WorldWideScience

Sample records for azoles

  1. Azoles

    OpenAIRE

    Collado, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Azoles. Imidazol, tiazoles y oxazoles: reactividad y síntesis. Pirazol, isoozaxol, isotiazol: reactividad y síntesis. Capítulo cuarto del temario del segundo bloque de la asignatura Ampliación de Química Orgánica Avanzada. Azoles.

  2. Azole-Resistant Invasive Aspergillosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensvold, Christen Rune; Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2012-01-01

    with point mutation (s) in CYP51A (TR34/L98H and TR46/Y121F/T289A). In the third a single target enzyme alteration (G432S) is found. These resistant “environmental” strains have been detected in many West-European countries as well as in the Asia- Pacifics. Noticeably, these two continents account...... and classes available is impressive compared to the armamentarium in human medicine, azoles will remain the most important group in agriculture due to superior field performance and significant resistance in fungal pathogens to other compounds. Hence, further spread of environmental resistant Aspergillus...

  3. Direct, Regioselective N-Alkylation of 1,3-Azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Graceffa, Russell F; Boezio, Alessandro A

    2016-01-04

    Regioselective N-alkylation of 1,3-azoles is a valuable transformation. Organomagnesium reagents were discovered to be competent bases to affect regioselective alkylation of various 1,3-azoles. Counterintuitively, substitution selectively occurred at the more sterically hindered nitrogen atom. Numerous examples are provided, on varying 1,3-azole scaffolds, with yields ranging from 25 to 95%.

  4. Azole-based antimycotic agents inhibit mold on unseasoned pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol. A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2005-01-01

    Inhibiting the growth of mold fungi on cellulose-based building materials may be achievable through the use of azole-based antimycotics. Azoles were variably effective against mold fungi that are frequently found on wood and wood products. Unseasoned southern yellow pine specimens that were dip-treated with varying concentrations of eight azoles were evaluated for...

  5. Clinical implications of globally emerging azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fungi are the cause of an array of diseases affecting humans, animals and plants. The triazole antifungal agents itraconazole, voriconazole, isavuconazole and posaconazole are treatment options against diseases caused by Aspergillus. However, resistance to azoles has recently emerged as a new therapeutic challenge in six continents. Although de novo azole resistance occurs occasionally in patients during azole therapy, the main burden is the aquisition of resistance through the environment. In this setting, the evolution of resistance is attributed to the widespread use of azole-based fungicides. Although ubiquitously distributed, A. fumigatus is not a phytopathogen. However, agricultural fungicides deployed against plant pathogenic moulds such as Fusarium, Mycospaerella and A. flavus also show activity against A. fumigatus in the environment and exposure of non-target fungi is inevitable. Further, similarity in molecule structure between azole fungicides and antifungal drugs results in cross-resistance of A. fumigatus to medical azoles. Clinical studies have shown that two-thirds of patients with azole-resistant infections had no previous history of azole therapy and high mortality rates between 50% and 100% are reported in azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis. The resistance phenotype is associated with key mutations in the cyp51A gene, including TR34/L98H, TR53 and TR46/Y121F/T289A resistance mechanisms. Early detection of resistance is of paramount importance and if demonstrated, either with susceptibility testing or through molecular analysis, azole monotherapy should be avoided. Liposomal amphotericin B or a combination of voriconazole and an echinocandin are recomended for azole-resistant aspergillosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience’. PMID:28080986

  6. Azole resistance surveillance in Aspergillus fumigatus: beneficial or biased?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, P.E.; Lestrade, P.P.A.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Azole resistance is a growing concern with Aspergillus fumigatus, and may cause increased mortality in patients with azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis (IA). Microbial surveillance has been recognized as a fundamental component of resistance management. Surveillance information may be used to

  7. On the evolution of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade azole resistance has increasingly been reported in Aspergillus fumigatus, which is a fungal pathogen involved in the vast majority of invasive aspergillosis infections in humans, and is now a global public health concern. Antifungal azoles, especially triazoles,

  8. Emergence of Aspergillus fumigatus azole-resistance in azole-naïve COPD patients and their homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dauchy, Camille; Bautin, Nathalie; Nseir, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus (ARAF) has been reported in COPD patients, but has not been specifically assessed so far. Here, we evaluated ARAF prevalence in azole-naïve COPD patients and their homes, and assessed whether CYP51A mutations were similar in clinical and environmental reservo...

  9. Acquired multi-azole resistance in Candida tropicalis during persistent urinary tract infection in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Álvarez-Pérez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-azole resistance acquisition by Candida tropicalis after prolonged antifungal therapy in a dog with urinary candidiasis is reported. Pre- and post-azole treatment isolates were clonally related and had identical silent mutations in the ERG11 gene, but the latter displayed increased azole minimum inhibitory concentrations. A novel frameshift mutation in ERG3 was found in some isolates recovered after resistance development, so it appears unlikely that this mutation is responsible for multi-azole resistance.

  10. Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida albicans and Emerging Non-albicans Candida Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Sarah G.; Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Rybak, Jeffrey M.; Nishimoto, Andrew T.; Barker, Katherine S.; Rogers, P. David

    2017-01-01

    Within the limited antifungal armamentarium, the azole antifungals are the most frequent class used to treat Candida infections. Azole antifungals such as fluconazole are often preferred treatment for many Candida infections as they are inexpensive, exhibit limited toxicity, and are available for oral administration. There is, however, extensive documentation of intrinsic and developed resistance to azole antifungals among several Candida species. As the frequency of azole resistant Candida isolates in the clinical setting increases, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms of such resistance in order to both preserve and improve upon the azole class of antifungals for the treatment of Candida infections. This review examines azole resistance in infections caused by C. albicans as well as the emerging non-albicans Candida species C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, and C. glabrata and in particular, describes the current understanding of molecular basis of azole resistance in these fungal species. PMID:28127295

  11. Management of Azole-Refractory Candida Species Using Boric Acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    commonly used drugs in the country, the best performance of boric acid envisage the need to update the national ... drugs especially with the azole antifungal groups and are ... Other factors include extensive use of broad spectrum ..... influence not only prescription tendency but .... pharmacokinetics, and antifungal therapy.

  12. An Azole-Tolerant Endosomal Trafficking Mutant of Candida albicans Is Susceptible to Azole Treatment in a Mouse Model of Vaginal Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brian M; Luna-Tapia, Arturo; Tournu, Hélène; Rybak, Jeffrey M; Rogers, P David; Palmer, Glen E

    2017-06-01

    We recently reported that a Candida albicans endosomal trafficking mutant continues to grow after treatment with the azole antifungals. Herein, we report that the vps21 Δ/Δ mutant does not have a survival advantage over wild-type isolates after fluconazole treatment in a mouse model of vaginal candidiasis. Furthermore, loss of VPS21 does not synergize with established mechanisms of azole resistance, such as overexpression of efflux pumps or of Erg11p, the target enzyme of the azoles. In summary, although loss of VPS21 function enhances C. albicans survival after azole treatment in vitro , it does not seem to affect azole susceptibility in vivo . Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Environmental study of azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus and other aspergilli in Austria, Denmark, and Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Klaus Leth; Mellado, Emilia; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    . fumigatus isolates from four Danish soil samples displayed elevated azole MICs (8%), and all harbored the same TR/L98H mutation of cyp51A. One A. lentulus isolate with voriconazole MIC of 4 mg/liter was detected in Spain. No azole-resistant aspergilli were detected in compost. Finally, A. terreus...

  14. Effects of azole fungicides on the function of sex and thyroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Andersen, Helle Raun; Taxvig, Camilla

    Azole-fungicides are frequently used in Denmark. Epoxiconazole, propiconazole, and tebuconazole had endocrine disrupting properties in cell based assays. In rats, epoxiconazole and tebuconazole increased gestational length, maternal progesterone level, and masculinized female-offspring. Besides, ......, tebuconazole caused feminization of male-offspring. Similar effects were previously demonstrated for prochloraz. The results indicate that azole-fungicides in general have endocrine disrupting properties....

  15. Uptake of azoles by lamb's lettuce (Valerianella locusta L.) grown in hydroponic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Valcárcel, Ana I; Loureiro, Iñigo; Escorial, Concepción; Molero, Encarnación; Tadeo, José L

    2016-02-01

    An uptake and translocation study of azole compounds was performed in lamb's lettuce (Valerianella locusta L.) grown in nutrient solution fortified with different azoles. Three azoles, (clotrimazole, fluconazole and propiconazole), which have different physico-chemical properties and are ubiquitous in the aquatic environment, were the compounds selected. An analytical method, based on matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) followed by LC-MS/MS determination, was developed to quantify these compounds in aqueous solution and in roots and leaves. The physicochemical properties of azoles are the main factors governing the uptake and plant accumulation. These azoles were detected in leaves indicating their transport within lamb's lettuce. Translocation from nutrient solution to the aerial part of lamb's lettuce was found to be highly dependent on the hydrophobicity of the azole. Clotrimazole accumulates in roots causing necrosis in roots and leaves, whereas fluconazole was the azole with the highest concentration in leaves without causing apparent phytotoxicity symptoms. The assessment of the levels of these azoles in leaves indicates that the risk for human health is negligible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Epidemiological and Genomic Landscape of Azole Resistance Mechanisms in Aspergillus Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Daisuke; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Goldman, Gustavo H.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a life-threatening mycosis caused by the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus. The predominant causal species is Aspergillus fumigatus, and azole drugs are the treatment of choice. Azole drugs approved for clinical use include itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, and the recently added isavuconazole. However, epidemiological research has indicated that the prevalence of azole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates has increased significantly over the last decade. What is worse is that azole-resistant strains are likely to have emerged not only in response to long-term drug treatment but also because of exposure to azole fungicides in the environment. Resistance mechanisms include amino acid substitutions in the target Cyp51A protein, tandem repeat sequence insertions at the cyp51A promoter, and overexpression of the ABC transporter Cdr1B. Environmental azole-resistant strains harboring the association of a tandem repeat sequence and punctual mutation of the Cyp51A gene (TR34/L98H and TR46/Y121F/T289A) have become widely disseminated across the world within a short time period. The epidemiological data also suggests that the number of Aspergillus spp. other than A. fumigatus isolated has risen. Some non-fumigatus species intrinsically show low susceptibility to azole drugs, imposing the need for accurate identification, and drug susceptibility testing in most clinical cases. Currently, our knowledge of azole resistance mechanisms in non-fumigatus Aspergillus species such as A. flavus, A. niger, A. tubingensis, A. terreus, A. fischeri, A. lentulus, A. udagawae, and A. calidoustus is limited. In this review, we present recent advances in our understanding of azole resistance mechanisms particularly in A. fumigatus. We then provide an overview of the genome sequences of non-fumigatus species, focusing on the proteins related to azole resistance mechanisms. PMID:27708619

  17. Structural Basis of Human CYP51 Inhibition by Antifungal Azoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strushkevich, Natallia; Usanov, Sergey A.; Park, Hee-Won (Toronto); (IBC-Belarus)

    2010-09-22

    The obligatory step in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes is demethylation of sterol precursors at the C14-position, which is catalyzed by CYP51 (sterol 14-alpha demethylase) in three sequential reactions. In mammals, the final product of the pathway is cholesterol, while important intermediates, meiosis-activating sterols, are produced by CYP51. Three crystal structures of human CYP51, ligand-free and complexed with antifungal drugs ketoconazole and econazole, were determined, allowing analysis of the molecular basis for functional conservation within the CYP51 family. Azole binding occurs mostly through hydrophobic interactions with conservative residues of the active site. The substantial conformational changes in the B{prime} helix and F-G loop regions are induced upon ligand binding, consistent with the membrane nature of the protein and its substrate. The access channel is typical for mammalian sterol-metabolizing P450 enzymes, but is different from that observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis CYP51. Comparison of the azole-bound structures provides insight into the relative binding affinities of human and bacterial P450 enzymes to ketoconazole and fluconazole, which can be useful for the rational design of antifungal compounds and specific modulators of human CYP51.

  18. Current treatment options for vulvovaginal candidiasis caused by azole-resistant Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, J D; Sobel, R

    2018-06-22

    Clinicians are increasingly challenged by patients with refractory vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) caused by azole-resistant Candida species. Fluconazole resistant C.albicans is a growing and perplexing problem following years of indiscriminate drug prescription and unnecessary drug exposure and for which there are few therapeutic alternatives. Regrettably, although the azole class of drugs has expanded, new classes of antifungal drugs have not been forthcoming, limiting effective treatment options in patients with azole resistant Candida vaginitis. Areas covered: This review covers published data on epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment options for women with azole-resistant refractory VVC. Expert opinion: Fluconazole resistant C.albicans adds to the challenge of azole resistant non-albicans Candida spp. Both issues follow years of indiscriminate drug prescription and unnecessary fluconazole exposure. Although an understanding of azole resistance in yeast has been established, this knowledge has not translated into useful therapeutic advantage. Treatment options for such women with refractory symptoms are extremely limited. New therapeutic options and strategies are urgently needed to meet this challenge of azole drug resistance.

  19. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, Verena [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Crettaz, Pierre [Federal Office of Public Health, Division Chemical Products, 3003 Bern (Switzerland); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Department of Environmental System Sciences, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollution Dynamics, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. Methods: The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose–response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach. Results: The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50}. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Conclusion: Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Practice: Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Implications: Our evaluation provides an appropriate “proof of concept”, but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. - Highlights: • Humans are exposed to pesticide mixtures such as pyrethroids and azole fungicides. • We assessed the antiandrogenicity of

  20. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Fent, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. Methods: The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose–response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach. Results: The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC 25 and EC 50 . Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Conclusion: Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Practice: Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Implications: Our evaluation provides an appropriate “proof of concept”, but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. - Highlights: • Humans are exposed to pesticide mixtures such as pyrethroids and azole fungicides. • We assessed the antiandrogenicity of pyrethroids and

  1. In vitro bioaccessibility of copper azole following simulated dermal transfer from pressure-treated wood

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In vitro bioaccessibility of copper azole following simulated dermal transfer from pressure-treated wood. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  2. Endocrine disrupting properties in vivo of widely used azole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day each......) were examined in the Hershberger assay. In the second study, pregnant Wistar rats were dosed with propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole or ketoconazole (50 mg/kg/day each) from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD 21. Caesarian sections were performed on dams at GD 21. Tebuconazole and propiconazole...... demonstrated no antiandrogenic effects at doses between 50 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day in the Hershberger assay. In the in utero exposure toxicity study, ketoconazole, a pharmaceutical to treat human fungal infections, decreased anogenital distance and reduced testicular testosterone levels, demonstrating...

  3. The Aspergillus fumigatus Damage Resistance Protein Family Coordinately Regulates Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Azole Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ergosterol is a major and specific component of the fungal plasma membrane, and thus, the cytochrome P450 enzymes (Erg proteins that catalyze ergosterol synthesis have been selected as valuable targets of azole antifungals. However, the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus has developed worldwide resistance to azoles largely through mutations in the cytochrome P450 enzyme Cyp51 (Erg11. In this study, we demonstrate that a cytochrome b5-like heme-binding damage resistance protein (Dap family, comprised of DapA, DapB, and DapC, coordinately regulates the functionality of cytochrome P450 enzymes Erg5 and Erg11 and oppositely affects susceptibility to azoles. The expression of all three genes is induced in an azole concentration-dependent way, and the decreased susceptibility to azoles requires DapA stabilization of cytochrome P450 protein activity. In contrast, overexpression of DapB and DapC causes dysfunction of Erg5 and Erg11, resulting in abnormal accumulation of sterol intermediates and further accentuating the sensitivity of ΔdapA strains to azoles. The results of exogenous-hemin rescue and heme-binding-site mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the heme binding of DapA contributes the decreased azole susceptibility, while DapB and -C are capable of reducing the activities of Erg5 and Erg11 through depletion of heme. In vivo data demonstrate that inactivated DapA combined with activated DapB yields an A. fumigatus mutant that is easily treatable with azoles in an immunocompromised mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to the single Dap proteins found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we suggest that this complex Dap family regulatory system emerged during the evolution of fungi as an adaptive means to regulate ergosterol synthesis in response to environmental stimuli.

  4. Effects of azole fungicides on the function of sex and thyroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Andersen, Helle Raun; Taxvig, Camilla

    Resumé: Azole-fungicides are frequently used in Denmark. Epoxiconazole, propiconazole, and tebuconazole had endocrine disrupting properties in cell based assays. In rats, epoxiconazole and tebuconazole increased gestational length, maternal progesterone level, and masculinized female-offspring. B......-offspring. Besides, tebuconazole caused feminization of male-offspring. Similar effects were previously demonstrated for prochloraz. The results indicate that azole-fungicides in general have endocrine disrupting properties...

  5. Asexual sporulation facilitates adaptation: The emergence of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Debets, Alfons J M; Verweij, Paul E; Melchers, Willem J G; Zwaan, Bas J; Schoustra, Sijmen E

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the occurrence and spread of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus is crucial for public health. It has been hypothesized that asexual sporulation, which is abundant in nature, is essential for phenotypic expression of azole resistance mutations in A. fumigatus facilitating subsequent spread through natural selection. Furthermore, the disease aspergilloma is associated with asexual sporulation within the lungs of patients and the emergence of azole resistance. This study assessed the evolutionary advantage of asexual sporulation by growing the fungus under pressure of one of five different azole fungicides over seven weeks and by comparing the rate of adaptation between scenarios of culturing with and without asexual sporulation. Results unequivocally show that asexual sporulation facilitates adaptation. This can be explained by the combination of more effective selection because of the transition from a multicellular to a unicellular stage, and by increased mutation supply due to the production of spores, which involves numerous mitotic divisions. Insights from this study are essential to unravel the resistance mechanisms of sporulating pathogens to chemical compounds and disease agents in general, and for designing strategies that prevent or overcome the emerging threat of azole resistance in particular. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Species Distribution and Susceptibility to Azoles of Vaginal Yeasts Isolated Prostitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma T. Gross

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We investigated the use of miconazole among female prostitutes in Costa Rica as well as the distribution of vaginal yeasts and the susceptibility pattern to azoles of strains obtained from this population. Our intention was to relate a frequent use of miconazole to occurrence of vaginal yeasts resistant to azoles. Methods. Vaginal samples were taken from 277 patients that have previously used azoles. Vaginal swabs were obtained for direct microscopy and culture. Yeast isolates were identified by germ tube test and assimilation pattern. Susceptibility testing was determined using a tablet diffusion method. Results. The number of clinical Candida isolates (one from each patient was 57 (20.6%. C. albicans was the predominant species (70%, followed by C. parapsilosis (12%, C. tropicalis (5.3%, C. glabrata and C. famata (3.5% each, C. krusei, C. inconspicua and C. guilliermondii (1.7% each. The majority of vaginal Candida isolates were susceptible to ketoconazole (91%, fluconazole (96.5%, and itraconazole (98%. A lower susceptibility of some isolates to miconazole (63% was observed as compared to the other azoles tested. Moreover, the strains, nonsusceptible to miconazole, were more often obtained from patients that have used this antifungal at least four times within the last year before taking the samples as compared to those with three or less treatments (P<.01. Conclusion. An indiscriminate use of miconazole, such as that observed among female prostitutes in Costa Rica, results in a reduced susceptibility of vaginal yeasts to miconazole but not to other azoles.

  7. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Fent, Karl

    2014-09-15

    Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose-response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach. The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC25 and EC50. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Our evaluation provides an appropriate "proof of concept", but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Successful treatment of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a bottlenose dolphin with high-dose posaconazole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E. Bunskoek (Paulien); S. Seyedmousavi (Seyedmojtaba); S. Gans (Steven); van Vierzen, P.B.J. (Peter B.J.); W.J. Melchers (Willem); C.E. van Elk; J.W. Mouton (Johan); P.E. Verweij (Paul)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractInvasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is difficult to manage. We describe a case of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a female bottlenose dolphin, who failed to respond to voriconazole and posaconazole therapy. As intravenous therapy was precluded,

  9. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr16p restricts changes in ergosterol biosynthesis caused by the presence of azole antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimová, Zuzana; Poloncová, Katarína; Tahotná, Dana; Holič, Roman; Hapala, Ivan; Smith, Adam R; White, Theodore C; Griač, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Pdr16p belongs to the family of phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins in yeast. The absence of Pdr16p results in enhanced susceptibility to azole antifungals in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the major fungal human pathogen Candida albicans, CaPDR16 is a contributing factor to clinical azole resistance. The current study was aimed at better understanding the function of Pdr16p, especially in relation to azole resistance in S. cerevisiae. We show that deletion of the PDR16 gene increased susceptibility of S. cerevisiae to azole antifungals that are used in clinical medicine and agriculture. Significant differences in the inhibition of the sterol biosynthetic pathway were observed between the pdr16Δ strain and its corresponding wild-type (wt) strain when yeast cells were challenged by sub-inhibitory concentrations of the azoles miconazole or fluconazole. The increased susceptibility to azoles, and enhanced changes in sterol biosynthesis upon exposure to azoles of the pdr16Δ strain compared to wt strain, are not the results of increased intracellular concentration of azoles in the pdr16Δ cells. We also show that overexpression of PDR17 complemented the azole susceptible phenotype of the pdr16Δ strain and corrected the enhanced sterol alterations in pdr16Δ cells in the presence of azoles. Pdr17p was found previously to be an essential part of a complex required for intermembrane transport of phosphatidylserine at regions of membrane apposition. Based on these observations, we propose a hypothesis that Pdr16p assists in shuttling sterols or their intermediates between membranes or, alternatively, between sterol biosynthetic enzymes or complexes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Unexpected effects of azole transporter inhibitors on antifungal susceptibility in Candida glabrata and other pathogenic Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Yohsuke; Miyazaki, Taiga; Shimamura, Shintaro; Nakayama, Hironobu; Minematsu, Asuka; Yamauchi, Shunsuke; Takazono, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru; Mukae, Hiroshi; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Candida glabrata is often resistant to azole antifungal agents. Drug efflux through azole transporters, such as Cdr1 and Cdr2, is a key mechanism of azole resistance and these genes are under the control of the transcription factor Pdr1. Recently, the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) inhibitor clorgyline was shown to inhibit the azole efflux pumps, leading to increased azole susceptibility in C. glabrata. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of clorgyline on susceptibility of C. glabrata to not only azoles, but also to micafungin and amphotericin B, using wild-type and several mutant strains. The addition of clorgyline to the culture media increased fluconazole susceptibility of a C. glabrata wild-type strain, whereas micafungin and amphotericin B susceptibilities were markedly decreased. These phenomena were also observed in other medically important Candida species, including Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. Expression levels of CDR1, CDR2 and PDR1 mRNAs and an amount of Cdr1 protein in the C. glabrata wild-type strain were highly increased in response to the treatment with clorgyline. However, loss of Cdr1, Cdr2, Pdr1, and a putative clorgyline target (Fms1), which is an ortholog of human MAO-A, or overexpression of CDR1 did not affect the decreased susceptibility to micafungin and amphotericin B in the presence of clorgyline. The presence of other azole efflux pump inhibitors including milbemycin A4 oxime and carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone also decreased micafungin susceptibility in C. glabrata wild-type, Δcdr1, Δcdr2, and Δpdr1 strains. These findings suggest that azole efflux pump inhibitors increase azole susceptibility but concurrently induce decreased susceptibility to other classes of antifungals independent of azole transporter functions.

  11. Mechanisms of azole resistance in a clinical isolate of Candida tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Larcher, Gérald; Bergès, Thierry; Renier, Gilles; Chabasse, Dominique; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2005-11-01

    Azole resistance has been insufficiently investigated in the yeast Candida tropicalis. Here we determined the molecular mechanisms responsible for azole resistance in a clinical isolate of this pathogenic yeast. Antifungal susceptibility testing performed by a disk diffusion method showed resistance or markedly decreased susceptibility to azoles, which was confirmed by determination of MICs. Considering the relationship between azole susceptibility and the respiration reported for other yeast species, the respiratory activity of this isolate was investigated. Flow cytometry using rhodamine 123 and oxygraphy demonstrated an increased respiratory activity, which was not linked to an overexpression or increased number of copies of the mitochondrial genome. Among previously described resistance mechanisms, an increased activity of efflux pumps was investigated by flow cytometry using rhodamine 6G. However, the efflux of rhodamine 6G was lower in the resistant isolate than in susceptible ones. Likewise, real-time reverse transcription-PCR quantification of the expression of C. tropicalis MDR1 (CtMDR1), which encodes an efflux protein belonging to the major facilitator superfamily, did not show overexpression of this gene. In contrast, the resistant isolate overexpressed the CtERG11 gene coding for lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase. This was in agreement with the larger amount of ergosterol found in this isolate. Moreover, sequencing of CtERG11 showed a point mutation leading to a tyrosine substitution in the protein sequence, which might lead to decreased binding affinity for azoles. In conclusion, overexpression of CtERG11 associated with a missense mutation in this gene seemed to be responsible for the acquired azole resistance of this clinical isolate.

  12. Catalyst- and Reagent-free Electrochemical Azole C-H Amination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Youai; Struwe, Julia; Meyer, Tjark H; Oliveira, Joao Carlos Agostinho Carlos Agostinho; Ackermann, Lutz

    2018-06-14

    Catalyst-, and chemical oxidant-free electrochemical azole C-H aminations were accomplished via cross-dehydrogenative C-H/N-H functionalization. The catalyst-free electrochemical C-H amination proved feasible on azoles with high levels of efficacy and selectivity, avoiding the use of stoichiometric oxidants under ambient conditions. Likewise, the C(sp3)-H nitrogenation proved viable under otherwise identical conditions. The dehydrogenative C-H amination featured ample scope, including cyclic and acyclic aliphatic amines as well as anilines, and employed sustainable electricity as the sole oxidant. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Multicentre validation of 4-well azole agar plates as a screening method for detection of clinically relevant azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Verweij, Paul E; Mouton, Johan W

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is emerging worldwide. Reference susceptibility testing methods are technically demanding and no validated commercial susceptibility tests for moulds currently exist. In this multicentre study a 4-well azole-containing screening agar method...... following E.Def 9.3. In-house and commercial 4-well plates containing agars supplemented with 4 mg/L itraconazole, 1 mg/L voriconazole, 0.5 mg/L posaconazole and no antifungal, respectively, were evaluated. Growth was scored (0-3) by two independent observers in three laboratories. Inter-plate, inter...... agreement (no growth versus growth) was excellent (median 95%-100%, range 87%-100%, overall). The overall sensitivity and specificity for the 4-well plate (no growth versus growth) was 99% (range 97%-100%) and 99% (95%-100%), respectively. The sensitivity for simulated WT/mutant specimens was 94% (range 83...

  14. Performance of Molecular Approaches for Aspergillus Detection and Azole Resistance Surveillance in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Guegan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus triazole resistance is an emerging concern for treating chronically infected/colonized patients. This study sought to evaluate the performance of PCR assays to detect Aspergillus fungi together with azole resistance in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF patients. In total, 119 sputum samples from 87 CF patients were prospectively processed for Aspergillus detection by means of mycological culture and four qPCR assays, 2 in-house methods and two commercial multiplex real-time PCR assays simultaneously detecting Aspergillus and the most relevant cyp51A gene mutations (MycoGENIE® and AsperGenius®. Azole susceptibility of A. fumigatus isolates was assessed using Etest® method and cyp51A gene mutation were characterized by sequencing. The overall rate of Aspergillus detection with the four qPCR assays ranged from 47.9 to 57.1%, contrasting with 42/119 (35.3% positive cultures with A. fumigatus. The high sensitivity of PCR on sputum could then contribute to more effective grading of Aspergillus disease in CF patients. Five out of 41 isolated strains (12.2% exhibited azole-resistant MIC patterns, three of which harbored cyp51A mutations and only 1/3 with the sequence TR34/L98H. Combined with culture, PCR assay achieved high sensitivity Aspergillus screening in CF samples. However, cyp51A targeting was only moderately effective for azole resistance monitoring, while Aspergillus resistance remains of great concern.

  15. In vitro drug interaction modeling of combinations of azoles with terbinafine against clinical Scedosporium prolificans isolates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meletiadis, J.; Mouton, J.W.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Verweij, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    The in vitro interaction between terbinafine and the azoles voriconazole, miconazole, and itraconazole against five clinical Scedosporium prolificans isolates after 48 and 72 h of incubation was tested by a microdilution checkerboard (eight-by-twelve) technique. The antifungal effects of the drugs

  16. In vitro bioaccessibility of copper azole following simulated dermal transfer from pressure-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micronized copper azole (MCA) and micronized copper quaternary are the latest wood preservatives to replace the liquid lkaline copper and chromated copper arsenate preservatives due to concerns over the toxicity or lack of effectiveness of the earlier formulations. Today, the use...

  17. Molecular Tools for the Detection and Deduction of Azole Antifungal Drug Resistance Phenotypes in Aspergillus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudakova, Anna; Spiess, Birgit; Tangwattanachuleeporn, Marut; Sasse, Christoph; Buchheidt, Dieter; Weig, Michael; Groß, Uwe; Bader, Oliver

    2017-10-01

    The incidence of azole resistance in Aspergillus species has increased over the past years, most importantly for Aspergillus fumigatus . This is partially attributable to the global spread of only a few resistance alleles through the environment. Secondary resistance is a significant clinical concern, as invasive aspergillosis with drug-susceptible strains is already difficult to treat, and exclusion of azole-based antifungals from prophylaxis or first-line treatment of invasive aspergillosis in high-risk patients would dramatically limit drug choices, thus increasing mortality rates for immunocompromised patients. Management options for invasive aspergillosis caused by azole-resistant A. fumigatus strains were recently reevaluated by an international expert panel, which concluded that drug resistance testing of cultured isolates is highly indicated when antifungal therapy is intended. In geographical regions with a high environmental prevalence of azole-resistant strains, initial therapy should be guided by such analyses. More environmental and clinical screening studies are therefore needed to generate the local epidemiologic data if such measures are to be implemented on a sound basis. Here we propose a first workflow for evaluating isolates from screening studies, and we compile the MIC values correlating with individual amino acid substitutions in the products of cyp51 genes for interpretation of DNA sequencing data, especially in the absence of cultured isolates. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. A Novel Environmental Azole Resistance Mutation in Aspergillus fumigatus and a Possible Role of Sexual Reproduction in Its Emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the dynamics of Aspergillus fumigatus azole-resistant phenotypes in two compost heaps with contrasting azole exposures: azole free and azole exposed. After heat shock, to which sexual but not asexual spores are highly resistant, the azole-free compost yielded 98% (49/50 wild-type and 2% (1/50 azole-resistant isolates, whereas the azole-containing compost yielded 9% (4/45 wild-type and 91% (41/45 resistant isolates. From the latter compost, 80% (36/45 of the isolates contained the TR46/Y121F/T289A genotype, 2% (1/45 harbored the TR46/Y121F/M172I/T289A/G448S genotype, and 9% (4/45 had a novel pan-triazole-resistant mutation (TR463/Y121F/M172I/T289A/G448S with a triple 46-bp promoter repeat. Subsequent screening of a representative set of clinical A. fumigatus isolates showed that the novel TR463 mutant was already present in samples from three Dutch medical centers collected since 2012. Furthermore, a second new resistance mutation was found in this set that harbored four TR46 repeats. Importantly, in the laboratory, we recovered the TR463 mutation from a sexual cross between two TR46 isolates from the same azole-containing compost, possibly through unequal crossing over between the double tandem repeats (TRs during meiosis. This possible role of sexual reproduction in the emergence of the mutation was further implicated by the high level of genetic diversity of STR genotypes in the azole-containing compost. Our study confirms that azole resistance mutations continue to emerge in the environment and indicates compost containing azole residues as a possible hot spot. Better insight into the biology of environmental resistance selection is needed to retain the azole class for use in food production and treatment of Aspergillus diseases.

  19. A D-octapeptide drug efflux pump inhibitor acts synergistically with azoles in a murine oral candidiasis infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Ishijima, Sanae A; Niimi, Kyoko; Tansho, Shigeru; Ono, Yasuo; Monk, Brian C; Holmes, Ann R; Harding, David R K; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Clinical management of patients undergoing treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis with azole antifungals can be impaired by azole resistance. High-level azole resistance is often caused by the overexpression of Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p. Inhibition of this pump therefore represents a target for combination therapies that reverse azole resistance. We assessed the therapeutic potential of the D-octapeptide derivative RC21v3, a Cdr1p inhibitor, in the treatment of murine oral candidiasis caused by either the azole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate MML611 or its azole-susceptible parental strain MML610. RC21v3, fluconazole (FLC), or a combination of both drugs were administered orally to immunosuppressed ICR mice at 3, 24, and 27 h after oral inoculation with C. albicans. FLC protected the mice inoculated with MML610 from oral candidiasis, but was only partially effective in MML611-infected mice. The co-application of RC21v3 (0.02 μmol per dose) potentiated the therapeutic performance of FLC for mice infected with either strain. It caused a statistically significant decrease in C. albicans cfu isolated from the oral cavity of the infected mice and reduced oral lesions. RC21v3 also enhanced the therapeutic activity of itraconazole against MML611 infection. These results indicate that RC21v3 in combination with azoles has potential as a therapy against azole-resistant oral candidiasis. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Culture-Based Methods and Molecular Tools for Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus Detection in a Belgian University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Montesinos, I.; Argudín, M. A.; Hites, M.; Ahajjam, F.; Dodémont, M.; Dagyaran, C.; Bakkali, M.; Etienne, I.; Jacobs, F.; Knoop, C.; Patteet, S.; Lagrou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is an increasing worldwide problem with major clinical implications. Surveillance is warranted to guide clinicians to provide optimal treatment to patients. To investigate azole resistance in clinical Aspergillus isolates in our institution, a Belgian university hospital, we conducted a laboratory-based surveillance between June 2015 and October 2016. Two different approaches were used: a prospective culture-based surveillance using VIPcheck on unselected...

  1. Development of a novel multiplex DNA microarray for Fusarium graminearum and analysis of azole fungicide responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deising Holger B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The toxigenic fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum compromises wheat production worldwide. Azole fungicides play a prominent role in controlling this pathogen. Sequencing of its genome stimulated the development of high-throughput technologies to study mechanisms of coping with fungicide stress and adaptation to fungicides at a previously unprecedented precision. DNA-microarrays have been used to analyze genome-wide gene expression patterns and uncovered complex transcriptional responses. A recently developed one-color multiplex array format allowed flexible, effective, and parallel examinations of eight RNA samples. Results We took advantage of the 8 × 15 k Agilent format to design, evaluate, and apply a novel microarray covering the whole F. graminearum genome to analyze transcriptional responses to azole fungicide treatment. Comparative statistical analysis of expression profiles uncovered 1058 genes that were significantly differentially expressed after azole-treatment. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 31 selected genes indicated high conformity to results from the microarray hybridization. Among the 596 genes with significantly increased transcript levels, analyses using GeneOntology and FunCat annotations detected the ergosterol-biosynthesis pathway genes as the category most significantly responding, confirming the mode-of-action of azole fungicides. Cyp51A, which is one of the three F. graminearum paralogs of Cyp51 encoding the target of azoles, was the most consistently differentially expressed gene of the entire study. A molecular phylogeny analyzing the relationships of the three CYP51 proteins in the context of 38 fungal genomes belonging to the Pezizomycotina indicated that CYP51C (FGSG_11024 groups with a new clade of CYP51 proteins. The transcriptional profiles for genes encoding ABC transporters and transcription factors suggested several involved in mechanisms alleviating the impact of the fungicide

  2. Supramolecular Coordination Assemblies Constructed From Multifunctional Azole-Containing Carboxylic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuheng Deng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief review of recent progress in the field of metal coordination polymers assembled from azole-containing carboxylic acids and gives a diagrammatic summary of the diversity of topological structures in the resulting infinite metal-organic coordination networks (MOCNs. Azole-containing carboxylic acids are a favorable kind of multifunctional ligand to construct various metal complexes with isolated complexes and one, two and three dimensional structures, whose isolated complexes are not the focus of this review. An insight into the topology patterns of the infinite coordination polymers is provided. Analyzed topologies are compared with documented topologies and catalogued by the nature of nodes and connectivity pattern. New topologies which are not available from current topology databases are described and demonstrated graphically.

  3. Vibrational spectra of water solutions of azoles from QM/MM calculations: effects of solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Luana; Ramondo, Fabio; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2012-10-18

    Using microsolvation models and mixed quantum/classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the vibrational properties of two azoles in water solution: pyrazole and oxazole. The effects of the water-azole hydrogen bonding are rationalized by an extensive comparison between structural parameters and harmonic frequencies obtained by microsolvation models. Following the effective normal-mode analysis introduced by Martinez et al. [Martinez et al., J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 125, 144106], we identify the vibrational frequencies of the solutes using the decomposition of the vibrational density of states of the gas phase and solution dynamics. The calculated shifts from gas phase to solution are fairly in agreement with the available experimental data.

  4. Synthesis of nonionic surfactants with azole ring bearing N-glycosides and their antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia Taieb Brahimi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Six azoles with n-pentyl side chain 6–9, 11 and 12 were synthesized from n-hexanoic acid. Three N-glycosides namely: 5-pentyl-2-(d-amino arabinoside-1,3,4-oxadiazole (13, 5-pentyl-2-(d-aminoglycoside-1,3,4-thiadiazole (14, and 3-pentyl-4-(d-amino xyloside-4H-1,2,4-triazole-5-thiol (15 were prepared from already synthesized n-pentyl azoles 6, 7 and 11, respectively. Surface activity properties of water soluble synthesized compounds 6, 7, and 11–15 were studied in terms of surface tension, cloud point and critical micelle concentration. The antibacterial activities were assessed using the paper disk diffusion and broth dilution methods against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Some of the synthetic compounds showed promising activity against microorganisms under test in comparison to commercially available antibiotics polymixine and oxytetracycline.

  5. Performance of Molecular Approaches for Aspergillus Detection and Azole Resistance Surveillance in Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hélène Guegan; Sylviane Chevrier; Chantal Belleguic; Eric Deneuville; Florence Robert-Gangneux; Florence Robert-Gangneux; Jean-Pierre Gangneux; Jean-Pierre Gangneux

    2018-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus triazole resistance is an emerging concern for treating chronically infected/colonized patients. This study sought to evaluate the performance of PCR assays to detect Aspergillus fungi together with azole resistance in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In total, 119 sputum samples from 87 CF patients were prospectively processed for Aspergillus detection by means of mycological culture and four qPCR assays, 2 in-house methods and two commercial multiplex...

  6. o-Iodoxybenzoic acid mediated oxidative desulfurization initiated domino reactions for synthesis of azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Pramod S; Pathare, Sagar P; Akamanchi, Krishnacharaya G

    2012-04-20

    A systematic exploration of thiophilic ability of o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) for oxidative desulfurization to trigger domino reactions leading to new methodologies for synthesis of different azoles is described. A variety of highly substituted oxadiazoles, thiadiazoles, triazoles, and tetrazoles have been successfully synthesized in good to excellent yields, starting from readily accessible thiosemicarbazides, bis-diarylthiourea, 1,3-disubtituted thiourea, and thioamides. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  7. A comparison of the embryonic stem cell test and whole embryo culture assay combined with the BeWo placental passage model for predicting the embryotoxicity of azoles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto; Verhoef, Aart; Gomes, Caroline A; van Dongen, Catharina W; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Piersma, Aldert H; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we show the value of combining toxico-dynamic and -kinetic in vitro approaches for embryotoxicity testing of azoles. Both the whole embryo culture (WEC) and the embryonic stem cells test (EST) predicted the in vivo potency ranking of twelve tested azoles with moderate accuracy.

  8. Multidrug resistance in Botrytis cinerea associated with decreased accumulation of the azole fungicide oxpoconazole and increased transcription of the ABC transporter gene BcatrD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Sugiura, H.; Waard, De M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Azole-resistant mutants of Botrytis cinerea have a multidrug resistance phenotype since they exhibit cross-resistance to unrelated chemicals. These mutants also display resistance to the new azole fungicide oxpoconazole. Resistance to oxpoconazole is associated with decreased accumulation of the

  9. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Hung [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, Pei-Hsin [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Jen, E-mail: chenpj@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-30

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  10. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  11. The Effects of Antifungal Azoles on Inflammatory Cytokine Production in Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Zomorodian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Azoles drugs are being used successfully in treatment of fungal infections. Recently, immunosuppressive effects of some of these agents have been reported. Keratinocytes, as the major cells of the skin, have an important role in innate immunity against pathogenic agents. Considering the scanty of information about the effects of azoles on immune responces, this study was conducted to assess the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines in keratinocytes following treatment with azole drugs. Materials & Methods: This is an exprimental study conducted in in molecular biology division in Tehran University of Medical Sciences and Immunodermatology Department in Vienna Medical University. Primery keratinocytes were cultured and treated with different concentrations of fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole and griseofulvin. Secreted IL1, IL6 and TNF-α by keratinocytes in culture supernatant were measured by quantitative enzyme immunoassay technique. Moreover, expression of the genes encoding IL1 and IL8 was evaluated by Real Time-PCR. Results: Treatment of keratinocytes with different concentrations of fluconazole and low concentration of ketoconazole resulted in decrease in IL1 secretion, but Itraconazole and griseofulvin did not show such an effect at the same concentrations. In addition, none of the examined drugs had an effect on secretion level of IL6 and TNF-α. Quantitative analysis of IL1 and IL8 encoding genes revealed that transcription on these genes might be suppressed following treatment with fluconazole or ketoconazole. Conclusion: Fluconazole and ketoconazole might modulate the expression and secretion of IL1 and IL8 and affect the direction of immune responses induced by keratinocytes

  12. Emergence of Azoles Resistance Candida species in Iranian AIDS defined patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Katiraee

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Based on the findings, it can be concluded that screening of resistant Candida isolates by disk diffusion or broth dilution method is essential for the surveillance and prevention of antifungal resistance in patient management. Although nystatin is widely used in clinical practice for HIV patients in Iran, no evidence of enhanced resistance against this agent was found on the other hand, resistance to azole antifungals, particularly fluconazole, increased. Considering the lack of resistance to caspofungin, administration of this agent is suggested for the treatment of OPC in AIDS patients.

  13. Azole-Resistance in Aspergillus terreus and Related Species: An Emerging Problem or a Rare Phenomenon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Zoran

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Invasive mold infections associated with Aspergillus species are a significant cause of mortality in immunocompromised patients. The most frequently occurring aetiological pathogens are members of the Aspergillus section Fumigati followed by members of the section Terrei. The frequency of Aspergillus terreus and related (cryptic species in clinical specimens, as well as the percentage of azole-resistant strains remains to be studied.Methods: A global set (n = 498 of A. terreus and phenotypically related isolates was molecularly identified (beta-tubulin, tested for antifungal susceptibility against posaconazole, voriconazole, and itraconazole, and resistant phenotypes were correlated with point mutations in the cyp51A gene.Results: The majority of isolates was identified as A. terreus (86.8%, followed by A. citrinoterreus (8.4%, A. hortai (2.6%, A. alabamensis (1.6%, A. neoafricanus (0.2%, and A. floccosus (0.2%. One isolate failed to match a known Aspergillus sp., but was found most closely related to A. alabamensis. According to EUCAST clinical breakpoints azole resistance was detected in 5.4% of all tested isolates, 6.2% of A. terreus sensu stricto (s.s. were posaconazole-resistant. Posaconazole resistance differed geographically and ranged from 0% in the Czech Republic, Greece, and Turkey to 13.7% in Germany. In contrast, azole resistance among cryptic species was rare 2 out of 66 isolates and was observed only in one A. citrinoterreus and one A. alabamensis isolate. The most affected amino acid position of the Cyp51A gene correlating with the posaconazole resistant phenotype was M217, which was found in the variation M217T and M217V.Conclusions:Aspergillus terreus was most prevalent, followed by A. citrinoterreus. Posaconazole was the most potent drug against A. terreus, but 5.4% of A. terreus sensu stricto showed resistance against this azole. In Austria, Germany, and the United Kingdom posaconazole-resistance in all A. terreus

  14. Synthesis of fused azole-piperidionoses: A free radical cyclization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco-Contelles, Jose; Alhambra Jimenez, Carolina [Instituto de Quimica Organica General (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    1999-08-01

    A new strategy has been reported for the synthesis of fused azole-piperidinoses featuring and unprecedented and very efficient 6-exo-trig free radical cyclization onto heterocyclic sugar templates. These compounds are key intermediates for the synthesis of known or analogues of azole-glycosidase inhibitors. In this communication we describe our recent and successful results on the synthesis of fused triazole-piperidinoses. Radical precursors have been prepared by standard methodologies from 1, 2:5, 6-bis-O-isopropylidene-{alpha}-D-glucofuranose (4) via triazoles linked at C3 with {beta}-orientation, readily obtained by 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azide 5 with diethyl acetylenedicarboxylate or methyl propiolate, and by S{sub N}2 displacement of the tosylate at C3 with 1, 2, 4-triazole in compound 20. The key 6-exp-trig free radical cyclizations proceeded in the usual conditions [tributyltin hydride or tris(trimethylsily)silane, AIBN, toluene] yielding the azaannulated sugars 9, 11, 19 and 23 in good or excellent yields. A mechanism for these cyclizations has been proposed. [Spanish] Se ha informado una nueva estrategia para la sintesis azol-piperidinosas fusionadas mediante una ciclizacion 6-exo-trig muy eficiente y sin precedentes, sobre plantillas de azucares heterociclicos. Estos compuestos son intermediarios claves para la sintesis de inhibidores de azol-glicosidasa conocidos analogos de ellos. En esta comunicacion describimos nuestros resultados recientes y exitosos sobre la sintesis de triazol-piperidinosas. Los precursores de radicales fueron preparados por la metodologia usual a partir de 1, 2:5, 6-bis-O-isopropiliden-{alpha}-D-glucofuranosa (4) via triazoles unidos en C3, con orientacion {beta}, los cuales se obtienen facilmente por cicloadicion 1, 3-dipolar de la azida 5 con acetilendicarboxilato de dietilo o propiolato de metilo y por desplazamiento S{sub N}2 del tosilato en C3 con 1, 2, 4-triazol en el compuesto 20. Las ciclizaciones 6-exo

  15. Home Environment as a Source of Life-Threatening Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus in Immunocompromised Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Rose-Anne; Chouaki, Taieb; Hagen, Ferry; Toublanc, Bénédicte; Dupont, Hervé; Jounieaux, Vincent; Meis, Jacques F; Morio, Florent; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    A case of fatal aspergillosis due to a TR 46 /Y121F/T289A azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is reported. Environmental investigations at the patient's residence led to the recovery of TR 46 /Y121F/T289A isolates, genotypically indistinguishable from the clinical isolate, supporting for the first time the direct role of household as potential source of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Successful treatment of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a bottlenose dolphin with high-dose posaconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulien E. Bunskoek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is difficult to manage. We describe a case of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a female bottlenose dolphin, who failed to respond to voriconazole and posaconazole therapy. As intravenous therapy was precluded, high dose posaconazole was initiated aimed at achieving trough levels exceeding 3 mg/l. Posaconazole serum levels of 3–9.5 mg/l were achieved without significant side-effects. Follow-up bronchoscopy and computed tomography showed complete resolution of the lesions.

  17. Synthesis of Azole-containing Piperazine Derivatives and Evaluation of their Antibacterial, Antifungal and Cytotoxic Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Lin Ling; Fang, Bo; Zhou, Cheng He

    2010-01-01

    A series of azole-containing piperazine derivatives have been designed and synthesized. The obtained compounds were investigated in vitro for their antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activities. The preliminary results showed that most compounds exhibited moderate to significant antibacterial and antifungal activities in vitro. 1-(4-((4-chlorophenyl) (phenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethanone and 1-(4-((4-Chlorophenyl)(phenyl)methyl)piperazin-1- yl)-2-(2-phenyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethanone gave remarkable and broad-spectrum antimicrobial efficacy against all tested strains with MIC values ranging from 3.1 to 25 μg/mL, and exhibited comparable activities to the standard drugs chloramphenicol and fluconazole in clinic. Moreover, 2-((4-((4-chlorophenyl)(phenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)methyl)- 1H-benzo[d]imidazole was found to be the most effective in vitro against the PC-3 cell line, reaching growth inhibition values (36.4, 60.1 and 76.5%) for each tested concentration: 25 μM, 50 μM and 100 μM in dose-dependent manner. The results also showed that the azole ring had noticeable effect on their antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, and imidazole and benzimidazole moiety were much more favourable to biological activity than 1,2,4-triazole

  18. Antifungal activity of terrestrial Streptomyces rochei strain HF391 against clinical azole -resistant Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh, S; Forootanfar, H; Shahidi Bonjar, GH; Falahati Nejad, M; Karamy Robati, A; Ayatollahi Mousavi, SA; Amirporrostami, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Actinomycetes have been discovered as source of antifungal compounds that are currently in clinical use. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) due to Aspergillus fumigatus has been identified as individual drug-resistant Aspergillus spp. to be an emerging pathogen opportunities a global scale. This paper described the antifungal activity of one terrestrial actinomycete against the clinically isolated azole-resistant A. fumigatus. Materials and Methods: Soil samples were collected from various locations of Kerman, Iran. Thereafter, the actinomycetes were isolated using starch-casein-nitrate-agar medium and the most efficient actinomycetes (capable of inhibiting A. fumigatus) were screened using agar block method. In the next step, the selected actinomycete was cultivated in starch-casein- broth medium and the inhibitory activity of the obtained culture broth was evaluated using agar well diffusion method. Results: The selected actinomycete, identified as Streptomyces rochei strain HF391, could suppress the growth of A. fumigatus isolates which was isolated from the clinical samples of patients treated with azoles. This strain showed higher inhibition zones on agar diffusion assay which was more than 15 mm. Conclusion: The obtained results of the present study introduced Streptomyces rochei strain HF391 as terrestrial actinomycete that can inhibit the growth of clinically isolated A. fumigatus. PMID:28680984

  19. Candida glabrata Esophagitis: Are We Seeing the Emergence of a New Azole-Resistant Pathogen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aze Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Candida glabrata (C. glabrata has become a recognized pathogen in fungal esophagitis. A proportion of these isolates are azole-resistant which may have treatment implications. Variability in the prevalence of this organism exists in the limited data available. Objective. To determine the incidence of C. glabrata esophagitis in a North American hospital setting and to highlight factors that may predispose patients to this condition. Methods. Patient charts were collected from January 1, 2009 to July 30, 2011. Any charts of patients identified as having esophagitis with a positive fungal culture were reviewed for the species of Candida and the presence of factors that would predispose them to esophageal candidiasis. Results. The prevalence of Candida esophagitis based on culture was 2.2% (37 subjects. C. glabrata was the 2nd most prevalent pathogen identified (24.3% or 9 subjects. Of the C. glabrata cohort, all patients had at least one factor predisposing them to candidiasis. Conclusion. C. glabrata esophagitis makes up a large portion of the candidal esophagitis seen in hospital. C. glabrata infections were associated with at least one risk factor for candidal infection. Given its resistance to azole-based therapy, this may have treatment implications for how candidal esophagitis is approached by the clinician.

  20. Synthesis of Azole-containing Piperazine Derivatives and Evaluation of their Antibacterial, Antifungal and Cytotoxic Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Lin Ling; Fang, Bo; Zhou, Cheng He [Southwest University, Chongqing (China)

    2010-12-15

    A series of azole-containing piperazine derivatives have been designed and synthesized. The obtained compounds were investigated in vitro for their antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activities. The preliminary results showed that most compounds exhibited moderate to significant antibacterial and antifungal activities in vitro. 1-(4-((4-chlorophenyl) (phenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethanone and 1-(4-((4-Chlorophenyl)(phenyl)methyl)piperazin-1- yl)-2-(2-phenyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethanone gave remarkable and broad-spectrum antimicrobial efficacy against all tested strains with MIC values ranging from 3.1 to 25 μg/mL, and exhibited comparable activities to the standard drugs chloramphenicol and fluconazole in clinic. Moreover, 2-((4-((4-chlorophenyl)(phenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)methyl)- 1H-benzo[d]imidazole was found to be the most effective in vitro against the PC-3 cell line, reaching growth inhibition values (36.4, 60.1 and 76.5%) for each tested concentration: 25 μM, 50 μM and 100 μM in dose-dependent manner. The results also showed that the azole ring had noticeable effect on their antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, and imidazole and benzimidazole moiety were much more favourable to biological activity than 1,2,4-triazole.

  1. The Hsp90 co-chaperones Sti1, Aha1, and P23 regulate adaptive responses to antifungal azoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokui Gu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90 is essential for tumor progression in humans and drug resistance in fungi. However, the roles of its many co-chaperones in antifungal resistance are unknown. In this study, by susceptibility test of Neurospora crassa mutants lacking each of 18 Hsp90/Calcineurin system member genes (including 8 Hsp90 co-chaperone genes to antifungal drugs and other stresses, we demonstrate that the Hsp90 co-chaperones Sti1 (Hop1 in yeast, Aha1, and P23 (Sba1 in yeast were required for the basal resistance to antifungal azoles and heat stress. Deletion of any of them resulted in hypersensitivity to azoles and heat. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS analysis showed that the toxic sterols eburicol and 14α-methyl-3,6-diol were significantly accumulated in the sti1 and p23 deletion mutants after ketoconazole treatment, which has been shown before to led to cell membrane stress. At the transcriptional level, Aha1, Sti1, and P23 positively regulate responses to ketoconazole stress by erg11 and erg6, key genes in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Aha1, Sti1, and P23 are highly conserved in fungi, and sti1 and p23 deletion also increased the susceptibility to azoles in Fusarium verticillioides. These results indicate that Hsp90-cochaperones Aha1, Sti1, and P23 are critical for the basal azole resistance and could be potential targets for developing new antifungal agents.

  2. In vivo emergence of Aspergillus terreus with reduced azole susceptibility and a Cyp51a M217I alteration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken C; Jensen, Rasmus; Grif, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Azole resistance in Aspergillus terreus isolates was explored. Twenty related (MB) and 6 unrelated A. terreus isolates were included. CYP51A sequencing and RAPD genotyping was performed. Five MB isolates were itraconazole susceptible, whereas the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for 15 MB...

  3. Dimeric fluorescent energy transfer dyes comprising asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Novel fluorescent heterodimeric DNA-staining energy transfer dyes are provided combining asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine dyes, which provide for strong DNA affinity, large Stokes shifts and emission in the red region of the spectrum. The dyes find particular application in gel electrophoresis and for labels which may be bound to a variety of compositions in a variety of contexts. Kits and individual compounds are provided, where the kits find use for simultaneous detection of a variety of moieties, particularly using a single narrow wavelength irradiation source. The individual compounds are characterized by high donor quenching and high affinity to dsDNA as a result of optimizing the length of the linking group separating the two chromophores.

  4. In vitro and in vivo screening of azole fungicides for antiandrogenic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    signs of feminization of the male offspring were investigated. Tebuconazole caused an increase in testicular 17alfa-hydroxyprogesterone and progesterone levels, and a decrease in testosterone levels in male fetuses. Epoxiconazole had no effect on any of the mesured hormonelevels. Furthermore...... and antiandrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Two other azole fungicides, tebuconazole and epoxiconazole, have now been investigated for antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo as well. The fungicides were screened in two well-established cell assays, including testing for agonistic and antagonistic...... effects on AR in transfected CHO cells, using an AR reporter gene assay. The compounds were also analyzed for effects on steroidogenesis in H295R cells, a human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line, used to detect effects on steroid production. In vitro tebuconazole and epoxiconazole proved to be antagonists...

  5. Disturbance in hemoglobin metabolism and in vivo antimalarial activity of azole antimycotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ricardo Rodrigues

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium parasites degrade host hemoglobin to obtain free amino acids, essential for protein synthesis. During this event, free toxic heme moieties crystallize spontaneously to produce a non-toxic pigment called hemozoin or ß-hematin. In this context, a group of azole antimycotics, clotrimazole (CTZ, ketoconazole (KTZ and fluconazole (FCZ, were investigated for their abilities to inhibit ß-hematin synthesis (IßHS and hemoglobin proteolysis (IHbP in vitro. The ß-hematin synthesis was recorded by spectrophotometry at 405 nm and the hemoglobin proteolysis was determined by SDS-PAGE 12.5%, followed by densitometric analysis. Compounds were also assayed in vivo in a malaria murine model. CTZ and KTZ exhibited the maximal effects inhibiting both biochemical events, showing inhibition of β-hematin synthesis (IC50 values of 12.4 ± 0.9 µM and 14.4 ± 1.4 µM respectively and inhibition of hemoglobin proteolysis (80.1 ± 2.0% and 55.3 ± 3.6%, respectively. There is a broad correlation to the in vivo results, especially CTZ, which reduced the parasitemia (%P of infected-mice at 4th day post-infection significantly compared to non-treated controls (12.4 ± 3.0% compared to 26.6 ± 3.7%, p = 0.014 and prolonged the survival days post-infection. The results indicated that the inhibition of the hemoglobin metabolism by the azole antimycotics could be responsible for their antimalarial effect.

  6. Inhibition of Hyphal Growth of Azole-Resistant Strains of Candida albicans by Triazole Antifungal Agents in the Presence of Lactoferrin-Related Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Abe, Shigeru; Teraguchi, Susumu; Hayasawa, Hirotoshi; Yamaguchi, Hideyo

    1998-01-01

    The effects of bovine lactoferrin (LF) or the LF-derived antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B (LFcin B) on the growth of Candida albicans hyphae, including those of three azole-resistant strains, were investigated by a crystal violet staining method. The hyphae of two highly azole-resistant strains were more susceptible to inhibition by LF or LFcin B than the azole-susceptible strains tested. One moderately azole-resistant strain was defective in the formation of hyphae and showed a susceptibility to LF greater than that of the susceptible strains but a susceptibility to LFcin B similar to that of the susceptible strains. The highly azole-resistant strain TIMM3317 showed trailing growth in the presence of fluconazole or itraconazole, while the extent of growth was reduced by the addition of LF or LFcin B at a sub-MIC. Thus, the addition of LF or LFcin B at a sub-MIC resulted in a substantial decrease in the MICs of fluconazole and itraconazole for two highly azole-resistant strains; e.g., the MIC of fluconazole for TIMM3317 was shifted from >256 to 0.25 μg/ml by LF, but the MICs were not decreased for the susceptible strains. The combination effects observed with triazoles and LF-related compounds in the case of the two highly azole-resistant strains were confirmed to be synergistic by the fractional inhibitory concentration index. These results demonstrate that for some azole-resistant C. albicans strains, LF-related compounds combined with triazoles can inhibit the growth of hyphae, an important form of this organism in pathogenesis. PMID:9660988

  7. Stepwise emergence of azole, echinocandin and amphotericin B multidrug resistance in vivo in Candida albicans orchestrated by multiple genetic alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Thyssen Astvad, Karen Marie; Vale Silva, Luis

    2015-01-01

    -MS were used for sterol analyses. In vivo virulence was determined in the insect model Galleria mellonella and evaluated by log-rank Mantel–Cox tests. Results: P-1 + P-2 were susceptible, P-3 + P-4 fluconazole resistant, P-5 pan-azole resistant, P-6 + P-7 pan-azole and echinocandin resistant and P-8 + P-9...

  8. Azole resistance in Candida spp. isolated from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil: an efflux-pump-mediated mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimunda S.N. Brilhante

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since, there is no study reporting the mechanism of azole resistance among yeasts isolated from aquatic environments; the present study aims to investigate the occurrence of antifungal resistance among yeasts isolated from an aquatic environment, and assess the efflux-pump activity of the azole-resistant strains to better understand the mechanism of resistance for this group of drugs. For this purpose, monthly water and sediment samples were collected from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil, from March 2011 to February 2012. The obtained yeasts were identified based on morphological and biochemical characteristics. Of the 46 isolates, 37 were Candida spp., 4 were Trichosporon asahii, 3 were Cryptococcus laurentii, 1 Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and 1 was Kodamaea ohmeri. These isolates were subjected to broth microdilution assay with amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole, according to the methodology standardized by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole were 0.03125–2 µg/mL, 0.0625 to ≥16 µg/mL, and 0.5 to ≥64 µg/mL, respectively, and 13 resistant azole-resistant Candida isolates were detected. A reduction in the azole MICs leading to the phenotypical reversal of the azole resistance was observed upon addition of efflux-pump inhibitors. These findings suggest that the azole resistance among environmental Candida spp. is most likely associated with the overexpression of efflux-pumps.

  9. A comparative investigation of azole susceptibility in Candida isolates from vulvovaginal candidiasis and recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis patients in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjapong, Gloria; Hale, Marie; Garrill, Ashley

    2017-08-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) affect millions of women and are typically treated with azoles. We know little about azole susceptibility of Candida species from VVC versus RVVC patients, and nothing about African isolates. We have investigated the susceptibility of Candida isolates from Ghana to fluconazole, itraconazole and/or voriconazole. The percentage of Candida albicans isolates showing susceptibility was significantly lower in RVVC than VVC patients. Isolates of Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis showed a similar trend. For Candida glabrata there was no observed difference. The data indicate a decreased susceptibility in selected Candida species from RVVC patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A theoretical investigation on the neutral Cu(I) phosphorescent complexes with azole-based and phosphine mixed ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-Li; Shen, Lu; Zou, Lu-Yi; Ma, Ming-Shuo; Ren, Ai-Min

    2018-04-01

    A theoretical study on a series of neutral heteroleptic Cu(I) complexes with different azole-pyridine-based N^N ligands has been presented to get insight into the effect of various nitrogen atoms in the azole ring on photophysical properties. The results reveal that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) levels and the emission wavelengths of these complexes are mainly governed by the nitrogen atom number in azole ring. With the increasing number of nitrogen atom , the electron density distribution of HOMO gradually extend from the N^N ligand to the whole molecule, meanwhile, the improved contribution from Cu(d) orbits in HOMO results in an effective mixing of various charge transfermodes, and hence, the fast radiative decay(kr) and the slow non-radiative decay rate(knr) are achieved. The photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) show an apparent dependence on the nitrogen atom number in the five-membered nitrogen heterocycles. However, the increasing number of nitrogen atoms is not necessary for increasing PLQY. The complex 3 with 1,2,4-triazole-pyridine-based N^N ligands is considered to be a potential emitter with high phosphorescence efficiency. Finally, we hope that our investigations will contribute to systematical understanding and guiding for material molecular engineering.

  11. Biological properties of novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles

    KAUST Repository

    Novak, Maria S.; Bü chel, Gabriel E.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Jakupec, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery that nitric oxide (NO) is a physiologically relevant molecule, there has been great interest in the use of metal nitrosyl compounds as antitumor pharmaceuticals. Particularly interesting are those complexes which can deliver NO to biological targets. Ruthenium- and osmium-based compounds offer lower toxicity compared to other metals and show different mechanisms of action as well as different spectra of activity compared to platinum-based drugs. Novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles were studied to elucidate their cytotoxicity and possible interactions with DNA. Apoptosis induction, changes of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and possible formation of reactive oxygen species were investigated as indicators of NO-mediated damage by flow cytometry. Results suggest that ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with the general formula (indazolium)[cis/trans-MCl4(NO)(1H-indazole)] have pronounced cytotoxic potency in cancer cell lines. Especially the more potent ruthenium complexes strongly induce apoptosis associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, and elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, a slight yet not unequivocal trend to accumulation of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate attributable to NO-mediated effects was observed.

  12. Biological properties of novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles

    KAUST Repository

    Novak, Maria S.

    2016-03-09

    Since the discovery that nitric oxide (NO) is a physiologically relevant molecule, there has been great interest in the use of metal nitrosyl compounds as antitumor pharmaceuticals. Particularly interesting are those complexes which can deliver NO to biological targets. Ruthenium- and osmium-based compounds offer lower toxicity compared to other metals and show different mechanisms of action as well as different spectra of activity compared to platinum-based drugs. Novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles were studied to elucidate their cytotoxicity and possible interactions with DNA. Apoptosis induction, changes of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and possible formation of reactive oxygen species were investigated as indicators of NO-mediated damage by flow cytometry. Results suggest that ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with the general formula (indazolium)[cis/trans-MCl4(NO)(1H-indazole)] have pronounced cytotoxic potency in cancer cell lines. Especially the more potent ruthenium complexes strongly induce apoptosis associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, and elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, a slight yet not unequivocal trend to accumulation of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate attributable to NO-mediated effects was observed.

  13. Counter-current acid leaching process for copper azole treated wood waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janin, Amélie; Riche, Pauline; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy; Cooper, Paul; Morris, Paul

    2012-09-01

    This study explores the performance of a counter-current leaching process (CCLP) for copper extraction from copper azole treated wood waste for recycling of wood and copper. The leaching process uses three acid leaching steps with 0.1 M H2SO4 at 75degrees C and 15% slurry density followed by three rinses with water. Copper is recovered from the leachate using electrodeposition at 5 amperes (A) for 75 min. Ten counter-current remediation cycles were completed achieving > or = 94% copper extraction from the wood during the 10 cycles; 80-90% of the copper was recovered from the extract solution by electrodeposition. The counter-current leaching process reduced acid consumption by 86% and effluent discharge volume was 12 times lower compared with the same process without use of counter-current leaching. However, the reuse of leachates from one leaching step to another released dissolved organic carbon and caused its build-up in the early cycles.

  14. Enhanced Framework Rigidity of a Zeolitic Metal-Azolate via Ligand Substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqiang Gao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The elastic properties of a zeolitic metal-azolate framework, Zn(mtz2 (MAF-7, mtz− = 3-methyl-1,2,4-triazolate, have been examined from the view point of the first principles calculations and experiments. Our results demonstrate that the three independent elastic constants of MAF-7 are about 5.0–73.3% higher than those of ZIF-8, though they are isomorphic. The electron-donating effect of the nitrogen atom at the 2-position in mtz- ring dominantly accounts for such a prominent difference. The detailed analysis of the full elastic tensors reveals that the volume moduli, shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratios of MAF-7 are about 3.4% to 20.1%, 3.2% to 20.6%, and −30.3% to 12.3% higher than those of ZIF-8. The underlying structural reasons were discussed to explain the anisotropic difference of those properties. Moreover, the conclusion deduced from first-principle calculations was also been verified by nanoindentation and high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements.

  15. In vitro activities of caspofungin, amphotericin B and azoles against Coccidioides posadasii strains from Northeast, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, R A; Brilhante, R S N; Rocha, M F G; Fechine, M A B; Costa, A K F; Camargo, Z P; Sidrim, J J C

    2006-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a systemic infection caused by the soil-dwelling dimorphic fungi Coccidioides spp. The disease is endemic in semiarid Northeast Brazil, where it is caused by C. posadasii. The aim of this study was to perform antifungal susceptibility tests of clinical and environmental strains of C. posadasii from Northeast Brazil. The in vitro activities of caspofungin, amphotericin B and azoles against clinical and environment isolates of C. posadasii were determined in accordance with the NCLLS M-38P macrodilution method. The antifungal susceptibility analysis showed that all the strains of C. posadasii (n = 10) were sensitive to caspofungin (16 microg/ml < or = MIC < or = 32 microg/ml), amphotericin B (0.0625 mug/ml < or = MIC < or = 0.125 microg/ml), ketoconazole (0.039 microg/ml < or = MIC < or = 0.156 microg/ml), itraconazole (0.125 microg/ml < or = MIC < or = 0.5 microg/ml), fluconazole (3.125 microg/ml < or = MIC < or = 6.25 microg/ml), and voriconazole (0.125 microg/ml). This study is the first description of in vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern of Brazilian strains of C. posadasii.

  16. Structural characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 in complex with azole-based inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Roman, Gheorghe; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2010-03-01

    The development of inhibitors specific for heme oxygenases (HO) aims to provide powerful tools in understanding the HO system. Based on the lead structure (2S, 4S)-2-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-2-[(1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl]-4-[((4-aminophenyl)thio)methyl]-1,3-dioxolane (azalanstat, QC-1) we have synthesized structural modifications to develop novel and selective HO inhibitors. The structural study of human HO-1 (hHO-1) in complex with a select group of the inhibitors was initiated using X-ray crystallographic techniques. Comparison of the structures of four such compounds each in complex with hHO-1 revealed a common binding mode, despite having different structural fragments. The compounds bind to the distal side of heme through an azole "anchor" which coordinates with the heme iron. An expansion of the distal pocket, mainly due to distal helix flexibility, allows accommodation of the compounds without displacing heme or the critical Asp140 residue. Rather, binding displaces a catalytically critical water molecule and disrupts an ordered hydrogen-bond network involving Asp140. The presence of a triazole "anchor" may provide further stability via a hydrogen bond with the protein. A hydrophobic pocket acts to stabilize the region occupied by the phenyl or adamantanyl moieties of these compounds. Further, a secondary hydrophobic pocket is formed via "induced fit" to accommodate bulky substituents at the 4-position of the dioxolane ring. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Embryotoxic and pharmacologic potency ranking of six azoles in the rat whole embryo culture by morphological and transcriptomic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto; Verhoef, Aart; Pennings, Jeroen L.A.; Ravenzwaay, Bennard van; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2017-01-01

    Differential gene expression analysis in the rat whole embryo culture (WEC) assay provides mechanistic insight into the embryotoxicity of test compounds. In our study, we hypothesized that comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of rat embryos exposed to six azoles (flusilazole, triadimefon, ketoconazole, miconazole, difenoconazole and prothioconazole) could lead to a better mechanism-based understanding of their embryotoxicity and pharmacological action. For evaluating embryotoxicity, we applied the total morphological scoring system (TMS) in embryos exposed for 48 h. The compounds tested showed embryotoxicity in a dose-response fashion. Functional analysis of differential gene expression after 4 h exposure at the ID 10 (effective dose for 10% decreased TMS), revealed the sterol biosynthesis pathway and embryonic development genes, dominated by genes in the retinoic acid (RA) pathway, albeit in a differential way. Flusilazole, ketoconazole and triadimefon were the most potent compounds affecting the RA pathway, while in terms of regulation of sterol function, difenoconazole and ketoconazole showed the most pronounced effects. Dose-dependent analysis of the effects of flusilazole revealed that the RA pathway related genes were already differentially expressed at low dose levels while the sterol pathway showed strong regulation at higher embryotoxic doses, suggesting that this pathway is less predictive for the observed embryotoxicity. A similar analysis at the 24-hour time point indicated an additional time-dependent difference in the aforementioned pathways regulated by flusilazole. In summary, the rat WEC assay in combination with transcriptomics could add a mechanistic insight into the embryotoxic potency ranking and pharmacological mode of action of the tested compounds. - Highlights: • Embryonic exposure to azoles revealed concentration-dependent malformations. • Transcriptomics could enhance the mechanistic knowledge of embryotoxicants. • Retinoic

  18. Embryotoxic and pharmacologic potency ranking of six azoles in the rat whole embryo culture by morphological and transcriptomic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto, E-mail: myrto.dimopoulou@wur.nl [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University (Netherlands); National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Verhoef, Aart; Pennings, Jeroen L.A. [National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Ravenzwaay, Bennard van [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University (Netherlands); BASF SE, Experimental Toxicology and Ecology, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M. [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-05-01

    Differential gene expression analysis in the rat whole embryo culture (WEC) assay provides mechanistic insight into the embryotoxicity of test compounds. In our study, we hypothesized that comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of rat embryos exposed to six azoles (flusilazole, triadimefon, ketoconazole, miconazole, difenoconazole and prothioconazole) could lead to a better mechanism-based understanding of their embryotoxicity and pharmacological action. For evaluating embryotoxicity, we applied the total morphological scoring system (TMS) in embryos exposed for 48 h. The compounds tested showed embryotoxicity in a dose-response fashion. Functional analysis of differential gene expression after 4 h exposure at the ID{sub 10} (effective dose for 10% decreased TMS), revealed the sterol biosynthesis pathway and embryonic development genes, dominated by genes in the retinoic acid (RA) pathway, albeit in a differential way. Flusilazole, ketoconazole and triadimefon were the most potent compounds affecting the RA pathway, while in terms of regulation of sterol function, difenoconazole and ketoconazole showed the most pronounced effects. Dose-dependent analysis of the effects of flusilazole revealed that the RA pathway related genes were already differentially expressed at low dose levels while the sterol pathway showed strong regulation at higher embryotoxic doses, suggesting that this pathway is less predictive for the observed embryotoxicity. A similar analysis at the 24-hour time point indicated an additional time-dependent difference in the aforementioned pathways regulated by flusilazole. In summary, the rat WEC assay in combination with transcriptomics could add a mechanistic insight into the embryotoxic potency ranking and pharmacological mode of action of the tested compounds. - Highlights: • Embryonic exposure to azoles revealed concentration-dependent malformations. • Transcriptomics could enhance the mechanistic knowledge of embryotoxicants.

  19. Mechanical properties of wood from Pinus sylvestris L. treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative and with waterborne Copper Azole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Villasante

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: To determine the effect on wood from Pinus sylvestris of treatment with preservatives on mechanical properties and to establish the relation between the penetration and compression strength.Area of study: SpainMaterial and Methods: 40 samples of defect-free wood from Pinus sylvestris L. were treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative (Vacsol Azure WR 2601 and 50 with waterborne Copper Azole (Tanalith E 3492. 40 control samples were not treated (water or preservative. Mechanical resistance to static bending, modulus of elasticity and compression strength parallel to the grain were compared with untreated wood. Regression analysis between the penetration and compression strength parallel was done with the samples treated with waterborne preservative.Main results: The results indicate that the treated wood (with either product presents a statistically significant increase in mechanical resistance in all three mechanical characteristics. The results obtained differ from earlier studies carried out by other authors.There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation of the wood with waterborne Copper Azole . The most probable explanation for these results concerns changes in pressure during treatment.The use of untreated control samples instead of samples treated only with water is more likely to produce significant results in the mechanical resistance studies.Research highlights: Treated wood presents a statistically significant increase in MOE, modulus of rupture to static bending  and parallel compression strength.There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation with waterborne preservative.Keywords: Light Organic Solvent Preservative; MOE; parallel compression; static bending; waterborne Copper Azole; wood technology.

  20. INK128 Exhibits Synergy with Azoles against Exophiala spp. and Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lujuan; Sun, Yi; He, Chengyan; Li, Ming; Zeng, Tongxiang; Lu, Qiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Infections of Exophiala spp. and Fusarium spp. are often chronic and recalcitrant. Systemic disseminations, which mostly occur in immunocompromised patients, are often refractory to available antifungal therapies. The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) orchestrates cell growth and proliferation in response to nutrients and growth factors, which are important for pathogenicity and virulence. INK128 is a second-generation ATP-competitive TOR inhibitor, which binds the TOR catalytic domain and selectively inhibits TOR. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro activities of INK128 alone and the interactions of INK128 with conventional antifungal drugs including itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, and amphotericin B against 18 strains of Exophiala spp. and 10 strains of Fusarium spp. via broth microdilution checkerboard technique system adapted from Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution method M38-A2. INK128 alone was inactive against all isolates tested. However, favorable synergistic effects between INK128 and voriconazole were observed in 61% Exophiala strains and 60% Fusarium strains, despite Fusarium strains exhibited high MIC values (4-8 μg/ml) against voriconazole. In addition, synergistic effects of INK128/itraconazole were shown in 33% Exophiala strains and 30% Fusarium strains, while synergy of INK128/posaconazole were observed in 28% Exophiala strains and 30% Fusarium strains. The effective working ranges of INK128 were 0.125-2 μg/ml and 1-4 μg/ml against Exophiala isolates and Fusarium isolates, respectively. No synergistic effect was observed when INK128 was combined with amphotericin B. No antagonism was observed in all combinations. In conclusion, INK128 could enhance the in vitro antifungal activity of voriconazole, itraconazole and posaconazole against Exophiala spp. and Fusarium spp., suggesting that azoles, especially voriconazole, combined with TOR kinase inhibitor might provide a potential strategy to

  1. Triazole derivatives with improved in vitro antifungal activity over azole drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu S

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Shichong Yu,1,* Xiaoyun Chai,1,* Yanwei Wang,1 Yongbing Cao,2 Jun Zhang,3 Qiuye Wu,1 Dazhi Zhang,1 Yuanying Jiang,2 Tianhua Yan,4 Qingyan Sun11Department of Organic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Drug Research Center, School of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3Overseas Education Faculty of the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: A series of triazole antifungal agents with piperidine side chains was designed and synthesized. The results of antifungal tests against eight human pathogenic fungi in vitro showed that all the compounds exhibited moderate-to-excellent activities. Molecular docking between 8d and the active site of Candida albicans CYP51 was provided based on the computational docking results. The triazole interacts with the iron of the heme group. The difluorophenyl group is located in the S3 subsite and its fluorine atom (2-F can form H-bonds with Gly307. The side chain is oriented into the S4 subsite and formed hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions with the amino residues. Moreover, the phenyl group in the side chain interacts with the phenol group of Phe380 through the formation of π–π face-to-edge interactions.Keywords: synthesis, CYP51, molecular docking, azole agents

  2. Mechanical properties of wood from Pinus sylvestris L. treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative and with waterborne Copper Azole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villasante, A.; Laina, R.; Rojas, J. A. M.; Rojas, I. M.; Vignote, S.

    2013-07-01

    Aim of study: To determine the effect on wood from Pinus sylvestris of treatment with preservatives on mechanical properties and to establish the relation between the penetration and compression strenght. Area of study: Spain. Material and methods: 40 samples of defect-free wood from Pinus sylvestris L. were treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative (Vacsol Azure WR 2601) and 50 with waterborne Copper Azole (Tanalith E 3492). 40 control samples were not treated (water or preservative). Mechanical resistance to static bending, modulus of elasticity and compression strength parallel to the grain were compared with untreated wood. Regression analysis between the penetration and compression strength parallel was done with the samples treated with waterborne preservative. Main results: The results indicate that the treated wood (with either product) presents a statistically significant increase in mechanical resistance in all three mechanical characteristics. The results obtained differ from earlier studies carried out by other authors. There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation of the wood with waterborne Copper Azole. The most probable explanation for these results concerns changes in pressure during treatment. The use of untreated control samples instead of samples treated only with water is more likely to produce significant results in the mechanical resistance studies. Research highlights: Treated wood presents a statistically significant increase in MOE, modulus of rupture to static bending and parallel compression strength. There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation with waterborne preservative. (Author)

  3. The Influence of Genetic Stability on Aspergillus fumigatus Virulence and Azole Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaila Fernanda dos Reis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic stability is extremely important for the survival of every living organism, and a very complex set of genes has evolved to cope with DNA repair upon DNA damage. Here, we investigated the Aspergillus fumigatus AtmA (Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, ATM and AtrA kinases, and how they impact virulence and the evolution of azole resistance. We demonstrated that A. fumigatus atmA and atrA null mutants are haploid and have a discrete chromosomal polymorphism. The ΔatmA and ΔatrA strains are sensitive to several DNA-damaging agents, but surprisingly both strains were more resistant than the wild-type strain to paraquat, menadione, and hydrogen peroxide. The atmA and atrA genes showed synthetic lethality emphasizing the cooperation between both enzymes and their consequent redundancy. The lack of atmA and atrA does not cause any significant virulence reduction in A. fumigatus in a neutropenic murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and in the invertebrate alternative model Galleria mellonela. Wild-type, ΔatmA, and ΔatrA populations that were previously transferred 10 times in minimal medium (MM in the absence of voriconazole have not shown any significant changes in drug resistance acquisition. In contrast, ΔatmA and ΔatrA populations that similarly evolved in the presence of a subinhibitory concentration of voriconazole showed an ∼5–10-fold increase when compared to the original minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values. There are discrete alterations in the voriconazole target Cyp51A/Erg11A or cyp51/erg11 and/or Cdr1B efflux transporter overexpression that do not seem to be the main mechanisms to explain voriconazole resistance in these evolved populations. Taken together, these results suggest that genetic instability caused by ΔatmA and ΔatrA mutations can confer an adaptive advantage, mainly in the intensity of voriconazole resistance acquisition.

  4. Azole affinity of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) enzymes from Candida albicans and Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrilow, Andrew G; Parker, Josie E; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2013-03-01

    Candida albicans CYP51 (CaCYP51) (Erg11), full-length Homo sapiens CYP51 (HsCYP51), and truncated Δ60HsCYP51 were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. CaCYP51 and both HsCYP51 enzymes bound lanosterol (K(s), 14 to 18 μM) and catalyzed the 14α-demethylation of lanosterol using Homo sapiens cytochrome P450 reductase and NADPH as redox partners. Both HsCYP51 enzymes bound clotrimazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole tightly (dissociation constants [K(d)s], 42 to 131 nM) but bound fluconazole (K(d), ~30,500 nM) and voriconazole (K(d), ~2,300 nM) weakly, whereas CaCYP51 bound all five medical azole drugs tightly (K(d)s, 10 to 56 nM). Selectivity for CaCYP51 over HsCYP51 ranged from 2-fold (clotrimazole) to 540-fold (fluconazole) among the medical azoles. In contrast, selectivity for CaCYP51 over Δ60HsCYP51 with agricultural azoles ranged from 3-fold (tebuconazole) to 9-fold (propiconazole). Prothioconazole bound extremely weakly to CaCYP51 and Δ60HsCYP51, producing atypical type I UV-visible difference spectra (K(d)s, 6,100 and 910 nM, respectively), indicating that binding was not accomplished through direct coordination with the heme ferric ion. Prothioconazole-desthio (the intracellular derivative of prothioconazole) bound tightly to both CaCYP51 and Δ60HsCYP51 (K(d), ~40 nM). These differences in binding affinities were reflected in the observed 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values, which were 9- to 2,000-fold higher for Δ60HsCYP51 than for CaCYP51, with the exception of tebuconazole, which strongly inhibited both CYP51 enzymes. In contrast, prothioconazole weakly inhibited CaCYP51 (IC(50), ~150 μM) and did not significantly inhibit Δ60HsCYP51.

  5. Evaluation of reference genes for real-time quantitative PCR studies in Candida glabrata following azole treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qingdi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of stable and suitable reference genes for real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR is a crucial prerequisite for reliable gene expression analysis under different experimental conditions. The present study aimed to identify reference genes as internal controls for gene expression studies by RT-qPCR in azole-stimulated Candida glabrata. Results The expression stability of 16 reference genes under fluconazole stress was evaluated using fold change and standard deviation computations with the hkgFinder tool. Our data revealed that the mRNA expression levels of three ribosomal RNAs (RDN5.8, RDN18, and RDN25 remained stable in response to fluconazole, while PGK1, UBC7, and UBC13 mRNAs showed only approximately 2.9-, 3.0-, and 2.5-fold induction by azole, respectively. By contrast, mRNA levels of the other 10 reference genes (ACT1, EF1α, GAPDH, PPIA, RPL2A, RPL10, RPL13A, SDHA, TUB1, and UBC4 were dramatically increased in C. glabrata following antifungal treatment, exhibiting changes ranging from 4.5- to 32.7-fold. We also assessed the expression stability of these reference genes using the 2-ΔΔCT method and three other software packages. The stability rankings of the reference genes by geNorm and the 2-ΔΔCT method were identical to those by hkgFinder, whereas the stability rankings by BestKeeper and NormFinder were notably different. We then validated the suitability of six candidate reference genes (ACT1, PGK1, RDN5.8, RDN18, UBC7, and UBC13 as internal controls for ten target genes in this system using the comparative CT method. Our validation experiments passed for all six reference genes analyzed except RDN18, where the amplification efficiency of RDN18 was different from that of the ten target genes. Finally, we demonstrated that the relative quantification of target gene expression varied according to the endogenous control used, highlighting the importance of the choice of internal controls in such

  6. Synergistic effects of tacrolimus and azole antifungal compounds in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant Candida glabrata isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bedin Denardi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In vitro interaction between tacrolimus (FK506 and four azoles (fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole against thirty clinical isolates of both fluconazole susceptible and -resistant Candida glabrata were evaluated by the checkerboard microdilution method. Synergistic, indifferent or antagonism interactions were found for combinations of the antifungal agents and FK506. A larger synergistic effect was observed for the combinations of FK506 with itraconazole and voriconazole (43%, followed by that of the combination with ketoconazole (37%, against fluconazole-susceptible isolates. For fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata, a higher synergistic effect was obtained from FK506 combined with ketoconazole (77%, itraconazole (73%, voriconazole (63% and fluconazole (60%. The synergisms that we observed in vitro, notably against fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates, are promising and warrant further analysis of their applications in experimental in vivo studies.

  7. Seminational surveillance of fungemia in Denmark: notably high rates of fungemia and numbers of isolates with reduced azole susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Fuursted, Kurt; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2005-01-01

    laboratory systems documented a continuous increase of candidemia cases since the early 1990s. For the 272 susceptibility-tested isolates, MICs of amphotericin B and caspofungin were within the limits expected for the species or genus. However, decreased azole susceptibility, defined as a fluconazole MIC...... of >8 microg/ml and/or itraconazole MIC of >0.125 microg/ml, was detected for 11 Candida isolates that were neither C. glabrata nor C. krusei. Including intrinsically resistant fungi, we detected decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and/or itraconazole in 87 (32%) current Danish bloodstream fungal...... isolates. We showed a continuous increase of fungemia in Denmark and an annual rate in 2003 to 2004 higher than in most other countries. The proportion of bloodstream fungal isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole and/or itraconazole was also notably high....

  8. Mediator Tail Module Is Required for Tac1-Activated CDR1 Expression and Azole Resistance in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongle; Myers, Lawrence C

    2017-11-01

    The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans develops drug resistance after long-term exposure to azole drugs in the treatment of chronic candidiasis. Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in the transcription factor Tac1 and the consequent expression of its targets, drug efflux pumps Cdr1 and Cdr2, are a common mechanism by which C. albicans acquires fluconazole resistance. The mechanism by which GOF mutations hyperactivate Tac1 is currently unknown. Here, we define a transcriptional activation domain (TAD) at the C terminus of Tac1. GOF mutations within the Tac1 TAD, outside the context of full-length Tac1, generally do not enhance its absolute potential as a transcriptional activator. Negative regulation of the Tac1 TAD by the Tac1 middle region is necessary for the activating effect of GOF mutations or fluphenazine to be realized. We have found that full-length Tac1, when hyperactivated by xenobiotics or GOF mutations, facilitates the recruitment of the Mediator coactivator complex to the CDR1 promoter. Azole resistance and the activation of Tac1 target genes, such as CDR1 , are dependent on the Tac1 TAD and subunits of the Mediator tail module. The dependence of different Tac1 target promoters on the Mediator tail module, however, varies widely. Lastly, we show that hyperactivation of Tac1 is correlated with its Mediator-dependent phosphorylation, a potentially useful biomarker for Tac1 hyperactivation. The role of Mediator in events downstream of Tac1 hyperactivation in fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates is complex and provides opportunities and challenges for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Screening of antifungal azole drugs and agrochemicals with an adapted alamarBlue-based assay demonstrates antibacterial activity of croconazole against Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Nicole; Röltgen, Katharina; Witschel, Matthias; Pluschke, Gerd

    2012-12-01

    An alamarBlue-based growth inhibition assay has been adapted for the thermosensitive and slow-growing pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. The standardized test procedure enables medium-throughput screening of preselected compound libraries. Testing of a set of 48 azoles with known antifungal activity led to the identification of an imidazole antifungal displaying an inhibitory dose (ID) of 9 μM for M. ulcerans.

  10. The widely used ATB FUNGUS 3 automated readings in China and its misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles: challenges for developing countries' clinical microbiology labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, He; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Mao, Lei-Li; Zhao, Hao-Ran; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development in the clinical microbiology diagnostic assays presents more challenges for developing countries than for the developed world, especially in the area of test validation before the introduction of new tests. Here we report on the misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles using the ATB FUNGUS 3 (bioMérieux, La Balme-les Grottes, France) with automated readings in China to highlight the dangers of introducing a diagnostic assay without validation. ATB FUNGUS 3 is the most commonly used commercial antifungal susceptibility testing method in China. An in-depth analysis of data showed higher levels of resistance to azoles when ATB FUNGUS 3 strips were read automatically than when read visually. Based on this finding, the performance of ATB FUNGUS 3, read both visually and automatically, was evaluated by testing 218 isolates of five clinically important Candida species, using broth microdilution (BMD) following CLSI M27-A3 as the gold-standard. The overall essential agreement (EA) between ATB visual readings and BMD was 99.1%. In contrast, the ATB automated readings showed higher discrepancies with BMD, with overall EA of 86.2%, and specifically lower EA was observed for fluconazole (80.7%), voriconazole (77.5%), and itraconazole (73.4%), which was most likely due to the trailing effect of azoles. The major errors in azole drug susceptibilities by ATB automated readings is a concern in China that can result in misleading clinical antifungal drug selection and pseudo high rates of antifungal resistance. Therefore, the ATB visual reading is generally recommended. In the meantime, we propose a practical algorithm to be followed for ATB FUNGUS 3 antifungal susceptibility for Candida spp. before the improvement in the automated reading system.

  11. The Widely Used ATB FUNGUS 3 Automated Readings in China and Its Misleading High MICs of Candida spp. to Azoles: Challenges for Developing Countries' Clinical Microbiology Labs

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li; Wang, He; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Mao, Lei-Li; Zhao, Hao-Ran; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development in the clinical microbiology diagnostic assays presents more challenges for developing countries than for the developed world, especially in the area of test validation before the introduction of new tests. Here we report on the misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles using the ATB FUNGUS 3 (bioMérieux, La Balme-les Grottes, France) with automated readings in China to highlight the dangers of introducing a diagnostic assay without validation. ATB FUNGUS 3 is the m...

  12. The widely used ATB FUNGUS 3 automated readings in China and its misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles: challenges for developing countries' clinical microbiology labs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available The rapid development in the clinical microbiology diagnostic assays presents more challenges for developing countries than for the developed world, especially in the area of test validation before the introduction of new tests. Here we report on the misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles using the ATB FUNGUS 3 (bioMérieux, La Balme-les Grottes, France with automated readings in China to highlight the dangers of introducing a diagnostic assay without validation. ATB FUNGUS 3 is the most commonly used commercial antifungal susceptibility testing method in China. An in-depth analysis of data showed higher levels of resistance to azoles when ATB FUNGUS 3 strips were read automatically than when read visually. Based on this finding, the performance of ATB FUNGUS 3, read both visually and automatically, was evaluated by testing 218 isolates of five clinically important Candida species, using broth microdilution (BMD following CLSI M27-A3 as the gold-standard. The overall essential agreement (EA between ATB visual readings and BMD was 99.1%. In contrast, the ATB automated readings showed higher discrepancies with BMD, with overall EA of 86.2%, and specifically lower EA was observed for fluconazole (80.7%, voriconazole (77.5%, and itraconazole (73.4%, which was most likely due to the trailing effect of azoles. The major errors in azole drug susceptibilities by ATB automated readings is a concern in China that can result in misleading clinical antifungal drug selection and pseudo high rates of antifungal resistance. Therefore, the ATB visual reading is generally recommended. In the meantime, we propose a practical algorithm to be followed for ATB FUNGUS 3 antifungal susceptibility for Candida spp. before the improvement in the automated reading system.

  13. Inhibitory effects of azole-type fungicides on interleukin-17 gene expression via retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Muromoto, Ryuta; Takahashi, Miki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Takeda, Yukimasa; Jetten, Anton M.; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ (RORα and RORγ), are key regulators of helper T (Th)17 cell differentiation, which is involved in the innate immune system and autoimmune disorders. However, it remains unclear whether environmental chemicals, including pesticides, have agonistic and/or antagonistic activity against RORα/γ. In this study, we investigated the RORα/γ activity of several azole-type fungicides, and the effects of these fungicides on the gene expression of interleukin (IL)-17, which mediates the function of Th17 cells. In the ROR-reporter gene assays, five azole-type fungicides (imibenconazole, triflumizole, hexaconazole, tetraconazole and imazalil) suppressed RORα- and/or RORγ-mediated transcriptional activity as did benzenesulphonamide T0901317, a ROR inverse agonist and a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. In particular, imibenconazole, triflumizole and hexaconazole showed RORγ inverse agonistic activity at concentrations of 10−6 M. However, unlike T0901317, these fungicides failed to show any LXRα/β agonistic activity. Next, five azole-type fungicides, showing ROR inverse agonist activity, were tested on IL-17 mRNA expression in mouse T lymphoma EL4 cells treated with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that these fungicides suppressed the expression of IL-17 mRNA without effecting RORα and RORγ mRNA levels. In addition, the inhibitory effect of imibenconazole as well as that of T0901317 was absorbed in RORα/γ-knocked down EL4 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that some azole-type fungicides inhibit IL-17 production via RORα/γ. This also provides the first evidence that environmental chemicals can act as modulators of IL-17 expression in immune cells. PMID:22289359

  14. A Novel Zn2-Cys6 Transcription Factor AtrR Plays a Key Role in an Azole Resistance Mechanism of Aspergillus fumigatus by Co-regulating cyp51A and cdr1B Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kiminori; Paul, Sanjoy; Ohba, Ayumi; Gonoi, Tohru; Watanabe, Akira; Gomi, Katsuya

    2017-01-01

    Successful treatment of aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus is threatened by an increasing incidence of drug resistance. This situation is further complicated by the finding that strains resistant to azoles, the major antifungal drugs for aspergillosis, have been widely disseminated across the globe. To elucidate mechanisms underlying azole resistance, we identified a novel transcription factor that is required for normal azole resistance in Aspergillus fungi including A. fumigatus, Aspergillus oryzae, and Aspergillus nidulans. This fungal-specific Zn2-Cys6 type transcription factor AtrR was found to regulate expression of the genes related to ergosterol biosynthesis, including cyp51A that encodes a target protein of azoles. The atrR deletion mutant showed impaired growth under hypoxic conditions and attenuation of virulence in murine infection model for aspergillosis. These results were similar to the phenotypes for a mutant strain lacking SrbA that is also a direct regulator for the cyp51A gene. Notably, AtrR was responsible for the expression of cdr1B that encodes an ABC transporter related to azole resistance, whereas SrbA was not involved in the regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AtrR directly bound both the cyp51A and cdr1B promoters. In the clinically isolated itraconazole resistant strain that harbors a mutant Cyp51A (G54E), deletion of the atrR gene resulted in a hypersensitivity to the azole drugs. Together, our results revealed that AtrR plays a pivotal role in a novel azole resistance mechanism by co-regulating the drug target (Cyp51A) and putative drug efflux pump (Cdr1B). PMID:28052140

  15. Inhibitory effects of azole-type fungicides on interleukin-17 gene expression via retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki, E-mail: kojima@iph.pref.hokkaido.jp [Hokkaido Institute of Public Health, Kita-19, Nishi-12, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Muromoto, Ryuta; Takahashi, Miki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Takeuchi, Shinji [Hokkaido Institute of Public Health, Kita-19, Nishi-12, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Takeda, Yukimasa; Jetten, Anton M. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Matsuda, Tadashi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ (RORα and RORγ), are key regulators of helper T (Th)17 cell differentiation, which is involved in the innate immune system and autoimmune disorders. However, it remains unclear whether environmental chemicals, including pesticides, have agonistic and/or antagonistic activity against RORα/γ. In this study, we investigated the RORα/γ activity of several azole-type fungicides, and the effects of these fungicides on the gene expression of interleukin (IL)-17, which mediates the function of Th17 cells. In the ROR-reporter gene assays, five azole-type fungicides (imibenconazole, triflumizole, hexaconazole, tetraconazole and imazalil) suppressed RORα- and/or RORγ-mediated transcriptional activity as did benzenesulphonamide T0901317, a ROR inverse agonist and a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. In particular, imibenconazole, triflumizole and hexaconazole showed RORγ inverse agonistic activity at concentrations of 10{sup −6} M. However, unlike T0901317, these fungicides failed to show any LXRα/β agonistic activity. Next, five azole-type fungicides, showing ROR inverse agonist activity, were tested on IL-17 mRNA expression in mouse T lymphoma EL4 cells treated with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that these fungicides suppressed the expression of IL-17 mRNA without effecting RORα and RORγ mRNA levels. In addition, the inhibitory effect of imibenconazole as well as that of T0901317 was absorbed in RORα/γ-knocked down EL4 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that some azole-type fungicides inhibit IL-17 production via RORα/γ. This also provides the first evidence that environmental chemicals can act as modulators of IL-17 expression in immune cells. -- Highlights: ► Nuclear receptors, RORα and RORγ, are key regulators of Th17 cell differentiation. ► Five azole-type fungicides act as RORα/γ inverse agonists. ► These fungicides

  16. Inhibitory effects of azole-type fungicides on interleukin-17 gene expression via retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Muromoto, Ryuta; Takahashi, Miki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Takeda, Yukimasa; Jetten, Anton M.; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ (RORα and RORγ), are key regulators of helper T (Th)17 cell differentiation, which is involved in the innate immune system and autoimmune disorders. However, it remains unclear whether environmental chemicals, including pesticides, have agonistic and/or antagonistic activity against RORα/γ. In this study, we investigated the RORα/γ activity of several azole-type fungicides, and the effects of these fungicides on the gene expression of interleukin (IL)-17, which mediates the function of Th17 cells. In the ROR-reporter gene assays, five azole-type fungicides (imibenconazole, triflumizole, hexaconazole, tetraconazole and imazalil) suppressed RORα- and/or RORγ-mediated transcriptional activity as did benzenesulphonamide T0901317, a ROR inverse agonist and a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. In particular, imibenconazole, triflumizole and hexaconazole showed RORγ inverse agonistic activity at concentrations of 10 −6 M. However, unlike T0901317, these fungicides failed to show any LXRα/β agonistic activity. Next, five azole-type fungicides, showing ROR inverse agonist activity, were tested on IL-17 mRNA expression in mouse T lymphoma EL4 cells treated with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that these fungicides suppressed the expression of IL-17 mRNA without effecting RORα and RORγ mRNA levels. In addition, the inhibitory effect of imibenconazole as well as that of T0901317 was absorbed in RORα/γ-knocked down EL4 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that some azole-type fungicides inhibit IL-17 production via RORα/γ. This also provides the first evidence that environmental chemicals can act as modulators of IL-17 expression in immune cells. -- Highlights: ► Nuclear receptors, RORα and RORγ, are key regulators of Th17 cell differentiation. ► Five azole-type fungicides act as RORα/γ inverse agonists. ► These fungicides suppress

  17. A remarkable adsorbent for removal of contaminants of emerging concern from water: Porous carbon derived from metal azolate framework-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Biswa Nath; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2017-10-15

    A series of metal-azolate frameworks or MAFs-MAF-4, -5, and -6-were synthesized and pyrolyzed to prepare porous carbons derived from MAFs (CDM-4, -5, -6, respectively). Not only the obtained carbons but also MAFs were characterized and applied for the adsorption of organic contaminants of emerging concern (CECs, including pharmaceuticals and personal care products) such as salicylic acid, clofibric acid, diclofenac sodium, bisphenol-A, and oxybenzone (OXB) from water. CDM-6 was found to be the most remarkable adsorbent among the tested ones (including activated carbon) for all the adsorbates. OXB was taken as a representative adsorbate for detailed adsorption studies as well as understanding the adsorption mechanism. H-bonding (H-acceptor: CDM; H-donor: CECs) was suggested as the principal mechanism for the adsorption of tested adsorbates. Finally, CDMs, especially CDM-6, were suggested as highly efficient and easily recyclable adsorbents for water purification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Azole-Anion-Based Aprotic Ionic Liquids: Functional Solvents for Atmospheric CO2 Transformation into Various Heterocyclic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanfei; Wu, Yunyan; Yuan, Guangfeng; Hao, Leiduan; Gao, Xiang; Yang, Zhenzhen; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Hongye; Liu, Zhimin

    2016-10-06

    The chemical transformation of atmospheric CO 2 is of great significance yet still poses a great challenge. Herein, azole-anion-based aprotic ionic liquids (ILs) were synthesized by the deprotonation of weak proton donors (e.g., 2-methylimidazole, 4-methylimidazole, and 2,4-dimethylimidazole) with tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide, [Bu 4 P][OH]. We found that these ILs, such as [Bu 4 P][2-MIm], could activate atmospheric CO 2 through the formation of carbamates. The resultant carbamate intermediates could further react with various types of substrate, including propargylic alcohols, 2-aminobenzonitriles, ortho-phenylenediamines, and 2-aminothiophenol, thereby producing α-alkylidene cyclic carbonates, quinazoline-2,4(1 H,3 H)-diones, benzimidazolones, and benzothiazoline, respectively, in moderate-to-good yields. Thus, we have achieved the transformation of CO 2 at atmospheric pressure, and we expect this method to open up new routes for the synthesis of various oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds under metal-free conditions. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. DFT Study of Azole Corrosion Inhibitors on Cu2O Model of Oxidized Copper Surfaces: II. Lateral Interactions and Thermodynamic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunja Gustinčič

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of imidazole, triazole, and tetrazole—used as simple models of azole corrosion inhibitors—on various Cu 2 O(111- and Cu 2 O(110-type surfaces was characterized using density functional theory (DFT calculations with the focus on lateral intermolecular interactions and the thermodynamic stability of various adsorption structures. To this end, an ab initio thermodynamics approach was used to construct two-dimensional phase diagrams for all three molecules. The impact of van der Waals dispersion interactions on molecular adsorption bonding was also addressed. Lateral intermolecular interactions were found to be the most repulsive for imidazole and the least for tetrazole, for which they are usually even slightly attractive. Both non-dissociative and dissociative adsorption modes were considered and although dissociated molecules bind to surfaces more strongly, none of the considered structures that involve dissociated molecules appear on the phase diagrams. Our results show that the three azole molecules display a strong tendency to preferentially adsorb at reactive coordinatively unsaturated (CUS Cu surface sites and stabilize them. According to the calculated phase diagrams for Cu 2 O(111-type surfaces, the three azole molecules adsorb to specific CUS sites, designated as Cu CUS , under all conditions at which molecular adsorption is stable. This tentatively suggests that their corrosion inhibition capability may stem, at least in part, from their ability to passivate reactive surface sites. We further comment on a specific drawback due to neglect of configurational entropy that is usually utilized within the ab initio thermodynamics approach. We analyze the issue for Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption models and show that when configurational entropy is neglected, the ab initio thermodynamics approach is too hasty to predict phase-transition like behavior.

  20. Alquilación de azoles vía funcionalización C(sp3)–H promovida por I(III)

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Calleja, Carmela

    2013-01-01

    A lo largo de esta Memoria se ha desarrollado un método sintético sencillo que permite llevar a cabo la alquilación de azoles mediante un proceso de funcionalización de enlaces C–H utilizando éteres como agente alquilante. Esta reacción se lleva a cabo utilizando una fuente de iodo hipervalente, lo que permite la creación de enlaces C–N en un proceso libre de metal (y de oxidantes como peróxidos). Dentro de un contexto de química sostenible, los estudios desarrollados aportan un método eco...

  1. Two missense mutations, E123Q and K151E, identified in the ERG11 allele of an azole-resistant isolate of Candida kefyr recovered from a stem cell transplant patient for acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Couzigou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first cloning and nucleotide sequencing of an ERG11 allele from a clinical isolate of Candida kefyr cross-resistant to azole antifungals. It was recovered from a stem cell transplant patient, in an oncohematology unit exhibiting unexpected high prevalence of C. kefyr. Two amino acid substitutions were identified: K151E, whose role in fluconazole resistance was already demonstrated in Candida albicans, and E123Q, a new substitution never described so far in azole-resistant Candida yeast.

  2. Use of Pinus sylvestris L. (Pinaceae), Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae), and Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae) essential oils and their main components to enhance itraconazole activity against azole susceptible/not-susceptible Cryptococcus neoformans strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalas, Daniela; Mandras, Narcisa; Roana, Janira; Tardugno, Roberta; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Ghisetti, Valeria; Benvenuti, Stefania; Tullio, Vivian

    2018-05-03

    Cryptococcal infections, besides being a problem for immunocompromised patients, are occasionally being a problem for immunocompetent patients. In addition, the lower susceptibility of this yeast to azoles is a growing problem in health care. To date, there are very few molecules with any activity towards Cryptococcus neoformans, leading to heightened interest in finding new alternatives or adjuvants to conventional drugs for the treatment of mycosis caused by this yeast. Since the essential oils (EOs) are considered as a potential rich source of bioactive antimicrobial compounds, we evaluated the antifungal activity of Origanum vulgare (oregano), Pinus sylvestris (pine), and Thymus vulgaris (thyme red) EOs, and their components (α-pinene, carvacrol, thymol) compared with fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole, against C.neoformans clinical strains. Then, we investigated the effect of EOs and components in combination with itraconazole. EO composition was analysed by Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A broth microdilution method was used to evaluate the susceptibility of C.neoformans to azoles, EOs and components. Checkerboard tests, isobolograms and time-kill assays were carried out for combination studies. Six C.neoformans isolates were susceptible to azoles, while one C.neoformans exhibited a reduced susceptibility to all tested azole drugs. All EOs exerted a good inhibitory activity against all C.neoformans strains. Pine EO was the most effective. Among components, thymol exerted the most remarkable activity. By checkerboard testing and isobolographic analysis, combinations of itraconazole with oregano, pine, or thyme EOs, and carvacrol were found to be synergistic (FICI≤0.5) against azole susceptible C.neoformans. Regarding the azole not susceptible C.neoformans strain, the synergistic effect with itraconazole was observed with thyme EO (chemotype: thymol 26.52%; carvacrol 7.85%), and carvacrol. Time-kill assays confirmed the synergistic

  3. Combination Effects of (TriAzole Fungicides on Hormone Production and Xenobiotic Metabolism in a Human Placental Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja Rieke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Consumers are exposed to multiple residues of different pesticides via the diet. Therefore, EU legislation for pesticides requires the evaluation of single active substances as well as the consideration of combination effects. Hence the analysis of combined effects of substances in a broad dose range represents a key challenge to current experimental and regulatory toxicology. Here we report evidence for additive effects for (triazole fungicides, a widely used group of antifungal agents, in the human placental cell line Jeg-3. In addition to the triazoles cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, flusilazole and tebuconazole and the azole fungicide prochloraz also pesticides from other chemical classes assumed to act via different modes of action (i.e., the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the triazinylsulfonylurea herbicide triflusulfuron-methyl were investigated. Endpoints analysed include synthesis of steroid hormone production (progesterone and estradiol and gene expression of steroidogenic and non-steroidogenic cytochrome-P-450 (CYP enzymes. For the triazoles and prochloraz, a dose dependent inhibition of progesterone production was observed and additive effects could be confirmed for several combinations of these substances in vitro. The non-triazoles chlorpyrifos and triflusulfuron-methyl did not affect this endpoint and, in line with this finding, no additivity was observed when these substances were applied in mixtures with prochloraz. While prochloraz slightly increased aromatase expression and estradiol production and triflusulfuron-methyl decreased estradiol production, none of the other substances had effects on the expression levels of steroidogenic CYP-enzymes in Jeg-3 cells. For some triazoles, prochloraz and chlorpyrifos a significant induction of CYP1A1 mRNA expression and potential combination effects for this endpoint were observed. Inhibition of CYP1A1 mRNA induction by the AhR inhibitor CH223191 indicated AhR receptor dependence this

  4. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) inspired azole-quinoline based fluorophores: Synthesis and photophysical properties study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padalkar, Vikas S.; Sekar, Nagaiyan, E-mail: n.sekar@ictmumbai.edu.in

    2014-11-15

    7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl)quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was obtained by the condensation reaction of p-amino salicylic acid and 4-nitrophenylmalonadialdehyde which was obtained from phenylacetonitrile through nitration, hydrolysis and Vilsmeier reaction. 7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl) quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was condensed with different o-aminophenols or o-aminothiophenol in ethanol in the presence of phosphorustrichloride. Synthesized quinoline contained benzimidazole and benzothiazole moieties. Photophysical behaviors of these compounds in solvents of different polarities were studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds showed single absorption in all the studied solvents. The dual emissions (normal emission and ESIPT emission) as well as large Stokes' shift emission pattern were observed for the synthesized fluorophores. The photophysical study shows that the emission properties of the compounds depend on the solvent polarity. The photophysical properties of the compounds were compared with structurally analogous ESIPT quinoline. Thermal stability of the compounds was studied using thermogravimetric analysis and results show that compounds are thermally stable up to 300 °C. The synthesized quinoline derivatives were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR and {sup 1}H –NMR, {sup 13}C –NMR spectroscopy and mass spectral analysis. - Highlights: • First and unique study of quinoline derivatives contain ESIPT azole unit at 6-position and hydroxyl group at 7-position. • Compounds are fluorescent with considerable quantum yields. • All compounds showed absorption in ultraviolet region and emission in visible region with large Stokes' shift. • The photophysical properties of new compounds were compared with reported ESIPT quinoline analogous.

  5. The interaction of representative members from two classes of antimycotics--the azoles and the allylamines--with cytochromes P-450 in steroidogenic tissues and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, I

    1985-06-01

    Spectrophotometric studies with ketoconazole, clotrimazole and miconazole show strong type-II interactions with several cytochromes P-450, particularly (Ks greater than 10(7)M-1; pH7.4; 25 degrees C) with the 11 beta-hydroxylase of adrenal mitochondria, with the 17 alpha/20 lyase of testis microsomes and with some forms of cytochromes P-450 of liver. A tight binding of the azoles also occurs to the reduced cytochromes, giving rise to an impeded CO binding to the haem iron. The binding of the azoles to 11 beta-hydroxylase and 17 alpha/20 lyase is much tighter than the binding of endogenous substrates, and consequently inhibition of steroidogenesis will occur at these sites. The metabolism of xenobiotic substrates by the cytochromes P-450 of liver will also be severely impeded. In contrast, the allylamines naftifine and SF 86-327 are type-I substrates for a small portion of cytochromes P-450 of liver microsomes only and there is no spectral evidence for binding to the cytochromes P-450 involved in steroid biosynthesis.

  6. Overexpression of Aldo-Keto-Reductase in Azole-resistant Clinical Isolates of Candida Glabrata Determined by cDNA-AFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Heidari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida glabrata causes significant medical problems in immunocompromised patients. Many strains of this yeast are intrinsically resistant to azole antifungal agents, and treatment is problematic, leading to high morbidity and mortality rates in immunosuppressed individuals. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the genes involved in the drug resistance of clinical isolates of C. glabrata.Methods: The clinical isolates of C. glabrata were collected in an epidemiological survey of candidal infection inimmunocompromised patients and consisted of four fluconazole and itraconazole resistant isolates, two fluconazoleand itraconazole sensitive isolates, and C. glabrata CBS 138 as reference strain. Antifungal susceptibility patterns ofthe organisms were determined beforehand by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. The potentialgene(s implicated in antifungal resistance were investigated using complementary DNA- Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was carried out to evaluate the expression of gene(s in resistant isolates as compared to sensitive and reference strains.Results and conclusions: The aldo-keto-reductase superfamily (AKR gene was upregulated in the resistant clinicalisolates as assessed by cDNA-AFLP. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed AKR mRNA expression approximately twice that seen in the sensitive isolates. Overexpression of the AKR gene was associated with increased fluconazole and itraconazole resistance in C. glabrata. The data suggest that upregulation of the AKR gene might give a new insight into the mechanism of azole resistance.

  7. Microbiological screening of Irish patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy reveals persistence of Candida albicans strains, gradual reduction in susceptibility to azoles, and incidences of clinical signs of oral candidiasis without culture evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Brenda A; McGovern, Eleanor; Moran, Gary P; Healy, Claire M; Nunn, June; Fleming, Pádraig; Costigan, Colm; Sullivan, Derek J; Coleman, David C

    2011-05-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) are prone to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, which is often treated with azoles. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oral Candida populations from 16 Irish APECED patients, who comprise approximately half the total number identified in Ireland, and to examine the effect of intermittent antifungal therapy on the azole susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates. Patients attended between one and four clinical evaluations over a 5-year period, providing oral rinses and/or oral swab samples each time. Candida was recovered from 14/16 patients, and Candida albicans was the only Candida species identified. Interestingly, clinical diagnosis of candidiasis did not correlate with microbiological evidence of Candida infection at 7/22 (32%) clinical assessments. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of C. albicans isolates recovered from the same patients on separate occasions identified the same sequence type each time. Fluconazole resistance was detected in isolates from one patient, and isolates exhibiting a progressive reduction in itraconazole and/or fluconazole susceptibility were identified in a further 3/16 patients, in each case correlating with the upregulation of CDR- and MDR-encoded efflux pumps. Mutations were also identified in the ERG11 and the TAC1 genes of isolates from these four patients; some of these mutations have previously been associated with azole resistance. The findings suggest that alternative Candida treatment options, other than azoles such as chlorhexidine, should be considered in APECED patients and that clinical diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be confirmed by culture prior to the commencement of anti-Candida therapy.

  8. Microbiological Screening of Irish Patients with Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy Reveals Persistence of Candida albicans Strains, Gradual Reduction in Susceptibility to Azoles, and Incidences of Clinical Signs of Oral Candidiasis without Culture Evidence▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Brenda A.; McGovern, Eleanor; Moran, Gary P.; Healy, Claire M.; Nunn, June; Fleming, Pádraig; Costigan, Colm; Sullivan, Derek J.; Coleman, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) are prone to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, which is often treated with azoles. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oral Candida populations from 16 Irish APECED patients, who comprise approximately half the total number identified in Ireland, and to examine the effect of intermittent antifungal therapy on the azole susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates. Patients attended between one and four clinical evaluations over a 5-year period, providing oral rinses and/or oral swab samples each time. Candida was recovered from 14/16 patients, and Candida albicans was the only Candida species identified. Interestingly, clinical diagnosis of candidiasis did not correlate with microbiological evidence of Candida infection at 7/22 (32%) clinical assessments. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of C. albicans isolates recovered from the same patients on separate occasions identified the same sequence type each time. Fluconazole resistance was detected in isolates from one patient, and isolates exhibiting a progressive reduction in itraconazole and/or fluconazole susceptibility were identified in a further 3/16 patients, in each case correlating with the upregulation of CDR- and MDR-encoded efflux pumps. Mutations were also identified in the ERG11 and the TAC1 genes of isolates from these four patients; some of these mutations have previously been associated with azole resistance. The findings suggest that alternative Candida treatment options, other than azoles such as chlorhexidine, should be considered in APECED patients and that clinical diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be confirmed by culture prior to the commencement of anti-Candida therapy. PMID:21367996

  9. Microbiological screening of Irish patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy reveals persistence of Candida albicans strains, gradual reduction in susceptibility to azoles, and incidences of clinical signs of oral candidiasis without culture evidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McManus, Brenda A

    2011-05-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) are prone to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, which is often treated with azoles. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oral Candida populations from 16 Irish APECED patients, who comprise approximately half the total number identified in Ireland, and to examine the effect of intermittent antifungal therapy on the azole susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates. Patients attended between one and four clinical evaluations over a 5-year period, providing oral rinses and\\/or oral swab samples each time. Candida was recovered from 14\\/16 patients, and Candida albicans was the only Candida species identified. Interestingly, clinical diagnosis of candidiasis did not correlate with microbiological evidence of Candida infection at 7\\/22 (32%) clinical assessments. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of C. albicans isolates recovered from the same patients on separate occasions identified the same sequence type each time. Fluconazole resistance was detected in isolates from one patient, and isolates exhibiting a progressive reduction in itraconazole and\\/or fluconazole susceptibility were identified in a further 3\\/16 patients, in each case correlating with the upregulation of CDR- and MDR-encoded efflux pumps. Mutations were also identified in the ERG11 and the TAC1 genes of isolates from these four patients; some of these mutations have previously been associated with azole resistance. The findings suggest that alternative Candida treatment options, other than azoles such as chlorhexidine, should be considered in APECED patients and that clinical diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be confirmed by culture prior to the commencement of anti-Candida therapy.

  10. In vitro and in vivo studies of gold(I) azolate/phosphane complexes for the treatment of basal like breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Valentina; Tilio, Martina; Maina, Eunice Wairimu; Andreani, Cristina; Bartolacci, Caterina; Wang, Junbiao; Iezzi, Manuela; Ferraro, Stefano; Ramadori, Anna Teresa; Simon, Oumarou Camille; Pucciarelli, Stefania; Wu, Guojun; Dou, Q Ping; Marchini, Cristina; Galassi, Rossana; Amici, Augusto

    2018-06-02

    Basal like breast cancer (BLBC) is a very aggressive subtype of breast cancer giving few chances of survival, against which cisplatin based therapy is a compromise among the anticancer activity, the resistance development and the severe side effects. With the aim of finding new anticancer agents alternative to cisplatin, seven gold(I) azolate/phosphane compounds were evaluated in vitro by MTT tests in human MDA-MB-231, human mammary epithelial HMLE cells overexpressing FoxQ1, and murine A17 cells as models of BLBC. Two compounds, (4,5-dichloro-1H-imidazolate-1-yl)-(triphenylphosphane)-gold(I) 1 and (4,5-dicyano-1H-imidazolate-1-yl)-(triphenylphosphane)-gold(I) 2 were found very active and chosen for an in vivo study in A17 tumors transplanted in syngeneic mice. The compounds resulted to be more active than cisplatin, less nephrotoxic and generally more tolerated by the mice. This study also provides evidence that both gold(I) complexes inhibited the 19 S proteasome-associated deubiquitinase USP14 and induced apoptosis, while compound 1's mechanism of action depends also on its ability to down-regulate key molecules governing cancer growth and progression, such as STAT3 and Cox-2. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. 1-[(2-arylthiazol-4-yl)methyl]azoles as a new class of anticonvulsants: design, synthesis, in vivo screening, and in silico drug-like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangar, Nematollah; Ayati, Adile; Alipour, Eskandar; Pashapour, Arsalan; Foroumadi, Alireza; Emami, Saeed

    2011-11-01

    A series of novel thiazole incorporated (arylalkyl)azoles were synthesized and screened for their anticonvulsant properties using maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazole models in mice. Among target compounds, 1-[(2-(4-chlorophenyl)thiazol-4-yl)methyl]-1H-imidazole (compound 4b), 1-[(2-phenylthiazol-4-yl)methyl]-1H-1,2,4-tria-zole (8a), and its 4-chlorophenyl analog (compound 8b) were able to display noticeable anticonvulsant activity in both pentylenetetrazole and maximal electroshock tests with percentage protection range of 33-100%. A computational study was carried out for prediction of pharmacokinetics properties and drug-likeness. The structure-activity relationship and in silico drug relevant properties (molecular weight, topological polar surface area, clog P, hydrogen bond donors, hydrogen bond acceptors, and log BB) confirmed that the compounds were within the range set by Lipinski's rule-of-five, and possessing favorable physicochemical properties for acting as CNS-drugs, making them potentially promising agents for epilepsy therapy. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Coordination preference and magnetic properties of FeII assemblies with a bis-azole bearing 1,2,4-triazole and tetrazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Anil D.; Railliet, Antoine P.; Dîrtu, Marinela M.; Garcia, Yann

    2012-03-01

    With a new bis-azole molecular fragment ( Htt) bearing 1,2,4-triazole and tetrazole, a mononuclear complex [Fe(tt)2(H2O)4]·2H2O ( 1), a trinuclear complex [Fe3(tt)6(H2O)6]·2H2O ( 2) and a 1D coordination polymer [Fe(tt)(Htt)2]BF4·2CH3OH ( 3) were obtained by varying reaction conditions. Htt acts either as an anionic or neutral ligand depending upon the reaction medium and pH. Thermal variation of spin states of 1- 3 were investigated in the range 77-300 K by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. 1 totally remains in high-spin state over the entire temperature range whereas no spin crossover was evidenced in 2. Nearly 1:1 high-spin and low-spin population ratio is found in 3, which remains constant over the entire temperature range investigated.

  13. Novel 3-Amino-6-chloro-7-(azol-2 or 5-yl-1,1-dioxo-1,4,2-benzodithiazine Derivatives with Anticancer Activity: Synthesis and QSAR Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Pogorzelska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of new 3-amino-6-chloro-7-(azol-2 or 5-yl-1,1-dioxo-1,4,2-benzodithiazine derivatives 5a–j have been synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their antiproliferative activity at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The most active compound 5h showed significant cytotoxic effects against ovarian (OVCAR-3 and breast (MDA-MB-468 cancer (10% and 47% cancer cell death, respectively as well as a good selectivity toward prostate (DU-145, colon (SW-620 and renal (TK-10 cancer cell lines. To obtain a deeper insight into the structure-activity relationships of the new compounds 5a–j QSAR studies have been applied. Theoretical calculations allowed the identification of molecular descriptors belonging to the RDF (RDF055p and RDF145m in the MOLT-4 and UO-31 QSAR models, respectively and 3D-MorSE (Mor32m and Mor16e for MOLT-4 and UO-31 QSAR models descriptor classes. Based on these data, QSAR models with good robustness and predictive ability have been obtained.

  14. Cobalt(II) complexes with azole-pyridine type ligands for non-aqueous redox-flow batteries: Tunable electrochemistry via structural modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Craig G.; Toghill, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    A single species redox flow battery employing a new class of cobalt(II) complexes with 'tunable' tridentate azole-pyridine type ligands is reported. Four structures were synthesised and their electrochemical, physical and battery characteristics were investigated as a function of successive substitution of the ligand terminal pyridyl donors. The Co(II/I) and Co(III/II) couples are stable and quasi-reversible on gold and glassy carbon electrodes, however redox potentials are tunable allowing the cobalt potential difference to be preferentially increased from 1.07 to 1.91 V via pyridine substitution with weaker σ-donating/π-accepting 3,5-dimethylpyrazole groups. The charge-discharge properties of the system were evaluated using an H-type glass cell and graphite rod electrodes. The complexes delivered high Coulombic efficiencies of 89.7-99.8% and very good voltaic efficiencies of 70.3-81.0%. Consequently, energy efficiencies are high at 63.1-80.8%, marking an improvement on other similar non-aqueous systems. Modification of the ligands also improved solubility from 0.18 M to 0.50 M via pyridyl substitution with 3,5-dimethylpyrazole, though the low solubility of the complexes limits the overall energy capacity to between 2.58 and 12.80 W h L-1. Preliminary flow cell studies in a prototype flow cell are also demonstrated.

  15. Extracellular phospholipase production of oral Candida albicans isolates from smokers, diabetics, asthmatics, denture wearers and healthy individuals following brief exposure to polyene, echinocandin and azole antimycotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjuna N.B. Ellepola

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Candida albicans is the primary causative agent of oral candidosis, and one of its key virulent attributes is considered to be its ability to produce extracellular phospholipases that facilitate cellular invasion. Oral candidosis can be treated with polyenes, and azoles, and the more recently introduced echinocandins. However, once administered, the intraoral concentration of these drugs tend to be sub-therapeutic and rather transient due to factors such as the diluent effect of saliva and cleansing effect of the oral musculature. Hence, intra-orally, the pathogenic yeasts may undergo a brief exposure to antifungal drugs. We, therefore, evaluated the phospholipase production of oral C. albicans isolates following brief exposure to sub-therapeutic concentrations of the foregoing antifungals. Materials and methods Fifty C. albicans oral isolates obtained from smokers, diabetics, asthmatics using steroid inhalers, partial denture wearers and healthy individuals were exposed to sub-therapeutic concentrations of nystatin, amphotericin B, caspofungin, ketoconazole and fluconazole for one hour. Thereafter the drugs were removed and the phospholipase production was determined by a plate assay using an egg yolk-agar medium. Results The phospholipase production of these isolates was significantly suppressed with a percentage reduction of 10.65, 12.14, 11.45 and 6.40% following exposure to nystatin, amphotericin B, caspofungin and ketoconazole, respectively. This suppression was not significant following exposure to fluconazole. Conclusions Despite the sub-therapeutic, intra oral, bioavailability of polyenes, echinocandins and ketoconazole, they are likely to produce a persistent antifungal effect by suppressing phospholipase production, which is a key virulent attribute of this common pathogenic yeast.

  16. A fabric phase sorptive extraction-High performance liquid chromatography-Photo diode array detection method for the determination of twelve azole antimicrobial drug residues in human plasma and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Marcello; Kabir, Abuzar; Innosa, Denise; Lopatriello, Teresa; Furton, Kenneth G

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a novel fabric phase sorptive extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (FPSE-HPLC-PDA) method for the simultaneous extraction and analysis of twelve azole antimicrobial drug residues that include ketoconazole, terconazole, voriconazole, bifonazole, clotrimazole, tioconazole, econazole, butoconazole, miconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and itraconazole in human plasma and urine samples. The selected azole antimicrobial drugs were well resolved by using a Luna C 18 column (250mm×4.6mm; 5μm particle size) in gradient elution mode within 36min. The analytical method was calibrated and validated in the range from 0.1 to 8μg/mL for all the drug compounds. Blank human plasma and urine were used as the sample matrix for the analysis; while benzyl-4-hydroxybenzoate was used as the internal standard (IS). The limit of quantification of the FPSE-HPLC-PDA method was found as 0.1μg/mL and the weighted-matrix matched standard calibration curves of the drugs showed a good linearity upto a concentration of 8μg/mL. The parallelism tests were also performed to evaluate whether overrange sample can be analyzed after dilution, without compromising the analytical performances of the validated method. The intra- and inter-day precision (RSD%) values were found ≤13.1% and ≤13.9%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day trueness (bias%) values were found in the range from -12.1% to 10.5%. The performances of the validated FPSE-HPLC-PDA were further tested on real samples collected from healthy volunteers after a single dose administration of itraconazole and miconazole. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first FPSE extraction procedure applied on plasma and urine samples for the simultaneous determination of twelve azole drugs possessing a wide range of logK ow values (extending from 0.4 for fluconazole to 6.70 of butoconazole) and could be adopted as a rapid and robust green analytical tool for clinical and

  17. A study of the structure-property relationship of azole-azine based homoleptic platinum(II) complexes and tunability of the photo-physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranga Prabhath, Malaviarachchige Rabel

    reveal that the solid state emission is associated with 1MMLCT transitions. Lifetime measurements revealed the existence of two decay processes: one being fluorescence and the other process, either phosphorescence or delayed fluorescence. Further a linear-relationship between the Hammett parameters of the substituents and emission wavelengths was established. This allows a reliable emission predictability for any given substituent of 5-substituted pyridyl-1,2,3-triazole platinum complexes. In conclusion, we show a new approach in achieving coarse emission tunability in pyridyl-1,2,3-triazole based platinum complexes via subtle changes in the molecular structure and the importance of metallophilic interactions in the process. During the second phase of the study, the scope was broadened to examine the effects of heterocyclic nitrogens in the ligand skeleton. Fifteen different combinations of azole-azine linked ligand systems were synthesized, by systematically increasing the number of nitrogens and changing the ring position of the nitrogens in the skeleton. Later, the homoleptic platinum complexes of the respective ligands were synthesised, and the photo-physical characteristics were studied. The above mentioned changes in the ligand structure resulted in a 264 nm emission tunability, in the thin films of the complexes. Theoretical studies on the complexes revealed that based on the structure of the ligand, different metallophilic stacking behaviours and different origins of emission (fluorescence and phosphorescence) can result, which in turn give rise to tunable emission wavelengths.

  18. Evaluation of an early step-down strategy from intravenous anidulafungin to oral azole therapy for the treatment of candidemia and other forms of invasive candidiasis: results from an open-label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jose; Reboli, Annette C; Pappas, Peter G; Patterson, Thomas F; Reinhardt, John; Chin-Hong, Peter; Tobin, Ellis; Kett, Daniel H; Biswas, Pinaki; Swanson, Robert

    2014-02-21

    Hospitalized patients are at increased risk for candidemia and invasive candidiasis (C/IC). Improved therapeutic regimens with enhanced clinical and pharmacoeconomic outcomes utilizing existing antifungal agents are still needed. An open-label, non-comparative study evaluated an intravenous (i.v.) to oral step-down strategy. Patients with C/IC were treated with i.v. anidulafungin and after 5 days of i.v. therapy had the option to step-down to oral azole therapy (fluconazole or voriconazole) if they met prespecified criteria. The primary endpoint was the global response rate (clinical + microbiological) at end of treatment (EOT) in the modified intent-to-treat (MITT) population (at least one dose of anidulafungin plus positive Candida within 96 hours of study entry). Secondary endpoints included efficacy at other time points and in predefined patient subpopulations. Patients who stepped down early (≤ 7 days' anidulafungin) were identified as the "early switch" subpopulation. In total, 282 patients were enrolled, of whom 250 were included in the MITT population. The MITT global response rate at EOT was 83.7% (95% confidence interval, 78.7-88.8). Global response rates at all time points were generally similar in the early switch subpopulation compared with the MITT population. Global response rates were also similar across multiple Candida species, including C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. The most common treatment-related adverse events were nausea and vomiting (four patients each). A short course of i.v. anidulafungin, followed by early step-down to oral azole therapy, is an effective and well-tolerated approach for the treatment of C/IC. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00496197.

  19. Molecular analysis and dimorphism of azole-susceptible and resistant Candida albicans isolates Análise molecular e dimorfismo de isolados de Candida albicans suscetíveis e resistentes aos azólicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Rodrigues Costa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Candida albicans is responsible for superficial or systemic infections known as candidiasis, which may be found in infected tissue as unicellular budding yeasts, hyphae, or pseudohyphae. In this study, the effects of both fluconazole and itraconazole antifungal agents on the hyphal formation and genotypic characterization of C. albicans isolates classified as either susceptible or resistant were investigated. METHODS: The hyphal production of five C. albicans isolates under the action of antifungal agents was investigated by culturing yeast on growth medium and on hyphal induction medium. The genotypic characterization was carried out for 13 isolates of C. albicans using the random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR method. RESULTS: The dimorphism analysis showed that the hyphal formation was higher in resistant than in the susceptible isolates to both azoles. The RAPD-PCR method identified the formation of two different groups. In group A, four resistant and two susceptible isolates were clustered, and in group B, one resistant and six susceptible isolates were clustered. CONCLUSIONS: Considering that hyphal formation was higher in resistant isolates in the presence of azole drugs, we confirmed that the hyphal production is closely related to susceptibility to azoles. These drugs may affect the morphogenesis of C. albicans depending on their susceptibility to these drugs. In relation to RAPD-PCR, most resistant isolates classified in group A and susceptible isolates in group B demonstrated that this method presented a similar standard between the two groups, suggesting that by this technique, a strong correlation between genotypes and fluconazole-resistant samples may be found.INTRODUÇÃO: Candida albicans é responsável por infecções superficiais ou sistêmicas conhecidas como candidíase, encontrada em tecidos infectados na forma de leveduras brotantes unicelulares, hifas ou pseudohifas. Neste

  20. Functional coordination polymers and MOFs from reactions of the lanthanides and barium with azole ligands. Synthesis and characterization with a focus on structure determination from X-ray powder diffraction data; Funktionale Koordinationspolymere und MOFs aus Reaktionen der Lanthanide und des Bariums mit Azol-Liganden. Synthese und Charakterisierung mit dem Fokus der Strukturbestimmung anhand von Roentgenpulverbeugungsdaten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybak, Jens-Christoph

    2012-07-01

    This thesis deals with the synthesis and characterization of coordination polymers and MOFs of the lanthanides and barium with different azolic N-heterocycles. A total of 18 new organic-inorganic hybrid materials, as well as a series of co-doped compounds is presented. Besides the structural characterization of these materials from X-ray diffraction powder data, the focus of the investigations is on the thermal and photoluminescence spectroscopic properties. The lanthanides La - Lu, except Eu and Pm, can be reacted with 1H-1,2,3-triazole to give the series of the isotypic dense 3D-MOFs {sup 3}{sub ∞}[Ln(Tz{sup *}){sub 3}]. Investigation of the photoluminescence properties of these compounds reveals a broad range of different luminescence phenomena, including the first observation of an intrinsic inner-filter effect of the Ln{sup 3+}-ions. The structure of this isotypic series of compounds was solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. A 2D-polymorph of these compounds {sup 2}{sub ∞}[Ln(Tz{sup *}){sub 3}], is observed for Ln = Sm, Tb and was characterized by single crystal data. The reaction of Eu with 1H-benzotriazole yields the 1D-coordination polymer {sup 1}{sub ∞}[Eu(Btz){sub 2}(BtzH){sub 2}], which is the first example of a divalent rare earth benzotriazolate. Analysis of the thermal properties reveals the transformation to the 3D-MOF {sup 3}{sub ∞}[Eu(Btz){sub 2}] at higher temperatures. The structure of this material was also solved from X-ray powder diffraction data. Investigation of the photoluminescence properties of the co-doped compounds {sup 3}{sub ∞}[Ba{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}(Im){sub 2}], which were obtained from reaction of the salt-like hydrides BaH{sub 2} and EuH{sub 2} with imidazole, show that the synthesis of luminescent MOF materials by co-doping of non-luminescent networks with luminescence centers is possible. The structure of these materials was solved from X-ray powder diffraction data of the undoped compound {sup 3}{sub

  1. Facultative Sterol Uptake in an Ergosterol-Deficient Clinical Isolate of Candida glabrata Harboring a Missense Mutation in ERG11 and Exhibiting Cross-Resistance to Azoles and Amphotericin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Claire M.; Parker, Josie E.; Bader, Oliver; Weig, Michael; Gross, Uwe; Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Kelly, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    We identified a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata (CG156) exhibiting flocculent growth and cross-resistance to fluconazole (FLC), voriconazole (VRC), and amphotericin B (AMB), with MICs of >256, >256, and 32 μg ml−1, respectively. Sterol analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that CG156 was a sterol 14α-demethylase (Erg11p) mutant, wherein 14α-methylated intermediates (lanosterol was >80% of the total) were the only detectable sterols. ERG11 sequencing indicated that CG156 harbored a single-amino-acid substitution (G315D) which nullified the function of native Erg11p. In heterologous expression studies using a doxycycline-regulatable Saccharomyces cerevisiae erg11 strain, wild-type C. glabrata Erg11p fully complemented the function of S. cerevisiae sterol 14α-demethylase, restoring growth and ergosterol synthesis in recombinant yeast; mutated CG156 Erg11p did not. CG156 was culturable using sterol-free, glucose-containing yeast minimal medium (glcYM). However, when grown on sterol-supplemented glcYM (with ergosta 7,22-dienol, ergosterol, cholestanol, cholesterol, Δ7-cholestenol, or desmosterol), CG156 cultures exhibited shorter lag phases, reached higher cell densities, and showed alterations in cellular sterol composition. Unlike comparator isolates (harboring wild-type ERG11) that became less sensitive to FLC and VRC when cultured on sterol-supplemented glcYM, facultative sterol uptake by CG156 did not affect its azole-resistant phenotype. Conversely, CG156 grown using glcYM with ergosterol (or with ergosta 7,22-dienol) showed increased sensitivity to AMB; CG156 grown using glcYM with cholesterol (or with cholestanol) became more resistant (MICs of 2 and >64 μg AMB ml−1, respectively). Our results provide insights into the consequences of sterol uptake and metabolism on growth and antifungal resistance in C. glabrata. PMID:22615281

  2. Functional coordination polymers and MOFs from reactions of the lanthanides and barium with azole ligands. Synthesis and characterization with a focus on structure determination from X-ray powder diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybak, Jens-Christoph

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with the synthesis and characterization of coordination polymers and MOFs of the lanthanides and barium with different azolic N-heterocycles. A total of 18 new organic-inorganic hybrid materials, as well as a series of co-doped compounds is presented. Besides the structural characterization of these materials from X-ray diffraction powder data, the focus of the investigations is on the thermal and photoluminescence spectroscopic properties. The lanthanides La - Lu, except Eu and Pm, can be reacted with 1H-1,2,3-triazole to give the series of the isotypic dense 3D-MOFs 3 ∞ [Ln(Tz * ) 3 ]. Investigation of the photoluminescence properties of these compounds reveals a broad range of different luminescence phenomena, including the first observation of an intrinsic inner-filter effect of the Ln 3+ -ions. The structure of this isotypic series of compounds was solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. A 2D-polymorph of these compounds 2 ∞ [Ln(Tz * ) 3 ], is observed for Ln = Sm, Tb and was characterized by single crystal data. The reaction of Eu with 1H-benzotriazole yields the 1D-coordination polymer 1 ∞ [Eu(Btz) 2 (BtzH) 2 ], which is the first example of a divalent rare earth benzotriazolate. Analysis of the thermal properties reveals the transformation to the 3D-MOF 3 ∞ [Eu(Btz) 2 ] at higher temperatures. The structure of this material was also solved from X-ray powder diffraction data. Investigation of the photoluminescence properties of the co-doped compounds 3 ∞ [Ba 1-x Eu x (Im) 2 ], which were obtained from reaction of the salt-like hydrides BaH 2 and EuH 2 with imidazole, show that the synthesis of luminescent MOF materials by co-doping of non-luminescent networks with luminescence centers is possible. The structure of these materials was solved from X-ray powder diffraction data of the undoped compound 3 ∞ [BaEu(Im) 2 ]. Structural characterization of materials from X-ray powder diffraction data is an important aspect

  3. Green colorants based on energetic azole borates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, Johann; Klapötke, Thomas M; Rusan, Magdalena; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2014-11-24

    The investigation of green-burning boron-based compounds as colorants in pyrotechnic formulations as alternative for barium nitrate, which is a hazard to health and to the environment, is reported. Metal-free and nitrogen-rich dihydrobis(5-aminotetrazolyl)borate salts and dihydrobis(1,3,4-triazolyl)borate salts have been synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, and vibrational spectroscopy. Their thermal and energetic properties have been determined as well. Several pyrotechnic compositions using selected azolyl borate salts as green colorants were investigated. Formulations with ammonium dinitramide and ammonium nitrate as oxidizers and boron and magnesium as fuels were tested. The burn time, dominant wavelength, spectral purity, luminous intensity, and luminous efficiency as well as the thermal and energetic properties of these compositions were measured. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Arylimidamide-Azole Combinations against Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Antileishmanial Activity of Compounds Derived from the Medicines for Malaria Venture Open Access Box Against Intracellular Leishmania major Amastigotes...Atovaquone and other antimalarial drugs against P. falciparum in vitro. Experimental Parasitology 80, 373-381, 1995. 4. Sharlow E, Leimgruber S...with in Vitro and in Vivo Anti-leishmanial Activity . ACS Chemical Biology, Dec 2013. 5. Caridha D, Parriot S, Hudson TH, Lang T, Ngundam F, Leed S

  5. Dermatophyte susceptibilities to antifungal azole agents tested in vitro by broth macro and microdilution methods Suscetibilidade in vitro de dermatófitos a azóis pelos métodos macro e microdiluição em caldo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Roberto Siqueira

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro susceptibility of dermatophytes to the azole antifungals itraconazole, fluconazole and ketoconazole was evaluated by broth macro and microdilution methods, according to recommendations of the CLSI, with some adaptations. Twenty nail and skin clinical isolates, four of Trichophyton mentagrophytes and 16 of T. rubrum were selected for the tests. Itraconazole minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC varied from Foi avaliada a suscetibilidade in vitro de dermatófitos aos antifúngicos itraconazol, fluconazol e cetoconazol, pelos métodos macro e microdiluição em caldo, de acordo com as recomendações do CLSI, com algumas modificações. Foram estudados 20 isolados clínicos de lesões de unha e pele, sendo quatro Trichophyton mentagrophytes e 16 T. rubrum. A concentração inibitória mínima (CIM para itraconazol variou de < 0,03 a 0,25 µg/mL pelo método da macrodiluição, e de < 0,03 a 0,5 µg/mL pela microdiluição em caldo; de 0,5 a 64 µg/mL e de 0,125 a 16 µg/mL para fluconazol, respectivamente, pela macro e microdiluição; e de < 0,03 a 0,5 µg/mL por ambos os métodos para cetoconazol. A concordância entre os dois métodos (considerando ± uma diluição foi de 70% para itraconazol, 45% para fluconazol e 85% para cetoconazol. Conclui-se que os isolados estudados foram inibidos por concentrações relativamente baixas dos antifúngicos testados, e os dois métodos apresentam boa concordância, especialmente para itraconazol e cetoconazol.

  6. Synthesis and oxidation of some azole-containing thioethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei S. Potapov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pyrazole and benzotriazole-containing thioethers, namely 1,5-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl-3-thiapentane, 1,8-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl-3,6-dithiaoctane and 1,3-bis(1,2,3-benzotriazol-1-yl-2-thiapropane were prepared and fully characterized. Oxidation of the pyrazole-containing thioether by hydrogen peroxide proceeds selectively to provide a sulfoxide or sulfone, depending on the amount of oxidant used. Oxidation of the benzotriazole derivative by hydrogen peroxide is not selective, and sulfoxide and sulfone form concurrently. Selenium dioxide-catalyzed oxidation of benzotriazole thioether by H2O2, however, proceeds selectively and yields sulfoxide only.

  7. Desulfurization performance of azole-based ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubei CHENG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the addition of functional groups in ionic liquid anion and cation to achieve better absorbing of SO2, the 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine triazole ( is synthesized using 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine and triazole as raw materials. The desulfurization performance of the synthesized is systematically studied. The desulfurization performance and desulfurization mechanism of the are discussed. The results show that the has good performance of desulfurization and regeneration. At the atmospheric pressure, 1 mol of the absorbs 2.964 mol of SO2 at 20 ℃. With the increase of temperature, the desulfurization capacity of the decreases gradually. The molar absorption ratio increases with the increase of SO2 partial pressure, and under the conditions of 130 ℃, the desorption rate of the ionic liquid after saturated adsorption reaches over 95%. The mechanism investigation results show that the interaction of SO2 and is the combination of chemical absorption and physical absorption. The results have a certain reference value to improve the efficiency of flue gas treatment.

  8. Emerging azole resistance among Candida albicans from clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candida albicans is one of the most frequently isolated yeasts in clinical laboratories and accounts for up to 80 % of the yeasts recovered from sites of infection. The study was set out to determine antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida albicans and to establish the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) to ...

  9. Azole Fungicides as Synergists in the Aquatic Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergager, Maj-Britt Andersen

    be a reasonableapproach for non-interacting contaminants, synergizing compounds, enhancing the toxicity of others, maycompromise the predictive ability of the models. Though only rarely occurring, the phenomenon ofsynergism is of great concern, making apparently low and non-toxic contaminant concentrations apotential...

  10. Aberrant lipogenesis is a metabolic marker for azole-resistant candida albicans (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanja, Caroline; Hong, Weili; Younis, Waleed; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Seleem, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    Candida is the single most important cause of fungal bloodstream infections worldwide causing significant mortality as high as 50%. This high mortality rate is, in part, due to the inability to rapidly diagnose and simultaneously initiate an effective antifungal therapy early in the disease process. Current culture-based diagnostics are often slow, requiring several days to complete, and are only 50% sensitive in diagnosing candidemia (Candida bloodstream infection). For every 12 hours of delay in starting correct antifungal therapy, the risk of death for a given patient with candidemia increases by 200%. To address this unmet need, we explored the potential of employing stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) imaging to diagnose candidemia and probe metabolic differences between resistant and susceptible strain at a single cell level. Metabolism is integral to pathogenicity; microorganism have very short life cycles, and therefore only a few hours are needed to observe a full metabolic cycle. SRS imaging at C-H vibration frequency at 2850 cm-1 revealed a substantial difference in lipogenesis between the susceptible and resistant C. albicans. Treating the C. albicans with fluconazole, an antimicrobial drug that targets ergosterol biosynthesis only affected the lipogenesis in the susceptible strain. Our results show that single-cell metabolic imaging under a SRS microscope can be used for diagnose candidemia and early detection of antimicrobial susceptibility.

  11. Some azine and azole derivatives as antioxidant additives for lithium lubricating grease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda M. Fikry

    2013-06-01

    The structure of these compounds has been confirmed using elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. On the other hand, lithium lubricating grease was prepared and evaluated according to the National Lubricating Grease Institute (NLGI and Egyptian Standard (ES. The antioxidant compounds were tested for the prepared grease with concentration 0.1 wt.%. The efficiency of these compounds has been determined using total acid number. It was found that the prepared lithium grease resists oxidation reaction in the presence of these compounds. A correlation between the chemical structure of these compounds and their efficiency as antioxidants additives was discussed. Data showed that the efficiency of these compounds as antioxidants decreases in the order: compound I > compound II > compound III.

  12. In vitro screening of azole fungicides for antiandrogenic effects – comparison with in vivo effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    testosterone and progesterone production. Epoxiconazole showed now effect. Furthermore tebuconazole increased the AGD in female pups and resulted in an increased number of nipples in male pups at PND 13, a tendency that was also seen for epoxiconazole, though it was not significant. In conclusion the results...... in H295R cells, a cell line, which produces a wide range of steroid hormones in measurable quantities, including testosterone, progesterone and estradiol, a property that makes it suitable as a screening assay to detect effects on steroidogenesis. In the in vitro tebuconazole and epoxiconazole showed...... antiandrogenic effects, and in the H295R cell assay, tebuconazole and epoxiconazole were like prochloraz able to inhibit testosterone and estradiol levels and increase progesterone levels. For the in vivo testing, a study was conducted testing the developmental effects on offspring after prenatal exposure...

  13. POSACONAZOLE — NEW AZOLE BROAD-SPECTRUM ANTIFUNGAL AGENT FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF INVASIVE MYCOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.N. Klimko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive mycoses are a common complication of various categories of immune depressed patients that are characterized with heavy clinical presentations and high lethal rate. Many causatives of invasive mycoses are resistant to currently applied antifungal medications, and some are polybresistant. Posaconazole (Noksafil is a new triazole antimycotic of second generation that is active both in vitro and in vivo against most causatives of invasive mycoses, including poly resistant microbmycets. Clinical study demonstrate high efficiency and safety of applying this medication. in russia posaconazole is allowed for prevention of invasive mycoses for hematological patients with longbrunning neutropenia resulting from chemical therapy, who are prescribed large doses of immune suppressors, recipients of transplants of hemapoietic stem cells, as well as for treatment of invasive candidoses, aspergillus, zigomicosys, criptococcosis, fuzariosis, chromomycosis and micetoma, as well as cocsidiodosis that are refractory towards other anti fungal medications, or in cases of intolerance.Key words: mycoses, posaconazole, treatment.

  14. Enhanced oxidative killing of azole-resistant Candida glabrata strains with ERG11 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, V L; Geber, A; Bennett, J E

    1996-01-01

    The susceptibility of genetically defined Candida glabrata strains to killing by H2O2 and neutrophils was assessed. Fluconazole-susceptible L5L and L5D strains demonstrated survival rates higher than those of two fluconazole-resistant strains lacking the ERG11 gene coding for 14 alpha-demethylase. Fluconazole resistance can occur by mechanisms which increase fungal susceptibility to oxidative killing by H2O2 and neutrophils. PMID:8807069

  15. Alternative developmental toxicity models for assessing the in vivo embryotoxicity of azoles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of regulations for protecting both humans and the environment from potential chemical health hazards, as well as the increase of global pressure for reducing, refining and replacing animal experiments promote the development and application of alternatives to in vivo

  16. Effect of azole antifungal therapy on vincristine toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schie, R.M. van; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Loo, D.M. te

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vincristine is one of the cornerstones of the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Constipation, and peripheral and central neurotoxicities are the most common side effects. A comparative study exploring vincristine toxicity in individual patients receiving

  17. Effects of lovastatin (mevinolin) on sterol levels and on activity of azoles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, R T; Parks, L W

    1990-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic drug lovastatin (mevinolin) was found to be very effective in lowering the sterol levels of the wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Lovastatin dramatically decreased the steryl ester content from 2.62 to 0.8 micrograms/mg (dry weight), whereas the free sterol content decreased only from 2.79 to 2.24 micrograms/mg (dry weight) when lovastatin was present in the medium at 10 micrograms/ml. At higher concentrations (100 micrograms/ml), lovastatin nearly abolished th...

  18. The calcineurin pathway inhibitor tacrolimus enhances the in vitro activity of azoles against Mucorales via apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, F; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2013-09-01

    The calcineurin pathway regulates antifungal drug resistance and the virulence of several major human-pathogenic fungi, including the recalcitrant Mucorales. We hypothesized that the fungistatic triazoles posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) become fungicidal in the setting of the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus (TCR) and that such an effect is mediated through apoptosis. Fungicidal activity and apoptosis were studied using standard microbiological techniques and hyphal metabolic and vital dye reduction assays at 37°C in RPMI 1640. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting intracellular Ca(2+), phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, DNA fragmentation, plasma membrane integrity, chromatin condensation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caspase-like activity, ATP, and cytochrome c release. MICs for PCZ and ICZ alone were significantly higher (8 to 128 μg/ml) than those of PCZ or ICZ plus TCR (0.25 to 4 μg/ml) for Rhizopus oryzae, Cunninghamella bertholletiae, and Mucor circinelloides. Both PCZ and ICZ in combination with TCR became fungicidal, and their activity was mediated through increased apoptotic cell death of R. oryzae (10 to 50%), C. bertholletiae (5 to 50%), and M. circinelloides (5 to 55%) germlings, with morphological apoptotic changes characterized by externalization of PS, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation. Moreover, activation of the caspase-like activity was correlated with cell death induced by TCR plus PCZ or ICZ. These changes correlated with elevated intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels and disturbance of mitochondrial potential. We found that PCZ or ICZ in combination with TCR renders Mucorales sensitive to triazoles via apoptotic death. These observations could serve as a new paradigm for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  19. The Synthesis and Study of Azole Carboxamide Nucleosides as Agents Active Against RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-15

    44.89 4.80 28.56 Found: 45.01 4.96 28.45 6-Methylthio-9-0--D-ribofuranosylpurine (49). A solution of 9-1-D-ribo- furanosyl-6- mercaptopurine (0.33 g) in...97 reflections. There was no systematic change in these data indicating crystal and electronic stability . The data were merged to 2491 independent

  20. The origin, versatility and distribution of azole fungicide resistance in the banana black Sigatoka pathogen Pseudocercospora fijiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chong Aguirre, Pablo A.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudocercospora fijiensis causes black Sigatoka disease of banana. It is one of the most damaging threats of the crop requiring excessive fungicide applications for disease control as the major export “Cavendish” clones are highly susceptible. The consequence of this practice is the

  1. Ligand-Controlled Synthesis of Azoles via Ir-Catalyzed Reactions of Sulfoxonium Ylides with 2-Amino Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Alicia M; Chan, Vincent S; Napolitano, José G; Krabbe, Scott W; Schomaker, Jennifer M; Shekhar, Shashank

    2016-05-20

    An iridium-catalyzed method was developed for the synthesis of imidazo-fused pyrrolopyrazines. The presence or absence of a nitrogenated ligand controlled the outcome of the reaction, leading to simple β-keto amine products in the absence of added ligand and the cyclized 7- and 8-substituted-imidazo[1,2-a]pyrrolo[2,3-e]pyrazine products in the presence of ligand. This catalyst control was conserved across a variety of ylide and amine coupling partners. The substrate was shown to act as a ligand for the iridium catalyst in the absence of other ligands via NMR spectroscopy. Kinetic studies indicated that formation of the Ir-carbene was reversible and the slow step of the reaction. These mechanistic investigations suggest that the β-keto amine products form via an intramolecular carbene N-H insertion, and the imidazopyrrolopyrazines form via an intermolecular carbene N-H insertion.

  2. Use of cell surface protein typing for genotyping of azole-resistant and -susceptible Aspergillus fumigatus isolates in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falahatinejad, M.; Vaezi, A.; Fakhim, H.; Abastabar, M.; Shokohi, T.; Zahedi, N.; Ansari, S.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Badali, H.

    2018-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the leading cause of mortality in severely immunocompromised individuals. Understanding pathogen dispersion and relatedness is essential for determining the epidemiology of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the diversity and putative

  3. The Synthesis and Study of New Ribavirin Derivatives and Related Nucleoside Azole Carboxamides as Agents Active against RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    of the nitrate salt or degradation of the starting heterocycle. An alternate procedure for obtaining aromatic nitro compounds is the oxidation of the...SAcO OAc AcO OAc RO OR S102 99103, R-Ac 1--04, RC H -OH N HcO 0 cOY RO ᝹ HO O Ac RO OR 102 0_6 103, R - Ac 108, R = H 6- mercaptopurine riboside...occurring C-nucleoside antibiotic and unlike N-nucleosides, formycin B will not suffer enzymatic cleavage * 29 and degradation by phosphorolysis

  4. Photodegradation of the azole fungicide climbazole by ultraviolet irradiation under different conditions: Kinetics, mechanism and toxicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wang-Rong; Ying, Guang-Guo, E-mail: guang-guo.ying@gig.ac.cn; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, You-Sheng; Hu, Li-Xin; Yao, Li; Liang, Yan-Qiu; Tian, Fei

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Climbazole (CZ) could be effectively degraded under UV-254 irradiation. • CZ underwent direct and self-sensitized photolysis involving ROS. • The main photodegradation by-products of CZ were identified and semi-quantitated. • Pathway includes hydroxylative dechlorination, dechlorination, and de-pinacolone. • The toxicity of the photodegradation system reduced after UV-254 irradiation. - Abstract: Climbazole (CZ) has been known to persist in various environmental media, and may cause potential risks to aquatic organisms. This study investigated the photodegradation of CZ by ultraviolet (UV, 254 nm) under different conditions. The results revealed that CZ could be effectively degraded in aqueous solutions under UV-254 irradiation with a half-life of 9.78 min (pH = 7.5), and the photodegradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. pH had almost no effect on its rate constants and quantum yields; but the water quality of natural waters could affect the photolysis of CZ, and the coexisting constituents such as Fe{sup 3+}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, and HA obviously inhibited its photolysis. The addition of different radical scavengers also inhibited the photodegradation of CZ due to the reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). CZ underwent direct and self-sensitized photolysis involving ROS. Based on the identified photodegradation by-products, the proposed pathways included hydroxylative dechlorination, dechlorination and de-pinacolone. Moreover, toxicity evaluation using duckweed found significant toxicity reduction in the photodegradation system of CZ after the irradiation of UV-254, and the remaining by-products did not pose extra toxicity compared with CZ itself. These findings from present study suggest that CZ in effluent could be further reduced by applying UV photolysis treatment.

  5. Seminational surveillance of fungemia in Denmark: Notably high rates of fungemia and numbers of isolates with reduced azole susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M.C.; Fuursted, K.; Gahrn-Hansen, B.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the first set of comprehensive data on fungemia in Denmark including the distribution of species and range of susceptibility to major antifungal compounds based on a seminational surveillance study initiated in 2003. The catchment area of the participating hos...

  6. In Vitro Activities of Amphotericin B, Terbinafine, and Azole Drugs against Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Aspergillus terreus Sensu Stricto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Mariana S.; Rojas, Florencia D.; Cattana, María E.; Sosa, María de los Ángeles; Iovannitti, Cristina A.; Giusiano, Gustavo E.

    2015-01-01

    The antifungal susceptibilities of 40 clinical and environmental isolates of A. terreus sensu stricto to amphotericin B, terbinafine, itraconazole, and voriconazole were determined in accordance with CLSI document M38-A2. All isolates had itraconazole and voriconazole MICs lower than epidemiologic cutoff values, and 5% of the isolates had amphotericin B MICs higher than epidemiologic cutoff values. Terbinafine showed the lowest MICs. No significant differences were found when MICs of clinical and environmental isolates were compared. PMID:25824228

  7. In vitro activity of azole derivatives and griseofulvin against planktonic and biofilm growth of clinical isolates of dermatophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Correia, Edmilson Emanuel Monteiro; Guedes, Glaucia Morgana de Melo; de Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Pinheiro, Adriana de Queiroz; Chaves, Lúcio Jackson Queiroz; Pereira Neto, Waldemiro de Aquino; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2018-03-08

    As shown by recent research, most of the clinically relevant fungi, including dermatophytes, form biofilms in vitro and in vivo, which may exhibit antimicrobial tolerance that favour recurrent infections. The aim of this study was to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VCZ) and griseofulvin (GRI) against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum canis and Microsporum gypseum in planktonic and biofilm growth. For the planktonic form, susceptibility testing was performed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), document M38-A2, while biofilm susceptibility was evaluated using the XTT colorimetric essay. The planktonic growth of all strains was inhibited, with MIC values ranging from 0.00195 to 0.1225 μg/mL for VRC, 0.00195 to 0.25 μg/mL for ITC and GRI, while a 50-fold increase in the MIC was required to significantly reduce the metabolic activity (P < .05) of dermatophyte biofilms. In brief, the ability of dermatophytes to form biofilms may be a contributing factor for the recalcitrance of dermatophytoses or the dissemination of the disease. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Multimedia fate modeling and risk assessment of a commonly used azole fungicide climbazole at the river basin scale in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ying, Guang-Guo; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Liu, You-Sheng; Liu, Wang-Rong; Zhao, Jian-Liang

    2015-07-01

    Climbazole is an antidandruff active ingredient commonly used in personal care products, but little is known about its environmental fate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fate of climbazole in water, sediment, soil and air compartments of the whole China by using a level III multimedia fugacity model. The usage of climbazole was calculated to be 345 t in the whole China according to the market research data, and after wastewater treatment a total emission of 245 t was discharged into the receiving environment with approximately 93% into the water compartment and 7% into the soil compartment. The developed fugacity model was successfully applied to estimate the contamination levels and mass inventories of climbazole in various environmental compartments of the river basins in China. The predicted environmental concentration ranges of climbazole were: 0.20-367 ng/L in water, and 0.009-25.2 ng/g dry weight in sediment. The highest concentration was mainly found in Haihe River basin and the lowest was in basins of Tibet and Xinjiang regions. The mass inventory of climbazole in the whole China was estimated to be 294 t, with 6.79% in water, 83.7% in sediment, 9.49% in soil, and 0.002% in air. Preliminary risk assessment showed high risks in sediment posed by climbazole in 2 out of 58 basins in China. The medium risks in water and sediment were mostly concentrated in north China. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report on the emissions and multimedia fate of climbazole in the river basins of the whole China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Weight loss studies of fastener materials corrosion in contact with timbers treated with copper azole and alkaline copper quaternary compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kear, Gareth [Building Research Association of New Zealand (BRANZ) Ltd., Science and Engineering Services, Private Bag 50 908, Porirua City 5240 (New Zealand)], E-mail: G.Kear@soton.ac.uk; Wu Haizhen; Jones, Mark S. [Building Research Association of New Zealand (BRANZ) Ltd., Science and Engineering Services, Private Bag 50 908, Porirua City 5240 (New Zealand)

    2009-02-15

    Corrosion rates of mild steel, AISI 316 stainless steel and hot-dipped galvanised steel in contact with preservative-treated Pinus radiata have been determined using four distinct accelerated (49 {+-} 1 deg. C) and non-accelerated (21 {+-} 2 deg. C) weight loss methodologies. The data were measured as a function of timber moisture content and copper concentration over periods of exposure ranging from 2 weeks to 14 months. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel was not influenced by classification or magnitude of preservative loading. Corrosion rates of this material were multiple orders of magnitude lower than those of the mild and galvanised steels. In most instances, corrosion rates of hot-dipped galvanised layers in contact with alkaline copper quaternary-treated timbers were up to a factor of 10 times, or greater, than those measured for copper-chrome-arsenate treatments. A direct negative influence of copper ion concentration on the corrosion resistance of mild steel was also observed for each preservative type.

  10. N-(4-Bromobenzyl-2-(5,6-dimethyl-1H-benzo[d]imid-azol-2-ylbenzeneamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Dziełak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available N-(4-Bromobenzyl-2-(5,6-dimethyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-ylbenzeneamine was obtained by condensation of N-(4-bromobenzyl-3,1-benzoxazine-2,4-dione (N-(4-bromobenzylisatoic anhydride with 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylenediamine in refluxing acetic acid. This is a rare example of condensation of N-substituted 3,1-benzoxazine-2,4-dione with 1,2-phenylenediamine, which resulted in the formation of a benzimidazole derivative with a moderate yield. Crystallographic studies and initial biological screening were performed for the obtained product.

  11. <研究論文>置換基導入がアゾール型イオン液体の粘度に及ぼす影響

    OpenAIRE

    北岡, 賢; 藤本, 泰徳; 西中, 信之祐

    2014-01-01

    [Abstract] We investigated the substituent effects on the viscosity of azole based ionic liquids. Introducing some electro withdrawing groups to the azole anion and some electron donating groups to the azole cation decreased the viscosity of ionic liquids. In these substituent effects to azole anion and azole cation, the anion and cation charge are delocalized over substituent groups. The decrease in the anion and cation charge density weakens the cation-anion interaction of ionic liquids. As...

  12. Economic Evaluation of Posaconazole Versus Standard Azole Therapy as Prophylaxis against Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients with Prolonged Neutropenia in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir A Tahami Monfared

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Posaconazole prophylaxis in high-risk neutropenic patients prevents invasive fungal infection (IFI. An economic model was used to assess the cost effectiveness of posaconazole from a Canadian health care system perspective.

  13. Mechanistic Approach to Understanding the Toxicity of the Azole Fungicide Triadimefon to a Nontarget Aquatic Insect and Implications for Exposure Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    We utilized mechanistic and stereoselective based in vitro metabolism assays and sublethal exposures of triadimefon to gain insight into the extent of carbonyl reduction and the toxic mode of action of triadimefon with black fly (Diptera: Simuliidae) larvae.

  14. [Susceptibility to azoles and amphotericin B of isolates of Candida spp. Experience of a university health network, between 2004 and 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porte, Lorena; León, Pilar; Gárate, Cynthia; Guzmán, Ana María; Labarca, Jaime; García, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    To describe antifungal susceptibility testing surveillance (December 2004-September 2010) in Candida spp., for amphotericin B, fluconazole and voriconazole, at the Laboratorio de Microbiología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. The study was performed utilizing E test and included yeasts from invasive origin and isolates in which antifungal susceptibility testing was asked for by the patient's physician. The yeasts were mainly recovered from urine samples (n: 64), blood cultures (n: 51) and secretions (n: 24). Two hundred ninety three isolates were studied: C. albicans (38%), C. glabrata (30%), C. tropicalis (11%), C. parapsilosis (10%), C. krusei (4%) and others (7%). All Candida species were 100% susceptible to amphotericin B, except C. krusei (1/12). Fluconazole's global susceptibility in C. albicans was 91.8%, but 100% in isolates from blood cultures versus 76% in isolates from urine. C. tropicalis was 93.9% susceptible to fluconazole, C. parapsilosis, 90% and C. glabrata 30.3%. C. krusei had no susceptible isolates to fluconazole. Voriconazole resistance was mainly present in C. glabrata (11.5%). We recommend the study of antifungal susceptibility in isolates from invasive origin, selected urine strains and C. glabrata. Fluconazole remains effective in C. albicans from blood.

  15. Potent Antifungal Activity of Pure Compounds from Traditional Chinese Medicine Extracts against Six Oral Candida Species and the Synergy with Fluconazole against Azole-Resistant Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Yan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antifungal activities of four traditional Chinese medicine (TCM extracts. The inhibitory effects of pseudolaric acid B, gentiopicrin, rhein, and alion were assessed using standard disk diffusion and broth microdilution assays. They were tested against six oral Candida species, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida dubliniensis, and Candida guilliermondii, including clinical isolates from HIV-negative, HIV-positive, and Sjögren's syndrome patients. It was found that pseudolaric acid B had the most potent antifungal effect and showed similar antifungal activity to all six Candida spp, and to isolates from HIV-negative, HIV-positive, and Sjögren's syndrome patients. The MIC values ranged from 16 to 128 μg/mL. More interestingly, a synergistic effect of pseudolaric acid B in combination with fluconazole was observed. We suggest that pseudolaric acid B might be a potential therapeutic fungicidal agent in treating oral candidiasis.

  16. Modelling inorganic and organic biocide leaching from CBA-amine (Copper–Boron–Azole) treated wood based on characterisation leaching tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupsea, Maria [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F–31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, DEE/Environment and Life Cycle Engineering Team, 24 Rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Tiruta-Barna, Ligia, E-mail: ligia.barna@insa-toulouse.fr [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F–31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Schiopu, Nicoleta [Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, DEE/Environment and Life Cycle Engineering Team, 24 Rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Schoknecht, Ute [BAM — Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 4.1, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    Numerical simulation of the leaching behaviour of treated wood is the most pertinent and less expensive method for the prediction of biocides' release in water. Few studies based on mechanistic leaching models have been carried out so far. In this work, a coupled chemistry-mass transport model is developed for simulating the leaching behaviour of inorganic (Cu, B) and organic (Tebuconazole) biocides from CBA-amine treated wood. The model is based on experimental investigations (lab-scale leaching tests coupled with chemical and structural analysis). It considers biocides' interactions with wood solid components and with extractives (literature confirmed reactions), as well as transport mechanisms (diffusion, convection) in different compartments. Simulation results helped at identifying the main fixation mechanisms, like (i) direct complexation of Cu by wood-phenolic and -carboxylic sites (and not via monoethanolamine; complex) on lignin and hemicellulose and strong dependence on extractives' nature, (ii) pH dependent binding of tebuconazole on polarized -OH moieties on wood. The role of monoethanolamine is to provide a pore-solution pH of about 7.5, when copper solubility is found to be weakest. The capability of the developed model to simulate the chemical and transport behaviour is the main result of this study. Moreover, it proved that characterization leaching tests (pH dependency and dynamic tests), combined with appropriate analytical methods are useful experimental tools. Due to its flexibility for representing and simulating various leaching conditions, chemical-transport model developed could be used to further simulate the leaching behaviour of CBA treated wood at larger scales. - Highlights: • Biocide and extractives leaching from ammonia-CBA treated wood were modelled. • The chemical-transport model identifies the main fixation/solubilisation mechanisms. • The model describes well the results of equilibrium and dynamic leaching tests. • Cu is complexed direct by phenolic and carboxylic sites on wood. • Tebuconazole is bound on polarized -OH moieties on wood (pH dependent leaching)

  17. Pharmacodynamics of isavuconazole in an Aspergillus fumigatus mouse infection model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyedmousavi, S.; Bruggemann, R.J.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Mouton, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Azole resistance is an emerging problem in Aspergillus fumigatus which translates into treatment failure. Alternative treatments with new azoles may improve therapeutic outcome in invasive aspergillosis (IA) even for strains with decreased susceptibility to current azoles. The in vivo efficacy of

  18. Posaconazole (Noxafil, SCH 56592), a new azole antifungal drug, was a discovery based on the isolation and mass spectral characterization of a circulating metabolite of an earlier lead (SCH 51048).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomeir, Amin A; Pramanik, Birendra N; Heimark, Larry; Bennett, Frank; Veals, John; Bartner, Peter; Hilbert, Maryjane; Saksena, Anil; McNamara, Paul; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor; Ganguly, Ashit K; Lovey, Raymond; Pike, Russell; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Yi-Tsung; Kumari, Pramila; Korfmacher, Walter; Lin, Chin-Chung; Cacciapuoti, Anthony; Loebenberg, David; Hare, Roberta; Miller, George; Pickett, Cecil

    2008-04-01

    Posaconazole (SCH 56592) is a novel triazole antifungal drug that is marketed in Europe and the United States under the trade name 'Noxafil' for prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections. SCH 56592 was discovered as a possible active metabolite of SCH 51048, an earlier lead. Initial studies have shown that serum concentrations determined by a microbiological assay were higher than those determined by HPLC from animals dosed with SCH 51048. Subsequently, several animals species were dosed with (3)H-SCH 51048 and the serum was analyzed for total radioactivity, SCH 51048 concentration and antifungal activity. The antifungal activity was higher than that expected based on SCH 51048 serum concentrations, confirming the presence of active metabolite(s). Metabolite profiling of serum samples at selected time intervals pinpointed the peak that was suspected to be the active metabolite. Consequently, (3)H-SCH 51048 was administered to a large group of mice, the serum was harvested and the metabolite was isolated by extraction and semipreparative HPLC. LC-MS/MS analysis suggested that the active metabolite is a secondary alcohol with the hydroxyl group in the aliphatic side chain of SCH 51048. All corresponding monohydroxylated diastereomeric mixtures were synthesized and characterized. The HPLC retention time and LC-MS/MS spectra of the diastereomeric secondary alcohols of SCH 51048 were similar to those of the isolated active metabolite. Finally, all corresponding individual monohydroxylated diasteriomers were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro and in vivo antifungal potencies, as well as pharmacokinetics. SCH 56592 emerged as the candidate with the best overall profile.

  19. Facultative Sterol Uptake in an Ergosterol-Deficient Clinical Isolate of Candida glabrata Harboring a Missense Mutation in ERG11 and Exhibiting Cross-Resistance to Azoles and Amphotericin B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hull, Claire M.; Parker, Josie E.; Bader, Oliver; Weig, Michael; Gross, Uwe; Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Kelly, Diane E.; Kelly, Steven L.

    We identified a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata (CG156) exhibiting flocculent growth and cross-resistance to fluconazole (FLC), voriconazole (VRC), and amphotericin B (AMB), with MICs of >256, >256, and 32 mu g ml(-1), respectively. Sterol analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

  20. Analysis of electrochemical noise (ECN) data in time and frequency domain for comparison corrosion inhibition of some azole compounds on Cu in 1.0 M H2SO4 solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezanzadeh, B.; Arman, S. Y.; Mehdipour, M.; Markhali, B. P.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the corrosion inhibition properties of two similar heterocyclic compounds namely benzotriazole (BTA) and benzothiazole (BNS) inhibitors on copper in 1.0 M H2SO4 solution were studied by electrochemical techniques as well as surface analysis. The results showed that corrosion inhibition of copper largely depends on the molecular structure and concentration of the inhibitors. The effect of DC trend on the interpretation of electrochemical noise (ECN) results in time domain was evaluated by moving average removal (MAR) method. Accordingly, the impact of square and Hanning window functions as drift removal methods in frequency domain was studied. After DC trend removal, a good trend was observed between electrochemical noise (ECN) data and the results obtained from EIS and potentiodynamic polarization. Furthermore, the shot noise theory in frequency domain was applied to approach the charge of each electrochemical event (q) from the potential and current noise signals.

  1. (2RS)-2-(2,4-Difluoro-phen-yl)-1-[(4-iodo-benz-yl)(meth-yl)amino]-3-(1H-1,2,4-tri-azol-1-yl)propan-2-ol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hui-Ping; Gao, Shou-Hong; Li, Chun-Tong; Wu, Zhi-Jun

    2012-08-01

    IN THE TITLE COMPOUND (COMMON NAME: iodiconazole), C(19)H(19)F(2)IN(4)O, there is an intra-molecular O-H⋯N hydrogen bond and mol-ecules are linked by weak inter-actions only, namely C-H⋯N, C-H⋯O and C-H⋯F hydrogen bonds, and π-electron ring-π-electron ring inter-actions between the triazole rings with centroid-centroid distances of 3.725 (3) Å.

  2. Asexual sporulation facilitates adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Debets, A.J.M.; Verweij, P.E.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Zwaan, B.J.; Schoustra, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the occurrence and spread of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus is crucial for public health. It has been hypothesized that asexual sporulation, which is abundant in nature, is essential for phenotypic expression of azole resistance mutations in A. fumigatus facilitating

  3. Triazole Resistance in Aspergillus spp.: A Worldwide Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Menendez, Olga; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Mellado, Emilia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Since the first description of an azole-resistant A. fumigatus strain in 1997, there has been an increasing number of papers describing the emergence of azole resistance. Firstly reported in the USA and soon after in Europe, it has now been described worldwide, challenging the management of human aspergillosis. The main mechanism of resistance is the modification of the azole target enzyme: 14-α sterol demethylase, encoded by the cyp51A gene; although recently, other resistance mechanisms have also been implicated. In addition, a shift in the epidemiology has been noted with other Aspergillus species (mostly azole resistant) increasingly being reported as causative agents of human disease. This paper reviews the current situation of Aspergillus azole resistance and its implications in the clinical setting. PMID:29376938

  4. Expression of the CDR1 efflux pump in clinical Candida albicans isolates is controlled by a negative regulatory element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Naseem Akhtar; Manoharlal, Raman; Saini, Preeti; Prasad, Tulika; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Hoefer, Milan; Morschhaeuser, Joachim; Prasad, Rajendra

    2005-01-01

    Resistance to azole antifungal drugs in clinical isolates of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is often caused by constitutive overexpression of the CDR1 gene, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump of the ABC transporter superfamily. To understand the relevance of a recently identified negative regulatory element (NRE) in the CDR1 promoter for the control of CDR1 expression in the clinical scenario, we investigated the effect of mutation or deletion of the NRE on CDR1 expression in two matched pairs of azole-sensitive and resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Expression of GFP or lacZ reporter genes from the wild type CDR1 promoter was much higher in the azole-resistant C. albicans isolates than in the azole-susceptible isolates, reflecting the known differences in CDR1 expression in these strains. Deletion or mutation of the NRE resulted in enhanced reporter gene expression in azole-sensitive strains, but did not further increase the already high CDR1 promoter activity in the azole-resistant strains. In agreement with these findings, electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed a reduced binding to the NRE of nuclear extracts from the resistant C. albicans isolates as compared with extracts from the sensitive isolates. These results demonstrate that the NRE is involved in maintaining CDR1 expression at basal levels and that this repression is overcome in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates, resulting in constitutive CDR1 overexpression and concomitant drug resistance

  5. Effects of Artea, a systemic fungicide, on the antioxidant system and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... proportionally and were more meaningful at high concentrations (75 and ... Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in both ... They may induce a decrease in growth ... gical effects of azoles molecules on plants include.

  6. Mixed Valence Aspects of Diruthenium Complexes [{(L)ClRu}2(.mu.-tppz)]n+ Incorporating 2-(2-Pyridyl)azoles (L) as Ancillary Functions and 2,3,5,6-Tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (Tppz) as Bis-Tridentate Bridging Ligand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chanda, N.; Sarkar, B.; Kar, S.; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, W.; Lahiri, G. K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 16 (2004), s. 5128-5133 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D15.10; GA MŠk OC D14.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : electron-transfer * ruthenium complexes * spectroelectrochemical properties Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.454, year: 2004

  7. Study using {sup 1} H and {sup 13} V NMR of 3-aryl-s-triazole benzoate azole type compounds and intermediaries; Estudo por ressonancia magnetica nuclear de {sup 1} H e {sup 13} C compostos do tipo 3-aril-s-triazolo benzotiazol e seus intermediarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garske, Jose Emilio L; Bacha, Catarina T.M.; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia

    1992-12-31

    Approximately 62% of the compounds used for medical purposes are heterocyclic, and are distributed as follows: 95% containing hydrogen, 28% containing sulfur and 18% containing oxygen in the structural composition. Some triazole-s-triazole type hetero aromatic systems and intermediaries, such as 1-aryl hydrazides exhibited bactericide, anti inflammatory and fungi stat activities. All the triazoles are are obtained synthetically, and are not found in the Nature. The proton and carbon-13 spectra of the non usual I, II and III compounds that we obtained are discussed in this work 8 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Optically active antifungal azoles. XII. Synthesis and antifungal activity of the water-soluble prodrugs of 1-[(1R,2R)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-1-methyl-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl]-3-[4-(1H-1-tetrazolyl)phenyl]-2-imidazolidinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, T; Kitazaki, T; Matsushita, Y; Yamada, M; Hayashi, R; Yamaguchi, M; Kiyota, Y; Okonogi, K; Itoh, K

    2001-09-01

    1-[(1R,2R)-2-(2,4-Difluorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-1-methyl-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl]-3-[4-(1H-1-tetrazolyl)phenyl]-2-imidazolidinone (1: TAK-456) was selected as a candidate for clinical trials, but since its water-solubility was insufficient for an injectable formulation, the quaternary triazolium salts 2 were designed as water-soluble prodrugs. Among the prodrugs prepared, 4-acetoxymethyl-1-[(2R,3R)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-[2-oxo-3-[4-(1H-1-terazolyl)phenyl]-1-imidazolidinyl]butyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazolium chloride (2a: TAK-457) was selected as an injectable candidate for clinical trials based on the results of evaluations on solubility, stability, hemolytic effect and in vivo antifungal activities.

  9. Rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations in clinical Candida albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole by rolling circle amplification and DNA sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huiping; Kong, Fanrong; Sorrell, Tania C; Wang, Bin; McNicholas, Paul; Pantarat, Namfon; Ellis, David; Xiao, Meng; Widmer, Fred; Chen, Sharon CA

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Amino acid substitutions in the target enzyme Erg11p of azole antifungals contribute to clinically-relevant azole resistance in Candida albicans. A simple molecular method for rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations would be an advantage as a screening tool to identify potentially-resistant strains and to track their movement. To complement DNA sequencing, we developed a padlock probe and rolling circle amplification (RCA)-based method to detect a series of mutations in th...

  10. Investigation of the structure and properties of heterocyclic compounds and their complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shejnker, V.N.; Troilina, V.S.; Merinova, E.G.; Garnovskij, A.D.; Osipov, O.A.

    1988-01-01

    Complexing of acetyl derivatives of azoles with iodine and bromine iodide is investigated using UV-spectroscopy and dipole moment methods. In bimolecular complexes σ-acceptor coordination occurs by heterocycle pyridine type nitrogen atom and is not accompanied by the ligand conformation change. The complex stability increases in agreement with azole basicity. For N-acetyltriazole ligand, conformation reversal occurs in its trimolecular complex with IBr

  11. Imidazole and Triazole Coordination Chemistry for Antifouling Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Andersson Trojer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fouling of marine organisms on the hulls of ships is a severe problem for the shipping industry. Many antifouling agents are based on five-membered nitrogen heterocyclic compounds, in particular imidazoles and triazoles. Moreover, imidazole and triazoles are strong ligands for Cu2+ and Cu+, which are both potent antifouling agents. In this review, we summarize a decade of work within our groups concerning imidazole and triazole coordination chemistry for antifouling applications with a particular focus on the very potent antifouling agent medetomidine. The entry starts by providing a detailed theoretical description of the azole-metal coordination chemistry. Some attention will be given to ways to functionalize polymers with azole ligands. Then, the effect of metal coordination in azole-containing polymers with respect to material properties will be discussed. Our work concerning the controlled release of antifouling agents, in particular medetomidine, using azole coordination chemistry will be reviewed. Finally, an outlook will be given describing the potential for tailoring the azole ligand chemistry in polymers with respect to Cu2+ adsorption and Cu2+→Cu+ reduction for antifouling coatings without added biocides.

  12. Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Luminescent Property of A Novel Cd(II) Coordination Polymer with Bis-imidazole Ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yong Hong

    2013-01-01

    The key to the successful design of metal-organic coordination polymers is the judicious selection of organic ligand. Recently, polydentate aromatic nitrogen heterocyclic ligands with five-membered rings have been well-studied in the construction of supramolecular structure for their N-coordinated sites apt to coordinating to transition metals. Similar to six-membered N-heterocyclic ligands, the azole-based five-membered N-heterocyclic ligands, such as imidazoles, triazoles and tetrazoles have been extensively employed in the construction of various coordination polymers with diverse topologies and interesting properties. The bis(azole) ligands in which N-donor azole rings (imidazole, triazole, or tetrazole) are separated by alkyl, (CH 2 ) n , spacers are good choices for flexible bridging ligands. The conformational flexibility of the spacers makes the ligands adaptable to various coordination networks with one-, two-, and three dimensional structures

  13. Aspergillus prevalence in air conditioning filters from vehicles: taxis for patient transportation, forklifts, and personal vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Carla; Moreira, Ricardo; Faria, Tiago; Caetano, Liliana Aranha; Carolino, Elisabete; Gomes, Anita Quintal; Viegas, Susana

    2018-05-04

    The frequency and importance of Aspergillus infections is increasing worldwide. This study aimed to assess the occupational exposure of forklifts and taxi drivers to Aspergillus spp. Nineteen filters from air conditioning system of taxis, 17 from forklifts and 37 from personal vehicles were assessed. Filters extract were streaked onto MEA, DG18 and in azole-supplemented media. Real-time quantitative PCR amplification of selected Aspergillus species-complex was also performed. Forklifts filter samples presented higher median values. Aspergillus section Nigri was the most observed in forklifts filters in MEA (28.2%) and in azole-supplemented media. DNA from Aspergillus sections Fumigati and Versicolores was successfully amplified by qPCR. This study enlightens the added value of using filters from the air conditioning system to assess Aspergillus spp. occupational exposure. Aspergillus azole resistance screening should be included in future occupational exposure assessments.

  14. Determining lower threshold concentrations for synergistic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergager, Maj-Britt Andersen; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Kretschmann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    which proven synergists cease to act as synergists towards the aquatic crustacean Daphnia magna. To do this, we compared several approaches and test-setups to evaluate which approach gives the most conservative estimate for the lower threshold for synergy for three known azole synergists. We focus...... on synergistic interactions between the pyrethroid insecticide, alpha-cypermethrin, and one of the three azole fungicides prochloraz, propiconazole or epoxiconazole measured on Daphnia magna immobilization. Three different experimental setups were applied: A standard 48h acute toxicity test, an adapted 48h test...... of immobile organisms increased more than two-fold above what was predicted by independent action (vertical assessment). All three tests confirmed the hypothesis of the existence of a lower azole threshold concentration below which no synergistic interaction was observed. The lower threshold concentration...

  15. High prevalence of clinical and environmental triazole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus in Iran: is it a challenging issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabili, Mojtaba; Shokohi, Tahereh; Moazeni, Maryam; Khodavaisy, Sadegh; Aliyali, Masoud; Badiee, Parisa; Zarrinfar, Hossein; Hagen, Ferry; Badali, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Triazole antifungal agents are the mainstay of aspergillosis treatment. As highlighted in numerous studies, the global increase in the prevalence of triazole resistance could hamper the management of aspergillosis. In the present three-year study, 513 samples (213 clinical and 300 environmental samples) from 10 provinces of Iran were processed and screened in terms of azole resistance (4 and 1 mg l-1 of itraconazole and voriconazole, respectively), using selective plates. Overall, 150 A. fumigatus isolates (71 clinical and 79 environmental isolates) were detected. The isolates were confirmed by partial sequencing of the β-tubulin gene. Afterwards, in vitro antifungal susceptibility tests against triazole agents were performed, based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M38-A2 document. The CYP51A gene was sequenced in order to detect mutations. The MIC of itraconazole against 10 (6.6 %) strains, including clinical (n=3, 4.2 %) and environmental (n=7, 8.8 %) strains, was higher than the breakpoint and epidemiological cut-off value. Based on the findings, the prevalence of azole-resistant A. fumigatus in Iran has increased remarkablyfrom 3.3 % to 6.6 % in comparison with earlier epidemiological research. Among resistant isolates, TR34/L98H mutations in the CYP51A gene were the most prevalent (n=8, 80 %), whereas other point mutations (F46Y, G54W, Y121F, G138C, M172V, F219C, M220I, D255E, T289F, G432C and G448S mutations) were not detected. Although the number of patients affected by azole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates was limited, strict supervision of clinical azole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates and persistent environmental screening of azole resistance are vital to the development of approaches for the management of azole resistance in human pathogenic fungi.

  16. Comparison of Two Molecular Assays for Detection and Characterization of Aspergillus fumigatus Triazole Resistance and Cyp51A Mutations in Clinical Isolates and Primary Clinical Samples of Immunocompromised Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Postina; Julian Skladny; Tobias Boch; Oliver A. Cornely; Oliver A. Cornely; Axel Hamprecht; Peter-Michael Rath; Jörg Steinmann; Oliver Bader; Thomas Miethke; Anne Dietz; Natalia Merker; Wolf-Karsten Hofmann; Dieter Buchheidt; Birgit Spiess

    2018-01-01

    In hematological patients, the incidence of invasive aspergillosis (IA) caused by azole resistant Aspergillus fumigatus (ARAf) is rising. As the diagnosis of IA is rarely based on positive culture in this group of patients, molecular detection of resistance mutations directly from clinical samples is crucial. In addition to the in-house azole resistance ARAf polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays detecting the frequent mutation combinations TR34/L98H, TR46/Y121F/T289A, and M220 in the Aspergi...

  17. Can toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic modeling be used to understand and predict synergistic interactions between chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedergreen, Nina; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Li, Dan

    2017-01-01

    including synergists. The aim of the present study is to develop a mechanistic toxicokinetic (TK) and toxicodynamic (TD) model for the synergistic mixture of the azole fungicide, propiconazole (the synergist), and the insecticide, α-cypermethrin, on the mortality of the crustacean Daphnia magna. The study...... by their effect on the biotransformation rate but that this effect could only partly be explained by the effect of the two azoles on cytochrome P450 activity, measured on D. magna in vivo. TKTD models of interacting mixtures seem to be a promising tool to test mechanisms of interactions between chemicals...

  18. Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Heteroatom Bonds Formation and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    NH2. Page 3. 3. Cross-Dehydrogenative Coupling. Directed C-H Activation. Page 4. N. N. Me. N. N. Me. OH. O. Telmisartan. Treatment of high blood pressure. Examples of Biologically Important Benzofuzed Azoles. 4. Page 5. Advantages. • Wide Substrate Scope. • Mild Reaction Conditions. • Atom Economical. Drawbacks.

  19. Mixture effects of endocrine disrupting compounds in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Taxvig, Camilla; Andersen, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis and in the steroid synthesis assay using H295R cells, the inhibition of testosterone production was close to additive, whereas the inhibition of oestradiol production was over-estimated for the mixture of azole fungicides, when compared with the effect predicted when...

  20. Aspergillus species and other molds in respiratory samples from patients with cystic fibrosis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Klaus Leth; Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2011-01-01

    ,336 respiratory samples from 287 CF patients were collected during two 6-month periods in 2007 and 2009. Azole resistance was detected using an itraconazole screening agar (4 mg/liter) and the EUCAST method. cyp51A gene sequencing and microsatellite genotyping were performed for isolates from patients harboring...

  1. Susceptibility breakpoints and target values for therapeutic drug monitoring of voriconazole and Aspergillus fumigatus in an in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siopi, M.; Mavridou, E.; Mouton, J.W.; Verweij, P.E.; Zerva, L.; Meletiadis, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although voriconazole reached the bedside 10 years ago and became the standard care in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis, reliable clinical breakpoints are still in high demand. Moreover, this has increased due to the recent emergence of azole resistance. METHODS: Four clinical

  2. Risk assessment studies on succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors, the new weapons in the battle to control Septoria leaf blotch in wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Bart A.; Bayon, Carlos; Atkins, Sarah; Cools, Hans J.; Lucas, John A.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    Chemical control of Septoria leaf blotch, caused by Mycosphaerella graminicola, is essential to ensure wheat yield and food security in most European countries. Mycosphaerella graminicola has developed resistance to several classes of fungicide and, with the efficacy of azoles gradually declining

  3. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis triggered by drug-drug interaction with itraconazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybro, Anne Mette; Damkier, Per; Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch

    2016-01-01

    -associated rhabdomyolysis, probably caused by a drug-drug interaction between simvastatin and itraconazole. The patient made full recovery. Three commonly used statins-simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin-are metabolised by the liver enzyme CYP3A4. Several potent inhibitors of this enzyme are known, for example, azole...

  4. Tanzania Journal of Science - Vol 38, No 2 (2012)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrical Properties of DC Reactive Magnetron Sputtered ZnO:Al Films from Optical ... of ZnO:Al/ZnO Double Layers and the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cell Efficiencies · EMAIL ... Management of Azole-Refractory Candida Species Using Boric Acid ...

  5. Drug: D08903 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available azole derivative See [DR:D00355] Non-erosive GERD, healing of erosive esophagitis, and maintenance of heal...ing of erosive esophagitis ATP4A [HSA:495] [KO:K01542]; ATP4B [HSA:496] [KO:K01543

  6. Determination of antifungal susceptibility patterns among the environmental isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated that there was not azole-resistant among environmental isolates of A. fumigatus. Medical triazoles compounds have structural similarity with triazole fungicide compounds in agriculture, therefore, resistance development through exposure to triazole fungicide compounds in the environment is important but it sounds there is not a serious health problem in drug resistance in environmental isolates in Iran.

  7. Vulvovaginal candidiasis in a Flemish patient population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, MM; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Boekhout, T; Theelen, B; Matthijs, N; Bauters, T; Nailis, H; Dhont, MA; Rodriguez-Tudela, JL; Nelis, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Increased resistance to fluconazole has been reported in oral, oesophageal and urinary Candida isolates, but this has not been observed commonly in genital tract isolates. The rate of isolation of Candida spp. and their susceptibility to amphotericin B, flucytosine and azoles were determined in a

  8. Combination Antifungal Therapy in the Treatment of Scedosporium apiospermum Central Nervous System Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés F. Henao-Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Scedosporium apiospermum central nervous system (CNS infection typically consists of an azole in combination with surgical debridement. This approach requires prolonged treatment and carries a high associated mortality. We present two cases of the successful treatment of S. apiospermum CNS infections with the combination of voriconazole and terbinafine.

  9. Substituted benzotriazoles as inhibitors of copper corrosion in borate buffer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonkina, M. O.; Andreeva, N. P.; Kuznetsov, Yu. I.; Timashev, S. F.

    2017-08-01

    The adsorption of substituted 1,2,3-benzotriazoles (R-BTAs) onto copper is measured via ellipsometry in a pure borate buffer (pH 7.4) and satisfactorily described by Temkin's isotherm. The adsorption free energy (-Δ G a 0 ) values of these azoles are determined. The (-Δ G a 0 ) values are found to rise as their hydrophobicity, characterized by the logarithm of the partition coefficient of a substituted BTA in a model octanol-water system (log P), grows. The minimum concentration sufficient for the spontaneous passivation of copper ( C min) and a shift in the potential of local copper depassivation with chlorides ( E pt) after an azole is added to the solution (i.e., Δ E = E pt in - E pt backgr characterizing the ability of its adsorption to stabilize passivation) are determined in the same solution containing a corrosion additive (0.01M NaCl) for each azole under study. Both criteria of the passivating properties of azoles (log C min and Δ E) are shown to correlate linearly with log P, testifying to the role played by surface activity of this family of organic inhibitors in protecting copper in an aqueous solution.

  10. Adjunctive immunotherapy with recombinant cytokines for the treatment of disseminated candidiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the discovery in the last decade of azoles and echinocandins as novel and potent antimycotic drugs, systemic Candida infections are still accompanied by an unacceptably high burden of morbidity and mortality. A rational novel therapeutic approach would be the use of adjuvant immunotherapy,

  11. Effects of artea, a systemic fungicide, on the antioxidant system and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work aimed at the study of the effects of Artea, a systemic azole fungicide, on durum Wheat (Triticum durum L. cv. GTA dur). Seeds were grown in a medium containing respectively 25, 50, 75 and 100 ppm of Artea under controlled conditions. Roots of eight-day-old plants were used to determine catalase, ...

  12. In-host microevolution of Aspergillus fumigatus: A phenotypic and genotypic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballard, E.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Zoll, J.; Brown, A.J.; Verweij, P.E.; Warris, A.

    2018-01-01

    In order to survive, Aspergillus fumigatus must adapt to specific niche environments. Adaptation to the human host includes modifications facilitating persistent colonisation and the development of azole resistance. The aim of this study is to advance understanding of the genetic and physiological

  13. Fluconazole resistant opportunistic oro-pharyngeal candida and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Oro-Pharyngeal Candidiasis (OPC) continues to be considered the most common opportunistic fungal disease in HIV/AIDS patients globally. Azole antifungal agent has become important in the treatment of mucosal candidiasis in HIV patients. Presently, antifungal drug resistance is fast becoming a major ...

  14. Mimicking of cyproconazole behavior in the presence of Cu and Zn

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakl, M.; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 23 (2017), s. 2043-2050 ISSN 0951-4198 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-21409P Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : triazole fungicides * azole fungicides * copper Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 1.998, year: 2016

  15. Malassezia spp. overgrowth in allergic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordeix, Laura; Galeotti, Franca; Scarampella, Fabia; Dedola, Carla; Bardagí, Mar; Romano, Erica; Fondati, Alessandra

    2007-10-01

    A series of 18 allergic cats with multifocal Malassezia spp. overgrowth is reported: atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 16, an adverse food reaction in another and one was euthanized 2 months after diagnosis of Malassezia overgrowth. All the cats were otherwise healthy and those tested (16 out of 18) for feline leukaemia or feline immunodeficiency virus infections were all negative. At dermatological examination, multifocal alopecia, erythema, crusting and greasy adherent brownish scales were variably distributed on all cats. Cytological examination revealed Malassezia spp. overgrowth with/without bacterial infection in facial skin (n = 11), ventral neck (n = 6), abdomen (n = 6), ear canal (n = 4), chin (n = 2), ear pinnae (n = 2), interdigital (n = 1) and claw folds skin (n = 1). Moreover, in two cats Malassezia pachydermatis was isolated in fungal cultures from lesional skin. Azoles therapy alone was prescribed in seven, azoles and antibacterial therapy in eight and azoles with both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory therapy in three of the cats. After 3-4 weeks of treatment, substantial reduction of pruritus and skin lesions was observed in all 11 cats treated with a combined therapy and in five of seven treated solely with azoles. Malassezia spp. overgrowth may represent a secondary cutaneous problem in allergic cats particularly in those presented for dermatological examination displaying greasy adherent brownish scales. The favourable response to treatment with antifungal treatments alone suggests that, as in dogs, Malassezia spp. may be partly responsible for both pruritus and cutaneous lesions in allergic cats.

  16. Advances in corrosion testing of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel Zelinka; D.S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    A January 2004 change in the regulation of wood preservatives used in the U.S.has increased the use of newer wood preservatives, such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) and copper azole (CuAz). These preservatives contain high amounts of cupric ions, which may be reduced to copper metal at the expense of less noble steel and galvanized fasteners in the wood....

  17. Transformation and Release of Micronized Cu Used as a Wood Preservative in Treated Wood in Wetland Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micronized Cu (µ-Cu) is used as a wood preservative, replacing toxic Chromated Copper Arsenates. Micronized Cu is Malachite [Cu2CO3(OH)2] that has been milled to micron/submicron particles, many with diameters less than 100 nm, and then mixed with quat or azol biocides. I...

  18. Evaluation of the in vitro activity of isavuconazole and comparator voriconazole against 2635 contemporary clinical Candida and Aspergillus isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, K. M.T.; Hare, R. K.; Arendrup, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The in vitro activity of isavuconazole was determined for 1677 Candida and 958 Aspergillus isolates from 2012 to 2014 with voriconazole as comparator. Methods Aspergillus isolates were screened for resistance using azole-agar. Aspergillus isolates that screened positive and all Candida...

  19. Simulations of CYP51A from Aspergillus fumigatus in a model bilayer provide insights into triazole drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Anthony; Rhodes, Johanna

    2018-04-01

    Azole antifungal drugs target CYP51A in Aspergillus fumigatus by binding with the active site of the protein, blocking ergosterol biosynthesis. Resistance to azole antifungal drugs is now common, with a leucine to histidine amino acid substitution at position 98 the most frequent, predominantly conferring resistance to itraconazole, although cross-resistance has been reported in conjunction with other mutations. In this study, we create a homology model of CYP51A using a recently published crystal structure of the paralog protein CYP51B. The derived structures, wild type, and L98H mutant are positioned within a lipid membrane bilayer and subjected to molecular dynamics simulations in order improve the accuracy of both models. The structural analysis from our simulations suggests a decrease in active site surface from the formation of hydrogen bonds between the histidine substitution and neighboring polar side chains, potentially preventing the binding of azole drugs. This study yields a biologically relevant structure and set of dynamics of the A. fumigatus Lanosterol 14 alpha-demethylase enzyme and provides further insight into azole antifungal drug resistance.

  20. Chemical approaches to zero blowdown operation (TP93-05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, G.E.; Ogg, J.; Hatch, M.R.

    1993-03-01

    Zero blowdown operation was evaluated at a cooling tower at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in an attempt to eliminate cooling water discharge. Testing was performed with and without acid feed for pH control using a state-of-the-art treatment which contained polymer, phosphonate, and azole. Supplemental additional of a proprietary calcium carbonate scale inhibitor was also evaluated

  1. The Ligand Substitution Reactions of Hydrophobic Vitamin B12 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Chemistry ... The equilibrium constants, K, for the reaction of five-membered heterocyclic nitrogenous bases (the azoles imidazole, pyrazole and 1,2,4-triazole) with displacement of ... Keywords: Hydrophobic vitamin B12, cobalt corrinoids, equilibrium constants, solvent polarity, trans influence.

  2. Fluconazole Resistance Associated with Drug Efflux and Increased Transcription of a Drug Transporter Gene, PDH1, in Candida glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Haruko; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Geber, Antonia; Parkinson, Tanya; Hitchcock, Christopher; Falconer, Derek J.; Ward, Douglas J.; Marsden, Katherine; Bennett, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Sequential Candida glabrata isolates were obtained from the mouth of a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 who was receiving high doses of fluconazole for oropharyngeal thrush. Fluconazole-susceptible colonies were replaced by resistant colonies that exhibited both increased fluconazole efflux and increased transcripts of a gene which codes for a protein with 72.5% identity to Pdr5p, an ABC multidrug transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The deduced protein had a molecular mass of 175 kDa and was composed of two homologous halves, each with six putative transmembrane domains and highly conserved sequences of ATP-binding domains. When the earliest and most azole-susceptible isolate of C. glabrata from this patient was exposed to fluconazole, increased transcripts of the PDR5 homolog appeared, linking azole exposure to regulation of this gene. PMID:9661006

  3. Drug-drug interactions of antifungal agents and implications for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, Paul O; Amsden, Jarrett R

    2005-10-01

    Drug interactions in the gastrointestinal tract, liver and kidneys result from alterations in pH, ionic complexation, and interference with membrane transport proteins and enzymatic processes involved in intestinal absorption, enteric and hepatic metabolism, renal filtration and excretion. Azole antifungals can be involved in drug interactions at all the sites, by one or more of the above mechanisms. Consequently, azoles interact with a vast array of compounds. Drug-drug interactions associated with amphotericin B formulations are predictable and result from the renal toxicity and electrolyte disturbances associated with these compounds. The echinocandins are unknown cytochrome P450 substrates and to date are relatively devoid of significant drug-drug interactions. This article reviews drug interactions involving antifungal agents that affect other agents and implications for patient care are highlighted.

  4. In Vitro Comparison of Activities of Terbinafine and Itraconazole against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, R. C.; Fontes, C. J. F.; Batista, R. D.; Hamdan, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    In vitro, terbinafine is highly active against a broad spectrum of pathogenic fungi. We evaluated the activities of terbinafine and itraconazole against 31 isolates of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The tests were conducted by using a broth macrodilution procedure. MICs, in micrograms per milliliter, were as follows: terbinafine, 0.015 to 1.0 (geometric mean, 0.1188); itraconazole, 0.007 to 0.5 (geometric mean, 0.03165). The usual therapy for paracoccidioidomycosis is sulfonamides, amphotericin B, and azole derivatives (ketoconazole, itraconazole, and fluconazole). In comparison to amphotericin B, azole derivatives allow shorter treatment courses, can be administered orally, and are equally effective. Itraconazole has as high efficacy as ketoconazole, but with superior tolerance. It is the current drug of choice for treatment of paracoccidioidomycosis. The data obtained in this study indicate that terbinafine is active against P. brasiliensis in vitro and suggest that this allylamine can be considered a new option as drug therapy for paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:12149337

  5. Mechanistic evidence for a ring-opening pathway in the Pd-catalyzed direct arylation of benzoxazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, R.S.; Zhuravlev, Fedor

    2007-01-01

    The direct Pd-catalyzed arylation of 5-substituted benzoxazoles, used as a mechanistic model for 1,3-azoles, was investigated experimentally and computationally. The results of the primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect, Hammett studies, and H/D exchange were shown to be inconsistent with the r......The direct Pd-catalyzed arylation of 5-substituted benzoxazoles, used as a mechanistic model for 1,3-azoles, was investigated experimentally and computationally. The results of the primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect, Hammett studies, and H/D exchange were shown to be inconsistent...... with the rate-limiting electrophilic or concerted palladation. A mechanism, proposed on the basis of kinetic and computational studies, includes generation of isocyanophenolate as the key step. The DFT calculations suggest that the overall catalytic cycle is facile and is largely controlled by the C-H acidity...

  6. Causative Agents of Aspergillosis Including Cryptic Aspergillus Species and A. fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyotome, Takahito

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillosis is an important deep mycosis. The causative agents are Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus terreus, of which A. fumigatus is the most prevalent. Cryptic Aspergillus spp., which morphologically resemble representative species of each Aspergillus section, also cause aspergillosis. Most of the cryptic species reveal different susceptibility patterns and/or different secondary metabolite profiles, also called exometabolome in this manuscript, from those representative species. On the other hand, azole-resistant A. fumigatus strains in clinical specimens and in the environment have been reported. Therefore, it is imperative to precisely identify the species, including cryptic Aspergillus spp., and evaluate the susceptibility of isolates.In this manuscript, some of the causative cryptic Aspergillus spp. are briefly reviewed. In addition, the exometabolome of Aspergillus section Fumigati is described. Finally, azole resistance of A. fumigatus is also discussed, in reference to several studies from Japan.

  7. A prospective survey of Aspergillus spp. in respiratory tract samples: prevalence, clinical impact and antifungal susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K L; Johansen, H K; Fuursted, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    for routine microbiologic investigation were examined for Aspergillus following routine procedures and with extended incubation (5 days). Identification was done by morphologic criteria and susceptibility testing using EUCAST method for azoles and amphotericin B E-test. Invasive aspergillosis (IA......) was evaluated using modified EORTC/MSG criteria. A total of 11,368 airway samples were received. Growth of Aspergillus spp. was found in 129 and 151 patients using routine and extended incubation, respectively. Three patients had proven IA (2%), 11 probable (7%), four had allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis...... μg/ml (3/112 A. fumigatus, 1/2 A. terreus). In conclusion, Aspergillus appears to be an important pathogen in Denmark. Elevated itraconazole MICs were detected in 4% of the isolates including a multi-azole resistant isolate....

  8. Exploiting Large-Scale Drug-Protein Interaction Information for Computational Drug Repurposing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-20

    studies that have reported antimalarial activities of azole compounds [39-43] lend support to our model predictions. The highest-scored non-malarial...Table 4, verapamil and cimetidine, do not have antimal- arial activities themselves but exhibit synergism when used in combination with antimalarial ... activators . Because of their high frequencies among the antimalarial drugs, according to Eq. 3, the drug-protein interactions contributing most to the

  9. Detection of Cryptococcus neoformans DNA in Tissue Samples by Nested and Real-Time PCR Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bialek, Ralf; Weiss, Michael; Bekure-Nemariam, Kubrom; Najvar, Laura K.; Alberdi, Maria B.; Graybill, John R.; Reischl, Udo

    2002-01-01

    Two PCR protocols targeting the 18S rRNA gene of Cryptococcus neoformans were established, compared, and evaluated in murine cryptococcal meningitis. One protocol was designed as a nested PCR to be performed in conventional block thermal cyclers. The other protocol was designed as a quantitative single-round PCR adapted to LightCycler technology. One hundred brain homogenates and dilutions originating from 20 ICR mice treated with different azoles were examined. A fungal burden of 3 × 101 to ...

  10. Ruthenium-catalyzed direct C3 alkylation of indoles with α,β-unsaturated ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai-Shuai; Lin, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Dong, Lin

    2015-01-28

    In this paper, a simple and highly efficient ruthenium-catalyzed direct C3 alkylation of indoles with various α,β-unsaturated ketones without chelation assistance has been developed. This novel C-H activation methodology exhibits a broad substrate scope such as different substituted indoles, pyrroles, and other azoles. Further synthetic applications of the alkylation products can lead to more attractive 3,4-fused tricyclic indoles.

  11. AcEST: BP912573 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein OS=Ipomoea b... 55 2e-06 tr|Q8S3M2|Q8S3M2_AZOFI Metallothionein-like protein 2 OS=Azolla ... 54 3e-0...DPCTC 217 + T G+ACKCGSNC C DPC C Sbjct: 45 KATEGGHACKCGSNCPC-DPCNC 66 >tr|Q8S3M2|Q8S3M2_AZOFI Metallothionein-like protein 2 OS=Azoll

  12. Azasordarins: Susceptibility of Fluconazole-Susceptible and Fluconazole-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Candida spp. to GW 471558

    OpenAIRE

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Mellado, Emilia; Díaz-Guerra, Teresa M.; Monzón, Araceli; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2001-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the azasordarin GW 471558 was compared with those of amphotericin B, flucytosine, itraconazole, and ketoconazole against 177 clinical isolates of Candida spp. GW 471558 showed potent activity against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Candida tropicalis, even against isolates with decreased susceptibility to azoles. Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida guilliermondii are resistant to GW 471558 in vitro (MICs, >128 μg/ml).

  13. Ketoconazole modulates the infectivity of Ichthyophonus sp. (Mesomycetozoa) in vivo in experimentally injected European sea bass

    OpenAIRE

    Hontoria, Francisco; González, Mª Ángeles; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Palenzuela, Oswaldo

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies have confirmed the inhibitory effect of the azol-derivative ketoconazole (KZ) on the growth of Ichthyophonus, an important pathogen causing epizootics in wild and cultured fish. We evaluated the effect of KZ in vivo in European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax experimentally infected with the same Ichthyophonus isolate. Liposomes were used to vehiculate different doses of KZ to increase the effect on Ichthyophonus and lower the toxicity of the drug, and KZ toxicity was assessed ...

  14. Functional characterization of Candida albicans Hos2 histone deacetylase [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3xh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Karthikeyan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a mucosal commensal organism capable of causing superficial (oral and vaginal thrush infections in immune normal hosts, but is a major pathogen causing systemic and mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Azoles have been very effective anti-fungal agents and the mainstay in treating opportunistic mold and yeast infections. Azole resistant strains have emerged compromising the utility of this class of drugs. It has been shown that azole resistance can be reversed by the co-administration of a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor, suggesting that resistance is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms possibly involving Hos2, a fungal deacetylase. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of HOS2 (HighOsmolarity Sensitive, a gene coding for fungal histone deacetylase from C. albicans. Inhibition studies showed that Hos2 is susceptible to pan inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, but is not inhibited by class I inhibitors such as MS-275. This in vitro enzymatic assay, which is amenable to high throughput could be used for screening potent fungal Hos2 inhibitors that could be a potential anti-fungal adjuvant. Purified Hos2 protein consistently deacetylated tubulins, rather than histones from TSA-treated cells. Hos2 has been reported to be a putative NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, a feature of sirtuins. We assayed for sirtuin activation with resveratrol and purified Hos2 protein and did not find any sirtuin activity.

  15. [The in vitro antifungal activities of fluconazole against pathogenic yeasts recently isolated from clinical specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H; Igari, J; Kume, H; Abe, M; Oguri, T; Kanno, H; Kawakami, S; Okuzumi, K; Fukayama, M; Ito, A; Kawata, K; Uchida, K

    1997-09-01

    The emergence of Candida albicans resistance to azole antifungal agents have been reported in the U. S. and Europe. We examined the in vitro antifungal activities of fluconazole against clinical isolates collected by seven investigators in three years to examine if a tendency existed toward the development of azole-resistance among fungal isolates in Japan. The following results were obtained: 1. Sensitivities to fluconazole (FLCZ) were determined for yeast-like fungi, including 113 strains isolated in 1993, 149 strains isolated in 1994 and 205 strains isolated in 1995. No significant differences in sensitivities in the three years were detected. 2. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of FLCZ were 0.1-0.78 microgram/ml for C. albicans and 3.13-25 micrograms/ml for C. glabrata. Strains with 25 micrograms/ml of FLCZ's MIC were detected; two strains of C. krusei and one strain each of C. krusei, Trichospron beigelii and Hansenula anomala. No strains with higher than 50 micrograms/ml MIC of FLCZ were detected. 3. In vitro activities of FLCZ were compared between clinical strains isolated between 1993 and 1995 and clinical strains isolated before the marketing of FLCZ (up to December 1987) or clinical yeasts isolated between 1991 and 1992. No significant differences were observed, suggesting that no tendency existed toward azole resistance among fungal strains examined.

  16. Rh(I)-Catalyzed Arylation of Heterocycles via C-H Bond Activation: Expanded Scope Through Mechanistic Insight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Jared; Berman, Ashley; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-07-18

    A practical, functional group tolerant method for the Rh-catalyzed direct arylation of a variety of pharmaceutically important azoles with aryl bromides is described. Many of the successful azole and aryl bromide coupling partners are not compatible with methods for the direct arylation of heterocycles using Pd(0) or Cu(I) catalysts. The readily prepared, low molecular weight ligand, Z-1-tert-butyl-2,3,6,7-tetrahydrophosphepine, which coordinates to Rh in a bidentate P-olefin fashion to provide a highly active yet thermally stable arylation catalyst, is essential to the success of this method. By using the tetrafluoroborate salt of the corresponding phosphonium, the reactions can be assembled outside of a glove box without purification of reagents or solvent. The reactions are also conducted in THF or dioxane, which greatly simplifies product isolation relative to most other methods for direct arylation of azoles employing high-boiling amide solvents. The reactions are performed with heating in a microwave reactor to obtain excellent product yields in two hours.

  17. Influence of N-Oxide Introduction on the Stability of Nitrogen-Rich Heteroaromatic Rings: A Quantum Chemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jia; Long, Xinping; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2016-12-01

    N-Oxidization is an important strategy for enhancing the density and energy of energetic materials. Nevertheless, the influence of N + -O - introduction on molecular stability remains relatively unknown. Thus, the present work comprehensively studied 102 basic N-rich ring structures, including azoles, furazans, and azines, as well as their N-oxides by quantum chemical calculations. The introduction of N + -O - weakens molecular stability in most cases because the process elongates chemical bonds, decreases ring aromaticity, narrows the gaps between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, and increases the photochemical reactivity. Besides, the easy H transfer to the neighboring O atom, which forms a N-OH isomer in azoles, renders the stabilization by N-oxide introduction ineffective. However, N-oxide introduction can enhance the molecular stability of 1,2,3,4-tetrazine-1,3-dioxide and tetrazino-tetrazine 1,3,6,8-tetraoxide by promoting σ-π separation and relieving lone-pair repulsion. Moreover, the alternate arrangement of positive and negative charges is another factor stabilizing the 1,2,3,4-tetrazine ring by 1,3-dioxidation. Finally, we assess the accessibility of N-oxidized azoles and azines by regarding N 2 O and H 2 O 2 as oxidizers. We find that all the oxidations were exothermic, thermodynamically spontaneous, and kinetically feasible. After an overall evaluation, we propose 19 N-oxides as basic structures for high-energy materials with considerable stability.

  18. Purification, Reconstitution, and Inhibition of Cytochrome P-450 Sterol Δ22-Desaturase from the Pathogenic Fungus Candida glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, David C.; Maspahy, Segula; Kelly, Diane E.; Manning, Nigel J.; Geber, Antonia; Bennett, John E.; Kelly, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    Sterol Δ22-desaturase has been purified from a strain of Candida glabrata with a disruption in the gene encoding sterol 14α-demethylase (cytochrome P-45051; CYP51). The purified cytochrome P-450 exhibited sterol Δ22-desaturase activity in a reconstituted system with NADPH–cytochrome P-450 reductase in dilaurylphosphatidylcholine, with the enzyme kinetic studies revealing a Km for ergosta-5,7-dienol of 12.5 μM and a Vmax of 0.59 nmol of this substrate metabolized/min/nmol of P-450. This enzyme is encoded by CYP61 (ERG5) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and homologues have been shown in the Candida albicans and Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome projects. Ketoconazole, itraconazole, and fluconazole formed low-spin complexes with the ferric cytochrome and exhibited type II spectra, which are indicative of an interaction between the azole moiety and the cytochrome heme. The azole antifungal compounds inhibited reconstituted sterol Δ22-desaturase activity by binding to the cytochrome with a one-to-one stoichiometry, with total inhibition of enzyme activity occurring when equimolar amounts of azole and cytochrome P-450 were added. These results reveal the potential for sterol Δ22-desaturase to be an antifungal target and to contribute to the binding of drugs within the fungal cell. PMID:10390230

  19. White piedra in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiken, David A; Sekaran, Anand; Antaya, Richard J; Davis, Amy; Imaeda, Suguru; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2006-12-01

    White piedra is a fungal infection of the hair shaft caused by species of Trichosporon. Rarely has this infection been reported in the United States. Historically, infected individuals required shaving of their hair to achieve clearance of the infection. We sought to describe 8 cases of Trichosporon scalp infections seen in the northeastern United States. We conducted chart review and prospective evaluation of 7 girls and 1 boy seen in two dermatology practices in New Haven, Conn, and New York, NY. Seven girls, ages 4 to 16 years old, and one 4-year-old boy were determined to have Trichosporon scalp infection, all through culture. Of the 8 children who were available for follow-up, 7 had clearance of their infection with a combination of oral azole antifungal medication and azole antifungal shampoo, without shaving the scalp hair. This was a sample of patients from a localized region of the United States. White piedra is emerging as a commonly seen hair and scalp infection in the northeastern United States. Contrary to prior publications, scalp and hair infection may be successfully treated with a combination of oral azole antifungals and shampoos without shaving the scalp.

  20. In-host microevolution of Aspergillus fumigatus: A phenotypic and genotypic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Eloise; Melchers, Willem J G; Zoll, Jan; Brown, Alistair J P; Verweij, Paul E; Warris, Adilia

    2018-04-01

    In order to survive, Aspergillus fumigatus must adapt to specific niche environments. Adaptation to the human host includes modifications facilitating persistent colonisation and the development of azole resistance. The aim of this study is to advance understanding of the genetic and physiological adaptation of A. fumigatus in patients during infection and treatment. Thirteen A. fumigatus strains were isolated from a single chronic granulomatous disease patient suffering from persistent and recurrent invasive aspergillosis over a period of 2 years. All strains had identical microsatellite genotypes and were considered isogenic. Whole genome comparisons identified 248 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms. These non-synonymous mutations have potential to play a role in in-host adaptation. The first 2 strains isolated were azole susceptible, whereas later isolates were itraconazole, voriconazole and/or posaconazole resistant. Growth assays in the presence and absence of various antifungal stressors highlighted minor changes in growth rate and stress resistance, with exception of one isolate showing a significant growth defect. Poor conidiation was observed in later isolates. In certain drug resistant isolates conidiation was restored in the presence of itraconazole. Differences in virulence were observed as demonstrated in a Galleria mellonella infection model. We conclude that the microevolution of A. fumigatus in this patient has driven the emergence of both Cyp51A-independent and Cyp51A-dependent, azole resistance mechanisms, and additional phenotypes that are likely to have promoted fungal persistence. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Heterocyclic anions of astrobiological interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Callie A.; Demarais, Nicholas J.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Yang, Zhibo; Snow, Theodore P.

    2013-01-01

    As more complex organic molecules are detected in the interstellar medium, the importance of heterocyclic molecules to astrobiology and the origin of life has become evident. 2-Aminothiazole and 2-aminooxazole have recently been suggested as important nucleotide precursors, highlighting azoles as potential prebiotic molecules. This study explores the gas-phase chemistry of three deprotonated azoles: oxazole, thiazole, and isothiazole. For the first time, their gas-phase acidities are experimentally determined with bracketing and H/D exchange techniques, and their reactivity is characterized with several detected interstellar neutral molecules (N 2 O, O 2 , CO, OCS, CO 2 , and SO 2 ) and other reactive species (CS 2 , CH 3 Cl, (CH 3 ) 3 CCl, and (CH 3 ) 3 CBr). Rate constants and branching fractions for these reactions are experimentally measured using a modified commercial ion trap mass spectrometer whose kinetic data are in good accord with those of a flowing afterglow apparatus reported here. Last, we have examined the fragmentation patterns of these deprotonated azoles to elucidate their destruction mechanisms in high-energy environments. All experimental data are supported and complemented by electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory.

  2. Heterocyclic anions of astrobiological interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Callie A.; Demarais, Nicholas J.; Bierbaum, Veronica M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 215 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Yang, Zhibo [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Snow, Theodore P., E-mail: Callie.Cole@colorado.edu, E-mail: Nicholas.Demarais@colorado.edu, E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@colorado.edu, E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@ou.edu, E-mail: Theodore.Snow@colorado.edu [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, 391 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    As more complex organic molecules are detected in the interstellar medium, the importance of heterocyclic molecules to astrobiology and the origin of life has become evident. 2-Aminothiazole and 2-aminooxazole have recently been suggested as important nucleotide precursors, highlighting azoles as potential prebiotic molecules. This study explores the gas-phase chemistry of three deprotonated azoles: oxazole, thiazole, and isothiazole. For the first time, their gas-phase acidities are experimentally determined with bracketing and H/D exchange techniques, and their reactivity is characterized with several detected interstellar neutral molecules (N{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, CO, OCS, CO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2}) and other reactive species (CS{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}Cl, (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}CCl, and (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}CBr). Rate constants and branching fractions for these reactions are experimentally measured using a modified commercial ion trap mass spectrometer whose kinetic data are in good accord with those of a flowing afterglow apparatus reported here. Last, we have examined the fragmentation patterns of these deprotonated azoles to elucidate their destruction mechanisms in high-energy environments. All experimental data are supported and complemented by electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory.

  3. Rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations in clinical Candida albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole by rolling circle amplification and DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis David

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amino acid substitutions in the target enzyme Erg11p of azole antifungals contribute to clinically-relevant azole resistance in Candida albicans. A simple molecular method for rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations would be an advantage as a screening tool to identify potentially-resistant strains and to track their movement. To complement DNA sequencing, we developed a padlock probe and rolling circle amplification (RCA-based method to detect a series of mutations in the C. albicans ERG11 gene using "reference" azole-resistant isolates with known mutations. The method was then used to estimate the frequency of ERG11 mutations and their type in 25 Australian clinical C. albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole and in 23 fluconazole-susceptible isolates. RCA results were compared DNA sequencing. Results The RCA assay correctly identified all ERG11 mutations in eight "reference" C. albicans isolates. When applied to 48 test strains, the RCA method showed 100% agreement with DNA sequencing where an ERG11 mutation-specific probe was used. Of 20 different missense mutations detected by sequencing in 24 of 25 (96% isolates with reduced fluconazole susceptibility, 16 were detected by RCA. Five missense mutations were detected by both methods in 18 of 23 (78% fluconazole-susceptible strains. DNA sequencing revealed that mutations in non-susceptible isolates were all due to homozygous nucleotide changes. With the exception of the mutations leading to amino acid substitution E266D, those in fluconazole-susceptible strains were heterozygous. Amino acid substitutions common to both sets of isolates were D116E, E266D, K128T, V437I and V488I. Substitutions unique to isolates with reduced fluconazole susceptibility were G464 S (n = 4 isolates, G448E (n = 3, G307S (n = 3, K143R (n = 3 and Y123H, S405F and R467K (each n = 1. DNA sequencing revealed a novel substitution, G450V, in one isolate. Conclusion The sensitive RCA

  4. In vitro activity of the novel antifungal compound F901318 against difficult-to-treat Aspergillus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buil, J B; Rijs, A J M M; Meis, J F; Birch, M; Law, D; Melchers, W J G; Verweij, P E

    2017-09-01

    F901318 is a new antifungal agent with a novel mechanism of action with activity against Aspergillus species. We investigated the in vitro activity of F901318 against a collection of Aspergillus isolates. A total of 213 Aspergillus isolates were used in this study. A total of 143 Aspergillus fumigatus sensu stricto isolates were used, of which 133 were azole resistant [25 TR34/L98H; 25 TR46/Y121F/T289A; 33 A. fumigatus with cyp51A-associated point mutations (25 G54, 1 G432 and 7 M220); and 50 azole-resistant A. fumigatus without known resistance mechanisms]. Ten azole-susceptible A. fumigatus isolates were used as WT controls. The in vitro activity was also determined against Aspergillus calidoustus (25 isolates), Aspergillus flavus (10), Aspergillus nidulans (10) and Aspergillus tubingensis (25). F901318 activity was compared with that of itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, isavuconazole, amphotericin B and anidulafungin. Minimum effective concentrations and MICs were determined using the EUCAST broth microdilution method. F901318 was active against all tested isolates: A. fumigatus WT, MIC90 0.125 mg/L (range 0.031-0.125); TR34/L98H,TR46/Y121F/T289A and azole resistant without known resistance mechanisms, MIC90 0.125 mg/L (range 0.031-0.25); A. fumigatus with cyp51A-associated point mutations, MIC90 0.062 mg/L (range 0.015-0.125); and other species, A. calidoustus MIC90 0.5 mg/L (range 0.125-0.5), A. flavus MIC90 0.062 mg/L (range 0.015-0.62), A. nidulans MIC90 0.125 mg/L (range 0.062-0.25) and A. tubingensis MIC90 0.062 mg/L (range 0.015-0.25). F901318 showed potent and consistent in vitro activity against difficult-to-treat Aspergillus spp. with intrinsic and acquired antifungal resistance due to known and unknown resistance mechanisms, suggesting no significant implications of azole resistance mechanisms for the mode of action of F901318. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for

  5. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida, Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus from the Asia and Western Pacific region: data from the SENTRY antifungal surveillance program (2010-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2015-09-01

    The SENTRY Antifungal Surveillance Program monitors global susceptibility rates of newer and established antifungal agents. We report the in vitro activity of seven antifungal agents against 496 contemporary clinical isolates of yeasts and molds. The isolates were obtained from 20 laboratories in the Asia-Western Pacific (APAC) region during 2010 through 2012. Anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole were susceptibility tested using CLSI methods and species-specific interpretive criteria. Sequencing of fks hot spots was performed for echinocandin-resistant strains. Isolates included 13 species of Candida (n=460), 5 species of non-Candida yeasts (21), 5 species of Aspergillus (11) and 4 other molds. Echinocandin resistance was uncommon among eight species of Candida and was only detected in three isolates of Candida glabrata, two from Australia harboring mutations in fks1 (F625S) and fks2 (S663P). Resistance to the azoles was much more common and was observed among all species with the exception of Candida dubliniensis. Fluconazole resistance rates observed with C. glabrata (6.8%) was comparable to that seen with Candida parapsilosis (5.7%) and Candida tropicalis (3.6%). Cross resistance among the triazoles was seen with each of these three species. The mold-active azoles and the echinocandins were all active against isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus. Azole resistance was not detected among the isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans. Antifungal resistance is uncommon among isolates of fungi causing invasive fungal infections in the APAC region. As in other regions of the world, emerging resistance to the echinocandins among invasive isolates of C. glabrata bears close monitoring.

  6. Characterization of the sterol 14α-demethylases of Fusarium graminearum identifies a novel genus-specific CYP51 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jieru; Urban, Martin; Parker, Josie E; Brewer, Helen C; Kelly, Steven L; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Fraaije, Bart A; Liu, Xili; Cools, Hans J

    2013-05-01

    CYP51 encodes the cytochrome P450 sterol 14α-demethylase, an enzyme essential for sterol biosynthesis and the target of azole fungicides. In Fusarium species, including pathogens of humans and plants, three CYP51 paralogues have been identified with one unique to the genus. Currently, the functions of these three genes and the rationale for their conservation within the genus Fusarium are unknown. Three Fusarium graminearum CYP51s (FgCYP51s) were heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Single and double FgCYP51 deletion mutants were generated and the functions of the FgCYP51s were characterized in vitro and in planta. FgCYP51A and FgCYP51B can complement yeast CYP51 function, whereas FgCYP51C cannot. FgCYP51A deletion increases the sensitivity of F. graminearum to the tested azoles. In ΔFgCYP51B and ΔFgCYP51BC mutants, ascospore formation is blocked, and eburicol and two additional 14-methylated sterols accumulate. FgCYP51C deletion reduces virulence on host wheat ears. FgCYP51B encodes the enzyme primarily responsible for sterol 14α-demethylation, and plays an essential role in ascospore formation. FgCYP51A encodes an additional sterol 14α-demethylase, induced on ergosterol depletion and responsible for the intrinsic variation in azole sensitivity. FgCYP51C does not encode a sterol 14α-demethylase, but is required for full virulence on host wheat ears. This is the first example of the functional diversification of a fungal CYP51. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Hsp90 governs echinocandin resistance in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans via calcineurin.

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    Sheena D Singh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is the leading fungal pathogen of humans, causing life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals. Treatment of candidiasis is hampered by the limited number of antifungal drugs whose efficacy is compromised by host toxicity, fungistatic activity, and the emergence of drug resistance. We previously established that the molecular chaperone Hsp90, which regulates the form and function of diverse client proteins, potentiates resistance to the azoles in C. albicans and in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic studies in S. cerevisiae revealed that Hsp90's role in azole resistance is to enable crucial cellular responses to the membrane stress exerted by azoles via the client protein calcineurin. Here, we demonstrate that Hsp90 governs cellular circuitry required for resistance to the only new class of antifungals to reach the clinic in decades, the echinocandins, which inhibit biosynthesis of a critical component of the fungal cell wall. Pharmacological or genetic impairment of Hsp90 function reduced tolerance of C. albicans laboratory strains and resistance of clinical isolates to the echinocandins and created a fungicidal combination. Compromising calcineurin function phenocopied compromising Hsp90 function. We established that calcineurin is an Hsp90 client protein in C. albicans: reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation validated physical interaction; Hsp90 inhibition blocked calcineurin activation; and calcineurin levels were depleted upon genetic reduction of Hsp90. The downstream effector of calcineurin, Crz1, played a partial role in mediating calcineurin-dependent stress responses activated by echinocandins. Hsp90's role in echinocandin resistance has therapeutic potential given that genetic compromise of C. albicans HSP90 expression enhanced the efficacy of an echinocandin in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Our results identify the first Hsp90 client protein in C. albicans, establish an entirely

  8. Filters from taxis air conditioning system: A tool to characterize driver's occupational exposure to bioburden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Carla; Monteiro, Ana; Dos Santos, Mateus; Faria, Tiago; Caetano, Liliana Aranha; Carolino, Elisabete; Quintal Gomes, Anita; Marchand, Geneviève; Lacombe, Nancy; Viegas, Susana

    2018-07-01

    Bioburden proliferation in filters from air conditioning systems of taxis represents a possible source of occupational exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of fungi and bacteria in filters from the air conditioning system of taxis used for patient transportation and to assess the exposure of drivers to bioburden. Filters from the air conditioning systems of 19 taxis and 28 personal vehicles (used as controls) operating in three Portuguese cities including the capital Lisbon, were collected during the winter season. The occurrence and significance of bioburden detected in the different vehicles are reported and discussed in terms of colony-forming units (CFU) per 1 m 2 of filter area and by the identification of the most frequently detected fungal isolates based on morphology. Azole-resistant mycobiota, fungal biomass, and molecular detection of Aspergillus species/strains were also determined. Bacterial growth was more prevalent in taxis (63.2%) than in personal vehicles (26.3%), whereas fungal growth was more prevalent in personal vehicles (53.6%) than in taxis (21.1-31.6%). Seven different azole-resistant species were identified in this study in 42.1% taxi filters. Levels of fungal biomass were above the detection limit in 63% taxi filters and in 75% personal vehicle filters. No toxigenic species were detected by molecular analysis in the assessed filters. The results obtained show that bioburden proliferation occurs widely in filters from the air conditioning systems of taxis, including the proliferation of azole-resistant fungal species, suggesting that filters should be replaced more frequently. The use of culture based-methods and molecular tools combined enabled an improved risk characterization in this setting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. PKC signaling regulates drug resistance of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans via circuitry comprised of Mkc1, calcineurin, and Hsp90.

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    Shantelle L LaFayette

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Fungal pathogens exploit diverse mechanisms to survive exposure to antifungal drugs. This poses concern given the limited number of clinically useful antifungals and the growing population of immunocompromised individuals vulnerable to life-threatening fungal infection. To identify molecules that abrogate resistance to the most widely deployed class of antifungals, the azoles, we conducted a screen of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds. Three out of seven hits that abolished azole resistance of a resistant mutant of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a clinical isolate of the leading human fungal pathogen Candida albicans were inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC, which regulates cell wall integrity during growth, morphogenesis, and response to cell wall stress. Pharmacological or genetic impairment of Pkc1 conferred hypersensitivity to multiple drugs that target synthesis of the key cell membrane sterol ergosterol, including azoles, allylamines, and morpholines. Pkc1 enabled survival of cell membrane stress at least in part via the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK cascade in both species, though through distinct downstream effectors. Strikingly, inhibition of Pkc1 phenocopied inhibition of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 or its client protein calcineurin. PKC signaling was required for calcineurin activation in response to drug exposure in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, Pkc1 and calcineurin independently regulate drug resistance via a common target in C. albicans. We identified an additional level of regulatory control in the C. albicans circuitry linking PKC signaling, Hsp90, and calcineurin as genetic reduction of Hsp90 led to depletion of the terminal MAPK, Mkc1. Deletion of C. albicans PKC1 rendered fungistatic ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors fungicidal and attenuated virulence in a murine model of systemic candidiasis. This work establishes a new role for PKC signaling in drug resistance, novel circuitry through which

  10. Antifungal susceptibility and phylogeny of opportunistic members of the order mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Roxana G; de Hoog, G Sybren; Schwarz, Patrick; Dannaoui, Eric; Deng, Shuwen; Machouart, Marie; Voigt, Kerstin; van de Sande, Wendy W J; Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Meis, Jacques F; Walther, Grit

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 66 molecularly identified strains of the Mucorales to eight antifungals (amphotericin B, terbinafine, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin, micafungin, and 5-fluorocytosine) were tested. Molecular phylogeny was reconstructed based on the nuclear ribosomal large subunit to reveal taxon-specific susceptibility profiles. The impressive phylogenetic diversity of the Mucorales was reflected in susceptibilities differing at family, genus, and species levels. Amphotericin B was the most active drug, though somewhat less against Rhizopus and Cunninghamella species. Posaconazole was the second most effective antifungal agent but showed reduced activity in Mucor and Cunninghamella strains, while voriconazole lacked in vitro activity for most strains. Genera attributed to the Mucoraceae exhibited a wide range of MICs for posaconazole, itraconazole, and terbinafine and included resistant strains. Cunninghamella also comprised strains resistant to all azoles tested but was fully susceptible to terbinafine. In contrast, the Lichtheimiaceae completely lacked strains with reduced susceptibility for these antifungals. Syncephalastrum species exhibited susceptibility profiles similar to those of the Lichtheimiaceae. Mucor species were more resistant to azoles than Rhizopus species. Species-specific responses were obtained for terbinafine where only Rhizopus arrhizus and Mucor circinelloides were resistant. Complete or vast resistance was observed for 5-fluorocytosine, caspofungin, and micafungin. Intraspecific variability of in vitro susceptibility was found in all genera tested but was especially high in Mucor and Rhizopus for azoles and terbinafine. Accurate molecular identification of etiologic agents is compulsory to predict therapy outcome. For species of critical genera such as Mucor and Rhizopus, exhibiting high intraspecific variation, susceptibility testing before the onset of therapy is recommended.

  11. Candida albicans Swi/Snf and Mediator Complexes Differentially Regulate Mrr1-Induced MDR1 Expression and Fluconazole Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongle; Myers, Lawrence C

    2017-11-01

    Long-term azole treatment of patients with chronic Candida albicans infections can lead to drug resistance. Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in the transcription factor Mrr1 and the consequent transcriptional activation of MDR1 , a drug efflux coding gene, is a common pathway by which this human fungal pathogen acquires fluconazole resistance. This work elucidates the previously unknown downstream transcription mechanisms utilized by hyperactive Mrr1. We identified the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex as a key coactivator for Mrr1, which is required to maintain basal and induced open chromatin, and Mrr1 occupancy, at the MDR1 promoter. Deletion of snf2 , the catalytic subunit of Swi/Snf, largely abrogates the increases in MDR1 expression and fluconazole MIC observed in MRR1 GOF mutant strains. Mediator positively and negatively regulates key Mrr1 target promoters. Deletion of the Mediator tail module med3 subunit reduces, but does not eliminate, the increased MDR1 expression and fluconazole MIC conferred by MRR1 GOF mutations. Eliminating the kinase activity of the Mediator Ssn3 subunit suppresses the decreased MDR1 expression and fluconazole MIC of the snf2 null mutation in MRR1 GOF strains. Ssn3 deletion also suppresses MDR1 promoter histone displacement defects in snf2 null mutants. The combination of this work with studies on other hyperactive zinc cluster transcription factors that confer azole resistance in fungal pathogens reveals a complex picture where the induction of drug efflux pump expression requires the coordination of multiple coactivators. The observed variations in transcription factor and target promoter dependence of this process may make the search for azole sensitivity-restoring small molecules more complicated. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Prevalencia de candidiasis vaginal en embarazadas: Identificación de levaduras y sensibilidad a los antifúngicos Prevalence of vaginal candidiasis in pregnant women: Identification of yeasts and susceptibility to antifungal agents

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    M. García Heredia

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available La mujer embarazada es más susceptible tanto a la colonización como a la infección vaginal por levaduras. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de levaduras aisladas de exudados vaginales de mujeres embarazadas y evaluar la sensibilidad a los antifúngicos de uso frecuente. Se estudiaron 493 pacientes en el período comprendido desde diciembre de 1998 hasta febrero de 2000. La prevalencia de Candida spp. fue 28% (Candida albicans 90,4%, Candida glabrata 6,3%, Candida parapsilosis 1,1%, Candida kefyr 1,1%, especies no identificadas 1,1%. Se determinó la sensibilidad a fluconazol, ketoconazol, itraconazol y nistatina por el método de difusión en agar Shadomy. Todos los aislamientos de C. albicans, C. kefyr y C. parapsilosis fueron sensibles in vitro a los antifúngicos probados, mientras que 1 de 6 aislamientos de C. glabrata presentó resistencia extendida a todos los azoles, pero sensibilidad a nistatina. En mujeres embarazadas C. albicans fue la levadura más frecuentemente aislada de exudados vaginales y continúa siendo ampliamente sensible a los antifúngicos; sólo en C. glabrata se observó resistencia a los azoles. Se recomienda la identificación de la levadura a nivel de especie particularmente en el caso de falla terapéutica y en infecciones recidivantes o crónicas.Pregnant women are more susceptible to both vaginal colonization and infection by yeast. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence in pregnant women of yeasts isolated from vaginal exudates and their susceptibility to current antifungal drugs. A total of 493 patients was studied between December 1998 and February 2000. The prevalence of Candida spp. was 28% (Candida albicans 90.4%; Candida glabrata 6.3%; Candida parapsilosis 1.1%, Candida kefyr 1.1%; unidentified species 1.1%. The diffusion test in Shadomy agar was employed to determine the susceptibility to fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and nistatine. All C. albicans, C. kefyr and

  13. Drug-induced hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Hair loss can have major psychological consequences. It can be due to a wide variety of causes, including hormonal disorders, dietary factors, infections, inflammation, trauma, emotional factors, and cancer. Drugs can also induce hair loss, by interacting with the hair growth cycle. Drug-induced hair loss may be immediate or delayed, sudden or gradual, and diffuse or localised. It is usually reversible after drug discontinuation. The drugs most often implicated in hair loss are anticancer agents, interferon, azole antifungals, lithium, immunosuppressants, and many other drugs belonging to a variety of pharmacological classes.

  14. Metabolism of Zearalenone in the Course of Beer Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Mizutani, Kohei; Nagatomi, Yasushi; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZON) is a mycotoxin with estrogenic activity, produced by members of Fusarium species, and is found worldwide in a number of cereal crops. It is known to have four active metabolites (a-zearalenol (a-ZOL), b-zearalenol (b-ZOL), a-zearalanol (a-ZAL), and b-zearalanol (b-ZAL)). A highly sensitive analytical method using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization (LC-ESI-MS/MS) has been established and validated in order to analyze ZON and its metab...

  15. Candidíase em pacientes aidéticos

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    C.E.O.P. Campos

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Trinta e cinco aidéticos entre 19 e 55 anos admitidos e tratados de candidíase no Hospital Emílio Ribas, SP, com ELISA positivo para HIV e confirmado pelo Western Blot. Tuberculose em 9 sendo 2 com pericardite; neurotoxoplasmose em 6; neurocriptococose em 5; herpes labial em 4; pneumocistose em 3 e sarcoma de Kaposi em 2, achavam-se associadas. A concentração inibitória mínima 50% (MIC 50% para os azoles foi: ketoconazol= 2,2 µg/ml; itraconazol- 21,0 µg/ml; fluconazol = 19,0 µg/ml. O MIC 50% para ospolienos: nistatina- 50,0 µg/ml; anfotericina B= 0,12 µg/ml e para 5 fluorcitosina= 1,6 µg/ml nas 35 amostras de Candida isoladas. Testes não paramétricos de Siegel revelaram significante identificação (80% das Candida albicans na candidíase, e que a dose de AMB não modificou o número de óbitos, precoce e tardio, ocorridos nesses aidéticos. O uso prévio dos azoles e da nistatina explicaria, talvez, o elevado MIC 50% observado nas amostras de Candida isoladas.A total of 35 in patients admitted at Emilio Ribas Hospital - São Paulo, Brazil, with digestive candidiasis and AIDS clinical diagnostic were evaluated 10 month later, being 29 male and 6 female; white outnumbering black with age ranged from 30 to 50 years old. Agar Sabouraud culture and tube germinative tests identified 28 (80% Candida albicans out 35 strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC 50% was against azoles (ketoconazole= 2.2 µg/ml; itraconazole = 21.0 µg/ml and fluconazole- 19.0 µg/ml; polyenes (ny statine - 50.0 µg/ml and amphotericin B= 0.12 µg/ml and 5 fluorcytosine= 1.6µg/ml. Siegeltests showed significant Candida albicans proportions in strains isolated from 35 AIDS patients. There was no significant relation between AMB dosis and early or late death. Conclusions: candidiasis in AIDS patients showed high MIC 50% to azoles and nystatine and significant Candida albicans proportion in all strains isolated from AIDS patients. Previous amphotericin B

  16. AcEST: DK953214 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hit_id Q8S3M2 Definition tr|Q8S3M2|Q8S3M2_AZOFI Metallothionein-like protein 2 OS=Azolla...ducing significant alignments: (bits) Value tr|Q8S3M2|Q8S3M2_AZOFI Metallothionein-like protein 2 OS=Azoll... Metallothionein OS=Amaranthus cruentus PE... 41 0.026 >tr|Q8S3M2|Q8S3M2_AZOFI Metallothionein-like protein 2 OS=Azolla

  17. Successful long-term terbinafine therapy in an asthmatic patient with Aspergillus sensitization and bronchiectasis

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    Isabel Rodriguez-Goncer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Severe asthma with fungal sensitization (SAFS is estimated to affect ~25% of patients with poorly controlled asthma. Tri-azole therapy is effective in only 60–80% and side effects are common. We report a 25 years-old woman with severe asthma, Aspergillus sensitization and marked bronchiectasis that developed a rare Achilles-tendinopathy with both itraconazole and voriconazole. She started a trial with terbinafine as salvage therapy that led to a striking improvement and long-term control of her respiratory disease.

  18. Functionalised isocoumarins as antifungal compounds: Synthesis and biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simic, Milena; Paunovic, Nikola; Boric, Ivan; Randjelovic, Jelena; Vojnovic, Sandra; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Pekmezovic, Marina; Savic, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel 3-substituted isocoumarins was prepared via Pd-catalysed coupling processes and screened in vitro for antifungal activity against Candida species. The study revealed antifungal potential of isocoumarins possessing the azole substituents, which, in some cases, showed biological properties equal to those of clinically used voriconazole. Selected compounds were also screened against voriconazole resistant Candida krusei 6258 and a clinical isolate Candida parapsilosis CA-27. Although the activity against these targets needs to be improved further, the results emphasise additional potential of this new class of antifungal compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Conazoles

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    Jan Heeres

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a historical overview of the analog based drug discovery of miconazole and its congeners, and is focused on marketed azole antifungals bearing the generic suffix “conazole”. The antifungal activity of miconazole, one of the first broad-spectrum antimycotic agents has been mainly restricted to topical applications. The attractive in vitro antifungal spectrum was a starting point to design more potent and especially orally active antifungal agents such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, fluconazole and voriconazole. The chemistry, in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity, pharmacology, and clinical applications of these marketed conazoles has been described.

  20. Avances en el tratamiento de la aspergilosis broncopulmonar alérgica

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    Peña Durán A

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Los objetivos del tratamiento de la aspergilosis broncopulmonar alérgica (ABPA son la reducción de la inflamación pulmonar, el control del asma, el tratamiento del estadio agudo de ABPA, prevenir las exacerbaciones, evitar la apari- ción o progresión a la bronquiectasia y la aspergilosis pulmonar crónica. El tratamiento utilizado hasta la actualidad han sido corticoides a largo plazo, azoles y LABA/CI. En pacientes graves sin respuesta al tratamiento con corticoides ora- les y antifúngico recientemente se han utilizado otros tratamientos como omalizumab y antiIL5 (mepolizumab.

  1. Antifungal prophylaxis in chemotherapy-associated neutropenia: a retrospective, observational study

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    Martin Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In August 2002, the antifungal prophylaxis algorithm for neutropenic hematology/oncology (NHO patients at the Medical Center was changed from conventional amphotericin (AMB to an azole (AZ based regimen (fluconazole [FLU] in low-risk and voriconazole [VOR] in high-risk patients. The aim of our study was to compare outcomes associated with the two regimens, including breakthrough fungal infection, adverse drug events, and costs. Methods Adult, non-febrile, NHO patients who received prophylactic AMB from 8/01/01-7/30/02 or AZ from 8/01/02-7/30/03 were retrospectively evaluated. Results A total of 370 patients (AMB: n = 181; AZ: n = 216 associated with 580 hospitalizations (AMB: n = 259; AZ: n = 321 were included. The incidence of probable/definite breakthrough Aspergillus infections was similar among regimens (AMB: 1.9% vs AZ: 0.6%; p=0.19. A greater incidence of mild/moderate (24.7% vs. 5.3%; p $9,000 increase in mean total costs/hospitalization, the mean acquisition cost associated with AZ was only $947/hospitalization more than AMB. Conclusion While an AZ-based regimen is associated with increased cost, the reduced rate of nephrotoxicity and availability of oral dosage forms, suggests that azoles be used preferentially over AMB. However, an increased rate of severe hepatic toxicity may be associated with VOR.

  2. Genome-wide expression profiling of the response to short-term exposure to fluconazole in Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A

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    Sanguinetti Maurizio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluconazole (FLC, a triazole antifungal drug, is widely used for the maintenance therapy of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis, the most common opportunistic infection in AIDS patients. In this study, we examined changes in the gene expression profile of the C. neoformans reference strain H99 (serotype A following FLC treatment in order to investigate the adaptive cellular responses to drug stress. Results Simultaneous analysis of over 6823 transcripts revealed that 476 genes were responsive to FLC. As expected up-regulation of genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis was observed, including the azole target gene ERG11 and ERG13, ERG1, ERG7, ERG25, ERG2, ERG3 and ERG5. In addition, SRE1 which is a gene encoding a well-known regulator of sterol homeostasis in C. neoformans was up-regulated. Several other genes such as those involved in a variety of important cellular processes (i.e. lipid and fatty acid metabolism, cell wall maintenance, stress and virulence were found to be up-regulated in response to FLC treatment. Conversely, expression of AFR1, the major transporter of azoles in C. neoformans, was not regulated by FLC. Conclusions Short-term exposure of C. neoformans to FLC resulted in a complex altered gene expression profile. Some of the observed changes could represent specific adaptive responses to the antifungal agent in this pathogenic yeast.

  3. Micronized Copper Wood Preservatives: Efficacy of Ion, Nano, and Bulk Copper against the Brown Rot Fungus Rhodonia placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Schubert, Mark; Fey, Angelika; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2015-01-01

    Recently introduced micronized copper (MC) formulations, consisting of a nanosized fraction of basic copper (Cu) carbonate (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2) nanoparticles (NPs), were introduced to the market for wood protection. Cu NPs may presumably be more effective against wood-destroying fungi than bulk or ionic Cu compounds. In particular, Cu- tolerant wood-destroying fungi may not recognize NPs, which may penetrate into fungal cell walls and membranes and exert their impact. The objective of this study was to assess if MC wood preservative formulations have a superior efficacy against Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungi due to nano effects than conventional Cu biocides. After screening a range of wood-destroying fungi for their resistance to Cu, we investigated fungal growth of the Cu-tolerant fungus Rhodonia placenta in solid and liquid media and on wood treated with MC azole (MCA). In liquid cultures we evaluated the fungal response to ion, nano and bulk Cu distinguishing the ionic and particle effects by means of the Cu2+ chelator ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (TTM) and measuring fungal biomass, oxalic acid production and laccase activity of R. placenta. Our results do not support the presence of particular nano effects of MCA against R. placenta that would account for an increased antifungal efficacy, but provide evidence that attribute the main effectiveness of MCA to azoles.

  4. Systemic vs. Topical Therapy for the Treatment of Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

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    Sebastian Faro

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 75% of all women will experience at least 1 episode of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC during their lifetimes. Most patients with acute VVC can be treated with short-term regimens that optimize compliance. Since current topical and oral antifungals have shown comparably high efficacy rates, other issues should be considered in determining the most appropriate therapy. It is possible that the use of short-duration narrow-spectrum agents may increase selection of more resistant organisms which will result in an increase of recurrent VVC (RVVC. Women who are known or suspected to be pregnant and women of childbearing age who are not using a reliable means of contraception should receive topical therapy, as should those who are breast-feeding or receiving drugs that can interact with an oral azole and those who have previously experienced adverse effects during azole therapy. Because of the potential risks associated with systemic treatment, topical therapy with a broad-spectrum agent should be the method of choice for VVC, whereas systemic therapy should be reserved for either RVVC or cases where the benefits outweigh any possible adverse reactions.

  5. Species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of oral yeast isolates from Tanzanian HIV-infected patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis

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    Rijs Antonius JMM

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tanzania, little is known on the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profiles of yeast isolates from HIV-infected patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis. Methods A total of 296 clinical oral yeasts were isolated from 292 HIV-infected patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Identification of the yeasts was performed using standard phenotypic methods. Antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, clotrimazole, amphotericin B and nystatin was assessed using a broth microdilution format according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI; M27-A2. Results Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species from 250 (84.5% patients followed by C. glabrata from 20 (6.8% patients, and C. krusei from 10 (3.4% patients. There was no observed significant difference in species distribution between patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis, but isolates cultured from patients previously treated were significantly less susceptible to the azole compounds compared to those cultured from antifungal naïve patients. Conclusion C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species from patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis. Oral yeast isolates from Tanzania had high level susceptibility to the antifungal agents tested. Recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis and previous antifungal therapy significantly correlated with reduced susceptibility to azoles antifungal agents.

  6. Multicenter Brazilian Study of Oral Candida Species Isolated from Aids Patients

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    Priscilla de Laet Sant'Ana

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal candidiasis continues to be considered the most common opportunistic disease in Aids patients. This study was designed to investigate species distribution, serotype and antifungal susceptibility profile among Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of Aids patients recruited from six Brazilian university centers. Oral swabs from 130 Aids patients were plated onto CHROMagar Candida medium and 142 isolates were recovered. Yeast isolates were identified by classical methods and serotyped using the Candida Check® system-Iatron. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed according to the NCCLS microbroth assay. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species (91%, and 70% of the isolates belonged to serotype A. We detected 12 episodes of co-infection (9%, including co-infection with both serotypes of C. albicans. Non-albicans species were isolated from 12 episodes, 50% of them exhibited DDS or resistance to azoles. Otherwise, only 8 out 130 isolates of C. albicans exhibited DDS or resistance to azoles. Brazilian Aids patients are infected mainly by C. albicans serotype A, most of them susceptible to all antifungal drugs.

  7. Local, systemic, demographic, and health-related factors influencing pathogenic yeast spectrum and antifungal drug administration frequency in oral candidiasis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Moritz; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea Maria; Strietzel, Frank-Peter

    2016-09-01

    In order to identify oral candidiasis patients being at risk of carrying potentially drug-resistant Candida, the aim of the study was to detect local, systemic, demographic, and health-related factors influencing (I) yeast spectrum composition and (II) antifungal administration frequency. Additionally, the aim was to investigate (III) species shift occurrence. Data from 798 patients (496 females, 302 males; mean age 59.7) with oral candidiasis diagnosed based on positive clinical and microbial findings (species identification and CFU count) between 2006 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed using Pearson's chi(2) test and regression analysis. Among 958 isolates, Candida albicans was the most frequently detected (76.8 %). Also, species intrinsically resistant to azoles were frequently isolated (15.8 and 17.7 % of isolates and patients). (I) Infections only caused by C. albicans were significantly associated with the use of inhalation steroids (p = 0.001) and antibiotics (p = 0.04), super-infection of lichen planus (p = 0.002), and the absence of removable dentures (p oral candidiasis remains C. albicans. Nevertheless, therapeutic problems may be caused by the frequent presence of species intrinsically resistant to azoles, especially in patients wearing dentures.

  8. Candida tropicalis from veterinary and human sources shows similar in vitro hemolytic activity, antifungal biofilm susceptibility and pathogenesis against Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Oliveira, Jonathas Sales de; Evangelista, Antônio José de Jesus; Serpa, Rosana; Silva, Aline Lobão da; Aguiar, Felipe Rodrigues Magalhães de; Pereira, Vandbergue Santos; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro Aquino; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2016-08-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro hemolytic activity and biofilm antifungal susceptibility of veterinary and human Candida tropicalis strains, as well as their pathogenesis against Caenorhabditis elegans. Twenty veterinary isolates and 20 human clinical isolates of C. tropicalis were used. The strains were evaluated for their hemolytic activity and biofilm production. Biofilm susceptibility to itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin was assessed using broth microdilution assay. The in vivo evaluation of strain pathogenicity was investigated using the nematode C. elegans. Hemolytic factor was observed in 95% of the strains and 97.5% of the isolates showed ability to form biofilm. Caspofungin and amphotericin B showed better results than azole antifungals against mature biofilms. Paradoxical effect on mature biofilm metabolic activity was observed at elevated concentrations of caspofungin (8-64μg/mL). Azole antifungals were not able to inhibit mature C. tropicalis biofilms, even at the higher tested concentrations. High mortality rates of C. elegans were observed when the worms were exposed to with C. tropicalis strains, reaching up to 96%, 96h after exposure of the worms to C. tropicalis strains. These results reinforce the high pathogenicity of C. tropicalis from veterinary and human sources and show the effectiveness of caspofungin and amphotericin B against mature biofilms of this species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of a CCA-treated wood waste decontamination process to other copper-based preservative-treated wood after disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janin, Amelie, E-mail: amelie.janin@ete.inrs.ca [University of Toronto, Faculty of Forestry, 33, Willcocks St., Toronto, ON, M5S 3B3 (Canada); Coudert, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.coudert@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Riche, Pauline, E-mail: pauline.riche@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Mercier, Guy, E-mail: guy_mercier@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Cooper, Paul, E-mail: p.cooper@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Faculty of Forestry, 33, Willcocks St., Toronto, ON, M5S 3B3 (Canada); Blais, Jean-Francois, E-mail: blaisjf@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2011-02-28

    Research highlights: {yields} This paper describes a process for the metal removal from treated (CA-, ACQ- or MCQ-) wood wastes. {yields} This sulfuric acid leaching process is simple and economic. {yields} The remediated wood could be recycled in the industry. - Abstract: Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood was widely used until 2004 for residential and industrial applications. Since 2004, CCA was replaced by alternative copper preservatives such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), copper azole (CA) and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ), for residential applications due to health concerns. Treated wood waste disposal is becoming an issue. Previous studies identified a chemical process for decontaminating CCA-treated wood waste based on sulfuric acid leaching. The potential application of this process to wood treated with the copper-based preservatives (alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), copper azole (CA) and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ)) is investigated here. Three consecutive leaching steps with 0.1 M sulfuric acid at 75 deg, C for 2 h were successful for all the types of treated wood and achieved more than 98% copper solubilisation. The different acidic leachates produced were successively treated by coagulation using ferric chloride and precipitation (pH = 7) using sodium hydroxide. Between 94 and 99% of copper in leachates could be recovered by electrodeposition after 90 min using 2 A electrical current. Thus, the process previously developed for CCA-treated wood waste decontamination could be efficiently applied for CA-, ACQ- or MCQ-treated wood.

  10. The European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) survey of candidaemia in Italy: in vitro susceptibility of 375 Candida albicans isolates and biofilm production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorano, Anna Maria; Prigitano, Anna; Biraghi, Emanuela; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2005-10-01

    To investigate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern of 375 Candida albicans bloodstream isolates recovered during the European Confederation of Medical Mycology survey of candidaemia performed in Lombardia, Italy and to test the ability to form biofilm. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin was performed by broth microdilution following the NCCLS guidelines. Biofilm production was measured using the XTT reduction assay in 59 isolates selected as representative of different patterns of susceptibility to flucytosine and azoles. MICs (mg/L) at which 90% of the strains were inhibited were < or =0.25 for flucytosine, 0.25 for caspofungin, 4 for fluconazole and 0.06 for itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole. Flucytosine resistance was detected in five isolates and was associated with serotype B in 2/29 and serotype A in 3/346. Resistance to fluconazole was detected in 10 isolates; nine of these exhibited reduced susceptibility to the other azoles. Among the 10 patients with fluconazole-resistant C. albicans bloodstream infection, only one, an AIDS patient, had been previously treated with fluconazole. Biofilm production was observed in 23 isolates (39%) and was significantly associated with serotype B. No relationship was detected with the pattern of antifungal susceptibility. Resistance is uncommon in C. albicans isolates recovered from blood cultures, while biofilm production is a relatively frequent event. Periodic surveillance is warranted to monitor the incidence of in vitro antifungal resistance as well as of biofilm production.

  11. [A study for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast by the Japanese Society for Medical Mycology (JSMM) method. The proposal of the modified JSMM method 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yayoi; Abe, Michiko; Ikeda, Reiko; Uno, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Maesaki, Shigefumi; Mohri, Shinobu; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Hasumi, Yayoi; Abe, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    The Japanese Society for Medical Mycology (JSMM) method used for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast, the MIC end point for azole antifungal agents, is currently set at IC(80). It was recently shown, however that there is an inconsistency in the MIC value between the JSMM method and the CLSI M27-A2 (CLSI) method, in which the end- point was to read as IC(50). To resolve this discrepancy and reassess the JSMM method, the MIC for three azoles, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole were compared to 5 strains of each of the following Candida species: C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. krusei, for a total of 25 comparisons, using the JSMM method, a modified JSMM method, and the CLSI method. The results showed that when the MIC end- point criterion of the JSMM method was changed from IC(80) to IC(50) (the modified JSMM method) , the MIC value was consistent and compatible with the CLSI method. Finally, it should be emphasized that the JSMM method, using a spectrophotometer for MIC measurement, was superior in both stability and reproducibility, as compared to the CLSI method in which growth was assessed by visual observation.

  12. Evaluation of Susceptibility of Strains of Candida Albicans Isolated from AIDS Patients to Fluconazole and Determination of CDR2 Resistance Gene in Resistant Strains by RT-PCR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Farahbakhsh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Nowadays, opportunistic fungi especially Candida albicans are the most common cause of life-threatening infections in immunodeficiency patients. Increasing Azole-resistant strains of C.albicans are a main problem in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the CDR2 gene in C.albicans azole resistant strains, isolated from AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis by RT-PCR method. Materials & Methods: The present experimental study was conducted at Tarbiat Modares University of Medical Sciences in 2009. C. albicans isolates from HIV infected patients were identified by standard procedures, including germ tube formation, clamidospor and color of colonies on CHROM agar. At first, susceptibility of C. albicans isolates was assessed by disk diffusion agar technique. Then, CDR2 resistance gene was analyzed by RT-PCR and electrophoresis of the PCR products. Finally, patterns of the resulted bands were compared with standard fluconazole resistant strains. The collected data was analyzed using the SPSS software. Results: The results of drug sensitivity of 66 C. albicans isolates from AIDS patients revealed that 62.6% were susceptible, 8.6% were susceptible-dose dependent (SDD and 28.7% were resistant. In RT-PCR analysis, 6% of patients had the CDR2 gene. Conclusion: The use of phenotypic methods like disk diffusion agar, which is cheaper, along with genotypic methods, like RT-PCR, which provide the possibility of studying the mechanism of drug resistance, is recommended.

  13. Structural complex of sterol 14[alpha]-demethylase (CYP51) with 14[alpha]-methylenecyclopropyl-[delta]7-24, 25-dihydrolanosterol[S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Jialin; Waterman, Michael R.; Nes, W. David; Lepesheva, Galina I. (Vanderbilt); (TTU); (NWU)

    2012-06-28

    Sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) that catalyzes the removal of the 14{alpha}-methyl group from the sterol nucleus is an essential enzyme in sterol biosynthesis, a primary target for clinical and agricultural antifungal azoles and an emerging target for antitrypanosomal chemotherapy. Here, we present the crystal structure of Trypanosoma (T) brucei CYP51 in complex with the substrate analog 14{alpha}-methylenecyclopropyl-{Delta}7-24,25-dihydrolanosterol (MCP). This sterol binds tightly to all protozoan CYP51s and acts as a competitive inhibitor of F105-containing (plant-like) T. brucei and Leishmania (L) infantum orthologs, but it has a much stronger, mechanism-based inhibitory effect on I105-containing (animal/fungi-like) T. cruzi CYP51. Depicting substrate orientation in the conserved CYP51 binding cavity, the complex specifies the roles of the contact amino acid residues and sheds new light on CYP51 substrate specificity. It also provides an explanation for the effect of MCP on T. cruzi CYP51. Comparison with the ligand-free and azole-bound structures supports the notion of structural rigidity as the characteristic feature of the CYP51 substrate binding cavity, confirming the enzyme as an excellent candidate for structure-directed design of new drugs, including mechanism-based substrate analog inhibitors.

  14. Application of 2-Trichloromethylbenzimidazole in Analytical Chemistry: A Highly Selective Chromogenic Reagent for Thin-Layer Chromatography and Some Other Analytical Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Konopski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-Trichloromethylbenzimidazole (TCMB was used as a chromogenic reagent in organic or inorganic analysis, mainly in thin-layer chromatography (TLC. In reactions of TCMB with some heteroaromatic nitrogen containing compounds, such as azines, azoles and benzazoles, a formation of high colored products occurred. For azines, the chromogenic reaction was highly regioselective, since the both adjacent α-positions versus the nitrogen atom(s must not be substituted. A TLC method of detection was developed. Thirty azines, azoles, and benzazoles were detected at the detection limit 10 ng to 1 μg. This method was also applied for detection of heteroaromatic pesticides, and the attempts to construct active and passive dosimeters for nicotine were made. In a prechromatographic reaction of aromatic o-diamines with methyl trichloroacetimidate, TCMB or its derivatives were formed in situ. Followed by TLC and visualization in pyridine vapors, this procedure was applied for detection of o-phenylenediamine derivatives. The reaction product of TCMB and pyridine (LI Complex was identified and fully characterized. Two different reaction mechanisms: with electron deficient basic heteroaromatic compounds, like pyridine, and with more acidic compounds, for example, pyrrole, were discussed. In aqueous solutions, the LI Complex may be also used as a new indicator for complexometric, adsorption and acid-base titration of inorganic compounds.

  15. Triazole resistance surveillance in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendiz Sharpe, Agustin; Lagrou, Katrien; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Lockhart, Shawn R; Verweij, Paul E

    2018-04-01

    Triazole resistance is an increasing concern in the opportunistic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. Resistance can develop through exposure to azole compounds during azole therapy or in the environment. Resistance mutations are commonly found in the Cyp51A-gene, although other known and unknown resistance mechanisms may be present. Surveillance studies show triazole resistance in six continents, although the presence of resistance remains unknown in many countries. In most countries, resistance mutations associated with the environment dominate, but it remains unclear if these resistance traits predominately migrate or arise locally. Patients with triazole-resistant aspergillus disease may fail to antifungal therapy, but only a limited number of cohort studies have been performed that show conflicting results. Treatment failure might be due to diagnostic delay or due to the limited number of alternative treatment options. The ISHAM/ECMM Aspergillus Resistance Surveillance working group was set up to facilitate surveillance studies and stimulate international collaborations. Important aims are to determine the resistance epidemiology in countries where this information is currently lacking, to gain more insight in the clinical implications of triazole resistance through a registry and to unify nomenclature through consensus definitions.

  16. Candidíase em pacientes aidéticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.E.O.P. Campos

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Trinta e cinco aidéticos entre 19 e 55 anos admitidos e tratados de candidíase no Hospital Emílio Ribas, SP, com ELISA positivo para HIV e confirmado pelo Western Blot. Tuberculose em 9 sendo 2 com pericardite; neurotoxoplasmose em 6; neurocriptococose em 5; herpes labial em 4; pneumocistose em 3 e sarcoma de Kaposi em 2, achavam-se associadas. A concentração inibitória mínima 50% (MIC 50% para os azoles foi: ketoconazol= 2,2 µg/ml; itraconazol- 21,0 µg/ml; fluconazol = 19,0 µg/ml. O MIC 50% para ospolienos: nistatina- 50,0 µg/ml; anfotericina B= 0,12 µg/ml e para 5 fluorcitosina= 1,6 µg/ml nas 35 amostras de Candida isoladas. Testes não paramétricos de Siegel revelaram significante identificação (80% das Candida albicans na candidíase, e que a dose de AMB não modificou o número de óbitos, precoce e tardio, ocorridos nesses aidéticos. O uso prévio dos azoles e da nistatina explicaria, talvez, o elevado MIC 50% observado nas amostras de Candida isoladas.

  17. Antifungal Activity of Brazilian Propolis Microparticles against Yeasts Isolated from Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelen Fátima Dalben Dota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis, a resinous compound produced by Apis mellifera L. bees, is known to possess a variety of biological activities and is applied in the therapy of various infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity of propolis ethanol extract (PE and propolis microparticles (PMs obtained from a sample of Brazilian propolis against clinical yeast isolates of importance in the vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC. PE was used to prepare the microparticles. Yeast isolates (n=89, obtained from vaginal exudates of patients with VVC, were exposed to the PE and the PMs. Moreover, the main antifungal drugs used in the treatment of VVC (Fluconazole, Voriconazole, Itraconazole, Ketoconazole, Miconazole and Amphotericin B were also tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined according to the standard broth microdilution method. Some Candida albicans isolates showed resistance or dose-dependent susceptibility for the azolic drugs and Amphotericin B. Non-C. albicans isolates showed more resistance and dose-dependent susceptibility for the azolic drugs than C. albicans. However, all of them were sensitive or dose-dependent susceptible for Amphotericin B. All yeasts were inhibited by PE and PMs, with small variation, independent of the species of yeast. The overall results provided important information for the potential application of PMs in the therapy of VVC and the possible prevention of the occurrence of new symptomatic episodes.

  18. Evaluation of efficacy, pharmacokinetics and tolerability of peptidomimetic aspartic proteinase inhibitors as cream formulation in experimental vaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Tringali, Giuseppe; Greco, Maria Cristina; Ragazzoni, Enzo; Calugi, Chiara; Trabocchi, Andrea; Sandini, Silvia; Graziani, Sofia; Cauda, Roberto; Cassone, Antonio; Guarna, Antonio; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2014-08-01

    It has been previously shown that the treatment with the two protease inhibitors APG12 and APG19 confers protection in a rat model of mucosal candidiasis; in this study, we examined whether these peptidomimetic inhibitors are also effective as a cream formulation in reducing Candida albicans vaginal infection. These efficacy studies were performed in a rat model of estrogen-dependent rat vaginitis by C. albicans on both azole-susceptible and azole-resistant C. albicans, and on both caspofungin-susceptible and caspofungin-resistant C. albicans strains. In vivo studies were also conducted in female albino rats and rabbits to obtain information about the safety, local tolerability and principal pharmacokinetics parameters of the two compounds. Both hit compounds showed remarkable results within the 48-h range as effective inhibitors of the infection, particularly causing rapid decay of vaginal C. albicans burden. Importantly, the two compounds showed marked acceleration of fungus clearance in the rats challenged with the fluconazole-resistant as well as with the capsofungin-resistant strain of C. albicans. Both compounds showed fast elimination rates when given by the intravenous route, and poor systemic absorption after intravaginal cream administration. Test drugs were also well tolerated in 7-day local tolerability experiments in the rabbit. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. Possible mechanisms of the antifungal activity of fluconazole in combination with terbinafine against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodavandi, Alireza; Alizadeh, Fahimeh; Vanda, Nasim Aghai; Karimi, Golgis; Chong, Pei Pei

    2014-12-01

    Candidiasis is a term describing infections by yeasts from the genus Candida, the majority Candida albicans. Treatment of such infections often requires antifungals such as the azoles, but increased use of these drugs has led to selection of yeasts with increased resistance to these drugs. Combination therapy would be one of the best strategies for the treatment of candidiasis due to increased resistance to azoles. The antifungal activities of fluconazole and terbinafine were evaluated in vitro alone and in combination using broth microdilution test and time kill study. Eventually the expression level of selected genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis of Candida was evaluated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The obtained results showed the significant MICs ranging from 0.25 to 8 µg/mL followed by FICs ranged from 0.37 to 1 in combination with fluconazole/terbinafine. Our findings have demonstrated that the combination of fluconazole and terbinafine could also significantly reduce the expression of ERG1, 3, and 11 in the cell membrane of Candida in all concentrations tested ranging from 1.73- to 6.99-fold. This study was undertaken with the ultimate goal of finding the probable targets of fluconazole/terbinafine in C. albicans by looking at its effects on cell membrane synthesis.

  20. Evolutionary divergence in the fungal response to fluconazole revealed by soft clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Kuo, Dwight; Tan, Kai; Zinman, Guy; Ravasi, Timothy; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Ideker, Trey

    2010-01-01

    Background: Fungal infections are an emerging health risk, especially those involving yeast that are resistant to antifungal agents. To understand the range of mechanisms by which yeasts can respond to anti-fungals, we compared gene expression patterns across three evolutionarily distant species - Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida glabrata and Kluyveromyces lactis - over time following fluconazole exposure. Results: Conserved and diverged expression patterns were identified using a novel soft clustering algorithm that concurrently clusters data from all species while incorporating sequence orthology. The analysis suggests complementary strategies for coping with ergosterol depletion by azoles - Saccharomyces imports exogenous ergosterol, Candida exports fluconazole, while Kluyveromyces does neither, leading to extreme sensitivity. In support of this hypothesis we find that only Saccharomyces becomes more azole resistant in ergosterol-supplemented media; that this depends on sterol importers Aus1 and Pdr11; and that transgenic expression of sterol importers in Kluyveromyces alleviates its drug sensitivity. Conclusions: We have compared the dynamic transcriptional responses of three diverse yeast species to fluconazole treatment using a novel clustering algorithm. This approach revealed significant divergence among regulatory programs associated with fluconazole sensitivity. In future, such approaches might be used to survey a wider range of species, drug concentrations and stimuli to reveal conserved and divergent molecular response pathways.

  1. Micafungin in the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P Wiederhold

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nathan P Wiederhold1, Jason M Cota2, Christopher R Frei11University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, Austin, Texas, USA; 2University of the Incarnate Word Feik School of Pharmacy, San Antonio, Texas, USAAbstract: Micafungin is an echinocandin antifungal agent available for clinical use in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Through inhibition of β-1,3-glucan production, an essential component of the fungal cell wall, micafungin exhibits potent antifungal activity against key pathogenic fungi, including Candida and Aspergillus species, while contributing minimal toxicity to mammalian cells. This activity is maintained against polyene and azole-resistant isolates. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated linear kinetics both in adults and children with concentration-dependent activity observed both in vitro and in vivo. Dosage escalation studies have also demonstrated that doses much higher than those currently recommended may be administered without serious adverse effects. Clinically, micafungin has been shown to be efficacious for the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Furthermore, the clinical effectiveness of micafungin against these infections occurs without the drug interactions that occur with the azoles and the nephrotoxicity observed with amphotericin B formulations. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical microbiology, mechanisms of resistance, safety, and clinical efficacy of micafungin in the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis.Keywords: micafungin, echinocandin, Candida, Aspergillus, invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis

  2. Identification of small molecules that disrupt vacuolar function in the pathogen Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Tournu

    Full Text Available The fungal vacuole is a large acidified organelle that performs a variety of cellular functions. At least a sub-set of these functions are crucial for pathogenic species of fungi, such as Candida albicans, to survive within and invade mammalian tissue as mutants with severe defects in vacuolar biogenesis are avirulent. We therefore sought to identify chemical probes that disrupt the normal function and/or integrity of the fungal vacuole to provide tools for the functional analysis of this organelle as well as potential experimental therapeutics. A convenient indicator of vacuolar integrity based upon the intracellular accumulation of an endogenously produced pigment was adapted to identify Vacuole Disrupting chemical Agents (VDAs. Several chemical libraries were screened and a set of 29 compounds demonstrated to reproducibly cause loss of pigmentation, including 9 azole antifungals, a statin and 3 NSAIDs. Quantitative analysis of vacuolar morphology revealed that (excluding the azoles a sub-set of 14 VDAs significantly alter vacuolar number, size and/or shape. Many C. albicans mutants with impaired vacuolar function are deficient in the formation of hyphal elements, a process essential for its pathogenicity. Accordingly, all 14 VDAs negatively impact C. albicans hyphal morphogenesis. Fungal selectivity was observed for approximately half of the VDA compounds identified, since they did not alter the morphology of the equivalent mammalian organelle, the lysosome. Collectively, these compounds comprise of a new collection of chemical probes that directly or indirectly perturb normal vacuolar function in C. albicans.

  3. Synthesis, Structure Optimization and Antifungal Screening of Novel Tetrazole Ring Bearing Acyl-Hydrazones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzoor A. Malik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Azoles are generally fungistatic, and resistance to fluconazole is emerging in several fungal pathogens. In an attempt to find novel azole antifungal agents with improved activity, a series of tetrazole ring bearing acylhydrazone derivatives were synthesized and screened for their in vitro antifungal activity. The mechanism of their antifungal activity was assessed by studying their effect on the plasma membrane using flow cytometry and determination of the levels of ergosterol, a fungal-specific sterol. Propidium iodide rapidly penetrated a majority of yeast cells when they were treated with the synthesized compounds at concentrations just above MIC, implying that fungicidal activity resulted from extensive lesions of the plasma membrane. Target compounds also caused a considerable reduction in the amount of ergosterol. The results also showed that the presence and position of different substituents on the phenyl ring of the acylhydrazone pendant seem to play a role on the antifungal activity as well as in deciding the fungistatic and fungicidal nature of the compounds.

  4. Evolutionary divergence in the fungal response to fluconazole revealed by soft clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Kuo, Dwight

    2010-07-23

    Background: Fungal infections are an emerging health risk, especially those involving yeast that are resistant to antifungal agents. To understand the range of mechanisms by which yeasts can respond to anti-fungals, we compared gene expression patterns across three evolutionarily distant species - Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida glabrata and Kluyveromyces lactis - over time following fluconazole exposure. Results: Conserved and diverged expression patterns were identified using a novel soft clustering algorithm that concurrently clusters data from all species while incorporating sequence orthology. The analysis suggests complementary strategies for coping with ergosterol depletion by azoles - Saccharomyces imports exogenous ergosterol, Candida exports fluconazole, while Kluyveromyces does neither, leading to extreme sensitivity. In support of this hypothesis we find that only Saccharomyces becomes more azole resistant in ergosterol-supplemented media; that this depends on sterol importers Aus1 and Pdr11; and that transgenic expression of sterol importers in Kluyveromyces alleviates its drug sensitivity. Conclusions: We have compared the dynamic transcriptional responses of three diverse yeast species to fluconazole treatment using a novel clustering algorithm. This approach revealed significant divergence among regulatory programs associated with fluconazole sensitivity. In future, such approaches might be used to survey a wider range of species, drug concentrations and stimuli to reveal conserved and divergent molecular response pathways.

  5. Candidal colonization, strain diversity, and antifungal susceptibility among adult diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Attas, Safia A; Amro, Soliman O

    2010-01-01

    Candidal colonization in diabetics is a matter of debate. The aim of this study is to investigate oral candidal colonization, strain diversity, antifungal susceptibility, and the influence of local and systemic host factors on candidal colonization in adult diabetics. We conducted a case-control study that compared 150 diabetics (49 type 1, 101 type 2) with 50 healthy controls. Two salivary samples were collected, using the oral rinse sampling method: one for salivary flow rate and pH determination, and the other for candidal colonization assessment. The candidal isolates were identified and tested in vitro for antifungal susceptibility using the commercial kit, Candifast. The relationship between specific host factors and candidal colonization was also investigated. Diabetics had a higher candidal carriage rate compared to controls, but not density. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species, but diabetics had a variety of other candidal species present. None of the control samples were resistant to any tested antifungal, while the diabetic samples had differing resistances to azole antifungals. Although there was a significant positive correlation between glycemic control and candidal colonization in type 2 diabetics, there was a negative correlation between salivary pH and candidal carriage in the controls versus density in type 2 diabetics. Diabetic patients not only had a higher candidal carriage rate, but also a variety of candidal species that were resistant to azole antifungals. Oral candidal colonization was significantly associated with glycemic control, type of diabetes, and salivary pH.

  6. [Pharmacology of the antifungals used in the treatment of aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, José Ramón; Sádaba, Belén; Gómez-Guíu, Almudena

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of invasive aspergillosis requires the use of drugs that characteristically have complex pharmacokinetic properties, the knowledge of which is essential to achieve maximum efficacy with minimal risk to the patient. The lipid-based amphotericin B formulations vary significantly in their pharmacokinetic behaviour, with very high plasma concentrations of the liposomal form, probably related to the presence of cholesterol in their structure. Azoles have a variable absorption profile, particularly in the case of itraconazole and posaconazole, with the latter very dependent on multiple factors. This may also lead to variations in voriconazole, which requires considering the possibility of monitoring plasma concentrations. The aim of this article is to review some of the most relevant aspects of the pharmacology of the antifungals used in the prophylaxis and treatment of the Aspergillus infection. For this reason, it includes the most relevant features of some of the azoles normally prescribed in this infection (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole) and the amphotericin B formulations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  7. Antifungal treatment for invasive Candida infections: a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis

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    Nachega Jean B

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of mortality among patients at risk. Treatment guidelines vary on optimal treatment strategies. We aimed to determine the effects of different antifungal therapies on global response rates, mortality and safety. Methods We searched independently and in duplicate 10 electronic databases from inception to May 2009. We selected any randomized trial assessing established antifungal therapies for confirmed cases of invasive candidiasis among predominantly adult populations. We performed a meta-analysis and then conducted a Bayesian mixed treatment comparison to differentiate treatment effectiveness. Sensitivity analyses included dosage forms of amphotericin B and fluconazole compared to other azoles. Results Our analysis included 11 studies enrolling a total of 965 patients. For our primary analysis of global response rates, we pooled 7 trials comparing azoles to amphotericin B, Relative Risk [RR] 0.87 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.78–0.96, P = 0.007, I2 = 43%, P = 0.09. We also pooled 2 trials of echinocandins versus amphotericin B and found a pooled RR of 1.10 (95% CI, 0.99–1.23, P = 0.08. One study compared anidulafungin to fluconazole and yielded a RR of 1.26 (95% CI, 1.06–1.51 in favor of anidulafungin. We pooled 7 trials assessing azoles versus amphotericin B for all-cause mortality, resulting in a pooled RR of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.74–1.05, P = 0.17, I2 = 0%, P = 0.96. Echinocandins versus amphotericin B (2 trials for all-cause mortality resulted in a pooled RR of 1.01 (95% CI, 0.84–1.20, P = 0.93. Anidulafungin versus fluconazole resulted in a RR of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.48–1.10, P = 0.34. Our mixed treatment comparison analysis found similar within-class effects across all interventions. Adverse event profiles differed, with amphotericin B exhibiting larger adverse event effects. Conclusion Treatment options appear to offer preferential effects on response rates and mortality. When

  8. Phytotoxicity of wastewater-born micropollutants – Characterisation of three antimycotics and a cationic surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Elisabeth; Roller, Elias; Kunkel, Uwe; Ternes, Thomas A.; Coors, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Sewage sludge applied to soil may be a valuable fertiliser but can also introduce poorly degradable and highly adsorptive wastewater-born residues of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) to the soil, posing a potential risk to the receiving environment. Three azole antimycotics (climbazole, ketoconazole and fluconazole), and one quaternary ammonium compound (benzyldimethyldodecylammonium chloride, BDDA) that are frequently detected in municipal sewage sludge and/or treated wastewater were therefore characterised in their toxicity toward terrestrial (Brassica napus) and aquatic (Lemna minor) plants. Fluconazole and climbazole showed the greatest toxicity to B. napus, while toxicity of ketoconazole and BDDA was by one to two orders of magnitude lower. Sludge amendment to soil at an agriculturally realistic rate of 5 t/ha significantly reduced the bioconcentration of BDDA in B. napus shoots compared to tests without sludge amendment, although not significantly reducing phytotoxicity. Ketoconazole, fluconazole and BDDA proved to be very toxic to L. minor with median effective concentrations ranging from 55.7 μg/L to 969 μg/L. In aquatic as well as terrestrial plants, the investigated azoles exhibited growth-retarding symptoms presumably related to an interference with phytohormone synthesis as known for structurally similar fungicides used in agriculture. While all four substances exhibited considerable phytotoxicity, the effective concentrations were at least one order of magnitude higher than concentrations measured in sewage sludge and effluent. Based on preliminary hazard quotients, BDDA and climbazole appeared to be of greater environmental concern than the two pharmaceuticals fluconazole and ketoconazole. - Highlights: • Azole antimycotics and the investigated QAC are highly toxic toward aquatic plants at concentrations in the µg/L range. • Climbazole and fluconazole are very toxic toward terrestrial plants and show symptoms specific

  9. Candida albicans AGE3, the ortholog of the S. cerevisiae ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1, is required for hyphal growth and drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lettner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyphal growth and multidrug resistance of C. albicans are important features for virulence and antifungal therapy of this pathogenic fungus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show by phenotypic complementation analysis that the C. albicans gene AGE3 is the functional ortholog of the yeast ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1. The finding that the gene is required for efficient endocytosis points to an important functional role of Age3p in endosomal compartments. Most C. albicans age3Delta mutant cells which grew as cell clusters under yeast growth conditions showed defects in filamentation under different hyphal growth conditions and were almost completely disabled for invasive filamentous growth. Under hyphal growth conditions only a fraction of age3Delta cells shows a wild-type-like polarization pattern of the actin cytoskeleton and lipid rafts. Moreover, age3Delta cells were highly susceptible to several unrelated toxic compounds including antifungal azole drugs. Irrespective of the AGE3 genotype, C-terminal fusions of GFP to the drug efflux pumps Cdr1p and Mdr1p were predominantly localized in the plasma membrane. Moreover, the plasma membranes of wild-type and age3Delta mutant cells contained similar amounts of Cdr1p, Cdr2p and Mdr1p. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that the defect in sustaining filament elongation is probably caused by the failure of age3Delta cells to polarize the actin cytoskeleton and possibly of inefficient endocytosis. The high susceptibility of age3Delta cells to azoles is not caused by inefficient transport of efflux pumps to the cell membrane. A possible role of a vacuolar defect of age3Delta cells in drug susceptibility is proposed and discussed. In conclusion, our study shows that the ARF-GAP Age3p is required for hyphal growth which is an important virulence factor of C. albicans and essential for detoxification of azole drugs which are routinely used for antifungal therapy. Thus, it

  10. Synthesis and antimicrobial properties of 3-aryl-1-(1,1'-biphenyl-4-yl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)propanes as 'carba-analogues' of the N-arylmethyl-N-[(1,1'-biphenyl)-4-ylmethyl])-1H-imidazol-1-amines, a new class of antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Sabrina; Stefancich, Giorgio; Chillotti, Annalisa; Poni, Graziella

    2003-08-01

    A new series of 3-phenyl-1-(1,1'-biphenyl-4-yl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)propane derivatives 2a-l (related to the antifungal bifonazole) was synthesized and tested for antimicrobial activity. A number of substituents on the phenyl ring were chosen to compare the relative biological properties with those of corresponding aza-analogues, previously described by us. The in vitro antifungal activities of the newly synthesized azoles were tested against several pathogenic fungi responsible for human disease. Test pathogens included representatives of yeasts (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Criptococcus neoformans), dermathophytes (Tricophyton verrucosum, Tricophyton rubrum, Microsporum gypseum) and moulds (Aspergillus fumigatus). Bifonazole and miconazole were used as reference drugs. Title compounds were prepared by alkylation of 1-biphenyl-4-yl-2-imidazol-1-yl-ethanone with the proper arylmethyl halide and subsequent reduction of corresponding ketones applying the Huang-Minlon modification of the Wolff-Kishner reaction.

  11. Role of inhaled amphotericin in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

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    I S Sehgal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA is an immunological pulmonary disorder caused by immune reactions mounted against the ubiquitous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. The disease clinically manifests with poorly controlled asthma, hemoptysis, systemic manifestations like fever, anorexia and weight loss, fleeting pulmonary opacities and bronchiectasis. The natural course of the disease is characterized by repeated episodes of exacerbations. Almost 30-40% of the patients require prolonged therapy, which currently consists of corticosteroids and anti-fungal azoles; both these agents have significant adverse reactions. Amphotericin B administered via the inhaled route can achieve a high concentration in the small airways with minimal systemic side-effects. Nebulized amphotericin B has been used in the management of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. The aim of this review is to study the utility of inhaled amphotericin in ABPA.

  12. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Tracy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA, a progressive fungal allergic lung disease, is a common complication of asthma or cystic fibrosis. Although ABPA has been recognized since the 1950s, recent research has underscored the importance of Th2 immune deviation and granulocyte activation in its pathogenesis. There is also strong evidence of widespread under-diagnosis due to the complexity and lack of standardization of diagnostic criteria. Treatment has long focused on downregulation of the inflammatory response with prolonged courses of oral glucocorticosteroids, but more recently concerns with steroid toxicity and availability of new treatment modalities has led to trials of oral azoles, inhaled amphotericin, pulse intravenous steroids, and subcutaneously-injected anti-IgE monoclonal antibody omalizumab, all of which show evidence of efficacy and reduced toxicity.

  13. Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Palliative Care Patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, Karen; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Høiby, Niels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is a significant cause of morbidity, especially among patients with advanced cancer. The incidence and significance of yeast carriage and OPC in the palliative care setting in Denmark is unknown. The best diagnostic strategy and treatment regimen has...... positive and negative predictive value (∼50%). Candida albicans accounted for half of the isolates cultured. No C. albicans isolate displayed acquired fluconazole resistance; however, 3 out of 12 isolates of normally fluconazole-susceptible species were fluconazole resistant. These were all from patients...... recently treated with azoles. CONCLUSIONS: In total, 52% of culture-positive patients harbored at least one isolate with innately or acquired decreased fluconazole susceptibility. Therefore, susceptibility testing appears recommendable for patients with clinical signs of OPC....

  14. Multidrug-Resistant Candida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Patterson, Thomas F

    2017-01-01

    Invasive Candida infections remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in hospitalized and immunocompromised or critically ill patients. A limited number of antifungal agents from only a few drug classes are available to treat patients with these serious infections. Resistance...... can be either intrinsic or acquired. Resistance mechanisms are not exchanged between Candida; thus, acquired resistance either emerges in response to an antifungal selection pressure in the individual patient or, more rarely, occur due to horizontal transmission of resistant strains between patients....... Although multidrug resistance is uncommon, increasing reports of multidrug resistance to the azoles, echinocandins, and polyenes have occurred in several Candida species, most notably Candida glabrata and more recently Candida auris. Drivers are overall antifungal use, subtherapeutic drug levels at sites...

  15. Amphotericin B and caspofungin resistance in Candida glabrata isolates recovered from a critically ill patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Mikkel; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Heslet, Lars

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Consecutive Candida glabrata isolates recovered from a patient in an intensive care unit were resistant to amphotericin B (minimum inhibitory concentration, up to 32 mu g/mL; determined by Etest [AB Biodisk]). Analyses at the national reference laboratory showed that some isolates were...... also resistant to azoles and caspofungin. In this study, 4 isolates were studied thoroughly using susceptibility assays and a mouse model and to determine clonality. METHODS: Different broth microdilution tests, Etests, and time-kill studies for antifungals were performed in different media. Three...... isolates obtained from nonrelated patients, and a reference strain. RESULTS: The murine model indicated that 1 isolate was resistant to amphotericin B, 1 had intermediate susceptibility, and 1 was fully susceptible. Two of the 3 isolates were resistant to caspofungin. Microdilution methods did not reliably...

  16. Tolerability and safety of antifungal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Scaglione

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available When treating critically ill patients, as those with fungal infections, attention should be focused on the appropriate use of drugs, especially in terms of dose, safety, and tolerability. The fungal infection itself and the concomitant physiological disorders concur to increase the risk of mortality in these patients, therefore the use of any antifungal agent should be carefully evaluated, considering both the direct action on the target fungus and the adverse effects eventually caused. Among antifungal drugs, echinocandins have the greatest tolerability. In fact, unlike amphotericin B, showing nephrotoxicity, and azoles, which are hepatotoxic, the use of echinocandins doesn’t result in major adverse events.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i2s.873

  17. Lymphocutaneous Sporotrichosis Treated with Potassium Iodide with Development of Subclinical Hypothyroidism: Wolff-Chaikoff Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pooja; Raihan, M; Kubba, Asha; Gautam, Ram K

    2017-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycotic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii that is acquired by traumatic implantation. The diagnosis is established by demonstration of fungal elements on histopathology and culture. Potassium iodide, azole antifungals, and terbinafine are the treatment options available. In this article, we report a 60-year-old female with lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis that responded well to potassium iodide. However, subclinical hypothyroidism (Wolff-Chaikoff effect) was encountered as a side effect of therapy which was managed with thyroxine replacement. Knowledge about the Wolff-Chaikoff effect (WCE) is important for the dermatologist and reinforces the need for screening and monitoring of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in patients where long duration therapy is being planned.

  18. Donor Derived Candida stellimalicola in a Clinical Specimen: Preservation Fluid Contamination During Pancreas Procurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Damien; Huguenin, Antoine; Tisserand, Elodie; Reiter, Véronique; Morelon, Emmanuel; Badet, Lionel; Villena, Isabelle; Wallon, Martine; Toubas, Dominique

    2017-07-05

    We report here a case of possible donor-derived Candida stellimalicola infection after pancreas transplantation. Candida stellimalicola, an environmental non-filamentous yeast, was isolated from both the peritoneal fluid of the graft donor and the preservation fluid of the transplanted pancreas. Interestingly, this strain exhibited high minimum inhibitory concentrations to azoles. These results justified the use of echinocandins as therapy instead of fluconazole. This switch permitted a favorable outcome. To our knowledge, this is the first report of C. stellimalicola from clinical samples and therefore the first reported case of a possible human infection. This case report highlights the need for standardized microbiological procedures in solid organ transplant settings. Moreover, it underlines the importance of using molecular identification technique when routine techniques do not allow successful identification of the pathogen. It is of utmost importance to determine sensitivity profile, even in the absence of species-level identification, because resistance to fluconazole is not uncommon, especially in emergent species.

  19. [Invasive mould disease in haematological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mould infections (IMI) are a persistent problem with high morbidity and mortality rates among patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Management of IMI in this setting has become increasingly complex with the advent of new antifungal agents and diagnostic tests, which have resulted in different therapeutic strategies (prophylactic, empirical, pre-emptive, and directed). A proper assessment of the individual risk for IMI appears to be critical in order to use the best prophylactic and therapeutic approach and increase the survival rates. Among the available antifungal drugs, the most frequently used in the hematologic patient are fluconazole, mould-active azoles (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole), candins (anidulafungin, caspofungin and micafungin), and lipid formulations of amphotericin B. Specific recommendations for their use, and criteria for selecting the antifungal agents are discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  20. Candida glabrata olecranon bursitis treated with bursectomy and intravenous caspofungin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedros, John G; Keenan, Kendra E; Trachtenberg, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons are becoming more involved in the care of patients with septic arthritis and bursitis caused by yeast species. This case report involves a middle-aged immunocompromised female who developed a Candida glabrata septic olecranon bursitis that developed after she received a corticosteroid injection in the olecranon bursa for presumed aseptic bursitis. Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata is the second most frequently isolated Candida species from the bloodstream in the United States. Increased use of fluconazole and other azole antifungal agents as a prophylactic treatment for recurrent Candida albicans infections in immunocompromised individuals is one reason why there appears to be increased resistance of C. glabrata and other nonalbicans Candida (NAC) species to fluconazole. In this patient, this infection was treated with surgery (bursectomy) and intravenous caspofungin, an echinocandin. This rare infectious etiology coupled with this intravenous antifungal treatment makes this case novel among cases of olecranon bursitis caused by yeasts.

  1. Recent advances in the ruthenium-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes with aromatics: synthesis of trisubstituted alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Rajendran; Jeganmohan, Masilamani

    2015-11-14

    The hydroarylation of alkynes with substituted aromatics in the presence of a metal catalyst via chelation-assisted C-H bond activation is a powerful method to synthesize trisubstituted alkenes. Chelation-assisted C-H bond activation can be done by two ways: (a) an oxidative addition pathway and (b) a deprotonation pathway. Generally, a mixture of cis and trans stereoisomeric as well as regioisomeric trisubstituted alkenes was observed in an oxidative addition pathway. In the deprotonation pathway, the hydroarylation reaction can be done in a highly regio- and stereoselective manner, and enables preparation of the expected trisubstituted alkenes in a highly selective manner. Generally, ruthenium, rhodium and cobalt complexes are used as catalysts in the reaction. In this review, a ruthenium-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes with substituted aromatics is covered completely. The hydroarylation reaction of alkynes with amide, azole, carbamate, phosphine oxide, amine, acetyl, sulfoxide and sulphur directed aromatics is discussed.

  2. A Case Report of Penile Infection Caused by Fluconazole- and Terbinafine-Resistant Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxuan; Hu, Yanqing; Lu, Yan; Huang, Shiyun; Liu, Kangxing; Han, Xue; Mao, Zuhao; Wu, Zhong; Zhou, Xianyi

    2017-04-01

    Candida albicans is the most common pathogen that causes balanoposthitis. It often causes recurrence of symptoms probably due to its antifungal resistance. A significant number of balanitis Candida albicans isolates are resistant to azole and terbinafine antifungal agents in vitro. However, balanoposthitis caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans has rarely been reported. Here, we describe a case of a recurrent penile infection caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans, as well as the treatments administered to this patient. The isolate from the patient was tested for drug susceptibility in vitro. It was sensitive to itraconazole, voriconazole, clotrimazole and amphotericin B, but not to terbinafine and fluconazole. Thus, oral itraconazole was administrated to this patient with resistant Candida albicans penile infection. The symptoms were improved, and mycological examination result was negative. Follow-up treatment of this patient for 3 months showed no recurrence.

  3. Treatment of dermatophytosis in elderly, children, and pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subuhi Kaul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophytic infection of the skin and its appendages is a common occurrence. Though usually straightforward, treatment of dermatophytosis becomes notably challenging in certain population groups – pregnant women, children, and elderly. Treatment with topical azoles/allylamines alone is effective in limited cutaneous disease in all three groups. Terbinafine is the preferred oral agent in elderly population for treatment of extensive cutaneous disease and onychomycosis due to its lack of cardiac complications and lower propensity for drug interactions. If required, additional physical/mechanical modalities can be employed for symptomatic onychomycosis. Data for systemic therapy in children mainly pertains to the treatment of tinea capitis. At present, very little data exists regarding the safety of systemic antifungals in pregnancy and there is an effort to restrict treatment to topical therapies because of their negligible systemic absorption.

  4. The Candida Pathogenic Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Siobhán A.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida species are the most common causes of fungal infection. Approximately 90% of infections are caused by five species: Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei. Three (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis) belong to the CTG clade, in which the CTG codon is translated as serine and not leucine. C. albicans remains the most commonly isolated but is decreasing relative to the other species. The increasing incidence of C. glabrata is related to its reduced susceptibility to azole drugs. Genome analysis suggests that virulence in the CTG clade is associated with expansion of gene families, particularly of cell wall genes. Similar independent processes took place in the C. glabrata species group. Gene loss and expansion in an ancestor of C. glabrata may have resulted in preadaptations that enabled pathogenicity. PMID:25183855

  5. Catheter-related candidemia caused by Candida haemulonii in a patient in long-term hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunyong; Ko, Kwan Soo; Moon, Su Yeon; Lee, Mi Suk; Lee, Mi Young; Son, Jun Seong

    2011-02-01

    Candida haemulonii, one of the non-albicans Candida species, is an emerging yeast pathogen that is known to be resistant to amphotericin B and other antifungal agents such as azoles. These anti-fungal agents have often been associated with clinical treatment failure, so no treatment regimen has been clearly established for invasive C. haemulonii infections. We investigated a catheter-related infection of C. haemulonii candidemia in an adult patient in long-term hospital care. In the early stages, the candidemia remained persistent despite treatment with fluconazole. However, after changing the antifungal agent to caspofungin, the candidemia was resolved. Fluconazole and amphotericin B are not reliable empirical antifungal agents for invasive C. haemulonii infections, as shown in previous case reports. An echinocandin such as caspofungin may be an appropriate empirical choice of antifungal agent for an invasive C. haemulonii infection.

  6. Antifungal pharmacodynamics: Latin America's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier M. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current increment of invasive fungal infections and the availability of new broad-spectrum antifungal agents has increased the use of these agents by non-expert practitioners, without an impact on mortality. To improve efficacy while minimizing prescription errors and to reduce the high monetary cost to the health systems, the principles of pharmacokinetics (PK and pharmacodynamics (PD are necessary. A systematic review of the PD of antifungals agents was performed aiming at the practicing physician without expertise in this field. The initial section of this review focuses on the general concepts of antimicrobial PD. In vitro studies, fungal susceptibility and antifungal serum concentrations are related with different doses and dosing schedules, determining the PD indices and the magnitude required to obtain a specific outcome. Herein the PD of the most used antifungal drug classes in Latin America (polyenes, azoles, and echinocandins is discussed.

  7. Susceptibility testing of terbinafine alone and in combination with amphotericin B, itraconazole, or voriconazole against conidia and hyphae of dematiaceous molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancalana, Fernanda Simas Corrêa; Lyra, Luzia; Moretti, Maria Luiza; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli

    2011-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated excellent in vivo efficacy of terbinafine combined with other antifungal agents against dematiaceous molds; however, there is a lack of in vitro studies. Most studies evaluated conidia inocula, but susceptibility testing of hyphae could mimic the fungal status in infected tissues and might reflect the therapeutic potential of the agent. We investigated the in vitro susceptibility of terbinafine alone and in combination with amphotericin B, itraconazole, or voriconazole against conidia by microdilution and dynamic measurement of hyphae growth of dematiaceous molds. The MIC values for hyphae were, until 3 dilutions, below the MIC obtained for conidia. The results indicated 100% synergistic interactions between terbinafine and azoles or amphotericin B in all tests, but lower MICs for hyphae. In conclusion, our findings allow us to say that the hyphal form of tested dematiaceous molds showed high susceptibility to all antifungal agents evaluated, alone and in combination with terbinafine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Practical aspects of apixaban use in clinical practice: continuing the theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Bel'diev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there are no generally accepted guidelines for the use of apixaban together with CYP3A4 and/or P-glycoprotein (P-gp inhibitors. Analysis of clinical and pharmacological studies suggests that apixaban dose should be reduced to 2.5 mg twice daily when co-administered with a strong CYP3A4 and P-gp inhibitors, such as azole antimycotics, HIV protease inhibitors and clarithromycin. However, it is preferred to avoid apixaban combination with strong CYP3A4 and P-gp inhibitors in patients with a creatinine clearance (CrCl <30 mL/min. According to preliminary calculations, apixaban dose should also be adjusted in patients with CrCl <70-80 ml/min, receiving less potent inhibitors of CYP3A4 and/or P-gp, such as diltiazem, naproxen, verapamil, amiodarone and quinidine. 

  9. An experimental and clinical assay with ketoconazole in the treatment of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigman Brener

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available Ketoconazole an azole antifungic drug which is already in the market has also been demonstrated to be active against Trypanossoma cruzi experimental infections. In this paper we confirmed the drug effect and investigated its range of activity against different T. cruzi strains naturally resistant or susceptible to both standard drugs Nifurtimox and Benznidazole used clinically in Chagas disease. Moreover, we have shown that the association of Ketoconazole plus Lovastatin (an inhibitor of sterol synthesis, which has an antiproliferative effect against T. cruzi in vitro, failed to enhance the supressive effect of Ketoconazole displayed when administered alone to infected mice. Finally, administration in chronic chagasic patients of Ketoconazole at doses used in the treatment of deep mycosis also failed to induce cure as demonstrated by parasitological and serological tests. The strategy of identify and test drugs which are already in the market and fortuitously are active against T. cruzi has been discussed.

  10. Severe Dermatophytosis and Acquired or Innate Immunodeficiency: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Rouzaud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophytes are keratinophilic fungi responsible for benign and common forms of infection worldwide. However, they can lead to rare and severe diseases in immunocompromised patients. Severe forms include extensive and/or invasive dermatophytosis, i.e., deep dermatophytosis and Majocchi’s granuloma. They are reported in immunocompromised hosts with primary (autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency or acquired (solid organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases requiring immunosuppressive treatments, HIV infection immunodeficiencies. The clinical manifestations of the infection are not specific. Lymph node and organ involvement may also occur. Diagnosis requires both mycological and histological findings. There is no consensus on treatment. Systemic antifungal agents such as terbinafine and azoles (itraconazole or posaconazole are effective. However, long-term outcome and treatment management depend on the site and extent of the infection and the nature of the underlying immunodeficiency.

  11. Pesticides in the Ebro River basin: Occurrence and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ccanccapa, Alexander; Masiá, Ana; Navarro-Ortega, Alícia; Picó, Yolanda; Barceló, Damià

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 50 pesticides were analyzed in the Ebro River basin in 2010 and 2011 to assess their impact in water, sediment and biota. A special emphasis was placed on the potential effects of both, individual pesticides and their mixtures, in three trophic levels (algae, daphnia and fish) using Risk Quotients (RQs) and Toxic Units (TUs) for water and sediments. Chlorpyrifos, diazinon and carbendazim were the most frequent in water (95, 95 and 70% of the samples, respectively). Imazalil (409.73 ng/L) and diuron (150 ng/L) were at the highest concentrations. Sediment and biota were less contaminated. Chlorpyrifos, diazinon and diclofenthion were the most frequent in sediments (82, 45 and 21% of the samples, respectively). The only pesticide detected in biota was chlorpyrifos (up to 840.2 ng g"−"1). Ecotoxicological risk assessment through RQs showed that organophosphorus and azol presented high risk for algae; organophosphorus, benzimidazoles, carbamates, juvenile hormone mimic and other pesticides for daphnia, and organophosphorus, azol and juvenile hormone mimics for fish. The sum TU_s_i_t_e for water and sediments showed values < 1 for the three bioassays. In both matrices, daphnia and fish were more sensitive to the mixture of pesticide residues present. - Highlights: • Wide occurrence of pesticides in water and in lesser extent in sediment and biota. • Ecotoxicological pesticide risk assessment in the Ebro river and its tributaries. • Sum TU_s_i_t_e pointed out daphnia as more sensitive to the pesticide residue mixture. • Chronic toxicity test (RQ) showed risk in three trophic level (algae, daphnia and fish). - Evidence of water, sediment and biota contamination by a cocktail of pesticide residues especially hazardous for Daphnia.

  12. Longitudinal genotyping of Candida dubliniensis isolates reveals strain maintenance, microevolution, and the emergence of itraconazole resistance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleischhacker, M

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the population structure of 208 Candida dubliniensis isolates obtained from 29 patients (25 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 4 HIV negative) as part of a longitudinal study. The isolates were identified as C. dubliniensis by arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and then genotyped using the Cd25 probe specific for C. dubliniensis. The majority of the isolates (55 of 58) were unique to individual patients, and more than one genotype was recovered from 15 of 29 patients. A total of 21 HIV-positive patients were sampled on more than one occasion (2 to 36 times). Sequential isolates recovered from these patients were all closely related, as demonstrated by hybridization with Cd25 and genotyping by PCR. Six patients were colonized by the same genotype of C. dubliniensis on repeated sampling, while strains exhibiting altered genotypes were recovered from 15 of 21 patients. The majority of these isolates demonstrated minor genetic alterations, i.e., microevolution, while one patient acquired an unrelated strain. The C. dubliniensis strains could not be separated into genetically distinct groups based on patient viral load, CD4 cell count, or oropharyngeal candidosis. However, C. dubliniensis isolates obtained from HIV-positive patients were more closely related than those recovered from HIV-negative patients. Approximately 8% (16 of 194) of isolates exhibited itraconazole resistance. Cross-resistance to fluconazole was only observed in one of these patients. Two patients harboring itraconazole-resistant isolates had not received any previous azole therapy. In conclusion, longitudinal genotyping of C. dubliniensis isolates from HIV-infected patients reveals that isolates from the same patient are generally closely related and may undergo microevolution. In addition, isolates may acquire itraconazole resistance, even in the absence of prior azole therapy.

  13. Direct molecular diagnosis of aspergillosis and CYP51A profiling from respiratory samples of French patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microbiological diagnosis of aspergillosis and triazole resistance is limited by poor culture yield. To better estimate this shortcoming, we compared culture and molecular detection of A. fumigatus in respiratory samples from French patients at risk for aspergillosis. Methods: A total of 97 respiratory samples including bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL, bronchial aspirates (BA, tracheal aspirates, sputa, pleural fluids, and lung biopsy were collected from 33 patients having invasive aspergillosis (n=12, chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (n=3, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (n=7 or colonization (n=11 and 28 controls. Each specimen was evaluated by culture, pan-Aspergillus qPCR, and CYP51A PCR and sequencing. Results: One A. flavus and 19 A. fumigatus with one multiazole resistant strain (5.3% were cultured from 20 samples. Culture positivity was 62.5%, 75%, 42.9%, and 15.8% in ABPA, CPA, IA and colonized patients, respectively. Aspergillus detection rate was significantly higher by pan-Aspergillus qPCR than by culture in IA (90.5% vs 42.9%; P<0.05 and colonization group (73.7% vs 15.8%; P<0.05. The CYP51A PCR found one TR34/L98H along with 5 novel cyp51A mutations (4 non-synonymous and 1 promoter mutations, yet no association can be established currently between these novel mutations and azole resistance. The analysis of 11 matched pairs of BA and BAL samples found that 9/11 BA carried greater fungal load than BAL and CYP51A detection was more sensitive in BA than in BAL. Conclusion: Direct molecular detection of Aspergillus spp. and azole resistance markers are useful adjunct tools for comprehensive aspergillosis diagnosis. The observed superior diagnostic value of BAs to BAL fluids warrants more in-depth study.

  14. Challenges in microbiological diagnosis of invasive Aspergillus infections [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Alanio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA has been increasingly reported in populations other than the historical hematology patients and there are new questions about the performance of microbiological tools. Microscopy and culture have been completed by biomarkers, either antigens or DNA, and in blood or respiratory specimens or both. First studied in hematology, the antigen galactomannan performance in serum is low in other patient populations where the pathophysiology of the infection can be different and the prevalence of IA is much lower. DNA detection with polymerase chain reaction (PCR in blood or serum (or both has reached a certain level of acceptance thanks to consensus methods based on real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. When used on respiratory specimens, galactomannan and qPCR depend on standardization of the sampling and the diverse mycological procedures. Thus, culture remains the main diagnostic criterion in critically ill patients. The current trend toward more effective anti-mold prophylaxis in hematology hampers the yield of a screening strategy, as is usually performed in hematology. Therefore, circulating biomarkers as confirmatory tests should be considered and their performance should be reappraised in each new setting. The use of azole prophylaxis also raises the issue of selecting azole-resistance Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Ideally, the biomarkers will be more efficient when individual genetic risks of IA are defined. Culture, though not standardized, remains a key element for the diagnosis of IA and has the advantage to easily detect molds other than A. fumigatus. It is still unclear whether next-generation sequencing will replace culture in the future.

  15. Structural and Functional Elucidation of Yeast Lanosterol 14α-Demethylase in Complex with Agrochemical Antifungals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagatova, Alia A.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Negroni, Jacopo; Wilson, Rajni K.; Woods, Matthew A.; Monk, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Azole antifungals, known as demethylase inhibitors (DMIs), target sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway of fungal pathogens of both plants and humans. DMIs remain the treatment of choice in crop protection against a wide range of fungal phytopathogens that have the potential to reduce crop yields and threaten food security. We used a yeast membrane protein expression system to overexpress recombinant hexahistidine-tagged S. cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase and the Y140F or Y140H mutants of this enzyme as surrogates in order characterize interactions with DMIs. The whole-cell antifungal activity (MIC50 values) of both the R- and S-enantiomers of tebuconazole, prothioconazole (PTZ), prothioconazole-desthio, and oxo-prothioconazole (oxo-PTZ) as well as for fluquinconazole, prochloraz and a racemic mixture of difenoconazole were determined. In vitro binding studies with the affinity purified enzyme were used to show tight type II binding to the yeast enzyme for all compounds tested except PTZ and oxo-PTZ. High resolution X-ray crystal structures of ScErg11p6×His in complex with seven DMIs, including four enantiomers, reveal triazole-mediated coordination of all compounds and the specific orientation of compounds within the relatively hydrophobic binding site. Comparison with CYP51 structures from fungal pathogens including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Aspergillus fumigatus provides strong evidence for a highly conserved CYP51 structure including the drug binding site. The structures obtained using S. cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase in complex with these agrochemicals provide the basis for understanding the impact of mutations on azole susceptibility and a platform for the structure-directed design of the next-generation of DMIs. PMID:27907120

  16. ERG2 and ERG24 Are Required for Normal Vacuolar Physiology as Well as Candida albicans Pathogenicity in a Murine Model of Disseminated but Not Vaginal Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Tapia, Arturo; Peters, Brian M; Eberle, Karen E; Kerns, Morgan E; Foster, Timothy P; Marrero, Luis; Noverr, Mairi C; Fidel, Paul L; Palmer, Glen E

    2015-10-01

    Several important classes of antifungal agents, including the azoles, act by blocking ergosterol biosynthesis. It was recently reported that the azoles cause massive disruption of the fungal vacuole in the prevalent human pathogen Candida albicans. This is significant because normal vacuolar function is required to support C. albicans pathogenicity. This study examined the impact of the morpholine antifungals, which inhibit later steps of ergosterol biosynthesis, on C. albicans vacuolar integrity. It was found that overexpression of either the ERG2 or ERG24 gene, encoding C-8 sterol isomerase or C-14 sterol reductase, respectively, suppressed C. albicans sensitivity to the morpholines. In addition, both erg2Δ/Δ and erg24Δ/Δ mutants were hypersensitive to the morpholines. These data are consistent with the antifungal activity of the morpholines depending upon the simultaneous inhibition of both Erg2p and Erg24p. The vacuoles within both erg2Δ/Δ and erg24Δ/Δ C. albicans strains exhibited an aberrant morphology and accumulated large quantities of the weak base quinacrine, indicating enhanced vacuolar acidification compared with that of control strains. Both erg mutants exhibited significant defects in polarized hyphal growth and were avirulent in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Surprisingly, in a mouse model of vaginal candidiasis, both mutants colonized mice at high levels and induced a pathogenic response similar to that with the controls. Thus, while targeting Erg2p or Erg24p alone could provide a potentially efficacious therapy for disseminated candidiasis, it may not be an effective strategy to treat vaginal infections. The potential value of drugs targeting these enzymes as adjunctive therapies is discussed. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Efficacy and tolerability of topical sertaconazole versus topical terbinafine in localized dermatophytosis: A randomized, observer-blind, parallel group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Dattatreyo; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Sen, Sukanta; Sarkar, Saswati; Hazra, Avijit; De, Radharaman

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal dermatophyte infections most commonly manifest as tinea corporis or tinea cruris. Topical azole antifungals are commonly used in their treatment but literature suggests that most require twice-daily application and provide lower cure rates than the allylamine antifungal terbinafine. We conducted a head-to-head comparison of the effectiveness of the once-daily topical azole, sertaconazole, with terbinafine in these infections. We conducted a randomized, observer-blind, parallel group study (Clinical Trial Registry India [CTRI]/2014/09/005029) with adult patients of either sex presenting with localized lesions. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by potassium hydroxide smear microscopy of skin scrapings. After baseline assessment of erythema, scaling, and pruritus, patients applied either of the two study drugs once daily for 2 weeks. If clinical cure was not seen at 2 weeks, but improvement was noted, application was continued for further 2 weeks. Patients deemed to be clinical failure at 2 weeks were switched to oral antifungals. Overall 88 patients on sertaconazole and 91 on terbinafine were analyzed. At 2 weeks, the clinical cure rates were comparable at 77.27% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.52%-86.03%) for sertaconazole and 73.63% (95% CI 64.57%-82.68%) for terbinafine ( P = 0.606). Fourteen patients in either group improved and on further treatment showed complete healing by another 2 weeks. The final cure rate at 4 weeks was also comparable at 93.18% (95% CI 88.75%-97.62%) and 89.01% (95% CI 82.59%-95.44%), respectively ( P = 0.914). At 2 weeks, 6 (6.82%) sertaconazole and 10 (10.99%) terbinafine recipients were considered as "clinical failure." Tolerability of both preparations was excellent. Despite the limitations of an observer-blind study without microbiological support, the results suggest that once-daily topical sertaconazole is as effective as terbinafine in localized tinea infections.

  18. Inhibiting fungal multidrug resistance by disrupting an activator-Mediator interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Joy L; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Vale-Silva, Luis A; Torelli, Riccardo; Posteraro, Brunella; Sohn, Yoo-Jin; Ji, Fei; Gelev, Vladimir; Sanglard, Dominique; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Mukherjee, Goutam; Bhyravabhotla, Jayaram; Buhrlage, Sara J; Gray, Nathanael S; Wagner, Gerhard; Näär, Anders M; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2016-02-25

    Eukaryotic transcription activators stimulate the expression of specific sets of target genes through recruitment of co-activators such as the RNA polymerase II-interacting Mediator complex. Aberrant function of transcription activators has been implicated in several diseases. However, therapeutic targeting efforts have been hampered by a lack of detailed molecular knowledge of the mechanisms of gene activation by disease-associated transcription activators. We previously identified an activator-targeted three-helix bundle KIX domain in the human MED15 Mediator subunit that is structurally conserved in Gal11/Med15 Mediator subunits in fungi. The Gal11/Med15 KIX domain engages pleiotropic drug resistance transcription factor (Pdr1) orthologues, which are key regulators of the multidrug resistance pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the clinically important human pathogen Candida glabrata. The prevalence of C. glabrata is rising, partly owing to its low intrinsic susceptibility to azoles, the most widely used antifungal agent. Drug-resistant clinical isolates of C. glabrata most commonly contain point mutations in Pdr1 that render it constitutively active, suggesting that this transcriptional activation pathway represents a linchpin in C. glabrata multidrug resistance. Here we perform sequential biochemical and in vivo high-throughput screens to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction of the C. glabrata Pdr1 activation domain with the C. glabrata Gal11A KIX domain. The lead compound (iKIX1) inhibits Pdr1-dependent gene activation and re-sensitizes drug-resistant C. glabrata to azole antifungals in vitro and in animal models for disseminated and urinary tract C. glabrata infection. Determining the NMR structure of the C. glabrata Gal11A KIX domain provides a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanism of Pdr1 gene activation and multidrug resistance inhibition by iKIX1. We have demonstrated the feasibility of small-molecule targeting of a

  19. Antifungal Susceptibilities of Candida Species Causing Vulvovaginitis and Epidemiology of Recurrent Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sandra S.; Galask, Rudolph P.; Messer, Shawn A.; Hollis, Richard J.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Pfaller, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    There are limited data regarding the antifungal susceptibility of yeast causing vulvovaginal candidiasis, since cultures are rarely performed. Susceptibility testing was performed on vaginal yeast isolates collected from January 1998 to March 2001 from 429 patients with suspected vulvovaginal candidiasis. The charts of 84 patients with multiple positive cultures were reviewed. The 593 yeast isolates were Candida albicans (n = 420), Candida glabrata (n = 112), Candida parapsilosis (n = 30), Candida krusei (n = 12), Saccharomyces cerevisiae ( n = 9), Candida tropicalis (n = 8), Candida lusitaniae (n = 1), and Trichosporon sp. (n = 1). Multiple species suggesting mixed infection were isolated from 27 cultures. Resistance to fluconazole and flucytosine was observed infrequently (3.7% and 3.0%); 16.2% of isolates were resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 1 μg/ml). The four imidazoles (econazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, and ketoconazole) were active: 94.3 to 98.5% were susceptible at ≤1 μg/ml. Among different species, elevated fluconazole MICs (≥16 μg/ml) were only observed in C. glabrata (15.2% resistant [R], 51.8% susceptible-dose dependent [S-DD]), C. parapsilosis (3.3% S-DD), S. cerevisiae (11.1% S-DD), and C. krusei (50% S-DD, 41.7% R, considered intrinsically fluconazole resistant). Resistance to itraconazole was observed among C. glabrata (74.1%), C. krusei (58.3%), S. cerevisiae (55.6%), and C. parapsilosis (3.4%). Among 84 patients with recurrent episodes, non-albicans species were more common (42% versus 20%). A ≥4-fold rise in fluconazole MIC was observed in only one patient with C. parapsilosis. These results support the use of azoles for empirical therapy of uncomplicated candidal vulvovaginitis. Recurrent episodes are more often caused by non-albicans species, for which azole agents are less likely to be effective. PMID:15872235

  20. The Effectiveness of Voriconazole in Therapy of Candida glabrata's Biofilms Oral Infections and Its Influence on the Matrix Composition and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Célia F; Gonçalves, Bruna; Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Silva, Sónia; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2017-08-01

    Candida glabrata is one of most prevalent yeast in fungal infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Its azole resistance results in a low therapeutic response, particularly when associated with biofilms. The main goal of this work was to study the effectiveness of voriconazole (Vcz) against C. glabrata biofilms oral pathologies, as esophageal or oropharyngeal candidiasis. Antifungal susceptibilities were determined in pre-formed 24-h-biofilms and ERG genes expression was determined by qRT-PCR. Protein quantification was performed using BCA ® Kit, carbohydrate was estimated according to the Dubois assay and β-1,3 glucans concentration were determined using Glucatell ® kit. Finally, ergosterol, Vcz, and fluconazole (Flu) concentrations within the biofilm matrices were determined by RP-HPLC. Results showed that C. glabrata biofilms were more susceptible to Vcz than to Flu and that ERG genes expression evidenced an overexpression of the three ERG genes in the presence of both azoles. The matrix content presented a remarked decrease in proteins and an increase in carbohydrates, namely β-1,3 glucans. Ergosterol was successfully detected and quantified in the biofilm matrices, with no differences in all the considered conditions. Vcz demonstrated better diffusion through the biofilms and better cell penetration capacities, than Flu, indicating that the structure of the drug molecule fully influences its dissemination through the biofilm matrices. This work showed that Vcz is notably more effective than Flu for the treatment of resistant C. glabrata oral biofilms, which demonstrates a clinical relevance in its future use for the treatment of oropharyngeal/esophageal candidiasis caused by this species.

  1. Evaluation of Virulence Factors In vitro, Resistance to Osmotic Stress and Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida tropicalis Isolated from the Coastal Environment of Northeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza-Alves, Diana L.; de Medeiros, Sayama S. T. Q.; de Souza, Luanda B. F. C.; Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison P.; Francisco, Elaine C.; de Araújo, Maria C. B.; Lima-Neto, Reginaldo G.; Neves, Rejane P.; Melo, Analy S. de Azevedo; Chaves, Guilherme M.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have been developed regarding human health risks associated with the recreational use of beaches contaminated with domestic sewage. These wastes contain various micro-organisms, including Candida tropicalis. In this context, the objective of this study was to characterize C. tropicalis isolates from the sandy beach of Ponta Negra, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, regarding the expression of in vitro virulence factors, adaptation to osmotic stress and susceptibility to antifungal drugs. We analyzed 62 environmental isolates and observed a great variation among them for the various virulence factors evaluated. In general, environmental isolates were more adherent to human buccal epithelial cells (HBEC) than C. tropicalis ATCC13803 reference strain, and they also showed increased biofilm production. Most of the isolates presented wrinkled phenotypes on Spider medium (34 isolates, 54.8%). The majority of the isolates also showed higher proteinase production than control strains, but low phospholipase activity. In addition, 35 isolates (56.4%) had high hemolytic activity (hemolysis index > 0.55). With regard to C. tropicalis resistance to osmotic stress, 85.4% of the isolates were able to grow in a liquid medium containing 15% sodium chloride. The strains were highly resistant to the azoles tested (fluconazole, voriconazole and itraconazole). Fifteen strains were resistant to the three azoles tested (24.2%). Some strains were also resistant to amphotericin B (14 isolates; 22.6%), while all of them were susceptible for the echinocandins tested, except for a single strain of intermediate susceptibility to micafungin. Our results demonstrate that C. tropicalis isolated from the sand can fully express virulence attributes and showed a high persistence capacity on the coastal environment; in addition of showing high minimal inhibitory concentrations to several antifungal drugs used in current clinical practice, demonstrating that environmental isolates may

  2. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical species belonging to Aspergillus genus and Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuei, R; Khodavaisy, S; Rezaie, S; Sharifynia, S

    2016-03-01

    Among filamentous fungal pathogens, Aspergillus spp. and zygomycetes account for highest rates of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. Recently developed antifungal drugs offer the potential to improve management and therapeutic outcomes of fungal infections. The aim of this study was to analyse the in vitro activities of voriconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin against clinical isolates of Aspergillus spp. and Rhizopus oryzae. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility of 54 isolates belonging to different clinical isolates of Aspergillus spp. and R. oryzae was tested for four antifungal agents using a microdilution reference method (CLSI, M38-A2). All isolates were identified by typical colony and microscopic characteristics, and also characterized by molecular methods. Caspofungin (MEC range: 0.008-0.25 and MEC50: 0.0023μg/mL) was the most active drug in vitro against Aspergillus spp., followed by voriconazole (MIC range: 0.031-8 and MIC50: 0.5μg/mL), itraconazole (MIC range: 0.031-16 and MIC50: 0.25μg/mL), and amphotericin B (MIC range: 0.125-4 and MIC50: 0.5μg/mL), in order of decreasing activity. The caspofungin, voriconazole, and itraconazole demonstrated poor in vitro activity against R. oryzae isolates evaluated, followed by amphotericin B. This study demonstrates that caspofungin had good antifungal activity and azole agents had better activity than amphotericin B against Aspergillus species. Although, azole drugs are considered ineffective against R. oryzae. This result is just from a small scale in vitro susceptibility study and we did not take other factors into consideration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  4. Clinico-mycological and Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Candiduria in A Tertiary Care Hospital From South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinoop Korol Ponnambath

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Candida is one of the common causative agent of Urinary Tract Infections (UTI worldwide. The most common reported species causing UTI is Candida albicans. Incidence of UTI due to non-albicans Candida species. is on rise in recent years because of their better adaptability and increased resistance to antifungals. Susceptibility profile reports of various Candida species. to newer azoles like voriconazole and betaglucan inhibitors (e.g., caspofungin are deficient in India, since the reference broth microdilution method is not widely utilized. In this study, a rapid reliable and easier alternative, VITEK 2 compact system was utilized to determine the antifungal susceptibility profile. Aim: To analyse the clinical and mycological profile with determination of drug susceptibility pattern of Candida isolates from urine samples. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in PSG Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, during April to September 2015. Candida isolated with a colony count of ≥103 CFU/ml of urine from clinically suspected cases of UTI were included in the study. Urine samples (n=3821 from clinically suspected UTI cases (n=3821 were subjected to microscopic examination and semi quantitative estimation of yeast culture obtained by inoculated of calibrated volume of urine onto blood, Mac-conkey and HiCrome UTI agar. Clinical parameters of the cases were obtained for analysis. Speciation of Candida was performed using germ tube test, observation of morphology in corn-meal agar and pigment production in HiChrome Candida differential agar. Confirmation of the species identification and anti-fungal susceptibility profile were obtained using VITEK-2 compact system. Results: Total 101 patients were identified with significant candiduria. Community-Acquired Candiduria (CAC was seen in 11 (10.8% of the cases. 23 (22.7% cases of candiduria were associated with pyuria. Concomitant candidemia was observed in 4 (3

  5. PENINGKATAN KELARUTAN KETOKONAZOL DENGAN TEKNIK DISPERSI PADAT MENGGUNAKAN EUDRAGIT® E 100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Cipta Narsa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ketoconazole is an antifungal azole synthetic which derivatived from imidazole. Ketoconazole is practically insoluble in water and its bioavailability depend on pH condition of the gastrointestinal tract. The purpose of the research is to increase the solubility of ketoconazole by solid dispersion method using Eudragit® E 100, PEG 6000, and glycerol. Solid dispersion was evaluated with respect to solubility, cristalinity, complexation and morphology of solid dispersion. The optimum formulation with the highest solubility was resulted by solid dispersion with ratio ketoconazole - Eudragit® E 100 - glycerol of 1:8:0.5. X-ray diffraction test revealed the change of crystalline ketoconazole and similar to Eudragit® E 100. This result was also supported by spectrum of infrared and endothermic peak of differential scanning calorimetry. Based on scanning electron microscopy morphology of pure Eudragit® E 100 and solid dispersion was similar. Solid dispersion of ketoconazole with Eudragit® E 100 and glycerol improved solubilty. Keywords : ketoconazole, solid dispersion, Eudragit® E 100   ABSTRAK Ketokonazol merupakan zat antijamur sintetik golongan azol yang merupakan turunan imidazol.Ketokonazol praktis tidak larut dalam air dan ketersediaan hayati melalui rute oral sangat beragam tergantung dari kondisi pH saluran pencernaan.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan kelarutan ketokonazol dengan cara pembuatan dispersi padat mengunakan Eudragit® E 100, PEG 6000, serta gliserol. Dispersi padat di evaluasi dengan uji kelarutan jenuh, kristalinitas, kompleksasi, dan morfologinya.Formula optimal dengan peningkatan kelarutan tertinggi dihasilkan oleh perbandingan dispersi padat ketokonazol - Eudragit® E 100 - gliserol 1:8:0,5. Pengujian difraksi sinar-X menunjukkan adanya perubahan kristalinitas ketokonazol yaitu sama seperti Eudragit® E 100.Hasil ini juga didukung oleh hasil pengujian spetkrofotometer infra merah dan puncak endotermik

  6. Antifungal agents. 10. New derivatives of 1-[(aryl)[4-aryl-1H-pyrrol-3-yl]methyl]-1H-imidazole, synthesis, anti-candida activity, and quantitative structure-analysis relationship studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafi, Andrea; Costi, Roberta; Botta, Maurizio; Di Santo, Roberto; Corelli, Federico; Massa, Silvio; Ciacci, Andrea; Manetti, Fabrizio; Artico, Marino

    2002-06-20

    The synthesis, anti-Candida activity, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies of a series of 2,4-dichlorobenzylimidazole derivatives having a phenylpyrrole moiety (related to the antibiotic pyrrolnitrin) in the alpha-position are reported. A number of substituents on the phenyl ring, ranging from hydrophobic (tert-butyl, phenyl, or 1-pyrrolyl moiety) to basic (NH(2)), polar (CF(3), CN, SCH(3), NO(2)), or hydrogen bond donors and acceptor (OH) groups, were chosen to better understand the interaction of these compounds with cytochrome P450 14-alpha-lanosterol demethylase (P450(14DM)). Finally, the triazole counterpart of one of the imidazole compounds was synthesized and tested to investigate influence of the heterocyclic ring on biological activity. The in vitro antifungal activities of the newly synthesized azoles 10p-v,x-c' were tested against Candida albicans and Candida spp. at pH 7.2 and pH 5.6. A CoMFA model, previously derived for a series of antifungal agents belonging to chemically diverse families related to bifonazole, was applied to the new products. Because the results produced by this approach were not encouraging, Catalyst software was chosen to perform a new 3D-QSAR study. Catalyst was preferred this time because of the possibility of considering each compound as a collection of energetically reasonable conformations and of considering alternative stereoisomers. The pharmacophore model developed by Catalyst, named HYPO1, showed good performances in predicting the biological activity data, although it did not exhibit an unequivocal preference for one enantiomeric series of inhibitors relative to the other. One aromatic nitrogen with a lone pair in the ring plane (mapped by all of the considered compounds) and three aromatic ring features were recognized to have pharmacophoric relevance, whereas neither hydrogen bond acceptor nor hydrophobic features were found. These findings confirmed that the key interaction of azole

  7. Overcoming the heterologous bias: An in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika; Sanglard, Dominique; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → First report to demonstrate an in vivo expression system of an ABC multidrug transporter CgCdr1p of C. glabrata. → First report on the structure and functional characterization of CgCdr1p. → Functional conservation of divergent but typical residues of CgCdr1p. → CgCdr1p elicits promiscuity towards substrates and has a large drug binding pocket with overlapping specificities. -- Abstract: We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplished by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the arte-factual concerns encountered in using

  8. In vitro susceptibility of Candida albicans clinical isolates to eight antifungal agents in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zida, A; Yacouba, A; Bamba, S; Sangare, I; Sawadogo, M; Guiguemde, T; Kone, S; Traore, L K; Ouedraogo-Traore, R; Guiguemde, R T

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, the infection Candida albicans infection worldwide has risen, and the incidence of resistance to traditional antifungal therapies is also increasing. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro susceptibility of C. albicans clinical isolates to eight antifungal agents in Ouagadougou. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2015 at Yalgado Ouédraogo University Teaching Hospital. Two hundred seven strains have been isolated from 347 symptomatic patients received in different clinical services. Samples were cultured on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar supplemented with Cloramphenicol. Isolates were diagnosed as C. albicans using germ tube test, chlamydospore formation on Corn Meal Agar, and Api-Candida test (Biomérieux). Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method and isolates classified as susceptible, susceptible dose-dependent and resistant. Three hundred forty-seven (347) patients are included in this study. Two hundred and six (206) out of 347 collected samples (59.36%) were found positive for C. albicans. The strains were mostly isolated from vulvovaginal (49%) and oral infections (40.3%). The highest resistance rates of azoles were obtained with fluconazole (66.5%), itraconazole (52.3%) and ketoconazole (22.9%) when all clinical isolates were included. The resistance rates of fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole remain highest for vulvovaginal and oral isolates. The rate of resistance to the polyene amphotericin B was 32.0% for all clinical isolates and was 56.4% for vulvovaginal strains. Resistance rate to nystatin was 6.3% for all clinical isolates. Cross-resistance analysis with data of all clinical strains revealed that the incidence of resistance to ketoconazole and itraconazole in fluconazole-resistant isolates was significantly higher than recorded for fluconazole-susceptible isolates. In vitro C. albicans antifungal susceptibility test in this study showed relatively high

  9. Epidemiology and treatment approaches in management of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriengkauykiat J, Ito JI

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jane Kriengkauykiat1,2, James I Ito2, Sanjeet S Dadwal21Department of Pharmacy, 2Division of Infectious Diseases, City of Hope, Duarte, CA, USAAbstract: Over the past 20 years, the number of invasive fungal infections has continued to persist, due primarily to the increased numbers of patients subjected to severe immunosuppression. Despite the development of more active, less toxic antifungal agents and the standard use of antifungal prophylaxis, invasive fungal infections (especially invasive mold infections continue to be a significant factor in hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation outcomes, resulting in high mortality rates. Since the use of fluconazole as standard prophylaxis in the hematopoietic cell transplantation setting, invasive candidiasis has come under control, but no mold-active antifungal agent (except for posaconazole in the setting of acute myelogenous leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome has been shown to improve the survival rate over fluconazole. With the advent of new azole and echinocandin agents, we have seen the emergence of more azole-resistant and echinocandin-resistant fungi. The recent increase in zygomycosis seen in the hematopoietic cell transplantation setting may be due to the increased use of voriconazole. This has implications for the empiric approach to pulmonary invasive mold infections when zygomycosis cannot be ruled out. It is imperative that an amphotericin B product, an antifungal that has never developed resistance in over 50 years, be initiated. The clinical presentations of invasive mold infections and invasive candidiasis can be nonspecific and the diagnostic tests insensitive, so a high index of suspicion and immediate initiation of empiric therapy is required. Unfortunately, our currently available serologic tests do not predict infection ahead of disease, and, therefore cannot be used to initiate "preemptive" therapy. Also, the Aspergillus galactomannan test gives a false negative

  10. Assessment of carvacrol for control of avian aspergillosis in intratracheally challenged chickens in comparison to voriconazole with a reference on economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartor, Y H; Hassan, F A M

    2017-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of essential oils as an alternative prophylaxis and treatment for avian aspergillosis. The in vitro susceptibility of Aspergillus fumigatus strains to antifungal drugs and carvacrol, thymol, eugenol, thymoquinone and cinnamon was determined using the macrodiffusion and microdilution methods. Carvacrol has antifungal activity in comparison to voriconazole (VCZ) (MIC 0·5, 0·25 μg ml -1 respectively). While cinnamon, euganol, thymol and thymoquinone displayed moderate to weak inhibitory activity. For the efficacy study, five groups of 10-day-old chicks (n = 48) were infected intratracheally either with A. fumigatus conidia or saline (negative control). Chicks in carvacrol prophylactic and treatment (CRPT) group were fed for 10 days beginning from hatch with carvacrol (200 mg kg -1 per diet) supplemented diets. VCZ (VCZT:20 mg kg -1 body weight (BW)), carvacrol treatment (CRT, CRPT) was started upon appearance of the first clinical signs and continued for 10 days. Birds were monitored for an additional 15 days following treatment. Fungal burden and therapeutic efficacy were assessed by survival, BW, quantitative (q) culture (CFU), quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and histopathological changes at several time points. Serum biochemical changes were also assessed. VCZT, CRPT, CRT in comparison to the sham-treated (SHAM) group have prolonged survival (87·5, 83·4, 79·2, 41·7% respectively). In VCZT and CRPT, a significant reduction in clinical signs, lesions, CFU and qPCR counts to the limit of detection were observed. CRPT has the lowest BW reduction, economic losses and significant low total cholesterol levels. Carvacrol has a promising potential to be used as a prophylactic and treatment against A. fumigatus. Prognosis of avian aspergillosis is often poor due to delayed diagnosis and treatment failure. However, the widespread uses of azole prophylaxis in birds are thought to be the major driver of

  11. AKTIVITAS ANTIFUNGI FRAKSI ETILASETAT AKAR SINGAWALANG (PETIVERIA ALLIACEA L. TERHADAP ASPERGILLUS NIGER

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    Niken Indriyanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus niger is a mold that can infect respiratory tract in certain condition. Azoles are used to solve this infection. Drug development on antifungal drugs still continued, one of the resorce is from plant. A plant that widely studied as antifungi is singawalang (Petiveria alliacea L.. Activity of ethanol extract and fraction of singawalang roots on Aspergillus niger tested by microdilution broth method appropriate to Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI standard. Microdilution test results showed that Singawalang roots extract has antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger with Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC 32 μg/mL and Minimum Fungicidal Concentration (MFC 1048 μg/mL. Fraction that has high activity against Aspergillus niger was ethylacetate fraction of Singawalang roots with MIC 128 µg/ml dan MFC 512 μg/mL. The higher activity of the extract than the fraction was predicted as the impact of multiple compounds that have synergic activity. The growth profile of Aspergillus niger showed unconstant result and tends to descend. However, further research needed to ensure this effect.   Keywords:    antifungal, microdilution, singawalang (Petiveria alliacea L., Aspergillus niger      ABSTRAK   Aspergillus niger merupakan kapang penginfeksi saluran pernafasan pada kondisi tertentu. Obat-obat golongan azol biasa digunakan untuk mengatasi infeksi ini. Pengembangan obat antifungi saat ini terus dilakukan, termasuk dari tanaman. Salah satu tanaman yang telah banyak diteliti memiliki efek antifungi adalah tanaman singawalang (Petiveria alliacea L.. Pengujian dilakukan dengan Broth Microdilution sesuai standar Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI. Ekstrak akar singawalang menghambat pertumbuhan Aspergillus niger dan memiliki KHM 32 ppm dan KFM 1048 ppm. Hasil dan Fraksi Ekstrak Akar Singawalang Terhadap Aspergillus niger pada fraksi etilasetat ekstrak etanol akar singawalang adalah Konsentrasi Hambat

  12. Role of isavuconazole in the treatment of invasive fungal infections

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    Wilson DT

    2016-08-01

    isavuconazole for invasive candidiasis (relative to comparator agents such as echinocandins is not as robust. Therefore, isavuconazole use for invasive candidiasis may initially be reserved as a step-down oral option in those patients who cannot receive other azoles due to tolerability or spectrum of activity limitations. Post-marketing surveillance of isavuconazole will be important to better understand the safety and efficacy of this agent, as well as to better define the need for isavuconazole serum concentration monitoring. Keywords: isavuconazole, azole, antifungal, aspergillosis, Mucormycetes, mucormycosis

  13. Comparison of Two Molecular Assays for Detection and Characterization of Aspergillus fumigatus Triazole Resistance and Cyp51A Mutations in Clinical Isolates and Primary Clinical Samples of Immunocompromised Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Postina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In hematological patients, the incidence of invasive aspergillosis (IA caused by azole resistant Aspergillus fumigatus (ARAf is rising. As the diagnosis of IA is rarely based on positive culture in this group of patients, molecular detection of resistance mutations directly from clinical samples is crucial. In addition to the in-house azole resistance ARAf polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays detecting the frequent mutation combinations TR34/L98H, TR46/Y121F/T289A, and M220 in the Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus Cyp51A gene by subsequent DNA sequence analysis, we investigated in parallel the commercially available AsperGenius® real time PCR system in detecting the Cyp51A alterations TR34/L98H and Y121F/T289A directly from 52 clinical samples (15 biopsies, 22 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, 15 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples and ARAf isolates (n = 3 of immunocompromised patients. We analyzed DNA aliquots and compared both methods concerning amplification and detection of Aspergillus DNA and Cyp51A alterations. As positive control for the feasibility of our novel Y121F and T289A PCR assays, we used two A. fumigatus isolates with the TR46/Y121F/T289A mutation combination isolated from hematological patients with known Cyp51A alterations and a lung biopsy sample of a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The rate of positive ARAf PCR results plus successful sequencing using the ARAf PCR assays was 61% in biopsies, 29% in CSF, 67% in BAL samples and 100% in isolates. In comparison the amount of positive PCRs using the AsperGenius® assays was 47% in biopsies, 42% in CSF, 59% in BAL samples and 100% in isolates. Altogether 17 Cyp51A alterations were detected using our ARAf PCRs plus DNA sequencing and therefrom 10 alterations also by the AsperGenius® system. The comparative evaluation of our data revealed that our conventional PCR assays are more sensitive in detecting ARAf in BAL and biopsy samples, whereby differences were not significant

  14. Overcoming the heterologous bias: An in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika [Membrane Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Sanglard, Dominique [Institut de Microbiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Prasad, Rajendra, E-mail: rp47jnu@gmail.com [Membrane Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} First report to demonstrate an in vivo expression system of an ABC multidrug transporter CgCdr1p of C. glabrata. {yields} First report on the structure and functional characterization of CgCdr1p. {yields} Functional conservation of divergent but typical residues of CgCdr1p. {yields} CgCdr1p elicits promiscuity towards substrates and has a large drug binding pocket with overlapping specificities. -- Abstract: We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplished by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the arte-factual concerns

  15. Úlcera de lengua como presentación del Histoplasma capsulatum Tongue ulceration as a presentation of Histoplasma capsulatum infection

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    E J Carbó Amoroso

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available La histoplasmosis diseminada progresiva es una enfermedad que se manifiesta como reactivación de una infección latente en pacientes inmunodeprimidos, especialmente en personas con déficit en la inmunidad celular. Existen formas agudas, subagudas y crónicas. Las lesiones focales, en especial úlceras mucocutáneas, predominan en la forma diseminada crónica. Reportamos el caso de una paciente con artritis reumatoidea, que controlaba su patología con fármacos antirreumáticos modificadores de la enfermedad (DMARD, la que consultó por úlcera de lengua como única manifestación de una histoplasmosis diseminada crónica. La histopatología fue compatible y el cultivo positivo para Histoplasma capsulatum. La serología para el HIV fue negativa. Existen pocos casos publicados de pacientes con esta localización atípica en forma aislada, en particular aquellos HIV negativos. El itraconazol y la anfotericina B son las dos drogas más utilizadas para tratar esta enfermedad. Los datos clínicos sobre los nuevos azoles, voriconazol y posaconazol son limitados.The progressive disseminated histoplasmosis is a disease produced by reactivation of latent infection in immunocompromised host, specially in persons with defective cell-mediated immunity. There are acute, subacute and chronic forms in the progressive illness. Focal lesions, specially mucocutaneous ulcers, are most frequent in the chronic disseminated forms. We reported a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD, with an ulcer of the tongue as only clinical manifestation of a chronic disseminated histoplasmosis. The histopathology was compatible, and the culture was positive for Histoplasma capsulatum. The serology for the HIV was negative. There are few published cases of this isolated form, particularly in patients with HIV negative serological test. Itraconazole and amphotericin B are the most frequently drugs used for the treatment in this

  16. Actualización en Aspergilosis con énfasis en Aspergilosis invasora Aspergillosis update with focus in invasive aspergillosis

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    Sonia Isabel Cuervo-Maldonado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El género Aspergillus es ubicuo en la naturaleza y de distribución universal. Por esta razón, el contacto con este hongo incluye hospederos inmunocompetentes e inmunosuprimidos. La vía aérea es la forma más frecuente de adquirir este hongo y sus manifestaciones clínicas y localización topográfica se relacionan con la interacción del hongo y la capacidad inmunológica del hospedero. La principal manifestación clínica de este hongo es a nivel respiratorio, con un impacto muy importante en mortalidad y morbilidad, especialmente en el paciente inmunosuprimido. Los pacientes con tumores hematológicos, trasplantes de corazón, pulmón y con sida son más susceptibles de presentar invasión tisular y vascular por este hongo, que en tales casos se manifiesta como Aspergilosis Invasora (AI. La AI ofrece dificultades diagnósticas en el hospedero inmunosuprimido por lo que en este grupo de pacientes el uso de métodos de diagnóstico no invasores permite guiar el abordaje terapéutico. En la actualidad se dispone de medicamentos antifúngicos del grupo de los azoles (voriconazol y de las equinocandinas (caspofungina que han mejorado el resultado de la AI. En este artículo se actualiza la literatura en cuanto al diagnóstico y tratamiento de la AI.The genus Aspergillus is ubiquitous in nature and has universal distribution; for this reason contact with this fungus includes immunocompetent and non-immunocompetent hosts. The most common form of acquiring this fungus is through air, and its clinical manifestations and topographic location correspond to the interaction of the fungus and its host's immune capacity. The main clinical manifestation of this fungus is a breathing condition and has a very significant impact on mortality and morbidity, especially in non-immunocompetent patients. Patients with haematological malignancies, heart or lung transplant surgeries, and AIDS are the most susceptible to present tissue and vascular invasion by this

  17. [Potential antimicrobial drug interactions in clinical practice: consequences of polypharmacy and multidrug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Múgica, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Polypharmacy is a growing problem nowadays, which can increase the risk of potential drug interactions, and result in a loss of effectiveness. This is particularly relevant to the anti-infective therapy, especially when infection is produced by resistant bacteria, because therapeutic options are limited and interactions can cause treatment failure. All antimicrobial prescriptions were retrospectively reviewed during a week in the Pharmacy Department, in order to detect potential drug-interactions and analysing their clinical significance. A total of 314 antimicrobial prescriptions from 151 patients were checked. There was at least one potential interaction detected in 40% of patients, being more frequent and severe in those infected with multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Drugs most commonly involved were quinolones, azoles, linezolid and vancomycin. Potential drug interactions with antimicrobial agents are a frequent problem that can result in a loss of effectiveness. This is why they should be detected and avoided when possible, in order to optimize antimicrobial therapy, especially in case of multidrug resistant infections.

  18. Agronomic efficiency and physiologic efficiency determination of Azolla-N and Urea-N applied to lowland rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisworo, Elsje L.; Rasjid, Havid; Sisworo, Widjang H.; Wemay, Johannis; Djawanas, Amrin

    1994-01-01

    Data from three field experiments using 15 N labelled Azolla and urea as an N source have been used to determine the agronomical and physiological efficiency of the N-Azoll and N-Urea applied tolowland rice. In general physiological efficiency of N from N-sources applied was lower than the agronomical efficiency. It seems that the increase of N-rates would enhance the agronomical and physiological efficiency of N applied to lowland rice but on the other hand the efficiency of N derived from the applied N-source decreased. Azolla+inorganic N-fertilizer when applied to lowland rice could increase rice yield expresses in dry weight of grain and straw above the control plants. Applying Azolla+inorganic N-fertilizer in the farmer's field located in West Java and West Sumatera often showed higher yields compared to when applied with inorganic N-fertilizer alone although the latter has higher total N-rates. (author). 9 refs, 8 tabs, 5 figs

  19. New antimicrobial therapies used against fungi present in subgingival sites--a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardi, Janaina Cássia Orlandi; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco; Mendes Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2011-10-01

    Although the main reservoir of Candida spp. is believed to be the buccal mucosa, these microorganisms can coaggregate with bacteria in subgingival biofilm and adhere to epithelial cells. The treatment of periodontal disease includes scaling and root planning (SRP) associated with proper oral hygiene. However, some patients may have negative responses to different therapeutic procedures, with a continuous loss of insertion, so the use of antimicrobials is needed as an adjuvant to SRP treatment. The use of a broad-spectrum antibiotic, such as tetracycline and metronidazole, as an aid in periodontal treatment has also been a factor for the development of superinfections by resistant bacteria and Candida species, even in patients with HIV. In the dental practice, the most commonly used antifungals are nystatin and fluconazole. However, the introduction of new drugs like the next generation of azoles is essential before the onset of emergent species in periodontal disease. Plants are good options for obtaining a wide variety of drugs. This alternative could benefit a large population that uses plants as a first treatment option. Plants have been used in medicine for a long time and are extensively used in folk medicine, because they represent an economic alternative, are easily accessible and are applicable to various diseases. Herein, we briefly review the literature pertaining the presence of Candida sp. in periodontal pockets, the conventional antifungal resistance and new therapies that include natural antifungal agents are reviewed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida in the Clinical Laboratory: how to do it, when to do it, and how to interpret it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Manso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Significant changes in the management of fungaemia have occurred in the last decade with increased use of fluconazole prophylaxis, of empirical treatment and of echinocandins as first-line agents for documented disease. The emergence of drug resistance in fungal pathogens has a profound impact on human health given limited number of antifungal drugs. Antifungal resistance in Candida may be either intrinsic or acquired and may be encountered in the antifungal drug exposed but also the antifungal drug naïve patient The variation in resistance rates between centers emphasizes that it is essential to have knowledge of the local Candida species distribution and antifungal resistance rates to guide initial therapy for Candida BSI. Moreover, all Candida isolates from blood and normally sterile sites should be identified to the species level. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing have developed breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values that are now established for Candida spp. Clinical microbiology laboratories will be employed commercial susceptibility assays, rather than reference broth microdilution methods and comparative studies are particularly important. Vitek 2®, Etest® and Sensititre YeastOne® provided a high degree of essential agreement and comparable sensitivity and specificity to BMD-RPMI for identifying resistance to azole and echinocandins in Candida spp.

  1. Metabolism of Zearalenone in the Course of Beer Fermentation

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    Naoki Mochizuki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Zearalenone (ZON is a mycotoxin with estrogenic activity, produced by members of Fusarium species, and is found worldwide in a number of cereal crops. It is known to have four active metabolites (a-zearalenol (a-ZOL, b-zearalenol (b-ZOL, a-zearalanol (a-ZAL, and b-zearalanol (b-ZAL. A highly sensitive analytical method using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization (LC-ESI-MS/MS has been established and validated in order to analyze ZON and its metabolites in beer and malt samples. The metabolism of ZON in the course of beer fermentation was further characterized using the artificially contaminated wort by this established method. In the fermented sample, 85.9% of ZON was converted to b-ZOL, which has lower estrogenic activity than that of ZON. These findings indicate that the health risk to humans due to ZON in beer is reduced during the fermentation process.

  2. Genotyping and antifungal susceptibility testing of multiple Malassezia pachydermatis isolates from otitis and dermatitis cases in pets: is it really worth the effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E; Peláez, Teresa; Blanco, José L

    2016-01-01

    A total of 216 colonies of Malassezia pachydermatis from 28 cases of fungal otitis or dermatitis in pets were genotyped by M13 fingerprinting and tested for antifungal susceptibility. A huge genetic diversity was found (157 M13 types in total), with all animals having a polyclonal pattern of infection (5.4 ± 1.5 genotypes/sample). Furthermore, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that most genetic diversity (44%) was found at the within sample level. In contrast, variability in antifungal susceptibility among isolates from the same sample was less important, with different M13 types displaying in most cases identical or very similar MIC results. Most isolates displayed high in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, terbinafine and all azoles tested except fluconazole, for which MIC values were always ≥4 μg/ml and a 26.9% of isolates displayed values ≥32 μg/ml. We conclude that although characterization of multiple yeast isolates results in a considerable increase in laboratory workload and expenses, it may help to get a better understanding of the epidemiology of M. pachydermatis in a given patient population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Phytochemical profile and biological activities of Deverra tortuosa (Desf.)DC.: a desert aromatic shrub widespread in Northern Region of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guetat, Arbi; Boulila, Abdennacer; Boussaid, Mohamed

    2018-04-16

    The present study describes the chemical composition of the essential oil of different plant parts of Devrra tortuosa; in vivo and in vitro biological activities of plant extract and essential oils. Apiol was found to be the major component of the oil (between 65.73% and 74.41%). The best antioxidant activities were observed for the oil of flowers (IC50 = 175 μg/ml). The samples of stems and roots exhibit lower antioxidant activity (IC50 = 201 μg/ml and 182 μg/ml, respectively). The values of IC50 showed that the extracts of methanol exhibit the highest antioxidants activities (IC50 = 64.8 102 μg/ml). EOs showed excellent antifungal activity against yeasts with low azole susceptibilities (i.e. Malassezia spp. and Candida krusei). The MIC values of oils varied between 2.85 mg/mL and 27 mg/mL. The obtained results also showed that the plant extracts inhibited the germination and the shoot and root growth of Triticum æstivum seedlings.

  4. A new face of phenalenyl-based radicals in the transition metal-free C-H arylation of heteroarenes at room temperature: trapping the radical initiator via C-C σ-bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Jasimuddin; P, Sreejyothi; Vijaykumar, Gonela; Jose, Anex; Raj, Manthan; Mandal, Swadhin K

    2017-11-01

    The radical-mediated transition metal-free approach for the direct C-H bond functionalization of arenes is considered as a cost effective alternative to transition metal-based catalysis. An organic ligand-based radical plays a key role by generating an aryl radical which undergoes a subsequent functionalization process. The design principle of the present study takes advantage of a relatively stable odd alternant hydrocarbon-based phenalenyl (PLY) radical. In this study, the first transition metal-free catalyzed direct C-H arylation of a variety of heteroarenes such as azoles, furan, thiophene and pyridine at room temperature has been reported using a phenalenyl-based radical without employing any photoactivation step. This protocol has been successfully applied to the gram scale synthesis of core moieties of bioactive molecules. The phenalenyl-based radical initiator has been characterized crystallographically by trapping it via the formation of a C-C σ-bond between the phenalenyl radical and solvent-based radical species.

  5. Efficacy of oral E1210, a new broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action, in murine models of candidiasis, aspergillosis, and fusariosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Katsura; Horii, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Mamiko; Watanabe, Nao-Aki; Okubo, Miyuki; Sonoda, Jiro; Nakamoto, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Keigo; Shirotori, Syuji; Murai, Norio; Inoue, Satoshi; Matsukura, Masayuki; Abe, Shinya; Yoshimatsu, Kentaro; Asada, Makoto

    2011-10-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class, broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action-inhibition of fungal glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. In this study, the efficacies of E1210 and reference antifungals were evaluated in murine models of oropharyngeal and disseminated candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. Oral E1210 demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy in infections caused by Candida species, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium solani. In the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis, E1210 and fluconazole each caused a significantly greater reduction in the number of oral CFU than the control treatment (P candidiasis model, mice treated with E1210, fluconazole, caspofungin, or liposomal amphotericin B showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis caused by azole-resistant Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis. A 24-h delay in treatment onset minimally affected the efficacy outcome of E1210 in the treatment of disseminated candidiasis. In the Aspergillus flavus pulmonary aspergillosis model, mice treated with E1210, voriconazole, or caspofungin showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. These data suggest that further studies to determine E1210's potential for the treatment of disseminated fungal infections are indicated.

  6. Reversible Capture and Release of Cl2 and Br2 with a Redox-Active Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulchinsky, Yuri; Hendon, Christopher H; Lomachenko, Kirill A; Borfecchia, Elisa; Melot, Brent C; Hudson, Matthew R; Tarver, Jacob D; Korzyński, Maciej D; Stubbs, Amanda W; Kagan, Jacob J; Lamberti, Carlo; Brown, Craig M; Dincă, Mircea

    2017-04-26

    Extreme toxicity, corrosiveness, and volatility pose serious challenges for the safe storage and transportation of elemental chlorine and bromine, which play critical roles in the chemical industry. Solid materials capable of forming stable nonvolatile compounds upon reaction with elemental halogens may partially mitigate these challenges by allowing safe halogen release on demand. Here we demonstrate that elemental halogens quantitatively oxidize coordinatively unsaturated Co(II) ions in a robust azolate metal-organic framework (MOF) to produce stable and safe-to-handle Co(III) materials featuring terminal Co(III)-halogen bonds. Thermal treatment of the oxidized MOF causes homolytic cleavage of the Co(III)-halogen bonds, reduction to Co(II), and concomitant release of elemental halogens. The reversible chemical storage and thermal release of elemental halogens occur with no significant losses of structural integrity, as the parent cobaltous MOF retains its crystallinity and porosity even after three oxidation/reduction cycles. These results highlight a material operating via redox mechanism that may find utility in the storage and capture of other noxious and corrosive gases.

  7. Emerging role of Amiodarone and Dronedarone, as antiarrhythmic drugs, in treatment of leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, A; Bemani, E; Bahrami, S

    2018-04-21

    Leishmaniasis is a group of human and animal diseases causing 20,000 to 40,000 annual deaths and its etiological agents belong to the Leishmania genus. The most current treatment against leishmaniasis is chemotherapy. Pentavalent antimonials such as glucantime and pentostam have been administrated as the first-line drugs in treatment of various forms of leishmaniasis. The second-line drugs such as amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, miltefosine, pentamidine, azole drugs and paromomycin are used in resistant cases to pentavalent antimonials. Because of drawbacks of the first-line and second-line drugs including adverse side effects on different organs, increasing resistance, high cost, need to hospitalization and long-term treatment, it is necessary to find an alternative drug for leishmaniasis treatment. Several investigations have reported the effectiveness of amiodarone, the most commonly used antiarrhythmic drug, against fungi, Trypanosomes and Leishmania spp. in vitro, in vivo and clinical conditions. Moreover, the beneficial effects of dronedarone, amiodarone analogues, against Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania mexicana have recently been demonstrated and such treatment regimens resulted in lower side effects. The anti- leishmanial and anti- trypanosomal effectiveness of amiodarone and dronedarone has been attributed to destabilization of intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis, inhibition of sterol biosynthesis and collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. Because of relative low cost, excellent pharmacokinetic properties, easy accessibility and beneficial effects of amiodarone and dronedarone on leishmaniasis, they are proper candidates to replace the current drugs used in leishmaniasis treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro activities of antifungal drugs against environmental Exophiala isolates and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülmez, Dolunay; Doğan, Özlem; Boral, Barış; Döğen, Aylin; İlkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren; Arikan-Akdagli, Sevtap

    2018-04-03

    Exophiala is a genus of black fungi isolated worldwide from environmental and clinical specimens. Data on antifungal susceptibility of Exophiala isolates are limited and the methodology on susceptibility testing is not yet standardized. In this study, we investigated in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of environmental Exophiala isolates. A total of 87 Exophiala isolated from dishwashers or railway ties were included. CLSI M38-A2 microdilution method with modifications was used to determine antifungal susceptibility for fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B, and terbinafine. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined visually at 48h, 72h, and 96h. MIC-0 endpoint (complete inhibition of growth) was used for amphotericin B and azoles, except fluconazole, for which MIC-2 endpoint (~50% inhibition compared to growth control) was used. Both MIC-0 and MIC-1 (~80% inhibition compared to growth control) results were analysed for terbinafine, to enable comparison with previous studies. Fungal growth was sufficient for determination of MICs at 48h for all isolates except two Exophiala dermatitidis strains. At 72h, most active antifungal agents according to GM MIC were voriconazole and terbinafine, followed by posaconazole, itraconazole, and amphotericin B in rank order of decreasing activity. While amphotericin B displayed adequate in vitro activity despite relatively high MICs, fluconazole showed no meaningful antifungal activity against Exophiala. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. CYP3A4 Mediates Oxidative Metabolism of the Synthetic Cannabinoid AKB-48.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Nielsen, Line Marie; Linnet, Kristian

    2015-09-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid designer drugs have emerged as drugs of abuse during the last decade, and acute intoxication cases are documented in the scientific literature. Synthetic cannabinoids are extensively metabolized, but our knowledge of the involved enzymes is limited. Here, we investigated the metabolism of N-(1-adamantyl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (AKB-48), a compound identified in herbal blends from 2012 and onwards. We screened for metabolite formation using a panel of nine recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes (CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4) and compared the formed metabolites to human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations with specific inhibitors against CYP2D6, 2C19, and 3A4, respectively. The data reported here demonstrate CYP3A4 to be the major CYP enzyme responsible for the oxidative metabolism of AKB-48, preferentially performing the oxidation on the adamantyl moiety. Genetic polymorphisms are likely not important with regard to toxicity given the major involvement of CYP3A4. Adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) could potentially occur in cases with co-intake of strong CYP3A4 inhibitors, e.g., HIV antivirals and azole antifungal agents.

  10. Identification and Determination of Drug Resistant of Candida species isolated from Hospital Acquired Infections

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    Kambiz Diba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Currently, the use of antifungal azole group and yeasts resistant to these drugs is increasing. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify the yeasts obtained from candidiasis patients and furthermore determining thier antifungal resistance. Methods: In the present descriptive study, infections samples were collected from 256 patients with suspected nosocomial candidiasis, then direct exam and culture were performed. Yeast colonies were identified using phenotypic methods, polymerase chain reaction method and enzyme digestion. Data were analyzed using Descriptive statistical tests. Results: Of sixty isolated yeast, thirty-seven cases of Candida albicans (61.6%, seven cases of C. krusei and C. glabrata (11.6% each, five cases of C. dubliniensis (8.3% and four cases of C. tropicalis (6.6% were indicated. The study showed that the sensitivity of C. albicans and C. cruise species to amphotericin B was negligible in disk diffusion and very sensitve in microdilution. Conclusion: Inspite of the results of antifungal susceptibility test of strains studied did not show high resistance, but screening for drug-resistant Candida isolates in Candida infection by disk diffusion and microdilution methods for new cases of drug resistance is reasonable.

  11. Identification and characterization of Daldinia eschscholtzii isolated from skin scrapings, nails, and blood

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    Kee Peng Ng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Daldinia eschscholtzii is a filamentous wood-inhabiting endophyte commonly found in woody plants. Here, we report the identification and characterization of nine D. eschscholtzii isolates from skin scrapings, nail clippings, and blood. Methods The nine isolates were identified based on colony morphology, light microscopy, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS-based phylogeny. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of the fungal isolates was evaluated by the Etest to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. Results The nine isolates examined were confirmed as D. eschscholtzii. They exhibited typical features of Daldinia sp. on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar, with white felty colonies and black-gray coloration on the reverse side. Septate hyphae, branching conidiophore with conidiogenous cells budding from its terminus, and nodulisporium-like conidiophores were observed under the microscope. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the nine isolates were clustered within the D. eschscholtzii species complex. All the isolates exhibited low MICs against azole agents (voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole, as well as amphotericin B, with MIC of less than 1 µg/ml. Discussion Early and definitive identification of D. eschscholtzii is vital to reducing misuse of antimicrobial agents. Detailed morphological and molecular characterization as well as antifungal profiling of D. eschscholtzii provide the basis for future studies on its biology, pathogenicity, and medicinal potential.

  12. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  13. CYP1A inhibition in fish gill filaments: A novel assay applied on pharmaceuticals and other chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beijer, Kristina; Abrahamson, Alexandra; Brunstroem, Bjoern [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Norbyvaegen 18A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Brandt, Ingvar, E-mail: ingvar.brandt@ebc.uu.se [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Norbyvaegen 18A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-01-31

    The gill filament 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) assay was originally developed as a biomarker for cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) induction by Ah-receptor agonists in water. In this study, the assay was adapted to measure inhibition of CYP1A activity in fish gill filaments ex vivo. The experiments were carried out using gill arch filaments from {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}NF)-exposed three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Candidate CYP1A inhibitors were added to the assay buffer. Nine selected pharmaceuticals and five known or suspected CYP1A-modulating chemicals were examined with regard to their ability to reduce EROD activity in gill filaments. Ellipticine, a well characterized CYP1A inhibitor, was the most effective inhibitor of the compounds tested. At a concentration in the assay buffer of 1 {mu}M the antifungal azoles ketoconazole, miconazole and bitertanol, and the plant flavonoid acacetin reduced gill EROD activity by more than 50%, implying IC50 values below 1 {mu}M. These compounds have previously been shown to inhibit EROD activity in liver microsomes from fish and mammals at similar concentrations. The proton pump inhibitor omeprazole reduced the gill EROD activity by 39% at 10 {mu}M. It is concluded that the modified gill filament EROD assay is useful to screen for waterborne pollutants that inhibit catalytic CYP1A activity in fish gills.

  14. CYP1A inhibition in fish gill filaments: A novel assay applied on pharmaceuticals and other chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijer, Kristina; Abrahamson, Alexandra; Brunstroem, Bjoern; Brandt, Ingvar

    2010-01-01

    The gill filament 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) assay was originally developed as a biomarker for cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) induction by Ah-receptor agonists in water. In this study, the assay was adapted to measure inhibition of CYP1A activity in fish gill filaments ex vivo. The experiments were carried out using gill arch filaments from β-naphthoflavone (βNF)-exposed three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Candidate CYP1A inhibitors were added to the assay buffer. Nine selected pharmaceuticals and five known or suspected CYP1A-modulating chemicals were examined with regard to their ability to reduce EROD activity in gill filaments. Ellipticine, a well characterized CYP1A inhibitor, was the most effective inhibitor of the compounds tested. At a concentration in the assay buffer of 1 μM the antifungal azoles ketoconazole, miconazole and bitertanol, and the plant flavonoid acacetin reduced gill EROD activity by more than 50%, implying IC50 values below 1 μM. These compounds have previously been shown to inhibit EROD activity in liver microsomes from fish and mammals at similar concentrations. The proton pump inhibitor omeprazole reduced the gill EROD activity by 39% at 10 μM. It is concluded that the modified gill filament EROD assay is useful to screen for waterborne pollutants that inhibit catalytic CYP1A activity in fish gills.

  15. First report of Candida auris in America: Clinical and microbiological aspects of 18 episodes of candidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Belinda; Melo, Analy S A; Perozo-Mena, Armindo; Hernandez, Martin; Francisco, Elaine Cristina; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2016-10-01

    Characterization of a hospital outbreak of Candida auris candidemia that involved 18 critically ill patients in Venezuela. Bloodstream isolates of C. auris obtained from 18 patients admitted at a medical center in Maracaibo, between March, 2012 and July, 2013 were included. Species identification was confirmed by ITS rDNA sequencing. Isolates were subsequently typed by amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting (AFLP). Susceptibility testing was performed according to CLSI. Clinical data were collected from all cases by using a standard clinical form. A total of 13 critically ill pediatric and 5 adult patients, with a median age of 26 days, were included. All were previously exposed to antibiotics and multiple invasive medical procedures. Clinical management included prompt catheter removal and antifungal therapy. Thirteen patients (72%) survived up to 30 days after onset of candidemia. AFLP fingerprinting of all C. auris isolates suggested a clonal outbreak. The isolates were considered resistant to azoles, but susceptible to anidulafungin and 50% of isolates exhibited amphotericin B MIC values of >1 μg/ml. The study demonstrated that C. auris is a multiresistant yeast pathogen that can be a source of health-care associated infections in tertiary care hospitals with a high potential for nosocomial horizontal transmission. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanoparticles as safe and effective delivery systems of antifungal agents: Achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ghareb M

    2017-05-15

    Invasive fungal infections are becoming a major health concern in several groups of patients leading to severe morbidity and mortality. Moreover, cutaneous fungal infections are a major cause of visits to outpatient dermatology clinics. Despite the availability of several effective agents in the antifungal drug arena, their therapeutic outcome is less than optimal due to limitations related to drug physicochemical properties and toxicity. For instance, poor aqueous solubility limits the formulation options and efficacy of several azole antifungal drugs while toxicity limits the benefits of many other drugs. Nanoparticles hold great promise to overcome these limitations due to their ability to enhance drug aqueous solubility, bioavailability and antifungal efficacy. Further, drug incorporation into nanoparticles could greatly reduce its toxicity. Despite these interesting nanoparticle features, there are only few marketed nanoparticle-based antifungal drug formulations. This review sheds light on different classes of nanoparticles used in antifungal drug delivery, such as lipid-based vesicles, polymeric micelles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, nanoemulsions and dendrimers with emphasis on their advantages and limitations. Translation of these nanoformulations from the lab to the clinic could be facilitated by focusing the research on overcoming problems related to nanoparticle stability, drug loading and high cost of production and standardization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of the CYP51 gene and encoded protein in propiconazole-resistant isolates of Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas-Gutiérrez, Gloria P; Angarita-Velásquez, Mónica J; Restrepo-Flórez, Juan M; Rodríguez, Paola; Moreno, Claudia X; Arango, Rafael

    2009-08-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet causes black sigatoka, the most important disease in bananas and plantains. Disease control is mainly through the application of systemic fungicides, including sterol demethylation inhibitors (DMIs). Their intensive use has favoured the appearance of resistant strains. However, no studies have been published on the possible resistance mechanisms. In this work, the CYP51 gene was isolated and sequenced in 11 M. fijiensis strains that had shown different degrees of in vitro sensitivity to propiconazole, one of the most widely used DMI fungicides. Six mutations that could be related to the loss in sensitivity to this fungicide were found: Y136F, A313G, Y461D, Y463D, Y463H and Y463N. The mutations were analysed using a homology model of the protein that was constructed from the crystallographic structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Zoff.) Lehmann & Neumann. Additionally, gene expression was determined in 13 M. fijiensis strains through quantitative analysis of products obtained by RT-PCR. Several changes in the sequence of the gene encoding sterol 14alpha-demethylase were found that have been described in other fungi as being correlated with resistance to azole fungicides. No correlation was found between gene expression and propiconazole resistance.

  18. Medical image of the week: actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqi TA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 55-year-old man with history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, presented with unresolving pneumonia despite treatment with moxifloxacin. It was thought to be possible coccidioidomycosis and an azole was started. However, he returned with increasing dyspnea and hypoxemia. He had leukocytosis with a thoracic CT revealing a loculated empyema, multifocal necrotizing infection and a large intrapulmonary abscess (Figure 1. He was admitted to MICU, intubated and ventilated. He was in septic shock requiring fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, and broad antibiotics. Bronchoscopy revealed erythematous and edematous airways, with drainage of over one liter of purulent fluid. A chest tube was placed to drain pleural fluid with removal of around two liters of blood-tinged, purulent fluid. His condition worsened with development of disseminated intravascular coagulation leading to hemorrhagic shock. He arrested and died. Gram stain on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed mixed gram negative and gram variable rods, and cultures grew lactobacillus species. GMS ...

  19. SERS and DFT study of copper surfaces coated with corrosion inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Muniz-Miranda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Azole derivatives are common inhibitors of copper corrosion due to the chemical adsorption occurring on the metal surface that gives rise to a protective film. In particular, 1,2,4-triazole performs comparable to benzotriazole, which is much more widely used, but is by no means an environmentally friendly agent. In this study, we have analyzed the adsorption of 1,2,4-triazole on copper by taking advantage of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS effect, which highlights the vibrational features of organic ligand monolayers adhering to rough surfaces of some metals such as gold, silver and copper. To ensure the necessary SERS activation, a roughening procedure was implemented on the copper substrates, resulting in nanoscale surface structures, as evidenced by microscopic investigation. To obtain sufficient information on the molecule–metal interaction and the formation of an anticorrosive thin film, the SERS spectra were interpreted with the aid of theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT approach.

  20. Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Aspergillus spp. by Using a Composite Correlation Index (CCI)-Based Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Method Appears To Not Offer Benefit over Traditional Broth Microdilution Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitman, Melissa R; McTaggart, Lisa; Spinato, Joanna; Poopalarajah, Rahgavi; Lister, Erin; Husain, Shahid; Kus, Julianne V

    2017-07-01

    Aspergillus spp. cause serious invasive lung infections, and Aspergillus fumigatus is the most commonly encountered clinically significant species. Voriconazole is considered to be the drug of choice for treating A. fumigatus infections; however, rising resistance rates have been reported. We evaluated a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based method for the differentiation between wild-type and non-wild-type isolates of 20 Aspergillus spp. (including 2 isolates of Aspergillus ustus and 1 of Aspergillus calidoustus that were used as controls due their intrinsic low azole susceptibility with respect to the in vitro response to voriconazole). At 30 and 48 h of incubation, there was complete agreement between Cyp51A sequence analysis, broth microdilution, and MALDI-TOF MS classification of isolates as wild type or non-wild type. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrated that MALDI-TOF MS can be used to accurately detect A. fumigatus strains with reduced voriconazole susceptibility. However, rather than proving to be a rapid and simple method for antifungal susceptibility testing, this particular MS-based method showed no benefit over conventional testing methods. © Crown copyright 2017.

  1. Aspergillus fumigatus-Related Species in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoth, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the main etiologic agent of invasive aspergillosis (IA). Other Aspergillus species belonging to the section Fumigati (A. fumigatus complex) may occasionally be the cause of IA. These strains are often misidentified, as they cannot be distinguished from A. fumigatus by conventional morphological analysis and sequencing methods. This lack of recognition may have important consequences as these A. fumigatus-related species often display some level of intrinsic resistance to azoles and other antifungal drugs. A. lentulus, A. udagawae, A. viridinutans, and A. thermomutatus (Neosartorya pseudofischeri) have been associated with refractory cases of IA. Microbiologists should be able to suspect the presence of these cryptic species behind a putative A. fumigatus isolate on the basis of some simple characteristics, such as defect in sporulation and/or unusual antifungal susceptibility profile. However, definitive species identification requires specific sequencing analyses of the beta-tubulin or calmodulin genes, which are not available in most laboratories. Multiplex PCR assays or matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization - time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) gave promising results for rapid and accurate distinction between A. fumigatus and other Aspergillus spp. of the section Fumigati in clinical practice. Improved diagnostic procedures and antifungal susceptibility testing may be helpful for the early detection and management of these particular IA cases.

  2. Aspergillus fumigatus-Related Species in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic eLamoth

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is the main etiologic agent of invasive aspergillosis (IA. Other Aspergillus species belonging to the section Fumigati (A. fumigatus complex may occasionally be the cause of IA. These strains are often misidentified, as they cannot be distinguished from A. fumigatus by conventional morphological analysis and sequencing methods. This lack of recognition may have important consequences as these A. fumigatus-related species often display some level of intrinsic resistance to azoles and other antifungal drugs. A. lentulus, A. udagawae, A. viridinutans and A. thermomutatus (Neosartorya pseudofischeri have been associated with refractory cases of IA. Microbiologists should be able to suspect the presence of these cryptic species behind a putative A. fumigatus isolate on the basis of some simple characteristics, such as defect in sporulation and/or unusual antifungal susceptibility profile. However, definitive species identification requires specific sequencing analyses of the beta-tubulin or calmodulin genes, which are not available in most laboratories. Multiplex PCR assays or matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization – time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS gave promising results for rapid and accurate distinction between A. fumigatus and other Aspergillus spp. of the section Fumigati in clinical practice. Improved diagnostic procedures and antifungal susceptibility testing may be helpful for the early detection and management of these particular IA cases.

  3. Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Aspergillus spp. by Using a Composite Correlation Index (CCI)-Based Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Method Appears To Not Offer Benefit over Traditional Broth Microdilution Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitman, Melissa R.; McTaggart, Lisa; Spinato, Joanna; Poopalarajah, Rahgavi; Lister, Erin; Husain, Shahid

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aspergillus spp. cause serious invasive lung infections, and Aspergillus fumigatus is the most commonly encountered clinically significant species. Voriconazole is considered to be the drug of choice for treating A. fumigatus infections; however, rising resistance rates have been reported. We evaluated a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based method for the differentiation between wild-type and non-wild-type isolates of 20 Aspergillus spp. (including 2 isolates of Aspergillus ustus and 1 of Aspergillus calidoustus that were used as controls due their intrinsic low azole susceptibility with respect to the in vitro response to voriconazole). At 30 and 48 h of incubation, there was complete agreement between Cyp51A sequence analysis, broth microdilution, and MALDI-TOF MS classification of isolates as wild type or non-wild type. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrated that MALDI-TOF MS can be used to accurately detect A. fumigatus strains with reduced voriconazole susceptibility. However, rather than proving to be a rapid and simple method for antifungal susceptibility testing, this particular MS-based method showed no benefit over conventional testing methods. PMID:28404678

  4. Posaconazole-Induced Adrenal Insufficiency in a Case of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Miller

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Posaconazole is an azole used in treatment and prophylaxis of a broad spectrum of fungal infections. Antifungals such as ketoconazole have been shown to cause primary adrenal insufficiency (AI as a result of direct inhibition on the steroidogenesis pathway. There is only one reported case of primary AI induced by posaconazole in a patient with mucormycosis. We report a case of posaconazole-related primary AI. Case. A 63-year-old man with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia was admitted for fatigue and intermittent nausea and vomiting. He had recently discontinued prophylactic posaconazole 300 mg daily. He was assessed for AI with a morning cortisol of 1.9 mcg/dL followed by a failed cosyntropin stimulation (CS test. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH level was 154.6 pg/mL with negative 21-hydroxylase antibodies. The patient’s symptoms improved with initiation of hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. One year after discontinuation of posaconazole, he underwent a repeat CS test which showed normal adrenal function with normal ACTH at 34.1 pg/mL. Conclusion. In this case, we demonstrate that prolonged use of posaconazole is associated with primary AI. As use of posaconazole increases, knowledge of the potential risk of AI is important and must be included in the differential diagnosis when these patients present with hypotension, hypoglycemia, and failure to thrive.

  5. Molecular diagnostic methods for invasive fungal disease: the horizon draws nearer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, C L; Kidd, S E; Sorrell, T C; Chen, S C-A

    2015-04-01

    Rapid, accurate diagnostic laboratory tests are needed to improve clinical outcomes of invasive fungal disease (IFD). Traditional direct microscopy, culture and histological techniques constitute the 'gold standard' against which newer tests are judged. Molecular diagnostic methods, whether broad-range or fungal-specific, have great potential to enhance sensitivity and speed of IFD diagnosis, but have varying specificities. The use of PCR-based assays, DNA sequencing, and other molecular methods including those incorporating proteomic approaches such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS) have shown promising results. These are used mainly to complement conventional methods since they require standardisation before widespread implementation can be recommended. None are incorporated into diagnostic criteria for defining IFD. Commercial assays may assist standardisation. This review provides an update of molecular-based diagnostic approaches applicable to biological specimens and fungal cultures in microbiology laboratories. We focus on the most common pathogens, Candida and Aspergillus, and the mucormycetes. The position of molecular-based approaches in the detection of azole and echinocandin antifungal resistance is also discussed.

  6. Studies on non-steroidal inhibitors of aromatase enzyme; 4-(aryl/heteroaryl)-2-(pyrimidin-2-yl)thiazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Zafer; Ertas, Merve; Berk, Barkın; Biltekin, Sevde Nur; Yurttas, Leyla; Demirayak, Seref

    2018-05-01

    Steroidal and non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors target the suppression of estrogen biosynthesis in the treatment of breast cancer. Researchers have increasingly focused on developing non-steroidal derivatives for their potential clinical use avoiding steroidal side-effects. Non-steroidal derivatives generally have planar aromatic structures attached to the azole ring system. One part of this ring system comprises functional groups that inhibit aromatization through the coordination of the haem group of the aromatase enzyme. Replacement of the triazole ring system and development of aromatic/cyclic structures of the side chain can increase selectivity over aromatase enzyme inhibition. In this study, 4-(aryl/heteroaryl)-2-(pyrimidin-2-yl)thiazole derivatives were synthesized and physical analyses and structural determination studies were performed. The IC 50 values were determined by a fluorescence-based aromatase inhibition assay and compound 1 (4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(pyrimidine-2-yl)thiazole) were found potent inhibitor of enzyme (IC 50 :0.42 nM). Then, their antiproliferative activity over MCF-7 and HEK-293 cell lines was evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Compounds 1, 7, 8, 13, 15, 18, 21 were active against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Lastly, a series of docking experiments were undertaken to analyze the crystal structure of human placental aromatase and identify the possible interactions between the most active structure and the active site. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Invasive Trichosporon Infection: A systematic review on a re-emerging fungal pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Nobrega De Almeida Júnior

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review aimed to better depict the clinical features and address the issue of therapeutic management of Trichosporon deep-seated infections.Methods: We comprehensively reviewed the cases of invasive Trichosporon infection reported in the literature from 1994 (date of taxonomic modification to 2015. Data from antifungal susceptibility testing (AST studies were also analyzed. Results: Two hundred and three cases were retained and split into four groups: hemopathy (n=79, other immunodeficiency conditions (n =41, miscellaneous (n=58 and newborns (n=25. Trichosporon asahii was the main causative species (46.7% and may exhibit cross-resistance to different antifungal classes. The unfavorable outcome rate was at 44.3%. By multivariate analysis, breakthrough infection (OR 2.45 was associated with unfavorable outcome, whilst the use of an azole-based therapy improved the prognosis (OR 0.16. Voriconazole-based treatment was associated with favorable outcome in hematological patients (73.6% vs. 41.8%; p=0.016. Compiled data from AST demonstrated that (i T. asahii exhibits the highest MICs to amphotericin B and (ii voriconazole has the best in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates of Trichosporon spp. Conclusions: Trichosporon infection is not only restricted to hematological patients. Analysis of compiled data from AST and clinical outcome support the use of voriconazole as first line therapy.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of an Atypical Metschnikowia sp. Strain from the Skin Scraping of a Dermatitis Patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Sian Kuan

    Full Text Available A yeast-like organism was isolated from the skin scraping sample of a stasis dermatitis patient in the Mycology Unit Department of Medical Microbiology, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The isolate produced no pigment and was not identifiable using chromogenic agar and API 20C AUX. The fungus was identified as Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034, which is close to that of Metschnikowia drosophilae based on ITS- and D1/D2 domain-based phylogenetic analysis. However, the physiology of the strain was not associated to M. drosophilae. This pathogen exhibited low sensitivity to all tested azoles, echinocandins, 5-flucytosine and amphotericin B. This study provided insight into Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 phenotype profiles using a Biolog phenotypic microarray (PM. The isolate utilized 373 nutrients of 760 nutrient sources and could adapt to a broad range of osmotic and pH environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of Metschnikowia non-pulcherrima sp. from skin scraping, revealing this rare yeast species as a potential human pathogen that may be misidentified as Candida sp. using conventional methods. Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 can survive in flexible and diverse environments with a generalist lifestyle.

  9. Current issues in onychomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trépanier, E F; Amsden, G W

    1998-02-01

    To review the epidemiology, mycology, clinical features and diagnosis, current pharmacotherapy, and pharmacoeconomics of onychomycosis. We conducted a MEDLINE search from 1966 to May 1997. References from these articles, manufacturers of the discussed antimycotics, and relevant abstracts from recent dermatology conferences were used to collect pertinent data. Data were obtained from published controlled studies and case reports. In the pharmacotherapy section, the most weight was placed on fully reported, randomized, controlled comparative trials, but abstracts and case series were included when well-controlled studies were unavailable. Onychomycosis is a common nail disorder that has a substantial impact on patients' quality of life. It is most commonly caused by dermatophytes, but yeasts and molds can also be involved. Diagnosis is made through clinical presentation, potassium hydroxide preparations, and culture of tissue/nail samples. Griseofulvin was the drug of choice for many years, but its low cure rates and the development of newer, more effective drugs made it fall out of favor. Current therapeutic alternatives include fluconazole, itraconazole, and terbinafine. Data on the use of fluconazole are limited to case series and reports. Continuous dosing of itraconazole and terbinafine are well-proven therapies. New data are becoming available on the use of pulse itraconazole dosing, which has recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for fingernail infections. These drugs are well tolerated, but attention to drug interactions is necessary with the azoles. Currently, continuous terbinafine appears to be the most cost-effective drug for dermatophyte onychomycosis.

  10. Cdr2p contributes to fluconazole resistance in Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The development of resistance to azole antifungals used in the treatment of fungal infections can be a serious medical problem. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms associated with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole in clinical isolates of Candida dubliniensis , showing evidence of the trailing growth phenomenon. The changes in membrane sterol composition were studied in the presence of subinhibitory fluconazole concentrations. Despite lanosterol and eburicol accumulating as the most prevalent sterols after fluconazole treatment, these ergosterol precursors still support growth of Candida isolates. The overexpression of ABC transporters was demonstrated by immunoblotting employing specific antibodies against Cdr1p and Cdr2p. The presence of a full-length 170 kDa protein Cdr1p was detected in two isolates, while a truncated form of Cdr1p with the molecular mass of 85 kDa was observed in isolate 966\\/3(2). Notably, Cdr2p was detected in this isolate, and the expression of this transporter was modulated by subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis can display the trailing growth phenomenon, and such isolates express similar molecular mechanisms like that of fluconazole-resistant isolates and can therefore be associated with recurrent infections.

  11. Invasive candidiasis in pediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit; Deep, Akash

    2009-10-01

    Candidemia and disseminated candidiasis are major causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients especially in the intensive care units (ICU). The incidence of invasive candidasis is on a steady rise because of increasing use of multiple antibiotics and invasive procedures carried out in the ICUs. Worldwide there is a shifting trend from C. albicans towards non albicans species, with an associated increase in mortality and antifungal resistance. In the ICU a predisposed host in one who is on broad spectrum antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and central venous catheters. There are no pathognomonic signs or symptoms. The clinical clues are: unexplained fever or signs of severe sepsis or septic shock while on antibiotics, multiple, non-tender, nodular erythematous cutaneous lesions. The spectrum of infection with candida species range from superficial candidiasis of the skin and mucosa to more serious life threatening infections. Treatment of candidiasis involves removal of the most likely source of infection and drug therapy to speed up the clearance of infection. Amphotericin B remains the initial drug of first choice in hemodynamically unstable critically ill children in the wake of increasing resistance to azoles. Evaluation of newer antifungal agents and precise role of prophylactic therapy in ICU patients is needed.

  12. (R,S)-2-chlorophenoxyl pyrazolides as novel substrates for improving lipase-catalyzed hydrolytic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Min-fang; Lu, Pei-yu; Kao, Jou-yan; Wang, Pei-yun; Wu, An-chi; Tsai, Shau-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The best reaction condition of Candida antartica lipase B as biocatalyst, 3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazole as leaving azole, and water-saturated methyl t-butyl ether as reaction medium at 45°C were first selected for performing the hydrolytic resolution of (R,S)-2-(4-chlorophenoxyl) azolides (1-4). In comparison with the kinetic resolution of (R,S)-2-phenylpropionyl 3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazolide or (R,S)-α-methoxyphenylacetyl 3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazolide at the same reaction condition, excellent enantioselectivity with more than two order-of-magnitudes higher activity for each enantiomer was obtained. The resolution was then extended to other (R,S)-3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazolides (5-7) containing 2-chloro, 3-chloro, or 2,4-dichloro substituent, giving good (E > 48) to excellent (E > 100) enantioselectivity. The thermodynamic analysis for 1, 2, and 4-7 demonstrates profound effects of the acyl or leaving moiety on varying enthalpic and entropic contributions to the difference of Gibbs free energies. A thorough kinetic analysis further indicates that on the basis of 6, the excellent enantiomeric ratio for 4 and 7 is due to the higher reactivity of (S)-4 and lower reactivity of (R)-7, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Biofilm Formation by Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium Species: A Comparative Study

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    Rodrigo Rollin-Pinheiro

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species are medically important fungi that are present in soil and human impacted areas and capable of causing a wide spectrum of diseases in humans. Although little is known about their pathogenesis, their growth process and infection routes are very similar to those of Aspergillus species, which grow as biofilms in invasive infections. All nine strains tested here displayed the ability to grow as biofilms in vitro and to produce a dense network of interconnected hyphae on both polystyrene and the surfaces of central venous catheters, but with different characteristics. Scedosporium boydii and S. aurantiacum clinical isolates were able to form biofilms faster than the corresponding environmental strains, as evidenced in kinetic assays for S. boydii and CLSM for S. aurantiacum. Biofilms formed by Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species had significantly higher resistance to the class of antifungal azole than was observed in planktonic cells, indicating a protective role for this structure. In addition, the clinical S. aurantiacum isolate that formed the most robust biofilms was also more virulent in a larvae Galleria mellonella infection model, suggesting that the ability to form biofilms enhances virulence in Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species.

  14. Efficacy of Oral E1210, a New Broad-Spectrum Antifungal with a Novel Mechanism of Action, in Murine Models of Candidiasis, Aspergillosis, and Fusariosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Katsura; Horii, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Mamiko; Watanabe, Nao-aki; Okubo, Miyuki; Sonoda, Jiro; Nakamoto, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Keigo; Shirotori, Syuji; Murai, Norio; Inoue, Satoshi; Matsukura, Masayuki; Abe, Shinya; Yoshimatsu, Kentaro; Asada, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class, broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action—inhibition of fungal glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. In this study, the efficacies of E1210 and reference antifungals were evaluated in murine models of oropharyngeal and disseminated candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. Oral E1210 demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy in infections caused by Candida species, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium solani. In the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis, E1210 and fluconazole each caused a significantly greater reduction in the number of oral CFU than the control treatment (P candidiasis model, mice treated with E1210, fluconazole, caspofungin, or liposomal amphotericin B showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis caused by azole-resistant Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis. A 24-h delay in treatment onset minimally affected the efficacy outcome of E1210 in the treatment of disseminated candidiasis. In the Aspergillus flavus pulmonary aspergillosis model, mice treated with E1210, voriconazole, or caspofungin showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. These data suggest that further studies to determine E1210's potential for the treatment of disseminated fungal infections are indicated. PMID:21788462

  15. Prospective observational multicenter study to define a diagnostic algorithm for biliary candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Philipp; Eckelskemper, Franziska; Erichsen, Thomas; Lankisch, Tim; Dechêne, Alexander; Lubritz, Gabriele; Lenze, Frank; Beyna, Torsten; Ullerich, Hansjörg; Schmedt, Andre; Domagk, Dirk

    2014-09-14

    To develop an algorithm to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with biliary candidiasis. We performed a prospective study of 127 patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, for various biliary disorders, at 3 tertiary referral centers in Germany from July 2011 through July 2012 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01109550). Bile, buccal, and stool samples were collected. When indicated, endoscopic transpapillary bile duct biopsies were performed to clarify the etiology of bile duct strictures and to prove invasive fungal infections. Candida species were detected in 38 of the 127 bile samples (29.9%). By multivariate analysis patients' age and previous endoscopic sphincterotomy were independent risk factors for biliary candidiasis (P 7 d) (P = 0.089) tend to be at risk for biliary candidiasis. One patient was negative in mycological culture of bile fluid but invasive biliary candidiasis was diagnosed histologically. Of Candida subspecies detected, 36.7% were azole-resistant, such as C glabrata. Eight patients received anti-mycotic therapy, based on our algorithm. Of these, 3 had cancer with biliary tract involvement, 2 had secondary sclerosing cholangitis, 1 had retroperitoneal fibrosis, and 5 had septicemia. In all patients contamination was ruled out by smears of the endoscope channel. Gastroenterologists should be aware of frequent candida colonization in patients with cholangitis and biliary disorders. Our suggested algorithm facilitates the further clinical management.

  16. EFFECT OF HIGHLY ACTIVE ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY ON VAGINAL Candida spp. ISOLATION IN HIV-INFECTED COMPARED TO HIV-UNINFECTED WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia de Souza Dantas ALCZUK

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC in HIV-infected women contributed to the impairment of their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART use on the vaginal Candida spp. isolation in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected women. This cross-sectional study included 178 HIV-infected (HIV group and 200 HIV-uninfected women (control that were studied at the Specialized Assistance Service (SAE for sexually transmitted diseases (STD/AIDS of the city of Maringá, Brazil, from April 1 to October 30, 2011. The yeasts were isolated and identified by phenotypic and molecular methods. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, nystatin and amphotericin B was tested by the reference microdilution method. Higher frequencies of total vaginal Candida spp. isolation were found in the HIV-infected group than in the control group. However, both groups showed a similar frequency of colonization and VVC. Although C. albicans was the most frequent and sensitive to azolics and polyenes in both HIV-infected and uninfected women, the emerging resistance of C. glabrata to amphotericin B in the HIV-infected women was observed. Although higher frequency of vaginal Candida spp. isolation had been observed in the HIV-infected than in HIV-uninfected women, colonization and VVC showed similar frequency in both groups, indicating that HAART appears to protect against vaginal colonization and VVC.

  17. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from the patients with vaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Masahito; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-02-01

    There have been the current Japanese data on susceptibility testing for Candida isolates from vaginal candidiasis. The in vitro activities of therapeutic antifungal drugs for vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC); miconazole (MCZ), itraconazole (ITCZ), fluconazole (FLCZ), clotrimazole (CTZ), oxiconazole (OCZ), isoconazole (ICZ) and bifonazole (BFZ) against vaginal isolates. Fifty-four strains Candida albicans and 19 strains of Candida glabrata were evaluated using a broth microdilution method specified by Clinical Laboratories Standard Institute (CLSI) document M27-A3. The MIC90 of each drug, MCZ, ITCZ, FLCZ, CTZ, OCZ, ICZ and BFZ, against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates were 0.25, 0.12, 1, 0.06, 0.12, 0.12 and 1 μg/ml and 1, 1, 8, 0.5, 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml respectively. The activities of these drugs, except for BFZ, against C. glabrata were lower than that of C. albicans. There was one azole-resistant isolate in C. glabrata of which MIC of FLCZ is > 64 μg/ml and this isolate had cross resistance to other antifungal drugs tested. These results suggest that antifungal drugs for treatment of VVC continues to have potent antifungal activities against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates from vaginitis. CTZ, OCZ and ICZ susceptibility of FLCZ low susceptibility C. glabrata are relatively higher than MCZ, ITCZ and FLCZ. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Computational Study on Substituted s-Triazine Derivatives as Energetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas D. Ghule

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available s-Triazine is the essential candidate of many energetic compounds due to its high nitrogen content, enthalpy of formation and thermal stability. The present study explores s-triazine derivatives in which different -NO2, -NH2 and -N3 substituted azoles are attached to the triazine ring via C-N linkage. The density functional theory is used to predict geometries, heats of formation and other energetic properties. Among the designed compounds, -N3 derivatives show very high heats of formation. The densities for designed compounds were predicted by using the crystal packing calculations. Introduction of -NO2 group improves density as compared to -NH2 and -N3, their order of increasing density can be given as NO2>N3>NH2. Analysis of the bond dissociation energies for C-NO2, C-NH2 and C-N3 bonds indicates that substitutions of the -N3 and -NH2 group are favorable for enhancing the thermal stability of s-triazine derivatives. The nitro and azido derivatives of triazine are found to be promising candidates for the synthetic studies.

  19. Correlation between in vitro and in vivo antifungal activities in experimental fluconazole-resistant oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, T J; Gonzalez, C E; Piscitelli, S; Bacher, J D; Peter, J; Torres, R; Shetti, D; Katsov, V; Kligys, K; Lyman, C A

    2000-06-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis (OPEC) is a frequent opportunistic mycosis in immunocompromised patients. Azole-resistant OPEC is a refractory form of this infection occurring particularly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. The procedures developed by the Antifungal Subcommittee of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) are an important advance in standardization of in vitro antifungal susceptibility methodology. In order to further understand the relationship between NCCLS methodology and antifungal therapeutic response, we studied the potential correlation between in vitro susceptibility to fluconazole and in vivo response in a rabbit model of fluconazole-resistant OPEC. MICs of fluconazole were determined by NCCLS methods. Three fluconazole-susceptible (FS) (MIC, /=64 microgram/ml) isolates of Candida albicans from prospectively monitored HIV-infected children with OPEC were studied. FR isolates were recovered from children with severe OPEC refractory to fluconazole, and FS isolates were recovered from those with mucosal candidiasis responsive to fluconazole. Fluconazole at 2 mg/kg of body weight/day was administered to infected animals for 7 days. The concentrations of fluconazole in plasma were maintained above the MICs for FS isolates throughout the dosing interval. Fluconazole concentrations in the esophagus were greater than or equal to those in plasma. Rabbits infected with FS isolates and treated with fluconazole had significant reductions in oral mucosal quantitative cultures (P OPEC due to C. albicans.

  20. [Terbinafine : Drug-induced lupus erythematodes and triggering of psoriatic skin lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayser, P

    2016-09-01

    Based on the technical information that oral terbinafine must be used with caution in patients with pre-existing psoriasis or lupus erythematosus, the literature was summarized. Terbinafine belongs to the drugs able to induce subcutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE)-with a relatively high risk. The clinical picture of terbinafine-induced SCLE may be highly variable and can also include erythema exsudativum multiforme-like or bullous lesions. Thus, differentiation of terbinafine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis may be difficult. Therefore, terbinafine should be prescribed with caution in patients who show light sensitivity, arthralgias, positive antinuclear antibodies or have a history of SLE or SCLE. Case reports include wide-spread, but mostly nonlife-threatening courses, which did not require systemic therapy with steroids or antimalarials in every case. Terbinafine is also able to induce or to aggravate psoriasis. The latency period seems to be rather short (Terbinafine therefore is not first choice if a systemic therapy with antimycotics is indicated in a patient with psoriasis or psoriatic diathesis. Azole derivatives according to the guidelines may be used as an alternative.

  1. Efficacy of terbinafine compared to lanoconazole and luliconazole in the topical treatment of dermatophytosis in a guinea pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, M A; Long, L; Kim, H G; Cirino, A J; Miller, A R; Mallefet, P

    2010-05-01

    The in vivo efficacy of terbinafine was compared to lanoconazole and luliconazole in the topical treatment of dermatophytosis caused by Trichophyton mentagrophytes using a guinea pig model. Topical antifungal treatment commenced three days post-infection, and each agent was applied once daily for seven consecutive days. Upon completion of the treatment period, evaluations of clinical and mycological efficacies were performed, as was scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. Data showed that while all tested antifungals demonstrated significant mycological efficacy in terms of eradicating the fungi over untreated control, terbinafine and luliconazole showed superior clinical efficacy compared to lanoconazole (P-values Terbinafine demonstrated the highest clinical percent efficacy. SEM analysis revealed hairs from terbinafine and lanoconazole-treated animals had near complete clearance of fungi, while samples from luliconazole-treated animals were covered with debris and few conidia. This study demonstrates that, in general, terbinafine possessed similar efficacy to lanoconazole and luliconazole in the treatment of dermatophytosis. Terbinafine tended to have superior clinical efficacy compared to the azoles tested, although this difference was not statistically significant against luliconazole. This apparent superiority may be due to the fungicidal activity of terbinafine compared to the fungistatic effect of the other two drugs.

  2. Efficacy of Topical Therapy with Newly Developed Terbinafine and Econazole Formulations in the Treatment of Dermatophytosis in Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaskiene, M; Matusevicius, A P; Grigonis, A; Zamokas, G; Babickaite, L

    2016-09-01

    In the field of veterinary dermatology dermatophytosis is one of the most frequently occurring infectious diseases, therefore its treatment should be effective, convenient, safe and inexpensive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of newly developed topical formulations in the treatment of cats with dermatophytosis. Evaluation of clinical efficacy and safety of terbinafine and econazole formulations administered topically twice a day was performed in 40 cats. Cats, suffering from the most widely spread Microsporum canis-induced dermatophytosis and treated with terbinafine hydrochloride 1% cream, recovered within 20.3±0.88 days; whereas when treated with econazole nitrate 1% cream, they recovered within 28.4±1.14 days. A positive therapeutic effect was yielded by combined treatment with local application of creams and whole coat spray with enilconazole 0.2% emulsion "Imaverol". Most cats treated with econazole cream revealed redness and irritation of the skin at the site of application. This study demonstrates that terbinafine tended to have superior clinical efficacy (p<0.001) in the treatment of dermatophytosis in cats compared to the azole tested.

  3. Successful Treatment of Fluconazole-Resistant Oropharyngeal Candidiasis by a Combination of Fluconazole and Terbinafine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Elewski, Boni

    1999-01-01

    Increasing incidence of resistance to conventional antifungal therapy has demanded that novel therapies be introduced. Recent in vitro studies have shown that combinations involving azoles and allylamines may be effective in inhibiting fluconazole-resistant fungi. In this report, we describe the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with white patches on her buccal mucosa, tongue, and palate with a bright erythematous erosive base. A fungal culture revealed Candida albicans. The patient failed to respond to the initially prescribed fluconazole therapy. Failure of therapy can be attributed to a developed resistance to fluconazole from the patient’s intermittent use of this antifungal agent at varying dosages for the preceding 2 years due to a diagnosis of onychomycosis. In vitro testing of the culture from the patient showed elevated MICs of fluconazole, itraconzole, and terbinafine (MICs were 32, 0.5, and 64 μg/ml, respectively). Our goal was to combine therapies of fluconazole and terbinafine in an attempt to clear the fungal infection. Impressively, this combination resulted in the clearing of the clinical symptoms and the patient has successfully been asymptomatic for more than 12 months posttreatment. PMID:10548586

  4. Terbinafine inhibits Cryptococcus neoformans growth and modulates fungal morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Rezende Guerra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated fungus that causes cryptococcosis. Central nervous system infection is the most common clinical presentation followed by pulmonary, skin and eye manifestations. Cryptococcosis is primarily treated with amphotericin B (AMB, fluconazole (FLC and itraconazole (ITC. In the present work, we evaluated the in vitro effect of terbinafine (TRB, an antifungal not commonly used to treat cryptococcosis. We specifically examined the effects of TRB, either alone or in conjunction with AMB, FLC and ITC, on clinical C. neoformans isolates, including some isolates resistant to AMB and ITC. Broth microdilution assays showed that TRB was the most effective drug in vitro. Antifungal combinations demonstrated synergism of TRB with AMB, FLC and ITC. The drug concentrations used for the combination formulations were as much as 32 and 16-fold lower than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of FLC and AMB alone, respectively. In addition, calcofluor white staining revealed the presence of true septa in hyphae structures that were generated after drug treatment. Ultrastructural analyses demonstrated several alterations in response to drug treatment, such as cell wall alterations, plasma membrane detachment, presence of several cytoplasmic vacuoles and mitochondrial swelling. Therefore, we believe that the use of TRB alone or in combination with AMB and azoles should be explored as an alternative treatment for cryptococcosis patients who do not respond to standard therapies.

  5. PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS: CHALLENGES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A VACCINE AGAINST AN ENDEMIC MYCOSIS IN THE AMERICAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos. P. TABORDA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYParacoccidioidomycosis (PCM, caused by Paracoccidioides spp, is an important endemic mycosis in Latin America. There are two recognized Paracoccidioides species, P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii, based on phylogenetic differences; however, the pathogenesis and disease manifestations of both are indistinguishable at present. Approximately 1,853 (~51,2% of 3,583 confirmed deaths in Brazil due to systemic mycoses from 1996-2006 were caused by PCM. Antifungal treatment is required for patients with PCM. The initial treatment lasts from two to six months and sulfa derivatives, amphotericin B, azoles and terbinafine are used in clinical practice; however, despite prolonged therapy, relapses are still a problem. An effective Th1-biased cellular immune response is essential to control the disease, which can be induced by exogenous antigens or modulated by prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines. Stimulation of B cells or passive transference of monoclonal antibodies are also important means that may be used to improve the efficacy of paracoccidioidomycosis treatment in the future. This review critically details major challenges facing the development of a vaccine to combat PCM.

  6. Transcriptional and metabolic flux profiling of triadimefon effects on cultured hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Vidya V.; Ovacik, Meric A.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Roth, Charles M.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.

    2010-01-01

    Conazoles are a class of azole fungicides used to prevent fungal growth in agriculture, for treatment of fungal infections, and are found to be tumorigenic in rats and/or mice. In this study, cultured primary rat hepatocytes were treated to two different concentrations (0.3 and 0.15 mM) of triadimefon, which is a tumorigenic conazole in rat and mouse liver, on a temporal basis with daily media change. Following treatment, cells were harvested for microarray data ranging from 6 to 72 h. Supernatant was collected daily for three days, and the concentrations of various metabolites in the media and supernatant were quantified. Gene expression changes were most significant following exposure to 0.3 mM triadimefon and were characterized mainly by metabolic pathways related to carbohydrate, lipid and amino acid metabolism. Correspondingly, metabolic network flexibility analysis demonstrated a switch from fatty acid synthesis to fatty acid oxidation in cells exposed to triadimefon. It is likely that fatty acid oxidation is active in order to supply energy required for triadimefon detoxification. In 0.15 mM triadimefon treatment, the hepatocytes are able to detoxify the relatively low concentration of triadimefon with less pronounced changes in hepatic metabolism.

  7. [Treatment of fungal infections of upper respiratory tract and ear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnatowski, Piotr; Kurnatowska, Agnieszka K

    2007-01-01

    Fungi, in comparison with other pathogenic factors, have high pathogenicity. The number of fungal species which are able to infect people is over 500. The upper respiratory tract and ear have permanent contact with external environment which makes their ontocenoses open to continuous exchange of microorganisms of which they consist. In etiology of inflammatory processes 21 species which belonging to 3 genera (Zygomycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota) of fungi play important role. Administration of antifungal drugs can be: prophylactic, empiric preemptive and therapeutic. Physicians may prescribe antibiotics (mainly pollens: amphotericin B, natamycin and nystatin) and chemiotherapeutics (mainly azoles and fluorpirymidins, pigments, chlorhexidine and chlorquinaldol). In ENT practice topical and systemic drugs can be administrated. Topical lozenges include amphotericin B, clotrimazole, chlorhexidine or chlorquinaldol and oral gels: nystatin and miconazole. Some of drugs are in the form of suspension/solution, which can be used for inhalation, into the sinus, for swabbing or for lavage: amphotericin B, natamycin, nystatin, clotrimazol, flucytosine, miconazole, fluconazole, vorykonazole, caspofungin. It should be underlined that only a few of dugs can be absorbed from the digestive tract: flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, vorykonazole.

  8. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, β-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  9. Multidrug-Resistant Candida: Epidemiology, Molecular Mechanisms, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Patterson, Thomas F

    2017-08-15

    Invasive Candida infections remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in hospitalized and immunocompromised or critically ill patients. A limited number of antifungal agents from only a few drug classes are available to treat patients with these serious infections. Resistance can be either intrinsic or acquired. Resistance mechanisms are not exchanged between Candida; thus, acquired resistance either emerges in response to an antifungal selection pressure in the individual patient or, more rarely, occur due to horizontal transmission of resistant strains between patients. Although multidrug resistance is uncommon, increasing reports of multidrug resistance to the azoles, echinocandins, and polyenes have occurred in several Candida species, most notably Candida glabrata and more recently Candida auris. Drivers are overall antifungal use, subtherapeutic drug levels at sites of infection/colonization, drug sequestration in the biofilm matrix, and, in the setting of outbreaks, suboptimal infection control. Moreover, recent research suggests that DNA mismatch repair gene mutations may facilitate acquisition of resistance mutations in C. glabrata specifically. Diagnosis of antifungal-resistant Candida infections is critical to the successful management of patients with these infections. Reduction of unnecessary use of antifungals via antifungal stewardship is critical to limit multidrug resistance emergence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. An Update on Candida tropicalis Based on Basic and Clinical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza-Alves, Diana L.; Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison P.; Chaves, Guilherme M.

    2017-01-01

    Candida tropicalis has emerged as one of the most important Candida species. It has been widely considered the second most virulent Candida species, only preceded by C. albicans. Besides, this species has been recognized as a very strong biofilm producer, surpassing C. albicans in most of the studies. In addition, it produces a wide range of other virulence factors, including: adhesion to buccal epithelial and endothelial cells; the secretion of lytic enzymes, such as proteinases, phospholipases, and hemolysins, bud-to-hyphae transition (also called morphogenesis) and the phenomenon called phenotypic switching. This is a species very closely related to C. albicans and has been easily identified with both phenotypic and molecular methods. In addition, no cryptic sibling species were yet described in the literature, what is contradictory to some other medically important Candida species. C. tropicalis is a clinically relevant species and may be the second or third etiological agent of candidemia, specifically in Latin American countries and Asia. Antifungal resistance to the azoles, polyenes, and echinocandins has already been described. Apart from all these characteristics, C. tropicalis has been considered an osmotolerant microorganism and this ability to survive to high salt concentration may be important for fungal persistence in saline environments. This physiological characteristic makes this species suitable for use in biotechnology processes. Here we describe an update of C. tropicalis, focusing on all these previously mentioned subjects. PMID:29081766

  11. An in vitro study of antifungal drug susceptibility of Candida species isolated from human immunodeficiency virus seropositive and human immunodeficiency virus seronegative individuals in Lucknow population Uttar Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Mohammad Shafi; Sreedar, Gadiputi; Shukla, Abhilasha; Gupta, Prashant; Rehan, Ahmad Danish; George, Jiji

    2015-01-01

    Candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients, starting from asymptomatic colonization to pathogenic forms and gradual colonization of non-albicans in patients with advanced immunosuppression leads to resistance for azole group of antifungal drugs with high rate of morbidity and mortality. To isolate the Candida species and determine of antifungal drug susceptibility against fluconazole, itraconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B, and clotrimazolein HIV seropositive and control individuals, with or without clinical oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC). Includes samples from faucial region of 70 subjects with and without clinical candidiasis in HIV seropositive and controls were aseptically inoculated onto Sabaraud's Dextrose Agar media and yeasts were identified for the specific species by Corn Meal Agar, sugar fermentation and heat tolerance tests. Antifungal drug susceptibility of the isolated species was done against above-mentioned drugs by E-test and disc diffusion method. The commonly isolated species in HIV seropositive and controls were Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis Candida guilliermondii and Candida dubliniensis isolated only in HIV seropositive patients. Susceptibility against selected antifungal drugs was observed more in HIV-negative individuals whereas susceptible dose-dependent and resistance were predominant in HIV-positive patients. Resistance is the major problem in the therapy of OPC, especially in HIV seropositive patients due to aggressive and prolonged use of antifungal agents, therefore, our study emphasizes the need for antifungal drug susceptibility testing whenever antifungal treatment is desired, especially in HIV-infected subjects.

  12. [Oral diseases in auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Guyot, Sylvie

    2017-09-01

    Auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) also called Auto-immune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare monogenic childhood-onset auto-immune disease. This autosomal recessive disorder is caused by mutations in the auto-immune regulator (AIRE) gene, and leads to autoimmunity targeting peripheral tissues. There is a wide variability in clinical phenotypes in patients with APSI, with auto-immune endocrine and non-endocrine disorders, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. These patients suffer from oral diseases such as dental enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis. Both are frequently described, and in recent series, enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis are even the most frequent components of APS1 together with hypoparathyroidism. Both often occur during childhood (before 5 years old for canrdidiasis, and before 15 years old for enamel hypoplasia). Oral candidiasis is recurrent all life long, could become resistant to azole antifungal after years of treatment, and be carcinogenic, leading to severe oral squamous cell carcinoma. Oral components of APS1 should be diagnosed and rigorously treated. Dental enamel hypoplasia and/or recurrent oral candidiasis in association with auto-immune diseases in a young child should prompt APS1 diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Activity of Polyphenolic Compounds against Candida glabrata

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    Ricardo Salazar-Aranda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic mycoses increase the morbidity and mortality of immuno-compromised patients. Five Candida species have been shown to be responsible for 97% of worldwide cases of invasive candidiasis. Resistance of C. glabrata and C. krusei to azoles has been reported, and new, improved antifungal agents are needed. The current study was designed to evaluatethe activity of various polyphenolic compounds against Candida species. Antifungal activity was evaluated following the M27-A3 protocol of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and antioxidant activity was determined using the DPPH assay. Myricetin and baicalein inhibited the growth of all species tested. This effect was strongest against C. glabrata, for which the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC value was lower than that of fluconazole. The MIC values against C. glabrata for myricitrin, luteolin, quercetin, 3-hydroxyflavone, and fisetin were similar to that of fluconazole. The antioxidant activity of all compounds was confirmed, and polyphenolic compounds with antioxidant activity had the greatest activity against C. glabrata. The structure and position of their hydroxyl groups appear to influence their activity against C. glabrata.

  14. Fluconazole therapy for treatment of invasive candidiasis in Intensive Care patients. Is it still valid from a pharmacological point of view?

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    Mario Musu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluconazole – antimycotic belonging to the first generation azoles – is widely used as treatment for invasive candidiasis and candidemia in numerous clinical settings as Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU and adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU, as well as oncology, onco-hematology and solid organ transplantation. More recently use of antimycotics has spread to medical divisions, where fungal infections represent an emerging problem due to population’s ageing, malnourishment and important comorbidities. Fluconazole is effective against numerous Candida species, particularly against albicans, tropicalis and parapsilosis strains. On the other hand, C. krusei is intrinsically resistant to fluconazole and C. glabrata can be sensitive or resistant in a dose dependent fashion. Epidemiological variability is noteworthy and depends on the geographical location of the institution, the clinical setting, and the frequency and intensity of fluconazole employment for invasive candidiasis. In many ICUs fluconazole sensitive C. albicans is cultured in 50% of positive samples, while the remaining 50% show growth of variably sensitive fungal species, often resistant to fluconazole. Due to increasingly frequent emergence of resistant strains of Candida spp., American guidelines (IDSA in 2009, and European ones (ESCMID in 2012, recommended substitution of fluconazole with echinocandines as first line therapy in patients with severe disease, as defined by an APACHE II score greater than 15. Thus fluconazole must be limited to low risk cases, treatment of sensitive strains and de-escalation from echinocandin therapy, after microbiological diagnosis and drug resistance profile characterization.

  15. A clinical-economic study of caspofungin use in the treatment of invasive candidiasis in intensive care units

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    A. S. Kolbin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. are the fourth on the list of sepsis pathogens in patients in intensive care units. Currently the physician’s armamentarium includes a whole range of antifungal medicines that have demonstrated high clinicalmycological effectiveness in clinical trials. The aim of this study to evaluate the clinical-economic usefulness of caspofungin therapy in the treatment of invasive candidiasis versus standard and alternative treatments in patients inintensive care units. The first time in the Russian clinical-economic analysis for targeted IC treatment in non-neutropenic patients in intensive care units who have not received primary prophylaxis with azole antimycotics, as well as in those with low (< 20% occurrence of in vitro Candida spp. resistance to fluconazole according to national or local study results, yielded the following findings: the best strategy is initial amphotericin B therapy with subsequent switching to caspofungin in patients with ineffective initial amphotericin B therapy or those with severe adverse events.

  16. Invasive Fungal Infections in the ICU: How to Approach, How to Treat

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    Elisabeth Paramythiotou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are a growing problem in critically ill patients and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Most of them are due to Candida species, especially Candida albicans. Invasive candidiasis includes candidaemia, disseminated candidiasis with deep organ involvement and chronic disseminated candidiasis. During the last decades rare pathogenic fungi, such as Aspergillus species, Zygomycetes, Fusarium species and Scedosporium have also emerged. Timely diagnosis and proper treatment are of paramount importance for a favorable outcome. Besides blood cultures, several laboratory tests have been developed in the hope of facilitating an earlier detection of infection. The antifungal armamentarium has also been expanded allowing a treatment choice tailored to individual patients’ needs. The physician can choose among the old class of polyenes, the older and newer azoles and the echinocandins. Factors related to patient’s clinical situation and present co-morbidities, local epidemiology data and purpose of treatment (prophylactic, pre-emptive, empiric or definitive should be taken into account for the appropriate choice of antifungal agent.

  17. Review of the pharmacology and clinical studies of micafungin

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    Alison M Bormann

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Alison M Bormann1, Vicki A Morrison21Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Division of Hematology/Oncology and Infectious Disease, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Micafungin, like other members of the echinocandin class, has a unique mechanism of action that inhibits the synthesis of 1,3-β-D glucans in the fungal cell wall. It has been approved for treatment of esophageal candidiasis, invasive candidiasis including candidemia, and for prophylaxis of Candida infections in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although efficacy and safety have also been demonstrated in pediatric populations, micafungin is approved for this indication in Europe and Japan, but not in the United States. It has demonstrated activity against Candida spp. including those that are azole-resistant as well as Aspergillus and a few other clinically important molds. It is administered intravenously as a once daily infusion and does not require dose adjustments for renal or moderate hepatic dysfunction. Its safety record, favorable tolerability profile, and few drug interactions make it an important agent for the treatment of invasive fungal infections.Keywords: micafungin, antifungal therapy, echinocandins, fungal infections, Candida, Aspergillus

  18. Antifungal susceptibility profiles of 1698 yeast reference strains revealing potential emerging human pathogens.

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    Marie Desnos-Ollivier

    Full Text Available New molecular identification techniques and the increased number of patients with various immune defects or underlying conditions lead to the emergence and/or the description of novel species of human and animal fungal opportunistic pathogens. Antifungal susceptibility provides important information for ecological, epidemiological and therapeutic issues. The aim of this study was to assess the potential risk of the various species based on their antifungal drug resistance, keeping in mind the methodological limitations. Antifungal susceptibility profiles to the five classes of antifungal drugs (polyens, azoles, echinocandins, allylamines and antimetabolites were determined for 1698 yeast reference strains belonging to 992 species (634 Ascomycetes and 358 Basidiomycetes. Interestingly, geometric mean minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of all antifungal drugs tested were significantly higher for Basidiomycetes compared to Ascomycetes (p<0.001. Twenty four strains belonging to 23 species of which 19 were Basidiomycetes seem to be intrinsically "resistant" to all drugs. Comparison of the antifungal susceptibility profiles of the 4240 clinical isolates and the 315 reference strains belonging to 53 shared species showed similar results. Even in the absence of demonstrated in vitro/in vivo correlation, knowing the in vitro susceptibility to systemic antifungal agents and the putative intrinsic resistance of yeast species present in the environment is important because they could become opportunistic pathogens.

  19. A flexible ligand-based wavy layered metal-organic framework for lithium-ion storage.

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    An, Tiance; Wang, Yuhang; Tang, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Lijuan; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2015-05-01

    A substantial challenge for direct utilization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as lithium-ion battery anodes is to maintain the rigid MOF structure during lithiation/delithiation cycles. In this work, we developed a flexible, wavy layered nickel-based MOF (C20H24Cl2N8Ni, designated as Ni-Me4bpz) by a solvothermal approach of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole (H2Me4bpz) with nickel(II) chloride hexahydrate. The obtained MOF materials (Ni-Me4bpz) with metal azolate coordination mode provide 2-dimensional layered structure for Li(+) intercalation/extraction, and the H2Me4bpz ligands allow for flexible rotation feature and structural stability. Lithium-ion battery anodes made of the Ni-Me4bpz material demonstrate excellent specific capacity and cycling performance, and the crystal structure is well preserved after the electrochemical tests, suggesting the potential of developing flexible layered MOFs for efficient and stable electrochemical storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence, virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. isolated from bloodstream infections in a tertiary care hospital in Brazil.

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    Canela, Heliara Maria Spina; Cardoso, Bárbara; Vitali, Lucia Helena; Coelho, Harnoldo Colares; Martinez, Roberto; Ferreira, Márcia Eliana da Silva

    2018-01-01

    Candida spp. are responsible for 80% of all systemic fungal infections and are associated with high mortality rates. This study characterised 79 bloodstream isolates of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. orthopsilosis, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis from patients in a Brazilian hospital. The susceptibility to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole and voriconazole was determined; virulence factor production was assessed based on haemolysin, phospholipase and proteinase activities, and the patients' clinical characteristics were analysed. C. albicans was the predominant species (44%), followed by C. glabrata (19%), C. tropicalis (19%), C. parapsilosis (14%) and C. orthopsilosis (4%). The candidemia incidence was 1.52 per 1000 admissions, and the crude mortality rate was 52%. One C. albicans isolate was resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole. Moreover, 20.2%, 2.5% and 3.8% of the isolates exhibited dose-dependent susceptibility to fluconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin, respectively. In conclusion, although the C. glabrata incidence was higher than that usually described in Brazil, its increase was previously observed in studies conducted worldwide. Furthermore, the azole resistance of the C. albicans isolate could be due to previous exposure to these antifungals. These results highlight the importance of epidemiological studies and will facilitate an improved understanding of candidemia in the studied hospital. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility profile of Candida species isolated from patients with vulvovaginitis in Tehran, Iran.

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    Sharifynia, Somayeh; Falahati, Mehraban; Akhlaghi, Lame; Foroumadi, Alireza; Fateh, Roohollah

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification and evaluation of antifungal susceptibility pattern of Candida isolates are crucial to determine suitable antifungal drugs for the treatment of patients with vulvovaginitis candidiasis. Vaginal samples were collected from 150 women with suspicious vaginal candidiasis, and then cultured on Sabouraoud's Dextrose Agar with chloramphenicol to isolate Candida species. After identification of Candida isolates using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique, antifungal susceptibility testing of four azolic antifungal drugs was carried out using broth microdilution method according to the CLSI M27-A3. Candida species were isolated from eighty suspected patients (61.79%). The most common pathogen was Candida albicans (63.75%). Resistance to fluconazole and ketoconazole was observed in 27.5% and 23.75% of Candida isolates, respectively, and only 2% of Candida isolates were resistant to miconazole. Interestingly, resistance to fluconazole in C. albicans was more than other Candida species. The results indicated that therapy should be selected according to the antifungal susceptibility tests for the prevention of treatment failure and miconazole therapy can be considered as the best therapeutic choice in the management of vulvovaginitis.

  2. The epidemiology of mycotic vulvovaginitis and the use of antifungal agents in suspected mycotic vulvovaginitis and its implications for clinical practice.

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    Jackson, S T; Mullings, A M; Rainford, L; Miller, A

    2005-06-01

    Data in the Caribbean documenting the speciation of yeast associated with vulvovaginitis are lacking. The widespread use of antibiotics and increased availability of antimycotic agents, both prescribed and over-the-counter, predisposes both to a change in the epidemiologic patterns and the possible development of secondary resistance among previously susceptible yeast. This study was conducted to evaluate the aetiologic agents associated with mycotic vulvovaginitis and to review the appropriateness of prescribed antifungal therapy. Of 134 positive isolates, the most frequent yeast isolate was C. albicans accounting for 78%, C. tropicalis 10%, Prototheca wickerhamii (P. wickerhamii) 5%, C. glabrata 4%, Cryptococcus albidus (C. albidus) 2% and C. lusitaniae (1%) were also isolated. Of the positive cases, 75% were treated with antifungals, 17% with antibiotics and 8% were not treated. The azole group was the most frequently prescribed antifungal (71%). Of cases with negative yeast cultures, 83% were treated with antifungals. The presence of non-albicans Candida species and other opportunistic fungi is an important finding and combined with the pattern of therapy, represents a major challenge for future empirical therapeutic and prophylactic strategies in the treatment of mycotic vulvovaginitis.

  3. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility profile of Candida species isolated from patients with vulvovaginitis in Tehran, Iran

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    Somayeh Sharifynia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rapid and accurate identification and evaluation of antifungal susceptibility pattern of Candida isolates are crucial to determine suitable antifungal drugs for the treatment of patients with vulvovaginitis candidiasis. Materials and Methods: Vaginal samples were collected from 150 women with suspicious vaginal candidiasis, and then cultured on Sabouraoud's Dextrose Agar with chloramphenicol to isolate Candida species. After identification of Candida isolates using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique, antifungal susceptibility testing of four azolic antifungal drugs was carried out using broth microdilution method according to the CLSI M27-A3. Results: Candida species were isolated from eighty suspected patients (61.79%. The most common pathogen was Candida albicans (63.75%. Resistance to fluconazole and ketoconazole was observed in 27.5% and 23.75% of Candida isolates, respectively, and only 2% of Candida isolates were resistant to miconazole. Interestingly, resistance to fluconazole in C. albicans was more than other Candida species. Conclusion: The results indicated that therapy should be selected according to the antifungal susceptibility tests for the prevention of treatment failure and miconazole therapy can be considered as the best therapeutic choice in the management of vulvovaginitis.

  4. Antifungal Effects of Gold Nanoparticles Conjugated Fluconazole against Fluconazole Resistant Strains of Candida albicans Isolated From Patients with Chronic Vulvovaginitis

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    Mehrdad Memarian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: A number of women with volvuvaginal candidiasis suffer from certain chronic and recurrent types of this infection that affect their quality of life. Meanwhile, increased use of antifungal drugs, especially azoles, for treatment of chronic candidiasis is an important factor for incidence of drug resistance in Candida isolates from patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis. The aim of this study was to investigate anticandidal effects of gold nanoparticles conjugated fluconazole to develop better drugs for treatment of patients with candidal vaginitis, especially its chronic type. Methods: After collection of 300 vaginal swab specimens and culture and isolation of primary colonies and determination of Candida species, fluconazole resistant strains of Candida albicans were detected using disc diffusion. Finally, antifungal effects of gold nanoparticles conjugated fluconazole and fluconazole were compared by broth microdilution. Results: Only one fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans was isolated from patients (MIC=64µg/ml. The results obtained from drug susceptibility test showed that this strain was sensitive to gold nanoparticles conjugated fluconazole (MIC=2µg/ml. Conclusion: Given the optimal anticandidal effects of gold nanoparticles conjugated fluconazole on resistant strains of C. albicans, a suitable compound with great anticandidal properties may be achieved in the future.

  5. Sterol biosynthesis is required for heat resistance but not extracellular survival in leishmania.

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    Wei Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sterol biosynthesis is a crucial pathway in eukaryotes leading to the production of cholesterol in animals and various C24-alkyl sterols (ergostane-based sterols in fungi, plants, and trypanosomatid protozoa. Sterols are important membrane components and precursors for the synthesis of powerful bioactive molecules, including steroid hormones in mammals. Their functions in pathogenic protozoa are not well characterized, which limits the development of sterol synthesis inhibitors as drugs. Here we investigated the role of sterol C14α-demethylase (C14DM in Leishmania parasites. C14DM is a cytochrome P450 enzyme and the primary target of azole drugs. In Leishmania, genetic or chemical inactivation of C14DM led to a complete loss of ergostane-based sterols and accumulation of 14-methylated sterols. Despite the drastic change in lipid composition, C14DM-null mutants (c14dm(- were surprisingly viable and replicative in culture. They did exhibit remarkable defects including increased membrane fluidity, failure to maintain detergent resistant membrane fraction, and hypersensitivity to heat stress. These c14dm(- mutants showed severely reduced virulence in mice but were highly resistant to itraconazole and amphotericin B, two drugs targeting sterol synthesis. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of toxic sterol intermediates in c14dm(- causes strong membrane perturbation and significant vulnerability to stress. The new knowledge may help improve the efficacy of current drugs against pathogenic protozoa by exploiting the fitness loss associated with drug resistance.

  6. The synthesis, regulation, and functions of sterols in Candida albicans: Well-known but still lots to learn.

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    Lv, Quan-Zhen; Yan, Lan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2016-08-17

    Sterols are the basal components of the membranes of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and these membranes determine the susceptibility of C. albicans cells to a variety of stresses, such as ionic, osmotic and oxidative pressures, and treatment with antifungal drugs. The common antifungal azoles in clinical use are targeted to the biosynthesis of ergosterol. In the past years, the synthesis, storage and metabolism of ergosterol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been characterized in some detail; however, these processes has not been as well investigated in the human opportunistic pathogen C. albicans. In this review, we summarize the genes involved in ergosterol synthesis and regulation in C. albicans. As well, genes in S. cerevisiae implicated in ergosterol storage and conversions with other lipids are noted, as these provide us clues and directions for the study of the homologous genes in C. albicans. In this report we have particularly focused on the essential roles of ergosterol in the dynamic process of cell biology and its fundamental status in the biological membrane system that includes lipid rafts, lipid droplets, vacuoles and mitochondria. We believe that a thorough understanding of this classic and essential pathway will give us new ideas about drug resistance and morphological switching in C. albicans.

  7. Sterol biosynthesis is required for heat resistance but not extracellular survival in leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Baykal, Eda; Huang, Juyang; Zhang, Kai

    2014-10-01

    Sterol biosynthesis is a crucial pathway in eukaryotes leading to the production of cholesterol in animals and various C24-alkyl sterols (ergostane-based sterols) in fungi, plants, and trypanosomatid protozoa. Sterols are important membrane components and precursors for the synthesis of powerful bioactive molecules, including steroid hormones in mammals. Their functions in pathogenic protozoa are not well characterized, which limits the development of sterol synthesis inhibitors as drugs. Here we investigated the role of sterol C14α-demethylase (C14DM) in Leishmania parasites. C14DM is a cytochrome P450 enzyme and the primary target of azole drugs. In Leishmania, genetic or chemical inactivation of C14DM led to a complete loss of ergostane-based sterols and accumulation of 14-methylated sterols. Despite the drastic change in lipid composition, C14DM-null mutants (c14dm(-)) were surprisingly viable and replicative in culture. They did exhibit remarkable defects including increased membrane fluidity, failure to maintain detergent resistant membrane fraction, and hypersensitivity to heat stress. These c14dm(-) mutants showed severely reduced virulence in mice but were highly resistant to itraconazole and amphotericin B, two drugs targeting sterol synthesis. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of toxic sterol intermediates in c14dm(-) causes strong membrane perturbation and significant vulnerability to stress. The new knowledge may help improve the efficacy of current drugs against pathogenic protozoa by exploiting the fitness loss associated with drug resistance.

  8. Prospective observational multicenter study to define a diagnostic algorithm for biliary candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Philipp; Eckelskemper, Franziska; Erichsen, Thomas; Lankisch, Tim; Dechêne, Alexander; Lubritz, Gabriele; Lenze, Frank; Beyna, Torsten; Ullerich, Hansjörg; Schmedt, Andre; Domagk, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To develop an algorithm to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with biliary candidiasis. METHODS: We performed a prospective study of 127 patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, for various biliary disorders, at 3 tertiary referral centers in Germany from July 2011 through July 2012 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01109550). Bile, buccal, and stool samples were collected. When indicated, endoscopic transpapillary bile duct biopsies were performed to clarify the etiology of bile duct strictures and to prove invasive fungal infections. RESULTS: Candida species were detected in 38 of the 127 bile samples (29.9%). By multivariate analysis patients’ age and previous endoscopic sphincterotomy were independent risk factors for biliary candidiasis (P 7 d) (P = 0.089) tend to be at risk for biliary candidiasis. One patient was negative in mycological culture of bile fluid but invasive biliary candidiasis was diagnosed histologically. Of Candida subspecies detected, 36.7% were azole-resistant, such as C glabrata. Eight patients received anti-mycotic therapy, based on our algorithm. Of these, 3 had cancer with biliary tract involvement, 2 had secondary sclerosing cholangitis, 1 had retroperitoneal fibrosis, and 5 had septicemia. In all patients contamination was ruled out by smears of the endoscope channel. CONCLUSION: Gastroenterologists should be aware of frequent candida colonization in patients with cholangitis and biliary disorders. Our suggested algorithm facilitates the further clinical management. PMID:25232260

  9. Identification of isolates of the plant pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans with resistance to the triazole fungicide fluquinconazole using a novel In Planta assay.

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    Angela P Van de Wouw

    Full Text Available Leptosphaeria maculans is the major pathogen of canola (oilseed rape, Brassica napus worldwide. In Australia, the use of azole fungicides has contributed to the 50-fold increase in canola production in the last 25 years. However, extensive application of fungicides sets the stage for the selection of fungal populations with resistance. A high-throughput in planta assay was developed to allow screening of thousands of isolates from multiple populations. Using this screen, isolates were identified with decreased sensitivity to the fungicide fluquinconazole when applied at field rates as a protective seed dressing: these isolates cause significantly larger lesions on cotyledons and true leaves and increased disease severity at plant maturity. This increased in planta resistance was specific to fluquinconazole, with no cross resistance to flutriafol or tebuconazole/prothioconazole. In a limited set of 22 progeny from a cross between resistant and susceptible parents, resistance segregated in a 1:1 ratio, suggesting a single gene is responsible. A survey of 200 populations from across canola growing regions of Australia revealed fungicide resistance was present in 15% of the populations. Although in vitro analysis of the fungicide resistant isolates showed a significant shift in the average EC50 compared to the sensitive isolates, this was not as evident as the in planta assays. The development of this novel, high-throughput in planta assay has led to the identification of the first fungicide resistant L. maculans isolates, which may pose a threat to the productivity of the Australian canola industry.

  10. In vitro antifungal activity of isavuconazole against 345 mucorales isolates collected at study centers in eight countries.

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    Verweij, P E; González, G M; Wiedrhold, N P; Lass-Flörl, C; Warn, P; Heep, M; Ghannoum, M A; Guinea, J

    2009-06-01

    Although mucormycoses (formerly zygomycoses) are relatively uncommon, they are associated with high mortality and treatment options are limited. Isavuconazole is a novel, water soluble, broad-spectrum azole in clinical development for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis. The objective of this report was to collate data on the in vitro activity of isavuconazole against a collection of 345 diverse mucorales isolates, collected and tested at eight study centers in europe, mexico and North America. Each study center undertook minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) susceptibility testing of their isolates, according to EUCAST or CLSI guidelines. Across all study centers, isavuconazole exhibited MIC(50 )values of 1-4 mg/l and MIC(90 )values of 4-16 mg/l against the five genera. There were also marked differences in MIC distributions, which could be ascribed to differences in inoculum and/or endpoint. EUCAST guidelines appeared to generate modal MICs 2-fold higher than CLSI. These results confirm that isavuconazole possesses at least partial antifungal activity against mucorales.

  11. Bone and joint infections by Mucorales, Scedosporium, Fusarium and even rarer fungi.

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    Koehler, Philipp; Tacke, Daniela; Cornely, Oliver A

    2016-01-01

    Mucorales, Scedosporium and Fusarium species are rarely considered as cause for bone and joint infections. However, these moulds are emerging as important fungal pathogens in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Typical pre-disposing host conditions are immunosuppression and diabetes. Most common causative pathogens are Mucorales followed by Scedosporium and Fusarium. Acremonium and Phialemonium species are rare but some case reports exist. MRI is the gold standard imaging technique. Tissue specimens obtained as aspirates, imaging guided biopsy or open surgery need mycological and histopathological work-up for genus and species identification. Multimodal treatment strategies combine surgical debridement, drainage of joints or abscesses, removal of infected prosthetic joints and systemic antifungals. The treatment of mucormycosis is polyene based and may be combined with either posaconazole or - in rare cases - caspofungin. As Scedosporium species are intrinsically resistant to polyenes and azoles show absence of in vitro activity, voriconazole plus synergistic treatment regimens become the therapeutic standard. In fusariosis, fungal susceptibility is virtually impossible to predict, so that combination treatment of voriconazole and lipid-based amphotericin B should be the first-line strategy while susceptibility results are pending. In the absence of randomized controlled trials, infections due to the above moulds should be registered, e.g. in the registries of the European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM).

  12. [Fungal infectivities of implanted catheters due to Candida sp. Biofilms formation and resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddiki, S M L; Boucherit-Otmani, Z; Boucherit, K; Kunkel, D

    2015-06-01

    Candidemia are the most common fungal infections in hospitals. However, the catheters are subject to be altered by Candida biofilms which increase the risk of invasive nosocomial infections due to the high resistance to antifungal agents. Therefore, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of planktonic (MIC) and sessile cells (CIMS) were evaluated. To review the in vivo biofilms structures of Candida sp. formed on the inner and/or external surfaces of collected catheters, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The level of biofilm resistance was assessed against two conventional antifungal agents: amphotericin B (AmB), which belongs to the class of polyenes, and fluconazole (FLZ) which is an azole. The SEM observation of biofilms of Candida sp. reveals complex structures. Compared to MICs, the calculation of CIMS showed an increase of 32 times with AmB and of 128 times with FLZ. Catheters offer an ideal surface to Candida sp. to form biofilms. This complex structure induces the increase of the resistance of sessile cells against two antifungal agents, AmB and FLZ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Anidulafungin in the treatment of invasive fungal infections

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    Kathryn Sabol

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Sabol, Tawanda GumboUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: More antifungal agents have reached clinical use in the past two decades than at any other time. The echinocandins have been a welcome addition to this group, with the latest being anidulafungin. There are several lines of evidence to support anidulafungin’s role as primary therapy for the treatment of invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic patients, and as alternative therapy to fluconazole in patients with esophageal candidiasis with azole intolerance or triazole-resistant Candida. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies in animals have demonstrated superior efficacy, defined as maximal microbial kill, when compared to fluconazole, regardless of the fluconazole susceptibility of the Candida species. These studies, as well as dose-effect studies in patients, also support the currently recommended dose of anidulafungin. A well designed randomized controlled trial has demonstrated anidulafungin’s efficacy in patients with invasive candidiasis. In this paper, we argue that anidulafungin may be preferable to fluconazole for the treatment of candidemia. However, as of yet, the difference between anidulafungin and the other two licensed echinocandins as first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis is unclear. On the other hand, there is insufficient evidence as of yet to support first-line use of anidulafungin in patients with neutropenia or aspergillosis.Keywords: anidulafungin, pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics, efficacy, candidiasis

  14. Penetration and Effectiveness of Micronized Copper in Refractory Wood Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Schubert, Mark; Michel, Elisabeth; Butron, Maria Isabel; Boone, Matthieu N; Dierick, Manuel; Van Acker, Joris; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2016-01-01

    The North American wood decking market mostly relies on easily treatable Southern yellow pine (SYP), which is being impregnated with micronized copper (MC) wood preservatives since 2006. These formulations are composed of copper (Cu) carbonate particles (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2), with sizes ranging from 1 nm to 250 μm, according to manufacturers. MC-treated SYP wood is protected against decay by solubilized Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuCO3·Cu(OH)2 particles that successively release Cu2+ ions (reservoir effect). The wood species used for the European wood decking market differ from the North American SYP. One of the most common species is Norway spruce wood, which is poorly treatable i.e. refractory due to the anatomical properties, like pore size and structure, and chemical composition, like pit membrane components or presence of wood extractives. Therefore, MC formulations may not suitable for refractory wood species common in the European market, despite their good performance in SYP. We evaluated the penetration effectiveness of MC azole (MCA) in easily treatable Scots pine and in refractory Norway spruce wood. We assessed the effectiveness against the Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungus Rhodonia placenta. Our findings show that MCA cannot easily penetrate refractory wood species and could not confirm the presence of a reservoir effect.

  15. Ketoconazole inhibits the growth and development of Ichthyophonus sp. (Mesomycetozoa) in vitro.

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    Hontoria, Francisco; González, M Angeles; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Palenzuela, Oswaldo; Alvarez-Pellitero, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    We determined the in vitro effect of the azol-derivative antifungal ketoconazole (KZ) on the morphology, growth, and development of teleost fish parasite Ichthyophonus sp. The KZ was delivered to culture medium using liposomes (L) or a lipid emulsion (E) at five different doses (i.e. 5, 50, 100, 200, and 400 microg/ml) for both L and E formulations. Controls consisted of Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% foetal bovine serum (MEM-10) alone (C-MEM) or containing amounts of L or E equivalent to those used in the KZ100 and KZ400 treatments (i.e. 100L, 400L, 100E, and 400E, respectively). Morphological alterations, such as a decrease in the number of dividing spores and nuclei, and condensation or even destruction of the cytoplasm, were observed using light and electron microscopy in the MEM-cultured organisms receiving KZ formulations, especially with KZ400L preparations, at both 7- and 14-d postinoculation. The KZ treatments also demonstrated a statistically significant inhibition of Ichthyophonus growth in MEM. These treatments also had an inhibitory effect on subsequent Ichthyophonus germination in Earle's fish saline agar (EFSA) medium, which was more evident for L formulations when the organism was treated for 7 d and for E formulations at 14 d. Our results endorse the potential use of KZ for the treatment for ichthyophonosis and provide support to proceed to in vivo assays.

  16. Calcium dependence of eugenol tolerance and toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Stephen K Roberts

    Full Text Available Eugenol is a plant-derived phenolic compound which has recognised therapeutical potential as an antifungal agent. However little is known of either its fungicidal activity or the mechanisms employed by fungi to tolerate eugenol toxicity. A better exploitation of eugenol as a therapeutic agent will therefore depend on addressing this knowledge gap. Eugenol initiates increases in cytosolic Ca2+ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae which is partly dependent on the plasma membrane calcium channel, Cch1p. However, it is unclear whether a toxic cytosolic Ca2+elevation mediates the fungicidal activity of eugenol. In the present study, no significant difference in yeast survival was observed following transient eugenol treatment in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, using yeast expressing apoaequorin to report cytosolic Ca2+ and a range of eugenol derivatives, antifungal activity did not appear to be coupled to Ca2+ influx or cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. Taken together, these results suggest that eugenol toxicity is not dependent on a toxic influx of Ca2+. In contrast, careful control of extracellular Ca2+ (using EGTA or BAPTA revealed that tolerance of yeast to eugenol depended on Ca2+ influx via Cch1p. These findings expose significant differences between the antifungal activity of eugenol and that of azoles, amiodarone and carvacrol. This study highlights the potential to use eugenol in combination with other antifungal agents that exhibit differing modes of action as antifungal agents to combat drug resistant infections.

  17. Study of Relationship between Genetic Pattern and Susceptibility to Fluconazole in Clinical Isolated of Trichophyton rubrum

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    F Hadadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Trichophyton rubrum is one of the most common pathogenic causes of dermatophytosis. One of the drugs prescribed for fungal infections is fluconazole which belongs to Azoles group of antifungal agents. Recently molecular typing methods have been developed for answering the epidemiological questions and disease recurrence problems. Current study has been conducted on 22 isolates of Trichophyton rubrum obtained from patients randomly. Our aim was the investigation of correlation between genetic pattern and sensitivity to Fluconazole in clinical isolates of Trichophyton rubrum .   Methods: Firstly the genus and species of isolated fungi from patients have been confirmed by macroscopic and microscopic methods. Then, the resistance and sensitivity of isolates against drug have been determined using culture medium containing defined amount of drug. In next step fungal DNA has been extracted by RAPD-PCR (random amplified polymorphic DNA with random sequences of 3 primers.   Results: Each primer produced different amplified pattern, and differences have been observed in genetic pattern of resistant and sensitive samples using each 3 primers, but there was no bond with 100% specificity.   Conclusion: The 12 sensitive isolates which didn’t grow in 50µg/ml concentration of drug, also had limited growth at the lower concentration of drug. Ten resistant isolates which grew in 50µg/ml of drug, also showed resistant to lower concentration of drug. There are differences in genetic pattern of resistant and sensitive samples. RAPD analysis for molecular typing of Trichophyton rubrum seems to be completely suitable.

  18. Saponins of Trifolium spp. Aerial Parts as Modulators of Candida Albicans Virulence Attributes

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    Aleksandra Budzyńska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to provide the insight into the biology of C. albicans influenced by undescribed yet properties of saponin-rich (80%–98% fractions (SAPFs, isolated from extracts of Trifolium alexandrinum, T. incarnatum, T. resupinatum var. resupinatum aerial parts. Their concentrations below 0.5 mg/mL were arbitrarily considered as subMICs for C. albicans ATCC 10231 and were further used. SAPFs affected yeast enzymatic activity, lowered tolerance to the oxidative stress, to the osmotic stress and to the action of the cell wall disrupting agent. In their presence, germ tubes formation was significantly and irreversibly inhibited, as well as Candida invasive capacity. The evaluation of SAPFs interactions with anti-mycotics showed synergistic activity, mainly with azoles. Fluconazole MIC was lowered—susceptible C. albicans ATCC 10231 was more susceptible, and resistant C. glabrata (clinical strain become more susceptible (eightfold. Moreover, the tested samples showed no hemolytic activity and at the concentrations up to 0.5 mg/mL did not reduce viability of fibroblasts L929. This study provided the original evidence that SAPFs of Trifolium spp. aerial part exhibit significant antimicrobial activity, by reduce the expression/quantity of important Candida virulence factors and have good potential for the development of novel antifungal products supporting classic drugs.

  19. Medical image of the week: disseminated coccidioidomycosis

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    Ynosencio T

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 67-year-old African American man with no significant past medical history presented with shortness of breath and flu-like symptoms. On exam, he was noted to be profoundly hypoxemic with imaging showing diffuse thoracic changes (Figure 1 and a diffuse papular rash (Figure 2. Initial workup included coccidioidomycosis serologies which returned positive with a titer of 1:128. While exposure to coccidioidomycosis is very common in southern Arizona, dissemination is a rare occurrence. The incidence is estimated between 0.2 and 4.7 percent. Patients at highest risk include those that are immunosuppressed or that are of African or Filipino ancestry. Common extra-pulmonary sites include skin or subcutaneous tissue, meninges of brain or spinal cord, and bones. Even rarer sites include the eyes, liver, prostate, mediastinum, and kidneys. Treatment is usually the same as with pulmonary infection which is an azole agent. However, if the patient’s symptoms are severe or if the lesions involve …

  20. Epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and outcome of candidemia among Internal Medicine Wards of community hospitals of Udine province, Italy

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    Federico Silvestri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Candidemia is an emerging problem among patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine Wards (IMW. We performed a retrospective study to assess the epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and outcome of candidaemia recorded over a 3-year period (2010-2012 among IMW of community hospitals of Udine province in Italy: forty-eight patients were identified, with an overall incidence of 1.44 cases/1000 hospital admissions/year. Candida albicans was the most frequent species, followed by Candida parapsilosis that accounted for 42.9% of Tolmezzo cases. All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin and caspofungin, while 11.4% of strains were not-susceptible to voriconazole and 14.3% to fluconazole. Crude mortality was 41.7%. In conclusion, in community hospitals overall incidence of candidemia is similar to tertiary care hospitals, but 80% of cases are detected in IMW. Candida species distribution is overlapping, but differences in local epidemiology were found and should be taken into consideration. No resistance to amphotericin and caspofungin was found while resistance to azoles was observed. Knowledge of this data might be useful when planning the best therapeutic strategy.

  1. Antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast isolated from corneal infections Teste de susceptibilidade a antifúngicos de leveduras isoladas de infecções corneais

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    Vera Lucia Degaspare Monte Mascaro

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report the antifungal susceptibility profile of yeast isolates obtained from cases of keratitis. METHODS: Susceptibility testing of 15 yeast strains isolated from corneal infections to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was performed using the NCCLS broth microdilution assay. RESULTS: Most episodes of eye infections were caused by Candida albicans. The antifungal drugs tested showed the following minimal inhibitory concentration values against yeast isolates: 0.125-0.5 µg/ml for amphotericin B; 0.125->64.0 µg/ml for fluconazole; 0.015-1.0 µg/ml for itraconazole and 0.015-0.125 µg/ml for ketoconazole. Despite the fact that all Candida isolates were judged to be susceptible to azoles, one isolate showed a minimal inhibitory concentration value significantly higher than a 90% minimal inhibitory concentration of all tested isolates. Rhodotorula rubra was resistant to fluconazole and itraconazole. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the fact that most yeast isolates from corneal infections are usually susceptible to amphotericin B and azoles, they exhibit a wide range of minimal inhibitory concentration values for antifungal drugs. The identification of strains at species level and their susceptibility pattern to antifungal drugs should be considered before determining the concentration to be used in topical antifungal formulations in order to optimize therapeutic response in eye infections.OBJETIVO: Relatar resultados e avaliar a aplicabilidade do teste de suscetibilidade a antifúngicos de leveduras isoladas de infecções corneais oculares. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se teste de suscetibilidade pelo método de microdiluição em caldo, padronizado pelo NCCLS-EUA, em 15 amostras de leveduras de infecções corneanas a anfotericina B, fluconazol, itraconazol e ketoconazol. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos episódios de infecção corneal foi causada por Candida albicans. As drogas antifúngicas testadas exibiram valores de concentra

  2. Evaluación de tres métodos para la detección de la sensibilidad in vitro de especies de Candida a los antifúngicos Evaluation of three methods for in vitro detection of antifungal susceptibility of Candida species

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    Ivana Maldonado

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Los métodos de referencia E. Def 7.1 y M27-A3, que detectan resistencia in vitro a los antifúngicos, son onerosos y muy laboriosos, por lo que su implementación en los laboratorios hospitalarios es limitada. Existen técnicas comerciales de simple realización, que permitirían obtener resultados comparables a los que se obtienen con los métodos estándares. Los objetivos de esta investigación fueron: a comparar los resultados de concentración inhibitoria mínima obtenidos según el método de referencia E.Def 7.1 con los obtenidos mediante el empleo del equipo comercial ATB® Fungus 3 en un conjunto de 82 aislamientos clínicos de Candida spp. frente a los siguientes antifúngicos: anfotericina B, 5-fluorocitosina, fluconazol e itraconazol; b comparar en ese mismo conjunto de aislamientos los resultados del estudio de sensibilidad al fluconazol por difusión en agar empleando tabletas Neo-SensitabsTM o discos Malbrán con los que se obtienen por el método de referencia. La concordancia general entre el método de referencia y el ATB® Fungus 3 fue del 90,2 %, mientras que la concordancia del método de referencia con los métodos por difusión con discos y con tabletas alcanzó el 96,3% y el 92,7 %, respectivamente. El ATB® Fungus 3 fue eficaz para determinar la sensibilidad a la anfotericina B y a la 5-fluorocitosina, pero se observaron discrepancias al evaluar la sensibilidad a los azoles. Los métodos por difusión resultaron útiles para determinar la sensibilidad al fluconazol; sin embargo, observamos 3 discrepancias muy mayores, 1 mayor y 2 menores con el método de difusión con tabletas, mientras que con los discos solo se produjeron 3 discrepancias menores.Reference methods E.Def 7.1 and M27-A3 detect in vitro resistance; however, they are expensive and very laborious. Thus, their actual use in hospital laboratories is limited. There are commercial techniques available, having easier accessibility and development, which would

  3. [INVESTIGATION ON ANTIFUNGAL SUSCEPTIBILITY OF CANDIDA YEASTS IN PREGNANT PATIENTS WITH CONFIRMED VULVOVAGINAL CANDIDIASIS AND THEIR NEWBORNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokoeva, A; Kouzmanov, A; Ivanova, Z; Zisova, L; Amalie, G; Petleshkova, P; Miteva-Katrandzhieva, Ts; Krasteva, M; Uchikova, E

    patients with VVC immediately before birth (n = 22, 91.67 +/- 0.06%). Positive Candida colonization was detected in 14 (58.33%) of their newborns (n = 24), as no statistically significant difference was established, depending on the mode of delivery. The investigated antifungal susceptibility with test Fungifast (ELITech Microbiology Reagents), found 100% sensitivity of Candida albicans to Amphotericin B, Flucytosin and Voriconazole. Intermediate susceptibility to Itraconazole was found in 6 of 23 (26%) maternal isolates, and 5 of 23 (22%) isolates were moderately sensitive to Fluconazole. Candida krusei showed complete resistance to Fluconazole and Itraconazole. Within the group of antifungals for topical application (Econazole, Ketoconazole, Miconazole, Nystatin), the results established that 100% of the studied fungi were sensitive to Nystatin, while within the groups of azoles for vaginal and topical use - C.krusei was 100% resistant, as the sensitivity of C. albicans varied between 60-80%. Conclusion Our recommendation, based on the esablished results is that in pregnant with uncomplicated VVC as a first-line therapy should be considered the group of vaginal azoles and Nystatin, while the systemic therapy should be considered carefully and only after the firSt trimester. In cases of oral and intestinal candidiasis in neonatology, we recommend a therapy with minimal absorbable antifungals as Nystatin and miconazole (amphotericin B is available in our country), while systemic antifungal should be initiated only as a second choice. The exact etiological diagnosis is especially important because in our country there is a tendency for increased incidence of non-albicans fungus resistant to therapy, and that changes the therapeutic behavior.

  4. Vulvovaginitis: screening for and management of trichomoniasis, vulvovaginal candidiasis, and bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Julie; Yudin, Mark H

    2015-03-01

    To review the evidence and provide recommendations on screening for and management of vulvovaginal candidiasis, trichomoniasis, and bacterial vaginosis. OUTCOMES evaluated include the efficacy of antibiotic treatment, cure rates for simple and complicated infections, and the implications of these conditions in pregnancy. Published literature was retrieved through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in June 2013 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., vaginitis, trichomoniasis, vaginal candidiasis) and key words (bacterial vaginosis, yeast, candidiasis, trichomonas vaginalis, trichomoniasis, vaginitis, treatment). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date limits, but results were limited to English or French language materials. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to May 2014. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Summary Statements 1. Vulvovaginal candidiasis affects 75% of women at least once. Topical and oral antifungal azole medications are equally effective. (I) 2. Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis is defined as 4 or more episodes per year. (II-2) 3. Trichomonas vaginalis is a common non-viral sexually transmitted infection that is best detected by antigen testing using vaginal swabs collected and evaluated by immunoassay or nucleic acid amplification test. (II-2) 4. Cure rates are equal at up to 88% for trichomoniasis treated with oral metronidazole 2 g once or 500 mg twice daily for 7 days. Partner treatment, even without

  5. Iron – a key nexus in the virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

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    Hubertus eHaas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential but in excess toxic nutrient. Therefore, fungi evolved fine-tuned mechanisms for uptake and storage of iron, such as the production of siderophores (low-molecular mass iron-specific chelators. In Aspergillus fumigatus, iron starvation causes extensive transcriptional remodeling involving two central transcription factors, which are interconnected in a negative transcriptional feed-back loop: the GATA-factor SreA and the bZip-factor HapX. During iron sufficiency SreA represses iron uptake, including reductive iron assimilation and siderophore-mediated iron uptake, to avoid toxic effects. During iron starvation HapX represses iron-consuming pathways, including heme biosynthesis and respiration, to spare iron and activates synthesis of ribotoxin AspF1 and siderophores, the latter partly by ensuring supply of the precursor ornithine. In agreement with the expression pattern and mode of action, detrimental effects of inactivation of SreA and HapX are confined to growth during iron sufficiency and iron starvation, respectively. Deficiency in HapX, but not SreA, attenuates virulence of A. fumigatus in a murine model of aspergillosis, which underlines the crucial role of adaptation to iron limitation in virulence. Consistently, production of both extra- and intracellular siderophores is crucial for virulence of A. fumigatus. Recently, the sterol-regulatory element-binding protein SrbA was found to be essential for adaptation to iron starvation, thereby linking regulation of iron metabolism, ergosterol biosynthesis, azole drug resistance and hypoxia adaptation.

  6. Inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr5p by a natural compound extracted from Brazilian Red Propolis

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    Cinzia Lotti

    2011-08-01

    demonstrate that Brazilian propolis could be a source of promising compounds that can alleviate the MDR phenomenon, particularly in some fungi, where it could be used as an adjuvant for the treatment with azoles.

  7. Antifungal testing and high-throughput screening of compound library against Geomyces destructans, the etiologic agent of geomycosis (WNS in bats.

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    Sudha Chaturvedi

    Full Text Available Bats in the northeastern U.S. are affected by geomycosis caused by the fungus Geomyces destructans (Gd. This infection is commonly referred to as White Nose Syndrome (WNS. Over a million hibernating bats have died since the fungus was first discovered in 2006 in a cave near Albany, New York. A population viability analysis conducted on little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus, one of six bat species infected with Gd, suggests regional extinction of this species within 20 years. The fungus Gd is a psychrophile ("cold loving", but nothing is known about how it thrives at low temperatures and what pathogenic attributes allow it to infect bats. This study aimed to determine if currently available antifungal drugs and biocides are effective against Gd. We tested five Gd strains for their susceptibility to antifungal drugs and high-throughput screened (HTS one representative strain with SpectrumPlus compound library containing 1,920 compounds. The results indicated that Gd is susceptible to a number of antifungal drugs at concentrations similar to the susceptibility range of human pathogenic fungi. Strains of Gd were susceptible to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole and voriconazole. In contrast, very high MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations of flucytosine and echinocandins were needed for growth inhibition, which were suggestive of fungal resistance to these drugs. Of the 1,920 compounds in the library, a few caused 50%--to greater than 90% inhibition of Gd growth. A number of azole antifungals, a fungicide, and some biocides caused prominent growth inhibition. Our results could provide a theoretical basis for future strategies aimed at the rehabilitation of most affected bat species and for decontamination of Gd in the cave environment.

  8. Effects of fluconazole treatment of mice infected with fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant Candida tropicalis on fungal cell surface hydrophobicity, adhesion and biofilm formation

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    R L Kanoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The incidence of Candida tropicalis less susceptible to fluconazole (FLC has been reported in many parts of the world. Objectives : The aim of this study was to examine the changes of putative virulence attributes of Candida tropicalis accompanying the development of resistance to FLC in vitro and in vivo. Materials and Methods : A FLC-resistant strain (FLC-R was obtained after sequential exposure of a clinical isolate FLC-sensitive (FLC-S to increasing concentrations of the antifungal. The course of infection by both strains was analyzed in BALB/c mice. Analyses of gene expression were performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction PCR. The cell surface hydrophobicity, adhesion and biofilm formation were also determined. Results : Development of resistance to FLC could be observed after 15 days of subculture in azole-containing medium. Overexpression of MDR1 and ERG11 genes were observed in FLC-R, and this strain exhibited enhanced virulence in mice, as assessed by the mortality rate. All mice challenged with the FLC-R died and FLC-treatment caused earlier death in mice infected with this strain. All animals challenged with FLC-S survived the experiment, regardless of FLC-treatment. Overall, FLC-R derivatives strains were significantly more hydrophobic than FLC-S strains and showed greater adherence and higher capacity to form biofilm on polystyrene surface. Conclusions : The expression of virulence factors was higher in FLC-R-C. tropicalis and it was enhanced after FLC-exposure. These data alert us to the importance of identifying microorganisms that show resistance to the antifungals to establish an appropriate management of candidiasis therapy.

  9. Molecular design of flotation collectors: A recent progress.

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    Liu, Guangyi; Yang, Xianglin; Zhong, Hong

    2017-08-01

    The nature of froth flotation is to selectively hydrophobize valuable minerals by collector adsorption so that the hydrophobized mineral particles can attach air bubbles. In recent years, the increasing commercial production of refractory complex ores has been urgent to develop special collectors for enhancing flotation separation efficiency of valuable minerals from these ores. Molecular design methods offer an effective way for understanding the structure-property relationship of flotation collectors and developing new ones. The conditional stability constant (CSC), molecular mechanics (MM), quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), and first-principle theory, especially density functional theory (DFT), have been adopted to build the criteria for designing flotation collectors. Azole-thiones, guanidines, acyl thioureas and thionocarbamates, amide-hydroxamates, and double minerophilic-group surfactants such as Gemini, dithiourea and dithionocarbamate molecules have been recently developed as high-performance collectors. To design hydrophobic groups, the hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance parameters have been extensively used as criteria. The replacement of aryl group with aliphatic group or CC single bond(s) with CC double bond(s), reduction of carbon numbers, introduction of oxygen atom(s) and addition of trisiloxane to the tail terminal have been proved to be useful approaches for adjusting the surface activity of collectors. The role of molecular design of collectors in practical flotation applications was also summarized. Based on the critical review, some comments and prospects for further research on molecular design of flotation collectors were also presented in the paper. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Supportive care utilization and treatment toxicity in children with Down syndrome and acute lymphoid leukaemia at free-standing paediatric hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Elizabeth G; Li, Yimei; Fisher, Brian T; Rheingold, Susan R; Fitzgerald, Julie; Seif, Alix E; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Although inferior outcomes of children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) are established, national supportive care patterns for these patients are unknown. A validated retrospective cohort of paediatric patients diagnosed with ALL from 1999 to 2011 was assembled from the US Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database to examine organ toxicity, sepsis, and resource utilization in children with and without DS. Among 10699 ALL patients, 298 had DS-ALL (2·8%). In a multivariate model, DS was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular (odds ratio [OR] 2·0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·6-2·7), respiratory (OR 2·1, 95% CI: 1·6-2·9), neurologic (OR 3·4, 95% CI 1·9-6·2), and hepatic (OR 1·4, 95% CI 1·0-1·9) dysfunction and sepsis (OR 1·8, 95% CI: 1·4-2·4). Children with DS-ALL used significantly more respiratory support, insulin, and anti-infectives, including broad-spectrum Gram-positive agents, quinolones, and azoles. They used significantly fewer analgesics and antiemetics compared to non-DS-ALL children. Ultimately, this study confirms the increased risk of infectious and end-organ toxicity in children with DS-ALL and quantifies important differences in resource utilization between children with DS and non-DS ALL. These findings highlight the importance of investigating the impact of these care variations and developing specific supportive care guidelines for this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. MLST and Whole-Genome-Based Population Analysis of Cryptococcus gattii VGIII Links Clinical, Veterinary and Environmental Strains, and Reveals Divergent Serotype Specific Sub-populations and Distant Ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firacative, Carolina; Roe, Chandler C.; Malik, Richard; Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Escandón, Patricia; Sykes, Jane E.; Castañón-Olivares, Laura Rocío; Contreras-Peres, Cudberto; Samayoa, Blanca; Sorrell, Tania C.; Castañeda, Elizabeth; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Engelthaler, David M.; Meyer, Wieland

    2016-01-01

    The emerging pathogen Cryptococcus gattii causes life-threatening disease in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Of the four major molecular types (VGI-VGIV), the molecular type VGIII has recently emerged as cause of disease in otherwise healthy individuals, prompting a need to investigate its population genetic structure to understand if there are potential genotype-dependent characteristics in its epidemiology, environmental niche(s), host range and clinical features of disease. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of 122 clinical, environmental and veterinary C. gattii VGIII isolates from Australia, Colombia, Guatemala, Mexico, New Zealand, Paraguay, USA and Venezuela, and whole genome sequencing (WGS) of 60 isolates representing all established MLST types identified four divergent sub-populations. The majority of the isolates belong to two main clades, corresponding either to serotype B or C, indicating an ongoing species evolution. Both major clades included clinical, environmental and veterinary isolates. The C. gattii VGIII population was genetically highly diverse, with minor differences between countries, isolation source, serotype and mating type. Little to no recombination was found between the two major groups, serotype B and C, at the whole and mitochondrial genome level. C. gattii VGIII is widespread in the Americas, with sporadic cases occurring elsewhere, WGS revealed Mexico and USA as a likely origin of the serotype B VGIII population and Colombia as a possible origin of the serotype C VGIII population. Serotype B isolates are more virulent than serotype C isolates in a murine model of infection, causing predominantly pulmonary cryptococcosis. No specific link between genotype and virulence was observed. Antifungal susceptibility testing against six antifungal drugs revealed that serotype B isolates are more susceptible to azoles than serotype C isolates, highlighting the importance of strain typing to guide effective treatment to improve the

  12. Simultaneous Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Candida auris on 3 Continents Confirmed by Whole-Genome Sequencing and Epidemiological Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Shawn R; Etienne, Kizee A; Vallabhaneni, Snigdha; Farooqi, Joveria; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Govender, Nelesh P; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes; Calvo, Belinda; Cuomo, Christina A; Desjardins, Christopher A; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Castanheira, Mariana; Magobo, Rindidzani E; Jabeen, Kauser; Asghar, Rana J; Meis, Jacques F; Jackson, Brendan; Chiller, Tom; Litvintseva, Anastasia P

    2017-01-15

    Candida auris, a multidrug-resistant yeast that causes invasive infections, was first described in 2009 in Japan and has since been reported from several countries. To understand the global emergence and epidemiology of C. auris, we obtained isolates from 54 patients with C. auris infection from Pakistan, India, South Africa, and Venezuela during 2012-2015 and the type specimen from Japan. Patient information was available for 41 of the isolates. We conducted antifungal susceptibility testing and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). Available clinical information revealed that 41% of patients had diabetes mellitus, 51% had undergone recent surgery, 73% had a central venous catheter, and 41% were receiving systemic antifungal therapy when C. auris was isolated. The median time from admission to infection was 19 days (interquartile range, 9-36 days), 61% of patients had bloodstream infection, and 59% died. Using stringent break points, 93% of isolates were resistant to fluconazole, 35% to amphotericin B, and 7% to echinocandins; 41% were resistant to 2 antifungal classes and 4% were resistant to 3 classes. WGS demonstrated that isolates were grouped into unique clades by geographic region. Clades were separated by thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, but within each clade isolates were clonal. Different mutations in ERG11 were associated with azole resistance in each geographic clade. C. auris is an emerging healthcare-associated pathogen associated with high mortality. Treatment options are limited, due to antifungal resistance. WGS analysis suggests nearly simultaneous, and recent, independent emergence of different clonal populations on 3 continents. Risk factors and transmission mechanisms need to be elucidated to guide control measures. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Expression analysis of some genes regulated by retinoic acid in controls and triadimefon-exposed embryos: is the amphibian Xenopus laevis a suitable model for gene-based comparative teratology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Rossi, Federica; Bacchetta, Renato; Prati, Mariangela; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena

    2011-06-01

    The use of nonmammal models in teratological studies is a matter of debate and seems to be justified if the embryotoxic mechanism involves conserved processes. Published data on mammals and Xenopus laevis suggest that azoles are teratogenic by altering the endogenous concentration of retinoic acid (RA). The expression of some genes (Shh, Ptch-1, Gsc, and Msx2) controlled by retinoic acid is downregulated in rat embryos exposed at the phylotypic stage to the triazole triadimefon (FON). In order to propose X. laevis as a model for gene-based comparative teratology, this work evaluates the expression of Shh, Ptch-1, Gsc, and Msx2 in FON-exposed X. laevis embryos. Embryos, exposed to a high concentration level (500 µM) of FON from stage 13 till 17, were examined at stages 17, 27, and 47. Stage 17 and 27 embryos were processed to perform quantitative RT-PCR. The developmental rate was never affected by FON at any considered stage. FON-exposed stage 47 larvae showed the typical craniofacial malformations. A significant downregulation of Gsc was observed in FON-exposed stage 17 embryos. Shh, Ptch-1, Msx2 showed a high fluctuation of expression both in control and in FON-exposed samples both at stages 17 and 27. The downregulation of Gsc mimics the effects of FON on rat embryos, showing for this gene a common effect of FON in the two vertebrate classes. The high fluctuation observed in the gene expression of the other genes, however, suggests that X. laevis at this stage has limited utility for gene-based comparative teratology. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Detection and antifungal susceptibility testing of oral Candida dubliniensis from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

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    Chunchanur Sneha

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Candida dubliniensis, an opportunistic yeast that has been implicated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC in patients infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV may be under-reported due to its similarity with Candida albicans. Resistance to Fluconazole is often seen in C. dubliniensis isolates from clinical specimens. Aims: To know the prevalence of C. dubliniensis in OPC in patients infected with HIV and their antifungal susceptibility pattern. Settings and Design: One hundred and thirty-two HIV seropositive individuals and 50 healthy controls were included in the study. Materials and Methods: Two oral swabs were collected from the site of the lesion from 132 HIV-infected patients. Oral rinse was obtained from 50 healthy controls. Samples were inoculated on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar (SDA medium and on HiCrome Candida Differential Agar (CHROM agar medium. Isolates were speciated by standard tests. Dark green-colored, germ tube positive isolates, which failed to grow at 420C and negative for xylose assimilation were identified as C. dubliniensis. Antifungal susceptibility test was performed by Macro broth dilution technique (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines. Results and Conclusions: From 132 patients, 22 (16.3% C. dubliniensis were isolated; samples from healthy controls did not reveal their presence. Antifungal susceptibility test showed higher resistance among C. dubliniensis isolates to azoles compared to C. albicans. Five (22.7% isolates of C. dubliniensis were resistant to Fluconazole followed by four (18.2% to Ketoconazole. This study emphasizes the importance of identification and antifungal susceptibility testing of C. dubliniensis in HIV-infected patients.

  15. Herbal liposome for the topical delivery of ketoconazole for the effective treatment of seborrheic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Vivek; Sharma, Swati; Yadav, Renu Bala; Agarwal, Udita

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop liposomal gel containing ketoconazole and neem extract for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis in an effectual means. Azoles derivatives that are commonly used to prevent superficial fungal infections include triazole category like itraconazole. These drugs are available in the form of oral dosage that required a long period of time for treatment. Ketoconazole is available in the form of gel but is not used with any herbal extract. Neem ( Azadirachta indica) leaves show a good anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activity and have great potential as a bioactive compound. The thin film hydration method was used to design an herbal liposomal preparation. The formulation was further subjected to their characterization as particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, % cumulative drug release, and anti-fungal activity and it was also characterized by the mean of their physicochemical properties such as FTIR, SEM, DSC, TGA, and AFM. The results show that the formulation of liposomes with neem extract F12 were found to be optimum on the basis of entrapment efficiency in the range 88.9 ± 0.7%, with a desired mean particle size distribution of 141.6 nm and zeta potential - 45 mV. The anti-fungal activity of liposomal formulation F12 was carried out against Aspergillus niger and Candida tropicalis by measuring the inhibition zone 8.9 and 10.2 mm, respectively. Stability of optimized formulation was best seen at refrigerated condition. Overall, these results indicated that developed liposomal gel of ketoconazole with neem extract could have great potential for seborrheic dermatitis and showed synergetic effect for the treatment.

  16. In vitro activity of Spirulina platensis water extract against different Candida species isolated from vulvo-vaginal candidiasis cases.

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    Antonella Marangoni

    Full Text Available The high incidence of vulvo-vaginal candidiasis, combined with the growing problems about azole resistance and toxicity of antifungal drugs, highlights the need for the development of new effective strategies for the treatment of this condition. In this context, natural compounds represent promising alternatives. The cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, a blue-green alga, exhibits antimicrobial activities against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, only few data about the antifungal properties of Spirulina platensis are available and its potential toxic effects have not been largely investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of a fully-characterized water extract of Spirulina platensis against 22 strains of Candida spp. Prior to considering its potential topical use, we both investigated whether the extract exerted target activities on guinea pig uterine smooth muscle, and the impact of Spirulina platensis on the dominant microorganisms of the vaginal microbiota (i.e., lactobacilli, in order to exclude possible adverse events. By means of a broth microdilution assay, we found that the microalga extract possesses good antifungal properties (MIC: 0.125-0.5 mg/ml, against all the Candida species with a fungicidal activity. At the concentrations active against candida, Spirulina platensis did not modify the spontaneous basic waves pattern of uterine myometrium as underlined by the absence of aberrant contractions, and did not affect the main health-promoting bacteria of the vaginal ecosystem. Finally, we evaluated the selectivity index of our extract by testing its cytotoxicity on three different cell lines and it showed values ranging between 2 and 16. Further in vivo studies are needed, in particular to evaluate the use of control-release formulations in order to maintain Spirulina platensis concentrations at anti-Candida active doses but below the toxic levels found in the present work.

  17. Quantifying synergy: a systematic review of mixture toxicity studies within environmental toxicology.

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    Nina Cedergreen

    Full Text Available Cocktail effects and synergistic interactions of chemicals in mixtures are an area of great concern to both the public and regulatory authorities. The main concern is whether some chemicals can enhance the effect of other chemicals, so that they jointly exert a larger effect than predicted. This phenomenon is called synergy. Here we present a review of the scientific literature on three main groups of environmentally relevant chemical toxicants: pesticides, metal ions and antifouling compounds. The aim of the review is to determine 1 the frequency of synergy, 2 the extent of synergy, 3 whether any particular groups or classes of chemicals tend to induce synergy, and 4 which physiological mechanisms might be responsible for this synergy. Synergy is here defined as mixtures with minimum two-fold difference between observed and predicted effect concentrations using Concentration Addition (CA as a reference model and including both lethal and sub-lethal endpoints. The results showed that synergy occurred in 7%, 3% and 26% of the 194, 21 and 136 binary pesticide, metal and antifoulants mixtures included in the data compilation on frequency. The difference between observed and predicted effect concentrations was rarely more than 10-fold. For pesticides, synergistic mixtures included cholinesterase inhibitors or azole fungicides in 95% of 69 described cases. Both groups of pesticides are known to interfere with metabolic degradation of other xenobiotics. For the four synergistic metal and 47 synergistic antifoulant mixtures the pattern in terms of chemical groups inducing synergy was less clear. Hypotheses in terms of mechanisms governing these interactions are discussed. It was concluded that true synergistic interactions between chemicals are rare and often occur at high concentrations. Addressing the cumulative rather than synergistic effect of co-occurring chemicals, using standard models as CA, is therefore regarded as the most important step in

  18. CYP51 is an essential drug target for the treatment of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Anjan; Calvet, Claudia M; Jennings, Gareth; Zhou, Wenxu; Aksenov, Alexander; Luth, Madeline R; Abagyan, Ruben; Nes, W David; McKerrow, James H; Podust, Larissa M

    2017-12-01

    Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) is caused by Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba that occasionally infects humans. While considered "rare" (but likely underreported) the high mortality rate and lack of established success in treatment makes PAM a particularly devastating infection. In the absence of economic inducements to invest in development of anti-PAM drugs by the pharmaceutical industry, anti-PAM drug discovery largely relies on drug 'repurposing'-a cost effective strategy to apply known drugs for treatment of rare or neglected diseases. Similar to fungi, N. fowleri has an essential requirement for ergosterol, a building block of plasma and cell membranes. Disruption of sterol biosynthesis by small-molecule inhibitors is a validated interventional strategy against fungal pathogens of medical and agricultural importance. The N. fowleri genome encodes the sterol 14-demethylase (CYP51) target sharing ~35% sequence identity to fungal orthologues. The similarity of targets raises the possibility of repurposing anti-mycotic drugs and optimization of their usage for the treatment of PAM. In this work, we (i) systematically assessed the impact of anti-fungal azole drugs, known as conazoles, on sterol biosynthesis and viability of cultured N. fowleri trophozotes, (ii) identified the endogenous CYP51 substrate by mass spectrometry analysis of N. fowleri lipids, and (iii) analyzed the interactions between the recombinant CYP51 target and conazoles by UV-vis spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography. Collectively, the target-based and parasite-based data obtained in these studies validated CYP51 as a potentially 'druggable' target in N. fowleri, and conazole drugs as the candidates for assessment in the animal model of PAM.

  19. CYP51 is an essential drug target for the treatment of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM.

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    Anjan Debnath

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM is caused by Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba that occasionally infects humans. While considered "rare" (but likely underreported the high mortality rate and lack of established success in treatment makes PAM a particularly devastating infection. In the absence of economic inducements to invest in development of anti-PAM drugs by the pharmaceutical industry, anti-PAM drug discovery largely relies on drug 'repurposing'-a cost effective strategy to apply known drugs for treatment of rare or neglected diseases. Similar to fungi, N. fowleri has an essential requirement for ergosterol, a building block of plasma and cell membranes. Disruption of sterol biosynthesis by small-molecule inhibitors is a validated interventional strategy against fungal pathogens of medical and agricultural importance. The N. fowleri genome encodes the sterol 14-demethylase (CYP51 target sharing ~35% sequence identity to fungal orthologues. The similarity of targets raises the possibility of repurposing anti-mycotic drugs and optimization of their usage for the treatment of PAM. In this work, we (i systematically assessed the impact of anti-fungal azole drugs, known as conazoles, on sterol biosynthesis and viability of cultured N. fowleri trophozotes, (ii identified the endogenous CYP51 substrate by mass spectrometry analysis of N. fowleri lipids, and (iii analyzed the interactions between the recombinant CYP51 target and conazoles by UV-vis spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography. Collectively, the target-based and parasite-based data obtained in these studies validated CYP51 as a potentially 'druggable' target in N. fowleri, and conazole drugs as the candidates for assessment in the animal model of PAM.

  20. Drug-induced Inhibition and Trafficking Disruption of ion Channels: Pathogenesis of QT Abnormalities and Drug-induced Fatal Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Luigi X.

    2016-01-01

    Risk of severe and fatal ventricular arrhythmias, presenting as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), is increased in congenital and acquired forms of long QT syndromes (LQTS). Drug-induced inhibition of K+ currents, IKs, IKr, IK1, and/or Ito, delay repolarization, prolong QT, and increase the risk of TdP. Drug-induced interference with IKr is the most common cause of acquired LQTS/TdP. Multiple drugs bind to KNCH2-hERG-K+ channels affecting IKr, including antiarrythmics, antibiotics, antivirals, azole-antifungals, antimalarials, anticancer, antiemetics, prokinetics, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Azithromycin has been recently added to this list. In addition to direct channel inhibition, some drugs interfere with the traffic of channels from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing mature channel membrane density; e.g., pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol. Other drugs, such as ketoconazole, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, donepezil, tamoxifen, endoxifen, atazanavir, and roxitromycin, induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Although many drugs prolong the QT interval, TdP is a rare event. The following conditions increase the risk of drug-induced TdP: a) Disease states/electrolyte levels (heart failure, structural cardiac disease, bradycardia, hypokalemia); b) Pharmacogenomic variables (presence of congenital LQTS, subclinical ion-channel mutations, history of or having a relative with history of drug-induced long QT/TdP); c) Pharmacodynamic and kinetic factors (high doses, women, elderly, metabolism inhibitors, combining two or more QT prolonging drugs, drugs that prolong the QT and increase QT dispersion, and drugs with multiple actions on ion channels). Because most of these conditions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drug use associated with repolarization abnormalities are strongly recommended. PMID:26926294

  1. Quantifying synergy: a systematic review of mixture toxicity studies within environmental toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergreen, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Cocktail effects and synergistic interactions of chemicals in mixtures are an area of great concern to both the public and regulatory authorities. The main concern is whether some chemicals can enhance the effect of other chemicals, so that they jointly exert a larger effect than predicted. This phenomenon is called synergy. Here we present a review of the scientific literature on three main groups of environmentally relevant chemical toxicants: pesticides, metal ions and antifouling compounds. The aim of the review is to determine 1) the frequency of synergy, 2) the extent of synergy, 3) whether any particular groups or classes of chemicals tend to induce synergy, and 4) which physiological mechanisms might be responsible for this synergy. Synergy is here defined as mixtures with minimum two-fold difference between observed and predicted effect concentrations using Concentration Addition (CA) as a reference model and including both lethal and sub-lethal endpoints. The results showed that synergy occurred in 7%, 3% and 26% of the 194, 21 and 136 binary pesticide, metal and antifoulants mixtures included in the data compilation on frequency. The difference between observed and predicted effect concentrations was rarely more than 10-fold. For pesticides, synergistic mixtures included cholinesterase inhibitors or azole fungicides in 95% of 69 described cases. Both groups of pesticides are known to interfere with metabolic degradation of other xenobiotics. For the four synergistic metal and 47 synergistic antifoulant mixtures the pattern in terms of chemical groups inducing synergy was less clear. Hypotheses in terms of mechanisms governing these interactions are discussed. It was concluded that true synergistic interactions between chemicals are rare and often occur at high concentrations. Addressing the cumulative rather than synergistic effect of co-occurring chemicals, using standard models as CA, is therefore regarded as the most important step in the risk

  2. Synergy and antagonism between iron chelators and antifungal drugs in Cryptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Wen; Campbell, Leona T; Wilkins, Marc R; Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Chen, Sharon; Carter, Dee A

    2016-10-01

    Fungal infections remain very difficult to treat, and developing new antifungal drugs is difficult and expensive. Recent approaches therefore seek to augment existing antifungals with synergistic agents that can lower the therapeutic dose, increase efficacy and prevent resistance from developing. Iron limitation can inhibit microbial growth, and iron chelators have been employed to treat fungal infections. In this study, chequerboard testing was used to explore combinations of iron chelators with antifungal agents against pathogenic Cryptococcus spp. with the aim of determining how disruption to iron homeostasis affects antifungal susceptibility. The iron chelators ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), deferoxamine (DFO), deferiprone (DFP), deferasirox (DSX), ciclopirox olamine and lactoferrin (LF) were paired with the antifungal agents amphotericin B (AmB), fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin. All chelators except for DFO increased the efficacy of AmB, and significant synergy was seen between AmB and LF for all Cryptococcus strains. Addition of exogenous iron rescued cells from the antifungal effect of LF alone but could not prevent inhibition by AmB + LF, indicating that synergy was not due primarily to iron chelation but to other properties of LF that were potentiated in the presence of AmB. Significant synergy was not seen consistently for other antifungal-chelator combinations, and EDTA, DSX and DFP antagonised the activity of azole drugs in strains of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii. This study highlights the range of interactions that can be induced by chelators and indicates that most antifungal drugs are not enhanced by iron limitation in Cryptococcus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmentally friendly wood preservatives formulated with enzymatic-hydrolyzed okara, copper and/or boron salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sye Hee; Oh, Sei Chang; Choi, In-gyu; Han, Gyu-seong; Jeong, Han-seob; Kim, Ki-woo; Yoon, Young-ho; Yang, In

    2010-01-01

    Novel biocides, such as copper azole (CuAz) and ammoniacal copper quaternary (ACQ), are extensively used as substitutes for chromate copper arsenate (CCA) in wood preservation. However, the expense of these biocides has necessitated the development of cost-effective and environmentally friendly wood preservatives. This study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness against decaying fungi of the preservatives formulated with enzymatic-hydrolyzed okara (OK), which is an organic waste produced from the manufacture of tofu, CuCl 2 (CC) and/or Na 2 B 4 O 7 .10H 2 O (B). With the addition of NH 4 OH as a dissociating agent, the addition of OK facilitated the target retention of most of the OK/CC and OK/CC/B preservative formulations in wood blocks. The OK-based wood preservatives (OK-WPs) were stable against hot-water leaching. When compared with control and CC-treated wood blocks, the leached wood blocks treated with OK/CC and OK/CC/B formulations showed excellent decay resistance against both Postia placenta and Gloeophyllum trabeum, especially when OK was hydrolyzed by Celluclast at a loading level of 0.1 ml/g. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM-energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) spectrometry analyses demonstrated that preservative complexes, such as OK-CC and OK-CC-B, existed in the wood blocks treated with OK/CC and OK/CC/B formulations. This study results support the potential application of OK-WPs as environmentally friendly wood preservatives capable of replacing CuAz and ACQ.

  4. Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Emergence of Resistant Pathogens and New Antifungal Therapies

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    Maria N. Gamaletsou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections caused by drug-resistant organisms are an emerging threat to heavily immunosuppressed patients with hematological malignancies. Modern early antifungal treatment strategies, such as prophylaxis and empirical and preemptive therapy, result in long-term exposure to antifungal agents, which is a major driving force for the development of resistance. The extended use of central venous catheters, the nonlinear pharmacokinetics of certain antifungal agents, neutropenia, other forms of intense immunosuppression, and drug toxicities are other contributing factors. The widespread use of agricultural and industrial fungicides with similar chemical structures and mechanisms of action has resulted in the development of environmental reservoirs for some drug-resistant fungi, especially azole-resistant Aspergillus species, which have been reported from four continents. The majority of resistant strains have the mutation TR34/L98H, a finding suggesting that the source of resistance is the environment. The global emergence of new fungal pathogens with inherent resistance, such as Candida auris, is a new public health threat. The most common mechanism of antifungal drug resistance is the induction of efflux pumps, which decrease intracellular drug concentrations. Overexpression, depletion, and alteration of the drug target are other mechanisms of resistance. Mutations in the ERG11 gene alter the protein structure of C-demethylase, reducing the efficacy of antifungal triazoles. Candida species become echinocandin-resistant by mutations in FKS genes. A shift in the epidemiology of Candida towards resistant non-albicans Candida spp. has emerged among patients with hematological malignancies. There is no definite association between antifungal resistance, as defined by elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations, and clinical outcomes in this population. Detection of genes or mutations conferring resistance with the use of molecular methods

  5. In vitro antifungal susceptibility to six antifungal agents of 229 Candida isolates from patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, M; McCullough, M J; Polonelli, L; Conti, S; Al-Karaawi, Z M; Vescovi, P; Porter, S R

    2006-06-01

    The most common antifungal drugs in current clinical use for the treatment of oral candidosis are polyenes and azoles, mainly used topically. Poor glycaemic control in association with other local factors, such as the presence of oral dental prostheses, salivary pH, salivary flow rate and tobacco habits, may lead to the development of oral candidosis. Topical antifungal agents are frequently used to prevent the development of candidal infections in patients with poor metabolic control, particularly in the elderly wearing dentures. The aim of this study was to assess the antifungal susceptibility of Candida isolates to six antifungal agents using a commercially available kit, Fungitest. The isolated were collected from patients affected by diabetes mellitus from two different geographic localities (London, UK, and Parma, Italy) and from a group of healthy non-diabetic subjects. No differences in antifungal susceptibility to the six agents tested were observed between Candida isolates from diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. However, differences were observed between the two geographically different diabetes mellitus populations. Oral yeast isolates from diabetes mellitus patients in the UK more often displayed resistance or intermediate resistance to fluconazole (P=0.02), miconazole (Pdiabetes mellitus patients in Italy. In addition, more C. albicans isolates were found in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects that were susceptible to fluconazole (P=0.0008 and P=0.01, respectively) than non-albicans isolates. The difference in the antifungal resistance of isolates from the two populations of diabetes mellitus patients may be related to differences in the therapeutic management of candidal infections between the two centres.

  6. The Schistosoma mansoni Cytochrome P450 (CYP3050A1 Is Essential for Worm Survival and Egg Development.

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    Peter D Ziniel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis affects millions of people in developing countries and is responsible for more than 200,000 deaths annually. Because of toxicity and limited spectrum of activity of alternatives, there is effectively only one drug, praziquantel, available for its treatment. Recent data suggest that drug resistance could soon be a problem. There is therefore the need to identify new drug targets and develop drugs for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni genome sequence for proteins involved in detoxification processes found that it encodes a single cytochrome P450 (CYP450 gene. Here we report that the 1452 bp open reading frame has a characteristic heme-binding region in its catalytic domain with a conserved heme ligating cysteine, a hydrophobic leader sequence present as the membrane interacting region, and overall structural conservation. The highest sequence identity to human CYP450s is 22%. Double stranded RNA (dsRNA silencing of S. mansoni (SmCYP450 in schistosomula results in worm death. Treating larval or adult worms with antifungal azole CYP450 inhibitors results in worm death at low micromolar concentrations. In addition, combinations of SmCYP450-specific dsRNA and miconazole show additive schistosomicidal effects supporting the hypothesis that SmCYP450 is the target of miconazole. Treatment of developing S. mansoni eggs with miconazole results in a dose dependent arrest in embryonic development. Our results indicate that SmCYP450 is essential for worm survival and egg development and validates it as a novel drug target. Preliminary structure-activity relationship suggests that the 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl-2-(1H-imidazol-1-ylethan-1-ol moiety of miconazole is necessary for activity and that miconazole activity and selectivity could be improved by rational drug design.

  7. Treatment of tinea capitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, S M; Nahata, M C

    1997-03-01

    To review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, mycology, clinical presentation, and pharmacotherapy of tinea capitis, and describe the role of newer antimycotic agents. A MEDLINE search restricted to English-language articles published from 1966 through 1996 and journal references were used in preparing this review. The data on mycology, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects, and drug interactions were obtained from controlled studies and case reports appearing in the literature. Both open-label and comparative studies were evaluated to assess the efficacy of antimycotics in the treatment of this infection. Griseofulvin is the drug of choice in the treatment of tinea capitis. Newer agents with greater efficacy or shorter treatment durations continue to be explored. Ketoconazole, the first azole studied for efficacy in tinea capitis, has not demonstrated any clinical advantage over griseofulvin in several controlled clinical trials. Itraconazole is effective, but the available data are limited to case reports and a single uncontrolled study. Terbinafine similarly has shown promise in the treatment of tinea capitis, but the oral formulation was only recently approved in the US. Existing studies reflect the results in infection with pathogens not seen in the US. Both itraconazole and terbinafine achieve high concentrations in the hair and stratum corneum that persist for several weeks following drug administration. This may enable shorter courses of therapy; however, comparative studies need to be conducted in the US. Tinea capitis remains the most common dermatophyte infection in young urban children. Oral antifungal therapy is required for effective treatment, often for several months. The combination of griseofulvin with a selenium sulfide shampoo continues to be the mainstay of therapy until more experience is gained with the newer antimycotics.

  8. Evaluation of the Drug Treatment and Persistence of Onychomycosis

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    Andrew W. Campbell

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Onychomycosis is a common nail disease responsible for approximately 50% of diseases of the nail. It occurs more in the elderly, though several cases have been reported among children. Several factors influence, such as climate, geography, and migration. The two dermatophytes most commonly implicated in onychomycosis are Trichophyton rubrum and T. mentagrophytes, accounting for more than 90% of onychomycoses. Nonetheless, several other toxigenic molds have been implicated. For convenience, onychomycosis is divided into four major clinical presentations: distal subungal, which is the most common form of the disease; proximal subungal, which is the most common form found in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection; superficial; and total dystrophic onychomycosis. Epidemiology of onychomycosis in adults and children is evaluated and the most common clinical symptoms addressed. Although the risk factors are discussed, the multifactorial nature of onychomycosis makes this inexhaustible. The diagnosis and treatments are difficult and the choice of appropriate antifungal drugs complex and require the knowledge of the chemical structures of the metabolites of the molds that cause onychomycosis and their interaction with the antifungal drugs. This is true because most of the antifungal drugs are derived from mold/fungal metabolism. Treatment with griseofulvin and amphotericin is displaced by the use of newer drugs from azole compounds, pyrimidines, and allylamines derivatives. Amorolfine, itraconazole, and ciclopirox nail lacquer solution 8 have gained support globally, but the side effects, drug resistance, and persistence of the disease are still a serious concern to the patients, just as economics and quality of life. Hence, the search for safer and more efficacious drug treatments are continuing.

  9. Clotrimazole and econazole inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm and virulence in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Ren, Biao; Dai, Huanqin; Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Qiong; Zhou, Xuedong; Li, Yuqing

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the inhibitory effect of eight antifungal drugs on S. mutans growth, biofilm formation and virulence factors. The actions of antifungal drugs on S. mutans were determined by recovery plates and survival kinetic curves. Biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy and the viable cells were recovered on BHI plates, meanwhile biofilms were stained by BacLight live/dead kit to investigate the biofilm viability. Bacteria/extracellular polysaccharides staining assays were performed to determine the EPS production of S. mutans biofilms. Acidogenicity and acidurity of S. mutans were determined using pH drop and acid tolerance assays, and the expression of ldh gene was evaluated using qPCR. We found that clotrimazole (CTR) and econazole (ECO) showed antibacterial activities on S. mutans UA159 and S. mutans clinical isolates at 12.5 and 25mg/L, respectively. CTR and ECO could also inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation and reduce the viability of preformed biofilm. CTR and ECO affected the live/dead ratio and the EPS/bacteria ratio of S. mutans biofilms. CTR and ECO also inhibited the pH drop, lactate acid production, and acid tolerance. The abilities of CTR and ECO to inhibit S. mutans ldh expression were also confirmed. We found that two antifungal azoles, CTR and ECO, had the abilities to inhibit the growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans and more importantly, they could also inhibit the virulence factors of S. mutans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Deletion of the Candida glabrata ERG3 and ERG11 genes: effect on cell viability, cell growth, sterol composition, and antifungal susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, A; Hitchcock, C A; Swartz, J E; Pullen, F S; Marsden, K E; Kwon-Chung, K J; Bennett, J E

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the structural genes encoding the delta 5,6 sterol desaturase (ERG3 gene) and the 14 alpha-methyl sterol demethylase (ERG11 gene) from Candida glabrata L5 (leu2). Single and double mutants of these genes were created by gene deletion. The phenotypes of these mutants, including sterol profiles, aerobic viabilities, antifungal susceptibilities, and generation times, were studied. Strain L5D (erg3 delta::LEU2) accumulated mainly ergosta-7,22-dien-3 beta-ol, was aerobically viable, and remained susceptible to antifungal agents but had a slower generation time than its parent strain. L5LUD (LEU2 erg11 delta::URA3) strains required medium supplemented with ergosterol and an anaerobic environment for growth. A spontaneous aerobically viable mutant, L5LUD40R (LEU erg11 delta::URA3), obtained from L5LUD (LEU2 erg11 delta::URA3), was found to accumulate lanosterol and obtusifoliol, was resistant to azole antifungal agents, demonstrated some increase in resistance to amphotericin B, and exhibited a 1.86-fold increase in generation time in comparison with L5 (leu2). The double-deletion mutant L5DUD61 (erg3 delta::LEU2 erg11 delta::URA3) was aerobically viable, produced mainly 14 alpha-methyl fecosterol, and had the same antifungal susceptibility pattern as L5LUD40R (LEU2 erg11 delta::URA3), and its generation time was threefold greater than that of L5 (leu2). Northern (RNA) analysis revealed that the single-deletion mutants had a marked increase in message for the undeleted ERG3 and ERG11 genes. These results indicate that differences in antifungal susceptibilities and the restoration of aerobic viability exist between the C. glabrata ergosterol mutants created in this study and those sterol mutants with similar genetic lesions previously reported for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:8593007

  11. In Vitro Effect of Malachite Green on Candida albicans Involves Multiple Pathways and Transcriptional Regulators UPC2 and STP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Devaux, Frederic; Manoharlal, Raman; Vandeputte, Patrick; Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Singh, Ashutosh; Blugeon, Corinne; Sanglard, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we show that a chemical dye, malachite green (MG), which is commonly used in the fish industry as an antifungal, antiparasitic, and antibacterial agent, could effectively kill Candida albicans and non-C. albicans species. We have demonstrated that Candida cells are susceptible to MG at a very low concentration (MIC that reduces growth by 50% [MIC50], 100 ng ml−1) and that the effect of MG is independent of known antifungal targets, such as ergosterol metabolism and major drug efflux pump proteins. Transcriptional profiling in response to MG treatment of C. albicans cells revealed that of a total of 207 responsive genes, 167 genes involved in oxidative stress, virulence, carbohydrate metabolism, heat shock, amino acid metabolism, etc., were upregulated, while 37 genes involved in iron acquisition, filamentous growth, mitochondrial respiration, etc., were downregulated. We confirmed experimentally that Candida cells exposed to MG resort to a fermentative mode of metabolism, perhaps due to defective respiration. In addition, we showed that MG triggers depletion of intracellular iron pools and enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. These effects could be reversed by the addition of iron or antioxidants, respectively. We provided evidence that the antifungal effect of MG is exerted through the transcription regulators UPC2 (regulating ergosterol biosynthesis and azole resistance) and STP2 (regulating amino acid permease genes). Taken together, our transcriptome, genetic, and biochemical results allowed us to decipher the multiple mechanisms by which MG exerts its anti-Candida effects, leading to a metabolic shift toward fermentation, increased generation of ROS, labile iron deprivation, and cell necrosis. PMID:22006003

  12. Transcriptome Profile of the Response of Paracoccidioides spp. to a Camphene Thiosemicarbazide Derivative.

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    Lívia do Carmo Silva

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a systemic granulomatous human mycosis caused by fungi of the genus Paracoccidioides, which is geographically restricted to Latin America. Inhalation of spores, the infectious particles of the fungus, is a common route of infection. The PCM treatment of choice is azoles such as itraconazole, but sulfonamides and amphotericin B are used in some cases despite their toxicity to mammalian cells. The current availability of treatments highlights the need to identify and characterize novel targets for antifungal treatment of PCM as well as the need to search for new antifungal compounds obtained from natural sources or by chemical synthesis. To this end, we evaluated the antifungal activity of a camphene thiosemicarbazide derivative (TSC-C compound on Paracoccidioides yeast. To determine the response of Paracoccidioides spp. to TSC-C, we analyzed the transcriptional profile of the fungus after 8 h of contact with the compound. The results demonstrate that Paracoccidioides lutzii induced the expression of genes related to metabolism; cell cycle and DNA processing; biogenesis of cellular components; cell transduction/signal; cell rescue, defense and virulence; cellular transport, transport facilities and transport routes; energy; protein synthesis; protein fate; transcription; and other proteins without classification. Additionally, we observed intensely inhibited genes related to protein synthesis. Analysis by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that the compound induced the production of reactive oxygen species. Using an isolate with down-regulated SOD1 gene expression (SOD1-aRNA, we sought to determine the function of this gene in the defense of Paracoccidioides yeast cells against the compound. Mutant cells were more susceptible to TSC-C, demonstrating the importance of this gene in response to the compound. The results presented herein suggest that TSC-C is a promising candidate for PCM treatment.

  13. Frequent detection of ‘azole’ resistant Candida species among late presenting AIDS patients in northwest Ethiopia

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    Mulu Andargachew

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chronic use of antifungal agents in the treatment of fungal infection in general and oropharyngeal candidiasis mainly in AIDS patient’s leads to the selection of strain resistant to these therapies and a shift in the spectrum of Candida species. This study determines the species diversity and in vitro susceptibility of Candida isolates from late presenting AIDS patients in northwest Ethiopia. Methods Two hundred and twenty one HIV/AIDS patients were assessed with a standardized evaluation form at enrolment. Oral rinses were cultured on CHROMagar plates at 37°C for 48 hours and Candida species identification were made following standard microbiological techniques. In vitro drug susceptibility tests were made using broth microdilution method. Results The colonization rate of Candida species was found to be 82.3% (177/215. C. albicans was the predominant species isolated from 139 (81% patients but there was a diversity of other species. C. glabrata was the most frequent non-albicans species isolated in 22.5% (40/177 of the patients followed by C. tropicalis 14.1% (27/177, C. krusei 5.6% (10 and other unidentifiable Candida species 4% (7/177. Recurrent episodes of oropharyngeal candidiasis and previous exposure to antifungal drugs were found to be predisposing factors for colonization by non-albicans species. Irrespective of the Candida species identified 12.2% (11/90, 7.7% (7/90 and 4.7% (4 of the isolates were resistant to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole, respectively. In contrast, resistance to micafungin, amphotericin B and 5-Fluorocytosine was infrequent. Conclusion HIV/AIDS patients are orally colonized by single or multiple albicans and non- albicans Candida species that are frequently resistant to azoles and occasionally to amphotericin B, 5-Fluorocytosine and micafungin. These highlight the need for national surveillance for examining Candida epidemiology and resistance to antifungal drugs.

  14. Therapeutic use of a cationic antimicrobial peptide from the spider Acanthoscurria gomesiana in the control of experimental candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial peptides are present in animals, plants and microorganisms and play a fundamental role in the innate immune response. Gomesin is a cationic antimicrobial peptide purified from haemocytes of the spider Acanthoscurria gomesiana. It has a broad-spectrum of activity against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and tumour cells. Candida albicans is a commensal yeast that is part of the human microbiota. However, in immunocompromised patients, this fungus may cause skin, mucosal or systemic infections. The typical treatment for this mycosis comprises three major categories of antifungal drugs: polyenes, azoles and echinocandins; however cases of resistance to these drugs are frequently reported. With the emergence of microorganisms that are resistant to conventional antibiotics, the development of alternative treatments for candidiasis is important. In this study, we evaluate the efficacy of gomesin treatment on disseminated and vaginal candidiasis as well as its toxicity and biodistribution. Results Treatment with gomesin effectively reduced Candida albicans in the kidneys, spleen, liver and vagina of infected mice. The biodistribution of gomesin labelled with technetium-99 m showed that the peptide is captured in the kidneys, spleen and liver. Enhanced production of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 was detected in infected mice treated with gomesin, suggesting an immunomodulatory activity. Moreover, immunosuppressed and C. albicans-infected mice showed an increase in survival after treatment with gomesin and fluconazole. Systemic administration of gomesin was also not toxic to the mic Conclusions Gomesin proved to be effective against experimental Candida albicans infection. It can be used as an alternative therapy for candidiasis, either alone or in combination with fluconazole. Gomesin's mechanism is not fully understood, but we hypothesise that the peptide acts through the permeabilisation of the yeast membrane leading to death and/or releasing the yeast

  15. A multicenter multinational study of abdominal candidiasis: epidemiology, outcomes and predictors of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, Matteo; Righi, Elda; Ansaldi, Filippo; Merelli, Maria; Scarparo, Claudio; Antonelli, Massimo; Garnacho-Montero, Jose; Diaz-Martin, Ana; Palacios-Garcia, Inmaculada; Luzzati, Roberto; Rosin, Chiara; Lagunes, Leonel; Rello, Jordi; Almirante, Benito; Scotton, Pier Giorgio; Baldin, Gianmaria; Dimopoulos, George; Nucci, Marcio; Munoz, Patricia; Vena, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; de Egea, Viviana; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes; Tascini, Carlo; Menichetti, Francesco; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Mesini, Alessio; Sganga, Gabriele; Viscoli, Claudio; Tumbarello, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Clinical data on patients with intra-abdominal candidiasis (IAC) is still scarce. We collected data from 13 hospitals in Italy, Spain, Brazil, and Greece over a 3-year period (2011-2013) including patients from ICU, medical, and surgical wards. A total of 481 patients were included in the study. Of these, 27% were hospitalized in ICU. Mean age was 63 years and 57% of patients were male. IAC mainly consisted of secondary peritonitis (41%) and abdominal abscesses (30%); 68 (14%) cases were also candidemic and 331 (69%) had concomitant bacterial infections. The most commonly isolated Candida species were C. albicans (n = 308 isolates, 64%) and C. glabrata (n = 76, 16%). Antifungal treatment included echinocandins (64%), azoles (32%), and amphotericin B (4%). Septic shock was documented in 40.5% of patients. Overall 30-day hospital mortality was 27% with 38.9% mortality in ICU. Multivariate logistic regression showed that age (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.07, P < 0.001), increments in 1-point APACHE II scores (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.08, P = 0.028), secondary peritonitis (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.02-2.89, P = 0.019), septic shock (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.88-5.86, P < 0.001), and absence of adequate abdominal source control (OR 3.35, 95% CI 2.01-5.63, P < 0.001) were associated with mortality. In patients with septic shock, absence of source control correlated with mortality rates above 60% irrespective of administration of an adequate antifungal therapy. Low percentages of concomitant candidemia and high mortality rates are documented in IAC. In patients presenting with septic shock, source control is fundamental.

  16. In vitro activity of Spirulina platensis water extract against different Candida species isolated from vulvo-vaginal candidiasis cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangoni, Antonella; Foschi, Claudio; Micucci, Matteo; Nahui Palomino, Rogers Alberto; Gallina Toschi, Tullia; Vitali, Beatrice; Camarda, Luca; Mandrioli, Mara; De Giorgio, Marta; Aldini, Rita; Corazza, Ivan; Chiarini, Alberto; Cevenini, Roberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    The high incidence of vulvo-vaginal candidiasis, combined with the growing problems about azole resistance and toxicity of antifungal drugs, highlights the need for the development of new effective strategies for the treatment of this condition. In this context, natural compounds represent promising alternatives. The cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, a blue-green alga, exhibits antimicrobial activities against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, only few data about the antifungal properties of Spirulina platensis are available and its potential toxic effects have not been largely investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of a fully-characterized water extract of Spirulina platensis against 22 strains of Candida spp. Prior to considering its potential topical use, we both investigated whether the extract exerted target activities on guinea pig uterine smooth muscle, and the impact of Spirulina platensis on the dominant microorganisms of the vaginal microbiota (i.e., lactobacilli), in order to exclude possible adverse events. By means of a broth microdilution assay, we found that the microalga extract possesses good antifungal properties (MIC: 0.125-0.5 mg/ml), against all the Candida species with a fungicidal activity. At the concentrations active against candida, Spirulina platensis did not modify the spontaneous basic waves pattern of uterine myometrium as underlined by the absence of aberrant contractions, and did not affect the main health-promoting bacteria of the vaginal ecosystem. Finally, we evaluated the selectivity index of our extract by testing its cytotoxicity on three different cell lines and it showed values ranging between 2 and 16. Further in vivo studies are needed, in particular to evaluate the use of control-release formulations in order to maintain Spirulina platensis concentrations at anti-Candida active doses but below the toxic levels found in the present work.

  17. [Reliable microbiological diagnosis of vulvovaginal candidiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykushev, R; Ouzounova-Raykova, V; Stoykova, V; Mitov, I

    2014-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is common infection among those affecting the vulva and vagina. Is caused by the perpesentatives from the genus Candida, in most cases C. albicans (85-90%). An increase in the percentage of the so-called non-albicans agents is seen and these pathgogens are often resistant to the most commonly used in the practice antifungals. Faulty diagnosis, incorrect use of azoles, and self-treatment lead to selection of resistant strains and recurrent infections. Identification of Candida species associated with vulvovaginal candidiasis by conventional and PCR techniques. For six months a total number of 213 vaginal secretions were tested applying Gram stain and cultivation on ChromAgar. API Candida fermentation tests and API 20CAUX assimilation tests were performed for the identification of the bacteria. Extraction of DNA of all the smears with subsequent PCR detection of different Candida species were done. 80.7% materials showed presence of blastospores and/or hyphae. Positive culture results were detected in 60 (28.2%) samples. The species specific identification revealed presence of C. albicans in 51 (85%) smears, C. glabrata--in 8 (13.3%), C. krusei--in 2 (3.3%), and S. cervisie--in 1 (2.1%). The PCR technique confirmed the results of the conventional methods. It is worth to mention that 51 of the tested smears were positive for G. vaginalis using additional PCR. The correct diagnosis of the cause of vulvovaginal candidiasis helps in the correct choice of appropriate antifungal therapy and prevents development of recurrent infections and consequences. The PCR based method is rapid, specific and sensitive. It perfectly correlates with the results from the conventional diagnostic tests so it could be selected as a method of choice for the diagnosis of vulvovaginal candidiasis.

  18. A curcumin-loaded liquid crystal precursor mucoadhesive system for the treatment of vaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmazi, Rafael; Calixto, Giovana; Bernegossi, Jéssica; Ramos, Matheus Aparecido dos Santos; Bauab, Taís Maria; Chorilli, Marlus

    2015-01-01

    Women often develop vaginal infections that are caused primarily by organisms of the genus Candida. The current treatments of vaginal candidiasis usually involve azole-based antifungals, though fungal resistance to these compounds has become prevalent. Therefore, much attention has been given to molecules with antifungal properties from natural sources, such as curcumin (CUR). However, CUR has poor solubility in aqueous solvents and poor oral bioavailability. This study attempted to overcome this problem by developing, characterizing, and evaluating the in vitro antifungal action of a CUR-loaded liquid crystal precursor mucoadhesive system (LCPM) for vaginal administration. A low-viscosity LCPM (F) consisting of 40% wt/wt polyoxpropylene-(5)-polyoxyethylene-(20)-cetyl alcohol, 50% wt/wt oleic acid, and 10% wt/wt chitosan dispersion at 0.5% with the addition of 16% poloxamer 407 was developed to take advantage of the lyotropic phase behavior of this formulation. Notably, F could transform into liquid crystal systems when diluted with artificial vaginal mucus at ratios of 1:3 and 1:1 (wt/wt), resulting in the formation of F30 and F100, respectively. Polarized light microscopy and rheological studies revealed that F behaved like an isotropic formulation, whereas F30 and F100 behaved like an anisotropic liquid crystalline system (LCS). Moreover, F30 and F100 presented higher mucoadhesion to porcine vaginal mucosa than F. The analysis of the in vitro activity against Candida albicans revealed that CUR-loaded F was more potent against standard and clinical strains compared with a CUR solution. Therefore, the vaginal administration of CUR-loaded LCPMs represents a promising platform for the treatment of vaginal candidiasis.

  19. Antifungal Properties of Cationic Phenylene Ethynylenes and Their Impact on β-Glucan Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Harry C; Sylejmani, Rina; Graus, Matthew S; Donabedian, Patrick L; Whitten, David G; Neumann, Aaron K

    2016-08-01

    Candida species are the cause of many bloodstream infections through contamination of indwelling medical devices. These infections account for a 40% mortality rate, posing a significant risk to immunocompromised patients. Traditional treatments against Candida infections include amphotericin B and various azole treatments. Unfortunately, these treatments are associated with high toxicity, and resistant strains have become more prevalent. As a new frontier, light-activated phenylene ethynylenes have shown promising biocidal activity against Gram-positive and -negative bacterial pathogens, as well as the environmental yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae In this study, we monitored the viability of Candida species after treatment with a cationic conjugated polymer [poly(p-phenylene ethynylene); PPE] or oligomer ["end-only" oligo(p-phenylene ethynylene); EO-OPE] by flow cytometry in order to explore the antifungal properties of these compounds. The oligomer was found to disrupt Candida albicans yeast membrane integrity independent of light activation, while PPE is able to do so only in the presence of light, allowing for some control as to the manner in which cytotoxic effects are induced. The contrast in killing efficacy between the two compounds is likely related to their size difference and their intrinsic abilities to penetrate the fungal cell wall. Unlike EO-OPE-DABCO (where DABCO is quaternized diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane), PPE-DABCO displayed a strong propensity to associate with soluble β-glucan, which is expected to inhibit its ability to access and perturb the inner cell membrane of Candida yeast. Furthermore, treatment with PPE-DABCO unmasked Candida albicans β-glucan and increased phagocytosis by Dectin-1-expressing HEK-293 cells. In summary, cationic phenylene ethynylenes show promising biocidal activity against pathogenic Candida yeast cells while also exhibiting immunostimulatory effects. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights

  20. Malformations Induced in Pregnant Rats and their Fetuses Treated with Fluconazole and / or Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, F.L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to study the synergistic effect of antifungal (fluconazole) treatment and / or g-radiation stress on pregnant mothers and their developing embryos by evaluating the maternal biochemical changes, embryological and histopathological lesions. Fluconazole is a broad-spectrum azole antifungal medication used for the treatment of several types of fungal infections including common forms such as vaginal candidiasis. Fluconazole (50 mg/kg b.wt.) was daily administered by oral gavage to pregnant rats from the 4th to the 13th gestational days during which they were subjected to g-radiation at a dose level of 1 Gy given at the 6th day (post implantation period) and 1 Gy on the 12th day (organogenesis period) of gestation. The animals were dissected and examined on the 20th day of gestation (one day prior to praturation). Fluconazole and radiation dual treatment resulted in increased maternal serum of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), aspartate transaminase (AST) activities and sodium (Na + ) level accompanied with a decline in potassium (K + ) concentration. The results showed that there was an elevation in the lipid peroxidation end product malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as nitric oxide (NO) in the brain and heart tissues of pregnant rats. Meantime, the developing embryos in the uteri showed various teratological, skeletal and histological impairments. Moreover, the fluconazole treatment and / or g-radiation harm effects were detected as growth retardation, malformations, intrauterine death and embryonic resorption. The examination of the endoskeletal system of fetuses showed retardation in the ossification of the skull bones and lack of ossification at the center of vertebrae and appendages. In addition, the embryonic histological examinations revealed heart loss of normal architecture, the interstitial tissues were oedematous and containing necrotic cellular debris together with fibrosis of nerve cells in the brain

  1. A genetic and pharmacological analysis of isoprenoid pathway by LC-MS/MS in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Takami

    Full Text Available Currently, statins are the only drugs acting on the mammalian isoprenoid pathway. The mammalian genes in this pathway are not easily amenable to genetic manipulation. Thus, it is difficult to study the effects of the inhibition of various enzymes on the intermediate and final products in the isoprenoid pathway. In fission yeast, antifungal compounds such as azoles and terbinafine are available as inhibitors of the pathway in addition to statins, and various isoprenoid pathway mutants are also available. Here in these mutants, treated with statins or antifungals, we quantified the final and intermediate products of the fission yeast isoprenoid pathway using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. In hmg1-1, a mutant of the gene encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR, ergosterol (a final sterol product, and squalene (an intermediate pathway product, were decreased to approximately 80% and 10%, respectively, compared with that of wild-type cells. Consistently in wild-type cells, pravastatin, an HMGR inhibitor decreased ergosterol and squalene, and the effect was more pronounced on squalene. In hmg1-1 mutant and in wild-type cells treated with pravastatin, the decrease in the levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate respectively was larger than that of ergosterol but was smaller than that of squalene. In Δerg6 or Δsts1 cells, mutants of the genes involved in the last step of the pathway, ergosterol was not detected, and the changes of intermediate product levels were distinct from that of hmg1-1 mutant. Notably, in wild-type cells miconazole and terbinafine only slightly decreased ergosterol level. Altogether, these studies suggest that the pleiotropic phenotypes caused by the hmg1-1 mutation and pravastatin might be due to decreased levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates or other isoprenoid pathway intermediate products rather than due to a decreased ergosterol level.

  2. Advances in targeting the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase for anti-fungal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer R. Hayek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase is a membrane-bound, multi-subunit enzyme that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to pump protons across membranes. V-ATPase activity is critical for pH homeostasis and organelle acidification as well as for generation of the membrane potential that drives secondary transporters and cellular metabolism. V-ATPase is highly conserved across species and is best characterized in the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae. However, recent studies in mammals have identified significant alterations from fungi, particularly in the isoform composition of the 14 subunits and in the regulation of complex disassembly. These differences could be exploited for selectivity between fungi and humans and highlight the potential for V-ATPase as an anti-fungal drug target. Candida albicans (C. albicans is a major human fungal pathogen and causes fatality in 35% of systemic infections, even with anti-fungal treatment. The pathogenicity of C. albicans correlates with environmental, vacuolar, and cytoplasmic pH regulation, and V-ATPase appears to play a fundamental role in each of these processes. Genetic loss of V-ATPase in pathogenic fungi leads to defective virulence, and a comprehensive picture of the mechanisms involved is emerging. Recent studies have explored the practical utility of V-ATPase as an anti-fungal drug target in C. albicans, including pharmacological inhibition, azole therapy, and targeting of downstream pathways. This overview will discuss these studies as well as hypothetical ways to target V-ATPase and novel high-throughput methods for use in future drug discovery screens.

  3. A rapid MCM-41 dispersive micro-solid phase extraction coupled with LC/MS/MS for quantification of ketoconazole and voriconazole in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Noorfatimah; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Abd Aziz, Noorizan; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Nur, Hadi; Loh, Saw Hong; Kamaruzaman, Sazlinda

    2017-02-01

    A rapid dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) combined with LC/MS/MS method was developed and validated for the determination of ketoconazole and voriconazole in human urine and plasma samples. Synthesized mesoporous silica MCM-41 was used as sorbent in d-μ-SPE of the azole compounds from biological fluids. Important D-μ-SPE parameters, namely type desorption solvent, extraction time, sample pH, salt addition, desorption time, amount of sorbent and sample volume were optimized. Liquid chromatographic separations were carried out on a Zorbax SB-C 18 column (2.1 × 100 mm, 3.5 μm), using a mobile phase of acetonitrile-0.05% formic acid in 5 mm ammonium acetate buffer (70:30, v/v). A triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with positive ionization mode was used for the determination of target analytes. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curves showed good linearity in the range of 0.1-10,000 μg/L with satisfactory limit of detection (≤0.06 μg/L) and limit of quantitation (≤0.3 μg/L). The proposed method also showed acceptable intra- and inter-day precisions for ketoconazole and voriconazole from urine and human plasma with RSD ≤16.5% and good relative recoveries in the range 84.3-114.8%. The MCM-41-D-μ-SPE method proved to be rapid and simple and requires a small volume of organic solvent (200 μL); thus it is advantageous for routine drug analysis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of antifungal activity of standardized extract of Salvia rhytidea Benth. (Lamiaceae) against various Candida isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, S; Bakhshi, T; Sharififar, F; Naseri, A; Ghasemi Nejad Almani, P

    2016-12-01

    Salvia species have long been described in traditional medicine for various indications. Owing to the widespread use of this genus by ethnic populations, especially for various infections ranging from skin disease to gastrointestinal disorders, we were encouraged to determine whether Salvia rhytidea could be effective against fungal infections. Given the increased incidence of candidiasis in the past decade, limits on the use of antifungal drugs, emergence of azole-resistant Candida species and increased incidence of treatment failures, it is necessary to identify a novel agent with antifungal properties. Aim of the study was to evaluate the antifungal properties of S. rhytidea against various Candida isolates. In this study, at first rosmarinic acid content of plant extract was determined. A total of 96 Candida isolates were tested, including the following species: Candida albicans (n=42), Candida glabrata (n=16), Candida tropicalis (n=11), Candida krusei (n=9), Candida parapsilosis (n=9), Candida lusitaniae (n=7) and Candida guilliermondii (n=2). The in vitro antifungal activity of methanolic extracts of S. rhytidea Benth. was evaluated against Candida isolates and compared with that of the standard antifungal drug nystatin by using a broth microdilution method, according to CLSI. Phytochemical screening results showed that the methanolic extract of S. rhytidea Benth. was rich in flavonoids and tannins. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) values of S. rhytidea Benth. ranged from 3.125 to>100μg/ml and 6.25 to>100μg/ml respectively. The growth inhibition value displayed that C. tropicalis, C. krusei and C. albicans isolates were most susceptible to S. rhytidea. Findings show that S. rhytidea possesses an antifungal effect against Candida isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative Phenotypic Analysis of the Major Fungal Pathogens Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Linda M.; Schröder, Markus S.; Turner, Siobhán A.; Taff, Heather; Andes, David; Grózer, Zsuzsanna; Gácser, Attila; Ames, Lauren; Haynes, Ken; Higgins, Desmond G.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans are human fungal pathogens that belong to the CTG clade in the Saccharomycotina. In contrast to C. albicans, relatively little is known about the virulence properties of C. parapsilosis, a pathogen particularly associated with infections of premature neonates. We describe here the construction of C. parapsilosis strains carrying double allele deletions of 100 transcription factors, protein kinases and species-specific genes. Two independent deletions were constructed for each target gene. Growth in >40 conditions was tested, including carbon source, temperature, and the presence of antifungal drugs. The phenotypes were compared to C. albicans strains with deletions of orthologous transcription factors. We found that many phenotypes are shared between the two species, such as the role of Upc2 as a regulator of azole resistance, and of CAP1 in the oxidative stress response. Others are unique to one species. For example, Cph2 plays a role in the hypoxic response in C. parapsilosis but not in C. albicans. We found extensive divergence between the biofilm regulators of the two species. We identified seven transcription factors and one protein kinase that are required for biofilm development in C. parapsilosis. Only three (Efg1, Bcr1 and Ace2) have similar effects on C. albicans biofilms, whereas Cph2, Czf1, Gzf3 and Ume6 have major roles in C. parapsilosis only. Two transcription factors (Brg1 and Tec1) with well-characterized roles in biofilm formation in C. albicans do not have the same function in C. parapsilosis. We also compared the transcription profile of C. parapsilosis and C. albicans biofilms. Our analysis suggests the processes shared between the two species are predominantly metabolic, and that Cph2 and Bcr1 are major biofilm regulators in C. parapsilosis. PMID:25233198

  6. Frequent detection of ‘azole’ resistant Candida species among late presenting AIDS patients in northwest Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The chronic use of antifungal agents in the treatment of fungal infection in general and oropharyngeal candidiasis mainly in AIDS patient’s leads to the selection of strain resistant to these therapies and a shift in the spectrum of Candida species. This study determines the species diversity and in vitro susceptibility of Candida isolates from late presenting AIDS patients in northwest Ethiopia. Methods Two hundred and twenty one HIV/AIDS patients were assessed with a standardized evaluation form at enrolment. Oral rinses were cultured on CHROMagar plates at 37°C for 48 hours and Candida species identification were made following standard microbiological techniques. In vitro drug susceptibility tests were made using broth microdilution method. Results The colonization rate of Candida species was found to be 82.3% (177/215). C. albicans was the predominant species isolated from 139 (81%) patients but there was a diversity of other species. C. glabrata was the most frequent non-albicans species isolated in 22.5% (40/177) of the patients followed by C. tropicalis 14.1% (27/177), C. krusei 5.6% (10) and other unidentifiable Candida species 4% (7/177). Recurrent episodes of oropharyngeal candidiasis and previous exposure to antifungal drugs were found to be predisposing factors for colonization by non-albicans species. Irrespective of the Candida species identified 12.2% (11/90), 7.7% (7/90) and 4.7% (4) of the isolates were resistant to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole, respectively. In contrast, resistance to micafungin, amphotericin B and 5-Fluorocytosine was infrequent. Conclusion HIV/AIDS patients are orally colonized by single or multiple albicans and non- albicans Candida species that are frequently resistant to azoles and occasionally to amphotericin B, 5-Fluorocytosine and micafungin. These highlight the need for national surveillance for examining Candida epidemiology and resistance to antifungal drugs. PMID:23398783

  7. Yeasts from Scarlet ibises (Eudocimus ruber): A focus on monitoring the antifungal susceptibility of Candida famata and closely related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Silva, Aline Lobão da; Monteiro, Frederico Ozanan Barros; Guedes, Glaucia Morgana de Melo; Sales, Jamille Alencar; Oliveira, Jonathas Sales de; Maia Junior, José Erisvaldo; Miranda, Stefânia Araújo; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Alencar, Lucas Pereira de; Castelo-Branco, Débora Souza Collares Maia; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Pereira Neto, Waldemiro de Aquino; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to identify yeasts from the gastrointestinal tract of scarlet ibises (Eudocimus ruber) and from plant material collected from the environment where they live. Then, the isolates phenotypically identified as Candida famata were submitted to molecular identification of their closely related species and evaluated for their antifungal susceptibility and possible resistance mechanisms to antifungal drugs. Cloacal swabs from 20 scarlet ibises kept in captivity at Mangal das Garças Park (Brazil), pooled stool samples (n = 20) and samples of trunks and hollow of trees (n = 20) obtained from their enclosures were collected. The samples were seeded on Sabouraud agar supplemented with chloramphenicol. The 48 recovered isolates were phenotypically identified as 15 Candida famata, 13 Candida catenulata, 2 Candida intermedia, 1 Candida lusitaniae, 2 Candida guilliermondii, 1 Candida kefyr, 1 Candida amapae, 1 Candida krusei, 8 Trichosporon spp., and 4 Rhodotorula spp. The C. famata isolates were further identified as 3 C. famata, 8 Debaryomyces nepalensis, and 4 C. palmioleophila. All C. famata and C. palmioleophila were susceptible to caspofungin and itraconazole, while one D. nepalensis was resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole. This same isolate and another D. nepalensis had lower amphotericin B susceptibility. The azole resistant strain had an increased efflux of rhodamine 6G and an alteration in the membrane sterol content, demonstrating multifactorial resistance mechanism. Finally, this research shows that scarlet ibises and their environment harbor C. famata and closely related species, including antifungal resistant isolates, emphasizing the need of monitoring the antifungal susceptibility of these yeast species. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Fungal diseases: could nanostructured drug delivery systems be a novel paradigm for therapy?

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    Voltan AR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aline Raquel Voltan,1 Guillermo Quindós,2 Kaila P Medina Alarcón,3 Ana Marisa Fusco-Almeida,3 Maria José Soares Mendes-Giannini,3 Marlus Chorilli1 1Department of Drugs and Medicines, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2Immunology, Microbiology, and Parasitology Department, Facultad de Medicina y Odontología, Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao, Spain; 3Department of Clinical Analysis, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Invasive mycoses are a major problem for immunocompromised individuals and patients in intensive care units. Morbidity and mortality rates of these infections are high because of late diagnosis and delayed treatment. Moreover, the number of available antifungal agents is low, and there are problems with toxicity and resistance. Alternatives for treating invasive fungal infections are necessary. Nanostructured systems could be excellent carriers for antifungal drugs, reducing toxicity and targeting their action. The use of nanostructured systems for antifungal therapy began in the 1990s, with the appearance of lipid formulations of amphotericin B. This review encompasses different antifungal drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, carriers based on solid lipids and nanostructure lipids, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and others. All these delivery systems have advantages and disadvantages. Main advantages are the improvement in the antifungal properties, such as bioavailability, reduction in toxicity, and target tissue, which facilitates innovative therapeutic techniques. Conversely, a major disadvantage is the high cost of production. In the near future, the use of nanosystems for drug delivery strategies can be used for delivering peptides, including mucoadhesive systems for the treatment of oral and vaginal candidiasis. Keywords: fungal diseases, antifungal agents, amphotericin B, azoles

  9. Molecular identification and in-vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida species isolated from patients with onychomycosis

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    Keyvan Pakshir

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Candida species are the most opportunistic fungi affecting the nails and resulting in onychomycosis. In this study, we identified and evaluated in-vitro susceptibility of the recovered isolates against fluconazole (FLC, voriconazole (VRC, and clotrimazole (CLT using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI M27-A3 document. Materials and Methods: From patients with either clinically or mycologically proven onychomycosis, 97 isolates comprising of seven Candida species were isolated, which were identified by both conventional and molecular techniques such as polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. In addition, Candida dubliniensis was confirmed by restriction endonuclease analysis. Antifungal susceptibility of each isolate against the three azoles applied in this study was determined using the CLSI microdilution reference method M27-A3. Results: Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis was the most frequently isolated species (n=44, followed by C. albicans (n=23, C. tropicalis (n=13, C. glabrata (n=7, C. krusei (n=6, C. guilliermondii (n=3, and C. dubliniensis (n=1. All the isolates were susceptible to CLT. VRC had lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values for the isolates compared to FLC. Geometric mean MIC values of VRC, FLC, and CLT for C. parapsilosis isolates were 0.07 µg/ml, 0.8 µg/ml, and 0.35 µg/ml, respectively. Collectively, all species exhibited greater susceptibility to VRC in comparison to C. albicans (P≤0.001. Conclusion: This study showed that non-albicans Candida species were the most common etiologic agents of non-dermatophyte onychomycosis. The major antifungal agents used in clinics to empirically treat yeast onychomycosis are FLC and CLT. Our data suggested that CLT is a better choice for the treatment of Candida onychomycosis, especially in drug resistant cases.

  10. Use of external metabolizing systems when testing for endocrine disruption in the T-screen assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Olesen, Pelle Thonning; Nellemann, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Although, it is well-established that information on the metabolism of a substance is important in the evaluation of its toxic potential, there is limited experience with incorporating metabolic aspects into in vitro tests for endocrine disrupters. The aim of the current study was a) to study different in vitro systems for biotransformation of ten known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDs): five azole fungicides, three parabens and 2 phthalates, b) to determine possible changes in the ability of the EDs to bind and activate the thyroid receptor (TR) in the in vitro T-screen assay after biotransformation and c) to investigate the endogenous metabolic capacity of the GH3 cells, the cell line used in the T-screen assay, which is a proliferation assay used for the in vitro detection of agonistic and antagonistic properties of compounds at the level of the TR. The two in vitro metabolizing systems tested the human liver S9 mix and the PCB-induced rat microsomes gave an almost complete metabolic transformation of the tested parabens and phthalates. No marked difference the effects in the T-screen assay was observed between the parent compounds and the effects of the tested metabolic extracts. The GH3 cells themselves significantly metabolized the two tested phthalates dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). Overall the results and qualitative data from the current study show that an in vitro metabolizing system using liver S9 or microsomes could be a convenient method for the incorporation of metabolic and toxicokinetic aspects into in vitro testing for endocrine disrupting effects.

  11. Micafungin treatment and eradication of candiduria among hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Martin, Spencer; Sura, Mihir; Mohammed, Anisa; Golan, Yoav

    2016-11-01

    In high-risk patients, candiduria may be associated with the development of urinary tract infections (UTI) and invasive candidiasis. The triazole antifungals achieve good urine concentrations, but their use is limited by the emergence of non-albicans Candida spp. with low-triazole susceptibility. The echinocandins remain fungicidal against many azole-resistant Candida spp., but low urine concentrations limit their use. We examined the rates of candiduria elimination in micafungin-treated patients. This retrospective analysis evaluated consecutive patients with candiduria (1/2008-4/2011) who were treated with micafungin (100 mg/day) and had post-micafungin urine cultures. Patients were deemed to have either candiduria or UTI and were assessed for short-term (within 2 weeks post-micafungin) and long-term (>1 month post-micafungin) urine sterilization. Thirty-three patients meeting our inclusion criteria were identified. Of these, 16 (48 %) were diagnosed with a Candida UTI. A total of 25 patients (76 %) had Foley catheters, which were replaced in 11 (44 %) cases. The majority of patients had Candida albicans (39 %), but Candida krusei and Candida glabrata (33 %) were also isolated. Eight patients (24 %) were immunocompromised, and 29 (88 %) received broad-spectrum antibiotics. Rates of urine sterilization during micafungin treatment, 2 weeks after micafungin, and >1 month after micafungin were 81, 78, and 75 %, respectively. Among hospitalized patients with candiduria, micafungin administration was frequently associated with both short- and long-term urine sterilization. This was observed among patients with or without Foley removal and among those with Candida albicans, as well as non-albicans Candida spp.

  12. Influences of cinnamic aldehydes on H⁺ extrusion activity and ultrastructure of Candida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreaz, Sheikh; Bhatia, Rimple; Khan, Neelofar; Muralidhar, Sumathi; Manzoor, Nikhat; Khan, Luqman Ahmad

    2013-02-01

    The antifungal effects of cinnamaldehyde, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde (coniferyl aldehyde) and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (sinapaldehyde) were investigated against 65 strains of Candida (six standard, 39 fluconazole-sensitive and 20 fluconazole-resistant). MICs of cinnamaldehyde, coniferyl aldehyde and sinapaldehyde ranged from 100 to 500 µg ml(-1), 100 to 300 µg ml(-1) and 100 to 200 µg ml(-1), respectively. All tested isolates showed a marked sensitivity towards these aldehydes in spot and time-kill assays. Sinapaldehyde was found to be the most effective, followed by coniferyl aldehyde and cinnamaldehyde. At their respective MIC(90) values, the three compounds caused mean inhibition levels of glucose-stimulated H(+)-efflux of 36, 34 and 41 % (cinnamaldehyde), 41, 42 and 47 % (coniferyl aldehyde) and 43, 45 and 51 % (sinapaldehyde) for standard-sensitive, clinical-sensitive and clinical-resistant isolates, respectively. Inhibition levels of H(+)-efflux caused by plasma membrane ATPase inhibitors N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (100 µM) and diethylstilbestrol (10 µM) were 34, 45 and 44 %, and 57, 39 and 35 %, for standard-sensitive, clinical-sensitive and clinical-resistant isolates, respectively. Intracellular pH (pHi) was found to decrease by 0.34, 0.42 and 0.50 units following incubation with three tested aldehydes from the control pHi of 6.70. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis was performed on a representative strain, C. albicans 10261, showing alterations in morphology, cell wall, plasma membrane damage and lysis. Haemolytic activity of the three compounds varied from 10 to 15 % at their highest MIC compared to an activity level of 20 % shown by fluconazole at 30 µg ml(-1). In conclusion, this study shows significant activity of cinnamic aldehydes against Candida, including azole-resistant strains, suggesting that these molecules can be developed as antifungals.

  13. Single and multiple dose Fluconazole in the treatment of candidia vulvovaginitis: a prospective comparative study

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    Ashrafinia M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis, the most common type of vaginitis, is usually caused by Candidia albicans. Patients experience a variety of symptoms. There are many types of vulvovaginal candidiasis with various microbial causes, symptoms, host circumstances, recurrence rates, and responses to treatment. The purpose of this study was to find the best method of treatment of complicated vaginitis as determined by its high prevalence, varying symptoms and signs and patient complaints.Methods: In this open clinical trial without placebo control, we studied all patients aged 18 to 65 years, suffering from vaginitis symptoms that presented at the gynecological clinic of Arash Hospital, Tehran, Iran, during the year 2004. After obtaining informed consent, we assessed the response to a treatment of single 150 mg dose of fluconazole in one group, and sequential 150 mg doses of fluconazole in the other. The analysis was performed using SPSS statistical software (version 11.Results: With regard to symptom severity, no significant difference was found between the groups. The rate of excoriation and fissure formation demonstrated significant difference between the two groups (p=0.048. Assessment of clinical and mycological response proved that patients with severe vaginitis treated with sequential doses of fluconazole had a better general status than those in the other group. The difference between the severity of vaginitis and positive response to the treatment in culture was not significant among patients with recurrent vaginitis.Conclusion: Patients with mild to moderate recurrent vaginitis show better response to treatment. The high rate of positive culture on day 35 reconfirms the limitation of fluconazole and other azoles as fungistatic drugs.

  14. Zinc finger transcription factors displaced SREBP proteins as the major Sterol regulators during Saccharomycotina evolution.

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    Sarah L Maguire

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In most eukaryotes, including the majority of fungi, expression of sterol biosynthesis genes is regulated by Sterol-Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs, which are basic helix-loop-helix transcription activators. However, in yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans sterol synthesis is instead regulated by Upc2, an unrelated transcription factor with a Gal4-type zinc finger. The SREBPs in S. cerevisiae (Hms1 and C. albicans (Cph2 have lost a domain, are not major regulators of sterol synthesis, and instead regulate filamentous growth. We report here that rewiring of the sterol regulon, with Upc2 taking over from SREBP, likely occurred in the common ancestor of all Saccharomycotina. Yarrowia lipolytica, a deep-branching species, is the only genome known to contain intact and full-length orthologs of both SREBP (Sre1 and Upc2. Deleting YlUPC2, but not YlSRE1, confers susceptibility to azole drugs. Sterol levels are significantly reduced in the YlUPC2 deletion. RNA-seq analysis shows that hypoxic regulation of sterol synthesis genes in Y. lipolytica is predominantly mediated by Upc2. However, YlSre1 still retains a role in hypoxic regulation; growth of Y. lipolytica in hypoxic conditions is reduced in a Ylupc2 deletion and is abolished in a Ylsre1/Ylupc2 double deletion, and YlSre1 regulates sterol gene expression during hypoxia adaptation. We show that YlSRE1, and to a lesser extent YlUPC2, are required for switching from yeast to filamentous growth in hypoxia. Sre1 appears to have an ancestral role in the regulation of filamentation, which became decoupled from its role in sterol gene regulation by the arrival of Upc2 in the Saccharomycotina.

  15. Zinc Finger Transcription Factors Displaced SREBP Proteins as the Major Sterol Regulators during Saccharomycotina Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Sarah L.; Wang, Can; Holland, Linda M.; Brunel, François; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Zavrel, Martin; White, Theodore C.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, including the majority of fungi, expression of sterol biosynthesis genes is regulated by Sterol-Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs), which are basic helix-loop-helix transcription activators. However, in yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans sterol synthesis is instead regulated by Upc2, an unrelated transcription factor with a Gal4-type zinc finger. The SREBPs in S. cerevisiae (Hms1) and C. albicans (Cph2) have lost a domain, are not major regulators of sterol synthesis, and instead regulate filamentous growth. We report here that rewiring of the sterol regulon, with Upc2 taking over from SREBP, likely occurred in the common ancestor of all Saccharomycotina. Yarrowia lipolytica, a deep-branching species, is the only genome known to contain intact and full-length orthologs of both SREBP (Sre1) and Upc2. Deleting YlUPC2, but not YlSRE1, confers susceptibility to azole drugs. Sterol levels are significantly reduced in the YlUPC2 deletion. RNA-seq analysis shows that hypoxic regulation of sterol synthesis genes in Y. lipolytica is predominantly mediated by Upc2. However, YlSre1 still retains a role in hypoxic regulation; growth of Y. lipolytica in hypoxic conditions is reduced in a Ylupc2 deletion and is abolished in a Ylsre1/Ylupc2 double deletion, and YlSre1 regulates sterol gene expression during hypoxia adaptation. We show that YlSRE1, and to a lesser extent YlUPC2, are required for switching from yeast to filamentous growth in hypoxia. Sre1 appears to have an ancestral role in the regulation of filamentation, which became decoupled from its role in sterol gene regulation by the arrival of Upc2 in the Saccharomycotina. PMID:24453983

  16. Proteomic profiling of the antifungal drug response of Aspergillus fumigatus to voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarsaikhan, Nansalmaa; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Sasse, Christoph; Braus, Gerhard H; Ogel, Zumrut B; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    Antifungal resistance is an emerging problem and one of the reasons for treatment failure of invasive aspergillosis (IA). Voriconazole has become a standard therapeutic for the treatment of this often fatal infection. We studied the differentially expressed proteins as a response of Aspergillus fumigatus to voriconazole by employing the two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technique. Due to addition of drug, a total of 135 differentially synthesized proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-mass spectrometry. In particular, the level of proteins involved in the general stress response and cell detoxification increased prominently. In contrast, cell metabolism and energy proteins were down-regulated, which suggests the cellular effort to maintain balance in energy utilization while trying to combat the cellular stress exerted by the drug. We detected several so-far uncharacterized proteins which may play a role in stress response and drug metabolism and which could be future targets for antifungal treatment. A mutant strain, which is deleted in the cross-pathway control gene cpcA, was treated with voriconazole to investigate the contribution of the general control of amino acid biosynthesis to drug resistance. We compared the mutant strain's protein expression profile with the wild-type strain. The absence of CpcA led to an increased resistance to voriconazole and a reduced activation of some general stress response proteins, while the transcript level of the triazole target gene erg11A (cyp51A) remained unchanged. In contrast, the sensitivity of strain ΔcpcA to terbinafine and amphotericin B was slightly increased. These findings imply a role of CpcA in the cellular stress response to azole drugs at the post transcriptional level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. In-depth 2-DE reference map of Aspergillus fumigatus and its proteomic profiling on exposure to itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Poonam; Mushahary, Dolly; Hassan, Wazid; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Madan, Taruna; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Sundaram, Curam Sreenivasacharlu; Sarma, Puranam Usha

    2016-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is a medically important opportunistic fungus that may lead to invasive aspergillosis in humans with weak immune system. Proteomic profiling of this fungus on exposure to itraconazole (ITC), an azole antifungal drug, may lead to identification of its molecular targets and better understanding on the development of drug resistance against ITC in A. fumigatus. Here, proteome analysis was performed using 2-DE followed by mass spectrometric analysis which resulted in identification of a total of 259 unique proteins. Further, proteome profiling of A. fumigatus was carried out on exposure to ITC, 0.154 μg/ml, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50). Image analysis showed altered levels of 175 proteins (66 upregulated and 109 downregulated) of A. fumigatus treated with ITC as compared to the untreated control. Peptide mass fingerprinting led to the identification of 54 proteins (12 up-regulated and 42 down-regulated). The differentially expressed proteins include proteins related to cell stress, carbohydrate metabolism and amino acid metabolism. We also observed four proteins, including nucleotide phosphate kinase (NDK), that are reported to interact with calcineurin, a protein involved in regulation of cell morphology and fungal virulence. Comparison of differentially expressed proteins on exposure to ITC with artemisinin (ART), an antimalarial drug with antifungal activity(1), revealed a total of 26 proteins to be common among them suggesting that common proteins and pathways are targeted by these two antifungal agents. The proteins targeted by ITC may serve as important leads for development of new antifungal drugs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Complications of hematopoietic stem transplantation: Fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Ali S; Almaghrabi, Reem S

    2017-12-01

    Patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at increased risk of invasive fungal infections, especially during the early neutropenic phase and severe graft-versus-host disease. Mold-active prophylaxis should be limited to the highest risk groups. Empiric antifungal therapy for HSCT with persistent febrile neutropenia is associated with unacceptable response rates, unnecessary antifungal therapy, increased risk of toxicity, and inflated costs. Empiric therapy should not be a substitute for detailed work up to identify the cause of fever in such patients. The improved diagnostic performance of serum biomarkers such as galactomannan and β-D-glucan, as well as polymerase chain reaction assays has allowed the development of diagnostic-driven antifungal therapy strategies for high risk patients. Diagnostic-driven approaches have resulted in reduced unnecessary antifungal exposure, improved diagnosis of invasive fungal disease, and reduced costs without increased risk of mortality. The appropriateness of diagnostic-driven antifungal strategy for individual HSCT centers depends on the availability and turnaround times for diagnostics, multidisciplinary expertise, and the local epidemiology of invasive fungal infections. Echinocandins are the treatment of choice for invasive candidiasis in most HSCT recipients. Fluconazole may be used for the treatment of invasive candidiasis in hemodynamically stable patients with no prior azole exposure. The primary treatment of choice for invasive aspergillosis is voriconazole. Alternatives include isavuconazole and lipid formulations of amphotericin. Currently available evidence does not support routine primary combination antifungal therapy for invasive aspergillosis. However, combination salvage antifungal therapy may be considered in selected patients. Therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended for the majority of HSCT recipients on itraconazole, posaconazole, or voriconazole. Copyright © 2017

  19. Environmentally friendly wood preservatives formulated with enzymatic-hydrolyzed okara, copper and/or boron salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sye Hee; Oh, Sei Chang [Department of Forest Resources, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, In-gyu [Department of Forest Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Gyu-seong [Department of Wood and Paper Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Han-seob [Department of Forest Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-woo [National Instrumentation Center for Environmental Management, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young-ho [KCI Co. Ltd., Seosan, Chungcheongnam-do 356-874 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, In, E-mail: dahadad2000@yahoo.com [Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-Dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Novel biocides, such as copper azole (CuAz) and ammoniacal copper quaternary (ACQ), are extensively used as substitutes for chromate copper arsenate (CCA) in wood preservation. However, the expense of these biocides has necessitated the development of cost-effective and environmentally friendly wood preservatives. This study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness against decaying fungi of the preservatives formulated with enzymatic-hydrolyzed okara (OK), which is an organic waste produced from the manufacture of tofu, CuCl{sub 2} (CC) and/or Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}.10H{sub 2}O (B). With the addition of NH{sub 4}OH as a dissociating agent, the addition of OK facilitated the target retention of most of the OK/CC and OK/CC/B preservative formulations in wood blocks. The OK-based wood preservatives (OK-WPs) were stable against hot-water leaching. When compared with control and CC-treated wood blocks, the leached wood blocks treated with OK/CC and OK/CC/B formulations showed excellent decay resistance against both Postia placenta and Gloeophyllum trabeum, especially when OK was hydrolyzed by Celluclast at a loading level of 0.1 ml/g. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM-energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) spectrometry analyses demonstrated that preservative complexes, such as OK-CC and OK-CC-B, existed in the wood blocks treated with OK/CC and OK/CC/B formulations. This study results support the potential application of OK-WPs as environmentally friendly wood preservatives capable of replacing CuAz and ACQ.

  20. Metal loss from treated wood products in contact with municipal solid waste landfill leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, Brajesh [Department of Environmental Health, PO Box 70682, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6450 (United States); Townsend, Timothy, E-mail: ttown@ufl.edu [Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6450 (United States); Solo-Gabriele, Helena [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124-0630 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    The research presented in this paper evaluates the potential impact of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill leachate quality on the loss of metals from discarded treated wood during disposal. The loss of arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), and boron (B) from several types of pressure-treated wood (CCA: chromated copper arsenate, ACQ: alkaline copper quaternary, CBA: copper boron azole, and DOT: disodium octaborate tetrahydrate) using leachate collected from 26 MSW landfills in Florida was examined. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), the synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), and California's waste extraction test (WET) were also performed. The results suggested that loss of preservative components was influenced by leachate chemistry. Copper loss from CCA-, ACQ- and CBA-treated wood was similar in magnitude when in contact with landfill leachates compared to synthetic TCLP and SPLP solutions. Ammonia was found as one of the major parameters influencing the leaching of Cu from treated wood when leached with MSW landfill leachates. The results suggest that disposal of ACQ- and CBA-treated wood in substantial quantity in MSW landfills may elevate the Cu concentration in the leachate; this could be of potential concern, especially for a bioreactor MSW landfill in which relatively higher ammonia concentrations in leachate have been reported in recent literature. For the As, Cr and B the concentrations observed with the landfill leachate as the leaching solutions were over a range from some sample showing the concentrations below and some showing above the observed value from corresponding SPLP and TCLP tests. In general the WET test showed the highest concentrations.

  1. Modelling inorganic biocide emission from treated wood in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiruta-Barna, Ligia, E-mail: Ligia.barna@insa-toulouse.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR792, Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Systemes Biologiques et des Procedes, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Schiopu, Nicoleta [Universite Paris-Est, CSTB- Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, ESE/Environment, 24, rue Joseph Fourier, 38400 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {center_dot} We developed a mechanistic model for biocide metals fixation/mobilisation in wood. {center_dot} This is the first chemical model explaining the biocide leaching from treated wood. {center_dot} The main fixation mechanism is the surface complexation with wood polymers. {center_dot} The biocide mobilization is due to metal-DOC complexation and pH effect. - Abstract: The objective of this work is to develop a chemical model for explaining the leaching behaviour of inorganic biocides from treated wood. The standard leaching test XP CEN/TS14429 was applied to a commercial construction material made of treated Pinus sylvestris (Copper Boron Azole preservative). The experimental results were used for developing a chemical model under PHREEQC (a geochemical software, with LLNL, MINTEQ data bases) by considering the released species detected in the eluates: main biocides Cu and B, other trace biocides (Cr and Zn), other elements like Ca, K, Cl, SO{sub 4}{sup -2}, dissolved organic matter (DOC). The model is based on chemical phenomena at liquid/solid interfaces (complexation, ion exchange and hydrolysis) and is satisfactory for the leaching behaviour representation. The simulation results confronted with the experiments confirmed the hypotheses of: (1) biocide fixation by surface complexation reactions with wood specific sites (carboxyl and phenol for Cu, Zn, Cr(III), aliphatic hydroxyl for B, ion exchange to a lesser extent) and (2) biocide mobilisation by extractives (DOC) coming from the wood. The maximum of Cu, Cr(III) and Zn fixation occurred at neutral pH (including the natural pH of wood), while B fixation was favoured at alkaline pH.

  2. Species distribution and antifungal susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates from a public tertiary teaching hospital in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnge, P; Okeleye, B I; Vasaikar, S D; Apalata, T

    2017-05-15

    Candida species are the leading cause of invasive fungal infections, and over the past decade there has been an increased isolation of drug resistant Candida species. This study aimed to identify the species distribution of Candida isolates and to determine their unique antifungal susceptibility and resistance patterns. During a cross-sectional study, 209 Candida isolates (recovered from 206 clinical samples) were collected and their species distribution was determined using ChromAgar Candida. The Vitek-2 system (Biomerieux, South Africa) was used to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to azoles (fluconazole, voriconazole), echinocandins (caspofungin, micafungin), polyenes (amphotericin B) and flucytosine. Four species of Candida were isolated, of which C. albicans was the most frequent, isolated in 45.4% (95/209) of the isolates, followed by C. glabrata: 31.1% (65/209). The MICs of the different antifungal drugs varied amongst the species of Candida. From the 130 isolates tested for MICs, 90.77% (112/130) were susceptible to all antifungal drugs and 6.9% (9/130) of the isolates were multi-drug resistant. C. dubliniensis (n=2) isolates were susceptible to all the above mentioned antifungal drugs. There was no significant difference in species distribution amongst clinical specimens and between patients' genders (P>0.05). An increase in MIC values for fluconazole and flucytosine towards the resistance range was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report on surveillance of Candida species distribution and antifungal susceptibility at a public tertiary teaching hospital in Eastern Cape, South Africa.

  3. Increasing incidence of mucormycosis in a large Spanish hospital from 2007 to 2015: Epidemiology and microbiological characterization of the isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Guinea

    Full Text Available We studied 19 cases of proven/probable mucormycosis diagnosed from 2007 to 2015 in our hospital and assessed the microbiological characteristics of the isolates. We recorded the incidence of mucormycosis and clinical and microbiological data of infected patients. Isolates were identified to molecular level and tested for their antifungal susceptibility to azoles, amphotericin B, and liposomal amphotericin B according to the CLSI M-38 A2 procedure. The incidence of mucormycosis in cases/100,000 hospital admissions during 2007-2015 increased significantly with respect to that reported in 1988-2006 (3.3 vs. 1.2; P<0.05. Patients mainly had hematological malignancies (52.6% and/or trauma/surgical wounds (52.6% and had received antifungal agents before the diagnosis of mucormycosis in 68% of cases. Diagnosis was by isolation (n = 17/19 and/or direct staining (n = 17/18 of Mucorales fungi in clinical samples. Identification was by panfungal PCR in patients with negative results in culture and in direct staining. The microorganisms identified were Lichtheimia spp. (42%, Rhizopus spp. (21%, Cunninghamella bertholletiae (16%, and others (21%. Liposomal amphotericin B was always more active than the other drugs against all the microorganisms except C. bertholletiae. All patients received antifungal treatment with 1 or more antifungal agents, mainly liposomal amphotericin B (17/19. Mortality was 47.4%, although this was significantly lower in the 11 patients in whom debridement was performed (18% vs. 87.5% (P = 0.015. The incidence of mucormycosis has risen in recent years. The proportion of cases with soft tissue involvement was high, and Lichtheimia was the most frequently involved species. The highest antifungal activity was observed with liposomal amphotericin B.

  4. Using RNA-seq to determine the transcriptional landscape and the hypoxic response of the pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guida, Alessandro

    2011-12-22

    Abstract Background Candida parapsilosis is one of the most common causes of Candida infection worldwide. However, the genome sequence annotation was made without experimental validation and little is known about the transcriptional landscape. The transcriptional response of C. parapsilosis to hypoxic (low oxygen) conditions, such as those encountered in the host, is also relatively unexplored. Results We used next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) to determine the transcriptional profile of C. parapsilosis growing in several conditions including different media, temperatures and oxygen concentrations. We identified 395 novel protein-coding sequences that had not previously been annotated. We removed > 300 unsupported gene models, and corrected approximately 900. We mapped the 5\\' and 3\\' UTR for thousands of genes. We also identified 422 introns, including two introns in the 3\\' UTR of one gene. This is the first report of 3\\' UTR introns in the Saccharomycotina. Comparing the introns in coding sequences with other species shows that small numbers have been gained and lost throughout evolution. Our analysis also identified a number of novel transcriptional active regions (nTARs). We used both RNA-seq and microarray analysis to determine the transcriptional profile of cells grown in normoxic and hypoxic conditions in rich media, and we showed that there was a high correlation between the approaches. We also generated a knockout of the UPC2 transcriptional regulator, and we found that similar to C. albicans, Upc2 is required for conferring resistance to azole drugs, and for regulation of expression of the ergosterol pathway in hypoxia. Conclusion We provide the first detailed annotation of the C. parapsilosis genome, based on gene predictions and transcriptional analysis. We identified a number of novel ORFs and other transcribed regions, and detected transcripts from approximately 90% of the annotated protein coding genes. We found that the transcription factor

  5. Age and gender affect the composition of fungal population of the human gastrointestinal tract

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    Francesco Strati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The fungal component of the human gut microbiota has been neglected for long time due to the low relative abundance of fungi with respect to bacteria, and only recently few reports have explored its composition and dynamics in health or disease. The application of metagenomics methods to the full understanding of fungal communities is currently limited by the under representation of fungal DNA with respect to the bacterial one, as well as by the limited ability to discriminate passengers from colonizers. Here we investigated the gut mycobiota of a cohort of healthy subjects in order to reduce the gap of knowledge concerning fungal intestinal communities in the healthy status further screening for phenotypical traits that could reflect fungi adaptation to the host. We studied the fecal fungal populations of 111 healthy subjects by means of cultivation on fungal selective media and by amplicon-based ITS1 metagenomics analysis on a subset of 57 individuals. We then characterized the isolated fungi for their tolerance to gastrointestinal tract-like challenges and their susceptibility to antifungals. A total of 34 different fungal species were isolated showing several phenotypic characteristics associated with intestinal environment such as tolerance to body temperature (37°C, to acidic and oxidative stress and to bile salts exposure. We found a high frequency of azoles resistance in fungal isolates, with potential and significant clinical impact. Analyses of fungal communities revealed that the human gut mycobiota differs in function of individuals’ life stage in a gender-related fashion. The combination of metagenomics and fungal cultivation allowed an in-depth understanding of the fungal intestinal community structure associated to the healthy status and the commensalism-related traits of isolated fungi. We further discussed comparatively the results of sequencing and cultivation to critically evaluate the application of metagenomics

  6. Importation, Mitigation, and Genomic Epidemiology of Candida auris at a Large Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesho, Emil P; Bronstein, Melissa Z; McGann, Patrick; Stam, Jason; Kwak, Yoon; Maybank, Rosslyn; McNamara, Jodi; Callahan, Megan; Campbell, Jean; Hinkle, Mary K; Walsh, Edward E

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Candida auris (CA) is an emerging multidrug-resistant pathogen associated with increased mortality. The environment may play a role, but transmission dynamics remain poorly understood. We sought to limit environmental and patient CA contamination following a sustained unsuspected exposure. DESIGN Quasi-experimental observation. SETTING A 528-bed teaching hospital. PATIENTS The index case patient and 17 collocated ward mates. INTERVENTION Immediately after confirmation of CA in the bloodstream and urine of a patient admitted 6 days previously, active surveillance, enhanced transmission-based precautions, environmental cleaning with peracetic acid-hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet light, and patient relocation were undertaken. Pre-existing agreements and foundational relationships among internal multidisciplinary teams and external partners were leveraged to bolster detection and mitigation efforts and to provide genomic epidemiology. RESULTS Candida auris was isolated from 3 of 132 surface samples on days 8, 9, and 15 of ward occupancy, and from no patient samples (0 of 48). Environmental and patient isolates were genetically identical (4-8 single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) and most closely related to the 2013 India CA-6684 strain (~200 SNPs), supporting the epidemiological hypothesis that the source of environmental contamination was the index case patient, who probably acquired the South Asian strain from another New York hospital. All isolates contained a mutation associated with azole resistance (K163R) found in the India 2105 VPCI strain but not in CA-6684. The index patient remained colonized until death. No surfaces were CA-positive 1 month later. CONCLUSION Compared to previous descriptions, CA dissemination was minimal. Immediate access to rapid CA diagnostics facilitates early containment strategies and outbreak investigations. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:53-57.

  7. Biocide leaching from CBA treated wood — A mechanistic interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupsea, Maria; Mathies, Helena; Schoknecht, Ute; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta

    2013-01-01

    Treated wood is frequently used for construction. However, there is a need to ensure that biocides used for the treatment are not a threat for people or environment. The paper focused on Pinus sylvestris treated with copper–boron–azole (CBA), containing tebuconazole as organic biocide and monoethanolamine (Mea). This study investigates chemical mechanisms of fixation and mobilisation involved in the leaching process of the used inorganic and organic biocides in CBA. A pH dependent leaching test was performed, followed by a set of complementary analysis methods in order to identify and quantify the species released from wood. The main findings of this study are: -Organic compounds are released from untreated and treated wood; the quantity of released total organic carbon, carboxylic and phenolic functions increasing with the pH. -Nitrogen containing compounds, i.e. mainly Mea and its reaction products with extractives, are released in important quantities from CBA treated wood, especially at low pH. -The release of copper is the result of competitive reactions: fixation via complexation reactions and complexation with extractives in the liquid phase. The specific pH dependency of Cu leaching is explained by the competition of ligands for protonation and complexation. -Tebuconazole is released to a lesser extent relative to its initial content. Its fixation on solid wood structure seems to be influenced by pH, suggesting interactions with -OH groups on wood. Boron release appears to be pH independent and very high. This confirms its weak fixation on wood and also no or weak interaction with the extractives. - Highlights: ► A pH dependent leaching mechanism for CBA treated wood is described. ► The fixation and mobilisation of inorganic and organic biocides was investigated. ► Extractives' quantity and nature depend on pH. ► Competition of ligands for protonation and complexation explains Cu behaviour. ► Tebuconazole seems to interact with -OH groups on

  8. Resistance to antibiotics in Lacid acid bacteria - strain Lactococcus

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    Filipić Brankica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are widely used in the food industry, especially in the production of fermented dairy products and meat. The most studied species among Lis Lactococcus lactis. L. lactis strains are of great importance in the production of fermented dairy products such as yogurt, butter, fresh cheese and some kind of semi-hard cheese. Although L. lactis acquired the „Generally Regarded As Safe“ (GRAS status, many investigations indicated that lactococci may act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which could be transferred to other bacterial species in human gastrointestinal tract includ­ing pathogens. The genome analysis of L. lactis indicated the presence of at least 40 putative drug transporter genes, and only four multidrug resistance (MDR transporters are functionally characterized: LmrA, LmrP, LmrCD i CmbT. LmrA is the first described MDR transporter in prokaryotes. LmrCD is responsible for resistance to cholate, which is an integral part of human bile and LmrCD is important for intestinal survival of lactococci that are used as probiotics. Secondary multidrug transporter LmrP confers resistance to lincosamides, macrolides, streptogramins and tetracyclines. CmbT protein has an effect on the host cell resistance to lincomycin, sulfadiazine, streptomycin, rifampicin, puromycin and sulfametox­azole. Since the food chain is an important way of transmitting resistance genes in human and animal population, it is of great importance to study the mechanisms of resistance in lactococci and other LAB, intended for the food industry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173019: Izučavanje gena i molekularnih mehanizama u osnovi probiotičke aktivnosti bakterija mlečne kiseline izolovanih sa područja Zapadnog Balkana

  9. Probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii (nom. nud.) modulates adhesive properties of Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomičić, Zorica; Zupan, Jure; Matos, Tadeja; Raspor, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Following the widespread use of immunosuppressive therapy together with broad-spectrum antimycotic therapy, the frequency of mucosal and systemic infections caused by the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata has increased in the past decades. Due to the resistance of C. glabrata to existing azole drugs, it is very important to look for new strategies helping the treatment of such fungal diseases. In this study, we investigated the effect of the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii (nom. nud.) on C. glabrata adhesion at different temperatures, pH values, and in the presence of fluconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B. We also studied the adhesion of C. glabrata co-culture with Candida krusei, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two bacterial probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei The method used to assess adhesion was crystal violet staining. Our results showed that despite the nonadhesiveness of S. boulardii cells, this probiotic significantly affected the adherence ability of C. glabrata This effect was highly dependent on C. glabrata strain and was either antagonistic or synergistic. Regarding the extrinsic factors, temperature did not indicate any significant influence on this S. boulardii modulatory effect, while at high pH and at increased concentrations of antimycotics, S. boulardii did not manage to repress the adhesion of C. glabrata strains. The experiments of C. glabrata co-cultures with other species showed that the adhesiveness of two separate cultures could not be used to predict the adhesiveness of their co-culture. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Enantiospecific effects of ketoconazole on aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

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    Aneta Novotna

    Full Text Available Azole antifungal ketoconazole (KET was demonstrated to activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. Since clinically used KET is a racemic mixture of two cis-enantiomers (2R,4S-(+-KET and (2S,4R-(--KET, we examined the effects of KET enantiomers on AhR signaling pathway. (+-KET dose-dependently activated AhR in human gene reporter cell line AZ-AHR, and displayed 5-20× higher agonist activity (efficacy, as compared to (--KET; both enantiomers were AhR antagonists with equal potency (IC50. Consistently, (+-KET strongly induced CYP1A1 mRNA and protein in human HepG2 cells, while (--KET exerted less than 10% of (+-KET activity. In primary human hepatocytes, both enantiomers preferentially induced CYP1A2 over CYP1A1 mRNA and protein, and the potency of (+-KET was slightly higher as compared to (--KET. Ligand binding assay with guinea pig liver cytosols revealed that both (+-KET and (--KET are weak ligands of AhR that displaced [3H]-TCDD with comparable potency. Similarly, both enantiomers weakly transformed AhR to DNA-binding form with similar potency, as showed by EMSA, in guinea pig liver cytosolic extracts and nuclear extracts from mouse Hepa-1 cells. We also examined effects of KET on glucocorticoid receptor (GR, a regulator of AhR activity. Both KET enantiomers antagonized GR with similar potency, as revealed by gene reporter assay in AZ-GR cell line and down-regulation of tyrosine aminotransferase mRNA in human hepatocytes. Finally, we demonstrate enantiospecific antifungal activities of KET enantiomers in six Candida spp. strains. In conclusion, the significance of current study is providing the first evidence of enatiospecific effects of cis-enantiomers of ketoconazole on AhR-CYP1A pathway.

  11. Ketoconazole modulates the infectivity of Ichthyophonus sp. (Mesomycetozoa) in vivo in experimentally injected European sea bass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontoria, Francisco; González, Ma Angeles; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Palenzuela, Oswaldo; Alvarez-Pellitero, Pilar

    2013-09-03

    In vitro studies have confirmed the inhibitory effect of the azol-derivative ketoconazole (KZ) on the growth of Ichthyophonus, an important pathogen causing epizootics in wild and cultured fish. We evaluated the effect of KZ in vivo in European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax experimentally infected with the same Ichthyophonus isolate. Liposomes were used to vehiculate different doses of KZ to increase the effect on Ichthyophonus and lower the toxicity of the drug, and KZ toxicity was assessed in cultured sea bass juveniles. We also studied the effect of liposome-vehiculated KZ included in medicated food on ichthyophoniasis. KZ causes clear toxic effects in D. labrax juveniles at doses >80 mg kg-1, apparent in the reduced survival of fish and histological alterations to livers, kidneys and spleens. Fish injected with Ichthyophonus and treated with KZ dosages of ≤80 mg kg-1 d-1 presented lower ichthyophoniasis prevalence, fewer organs infected per fish, and fewer spores in the affected organs than the untreated fish. KZ seems to delay the onset of infection, but cannot stop further progression once established. However, this behaviour is not clearly reflected in the biometric and haematological data collected from these fish. We hypothesise that KZ's delaying effect would increase, if lower infective doses (more similar to natural situations) were used. The drug administration vehicle (liposomes vs. emulsions) did not affect the results. Our data confirm the potential utility of KZ in treating ichthyophoniasis and reveal its low toxicity for sea bass. Nevertheless, the optimal dose and appropriate application protocol remain to be determined.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole or itraconazole in the prevention of invasive fungal infections among high-risk neutropenic patients in Spain

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    Grau Santiago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of posaconazole compared with standard azole therapy (SAT; fluconazole or itraconazole for the prevention of invasive fungal infections (IFI and the reduction of overall mortality in high-risk neutropenic patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. The perspective was that of the Spanish National Health Service (NHS. Methods A decision-analytic model, based on a randomised phase III trial, was used to predict IFI avoided, life-years saved (LYS, total costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER; incremental cost per LYS over patients' lifetime horizon. Data for the analyses included life expectancy, procedures, and costs associated with IFI and the drugs (in euros at November 2009 values which were obtained from the published literature and opinions of an expert committee. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PAS was performed. Results Posaconazole was associated with fewer IFI (0.05 versus 0.11, increased LYS (2.52 versus 2.43, and significantly lower costs excluding costs of the underlying condition (€6,121 versus €7,928 per patient relative to SAT. There is an 85% probability that posaconazole is a cost-saving strategy compared to SAT and a 97% probability that the ICER for posaconazole relative to SAT is below the cost per LYS threshold of €30,000 currently accepted in Spain. Conclusions Posaconazole is a cost-saving prophylactic strategy (lower costs and greater efficacy compared with fluconazole or itraconazole in high-risk neutropenic patients.

  13. Rapid identification and susceptibility testing of Candida spp. from positive blood cultures by combination of direct MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and direct inoculation of Vitek 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelevich, Evgeny A; Grunewald, Camilla M; Wüllenweber, Jörg; Becker, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Fungaemia is associated with high mortality rates and early appropriate antifungal therapy is essential for patient management. However, classical diagnostic workflow takes up to several days due to the slow growth of yeasts. Therefore, an approach for direct species identification and direct antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST) without prior time-consuming sub-culturing of yeasts from positive blood cultures (BCs) is urgently needed. Yeast cell pellets prepared using Sepsityper kit were used for direct identification by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) and for direct inoculation of Vitek 2 AST-YS07 card for AFST. For comparison, MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek 2 testing were performed from yeast subculture. A total of twenty four positive BCs including twelve C. glabrata, nine C. albicans, two C. dubliniensis and one C. krusei isolate were processed. Applying modified thresholds for species identification (score ≥ 1.5 with two identical consecutive propositions), 62.5% of BCs were identified by direct MALDI-TOF MS. AFST results were generated for 72.7% of BCs directly tested by Vitek 2 and for 100% of standardized suspensions from 24 h cultures. Thus, AFST comparison was possible for 70 isolate-antifungal combinations. Essential agreement (minimum inhibitory concentration difference ≤ 1 double dilution step) was 88.6%. Very major errors (VMEs) (false-susceptibility), major errors (false-resistance) and minor errors (false categorization involving intermediate result) amounted to 33.3% (of resistant isolates), 1.9% (of susceptible isolates) and 1.4% providing 90.0% categorical agreement. All VMEs were due to fluconazole or voriconazole. This direct method saved on average 23.5 h for identification and 15.1 h for AFST, compared to routine procedures. However, performance for azole susceptibility testing was suboptimal and testing from subculture remains indispensable to validate the direct finding.

  14. Rapid identification and susceptibility testing of Candida spp. from positive blood cultures by combination of direct MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and direct inoculation of Vitek 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A Idelevich

    Full Text Available Fungaemia is associated with high mortality rates and early appropriate antifungal therapy is essential for patient management. However, classical diagnostic workflow takes up to several days due to the slow growth of yeasts. Therefore, an approach for direct species identification and direct antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST without prior time-consuming sub-culturing of yeasts from positive blood cultures (BCs is urgently needed. Yeast cell pellets prepared using Sepsityper kit were used for direct identification by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS and for direct inoculation of Vitek 2 AST-YS07 card for AFST. For comparison, MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek 2 testing were performed from yeast subculture. A total of twenty four positive BCs including twelve C. glabrata, nine C. albicans, two C. dubliniensis and one C. krusei isolate were processed. Applying modified thresholds for species identification (score ≥ 1.5 with two identical consecutive propositions, 62.5% of BCs were identified by direct MALDI-TOF MS. AFST results were generated for 72.7% of BCs directly tested by Vitek 2 and for 100% of standardized suspensions from 24 h cultures. Thus, AFST comparison was possible for 70 isolate-antifungal combinations. Essential agreement (minimum inhibitory concentration difference ≤ 1 double dilution step was 88.6%. Very major errors (VMEs (false-susceptibility, major errors (false-resistance and minor errors (false categorization involving intermediate result amounted to 33.3% (of resistant isolates, 1.9% (of susceptible isolates and 1.4% providing 90.0% categorical agreement. All VMEs were due to fluconazole or voriconazole. This direct method saved on average 23.5 h for identification and 15.1 h for AFST, compared to routine procedures. However, performance for azole susceptibility testing was suboptimal and testing from subculture remains indispensable to validate the direct finding.

  15. Photodynamic Inactivation of Candida albicans with Imidazoacridinones: Influence of Irradiance, Photosensitizer Uptake and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation.

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    Aleksandra Taraszkiewicz

    Full Text Available The increasing applicability of antifungal treatments, the limited range of available drug classes and the emergence of drug resistance in Candida spp. suggest the need for new treatment options. To explore the applicability of C. albicans photoinactivation, we examined nine structurally different imidazoacridinone derivatives as photosensitizing agents. The most effective derivatives showed a >10(4-fold reduction of viable cell numbers. The fungicidal action of the three most active compounds was compared at different radiant powers (3.5 to 63 mW/cm2, and this analysis indicated that 7 mW/cm2 was the most efficient. The intracellular accumulation of these compounds in fungal cells correlated with the fungicidal activity of all 9 derivatives. The lack of effect of verapamil, an inhibitor targeting Candida ABC efflux pumps, suggests that these imidazoacridinones are not substrates for ABC transporters. Thus, unlike azoles, a major class of antifungals used against Candida, ABC transporter-mediated resistance is unlikely. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR-spin trapping data suggested that the fungicidal light-induced action of these derivatives might depend on the production of superoxide anion. The highest generation rate of superoxide anion was observed for 1330H, 1610H, and 1611. Singlet oxygen production was also detected upon the irradiation of imidazoacridinone derivatives with UV laser light, with a low to moderate yield, depending on the type of compound. Thus, imidazoacridinone derivatives examined in the present study might act via mixed type I/type II photodynamic mechanism. The presented data indicate lack of direct correlation between the structures of studied imidazoacridinones, cell killing ability, and ROS production. However, we showed for the first time that for imidazoacridinones not only intracellular accumulation is necessary prerequisite of lethal photosensitization of C. albicans, but also localization within particular

  16. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesan SK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suganthini Krishnan Natesan,1,2 Pranatharthi H Chandrasekar1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Keywords: isavuconazole, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, efficacy, antifungal therapy, novel azole, tolerability, drug interactions

  17. Biological characterization of fenpicoxamid, a new fungicide with utility in cereals and other crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, W John; Yao, Chenglin; Myung, Kyung; Kemmitt, Greg; Leader, Andrew; Meyer, Kevin G; Bowling, Andrew J; Slanec, Thomas; Kramer, Vincent J

    2017-10-01

    The development of novel highly efficacious fungicides that lack cross-resistance is extremely desirable. Fenpicoxamid (Inatreq™ active) possesses these characteristics and is a member of a novel picolinamide class of fungicides derived from the antifungal natural product UK-2A. Fenpicoxamid strongly inhibited in vitro growth of several ascomycete fungi, including Zymoseptoria tritici (EC 50 , 0.051 mg L -1 ). Fenpicoxamid is converted by Z. tritici to UK-2A, a 15-fold stronger inhibitor of Z. tritici growth (EC 50 , 0.0033 mg L -1 ). Strong fungicidal activity of fenpicoxamid against driver cereal diseases was confirmed in greenhouse tests, where activity on Z. tritici and Puccinia triticina matched that of fluxapyroxad. Due to its novel target site (Q i site of the respiratory cyt bc1 complex) for the cereals market, fenpicoxamid is not cross-resistant to Z. tritici isolates resistant to strobilurin and/or azole fungicides. Across multiple European field trials Z. tritici was strongly controlled (mean, 82%) by 100 g as ha -1 applications of fenpicoxamid, which demonstrated excellent residual activity. The novel chemistry and biochemical target site of fenpicoxamid as well as its lack of cross-resistance and strong efficacy against Z. tritici and other pathogens highlight the importance of fenpicoxamid as a new tool for controlling plant pathogenic fungi. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Growth inhibitory action of ebselen on fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans: role of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billack, Blase; Santoro, Michelle; Lau-Cam, Cesar

    2009-06-01

    PMA1 is a yeast gene that codes for the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, a protein commonly referred to as Pma1p. Ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one) is a synthetic selenium-containing compound that has recently been shown to display antimicrobial activity owing to its ability to inhibit Pma1p. Ebselen is able to block the activity of Pma1p not only in opportunistic pathogens such as Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans but also in nonpathogenic yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A series of in vitro studies aimed at evaluating the antifungal activity of ebselen were performed. At low concentrations (ebselen was fungistatic against three strains of S. cerevisiae (IC(50) approximately 3 microM) and one fluconazole-resistant strain of C. albicans (IC(50) approximately 6 microM), and at a high concentration (30 microM) it was fungicidal against C. albicans. Moreover, ebselen was found to inhibit medium acidification by the fluconazole-resistant strain of C. albicans in a concentration-dependent manner. In comparison to currently used antifungal agents represented by azole (itraconazole, ketoconazole, fluconazole) and polyene (amphotericin B) compounds, ebselen was at least 10-fold more potent than fluconazole but less active than the other compounds tested. The present results suggest that the growth inhibitory activity of ebselen toward fluconazole-resistant yeast cells is due, at least in part, to inhibition of Pma1p. Ebselen may also serve as a useful agent in the treatment of infections caused by fluconazole-resistant fungi.

  19. The effect of fenbuconazole on cell proliferation and enzyme induction in the liver of female CD1 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juberg, Daland R.; Mudra, Daniel R.; Hazelton, George A.; Parkinson, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Fenbuconazole, a triazole fungicide, has been associated with an increase in the incidence of liver adenomas in female mice following long-term dietary exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the mode of action for liver tumor formation by fenbuconazole is similar to that of phenobarbital. Treatment of CD1 mice with 0, 20, 60, 180 or 1300 ppm fenbuconazole for up to 4 weeks caused a dose-dependent increase in liver weight that was associated with centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy, cytoplasmic eosinophilia and panlobular hepatocellular vacuolation, as well as an initial increase in the cell proliferation labeling index. Fenbuconazole also caused a dose-dependent increase in liver microsomal cytochromes b 5 and P450 and the levels of immunoreactive CYP2B10 and its associated activity 7-pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (PROD). Treatment of mice with 1000 ppm phenobarbital elicited the same effects as treatment of mice with 1300 ppm fenbuconazole, except that phenobarbital was more effective than fenbuconazole at inducing PROD activity, even though fenbuconazole induced CYP2B10 to the same extent as did phenobarbital. This difference was attributed to the ability of fenbuconazole to bind tightly to CYP2B10 and partially mask its catalytic activity in liver microsomes, which is characteristic of several azole-containing drugs. All hepatocellular changes and induced enzyme activity returned to control levels within 4 weeks of discontinuing treatment with fenbuconazole or phenobarbital, indicating that the observed changes were fully reversible. We conclude that fenbuconazole is a phenobarbital-type inducer of mouse liver cytochrome P450, and the mode of action by which fenbuconazole induces liver adenomas in mice is similar to that of phenobarbital

  20. [Infections of the oral mucosa II. Bacterial, mycotic and viral infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichart, P A

    1999-11-01

    Non-specific infections of the oral mucosa are rare; however, they may present during HIV infection in the form of gingivo-periodontal lesions. In some of these Candida albicans may play a role in the pathogenesis. Sexually transmitted bacterial infections such as gonorrhoea and syphilis are frequently associated with HIV infection. Since penicillin resistance is frequent in gonorrhoea, the cephalosporines are mainly used for treatment. Syphilis increases the risk for transmission of HIV. Lues maligna with oral manifestations has been described. For this, penicillin G is the therapy of choice. Tuberculosis, characterized by multitherapy resistance, is associated with HIV infections world-wide; oral manifestations are rare. Oral candidiasis during HIV infection is often characterized by therapy resistance against fluconazole and a shift in species, with Candida glabrata and Candida krusei as the emerging species. The azoles are still the mainstay of therapy, particularly fluconazole. Herpes simplex (HSV) infections run an atypical course during HIV disease; resistance against acyclovir is a clinical problem. The association of HSV infection with erythema exudativum multiforme has been clearly shown. Oral hairy leukoplakia caused by Epstein Barr virus is a characteristic infection during immunosuppression. Cytomegalovirus infection is also observed in immunodeficient patients. Cases of ganciclovir resistance have been described. Human herpes virus 8 (HHV 8) is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. Therapeutic trials have focussed on the inhibition of HHV 8 replication. Over 100 different genotypes of human papillomaviruses are known; some can cause infections of the oral mucosa. Characteristic lesions caused by different HPV genotypes are verruca vulgaris, condyloma acuminatum and focal epithelial hyperplasia.

  1. Determination of fluconazole in serum and amniotic fluid of rats by gas-chromatography/mass spectometry (GC/MS Determinação de fluconazol em soro e líquido amniótico de ratas por cromatografia a gas/espectrometria de massas (CG/EM

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    Dione Marçal Lima

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Rats treated with oral dose of 100 mg/kg of fluconazole during pregnancy had their serum and amniotic fluid quantified for this drug using a GC/MS method. Fluconazole was extracted with ethyl acetate from samples and analysed by a GC-MS Shimadzu QP5050A system using a CBP-5 fused silica capillary column. Tioconazole was used as internal standard. Calibration curve was linear within the range 10.0 - 300.0 µg/mL. The limit of quantification was 0.1 µg/mL and no interference was observed in the blank serum and amniotic liquid. The mean concentrations of the drug in the serum and amniotic fluid were 206.01 ± 105.25 µg/mL and 125.34 ± 65.24 mug/mL, respectively. This procedure showed to be sensitive and efficient enough for the use in teratogenic studies of fluconazole and other azole drugs.Soro e líquido amniótico de ratas tratadas com fluconazol (dose oral de 100 mg/kg durante a prenhez foram quantificados para este fármaco usando cromatografia gasosa acoplada à espectroscopia de massas (CG/EM. O fluconazol foi extraído das amostras com acetato de etila e analisado empregando-se um cromatógrafo CG/EM Shimadzu QP5050A com coluna capilar de sílica fundida CBP-5. O tioconazol foi utilizado como padrão interno. A curva padrão foi linear no intervalo das concentrações de 10,0 a 300,0 µg/mL. O limite de quantificação foi de 0,1 µg/mL e não foi observada interferência no branco de soro e líquido amniótico. As concentrações médias do fármaco no soro e líquido amniótico foram 206,01 ± 105,25 µg/mL e 125,34 ± 65,24 µg/mL, respectivamente. Este procedimento mostrou-se sensível e eficiente para ser usado em estudos de teratogenicidade do fluconazol e outros azóis.

  2. Clinically important drug interactions with zopiclone, zolpidem and zaleplon.

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    Hesse, Leah M; von Moltke, Lisa L; Greenblatt, David J

    2003-01-01

    Insomnia, an inability to initiate or maintain sleep, affects approximately one-third of the American population. Conventional benzodiazepines, such as triazolam and midazolam, were the treatment of choice for short-term insomnia for many years but are associated with adverse effects such as rebound insomnia, withdrawal and dependency. The newer hypnosedatives include zolpidem, zaleplon and zopiclone. These agents may be preferred over conventional benzodiazepines to treat short-term insomnia because they may be less likely to cause significant rebound insomnia or tolerance and are as efficacious as the conventional benzodiazepines. This review aims to summarise the published clinical drug interaction studies involving zolpidem, zaleplon and zopiclone. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that may be clinically important are highlighted. Clinical trials have studied potential interactions of zaleplon, zolpidem and zopiclone with the following types of drugs: cytochrome P450 (CYP) inducers (rifampicin), CYP inhibitors (azoles, ritonavir and erythromycin), histamine H(2) receptor antagonists (cimetidine and ranitidine), antidepressants, antipsychotics, antagonists of benzodiazepines and drugs causing sedation. Rifampicin significantly induced the metabolism of the newer hypnosedatives and decreased their sedative effects, indicating that a dose increase of these agents may be necessary when they are administered with rifampicin. Ketoconazole, erythromycin and cimetidine inhibited the metabolism of the newer hypnosedatives and enhanced their sedative effects, suggesting that a dose reduction may be required. Addition of ethanol to treatment with the newer hypnosedatives resulted in additive sedative effects without altering the pharmacokinetic parameters of the drugs. Compared with some of the conventional benzodiazepines, fewer clinically important interactions appear to have been reported in the literature with zaleplon, zolpidem and zopiclone. The

  3. Candidemia in a major regional tertiary referral hospital – epidemiology, practice patterns and outcomes

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    Jocelyn Qi-Min Teo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candidemia is a common cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. This study was conducted to describe the epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility patterns and outcomes of candidemia in a large regional tertiary referral hospital. Methods A retrospective surveillance study of patients with candidemia was conducted at Singapore General Hospital between July 2012 and December 2015. In addition, incidence densities and species distribution of candidemia episodes were analysed from 2008 to 2015. Results In the period of 2012 to 2015, 261 candidemia episodes were identified. The overall incidence was 0.14/1000 inpatient-days. C. glabrata (31.4%, C. tropicalis (29.9%, and C. albicans (23.8% were most commonly isolated. The incidence of C. glabrata significantly increased from 2008 to 2015 (Coefficient 0.004, confidence interval 0–0.007, p = 0.04. Fluconazole resistance was detected primarily in C. tropicalis (16.7% and C. glabrata (7.2%. fks mutations were identified in one C. albicans and one C. tropicalis. Candidemia episodes caused by C. tropicalis were more commonly encountered in patients with haematological malignancies (p = 0.01, neutropenia (p < 0.001 and higher SAPS II scores (p = 0.02, while prior exposure to echinocandins was associated with isolation of C. parapsilosis (p = 0.001. Echinocandins (73.3% were most commonly prescribed as initial treatment. The median (range time to initial treatment was 1 (0–9 days. The 30-day in-hospital mortality rate was 49.8%. High SAPS II score (Odds ratio, OR 1.08; 95% confidence interval, CI 1.05–1.11 and renal replacement therapy (OR 5.54; CI 2.80–10.97 were independent predictors of mortality, while drain placement (OR 0.44; CI 0.19–0.99 was protective. Conclusions Decreasing azole susceptibilities to C. tropicalis and the emergence of echinocandin resistance suggest that susceptibility

  4. Alterations in growth and branching of Neurospora crassa caused by sub-inhibitory concentrations of antifungal agents Alteraciones de crecimiento y ramificación en Neurospora crassa provocadas por concentraciones subinhibitorias de agentes antimicóticos

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    R. C. Pereira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Six antifungal agents at subinhibitory concentrations were used for investigating their ability to affect the growth and branching in Neurospora crassa. Among the antifungals herein used, the azole agent ketoconazole at 0.5 μg/ml inhibited radial growth more than fluconazole at 5.0 μg/ml while amphotericin B at 0.05 μg/ml was more effective than nystatin at 0.05 μg/ml. Morphological alterations in hyphae were observed in the presence of griseofulvin, ketoconazole and terbinafine at the established concentrations. The antifungal agents were more effective on vegetative growth than on conidial germination. Terbinafine markedly reduced growth unit length (GU by 54.89%, and caused mycelia to become hyperbranched. In all cases, there was a high correlation between hyphal length and number of tips (r > 0.9. All our results showed highly significant differences by ANOVA, (p Se investigó el efecto de seis agentes antimicóticos en concentraciones subinhibitorias sobre el crecimiento y la ramificación en Neurospora crassa. El agente azólico ketoconazol a la concentración de 0,5 μg/ml inhibió el crecimiento radial más que el fluconazol a 5,0 μg/ml, y la anfotericina B a 0,05 μg/ ml fue más eficiente que 0,05 μg/ml de nistatina, entre los agentes poliénicos usados. En presencia de griseofulvina, ketoconazol y terbinafina a las concentraciones establecidas se observaron alteraciones morfológicas en las hifas. Los agentes antimicóticos fueron más eficientes sobre el crecimiento vegetativo que sobre la germinación conidial. La terbinafina redujo marcadamente (54,89% la longitud de la unidad de crecimiento y provocó la hiperramificación del micelio. En todos los casos, existió gran correlación entre la longitud y el número de ápices de las hifa