFS) with the combination of obinutuzumab plus chlorambucil compared with chlorambucil alone. Obinutuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that targets CD20 antigen expressed on the surface of pre B- and mature B-lymphocytes. After binding to CD20, obinutuzumab mediates B-cell lysis by engaging immune effector cells, directly activating intracellular death signaling pathways, and activating the complement cascade. Immune effector cell activities include antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis.

  20. Clinical consequences of defects in B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Andre M; Schroeder, Harry W

    2010-04-01

    Abnormalities in humoral immunity typically reflect a generalized or selective failure of effective B-cell development. The developmental processes can be followed through analysis of cell-surface markers, such as IgM, IgD, CD10, CD19, CD20, CD21, and CD38. Early phases of B-cell development are devoted to the creation of immunoglobulin and testing of B-cell antigen receptor signaling. Failure leads to the absence of B cells and immunoglobulin in the blood from birth. As the developing B cells begin to express a surface B-cell receptor, they become subject to negative and positive selection pressures and increasingly depend on survival signals. Defective signaling can lead to selective or generalized hypogammaglobulinemia, even in the presence of normal numbers of B cells. In the secondary lymphoid organs some B cells enter the splenic marginal zone, where preactivated cells lie ready to rapidly respond to T-independent antigens, such as the polysaccharides that coat some microorganisms. Other cells enter the follicle and, with the aid of cognate follicular T cells, divide to help form a germinal center (GC) after their interaction with antigen. In the GC B cells can undergo the processes of class switching and somatic hypermutation. Failure to properly receive T-cell signals can lead to hyper-IgM syndrome. B cells that leave the GC can develop into memory B cells, short-lived plasma cells, or long-lived plasma cells. The latter ultimately migrate back to the bone marrow, where they can continue to produce protective antigen-specific antibodies for decades.

  1. Metabolism of peripheral lymphocytes, interleukin-2-activated lymphocytes and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from sup 31 P NMR studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, O.; Cohen, J.S.; Aebersold, P.

    1989-11-20

    {sup 31}O NMR spectra of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) were found to be significantly diefferent form those of normal peripheral lymphocytes. The greatest difference was in the phosphodiester (PDE) region, mainly in the glycerophosphocholine (GPC) signal. Short-term activation of peripheral lymphocytes with interleukin-2 induced a small increase in ATP levels. In all lumphocytes the phosphomonoester (PME) region is dominated by phosphoethanolamine (PE), while there is an unusual absence of phosphocholine (PC). Perfusion of these cells with high concentrations of choline caused only a minimal increase in PC, indicating that choline kinase is not the rate limiting step of lecithin synthesis in lymphocytes. (author). 13 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab.

  2. Pro-B cells propagated in stromal cell-free cultures reconstitute functional B-cell compartments in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Muenchow, Lilly; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Albertí-Servera, Llucia; Capoferri, Giuseppina; Doelz, Marianne; Rolink, Hannie; Bosco, Nabil; Ceredig, Rhodri; Rolink, Antonius G

    2017-02-01

    Up to now long-term in vitro growth of pro-B cells was thought to require stromal cells. However, here we show that fetal liver (FL) and bone marrow (BM) derived pro-B cells can be propagated long-term in stromal cell-free cultures supplemented with IL-7, stem cell factor and FLT3 ligand. Within a week, most cells expressed surface CD19, CD79A, λ5, and VpreB antigens and had rearranged immunoglobulin D-J heavy chain genes. Both FL and BM pro-B cells reconstituted the B-cell compartments of immuno-incompetent Rag2-deficient mice, with FL pro-B cells generating follicular, marginal zone (MZB) and B1a B cells, and BM pro-B cells giving rise mainly to MZB cells. Reconstituted Rag2-deficient mice generated significant levels of IgM and IgG antibodies to a type II T-independent antigen; mice reconstituted with FL pro-B cells generated surprisingly high IgG1 titers. Finally, we show for the first time that mice reconstituted with mixtures of pro-B and pro-T cells propagated in stromal cell-free in vitro cultures mounted a T-cell-dependent antibody response. This novel stromal cell-free culture system facilitates our understanding of B-cell development and might be applied clinically. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Tissue-specific B-cell dysfunction and generalized memory B-cell loss during acute SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Peruchon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.. We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD(-CD27(+ B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8(+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus-B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid

  4. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Roberto E; Radi, Zaher A

    2007-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis characterized by multifocal follicular lymphoid cell infiltrates with germinal centers, thyroid acinar atrophy and pituitary cell hyperplasia/hypertrophy of the adenohypophysis was detected in a vehicle control, 4-year-old female Cynomolgus macaque in a routine toxicology study. Lymphoid cells of germinal centers were positive for the B-cell marker CD20 by immunohistochemistry (IHC), while remaining lymphocytes were positive for the T-cell marker CD3. Hypertrophied/hyperplastic pituitary cells were positive for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by IHC, consistent with an adaptive response due to removal of hormonal negative feedback from the diseased thyroid gland. Features of this case are similar to chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in humans, an autoimmune disorder also known as Hashimoto's disease. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis with compensatory pituitary changes may occur spontaneously in young, clinically normal cynomolgus macaques and its presence in drug treated animals should be interpreted with caution.

  5. Transitional B cells in early human B cell development - time to revisit the paradigm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria G Martin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The B cell repertoire is generated in the adult bone marrow by an ordered series of gene rearrangement processes that result in massive diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig genes, and consequently an equally large number of potential specificities for antigen. As the process is essentially random, then cells exhibiting excess reactivity with self-antigens are generated and need to be removed from the repertoire before the cells are fully mature. Some of the cells are deleted, and some will undergo receptor editing to see if changing the light chain can rescue an autoreactive antibody. As a consequence, the binding properties of the B cell receptor are changed as development progresses through pre-B>>immature>>transitional>>naïve phenotypes. Using long-read, high-throughput, sequencing we have produced a unique set of sequences from these four cell types in human bone marrow and matched peripheral blood and our results describe the effects of tolerance selection on the B cell repertoire at the Ig gene level. Most strong effects of selection are seen within the heavy chain repertoire, and can be seen both in gene usage and in CDR-H3 characteristics. Age-related changes are small and only the size of the CDR-H3 shows constant and significant change in these data. The paucity of significant changes in either kappa or lambda light chain repertoires implies that either the heavy chain has more influence over autoreactivity than light chain and/or that switching between kappa and lambda light chains, as opposed to switching within the light chain loci, may effect a more successful autoreactive rescue by receptor editing. Our results show that the transitional cell population contains cells other than those that are part of the pre-B>>immature>>transitional>>naïve development pathway, since the population often shows a repertoire that is outside the trajectory of gene loss/gain between pre-B and naïve stages.

  6. ATP11c is critical for phosphatidylserine internalization and B lymphocyte differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabas, Mehmet; Teh, Charis E.; Frankenreiter, Sandra; Lal, Dennis; Roots, Carla M.; Whittle, Belinda; Andrews, Daniel T.; Zhang, Yafei; Teoh, Narci C.; Sprent, Jonathan; Tze, Lina E.; Kucharska, Edyta M.; Kofler, Jennifer; Farell, Geoffrey C.; Bröer, Stefan; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Enders, Anselm

    2011-01-01

    Subcompartments of the plasma membrane are believed to be critical for lymphocyte responses but few genetic tools exist to test their function. Here we describe a new X-linked B cell deficiency syndrome in mice caused by mutations in Atp11c, a member of the P4 ATPase family thought to serve as flippases concentrating aminophospholipids in the cytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes. Defective ATP11c decreased the rate of phosphatidylserine translocation in pro-B cells, greatly reduced pre-B and B cell numbers independent of Bcl2-inhibited apoptosis or immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and abolished pre-B cell expansion in response to an Il7 transgene. The only other abnormalities noted were anemia, hyperbilirubinemia and hepatocellular carcinoma. These results identify an intimate connection between phospholipid transport and B lymphocyte function. PMID:21423173

  7. Anti-B cell antibody therapies for inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Jayne, David R W

    2014-01-01

    erythematosus, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, and primary Sjögren's syndrome. For some anti-B cell agents, clinical benefits have been convincingly demonstrated, while other B cell-targeted therapies failed to improve outcomes when added to standard...

  8. Bidirectional regulation between B cells and T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margry, B.

    2014-01-01

    B cells were often thought of as simple precursors of end-stage effector cells that are merely in charge of antibody production. Research in the last decades has shown that B cells possess important other roles as well, including their involvement in the regulation and functioning of T cell-mediated

  9. B cells as therapeutic targets in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-10-01

    B cells have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune neurological disorders, not only as precursors of antibody-producing cells, but also as important regulators of the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation, cytokine production, and formation of ectopic germinal centers in the intermeningeal spaces. Two B-cell trophic factors-BAFF (B-cell-activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand)-and their receptors are strongly upregulated in many immunological disorders of the CNS and PNS, and these molecules contribute to clonal expansion of B cells in situ. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules and trophic factors provides a rational approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological diseases. This article reviews the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders and summarizes the experience to date with rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody against CD20, for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, autoimmune neuropathies, neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic neurological disorders, myasthenia gravis, and inflammatory myopathies. It is expected that ongoing controlled trials will establish the efficacy and long-term safety profile of anti-B-cell agents in several autoimmune neurological disorders, as well as exploring the possibility of a safe and synergistic effect with other immunosuppressants or immunomodulators.

  10. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease.

  11. A fine romance: T follicular helper cells and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Cecile

    2011-06-24

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells to generate affinity-matured antibodies. Three papers in this issue of Immunity (Choi et al., 2011; Kerfoot et al., 2011; Kitano et al., 2011) provide information about the reciprocal relationship between B cells and Tfh cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  13. Lymphocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    is an emerging evidence that T cell-induced apoptosis is a dominant effector mechanism ... Patients were subjected to clinical evaluation with special ... The percentage of CD95 on T-lymphocytes could not be ..... Correlation between CD3 lymphocytes and CD95 antigen .... control.36 On the other hand, Tchórzewski et al.1.

  14. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Miguel; May, Janet S; Sukla, Soumi; Frederico, Bruno; Gill, Michael B; Smith, Christopher M; Belz, Gabrielle T; Stevenson, Philip G

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in initiating immune responses. Some persistent viruses infect DCs and can disrupt their functions in vitro. However, these viruses remain strongly immunogenic in vivo. Thus what role DC infection plays in the pathogenesis of persistent infections is unclear. Here we show that a persistent, B cell-tropic gamma-herpesvirus, Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), infects DCs early after host entry, before it establishes a substantial infection of B cells. DC-specific virus marking by cre-lox recombination revealed that a significant fraction of the virus latent in B cells had passed through a DC, and a virus attenuated for replication in DCs was impaired in B cell colonization. In vitro MuHV-4 dramatically altered the DC cytoskeleton, suggesting that it manipulates DC migration and shape in order to spread. MuHV-4 therefore uses DCs to colonize B cells.

  15. In vitro reactivity to implant metals demonstrates a person-dependent association with both T-cell and B-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallab, Nadim James; Caicedo, Marco; Epstein, Rachel; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2010-02-01

    Hypersensitivity to metallic implants remains relatively unpredictable and poorly understood. We initially hypothesized that metal-induced lymphocyte proliferation responses to soluble metal challenge (ions) are mediated exclusively by early T-cell activation (not B-cells), typical of a delayed-type-hypersensitivity response. We tested this by comparing proliferation (6 days) of primary lymphocytes with early T-cell and B-cell activation (48 h) in three groups of subjects likely to demonstrate elevated metal reactivity: group 1 (n = 12) history of metal sensitivity with no implant; group 2a (n = 6) well performing metal-on-metal THRs, and group 2b (n = 20) subjects with poorly performing metal-on-polymer total joint arthroplasties (TJA). Group 1 showed 100% (12/12) metal reactivity (stimulation index > 2) to Ni. Groups 2a and 2b were 83% (5/6) and 75% (15/22) metal reactive (to Co, Cr, or Ni), respectively. Of the n = 32 metal-reactive subjects to Co, Cr, or Ni (SI > 2), n = 22/32 demonstrated >2-fold elevations in % of T-cell or B-cell activation (CD25+, CD69+) to metal challenge when compared with untreated control. 18/22 metal-activated subjects demonstrated an exclusively T-cell or B-cell activation response to metal challenge, where 6/18 demonstrated exclusively B-cell activation and 12/18 demonstrated a T-cell only response, as measured by surface activation markers CD25+ and CD69+. However, there was no direct correlation (R(2) metal reactivity than did subject-dependent results of flow-cytometry analysis of T-cell or B-cell activation. The high incidence of lymphocyte reactivity and activation indicate that more complex than initially hypothesized immune responses may contribute to the etiology of debris-induced osteolysis in metal-sensitive individuals.

  16. Polycyclic’ Aromatic Hydrocarbon Induced Intracellular Signaling and Lymphocyte Apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Alexander M.

    of this research indicate that the AhR is controlled by the cell progression through the cell cycle. This may imply differential cellular sensitivity to the toxins, and a role for the AhR in cell growth/differentiation. Previous PAH inununotoxicity research did not adequately address effects on immature...... lymphocytes. Our experiments on preB lymphocytes supported by stromal cells suggest that apoptosis is one of the mechanisms for PAH immunosuppression. It could be either due to direct effect of the PAH on the B cells, via stromal cell signaling. Ubiquitous PAH-like toxin, fluoranthene, was tested for it...

  17. Myeloma clonotypic B cells are hampered in their ability to undergo B-cell differentiation in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, JEJ; Vellenga, E; Bakkus, MHC; Bos, NA

    2002-01-01

    In the peripheral blood (PB) of multiple myeloma (MM) patients, clonotypic B cells are present that express the identical V( D) J rearrangements as the malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. In the present study, the proliferative capacity of clonotypic B cells from MM patients (n = 10) and the

  18. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease.

  19. B-cell receptor signaling inhibitors for treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases and B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Kamal D; Di Paolo, Julie A; Gold, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for normal B-cell development, selection, survival, proliferation, and differentiation into antibody-secreting cells. Similarly, this pathway plays a key role in the pathogenesis of multiple B-cell malignancies. Genetic and pharmacological approaches have established an important role for the Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase isoform p110delta (PI3Kδ) in coupling the BCR and other BCRs to B-cell survival, migration, and activation. In the past few years, several small-molecule inhibitory drugs that target PI3Kδ, Btk, and Syk have been developed and shown to have efficacy in clinical trials for the treatment of several types of B-cell malignancies. Emerging preclinical data have also shown a critical role of BCR signaling in the activation and function of self-reactive B cells that contribute to autoimmune diseases. Because BCR signaling plays a major role in both B-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation and B-cell malignancies, inhibition of this pathway may represent a promising new strategy for treating these diseases. This review summarizes recent achievements in the mechanism of action, pharmacological properties, and clinical activity and toxicity of these BCR signaling inhibitors, with a focus on their emerging role in treating lymphoid malignancies and autoimmune disorders.

  20. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease. PMID:27314053

  1. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Flores-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease.

  2. A Myc-dependent division timer complements a cell-death timer to regulate T cell and B cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, Susanne; Binh Giang, Tran; Kan, Andrey; Marchingo, Julia M; Lye, Bryan K; Corcoran, Lynn M; Hodgkin, Philip D

    2017-01-01

    T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes integrate activating signals to control the size of their proliferative response. Here we report that such control was achieved by timed changes in the production rate of cell-cycle-regulating proto-oncoprotein Myc, with division cessation occurring when Myc levels fell below a critical threshold. The changing pattern of the level of Myc was not affected by cell division, which identified the regulating mechanism as a cell-intrinsic, heritable temporal controller. Overexpression of Myc in stimulated T cells and B cells did not sustain cell proliferation indefinitely, as a separate 'time-to-die' mechanism, also heritable, was programmed after lymphocyte activation and led to eventual cell loss. Together the two competing cell-intrinsic timed fates created the canonical T cell and B cell immune-response pattern of rapid growth followed by loss of most cells. Furthermore, small changes in these timed processes by regulatory signals, or by oncogenic transformation, acted in synergy to greatly enhance cell numbers over time.

  3. [Comparative characteristics of 2 methods of separating mouse T- and B-lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudin, V M; Fedorovskaia, M I

    1975-10-01

    The results of separation of T- and B-cells of the C3H/Sn and AKR/j micr lymph nodes with AKR-anti-theta3H and C3H-thetaAKR isosera and cellular immunosorbents containing the antigen-antibody complexes were analyzed in this work. The strain differences in the theta+-cells (T-lymphocytes) level were demonstrated in the untreated mice of the noted strains. Populations enriched by B-lymphocytes under different methods of separation differed somewhat in composition. The cellular immunosorption had many advantages in comparison with the cytotoxic-immune sera used for the T- and B-cell separation.

  4. Exercise-induced B cell mobilisation: Preliminary evidence for an influx of immature cells into the bloodstream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J E; Spielmann, G; Wadley, A J; Aldred, S; Simpson, R J; Campbell, J P

    2016-10-01

    The number of peripheral blood B lymphocytes doubles during acute exercise, but the phenotypic composition of this response remains unknown. In two independent exercise studies, using complimentary phenotyping strategies, we investigated the mobilisation patterns of distinct B cell subsets. In study one, nine healthy males (mean±SD age: 22.1±3.4years) completed a continuous cycling bout at 80% V̇O2MAX for 20min. In study two, seven healthy experienced cyclists (mean±SD age: 29.9±4.7years) completed a 30min cycling trial at a workload corresponding to +5% of the individual blood lactate threshold. In study one, CD3-CD19+ B cell subsets were classified into immature (CD27-CD10+), naïve (CD27-CD10-), memory (CD27+CD38-), plasma cells/plasmablasts (CD27+CD38+) and finally, recently purported 'B1' cells (CD27+ CD43+ CD69-). In study two, CD20+ B cells were classified into immature (CD27-IgD-), naïve (CD27-IgD+), and IgM+/IgG+/IgA+ memory cells (CD27+IgD-). Total B cells exhibited a mean increase of 88% (study one) and 60% (study two) during exercise. In both studies, immature cells displayed the greatest increase, followed by memory cells, then naïve cells (study one: immature 130%>mature 105%>naïve 84%; study two: immature 110%>mature 56%>naïve 38%). Our findings show that, unlike T cells and NK cells, B cell mobilisation is not driven by effector status, and, for the first time, that B cell mobilisation during exercise is comprised of immature CD27- IgD-/CD10+ cells.

  5. Integrated Cellular and Plasma Proteomics of Contrasting B-cell Cancers Reveals Common, Unique and Systemic Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Harvey E; Carter, Matthew J; Cox, Kerry L; Dunscombe, Melanie; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Townsend, Paul A; Garbis, Spiros D; Cragg, Mark S

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 800,000 leukemia and lymphoma cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are examples of contrasting B-cell cancers; BL is a highly aggressive lymphoid tumor, frequently affecting children, whereas CLL typically presents as an indolent, slow-progressing leukemia affecting the elderly. The B-cell-specific overexpression of the myc and TCL1 oncogenes in mice induce spontaneous malignancies modeling BL and CLL, respectively. Quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics and isobaric labeling were employed to examine the biology underpinning contrasting Eμ-myc and Eμ-TCL1 B-cell tumors. Additionally, the plasma proteome was evaluated using subproteome enrichment to interrogate biomarker emergence and the systemic effects of tumor burden. Over 10,000 proteins were identified (qIL5) receptor. IL5 treatment promoted Eμ-TCL1 tumor proliferation, suggesting an amplification of IL5-induced AKT signaling by TCL1. Tumor plasma contained a substantial tumor lysis signature, most prominent in Eμ-myc plasma, whereas Eμ-TCL1 plasma contained signatures of immune-response, inflammation and microenvironment interactions, with putative biomarkers in early-stage cancer. These findings provide a detailed characterization of contrasting B-cell tumor models, identifying common and specific tumor mechanisms. Integrated plasma proteomics allowed the dissection of a systemic response and a tumor lysis signature present in early- and late-stage cancers, respectively. Overall, this study suggests common B-cell cancer signatures exist and illustrates the potential of the further evaluation of B-cell cancer subtypes by integrative proteomics.

  6. Detection of clonal B cells in microdissected reactive lymphoproliferations: possible diagnostic pitfalls in PCR analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, X.G.; Sandvej, K.; Gregersen, Niels

    1999-01-01

    rearrangement analysis is a sensitive and specific method for demonstrating B cell clonality in whole paraffin wax embedded sections. However, oligoclonal and monoclonal rearrangement patterns are regularly encountered in small tissue fragments from otherwise unremarkable reactive lymphoproliferations, possibly...... because of preferential priming or detection of local B cell clones. Data from clonal analysis of small, microdissected or lymphocyte poor samples must be evaluated critically. It is recommended that analyses should be run in parallel on at least two tissue specimens. Only reproducible bands present...

  7. Increased p190RhoGEF expression in activated B cells correlates with the induction of the plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yun Jung; Jeong, Ji Hye; Park, Yuna; Lee, Jong Ran

    2012-02-29

    Previously, we demonstrated that the p190 Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (p190RhoGEF) was induced following CD40 stimulation of B cells. In this study, we examined whether p190RhoGEF and a downstream effector molecule RhoA are required for B cell differentiation. Expression of p190RhoGEF positively correlated with the expression of surface markers and transcriptional regulators that are characteristic of mature B cells with plasma cell (PC) phenotypes. Moreover, either the overexpression of p190RhoGEF or the expression of a constitutively active RhoA drove cellular differentiation toward PC phenotypes. B cell maturation was abrogated in cells that overexpressed p190RhoGEF and a dominant-negative form of RhoA simultaneously. CD40-mediated maturation events were also abrogated in cells that overexpressed either dominant-negative p190RhoGEF or RhoA. Together, these data provide evidence that p190RhoGEF signaling through RhoA in CD40-activated B cells drives the induction of the PC differentiation.

  8. B cells regulate CD4+ T cell responses to papain following B cell receptor-independent papain uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Daniel F; Woodruff, Matthew C; Carroll, Michael C; Austen, K Frank; Gurish, Michael F

    2014-07-15

    Papain, a cysteine protease allergen with inherent adjuvant activity, induces potent IL-4 expression by T cells in the popliteal lymph nodes of mice following footpad immunization. In this study, we identify a novel, non-BCR-mediated capacity for B cells to rapidly bind and internalize papain. B cells subsequently regulate the adaptive immune response by enhancing ICOS expression on CD4(+) T cells and amplifying Th2 and follicular helper T cell induction. Ab blockade of ICOS ligand, expressed by popliteal lymph node B cells, but not dendritic cells, at the peak of the response inhibits IL-4 responses in wild-type mice but not B cell-deficient mice. Thus, B cells play a critical role in amplifying adjuvant-dependent Th2 polarization following noncanonical acquisition and internalization of the cysteine protease papain.

  9. Additivity dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rozin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Judgments of naturalness of foods tend to be more influenced by the process history of a food, rather than its actual constituents. Two types of processing of a ``natural'' food are to add something or to remove something. We report in this study, based on a large random sample of individuals from six countries (France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, UK and USA that additives are considered defining features of what makes a food not natural, whereas ``subtractives'' are almost never mentioned. In support of this, skim milk (with major subtraction of fat is rated as more natural than whole milk with a small amount of natural vitamin D added. It is also noted that ``additives'' is a common word, with a synonym reported by a native speaker in 17 of 18 languages, whereas ``subtractive'' is lexicalized in only 1 of the 18 languages. We consider reasons for additivity dominance, relating it to omission bias, feature positive bias, and notions of purity.

  10. Competitive Transfer of αCD19-TCRz-CD28 and αCD19-TCRz-CD137 CAR-T Cells for B-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-22

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  11. Molecular cloning of a new immunomodulatory protein from Anoectochilus formosanus which induces B cell IgM secretion through a T-independent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chou Kuan

    Full Text Available An immunomodulatory protein (IPAF was purified and cloned from Anoectochilus formosanus, an Orchidaceae herbal plant in Asia. The major targeting immune cells of IPAF and its modulating effects toward B lymphocytes were investigated. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE was conducted to clone the IPAF gene, and the obtained sequence was BLAST compared on the NCBI database. MACS-purified mouse T and B lymphocytes were stimulated with IPAF and the cell proliferation, activation, and Igs production were examined. IPAF comprised a 25 amino acids signal peptide and a 138 amino acids protein which was homologous to the lectins from Orchidaceae plant. IPAF selectively induced the cell proliferation in mouse splenic B lymphocytes but not T lymphocytes. The IPAF-induced B cells exhibited increased CD69 and MHC class II expression, and a dose- and time-dependent enhancement in IgM production. These results suggested potential benefits of IPAF to strengthen the humoral immunity.

  12. Phenotypic characterization of autoreactive B cells--checkpoints of B cell tolerance in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett M Jacobi

    Full Text Available DNA-reactive B cells play a central role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; DNA antibodies precede clinical disease and in established disease correlate with renal inflammation and contribute to dendritic cell activation and high levels of type 1 interferon. A number of central and peripheral B cell tolerance mechanisms designed to control the survival, differentiation and activation of autoreactive B cells are thought to be disturbed in patients with SLE. The characterization of DNA-reactive B cells has, however, been limited by their low frequency in peripheral blood. Using a tetrameric configuration of a peptide mimetope of DNA bound by pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies, we can identify B cells producing potentially pathogenic DNA-reactive antibodies. We, therefore, characterized the maturation and differentiation states of peptide, (ds double stranded DNA cross-reactive B cells in the peripheral blood of lupus patients and correlated these with clinical disease activity. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of tetramer-binding B cells in SLE patients compared to healthy controls. We demonstrated the existence of a novel tolerance checkpoint at the transition of antigen-naïve to antigen-experienced. We further demonstrate that patients with moderately active disease have more autoreactive B cells in both the antigen-naïve and antigen-experienced compartments consistent with greater impairment in B cell tolerance in both early and late checkpoints in these patients than in patients with quiescent disease. This methodology enables us to gain insight into the development and fate of DNA-reactive B cells in individual patients with SLE and paves the way ultimately to permit better and more customized therapies.

  13. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios.

  14. Transitional B Cells in Early Human B Cell Development – Time to Revisit the Paradigm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Victoria G.; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Townsend, Catherine L.; Lu, Grace H. C.; O’Hare, Joselli Silva; Mozeika, Alexander; Coolen, Anthonius C. C.; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    The B cell repertoire is generated in the adult bone marrow by an ordered series of gene rearrangement processes that result in massive diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and consequently an equally large number of potential specificities for antigen. As the process is essentially random, the cells exhibiting excess reactivity with self-antigens are generated and need to be removed from the repertoire before the cells are fully mature. Some of the cells are deleted, and some will undergo receptor editing to see if changing the light chain can rescue an autoreactive antibody. As a consequence, the binding properties of the B cell receptor are changed as development progresses through pre-B ≫ immature ≫ transitional ≫ naïve phenotypes. Using long-read, high-throughput, sequencing we have produced a unique set of sequences from these four cell types in human bone marrow and matched peripheral blood, and our results describe the effects of tolerance selection on the B cell repertoire at the Ig gene level. Most strong effects of selection are seen within the heavy chain repertoire and can be seen both in gene usage and in CDRH3 characteristics. Age-related changes are small, and only the size of the CDRH3 shows constant and significant change in these data. The paucity of significant changes in either kappa or lambda light chain repertoires implies that either the heavy chain has more influence over autoreactivity than light chain and/or that switching between kappa and lambda light chains, as opposed to switching within the light chain loci, may effect a more successful autoreactive rescue by receptor editing. Our results show that the transitional cell population contains cells other than those that are part of the pre-B ≫ immature ≫ transitional ≫ naïve development pathway, since the population often shows a repertoire that is outside the trajectory of gene loss/gain between pre-B and naïve stages. PMID:27994589

  15. Exploiting human memory B cell heterogeneity for improved vaccine efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Thomas Pauli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The major goal in vaccination is establishment of long-term, prophylactic humoral memory to a pathogen. Two major components to long-lived humoral memory are plasma cells for the production of specific immunoglobulin and memory B cells that survey for their specific antigen in the periphery for later affinity maturation, proliferation, and differentiation. The study of human B cell memory has been aided by the discovery of a general marker for B cell memory, expression of CD27; however, new data suggests the existence of CD27- memory B cells as well. These recently described non-canonical memory populations have increasingly pointed to the heterogeneity of the memory compartment. The novel B memory subsets in humans appear to have unique origins, localization, and functions compared to what was considered to be a classical memory B cell. In this article, we review the known B cell memory subsets, the establishment of B cell memory in vaccination and infection, and how understanding these newly described subsets can inform vaccine design and disease treatment.

  16. Salmonella induces PD-L1 expression in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella persists for a long time in B cells; however, the mechanism(s) through which infected B cells avoid effector CD8 T cell responses has not been characterized. In this study, we show that Salmonella infects and survives within all B1 and B2 cell subpopulations. B cells are infected with a Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing an ovalbumin (OVA) peptide (SIINFEKL) to evaluate whether B cells process and present Salmonella antigens in the context of MHC-I molecules. Our data showed that OVA peptides are presented by MHC class I K(b)-restricted molecules and the presented antigen is generated through proteasomal degradation and vacuolar processing. In addition, Salmonella-infected B cells express co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, and CD86 as well as inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1. Thus, the cross-presentation of Salmonella antigens and the expression of activation molecules suggest that infected B cells are able to prime and activate specific CD8(+) T cells. However, the Salmonella infection-stimulated expression of PD-L1 suggests that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may be involved in turning off the cytotoxic effector response during Salmonella persistent infection, thereby allowing B cells to become a reservoir for the bacteria.

  17. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anupam; Sindhava, Vishal; Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction.

  18. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia;

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas...... showed that many of the tumors/cell proliferations induced by each virus were polyclonal. Our results indicate that enhancer mutations weaken the ability of Akv to induce mature B-cell lymphomas prior to the plasma cell stage, whereas development of plasma cell proliferations is less dependent of viral......, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid...

  19. Impact of the B Cell Growth Factor APRIL on the Qualitative and Immunological Characteristics of Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernelot Moens, Sophie J; van Leuven, Sander I; Zheng, Kang H; Havik, Stefan R; Versloot, Miranda V; van Duivenvoorde, Leonie M; Hahne, Michael; Stroes, Erik S G; Baeten, Dominique L; Hamers, Anouk A J

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the role of B lymphocytes in atherosclerosis development, have yielded contradictory results. Whereas B lymphocyte-deficiency aggravates atherosclerosis in mice; depletion of mature B lymphocytes reduces atherosclerosis. These observations led to the notion that distinct B lymphocyte subsets have different roles. B1a lymphocytes exert an atheroprotective effect, which has been attributed to secretion of IgM, which can be deposited in atherosclerotic lesions thereby reducing necrotic core formation. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-family member 'A Proliferation-Inducing Ligand' (APRIL, also known as TNFSF13) was previously shown to increase serum IgM levels in a murine model. In this study, we investigated the effect of APRIL overexpression on advanced lesion formation and composition, IgM production and B cell phenotype. We crossed APRIL transgenic (APRIL-Tg) mice with ApoE knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. After a 12-week Western Type Diet, ApoE-/-APRIL-Tg mice and ApoE-/- littermates showed similar increases in body weight and lipid levels. Histologic evaluation showed no differences in lesion size, stage or necrotic area. However, smooth muscle cell (α-actin stain) content was increased in ApoE-/-APRIL-Tg mice, implying more stable lesions. In addition, increases in both plaque IgM deposition and plasma IgM levels were found in ApoE-/-APRIL-Tg mice compared with ApoE-/- mice. Flow cytometry revealed a concomitant increase in peritoneal B1a lymphocytes in ApoE-/-APRIL-Tg mice. This study shows that ApoE-/-APRIL-Tg mice have increased oxLDL-specific serum IgM levels, potentially mediated via an increase in B1a lymphocytes. Although no differences in lesion size were found, transgenic ApoE-/-APRIL-Tg mice do show potential plaque stabilizing features in advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

  20. In Vivo Chronic Stimulation Unveils Autoreactive Potential of Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome Protein-Deficient B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Villa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the gene encoding the hematopoietic-specific WAS protein (WASp. WAS is frequently associated with autoimmunity, indicating a critical role of WASp in maintenance of tolerance. The role of B cells in the induction of autoreactive immune responses in WAS has been investigated in several settings, but the mechanisms leading to the development of autoimmune manifestations have been difficult to evaluate in the mouse models of the disease that do not spontaneously develop autoimmunity. We performed an extensive characterization of Was−/− mice that provided evidence of the potential alteration in B cell selection, because of the presence of autoantibodies against double-stranded DNA, platelets, and tissue antigens. To uncover the mechanisms leading to the activation of the potentially autoreactive B cells in Was−/− mice, we performed in vivo chronic stimulations with toll-like receptors agonists (LPS and CpG and apoptotic cells or infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. All treatments led to increased production of autoantibodies, increased proteinuria, and kidney tissue damage in Was−/− mice. These findings demonstrate that a lower clearance of pathogens and/or self-antigens and the resulting chronic inflammatory state could cause B cell tolerance breakdown leading to autoimmunity in WAS.

  1. Unaltered levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in the absence of the B cell homing chemokine receptor CXCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensminger, Stephan M; Abele-Ohl, Silke; Ohl, Lars; Spriewald, Bernd M; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Weyand, Michael; Förster, Reinhold

    2009-03-01

    Chemokine receptors and their ligands are crucial for lymphocyte trafficking under both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. The chemokine receptor CXCR5 controls B cell migration and the organization of B cell follicles. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of CXCR5 on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Fully MHC mismatched BALB/c (H2(d)) donor aortas were transplanted into C57BL/6-CXCR5(-/-) (H2(b)), C57BL/6-CXCR5(+/-) (H2(b)) or C57BL/6-CXCR5(+/+) (H2(b)) recipients. Grafts were analysed by morphometry and immunofluorescence and intra-graft cytokine mRNA production was analysed by RT-PCR. Transplant arteriosclerosis was evident in CXCR5+/+ and CXCR5+/- mice and only mildly reduced in CXCR5-/- recipients indicating that absence of CXCR5 had no substantial effect on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Analysis of the cellular infiltrate of aortic grafts implanted in CXCR5-/- recipients revealed no differences in the number of T-cells, macrophages and B cells as compared to controls. Intra-graft cytokine production showed no significant changes in Th1 (IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines as well as in TGF-beta and iNOS production. These data suggest that lack of CXCR5 expression by recipient T- and B-cells has little effect on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis.

  2. The rationale for B lymphocyte depletion in Graves' disease. Monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody therapy as a novel treatment option

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus H; Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2006-01-01

    We have reviewed the immunology of thyroid autoimmunity with special reference to the importance of B lymphocytes (B cells) in thyroidal and extrathyroidal Graves' disease (GD), thus providing a framework for the hypothesis that B cell depletion may be beneficial in GD. Additionally, after review...

  3. Spectratyping analysis of the islet-reactive T cell repertoire in diabetic NOD Igμnull mice after polyclonal B cell reconstitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sercarz Eli E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non Obese Diabetic mice lacking B cells (NOD.Igμnull mice do not develop diabetes despite their susceptible background. Upon reconstitution of B cells using a chimera approach, animals start developing diabetes at 20 weeks of age. Methods We have used the spectratyping technique to follow the T cell receptor (TCR V beta repertoire of NOD.Igμnull mice following B cell reconstitution. This technique provides an unbiased approach to understand the kinetics of TCR expansion. We have also analyzed the TCR repertoire of reconstituted animals receiving cyclophosphamide treatment and following tissue transplants to identify common aggressive clonotypes. Results We found that B cell reconstitution of NOD.Igμnull mice induces a polyclonal TCR repertoire in the pancreas 10 weeks later, gradually diversifying to encompass most BV families. Interestingly, these clonotypic BV expansions are mainly confined to the pancreas and are absent from pancreatic lymph nodes or spleens. Cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes at 10 weeks post-B cell reconstitution reorganized the predominant TCR repertoires by removing potential regulatory clonotypes (BV1, BV8 and BV11 and increasing the frequency of others (BV4, BV5S2, BV9, BV16-20. These same clonotypes are more frequently present in neonatal pancreatic transplants under the kidney capsule of B-cell reconstituted diabetic NOD.Igμnull mice, suggesting their higher invasiveness. Phenotypic analysis of the pancreas-infiltrating lymphocytes during diabetes onset in B cell reconstituted animals show a predominance of CD19+ B cells with a B:T lymphocyte ratio of 4:1. In contrast, in other lymphoid organs (pancreatic lymph nodes and spleens analyzed by FACS, the B:T ratio was 1:1. Lymphocytes infiltrating the pancreas secrete large amounts of IL-6 and are of Th1 phenotype after CD3-CD28 stimulation in vitro. Conclusions Diabetes in NOD.Igμnull mice appears to be caused by a polyclonal repertoire of T cell

  4. Seeking help: B cells adapting to flu variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Most, Robbert G; Roman, François P; Innis, Bruce; Hanon, Emmanuel; Vaughn, David W; Gillard, Paul; Walravens, Karl; Wettendorff, Martine

    2014-07-23

    The study of influenza vaccines has revealed potential interactions between preexisting immunological memory and antigenic context and/or adjuvantation. In the face of antigenic diversity, the process of generating B cell adaptability is driven by cross-reactive CD4 memory cells, such as T follicular helper cells from previous infections or vaccinations. Although such "helped" B cells are capable of adapting to variant antigens, lack of CD4 help could lead to a suboptimal antibody response. Collectively, this indicates an interplay between CD4 T cells, adjuvant, and B cell adaptability.

  5. Glucose-dependent de Novo Lipogenesis in B Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufort, Fay J.; Gumina, Maria R.; Ta, Nathan L.; Tao, Yongzhen; Heyse, Shannon A.; Scott, David A.; Richardson, Adam D.; Seyfried, Thomas N.; Chiles, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterially derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates naive B lymphocytes to differentiate into immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting plasma cells. Differentiation of B lymphocytes is characterized by a proliferative phase followed by expansion of the intracellular membrane secretory network to support Ig production. A key question in lymphocyte biology is how naive B cells reprogram metabolism to support de novo lipogenesis necessary for proliferation and expansion of the endomembrane network in response to LPS. We report that extracellularly acquired glucose is metabolized, in part, to support de novo lipogenesis in response to LPS stimulation of splenic B lymphocytes. LPS stimulation leads to increased levels of endogenous ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), and this is accompanied by increased ACLY enzymatic activity. ACLY produces cytosolic acetyl-CoA from mitochondrially derived citrate. Inhibition of ACLY activity in LPS-stimulated B cells with the selective inhibitor 2-hydroxy-N-arylbenzenesulfonamide (compound-9; C-9) blocks glucose incorporation into de novo lipid biosynthesis, including cholesterol, free fatty acids, and neutral and acidic phospholipids. Moreover, inhibition of ACLY activity in splenic B cells results in inhibition of proliferation and defective endomembrane expansion and reduced expression of CD138 and Blimp-1, markers for plasma-like B cell differentiation. ACLY activity is also required for LPS-induced IgM production in CH12 B lymphoma cells. These data demonstrate that ACLY mediates glucose-dependent de novo lipogenesis in response to LPS signaling and identify a role for ACLY in several phenotypic changes that define plasma cell differentiation. PMID:24469453

  6. From the regulatory functions of B cells to the identification of cytokine-producing plasma cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Van Duc; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Ries, Stefanie; Shen, Ping; Fillatreau, Simon

    2014-06-01

    B lymphocytes have a unique role as antibody-producing cells. Antibodies are key mediators of humoral immunity against infections, and are thought to account for the protection afforded by successful vaccines. B cells can also secrete cytokines and subsequently regulate immune responses mediated by T and innate cells. Remarkably, recent studies identified plasma blasts/plasma cells as the main types of activated B cells producing the cytokines interleukin (IL)-10, IL-35, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-17, and GM-CSF in various contexts in mice. Here, we discuss these observations, which suggest the existence of various subsets of plasma blast/plasma cells distinguishable through their cytokine expression pattern.

  7. The cytotoxicity of anti-CD22 immunotoxin is enhanced by bryostatin 1 in B-cell lymphomas through CD22 upregulation and PKC-βII depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biberacher, Viola; Decker, Thomas; Oelsner, Madlen; Wagner, Michaela; Bogner, Christian; Schmidt, Burkhard; Kreitman, Robert J; Peschel, Christian; Pastan, Ira; Meyer Zum Büschenfelde, Christian; Ringshausen, Ingo

    2012-05-01

    In spite of potent first-line therapies for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, treatment remains palliative and all patients frequently relapse. Treatment options for these patients are more limited. BL22 is a recombinant protein composed of the variable region of a monoclonal antibody that binds to CD22 and of PE38, a truncated Pseudomonas exotoxin. BL22 is a very potent drug already used in patients with hairy cell leukemia, whereas in chronic lymphocytic leukemia its cytotoxicity is limited by a lower expression of CD22. Here we demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome by pre-activation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with bryostatin 1. Primary malignant B cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma patients were used in vitro to assess the therapeutic impact of drug combinations using BL22 and bryostatin 1. We demonstrate that bryostatin 1 sensitizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells for the cytotoxic effects of BL22 through activation of protein kinase C and subsequently increased CD22 surface expression. Dose and time response analysis reveals that activation of protein kinase C further activates an autocrine feedback loop degrading protein kinase C-βII protein. Depletion of protein kinase C-βII and upregulation of CD22 persist for several days following pre-stimulation with bryostatin 1. Therefore, our data provide a rationale for the sequential administration of BL22 following bryostatin 1 treatment. In addition to primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, bryostatin 1 also sensitizes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma cells to BL22 induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that the combination of bryostatin 1 with antibodies directed against CD22 is a potent drug combination for the treatment of low- and high-grade B-cell lymphoma.

  8. Numb Chin Syndrome as First Symptom of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Carbone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numb chin syndrome is a rare sensory neuropathy of the mental nerve characterized by numbness, hypoesthesia, paraesthesia, and very rarely pain. Dental causes, especially iatrogenic ones, maxillofacial trauma, or malignant neoplasm are etiologic factors for this rare syndrome. Many malignant and metastatic neoplasms are causing this syndrome, like primary osteosarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and mandibular metastasis of primary carcinoma of breast, lung, thyroid, kidney, prostate, and nasopharynx. Haematological malignancies like acute lymphocytic leukaemia, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and myeloma can cause this neuropathy. The authors report a case of a 71-year-old woman in which the numb chin syndrome was the first symptom of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which caused infiltration and reabsorption of the alveolar ridge and lower mandibular cortex. A biopsy of the mass was performed on fragments of tissue collected from the mandibular periosteum, medullary and cortical mandibular bone, and inferior alveolar nerve.

  9. NF-κB Regulates B-Cell-Derived Nerve Growth Factor Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klaus Heese; Noriko Inoue; Tohru Sawada

    2006-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, four neurotrophins have been identified: nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5). NGF exerts an important role in the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it has recently been documented that several types of immune cells, such as mast cells, lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils, produce,store and release NGF. Accumulating preclinical and clinical data indicate that dysfunctions of NGF and the other neurotrophins may contribute to impaired immune responses and concentration of NGF frequently correlates with disease severity. Thus, the aim of this study was to elucidate the potential signaling mechanisms of cytokineneurotrophins interactions contributing to increased NGF levels. Our data show that the transcription factorNF-κB plays a pivotal role in regulating B-cell-derived NGF expression.

  10. Targeting B-cell lymphomas with inhibitors of the MALT1 paracaspase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailfinger, Stephan; Lenz, Georg; Thome, Margot

    2014-12-01

    The paracaspase MALT1 is an Arg-specific protease that cleaves multiple substrates to promote lymphocyte proliferation and survival. The catalytic activity of MALT1 is normally tightly regulated by antigen receptor triggering, which promotes MALT1 activation by its inducible monoubiquitination-dependent dimerization. Constitutive MALT1 activity is a hallmark of specific subsets of B-cell lymphomas, which are characterized by chromosomal translocations or point mutations that activate MALT1 or its upstream regulators. Recent findings suggest that such lymphomas may be sensitive to treatment with MALT1 inhibitors. Here we review recent progress in the understanding of MALT1 function and regulation, and the development of small molecule MALT1 inhibitors for therapeutic applications.

  11. Dual kappa and lambda expressing in mature B-cell neoplasm: An unusual case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 57 years old male presented with transfusion dependent anemia for last 2 months with mild weight loss and on and off fever. On examination he was found to have small axillary lymph nodes with moderate splenomegaly. Flow cytometry revealed 63.2% cells in the lymphocyte window in cluster of differentiation (CD 45 versus side scatter plot. Further analysis on CD-19 gated cells showed that - 75.9% of these cells expressed CD-19 plus the expression of CD23, CD25, CD43, CD20 and CD22. The entire cluster showed dual expression of kappa and lambda light chains. Final diagnosis of low-grade B non-Hodgkin lymphoma was made. Given that dual kappa and lambda expressing in mature B cell neoplasm has been described in literature, it is important to differentiate such cases from reactive lymphoid proliferations.

  12. B cell analysis of ethnic groups in Mali with differential susceptibility to malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portugal Silvia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies indicate that people of the Fulani ethnic group are less susceptible to malaria compared to those of other ethnic groups living sympatrically in Africa, including the Dogon ethnic group. Although the mechanisms of this protection remain unclear, the Fulani are known to have higher levels of Plasmodium falciparum-specific antibodies of all Ig classes as compared to the Dogon. However, the proportions of B cell subsets in the Fulani and Dogon that may account for differences in the levels of Ig have not been characterized. Methods In this cross-sectional study, venous blood was collected from asymptomatic Fulani (n = 25 and Dogon (n = 25 adults in Mali during the malaria season, and from P. falciparum-naïve adults in the U.S. (n = 8. At the time of the blood collection, P. falciparum infection was detected by blood-smear in 16% of the Fulani and 36% of the Dogon volunteers. Thawed lymphocytes were analysed by flow cytometry to quantify B cell subsets, including immature and naïve B cells; plasma cells; and classical, activated, and atypical memory B cells (MBCs. Results The overall distribution of B cell subsets was similar between Fulani and Dogon adults, although the percentage of activated MBCs was higher in the Fulani group (Fulani: 11.07% [95% CI: 9.317 – 12.82]; Dogon: 8.31% [95% CI: 6.378 – 10.23]; P = 0.016. The percentage of atypical MBCs was similar between Fulani and Dogon adults (Fulani: 28.3% [95% CI: 22.73 – 34.88]; Dogon: 29.3% [95% CI: 25.06 – 33.55], but higher than U.S. adults (U.S.: 3.0% [95% CI: -0.21 - 6.164]; P Plasmodium falciparum infection was associated with a higher percentage of plasma cells among Fulani (Fulani infected: 3.3% [95% CI: 1.788 – 4.744]; Fulani uninfected: 1.71% [95% CI: 1.33 – 2.08]; P = 0.011, but not Dogon adults. Conclusion These data show that the malaria-resistant Fulani have a higher percentage of activated MBCs compared to the Dogon, and that P

  13. B cell analysis of ethnic groups in Mali with differential susceptibility to malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugal, Silvia; Doumtabe, Didier; Traore, Boubacar; Miller, Louis H; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Dolo, Amagana; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2012-05-11

    Several studies indicate that people of the Fulani ethnic group are less susceptible to malaria compared to those of other ethnic groups living sympatrically in Africa, including the Dogon ethnic group. Although the mechanisms of this protection remain unclear, the Fulani are known to have higher levels of Plasmodium falciparum-specific antibodies of all Ig classes as compared to the Dogon. However, the proportions of B cell subsets in the Fulani and Dogon that may account for differences in the levels of Ig have not been characterized. In this cross-sectional study, venous blood was collected from asymptomatic Fulani (n = 25) and Dogon (n = 25) adults in Mali during the malaria season, and from P. falciparum-naïve adults in the U.S. (n = 8). At the time of the blood collection, P. falciparum infection was detected by blood-smear in 16% of the Fulani and 36% of the Dogon volunteers. Thawed lymphocytes were analysed by flow cytometry to quantify B cell subsets, including immature and naïve B cells; plasma cells; and classical, activated, and atypical memory B cells (MBCs). The overall distribution of B cell subsets was similar between Fulani and Dogon adults, although the percentage of activated MBCs was higher in the Fulani group (Fulani: 11.07% [95% CI: 9.317 - 12.82]; Dogon: 8.31% [95% CI: 6.378 - 10.23]; P = 0.016). The percentage of atypical MBCs was similar between Fulani and Dogon adults (Fulani: 28.3% [95% CI: 22.73 - 34.88]; Dogon: 29.3% [95% CI: 25.06 - 33.55], but higher than U.S. adults (U.S.: 3.0% [95% CI: -0.21 - 6.164]; P Dogon adults. These data show that the malaria-resistant Fulani have a higher percentage of activated MBCs compared to the Dogon, and that P. falciparum infection is associated with a higher percentage of plasma cells in the Fulani compared to the Dogon, findings that may account for the higher levels of P. falciparum antibodies in the Fulani.

  14. Activation-induced cell death in B lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Upon encountering the antigen (Ag), the immune system can either develop a specific immune response or enter a specific state of unresponsiveness, tolerance. The response of B cells to their specific Ag can be activation and proliferation, leading to the immune response, or anergy and activation-induced cell death (AICD), leading to tolerance. AICD in B lymphocytes is a highly regulated event initiated by crosslinking of the B cell receptor (BCR). BCR engagement initiates several signaling events such as activation of PLCγ, Ras, and PI3K, which generally speaking, lead to survival However, in the absence of survival signals (CD40 or IL-4R engagement), BCR crosslinking can also promote apoptotic signal transduction pathways such as activation of effector caspases, expression of pro-apoptotic genes, and inhibition of pro-survival genes. The complex interplay between survival and death signals determines the B cell fate and, consequently, the immune response.

  15. Increased production of interleukin-6 by T lymphocytes from patients with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeña, P; Prieto, A; Garcia-Suarez, J; Reyes, E; San Miguel, J; Jorda, J; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1996-01-01

    Alterations in T lymphocyte functions may affect other cellular components of the immune system. Several lymphokines produced by T cells are involved in the proliferation and differentiation of human B lymphocytes. Alterations in the secretion of these molecules may be implicated in the development of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases. We have investigated the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by T lymphocytes from 14 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and 16 healthy controls. The phenotypical and functional characteristics of these T lymphocytes were also studied. The proliferative response to vegetal lectin phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation was decreased in T lymphocytes from MM patients (p 0.05) but not by exogenous IL-6 (p lectin stimulation, the production of IL-2 by T lymphocytes from those patients was normal, while IL-6 secretion was increased.

  16. Clinical role of obinutuzumab in the treatment of naive patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Cerquozzi S; Owen C

    2015-01-01

    Sonia Cerquozzi,1 Carolyn Owen2 1Department of Hematology, University of Calgary, 2Department of Hematology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: The introduction of targeted therapy against CD20+ with the monoclonal antibody rituximab has dramatically improved the survival of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma. Unfortunately, CLL remains incurable with chemoimmunotherapy, with many patients having refractory ...

  17. B cell development in the bone marrow is regulated by homeostatic feedback exerted by mature B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitit eShahaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis in the B cell compartment is strictly imposed to balance cell production and cell loss. However, it is not clear whether B cell development in the bone marrow (BM is an autonomous process or subjected to regulation by the peripheral B cell compartment. To specifically address this question, we used mice transgenic for human CD20, where effective depletion of B lineage cells is obtained upon administration of mouse-anti-human CD20 antibodies, in the absence of any effect on other cell lineages and/or tissues. We followed the kinetics of B cell return to equilibrium by BrdU labeling and flow cytometry and analyzed the resulting data by mathematical modeling. Labeling was much faster in depleted mice. Compared to control mice, B cell-depleted mice exhibited a higher proliferation rate in the pro-/pre-B compartment, and higher cell death and lower differentiation in the immature B cell compartment. We validated the first result by analysis of the expression of Ki67, the nuclear protein expressed in proliferating cells, and the second using Annexin-V staining. Collectively, our results suggest that B lymphopoiesis is subjected to homeostatic feedback mechanisms imposed by mature B cells in the peripheral compartment.

  18. Genetically predicted longer telomere length is associated with increased risk of B-cell lymphoma subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Lan, Qing; Slager, Susan L; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Teras, Lauren R; Camp, Nicola J; Cerhan, James R; Spinelli, John J; Wang, Sophia S; Nieters, Alexandra; Vijai, Joseph; Yeager, Meredith; Wang, Zhaoming; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Conde, Lucia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Cox, David G; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Giles, Graham G; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kane, Eleanor; Purdue, Mark P; Vajdic, Claire M; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M; Link, Brian K; Novak, Anne J; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A; Ansell, Stephen M; Witzig, Thomas E; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry J; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans-Olov; Roos, Göran; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T; Holly, Elizabeth A; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Tinker, Lesley F; North, Kari E; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J; Villano, Danylo J; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Boeing, Heiner; Tjønneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chung, Charles C; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Salles, Gilles; Glenn, Martha; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Curtin, Karen; Wu, Xifeng; Smedby, Karin E; de Sanjose, Silvia; Skibola, Christine F; Berndt, Sonja I; Birmann, Brenda M; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2016-04-15

    Evidence from a small number of studies suggests that longer telomere length measured in peripheral leukocytes is associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). However, these studies may be biased by reverse causation, confounded by unmeasured environmental exposures and might miss time points for which prospective telomere measurement would best reveal a relationship between telomere length and NHL risk. We performed an analysis of genetically inferred telomere length and NHL risk in a study of 10 102 NHL cases of the four most common B-cell histologic types and 9562 controls using a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising nine telomere length-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This approach uses existing genotype data and estimates telomere length by weighing the number of telomere length-associated variant alleles an individual carries with the published change in kb of telomere length. The analysis of the telomere length GRS resulted in an association between longer telomere length and increased NHL risk [four B-cell histologic types combined; odds ratio (OR) = 1.49, 95% CI 1.22-1.82,P-value = 8.5 × 10(-5)]. Subtype-specific analyses indicated that chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) was the principal NHL subtype contributing to this association (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.93-3.51,P-value = 4.0 × 10(-10)). Significant interactions were observed across strata of sex for CLL/SLL and marginal zone lymphoma subtypes as well as age for the follicular lymphoma subtype. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase NHL risk, particularly risk of CLL/SLL, and are consistent with earlier studies relating longer telomere length with increased NHL risk.

  19. Expression of IL-4 receptor on human T and B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zola, H; Flego, L; Weedon, H

    1993-08-01

    The expression of the interleukin-4 receptor on human blood and tonsil lymphocytes has been studied using a monoclonal antibody and high-sensitivity immunofluorescence flow cytometry. While no receptor expression could be detected on circulating or tonsil T cells, a subset of B cells was shown to express the receptor. The IL-4R-positive B cells in tonsil had a phenotype suggesting that they included both germinal centre B cells and B cells outside the germinal centre. The subset of B cells in the blood that expressed the receptor included CD23-positive B cells. Activation of tonsil B cells using anti-IgM, IL-4, IL-2, or combinations of these reagents led to increases in IL-4R expression, but these changes were small compared to changes in the expression of IL-2R p55 (CD25), a known marker of activation. Similarly, activation of T cells led to low-level expression of IL-4R, with IL-4 itself up-regulating IL-4R, especially in CD4 cells. The majority of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia samples were positive for IL-4R expression, whilst most other leukemic samples were negative.

  20. Cyclin D1 (Bcl-1, PRAD1) protein expression in low-grade B-cell lymphomas and reactive hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W. I.; Zukerberg, L. R.; Motokura, T.; Arnold, A.; Harris, N. L.

    1994-01-01

    Mantle cell (centrocytic) lymphoma (MCL) and occasional cases of B-cell small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-SLL/CLL) show a characteristic translocation, t(11:14)(q13;q32) involving rearrangement of the Bcl-1 region. Recently it was shown that the key Bcl-1 region oncogene is cyclin D1/PRAD1; cyclin D1 mRNA was shown to be overexpressed in cases of MCL. We examined cyclin D1 protein expression in low-grade B-cell lymphomas and reactive lymphoid hyperplasias using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to cyclin D1 protein. Definite nuclear staining was seen in 15 of 15 MCLs, 1 of 7 B-SLL/CLLs, 0 of 7 reactive hyperplasias, 0 of 10 follicular lymphomas, and 0 of 4 lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue using immunoperoxidase stains on paraffin-embedded sections. Best results were obtained with the affinity-purified polyclonal antibody on microwave-treated, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. MCLs showed diffuse nuclear staining, whereas the one positive B-SLL/CLL showed dot-like or globular nuclear staining. Nuclear cyclin D1 protein can be detected in all cases of MCL and in rare cases of B-SLL/CLL using an immunohistochemical technique on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, and it does not appear to be detectable in reactive hyperplasias and other low-grade B-cell lymphomas. This protein may be useful in subclassification of low-grade B-cell lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7518196

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