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Sample records for azoles

  1. Azole-Resistant Invasive Aspergillosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensvold, Christen Rune; Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2012-01-01

    and classes available is impressive compared to the armamentarium in human medicine, azoles will remain the most important group in agriculture due to superior field performance and significant resistance in fungal pathogens to other compounds. Hence, further spread of environmental resistant Aspergillus...... to the considerable use of azole fungicides in agriculture and for material preservation. Three specific resistance genotypes have been found in azole naïve patients. Two of these have also been found in the environment and are characterized by a tandem repeat in the promoter region of the target gene coupled...

  2. Direct, Regioselective N-Alkylation of 1,3-Azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Graceffa, Russell F; Boezio, Alessandro A

    2016-01-04

    Regioselective N-alkylation of 1,3-azoles is a valuable transformation. Organomagnesium reagents were discovered to be competent bases to affect regioselective alkylation of various 1,3-azoles. Counterintuitively, substitution selectively occurred at the more sterically hindered nitrogen atom. Numerous examples are provided, on varying 1,3-azole scaffolds, with yields ranging from 25 to 95%.

  3. Azole-Resistant Central Nervous System Aspergillosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Jan W. M.; Jansen, Rogier R.; Bresters, Dorine; Visser, Caroline E.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Three patients with central nervous system aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus (associated with a leucine substitution for histidine at codon 98 [L98H] and a 34-base pair repeat in tandem in the promoter region) are described. The patients were treated with combination therapy

  4. Azole-resistant central nervous system aspergillosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, J.W.M. van der; Jansen, R.R.; Bresters, D.; Visser, C.E.; Geerlings, S.E.; Kuijper, E.J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    Three patients with central nervous system aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus (associated with a leucine substitution for histidine at codon 98 [L98H] and a 34-base pair repeat in tandem in the promoter region) are described. The patients were treated with combination therapy

  5. Development of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus during azole therapy associated with change in virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiken Cavling Arendrup

    Full Text Available Four sequential Aspergillus fumigatus isolates from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD eventually failing azole-echinocandin combination therapy were investigated. The first two isolates (1 and 2 were susceptible to antifungal azoles, but increased itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole MICs were found for the last two isolates (3 and 4. Microsatellite typing showed that the 4 isolates were isogenic, suggesting that resistance had been acquired during azole treatment of the patient. An immunocompromised mouse model confirmed that the in vitro resistance corresponded with treatment failure. Mice challenged with the resistant isolate 4 failed to respond to posaconazole therapy, while those infected by susceptible isolate 2 responded. Posaconazole-anidulafungin combination therapy was effective in mice challenged with isolate 4. No mutations were found in the Cyp51A gene of the four isolates. However, expression experiments of the Cyp51A showed that the expression was increased in the resistant isolates, compared to the azole-susceptible isolates. The microscopic morphology of the four isolates was similar, but a clear alteration in radial growth and a significantly reduced growth rate of the resistant isolates on solid and in broth medium was observed compared to isolates 1 and 2 and to unrelated wild-type controls. In the mouse model the virulence of isolates 3 and 4 was reduced compared to the susceptible ones and to wild-type controls. For the first time, the acquisition of azole resistance despite azole-echinocandin combination therapy is described in a CGD patient and the resistance demonstrated to be directly associated with significant change of virulence.

  6. Clinical implications of globally emerging azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Rhodes, Johanna L; Fisher, Matthew C; Verweij, Paul E

    2016-12-05

    Aspergillus fungi are the cause of an array of diseases affecting humans, animals and plants. The triazole antifungal agents itraconazole, voriconazole, isavuconazole and posaconazole are treatment options against diseases caused by Aspergillus However, resistance to azoles has recently emerged as a new therapeutic challenge in six continents. Although de novo azole resistance occurs occasionally in patients during azole therapy, the main burden is the aquisition of resistance through the environment. In this setting, the evolution of resistance is attributed to the widespread use of azole-based fungicides. Although ubiquitously distributed, A. fumigatus is not a phytopathogen. However, agricultural fungicides deployed against plant pathogenic moulds such as Fusarium, Mycospaerella and A. flavus also show activity against A. fumigatus in the environment and exposure of non-target fungi is inevitable. Further, similarity in molecule structure between azole fungicides and antifungal drugs results in cross-resistance of A. fumigatus to medical azoles. Clinical studies have shown that two-thirds of patients with azole-resistant infections had no previous history of azole therapy and high mortality rates between 50% and 100% are reported in azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis. The resistance phenotype is associated with key mutations in the cyp51A gene, including TR 34 /L98H, TR 53 and TR 46 /Y121F/T289A resistance mechanisms. Early detection of resistance is of paramount importance and if demonstrated, either with susceptibility testing or through molecular analysis, azole monotherapy should be avoided. Liposomal amphotericin B or a combination of voriconazole and an echinocandin are recomended for azole-resistant aspergillosis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Emergence of Aspergillus fumigatus azole-resistance in azole-naïve COPD patients and their homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dauchy, Camille; Bautin, Nathalie; Nseir, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus (ARAF) has been reported in COPD patients, but has not been specifically assessed so far. Here, we evaluated ARAF prevalence in azole-naïve COPD patients and their homes, and assessed whether CYP51A mutations were similar in clinical and environmental reservo...

  8. A Novel Environmental Azole Resistance Mutation in Aspergillus fumigatus and a Possible Role of Sexual Reproduction in Its Emergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.; Snelders, E.; Zwaan, B.J.; Schoustra, S.E.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Dijk, K van; Hagen, F.; Beek, M.T. van der; Kampinga, G.A.; Zoll, J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Debets, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of Aspergillus fumigatus azole-resistant phenotypes in two compost heaps with contrasting azole exposures: azole free and azole exposed. After heat shock, to which sexual but not asexual spores are highly resistant, the azole-free compost yielded 98% (49/50)

  9. Acquired multi-azole resistance in Candida tropicalis during persistent urinary tract infection in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Álvarez-Pérez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-azole resistance acquisition by Candida tropicalis after prolonged antifungal therapy in a dog with urinary candidiasis is reported. Pre- and post-azole treatment isolates were clonally related and had identical silent mutations in the ERG11 gene, but the latter displayed increased azole minimum inhibitory concentrations. A novel frameshift mutation in ERG3 was found in some isolates recovered after resistance development, so it appears unlikely that this mutation is responsible for multi-azole resistance.

  10. A novel environmental azole resistance mutation in Aspergillus fumigatus and a possible role of sexual reproduction in its emergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Snelders, Eveline; Zwaan, Bas J.; Schoustra, Sijmen E.; Meis, Jacques F.; Dijk, van Karin; Hagen, Ferry; Beek, van der Martha T.; Kampinga, Greetje A.; Zoll, Jan; Melchers, Willem J.G.; Verweij, Paul E.; Debets, Fons

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of Aspergillus fumigatus azoleresistant phenotypes in two compost heaps with contrasting azole exposures: azole free and azole exposed. After heat shock, to which sexual but not asexual spores are highly resistant, the azole-free compost yielded 98% (49/50)

  11. Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida albicans and Emerging Non-albicans Candida Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Sarah G.; Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Rybak, Jeffrey M.; Nishimoto, Andrew T.; Barker, Katherine S.; Rogers, P. David

    2017-01-01

    Within the limited antifungal armamentarium, the azole antifungals are the most frequent class used to treat Candida infections. Azole antifungals such as fluconazole are often preferred treatment for many Candida infections as they are inexpensive, exhibit limited toxicity, and are available for oral administration. There is, however, extensive documentation of intrinsic and developed resistance to azole antifungals among several Candida species. As the frequency of azole resistant Candida isolates in the clinical setting increases, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms of such resistance in order to both preserve and improve upon the azole class of antifungals for the treatment of Candida infections. This review examines azole resistance in infections caused by C. albicans as well as the emerging non-albicans Candida species C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, and C. glabrata and in particular, describes the current understanding of molecular basis of azole resistance in these fungal species. PMID:28127295

  12. Multicentre validation of 4-well azole agar plates as a screening method for detection of clinically relevant azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Verweij, Paul E; Mouton, Johan W

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is emerging worldwide. Reference susceptibility testing methods are technically demanding and no validated commercial susceptibility tests for moulds currently exist. In this multicentre study a 4-well azole-containing screening agar method was ev...

  13. Abnormal Ergosterol Biosynthesis Activates Transcriptional Responses to Antifungal Azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengcheng; Zhou, Mi; Wang, Wenzhao; Sun, Xianyun; Yarden, Oded; Li, Shaojie

    2018-01-01

    Fungi transcriptionally upregulate expression of azole efflux pumps and ergosterol biosynthesis pathway genes when exposed to antifungal agents that target ergosterol biosynthesis. To date, these transcriptional responses have been shown to be dependent on the presence of the azoles and/or depletion of ergosterol. Using an inducible promoter to regulate Neurospora crassa erg11 , which encodes the major azole target, sterol 14α-demethylase, we were able to demonstrate that the CDR4 azole efflux pump can be transcriptionally activated by ergosterol biosynthesis inhibition even in the absence of azoles. By analyzing ergosterol deficient mutants, we demonstrate that the transcriptional responses by cdr4 and, unexpectedly, genes encoding ergosterol biosynthesis enzymes ( erg genes) that are responsive to azoles, are not dependent on ergosterol depletion. Nonetheless, deletion of erg2 , which encodes C-8 sterol isomerase, also induced expression of cdr4 . Deletion of erg2 also induced the expression of erg24 , the gene encoding C-14 sterol reductase, but not other tested erg genes which were responsive to erg11 inactivation. This indicates that inhibition of specific steps of ergosterol biosynthesis can result in different transcriptional responses, which is further supported by our results obtained using different ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors. Together with the sterol profiles, these results suggest that the transcriptional responses by cdr4 and erg genes are associated with accumulation of specific sterol intermediate(s). This was further supported by the fact that when the erg2 mutant was treated with ketoconazole, upstream inhibition overrode the effects by downstream inhibition on ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. Even though cdr4 expression is associated with the accumulation of sterol intermediates, intra- and extracellular sterol analysis by HPLC-MS indicated that the transcriptional induction of cdr4 did not result in efflux of the accumulated intermediate

  14. Azole Fungicides as Synergists in the Aquatic Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergager, Maj-Britt Andersen

    hazard.This PhD thesis evaluates the role of the so called azole fungicides as synergists in the aquaticenvironment through an assessment of the effect of sorption, time and azole concentration on theoccurrence and magnitude of synergistic interactions with pyrethroid insecticides towards...... the aquaticcrustacean Daphnia magna in both laboratory experiments and natural-like environments. In the PhDthesis, synergy is defined as happening in mixtures where either EC50 values decrease more than two-foldbelow the prediction by the model of Concentration Addition (horizontal assessment of synergy) or wherethe...... in stormwater runoff ordrain water and in the aquatic environment, the pesticides mainly occur in sorbed form. Sorption istraditionally considered to limit bioaccessibility and toxicity of hydrophobic compounds, hence,synergistic interactions may be limited in natural environments compared to laboratory studies...

  15. Isolation of azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus from the environment in the south-eastern USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Steven F; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Stevenson, Katherine L; Litvintseva, Anastasia P; Lockhart, Shawn R

    2017-09-01

    Azole resistance in isolates of the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus has been associated with agricultural use of azole fungicides. Environmental isolation of resistant isolates has been reported in Asia, Africa, Europe and South America. To determine whether A. fumigatus isolates containing TR34/L98H or TR46/Y121F/T289A can be found in fields in the USA treated with agricultural azoles. Crop debris was collected and screened for A. fumigatus. All A. fumigatus isolates were screened for azole resistance. The CYP51A gene of azole-resistant isolates was sequenced. The population structure of a subset of isolates was determined using microsatellite typing. This article identifies azole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates containing the TR34/L98H mutation in an experimental peanut field that had been treated with azole fungicides. These findings suggest the development of resistance to azole antifungals in A. fumigatus may be present where agricultural azoles are used in the USA. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Efficacy and pharmacodynamic of voriconazole combined with anidulafungin in azole resistant invasive aspergillosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyedmousav, S.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Mouton, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Azole resistance is an emerging problem in the treatment of Aspergillus fumigatus infections. Combination therapy may be an alternative approach to improve therapeutic outcome in azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis (IA). The in vivo efficacy of voriconazole and anidulafungin was

  17. Effects of azole fungicides on the function of sex and thyroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Andersen, Helle Raun; Taxvig, Camilla

    Azole-fungicides are frequently used in Denmark. Epoxiconazole, propiconazole, and tebuconazole had endocrine disrupting properties in cell based assays. In rats, epoxiconazole and tebuconazole increased gestational length, maternal progesterone level, and masculinized female-offspring. Besides, ......, tebuconazole caused feminization of male-offspring. Similar effects were previously demonstrated for prochloraz. The results indicate that azole-fungicides in general have endocrine disrupting properties....

  18. Uptake of azoles by lamb's lettuce (Valerianella locusta L.) grown in hydroponic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Valcárcel, Ana I; Loureiro, Iñigo; Escorial, Concepción; Molero, Encarnación; Tadeo, José L

    2016-02-01

    An uptake and translocation study of azole compounds was performed in lamb's lettuce (Valerianella locusta L.) grown in nutrient solution fortified with different azoles. Three azoles, (clotrimazole, fluconazole and propiconazole), which have different physico-chemical properties and are ubiquitous in the aquatic environment, were the compounds selected. An analytical method, based on matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) followed by LC-MS/MS determination, was developed to quantify these compounds in aqueous solution and in roots and leaves. The physicochemical properties of azoles are the main factors governing the uptake and plant accumulation. These azoles were detected in leaves indicating their transport within lamb's lettuce. Translocation from nutrient solution to the aerial part of lamb's lettuce was found to be highly dependent on the hydrophobicity of the azole. Clotrimazole accumulates in roots causing necrosis in roots and leaves, whereas fluconazole was the azole with the highest concentration in leaves without causing apparent phytotoxicity symptoms. The assessment of the levels of these azoles in leaves indicates that the risk for human health is negligible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural Basis of Human CYP51 Inhibition by Antifungal Azoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strushkevich, Natallia; Usanov, Sergey A.; Park, Hee-Won (Toronto); (IBC-Belarus)

    2010-09-22

    The obligatory step in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes is demethylation of sterol precursors at the C14-position, which is catalyzed by CYP51 (sterol 14-alpha demethylase) in three sequential reactions. In mammals, the final product of the pathway is cholesterol, while important intermediates, meiosis-activating sterols, are produced by CYP51. Three crystal structures of human CYP51, ligand-free and complexed with antifungal drugs ketoconazole and econazole, were determined, allowing analysis of the molecular basis for functional conservation within the CYP51 family. Azole binding occurs mostly through hydrophobic interactions with conservative residues of the active site. The substantial conformational changes in the B{prime} helix and F-G loop regions are induced upon ligand binding, consistent with the membrane nature of the protein and its substrate. The access channel is typical for mammalian sterol-metabolizing P450 enzymes, but is different from that observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis CYP51. Comparison of the azole-bound structures provides insight into the relative binding affinities of human and bacterial P450 enzymes to ketoconazole and fluconazole, which can be useful for the rational design of antifungal compounds and specific modulators of human CYP51.

  20. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, Verena [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Crettaz, Pierre [Federal Office of Public Health, Division Chemical Products, 3003 Bern (Switzerland); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Department of Environmental System Sciences, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollution Dynamics, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. Methods: The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose–response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach. Results: The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50}. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Conclusion: Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Practice: Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Implications: Our evaluation provides an appropriate “proof of concept”, but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. - Highlights: • Humans are exposed to pesticide mixtures such as pyrethroids and azole fungicides. • We assessed the antiandrogenicity of

  1. Endocrine disrupting properties in vivo of widely used azole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day each......) were examined in the Hershberger assay. In the second study, pregnant Wistar rats were dosed with propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole or ketoconazole (50 mg/kg/day each) from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD 21. Caesarian sections were performed on dams at GD 21. Tebuconazole and propiconazole...... demonstrated no antiandrogenic effects at doses between 50 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day in the Hershberger assay. In the in utero exposure toxicity study, ketoconazole, a pharmaceutical to treat human fungal infections, decreased anogenital distance and reduced testicular testosterone levels, demonstrating...

  2. In vitro bioaccessibility of copper azole following simulated dermal transfer from pressure-treated wood

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In vitro bioaccessibility of copper azole following simulated dermal transfer from pressure-treated wood. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  3. Antibacterial Activities of Azole Complexes Combined with Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor J. Bello-Vieda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Growing antimicrobial resistance is considered a potential threat for human health security by health organizations, such as the WHO, CDC and FDA, pointing to MRSA as an example. New antibacterial drugs and complex derivatives are needed to combat the development of bacterial resistance. Six new copper and cobalt complexes of azole derivatives were synthesized and isolated as air-stable solids and characterized by melting point analyses, elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA, and infrared and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. The analyses and spectral data showed that the complexes had 1:1 (M:L stoichiometries and tetrahedral geometries, the latter being supported by DFT calculations. The antibacterial activities of the metal complexes by themselves and combined with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs; 2 μg mL−1 were assessed in vitro by broth microdilution assays against eight bacterial strains of clinical relevance. The results showed that the complexes alone exhibited moderate antibacterial activities. However, when the metal complexes were combined with AgNPs, their antibacterial activities increased (up to 10-fold in the case of complex 5, while human cell viabilities were maintained. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50 values were in the range of 25–500 μg mL−1. This study thus presents novel approaches for the design of materials for fighting bacterial resistance. The use of azole complexes combined with AgNPs provides a new alternative against bacterial infections, especially when current treatments are associated with the rapid development of antibiotic resistance.

  4. The Aspergillus fumigatus Damage Resistance Protein Family Coordinately Regulates Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Azole Susceptibility

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    Jinxing Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ergosterol is a major and specific component of the fungal plasma membrane, and thus, the cytochrome P450 enzymes (Erg proteins that catalyze ergosterol synthesis have been selected as valuable targets of azole antifungals. However, the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus has developed worldwide resistance to azoles largely through mutations in the cytochrome P450 enzyme Cyp51 (Erg11. In this study, we demonstrate that a cytochrome b5-like heme-binding damage resistance protein (Dap family, comprised of DapA, DapB, and DapC, coordinately regulates the functionality of cytochrome P450 enzymes Erg5 and Erg11 and oppositely affects susceptibility to azoles. The expression of all three genes is induced in an azole concentration-dependent way, and the decreased susceptibility to azoles requires DapA stabilization of cytochrome P450 protein activity. In contrast, overexpression of DapB and DapC causes dysfunction of Erg5 and Erg11, resulting in abnormal accumulation of sterol intermediates and further accentuating the sensitivity of ΔdapA strains to azoles. The results of exogenous-hemin rescue and heme-binding-site mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the heme binding of DapA contributes the decreased azole susceptibility, while DapB and -C are capable of reducing the activities of Erg5 and Erg11 through depletion of heme. In vivo data demonstrate that inactivated DapA combined with activated DapB yields an A. fumigatus mutant that is easily treatable with azoles in an immunocompromised mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to the single Dap proteins found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we suggest that this complex Dap family regulatory system emerged during the evolution of fungi as an adaptive means to regulate ergosterol synthesis in response to environmental stimuli.

  5. Effects of azole fungicides on the function of sex and thyroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Andersen, Helle Raun; Taxvig, Camilla

    Resumé: Azole-fungicides are frequently used in Denmark. Epoxiconazole, propiconazole, and tebuconazole had endocrine disrupting properties in cell based assays. In rats, epoxiconazole and tebuconazole increased gestational length, maternal progesterone level, and masculinized female-offspring. B......-offspring. Besides, tebuconazole caused feminization of male-offspring. Similar effects were previously demonstrated for prochloraz. The results indicate that azole-fungicides in general have endocrine disrupting properties...

  6. Chloroquine sensitizes biofilms of Candida albicans to antifungal azoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar Bapurao Shinde

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed by Candida albicans, a human pathogen, are known to be resistant to different antifungal agents. Novel strategies to combat the biofilm associated Candida infections like multiple drug therapy are being explored. In this study, potential of chloroquine to be a partner drug in combination with four antifungal agents, namely fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, was explored against biofilms of C. albicans. Activity of various concentrations of chloroquine in combination with a particular antifungal drug was analyzed in a checkerboard format. Growth of biofilm in presence of drugs was analyzed by XTT-assay, in terms of relative metabolic activity compared to that of drug free control. Results obtained by XTT-metabolic assay were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The interactions between chloroquine and four antifungal drugs were determined by calculating fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Azole resistance in biofilms was reverted significantly (p < 0.05 in presence of 250 µg/mL of chloroquine, which resulted in inhibition of biofilms at very low concentrations of antifungal drugs. No significant alteration in the sensitivity of biofilms to caspofungin and amphotericin B was evident in combination with chloroquine. This study for the first time indicates that chloroquine potentiates anti-biofilm activity of fluconazole and voriconazole.

  7. Azole susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis and Malassezia furfur and tentative epidemiological cut-off values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Iatta, Roberta; Immediato, Davide; Puttilli, Maria Rita; Otranto, Domenico

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution and the epidemiological cut-off values (ECVs) of Malassezia pachydermatis and Malassezia furfur isolates for fluconazole (FLZ), itraconazole (ITZ), posaconazole (POS), and voriconazole (VOR). A total of 62 M. pachydermatis strains from dogs with dermatitis and 78 M. furfur strains from humans with bloodstream infections (BSI) were tested by a modified broth microdilution Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) method. ITZ and POS displayed lower MICs than VOR and FLZ, regardless of the Malassezia species. The MIC data for azoles of M. pachydermatis were four two-fold dilutions lower than those of M. furfur. Based on the ECVs, about 94% of Malassezia strains might be categorized within susceptible population for all azoles, except for FLZ, and azole cross-resistance was detected in association with FLZ in M. pachydermatis but not in M. furfur.The study proposes, for the first time, tentative azole ECVs for M. pachydermatis and M. furfur for monitoring the emergence of isolates with decreased susceptibilities and shows that the azole MIC distribution varied according to the Malassezia species tested, thus suggesting the usefulness of determining the susceptibility profile for effective treatment of each species. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Species Distribution and Susceptibility to Azoles of Vaginal Yeasts Isolated Prostitutes

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    Norma T. Gross

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We investigated the use of miconazole among female prostitutes in Costa Rica as well as the distribution of vaginal yeasts and the susceptibility pattern to azoles of strains obtained from this population. Our intention was to relate a frequent use of miconazole to occurrence of vaginal yeasts resistant to azoles. Methods. Vaginal samples were taken from 277 patients that have previously used azoles. Vaginal swabs were obtained for direct microscopy and culture. Yeast isolates were identified by germ tube test and assimilation pattern. Susceptibility testing was determined using a tablet diffusion method. Results. The number of clinical Candida isolates (one from each patient was 57 (20.6%. C. albicans was the predominant species (70%, followed by C. parapsilosis (12%, C. tropicalis (5.3%, C. glabrata and C. famata (3.5% each, C. krusei, C. inconspicua and C. guilliermondii (1.7% each. The majority of vaginal Candida isolates were susceptible to ketoconazole (91%, fluconazole (96.5%, and itraconazole (98%. A lower susceptibility of some isolates to miconazole (63% was observed as compared to the other azoles tested. Moreover, the strains, nonsusceptible to miconazole, were more often obtained from patients that have used this antifungal at least four times within the last year before taking the samples as compared to those with three or less treatments (P<.01. Conclusion. An indiscriminate use of miconazole, such as that observed among female prostitutes in Costa Rica, results in a reduced susceptibility of vaginal yeasts to miconazole but not to other azoles.

  9. Rapid induction of multiple resistance mechanisms in Aspergillus fumigatus during azole therapy: a case study and review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camps, S.M.T.; Linden, J.W.M. van der; Li, Y.; Kuijper, E.J.; Dissel, J.T. van; Verweij, P.E.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Nine consecutive isogenic Aspergillus fumigatus isolates cultured from a patient with aspergilloma were investigated for azole resistance. The first cultured isolate showed a wild-type phenotype, but four azole-resistant phenotypes were observed in the subsequent eight isolates. Four mutations were

  10. Successful treatment of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a bottlenose dolphin with high-dose posaconazole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E. Bunskoek (Paulien); S. Seyedmousavi (Seyedmojtaba); S. Gans (Steven); van Vierzen, P.B.J. (Peter B.J.); W.J. Melchers (Willem); C.E. van Elk; J.W. Mouton (Johan); P.E. Verweij (Paul)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractInvasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is difficult to manage. We describe a case of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a female bottlenose dolphin, who failed to respond to voriconazole and posaconazole therapy. As intravenous therapy was precluded,

  11. Azole resistance profile of amino acid changes in Aspergillus fumigatus CYP51A based on protein homology modeling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelders, E.; Karawajczyk, A.; Schaftenaar, G.; Verweij, P.E.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular studies have shown that the majority of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with amino acid substitutions in the cyp51A gene. To obtain insight into azole resistance mutations, the cyp51A gene of 130 resistant and 76 susceptible A. fumigatus isolates was sequenced. Out

  12. Selected mechanisms of molecular resistance of Candida albicans to azole drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołąbek, Karolina; Strzelczyk, Joanna Katarzyna; Owczarek, Aleksander; Cuber, Piotr; Ślemp-Migiel, Anna; Wiczkowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenon of increasing resistance of Candida spp. to azoles has been observed for several years now. One of the mechanisms of lack of sensitivity to azoles is associated with CDR1, CDR2, MRD1 genes (their products are active transport pumps conditioning drug efflux from pathogen's cell), and ERG11 gene (encoding lanosterol 14α-demethylase). Test material was 120 strains of Candida albicans (60 resistant and 60 susceptible to azole drugs) obtained from clinical samples. The first stage of experiment assessed the expression of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1 and ERG11 genes by Q-PCR. The impact of ERG11 gene's mutations on the expression of this gene was analysed. The final stage of the experiment assessed the level of genome methylation of Candida albicans strains. An increase in the expression of CDR2, MDR1 and ERG11 was observed in azole-resistant strains of Candida albicans in comparison to strains sensitive to this class of drugs. Furthermore, 19 changes in the sequence of ERG11 were detected in tested strains. Four of the discovered mutations: T495A, A530C, G622A and A945C led to the following amino acid substitutions: D116E, K128T, V159I and E266D, respectively. It has also been found that statistically five mutations: T462C, G1309A, C216T, C1257T and A945C affected the expression of ERG11. The applied method of assessing the level of methylation of Candida albicans genome did not confirm its role in the development of resistance to azoles. The results indicate however, that resistance of Candida albicans strains to azole drugs is multifactorial.

  13. Unexpected effects of azole transporter inhibitors on antifungal susceptibility in Candida glabrata and other pathogenic Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Yohsuke; Miyazaki, Taiga; Shimamura, Shintaro; Nakayama, Hironobu; Minematsu, Asuka; Yamauchi, Shunsuke; Takazono, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru; Mukae, Hiroshi; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Candida glabrata is often resistant to azole antifungal agents. Drug efflux through azole transporters, such as Cdr1 and Cdr2, is a key mechanism of azole resistance and these genes are under the control of the transcription factor Pdr1. Recently, the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) inhibitor clorgyline was shown to inhibit the azole efflux pumps, leading to increased azole susceptibility in C. glabrata. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of clorgyline on susceptibility of C. glabrata to not only azoles, but also to micafungin and amphotericin B, using wild-type and several mutant strains. The addition of clorgyline to the culture media increased fluconazole susceptibility of a C. glabrata wild-type strain, whereas micafungin and amphotericin B susceptibilities were markedly decreased. These phenomena were also observed in other medically important Candida species, including Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. Expression levels of CDR1, CDR2 and PDR1 mRNAs and an amount of Cdr1 protein in the C. glabrata wild-type strain were highly increased in response to the treatment with clorgyline. However, loss of Cdr1, Cdr2, Pdr1, and a putative clorgyline target (Fms1), which is an ortholog of human MAO-A, or overexpression of CDR1 did not affect the decreased susceptibility to micafungin and amphotericin B in the presence of clorgyline. The presence of other azole efflux pump inhibitors including milbemycin A4 oxime and carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone also decreased micafungin susceptibility in C. glabrata wild-type, Δcdr1, Δcdr2, and Δpdr1 strains. These findings suggest that azole efflux pump inhibitors increase azole susceptibility but concurrently induce decreased susceptibility to other classes of antifungals independent of azole transporter functions.

  14. Environmental study of azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus and other aspergilli in Austria, Denmark, and Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Klaus Leth; Mellado, Emilia; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    in the environment in other European countries, we collected samples from the surroundings of hospitals in Copenhagen, Innsbruck, and Madrid, flowerbeds in an amusement park in Copenhagen, and compost bags purchased in Austria, Denmark, and Spain and screened for azole resistance using multidish agars...... was present in seven samples from Austria. Multi-azole-resistant A. fumigatus is present in the environment in Denmark. The resistance mechanism is identical to that of environmental isolates in the Netherlands. No link to commercial compost could be detected. In Spain and Austria, only Aspergillus species...

  15. Requirement for ergosterol in V-ATPase function underlies antifungal activity of azole drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Qiang Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ergosterol is an important constituent of fungal membranes. Azoles inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis, although the cellular basis for their antifungal activity is not understood. We used multiple approaches to demonstrate a critical requirement for ergosterol in vacuolar H(+-ATPase function, which is known to be essential for fungal virulence. Ergosterol biosynthesis mutants of S. cerevisiae failed to acidify the vacuole and exhibited multiple vma(- phenotypes. Extraction of ergosterol from vacuolar membranes also inactivated V-ATPase without disrupting membrane association of its subdomains. In both S. cerevisiae and the fungal pathogen C. albicans, fluconazole impaired vacuolar acidification, whereas concomitant ergosterol feeding restored V-ATPase function and cell growth. Furthermore, fluconazole exacerbated cytosolic Ca(2+ and H(+ surges triggered by the antimicrobial agent amiodarone, and impaired Ca(2+ sequestration in purified vacuolar vesicles. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for the synergy between azoles and amiodarone observed in vitro. Moreover, we show the clinical potential of this synergy in treatment of systemic fungal infections using a murine model of Candidiasis. In summary, we demonstrate a new regulatory component in fungal V-ATPase function, a novel role for ergosterol in vacuolar ion homeostasis, a plausible cellular mechanism for azole toxicity in fungi, and preliminary in vivo evidence for synergism between two antifungal agents. New insights into the cellular basis of azole toxicity in fungi may broaden therapeutic regimens for patient populations afflicted with systemic fungal infections.

  16. In vitro bioaccessibility of copper azole following simulated dermal transfer from pressure-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micronized copper azole (MCA) and micronized copper quaternary are the latest wood preservatives to replace the liquid lkaline copper and chromated copper arsenate preservatives due to concerns over the toxicity or lack of effectiveness of the earlier formulations. Today, the use...

  17. Performance of Molecular Approaches for Aspergillus Detection and Azole Resistance Surveillance in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Guegan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus triazole resistance is an emerging concern for treating chronically infected/colonized patients. This study sought to evaluate the performance of PCR assays to detect Aspergillus fungi together with azole resistance in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF patients. In total, 119 sputum samples from 87 CF patients were prospectively processed for Aspergillus detection by means of mycological culture and four qPCR assays, 2 in-house methods and two commercial multiplex real-time PCR assays simultaneously detecting Aspergillus and the most relevant cyp51A gene mutations (MycoGENIE® and AsperGenius®. Azole susceptibility of A. fumigatus isolates was assessed using Etest® method and cyp51A gene mutation were characterized by sequencing. The overall rate of Aspergillus detection with the four qPCR assays ranged from 47.9 to 57.1%, contrasting with 42/119 (35.3% positive cultures with A. fumigatus. The high sensitivity of PCR on sputum could then contribute to more effective grading of Aspergillus disease in CF patients. Five out of 41 isolated strains (12.2% exhibited azole-resistant MIC patterns, three of which harbored cyp51A mutations and only 1/3 with the sequence TR34/L98H. Combined with culture, PCR assay achieved high sensitivity Aspergillus screening in CF samples. However, cyp51A targeting was only moderately effective for azole resistance monitoring, while Aspergillus resistance remains of great concern.

  18. Tuning interaction in dinuclear ruthenium complexes : HOMO versus LUMO mediated superexchange through azole and azine bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Browne, Wesley; Hage, R; Vos, Johannes G.

    In this review the interaction between metal centers in dinuclear complexes based on azole and azine containing bridging ligands is reviewed. The focus of the review is on the manner in which the interaction pathway can be manipulated by variations in the nature of both the direct bridging unit and

  19. A Novel Environmental Azole Resistance Mutation in Aspergillus fumigatus and a Possible Role of Sexual Reproduction in Its Emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the dynamics of Aspergillus fumigatus azole-resistant phenotypes in two compost heaps with contrasting azole exposures: azole free and azole exposed. After heat shock, to which sexual but not asexual spores are highly resistant, the azole-free compost yielded 98% (49/50 wild-type and 2% (1/50 azole-resistant isolates, whereas the azole-containing compost yielded 9% (4/45 wild-type and 91% (41/45 resistant isolates. From the latter compost, 80% (36/45 of the isolates contained the TR46/Y121F/T289A genotype, 2% (1/45 harbored the TR46/Y121F/M172I/T289A/G448S genotype, and 9% (4/45 had a novel pan-triazole-resistant mutation (TR463/Y121F/M172I/T289A/G448S with a triple 46-bp promoter repeat. Subsequent screening of a representative set of clinical A. fumigatus isolates showed that the novel TR463 mutant was already present in samples from three Dutch medical centers collected since 2012. Furthermore, a second new resistance mutation was found in this set that harbored four TR46 repeats. Importantly, in the laboratory, we recovered the TR463 mutation from a sexual cross between two TR46 isolates from the same azole-containing compost, possibly through unequal crossing over between the double tandem repeats (TRs during meiosis. This possible role of sexual reproduction in the emergence of the mutation was further implicated by the high level of genetic diversity of STR genotypes in the azole-containing compost. Our study confirms that azole resistance mutations continue to emerge in the environment and indicates compost containing azole residues as a possible hot spot. Better insight into the biology of environmental resistance selection is needed to retain the azole class for use in food production and treatment of Aspergillus diseases.

  20. A D-octapeptide drug efflux pump inhibitor acts synergistically with azoles in a murine oral candidiasis infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Ishijima, Sanae A; Niimi, Kyoko; Tansho, Shigeru; Ono, Yasuo; Monk, Brian C; Holmes, Ann R; Harding, David R K; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Clinical management of patients undergoing treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis with azole antifungals can be impaired by azole resistance. High-level azole resistance is often caused by the overexpression of Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p. Inhibition of this pump therefore represents a target for combination therapies that reverse azole resistance. We assessed the therapeutic potential of the D-octapeptide derivative RC21v3, a Cdr1p inhibitor, in the treatment of murine oral candidiasis caused by either the azole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate MML611 or its azole-susceptible parental strain MML610. RC21v3, fluconazole (FLC), or a combination of both drugs were administered orally to immunosuppressed ICR mice at 3, 24, and 27 h after oral inoculation with C. albicans. FLC protected the mice inoculated with MML610 from oral candidiasis, but was only partially effective in MML611-infected mice. The co-application of RC21v3 (0.02 μmol per dose) potentiated the therapeutic performance of FLC for mice infected with either strain. It caused a statistically significant decrease in C. albicans cfu isolated from the oral cavity of the infected mice and reduced oral lesions. RC21v3 also enhanced the therapeutic activity of itraconazole against MML611 infection. These results indicate that RC21v3 in combination with azoles has potential as a therapy against azole-resistant oral candidiasis. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Culture-Based Methods and Molecular Tools for Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus Detection in a Belgian University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Montesinos, I.; Argudín, M. A.; Hites, M.; Ahajjam, F.; Dodémont, M.; Dagyaran, C.; Bakkali, M.; Etienne, I.; Jacobs, F.; Knoop, C.; Patteet, S.; Lagrou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is an increasing worldwide problem with major clinical implications. Surveillance is warranted to guide clinicians to provide optimal treatment to patients. To investigate azole resistance in clinical Aspergillus isolates in our institution, a Belgian university hospital, we conducted a laboratory-based surveillance between June 2015 and October 2016. Two different approaches were used: a prospective culture-based surveillance using VIPcheck on unselected...

  2. Development of a novel multiplex DNA microarray for Fusarium graminearum and analysis of azole fungicide responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deising Holger B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The toxigenic fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum compromises wheat production worldwide. Azole fungicides play a prominent role in controlling this pathogen. Sequencing of its genome stimulated the development of high-throughput technologies to study mechanisms of coping with fungicide stress and adaptation to fungicides at a previously unprecedented precision. DNA-microarrays have been used to analyze genome-wide gene expression patterns and uncovered complex transcriptional responses. A recently developed one-color multiplex array format allowed flexible, effective, and parallel examinations of eight RNA samples. Results We took advantage of the 8 × 15 k Agilent format to design, evaluate, and apply a novel microarray covering the whole F. graminearum genome to analyze transcriptional responses to azole fungicide treatment. Comparative statistical analysis of expression profiles uncovered 1058 genes that were significantly differentially expressed after azole-treatment. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 31 selected genes indicated high conformity to results from the microarray hybridization. Among the 596 genes with significantly increased transcript levels, analyses using GeneOntology and FunCat annotations detected the ergosterol-biosynthesis pathway genes as the category most significantly responding, confirming the mode-of-action of azole fungicides. Cyp51A, which is one of the three F. graminearum paralogs of Cyp51 encoding the target of azoles, was the most consistently differentially expressed gene of the entire study. A molecular phylogeny analyzing the relationships of the three CYP51 proteins in the context of 38 fungal genomes belonging to the Pezizomycotina indicated that CYP51C (FGSG_11024 groups with a new clade of CYP51 proteins. The transcriptional profiles for genes encoding ABC transporters and transcription factors suggested several involved in mechanisms alleviating the impact of the fungicide

  3. A transcriptomic approach for evaluating the relative potency and mechanism of action of azoles in the rat Whole Embryo Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto; Verhoef, Aart; Pennings, Jeroen L A; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Piersma, Aldert H

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated the effect of six azoles on embryonic development in the rat whole embryo culture (WEC). Using the total morphological scoring system (TMS), we calculated the ID 10 concentration (effective dose for 10% decrease in TMS). For evaluating gene specific responses, we combined previously and newly collected transcriptomics data of rat WEC exposed to a total of twelve azoles at their ID 10 for 4h. Results revealed shared expressions responses in genes involved in the retinoic acid (RA) and sterol biosynthesis pathways, which are respectively representatives of developmental toxicity and targeted fungicidal action of the azoles. Azoles with more pronounced effects on the regulation of RA-associated genes were generally characterized as more potent embryotoxicants. Overall, compounds with strong sterol biosynthesis related responses and low RA related responses were considered as more favourable candidates, as they specifically regulated genes related to a desired target response. Among the identified sterol associated genes, we detected that methylsterol monooxygenase 1 (Msmo1) was more sensitively induced compared to Cyp51, a classical biomarker of this pathway. Therefore, we suggest that Msmo1 could be a better biomarker for screening the fungicidal value of azoles. In summary, we conclude that the embryonic regulation of RA and sterol metabolic pathways could be indicators for ranking azoles as embryotoxicants and determining their drug efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid induction of multiple resistance mechanisms in Aspergillus fumigatus during azole therapy: a case study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Simone M T; van der Linden, Jan W M; Li, Yi; Kuijper, Ed J; van Dissel, Jaap T; Verweij, Paul E; Melchers, Willem J G

    2012-01-01

    Nine consecutive isogenic Aspergillus fumigatus isolates cultured from a patient with aspergilloma were investigated for azole resistance. The first cultured isolate showed a wild-type phenotype, but four azole-resistant phenotypes were observed in the subsequent eight isolates. Four mutations were found in the cyp51A gene of these isolates, leading to the substitutions A9T, G54E, P216L, and F219I. Only G54 substitutions were previously proved to be associated with azole resistance. Using a Cyp51A homology model and recombination experiments in which the mutations were introduced into a susceptible isolate, we show that the substitutions at codons P216 and F219 were both associated with resistance to itraconazole and posaconazole. A9T was also present in the wild-type isolate and thus considered a Cyp51A polymorphism. Isolates harboring F219I evolved further into a pan-azole-resistant phenotype, indicating an additional acquisition of a non-Cyp51A-mediated resistance mechanism. Review of the literature showed that in patients who develop azole resistance during therapy, multiple resistance mechanisms commonly emerge. Furthermore, the median time between the last cultured wild-type isolate and the first azole-resistant isolate was 4 months (range, 3 weeks to 23 months), indicating a rapid induction of resistance.

  5. Supramolecular Coordination Assemblies Constructed From Multifunctional Azole-Containing Carboxylic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuheng Deng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief review of recent progress in the field of metal coordination polymers assembled from azole-containing carboxylic acids and gives a diagrammatic summary of the diversity of topological structures in the resulting infinite metal-organic coordination networks (MOCNs. Azole-containing carboxylic acids are a favorable kind of multifunctional ligand to construct various metal complexes with isolated complexes and one, two and three dimensional structures, whose isolated complexes are not the focus of this review. An insight into the topology patterns of the infinite coordination polymers is provided. Analyzed topologies are compared with documented topologies and catalogued by the nature of nodes and connectivity pattern. New topologies which are not available from current topology databases are described and demonstrated graphically.

  6. Synthesis of nonionic surfactants with azole ring bearing N-glycosides and their antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia Taieb Brahimi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Six azoles with n-pentyl side chain 6–9, 11 and 12 were synthesized from n-hexanoic acid. Three N-glycosides namely: 5-pentyl-2-(d-amino arabinoside-1,3,4-oxadiazole (13, 5-pentyl-2-(d-aminoglycoside-1,3,4-thiadiazole (14, and 3-pentyl-4-(d-amino xyloside-4H-1,2,4-triazole-5-thiol (15 were prepared from already synthesized n-pentyl azoles 6, 7 and 11, respectively. Surface activity properties of water soluble synthesized compounds 6, 7, and 11–15 were studied in terms of surface tension, cloud point and critical micelle concentration. The antibacterial activities were assessed using the paper disk diffusion and broth dilution methods against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Some of the synthetic compounds showed promising activity against microorganisms under test in comparison to commercially available antibiotics polymixine and oxytetracycline.

  7. Gene transcription profiling of Fusarium graminearum treated with an azole fungicide tebuconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jiang, Jinhua; Shao, Jiaofang; Yin, Yanni; Ma, Zhonghua

    2010-01-01

    Using a deep serial analysis of gene expression (DeepSAGE) sequencing approach, we profiled the transcriptional response of Fusarium graminearum to tebuconazole, a most widely used azole fungicide. By comparing the expression of genes in F. graminearum treated and untreated with tebuconazole, we identified 324 and 155 genes showing more than a 5-fold increase and decrease, respectively, in expression upon tebuconazole treatment. These genes are involved in a variety of cell functions including egrosterol biosynthesis, transcription, and cellular metabolism. The validity of DeepSAGE results were confirmed by real-time PCR analysis of expression of 20 genes with different expression levels in the DeepSAGE analysis. The results from this study provide useful information in understanding the mechanisms for the responses of F. graminearum to azole fungicides.

  8. Performance of Molecular Approaches for Aspergillus Detection and Azole Resistance Surveillance in Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hélène Guegan; Sylviane Chevrier; Chantal Belleguic; Eric Deneuville; Florence Robert-Gangneux; Florence Robert-Gangneux; Jean-Pierre Gangneux; Jean-Pierre Gangneux

    2018-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus triazole resistance is an emerging concern for treating chronically infected/colonized patients. This study sought to evaluate the performance of PCR assays to detect Aspergillus fungi together with azole resistance in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In total, 119 sputum samples from 87 CF patients were prospectively processed for Aspergillus detection by means of mycological culture and four qPCR assays, 2 in-house methods and two commercial multiplex...

  9. The role of drug efflux pumps in Malassezia pachydermatis and Malassezia furfur defence against azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatta, Roberta; Puttilli, Maria Rita; Immediato, Davide; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of efflux pump modulators (EPMs) on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of fluconazole (FLZ) and voriconazole (VOR) in Malassezia furfur and Malassezia pachydermatis. The in vitro efficacy of azoles, in combination with EPMs (ie haloperidol-HAL, promethazine-PTZ and cyclosporine A-CYS), against 21 M. furfur from bloodstream infection patients and 14 M. pachydermatis from the skin of dogs with dermatitis, was assessed using a broth microdilution chequerboard analysis. Data were analysed using the model-fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) method. The MIC of FLZ and VOR of Malassezia spp. decreased in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of HAL and/or PTZ. The synergic effect was observed only in strains with FLZ MIC≥128 μg/mL for M. furfur, FLZ MIC≥64 μg/mL for M. pachydermatis and VOR MIC≥4 μg/mL in both Malassezia spp. These results suggest that the drug efflux pumps are involved as defence mechanisms to azole drugs in Malassezia yeast. The synergism might be related to an increased expression of efflux pump genes, eventually resulting in azole resistance phenomena. Finally, the above FLZ and VOR MIC values might be considered the cut-off to discriminate susceptible and resistant strains. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Repurposing antipsychotic drugs into antifungal agents: Synergistic combinations of azoles and bromperidol derivatives in the treatment of various fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Selina Y L; Garzan, Atefeh; Dennis, Emily K; Shrestha, Sanjib K; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2017-10-20

    As the number of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients continues to rise, invasive fungal infections, such as invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis, threaten the life of millions of patients every year. The azole antifungals are currently the most prescribed drugs clinically that display broad-spectrum antifungal activity and excellent oral bioavailability. Yet, the azole antifungals have their own limitations and are unable to meet the challenges associated with increasing fungal infections and the accompanied development of resistance against azoles. Exploring combination therapy that involves the current azoles and another drug has been shown to be a promising strategy. Haloperidol and its derivative, bromperidol, were originally discovered as antipsychotics. Herein, we synthesize and report a series of bromperidol derivatives and their synergistic antifungal interactions in combination with a variety of current azole antifungals against a wide panel of fungal pathogens. We further select two representative combinations and confirm the antifungal synergy by performing time-kill assays. Furthermore, we evaluate the ability of selected combinations to destroy fungal biofilm. Finally, we perform mammalian cytotoxicity assays with the representative combinations against three mammalian cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparison of the embryonic stem cell test and whole embryo culture assay combined with the BeWo placental passage model for predicting the embryotoxicity of azoles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto; Verhoef, Aart; Gomes, Caroline A; van Dongen, Catharina W; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Piersma, Aldert H; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we show the value of combining toxico-dynamic and -kinetic in vitro approaches for embryotoxicity testing of azoles. Both the whole embryo culture (WEC) and the embryonic stem cells test (EST) predicted the in vivo potency ranking of twelve tested azoles with moderate accuracy.

  12. A comparison of the embryonic stem cell test and whole embryo culture assay combined with the BeWo placental passage model for predicting the embryotoxicity of azoles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto; Verhoef, Aart; Gomes, Caroline A.; Dongen, van Catharina W.; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Ravenzwaay, van Bennard

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we show the value of combining toxico-dynamic and -kinetic in vitro approaches for embryotoxicity testing of azoles. Both the whole embryo culture (WEC) and the embryonic stem cells test (EST) predicted the in vivo potency ranking of twelve tested azoles with moderate accuracy.

  13. Multidrug resistance in Botrytis cinerea associated with decreased accumulation of the azole fungicide oxpoconazole and increased transcription of the ABC transporter gene BcatrD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Sugiura, H.; Waard, De M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Azole-resistant mutants of Botrytis cinerea have a multidrug resistance phenotype since they exhibit cross-resistance to unrelated chemicals. These mutants also display resistance to the new azole fungicide oxpoconazole. Resistance to oxpoconazole is associated with decreased accumulation of the

  14. The Effects of Antifungal Azoles on Inflammatory Cytokine Production in Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Zomorodian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Azoles drugs are being used successfully in treatment of fungal infections. Recently, immunosuppressive effects of some of these agents have been reported. Keratinocytes, as the major cells of the skin, have an important role in innate immunity against pathogenic agents. Considering the scanty of information about the effects of azoles on immune responces, this study was conducted to assess the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines in keratinocytes following treatment with azole drugs. Materials & Methods: This is an exprimental study conducted in in molecular biology division in Tehran University of Medical Sciences and Immunodermatology Department in Vienna Medical University. Primery keratinocytes were cultured and treated with different concentrations of fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole and griseofulvin. Secreted IL1, IL6 and TNF-α by keratinocytes in culture supernatant were measured by quantitative enzyme immunoassay technique. Moreover, expression of the genes encoding IL1 and IL8 was evaluated by Real Time-PCR. Results: Treatment of keratinocytes with different concentrations of fluconazole and low concentration of ketoconazole resulted in decrease in IL1 secretion, but Itraconazole and griseofulvin did not show such an effect at the same concentrations. In addition, none of the examined drugs had an effect on secretion level of IL6 and TNF-α. Quantitative analysis of IL1 and IL8 encoding genes revealed that transcription on these genes might be suppressed following treatment with fluconazole or ketoconazole. Conclusion: Fluconazole and ketoconazole might modulate the expression and secretion of IL1 and IL8 and affect the direction of immune responses induced by keratinocytes

  15. In vitro anti-tuberculosis activity of azole drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperiale, Belén R; Cataldi, Ángel A; Morcillo, Nora S

    Latent tuberculosis has been associated with the persistence of dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the organism of infected individuals, who are reservoirs of the bacilli and the source for spreading the disease in the community. New active anti-TB drugs exerting their metabolic action at different stages and on latent/dormant bacilli are urgently required to avoid endogenous reactivations and to be part of treatments of multi- and extensively-drug resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB). It was previously reported that azole drugs are active against M. tuberculosis. For that reason, the aims of this study were to determine the in vitro activity of azole drugs, imidazole (clotrimazole, CLO and econazole, ECO) and nitroimidazole (metronidazole, MZ and ipronidazole, IPZ), against a collection of MDR M. tuberculosis clinical isolates; and to analyze their potential use in both the LTB and the active forms of M/XDR-TB treatments. A total of 55 MDR M. tuberculosis isolates and H37Rv were included. MZ and IPZ activity against M. tuberculosis isolates were tested using anaerobic culture conditions. The activity of ECO and CLO was measured by the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) using a microdilution colorimetric method. MZ and IPZ showed bacteriostatic activity against M. tuberculosis strains. MIC 50 and MIC 90 to ECO was 4.0μg/ml, while MIC 50 to CLO was 4.0μg/ml and MIC 90 was 8.0μg/ml respectively. All azole compounds tested in the study showed inhibitory activity against MDR M. tuberculosis clinical isolates. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  17. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Hung [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, Pei-Hsin [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Jen, E-mail: chenpj@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-30

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  18. Use of cell surface protein typing for genotyping of azole-resistant and -susceptible Aspergillus fumigatus isolates in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahatinejad, Mahsa; Vaezi, Afsane; Fakhim, Hamed; Abastabar, Mahdi; Shokohi, Tahereh; Zahedi, Nina; Ansari, Saham; Meis, Jacques F; Badali, Hamid

    2018-02-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the leading cause of mortality in severely immunocompromised individuals. Understanding pathogen dispersion and relatedness is essential for determining the epidemiology of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the diversity and putative origins of clinical and environmental azole-susceptible and -resistant A. fumigatus isolates from Iran. In all, 79 isolates, including 64 azole-susceptible and 15 -resistant isolates, were genotyped using the cell surface protein (CSP) gene. Seven distinct repeat types (r01, r02, r03, r04, r05, r06 and r07) and 11 different CSP variants (t01, t02, t03, t04A, t06A, t06B, t08, t10, t18A, t18B and t22) were observed. Interestingly, t06B, t18A and t18B were exclusively present in azole-resistant isolates. The Simpson's index of diversity (D) was calculated at 0.78. Resistant isolates were genetically less diverse than azole-susceptible isolates. However, azole-resistant A. fumigatus without TR 34 /L98H were more diverse than with TR 34 /L98H. The limited CSP type diversity of the TR 34 /L98H isolates versus azole-susceptible isolates suggests that repeated independent emergence of the TR 34 /L98H mechanism is unlikely. It has been suggested that CSP types might have a common ancestor that developed locally and subsequently migrated worldwide. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Synthesis of fused azole-piperidionoses: A free radical cyclization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco-Contelles, Jose; Alhambra Jimenez, Carolina [Instituto de Quimica Organica General (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    1999-08-01

    A new strategy has been reported for the synthesis of fused azole-piperidinoses featuring and unprecedented and very efficient 6-exo-trig free radical cyclization onto heterocyclic sugar templates. These compounds are key intermediates for the synthesis of known or analogues of azole-glycosidase inhibitors. In this communication we describe our recent and successful results on the synthesis of fused triazole-piperidinoses. Radical precursors have been prepared by standard methodologies from 1, 2:5, 6-bis-O-isopropylidene-{alpha}-D-glucofuranose (4) via triazoles linked at C3 with {beta}-orientation, readily obtained by 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azide 5 with diethyl acetylenedicarboxylate or methyl propiolate, and by S{sub N}2 displacement of the tosylate at C3 with 1, 2, 4-triazole in compound 20. The key 6-exp-trig free radical cyclizations proceeded in the usual conditions [tributyltin hydride or tris(trimethylsily)silane, AIBN, toluene] yielding the azaannulated sugars 9, 11, 19 and 23 in good or excellent yields. A mechanism for these cyclizations has been proposed. [Spanish] Se ha informado una nueva estrategia para la sintesis azol-piperidinosas fusionadas mediante una ciclizacion 6-exo-trig muy eficiente y sin precedentes, sobre plantillas de azucares heterociclicos. Estos compuestos son intermediarios claves para la sintesis de inhibidores de azol-glicosidasa conocidos analogos de ellos. En esta comunicacion describimos nuestros resultados recientes y exitosos sobre la sintesis de triazol-piperidinosas. Los precursores de radicales fueron preparados por la metodologia usual a partir de 1, 2:5, 6-bis-O-isopropiliden-{alpha}-D-glucofuranosa (4) via triazoles unidos en C3, con orientacion {beta}, los cuales se obtienen facilmente por cicloadicion 1, 3-dipolar de la azida 5 con acetilendicarboxilato de dietilo o propiolato de metilo y por desplazamiento S{sub N}2 del tosilato en C3 con 1, 2, 4-triazol en el compuesto 20. Las ciclizaciones 6-exo

  20. Emergence of Azoles Resistance Candida species in Iranian AIDS defined patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Katiraee

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Based on the findings, it can be concluded that screening of resistant Candida isolates by disk diffusion or broth dilution method is essential for the surveillance and prevention of antifungal resistance in patient management. Although nystatin is widely used in clinical practice for HIV patients in Iran, no evidence of enhanced resistance against this agent was found on the other hand, resistance to azole antifungals, particularly fluconazole, increased. Considering the lack of resistance to caspofungin, administration of this agent is suggested for the treatment of OPC in AIDS patients.

  1. Successful treatment of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a bottlenose dolphin with high-dose posaconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulien E. Bunskoek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is difficult to manage. We describe a case of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a female bottlenose dolphin, who failed to respond to voriconazole and posaconazole therapy. As intravenous therapy was precluded, high dose posaconazole was initiated aimed at achieving trough levels exceeding 3 mg/l. Posaconazole serum levels of 3–9.5 mg/l were achieved without significant side-effects. Follow-up bronchoscopy and computed tomography showed complete resolution of the lesions.

  2. The rare case of Alternaria alternata cutaneous and pulmonary infection in a heart transplant recipient treated by azole antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sečníková, Zuzana; Jůzlová, Kateřina; Vojáčková, Naděžda; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Hošková, Lenka; Fialová, Jorga; Džambová, Martina; Hercogová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Alternaria alternata cutaneous and pulmonary infection in a 62-year-old man after heart transplantation treated by azole antifungals. Alternaria spp. belong to a group of opportunistic dematiaceous fungi with worldwide distribution. The cutaneous form of the infection in human is very rare and occurs predominantly among immunosuppressed patients. Therefore, diagnosis is often delayed or not reached at all. Appropriate treatment is not standardized and remains a matter of discussion. According to current studies, the best results are obtained with systemic azole antifungal therapy combined with surgical intervention. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Home Environment as a Source of Life-Threatening Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus in Immunocompromised Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Rose-Anne; Chouaki, Taieb; Hagen, Ferry; Toublanc, Bénédicte; Dupont, Hervé; Jounieaux, Vincent; Meis, Jacques F; Morio, Florent; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    A case of fatal aspergillosis due to a TR 46 /Y121F/T289A azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is reported. Environmental investigations at the patient's residence led to the recovery of TR 46 /Y121F/T289A isolates, genotypically indistinguishable from the clinical isolate, supporting for the first time the direct role of household as potential source of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Antifungal activity of terrestrial Streptomyces rochei strain HF391 against clinical azole -resistant Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh, S; Forootanfar, H; Shahidi Bonjar, GH; Falahati Nejad, M; Karamy Robati, A; Ayatollahi Mousavi, SA; Amirporrostami, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Actinomycetes have been discovered as source of antifungal compounds that are currently in clinical use. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) due to Aspergillus fumigatus has been identified as individual drug-resistant Aspergillus spp. to be an emerging pathogen opportunities a global scale. This paper described the antifungal activity of one terrestrial actinomycete against the clinically isolated azole-resistant A. fumigatus. Materials and Methods: Soil samples were collected from various locations of Kerman, Iran. Thereafter, the actinomycetes were isolated using starch-casein-nitrate-agar medium and the most efficient actinomycetes (capable of inhibiting A. fumigatus) were screened using agar block method. In the next step, the selected actinomycete was cultivated in starch-casein- broth medium and the inhibitory activity of the obtained culture broth was evaluated using agar well diffusion method. Results: The selected actinomycete, identified as Streptomyces rochei strain HF391, could suppress the growth of A. fumigatus isolates which was isolated from the clinical samples of patients treated with azoles. This strain showed higher inhibition zones on agar diffusion assay which was more than 15 mm. Conclusion: The obtained results of the present study introduced Streptomyces rochei strain HF391 as terrestrial actinomycete that can inhibit the growth of clinically isolated A. fumigatus. PMID:28680984

  5. Candida glabrata Esophagitis: Are We Seeing the Emergence of a New Azole-Resistant Pathogen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aze Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Candida glabrata (C. glabrata has become a recognized pathogen in fungal esophagitis. A proportion of these isolates are azole-resistant which may have treatment implications. Variability in the prevalence of this organism exists in the limited data available. Objective. To determine the incidence of C. glabrata esophagitis in a North American hospital setting and to highlight factors that may predispose patients to this condition. Methods. Patient charts were collected from January 1, 2009 to July 30, 2011. Any charts of patients identified as having esophagitis with a positive fungal culture were reviewed for the species of Candida and the presence of factors that would predispose them to esophageal candidiasis. Results. The prevalence of Candida esophagitis based on culture was 2.2% (37 subjects. C. glabrata was the 2nd most prevalent pathogen identified (24.3% or 9 subjects. Of the C. glabrata cohort, all patients had at least one factor predisposing them to candidiasis. Conclusion. C. glabrata esophagitis makes up a large portion of the candidal esophagitis seen in hospital. C. glabrata infections were associated with at least one risk factor for candidal infection. Given its resistance to azole-based therapy, this may have treatment implications for how candidal esophagitis is approached by the clinician.

  6. Prevalence of azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus in the environment of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangwattanachuleeporn, Marut; Minarin, Nanthakan; Saichan, Saranya; Sermsri, Pornsuda; Mitkornburee, Ruthairat; Groß, Uwe; Chindamporn, Ariya; Bader, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Occurrence of azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus (ARAF) in the environment is an emerging problem worldwide, likely impacting on patient treatment. Several resistance mutations are thought to have initially arisen through triazole-based fungicide use in agriculture and subsequently being propagated in a similar manner. Here we investigated the prevalence of ARAF in the environment of Thailand and characterized their susceptibility profiles toward clinically used azole compounds along with underlying resistance mutations. Three hundred and eight soil samples were collected and analyzed, out of which 3.25% (n = 10) were positive for ARAF. All isolates obtained were resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 8 μg/ml), two showed additional increased MIC values toward posaconazole (MIC = 0.5 μg/ml), and one other toward voriconazole (MIC = 2 μg/ml). Sequencing of the respective cyp51A genes revealed that eight of the isolates carried the TR34/L98H allele and those two with elevated MIC values to posaconazole the G54R substitution. Although a clear correlation between the use of triazole-based fungicides and isolation of ARAF strains from agricultural lands could not be established for Thailand, but this study clearly demonstrates the spread of globally observed ARAF strains to the environment of South East Asia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. In vivo emergence of Aspergillus terreus with reduced azole susceptibility and a Cyp51a M217I alteration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken C; Jensen, Rasmus; Grif, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Azole resistance in Aspergillus terreus isolates was explored. Twenty related (MB) and 6 unrelated A. terreus isolates were included. CYP51A sequencing and RAPD genotyping was performed. Five MB isolates were itraconazole susceptible, whereas the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for 15 MB...

  8. The Hsp90 co-chaperones Sti1, Aha1, and P23 regulate adaptive responses to antifungal azoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokui Gu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90 is essential for tumor progression in humans and drug resistance in fungi. However, the roles of its many co-chaperones in antifungal resistance are unknown. In this study, by susceptibility test of Neurospora crassa mutants lacking each of 18 Hsp90/Calcineurin system member genes (including 8 Hsp90 co-chaperone genes to antifungal drugs and other stresses, we demonstrate that the Hsp90 co-chaperones Sti1 (Hop1 in yeast, Aha1, and P23 (Sba1 in yeast were required for the basal resistance to antifungal azoles and heat stress. Deletion of any of them resulted in hypersensitivity to azoles and heat. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS analysis showed that the toxic sterols eburicol and 14α-methyl-3,6-diol were significantly accumulated in the sti1 and p23 deletion mutants after ketoconazole treatment, which has been shown before to led to cell membrane stress. At the transcriptional level, Aha1, Sti1, and P23 positively regulate responses to ketoconazole stress by erg11 and erg6, key genes in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Aha1, Sti1, and P23 are highly conserved in fungi, and sti1 and p23 deletion also increased the susceptibility to azoles in Fusarium verticillioides. These results indicate that Hsp90-cochaperones Aha1, Sti1, and P23 are critical for the basal azole resistance and could be potential targets for developing new antifungal agents.

  9. Seminational surveillance of fungemia in Denmark: notably high rates of fungemia and numbers of isolates with reduced azole susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Fuursted, Kurt; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2005-01-01

    laboratory systems documented a continuous increase of candidemia cases since the early 1990s. For the 272 susceptibility-tested isolates, MICs of amphotericin B and caspofungin were within the limits expected for the species or genus. However, decreased azole susceptibility, defined as a fluconazole MIC...

  10. Emergence of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus and spread of a single resistance mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Snelders

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resistance to triazoles was recently reported in Aspergillus fumigatus isolates cultured from patients with invasive aspergillosis. The prevalence of azole resistance in A. fumigatus is unknown. We investigated the prevalence and spread of azole resistance using our culture collection that contained A. fumigatus isolates collected between 1994 and 2007. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We investigated the prevalence of itraconazole (ITZ resistance in 1,912 clinical A. fumigatus isolates collected from 1,219 patients in our University Medical Centre over a 14-y period. The spread of resistance was investigated by analyzing 147 A. fumigatus isolates from 101 patients, from 28 other medical centres in The Netherlands and 317 isolates from six other countries. The isolates were characterized using phenotypic and molecular methods. The electronic patient files were used to determine the underlying conditions of the patients and the presence of invasive aspergillosis. ITZ-resistant isolates were found in 32 of 1,219 patients. All cases were observed after 1999 with an annual prevalence of 1.7% to 6%. The ITZ-resistant isolates also showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations of voriconazole, ravuconazole, and posaconazole. A substitution of leucine 98 for histidine in the cyp51A gene, together with two copies of a 34-bp sequence in tandem in the gene promoter (TR/L98H, was found to be the dominant resistance mechanism. Microsatellite analysis indicated that the ITZ-resistant isolates were genetically distinct but clustered. The ITZ-sensitive isolates were not more likely to be responsible for invasive aspergillosis than the ITZ-resistant isolates. ITZ resistance was found in isolates from 13 patients (12.8% from nine other medical centres in The Netherlands, of which 69% harboured the TR/L98H substitution, and in six isolates originating from four other countries. CONCLUSIONS: Azole resistance has emerged in A. fumigatus and might be more

  11. In vitro and in vivo screening of azole fungicides for antiandrogenic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    and antiandrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Two other azole fungicides, tebuconazole and epoxiconazole, have now been investigated for antiandrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo as well. The fungicides were screened in two well-established cell assays, including testing for agonistic and antagonistic...... effects on AR in transfected CHO cells, using an AR reporter gene assay. The compounds were also analyzed for effects on steroidogenesis in H295R cells, a human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line, used to detect effects on steroid production. In vitro tebuconazole and epoxiconazole proved to be antagonists...... signs of feminization of the male offspring were investigated. Tebuconazole caused an increase in testicular 17alfa-hydroxyprogesterone and progesterone levels, and a decrease in testosterone levels in male fetuses. Epoxiconazole had no effect on any of the mesured hormonelevels. Furthermore...

  12. In vitro screening of azole fungicides for antiandrogenic effects – comparison with in vivo effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -based assays. In vitro prochloraz proved to be an activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), to inhibit aromatase activity and to possess antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Another two azole fungicides, tebuconazole and epoxiconazole, have now been investigated...... in H295R cells, a cell line, which produces a wide range of steroid hormones in measurable quantities, including testosterone, progesterone and estradiol, a property that makes it suitable as a screening assay to detect effects on steroidogenesis. In the in vitro tebuconazole and epoxiconazole showed...... antiandrogenic effects, and in the H295R cell assay, tebuconazole and epoxiconazole were like prochloraz able to inhibit testosterone and estradiol levels and increase progesterone levels. For the in vivo testing, a study was conducted testing the developmental effects on offspring after prenatal exposure...

  13. Dimeric fluorescent energy transfer dyes comprising asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Novel fluorescent heterodimeric DNA-staining energy transfer dyes are provided combining asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine dyes, which provide for strong DNA affinity, large Stokes shifts and emission in the red region of the spectrum. The dyes find particular application in gel electrophoresis and for labels which may be bound to a variety of compositions in a variety of contexts. Kits and individual compounds are provided, where the kits find use for simultaneous detection of a variety of moieties, particularly using a single narrow wavelength irradiation source. The individual compounds are characterized by high donor quenching and high affinity to dsDNA as a result of optimizing the length of the linking group separating the two chromophores.

  14. Disturbance in hemoglobin metabolism and in vivo antimalarial activity of azole antimycotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ricardo Rodrigues

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium parasites degrade host hemoglobin to obtain free amino acids, essential for protein synthesis. During this event, free toxic heme moieties crystallize spontaneously to produce a non-toxic pigment called hemozoin or ß-hematin. In this context, a group of azole antimycotics, clotrimazole (CTZ, ketoconazole (KTZ and fluconazole (FCZ, were investigated for their abilities to inhibit ß-hematin synthesis (IßHS and hemoglobin proteolysis (IHbP in vitro. The ß-hematin synthesis was recorded by spectrophotometry at 405 nm and the hemoglobin proteolysis was determined by SDS-PAGE 12.5%, followed by densitometric analysis. Compounds were also assayed in vivo in a malaria murine model. CTZ and KTZ exhibited the maximal effects inhibiting both biochemical events, showing inhibition of β-hematin synthesis (IC50 values of 12.4 ± 0.9 µM and 14.4 ± 1.4 µM respectively and inhibition of hemoglobin proteolysis (80.1 ± 2.0% and 55.3 ± 3.6%, respectively. There is a broad correlation to the in vivo results, especially CTZ, which reduced the parasitemia (%P of infected-mice at 4th day post-infection significantly compared to non-treated controls (12.4 ± 3.0% compared to 26.6 ± 3.7%, p = 0.014 and prolonged the survival days post-infection. The results indicated that the inhibition of the hemoglobin metabolism by the azole antimycotics could be responsible for their antimalarial effect.

  15. Persistent Candida albicans colonization and molecular mechanisms of azole resistance in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siikala, Emilia; Rautemaa, Riina; Richardson, Malcolm; Saxen, Harri; Bowyer, Paul; Sanglard, Dominique

    2010-12-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, APS-I) suffer from chronic candidosis caused mainly by Candida albicans, and repeated courses of azole antifungals have led to the development of resistance in the APECED patient population in Finland. The aim of our study was to address whether the patients are persistently colonized with the same or genetically closely related strains, whether epidemic strains are present and which molecular mechanisms account for azole resistance. Sets of C. albicans (n = 19) isolates from nine APECED patients reported with decreased susceptibility to fluconazole isolated up to 9 years apart were included. The strains were typed by multilocus sequence typing. CDR1/2, MDR1 and ERG11 mRNA expression was analysed by northern blotting and Cdr1, Cdr2 and Mdr1 protein expression by western blotting, and TAC1 and ERG11 genes were sequenced. All seven patients with multiple C. albicans isolates analysed were persistently colonized with the same or a genetically closely related strain for a mean of 5 years. All patients were colonized with different strains and no epidemic strains were found. The major molecular mechanisms behind the azole resistance were mutations in TAC1 contributing to overexpression of CDR1 and CDR2. Six new TAC1 mutations were found, one of which (N740S) is likely to be a gain-of-function mutation. Most isolates were found to have gained multiple TAC1 and ERG11 point mutations. Despite clinically successful treatment leading to relief of symptoms, colonization by C. albicans strains is persistent within APECED patients. Microevolution and point mutations occur within strains, leading to the development of azole-resistant isolates.

  16. Changing Azole Resistance: A Secondary Analysis of the MUTT I Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajna, N Venkatesh; Lalitha, Prajna; Rajaraman, Revathi; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Raghavan, Anita; Srinivasan, Muthiah; O'Brien, Kieran S; Zegans, Michael; McLeod, Stephen D; Acharya, Nisha R; Keenan, Jeremy D; Lietman, Thomas M; Rose-Nussbaumer, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    azoles, because presenting with azole treatment was not a risk factor for resistance. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00996736.

  17. Prevalence, mechanisms and genetic relatedness of the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus exhibiting resistance to medical azoles in the environment of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsuan-Chen; Huang, Jui-Chang; Lin, Yong-Hong; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Hsieh, Ming-I; Choi, Pui-Ching; Lo, Hsiu-Jung; Liu, Wei-Lun; Hsu, Ching-Shan; Shih, Hsin-I; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chen, Yee-Chun

    2018-01-01

    Emerging azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus poses a serious threat to human health. This nationwide surveillance study investigated the prevalence and molecular characteristics of azole-resistant A. fumigatus environmental isolates in Taiwan, an island country with increasing use of azole fungicides. Of the 2760 air and soil samples screened from 2014 to 2016, 451 A. fumigatus isolates were recovered from 266 samples and 34 isolates from 29 samples displayed resistance to medical azoles (itraconazole, voriconazole or posaconazole). The resistance prevalence was 10.9% and 7.5% in A. fumigatus-positive samples and isolates respectively. Most (29, 85.3%) azole-resistant isolates harboured TR 34 /L98H mutations, which were widely distributed, clustered genetically with clinical isolates, and had growth rates that were similar to those of the wild-type isolates. Microsatellite genotyping revealed both the global spread of the TR 34 /L98H isolates and the occurrence of TR 34 /L98H/S297T/F495I isolates belonging to local microsatellite genotypes. AfuMDR3 and atrF, two efflux transporter genes, were constitutively upregulated in two individual resistant isolates without cyp51A mutations, highlighting their potential roles in azole resistance. These results emphasize the need for periodic environmental surveillance at the molecular level in regions in which azole fungicides are applied, and agricultural fungicide management strategies that generate less selective pressure should be investigated. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. How Biotransformation Influences Toxicokinetics of Azole Fungicides in the Aquatic Invertebrate Gammarus pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, Andrea; Anliker, Sabine; Hollender, Juliane

    2016-07-05

    Biotransformation is a key process that can greatly influence the bioaccumulation potential and toxicity of organic compounds. In this study, biotransformation of seven frequently used azole fungicides (triazoles: cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, fluconazole, propiconazole, tebuconazole and imidazoles: ketoconazole, prochloraz) was investigated in the aquatic invertebrate Gammarus pulex in a 24 h exposure experiment. Additionally, temporal trends of the whole body internal concentrations of epoxiconazole, prochloraz, and their respective biotransformation products (BTPs) were studied to gain insight into toxicokinetic processes such as uptake, elimination and biotransformation. By the use of high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in total 37 BTPs were identified. Between one (ketoconazole) and six (epoxiconazole) BTPs were identified per parent compound except for prochloraz, which showed extensive biotransformation reactions with 18 BTPs detected that were mainly formed through ring cleavage or ring loss. In general, most BTPs were formed by oxidation and conjugation reactions. Ring loss or ring cleavage was only observed for the imidazoles as expected from the general mechanism of oxidative ring openings of imidazoles, likely affecting the bioactivity of these BTPs. Overall, internal concentrations of BTPs were up to 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of the corresponding parent compound. Thus, biotransformation did not dominate toxicokinetics and only played a minor role in elimination of the respective parent compound, with the exception of prochloraz.

  19. Counter-current acid leaching process for copper azole treated wood waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janin, Amélie; Riche, Pauline; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy; Cooper, Paul; Morris, Paul

    2012-09-01

    This study explores the performance of a counter-current leaching process (CCLP) for copper extraction from copper azole treated wood waste for recycling of wood and copper. The leaching process uses three acid leaching steps with 0.1 M H2SO4 at 75degrees C and 15% slurry density followed by three rinses with water. Copper is recovered from the leachate using electrodeposition at 5 amperes (A) for 75 min. Ten counter-current remediation cycles were completed achieving > or = 94% copper extraction from the wood during the 10 cycles; 80-90% of the copper was recovered from the extract solution by electrodeposition. The counter-current leaching process reduced acid consumption by 86% and effluent discharge volume was 12 times lower compared with the same process without use of counter-current leaching. However, the reuse of leachates from one leaching step to another released dissolved organic carbon and caused its build-up in the early cycles.

  20. Design and synthesis of 3-(azol-1-yl)phenylpropanes as microbicidal spermicides for prophylactic contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalit; Sarswat, Amit; Lal, Nand; Jain, Ashish; Kumar, Sumit; Kiran Kumar, S T V S; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Pandey, Atindra K; Shukla, Praveen K; Gupta, Gopal; Sharma, Vishnu L

    2011-01-01

    We designed a series of 25 3-(azol-1-yl)phenylpropanes which yielded 10 compounds (3, 4, 7, 8, 13, 14, 19, 21, 23, 26) that irreversibly immobilized 100% human sperm at 1% (w/v) concentration in 60s; 12 compounds (8, 9, 15, 16, 19-21, 23-25, 27, 28) that showed potent microbicidal activity at 12.5-50 μg/mL against Trichomonas vaginalis; and 17 compounds (3-11, 13, 15, 19, 21, 23, 26, 28, 30) that exhibited potent anticandida activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 12.5-50 μg/mL. Almost all the compounds exhibited high level of safety towards normal vaginal flora (Lactobacillus) and human cervical (HeLa) cells in comparison to the marketed spermicide nonoxynol-9 (N-9). All the biological activities were evaluated in vitro. Two compounds (4, 8) with good safety profile exhibited multiple (spermicidal, antitrichomonas and anticandida) activities, warranting further lead optimization for furnishing a prophylactic vaginal contraceptive. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. New azole derivatives showing antimicrobial effects and their mechanism of antifungal activity by molecular modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, İnci Selin; Saraç, Selma; Sari, Suat; Kart, Didem; Eşsiz Gökhan, Şebnem; Vural, İmran; Dalkara, Sevim

    2017-04-21

    Azole antifungals are potent inhibitors of fungal lanosterol 14α demethylase (CYP51) and have been used for eradication of systemic candidiasis clinically. Herein we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of 1-phenyl/1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethanol esters. Many of these derivatives showed fungal growth inhibition at very low concentrations. Minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) value of 15 was 0.125 μg/mL against Candida albicans. Additionally, some of our compounds, such as 19 (MIC: 0.25 μg/mL), were potent against resistant C. glabrata, a fungal strain less susceptible to some first-line antifungal drugs. We confirmed their antifungal efficacy by antibiofilm test and their safety against human monocytes by cytotoxicity assay. To rationalize their mechanism of action, we performed computational analysis utilizing molecular docking and dynamics simulations on the C. albicans and C. glabrata CYP51 (CACYP51 and CGCYP51) homology models we built. Leu130 and T131 emerged as possible key residues for inhibition of CGCYP51 by 19. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Facile synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular docking studies of novel substituted azole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad; Saleem, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Hanif, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Kang, Sung Kwon; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we synthesized the series of novel azole derivatives and evaluated for enzyme inhibition assays, corresponding kinetic analysis and molecular modeling. Among the investigated bioassays, the oxadiazole derivatives 4a-k were found potent α-glucosidase inhibitors while the Schiff base derivatives 7a-k exhibited considerable potential toward urease inhibition. The inhibition kinetics for the most active compounds were analyzed by the Lineweaver-Burk plots to investigate the possible binding modes of the synthesized compounds toward the tested proteins. Moreover, the detailed docking studies were performed on the synthesized library of 4a-k and 7a-k to study the molecular interaction and binding mode in the active site of the modeled yeast α-glucosidase and Jack Bean Urease, respectively. It could be inferred from docking results that theoretical studies are in close agreement to that of the experimental results. The structure of one of the compound 7k was characterized by the single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis in order to find out the predominant conformation of the molecules.

  3. Biological properties of novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles

    KAUST Repository

    Novak, Maria S.

    2016-03-09

    Since the discovery that nitric oxide (NO) is a physiologically relevant molecule, there has been great interest in the use of metal nitrosyl compounds as antitumor pharmaceuticals. Particularly interesting are those complexes which can deliver NO to biological targets. Ruthenium- and osmium-based compounds offer lower toxicity compared to other metals and show different mechanisms of action as well as different spectra of activity compared to platinum-based drugs. Novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles were studied to elucidate their cytotoxicity and possible interactions with DNA. Apoptosis induction, changes of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and possible formation of reactive oxygen species were investigated as indicators of NO-mediated damage by flow cytometry. Results suggest that ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with the general formula (indazolium)[cis/trans-MCl4(NO)(1H-indazole)] have pronounced cytotoxic potency in cancer cell lines. Especially the more potent ruthenium complexes strongly induce apoptosis associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, and elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, a slight yet not unequivocal trend to accumulation of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate attributable to NO-mediated effects was observed.

  4. Biological properties of novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Maria S; Büchel, Gabriel E; Keppler, Bernhard K; Jakupec, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Since the discovery that nitric oxide (NO) is a physiologically relevant molecule, there has been great interest in the use of metal nitrosyl compounds as antitumor pharmaceuticals. Particularly interesting are those complexes which can deliver NO to biological targets. Ruthenium- and osmium-based compounds offer lower toxicity compared to other metals and show different mechanisms of action as well as different spectra of activity compared to platinum-based drugs. Novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles were studied to elucidate their cytotoxicity and possible interactions with DNA. Apoptosis induction, changes of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and possible formation of reactive oxygen species were investigated as indicators of NO-mediated damage by flow cytometry. Results suggest that ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with the general formula (indazolium)[cis/trans-MCl4(NO)(1H-indazole)] have pronounced cytotoxic potency in cancer cell lines. Especially the more potent ruthenium complexes strongly induce apoptosis associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, and elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, a slight yet not unequivocal trend to accumulation of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate attributable to NO-mediated effects was observed.

  5. In vitro activities of caspofungin, amphotericin B and azoles against Coccidioides posadasii strains from Northeast, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, R A; Brilhante, R S N; Rocha, M F G; Fechine, M A B; Costa, A K F; Camargo, Z P; Sidrim, J J C

    2006-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a systemic infection caused by the soil-dwelling dimorphic fungi Coccidioides spp. The disease is endemic in semiarid Northeast Brazil, where it is caused by C. posadasii. The aim of this study was to perform antifungal susceptibility tests of clinical and environmental strains of C. posadasii from Northeast Brazil. The in vitro activities of caspofungin, amphotericin B and azoles against clinical and environment isolates of C. posadasii were determined in accordance with the NCLLS M-38P macrodilution method. The antifungal susceptibility analysis showed that all the strains of C. posadasii (n = 10) were sensitive to caspofungin (16 microg/ml < or = MIC < or = 32 microg/ml), amphotericin B (0.0625 mug/ml < or = MIC < or = 0.125 microg/ml), ketoconazole (0.039 microg/ml < or = MIC < or = 0.156 microg/ml), itraconazole (0.125 microg/ml < or = MIC < or = 0.5 microg/ml), fluconazole (3.125 microg/ml < or = MIC < or = 6.25 microg/ml), and voriconazole (0.125 microg/ml). This study is the first description of in vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern of Brazilian strains of C. posadasii.

  6. Mechanical properties of wood from Pinus sylvestris L. treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative and with waterborne Copper Azole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Villasante

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: To determine the effect on wood from Pinus sylvestris of treatment with preservatives on mechanical properties and to establish the relation between the penetration and compression strength.Area of study: SpainMaterial and Methods: 40 samples of defect-free wood from Pinus sylvestris L. were treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative (Vacsol Azure WR 2601 and 50 with waterborne Copper Azole (Tanalith E 3492. 40 control samples were not treated (water or preservative. Mechanical resistance to static bending, modulus of elasticity and compression strength parallel to the grain were compared with untreated wood. Regression analysis between the penetration and compression strength parallel was done with the samples treated with waterborne preservative.Main results: The results indicate that the treated wood (with either product presents a statistically significant increase in mechanical resistance in all three mechanical characteristics. The results obtained differ from earlier studies carried out by other authors.There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation of the wood with waterborne Copper Azole . The most probable explanation for these results concerns changes in pressure during treatment.The use of untreated control samples instead of samples treated only with water is more likely to produce significant results in the mechanical resistance studies.Research highlights: Treated wood presents a statistically significant increase in MOE, modulus of rupture to static bending  and parallel compression strength.There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation with waterborne preservative.Keywords: Light Organic Solvent Preservative; MOE; parallel compression; static bending; waterborne Copper Azole; wood technology.

  7. In vitro activity of the antifungal azoles itraconazole and posaconazole against Leishmania amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Teixeira de Macedo-Silva

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, caused by protozoan parasites of the Leishmania genus, is one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases. It is endemic in 98 countries, causing considerable morbidity and mortality. Pentavalent antimonials are the first line of treatment for leishmaniasis except in India. In resistant cases, miltefosine, amphotericin B and pentamidine are used. These treatments are unsatisfactory due to toxicity, limited efficacy, high cost and difficult administration. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop drugs that are efficacious, safe, and more accessible to patients. Trypanosomatids, including Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi, have an essential requirement for ergosterol and other 24-alkyl sterols, which are absent in mammalian cells. Inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis is increasingly recognized as a promising target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. The aim of this work was to investigate the antiproliferative, physiological and ultrastructural effects against Leishmania amazonensis of itraconazole (ITZ and posaconazole (POSA, two azole antifungal agents that inhibit sterol C14α-demethylase (CYP51. Antiproliferative studies demonstrated potent activity of POSA and ITZ: for promastigotes, the IC50 values were 2.74 µM and 0.44 µM for POSA and ITZ, respectively, and for intracellular amastigotes, the corresponding values were 1.63 µM and 0.08 µM, for both stages after 72 h of treatment. Physiological studies revealed that both inhibitors induced a collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, which was consistent with ultrastructural alterations in the mitochondrion. Intense mitochondrial swelling, disorganization and rupture of mitochondrial membranes were observed by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, accumulation of lipid bodies, appearance of autophagosome-like structures and alterations in the kinetoplast were also observed. In conclusion, our results indicate that ITZ and

  8. Frequency of Cutaneous Fungal Infections and Azole Resistance of the Isolates in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

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    Omid Raiesi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic patients are more susceptible to cutaneous fungal infections. The higher blood sugar levels cause increasing the cutaneous fungal infections in these patients. The main objective of this study was to find the frequency of fungal infections among cutaneous lesions of diabetic patients and to investigate azole antifungal agent susceptibility of the isolates. Materials and Methods: In this study, type 1diabetes (n = 78 and type 2 diabetes (n = 44 comprised 47 cases (38.5% with diabetic foot ulcers and 75 cases (61.5% with skin and nail lesions were studied. Fungal infection was confirmed by direct examination and culture methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing by broth microdilution method was performed according to the CLSI M27-A and M38-A references. Results: Out of 122 diabetic patients, thirty (24.5% were affected with fungal infections. Frequency of fungal infection was 19.1% in patients with diabetic foot ulcer and 28% of patients with skin and nail lesions. Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus were the most common species isolated from thirty patients with fungal infection, respectively. Susceptibility testing carried out on 18 representative isolates (13 C. albicans, five C. glabrata revealed that 12 isolates (10 C. albicans and two C. glabrata isolates (66.6% were resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥64 mg/ml to fluconazole (FCZ. Likewise, eight isolates (80% of Aspergillus spp. were resistant (MIC ≥4 mg/ml, to itraconazole. Conclusion: Our finding expands current knowledge about the frequency of fungal infections in diabetic patients. We noted the high prevalence of FCZ-resistant Candida spp., particularly in diabetic foot ulcers. More attention is important in diabetic centers about this neglected issue.

  9. Triazole derivatives with improved in vitro antifungal activity over azole drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu S

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Shichong Yu,1,* Xiaoyun Chai,1,* Yanwei Wang,1 Yongbing Cao,2 Jun Zhang,3 Qiuye Wu,1 Dazhi Zhang,1 Yuanying Jiang,2 Tianhua Yan,4 Qingyan Sun11Department of Organic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Drug Research Center, School of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3Overseas Education Faculty of the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: A series of triazole antifungal agents with piperidine side chains was designed and synthesized. The results of antifungal tests against eight human pathogenic fungi in vitro showed that all the compounds exhibited moderate-to-excellent activities. Molecular docking between 8d and the active site of Candida albicans CYP51 was provided based on the computational docking results. The triazole interacts with the iron of the heme group. The difluorophenyl group is located in the S3 subsite and its fluorine atom (2-F can form H-bonds with Gly307. The side chain is oriented into the S4 subsite and formed hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions with the amino residues. Moreover, the phenyl group in the side chain interacts with the phenol group of Phe380 through the formation of π–π face-to-edge interactions.Keywords: synthesis, CYP51, molecular docking, azole agents

  10. INK128 Exhibits Synergy with Azoles against Exophiala spp. and Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lujuan; Sun, Yi; He, Chengyan; Li, Ming; Zeng, Tongxiang; Lu, Qiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Infections of Exophiala spp. and Fusarium spp. are often chronic and recalcitrant. Systemic disseminations, which mostly occur in immunocompromised patients, are often refractory to available antifungal therapies. The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) orchestrates cell growth and proliferation in response to nutrients and growth factors, which are important for pathogenicity and virulence. INK128 is a second-generation ATP-competitive TOR inhibitor, which binds the TOR catalytic domain and selectively inhibits TOR. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro activities of INK128 alone and the interactions of INK128 with conventional antifungal drugs including itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, and amphotericin B against 18 strains of Exophiala spp. and 10 strains of Fusarium spp. via broth microdilution checkerboard technique system adapted from Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution method M38-A2. INK128 alone was inactive against all isolates tested. However, favorable synergistic effects between INK128 and voriconazole were observed in 61% Exophiala strains and 60% Fusarium strains, despite Fusarium strains exhibited high MIC values (4-8 μg/ml) against voriconazole. In addition, synergistic effects of INK128/itraconazole were shown in 33% Exophiala strains and 30% Fusarium strains, while synergy of INK128/posaconazole were observed in 28% Exophiala strains and 30% Fusarium strains. The effective working ranges of INK128 were 0.125-2 μg/ml and 1-4 μg/ml against Exophiala isolates and Fusarium isolates, respectively. No synergistic effect was observed when INK128 was combined with amphotericin B. No antagonism was observed in all combinations. In conclusion, INK128 could enhance the in vitro antifungal activity of voriconazole, itraconazole and posaconazole against Exophiala spp. and Fusarium spp., suggesting that azoles, especially voriconazole, combined with TOR kinase inhibitor might provide a potential strategy to

  11. Mechanical properties of wood from Pinus sylvestris L. treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative and with waterborne Copper Azole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villasante, A.; Laina, R.; Rojas, J. A. M.; Rojas, I. M.; Vignote, S.

    2013-07-01

    Aim of study: To determine the effect on wood from Pinus sylvestris of treatment with preservatives on mechanical properties and to establish the relation between the penetration and compression strenght. Area of study: Spain. Material and methods: 40 samples of defect-free wood from Pinus sylvestris L. were treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative (Vacsol Azure WR 2601) and 50 with waterborne Copper Azole (Tanalith E 3492). 40 control samples were not treated (water or preservative). Mechanical resistance to static bending, modulus of elasticity and compression strength parallel to the grain were compared with untreated wood. Regression analysis between the penetration and compression strength parallel was done with the samples treated with waterborne preservative. Main results: The results indicate that the treated wood (with either product) presents a statistically significant increase in mechanical resistance in all three mechanical characteristics. The results obtained differ from earlier studies carried out by other authors. There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation of the wood with waterborne Copper Azole. The most probable explanation for these results concerns changes in pressure during treatment. The use of untreated control samples instead of samples treated only with water is more likely to produce significant results in the mechanical resistance studies. Research highlights: Treated wood presents a statistically significant increase in MOE, modulus of rupture to static bending and parallel compression strength. There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation with waterborne preservative. (Author)

  12. A comparison of the embryonic stem cell test and whole embryo culture assay combined with the BeWo placental passage model for predicting the embryotoxicity of azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto; Verhoef, Aart; Gomes, Caroline A; van Dongen, Catharina W; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Piersma, Aldert H; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, we show the value of combining toxico-dynamic and -kinetic in vitro approaches for embryotoxicity testing of azoles. Both the whole embryo culture (WEC) and the embryonic stem cells test (EST) predicted the in vivo potency ranking of twelve tested azoles with moderate accuracy. Combining these results with relative placental transfer rates (Papp values) as determined in the BeWo cell culture model, increased the predictability of both WEC and EST, with R 2 values increasing from 0.51 to 0.87 and from 0.35 to 0.60, respectively. The comparison of these in vitro systems correlated well (R 2  = 0.67), correctly identifying the in vivo strong and weak embryotoxicants. Evaluating also specific gene responses related with the retinoic acid and sterol biosynthesis pathways, which represent the toxicological and fungicidal mode of action of azoles respectively in the WEC and EST, we observed that the differential regulation of Dhrs3 and Msmo1 reached higher magnitudes in both systems compared to Cyp26a1 and Cyp51. Establishing sensitive biomarkers across the in vitro systems for studying the underlying mechanism of action of chemicals, such as azoles, is valuable for comparing alternative in vitro models and for improving insight in the mechanism of developmental toxicity of chemicals. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular design of two sterol 14α-demethylase homology models and their interactions with the azole antifungals ketoconazole and bifonazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Bernd; Raub, Stephan; Marian, Christel; Höltje, Hans-Dieter

    2005-03-01

    Sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) is one of the known major targets for azole antifungals. Therapeutic side effects of these antifungals are based on interactions of the azoles with the human analogue enzyme. This study describes for the first time a comparison of a human CYP51 (HU-CYP51) homology model with a homology model of the fungal CYP51 of Candida albicans (CA-CYP51). Both models are constructed by using the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MT-CYP51 (PDB code: 1EA1). The binding mode of the azole ketoconazole is investigated in molecular dynamics simulations with the GROMACS force field. The usage of special parameters for the iron azole complex binding is necessary to obtain the correct complex geometry in the active site of the enzyme models. Based on the dynamics simulations it is possible to explain the enantioselectivity of the human enzyme and also to predict the binding mode of the isomers of ketoconazole in the active site of the fungal model.

  14. Loss of C-5 Sterol Desaturase Activity Results in Increased Resistance to Azole and Echinocandin Antifungals in a Clinical Isolate of Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, Jeffrey M; Dickens, C Michael; Parker, Josie E; Caudle, Kelly E; Manigaba, Kayihura; Whaley, Sarah G; Nishimoto, Andrew T; Luna-Tapia, Arturo; Roy, Sujoy; Zhang, Qing; Barker, Katherine S; Palmer, Glen E; Sutter, Thomas R; Homayouni, Ramin; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Kelly, Steven L; Rogers, P David

    2017-09-01

    Among emerging non- albicans Candida species, Candida parapsilosis is of particular concern as a cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections in neonatal and intensive care unit patients. While fluconazole and echinocandins are considered effective treatments for such infections, recent reports of fluconazole and echinocandin resistance in C. parapsilosis indicate a growing problem. The present study describes a novel mechanism of antifungal resistance in this organism affecting susceptibility to azole and echinocandin antifungals in a clinical isolate obtained from a patient with prosthetic valve endocarditis. Transcriptome analysis indicated differential expression of several genes in the resistant isolate, including upregulation of ergosterol biosynthesis pathway genes ERG2 , ERG5 , ERG6 , ERG11 , ERG24 , ERG25 , and UPC2 Whole-genome sequencing revealed that the resistant isolate possessed an ERG3 mutation resulting in a G111R amino acid substitution. Sterol profiles indicated a reduction in sterol desaturase activity as a result of this mutation. Replacement of both mutant alleles in the resistant isolate with the susceptible isolate's allele restored wild-type susceptibility to all azoles and echinocandins tested. Disruption of ERG3 in the susceptible and resistant isolates resulted in a loss of sterol desaturase activity, high-level azole resistance, and an echinocandin-intermediate to -resistant phenotype. While disruption of ERG3 in C. albicans resulted in azole resistance, echinocandin MICs, while elevated, remained within the susceptible range. This work demonstrates that the G111R substitution in Erg3 is wholly responsible for the altered azole and echinocandin susceptibilities observed in this C. parapsilosis isolate and is the first report of an ERG3 mutation influencing susceptibility to the echinocandins. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. An improved extraction method of rapeseed oil sample preparation for the subsequent determination in it of azole class fungicides by gas chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail F. Zayats

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of 19 azole class pesticides in hexane/aqueous–organic mixtures systems and rapeseed oil (or oil solution in hexane/organic solvents has been studied at 20 ± 1 °C. The distribution constants (P and coefficients (D between hydrocarbon and polar phase are calculated. It is found that all the studied pesticides are hydrophobic, i.e., in hexane–water system logP ≫ 0. Replacement of water by organic solvents results in sharp logP falling, and their values become negative. It is revealed that solutions of strong inorganic acids in anhydrous acetonitrile extract azole class pesticides from hexane and vegetable oils most fully and selectively. In particular, the acidification of acetonitrile causes a drop of D values in 50–2000 times for the majority of the studied pesticides. This phenomenon was used for the development of the improved technique for the quantitative analysis of a widely used azole class pesticides, which can be presented at trace levels in rapeseed oil. The proposed methodology is based on dissociation extraction (DE of azoles using perchloric acid in anhydrous acetonitrile, with following clean-up of acetonitrile extract from organic impurities by hexane and aqueous solution of dipotassium hydrogen orthophosphate, and final GC–ECD (gas chromatography with electron capture detection determination of azole fungicides. The values of obtained recoveries were between 85% and 115% with RSD values below 10%. The obtained limits of quantitation, ranged from 3.0 to 300 μg kg−1, are below the maximum residue levels (MRLs set by the European Union for the majority of pesticides. The developed method was successfully applied to different rapeseed oil samples.

  16. Azole-based chemoprophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in paediatric patients with acute leukaemia: an internal audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Sara; Pieper, Stephanie; Kolve, Hedwig; Goletz, Grazyna; Jürgens, Heribert; Groll, Andreas H

    2014-03-01

    Children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and recurrent acute leukaemias (RALs) are at high risk of life-threatening invasive fungal infections (IFIs). We analysed implementation, safety and efficacy of a standard operating procedure for oral, azole-based, mould-active antifungal prophylaxis. Patients with AML and RALs aged ≥13 years received 200 mg of posaconazole three times daily and patients aged 2-12 years received 200 mg of voriconazole two times daily from the completion of chemotherapy until haematopoietic recovery. Algorithms for fever or focal findings in all patients with haematological malignancies included blood cultures, high-resolution CT and other appropriate imaging, serial serum galactomannan, invasive diagnostics and pre-emptive therapy with change in class if on antifungal medication. From 2006 to 2010, 40 patients (0.8-17 years; 21 males) with newly diagnosed AML (n = 31) or RAL (n = 9) were admitted, of whom 36 received a total of 149 courses of chemotherapy (reasons for exclusion: contraindications and early death ≤3 days). Azole prophylaxis was given in 87.2% (n = 130/149) of episodes. Pre-emptive antifungal therapy for pulmonary infiltrates was initiated in 5/36 (13.9%) patients or 6/130 (4.6%) episodes for a duration of 3-22 days. No proven or probable IFIs occurred. Adverse events (AEs) were common but mostly low grade and reversible. Three courses (2.3%) were discontinued due to AEs. In simultaneously admitted new patients with acute lymphatic leukaemia (ALL; n = 101) and paediatric lymphomas (n = 29) not receiving standard antifungal prophylaxis, proven/probable IFIs occurred in 4 patients with ALL (4.0%) and 7/130 patients (5.4%) received pre-emptive therapy. Azole-based, mould-active antifungal prophylaxis in high-risk paediatric patients with AML and RALs was satisfactorily implemented, well tolerated and effective. The low rate of IFIs in patients with ALL/lymphoma supports the lack of a general indication for

  17. Azole affinity of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) enzymes from Candida albicans and Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrilow, Andrew G; Parker, Josie E; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2013-03-01

    Candida albicans CYP51 (CaCYP51) (Erg11), full-length Homo sapiens CYP51 (HsCYP51), and truncated Δ60HsCYP51 were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. CaCYP51 and both HsCYP51 enzymes bound lanosterol (K(s), 14 to 18 μM) and catalyzed the 14α-demethylation of lanosterol using Homo sapiens cytochrome P450 reductase and NADPH as redox partners. Both HsCYP51 enzymes bound clotrimazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole tightly (dissociation constants [K(d)s], 42 to 131 nM) but bound fluconazole (K(d), ~30,500 nM) and voriconazole (K(d), ~2,300 nM) weakly, whereas CaCYP51 bound all five medical azole drugs tightly (K(d)s, 10 to 56 nM). Selectivity for CaCYP51 over HsCYP51 ranged from 2-fold (clotrimazole) to 540-fold (fluconazole) among the medical azoles. In contrast, selectivity for CaCYP51 over Δ60HsCYP51 with agricultural azoles ranged from 3-fold (tebuconazole) to 9-fold (propiconazole). Prothioconazole bound extremely weakly to CaCYP51 and Δ60HsCYP51, producing atypical type I UV-visible difference spectra (K(d)s, 6,100 and 910 nM, respectively), indicating that binding was not accomplished through direct coordination with the heme ferric ion. Prothioconazole-desthio (the intracellular derivative of prothioconazole) bound tightly to both CaCYP51 and Δ60HsCYP51 (K(d), ~40 nM). These differences in binding affinities were reflected in the observed 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values, which were 9- to 2,000-fold higher for Δ60HsCYP51 than for CaCYP51, with the exception of tebuconazole, which strongly inhibited both CYP51 enzymes. In contrast, prothioconazole weakly inhibited CaCYP51 (IC(50), ~150 μM) and did not significantly inhibit Δ60HsCYP51.

  18. Evaluation of reference genes for real-time quantitative PCR studies in Candida glabrata following azole treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qingdi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of stable and suitable reference genes for real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR is a crucial prerequisite for reliable gene expression analysis under different experimental conditions. The present study aimed to identify reference genes as internal controls for gene expression studies by RT-qPCR in azole-stimulated Candida glabrata. Results The expression stability of 16 reference genes under fluconazole stress was evaluated using fold change and standard deviation computations with the hkgFinder tool. Our data revealed that the mRNA expression levels of three ribosomal RNAs (RDN5.8, RDN18, and RDN25 remained stable in response to fluconazole, while PGK1, UBC7, and UBC13 mRNAs showed only approximately 2.9-, 3.0-, and 2.5-fold induction by azole, respectively. By contrast, mRNA levels of the other 10 reference genes (ACT1, EF1α, GAPDH, PPIA, RPL2A, RPL10, RPL13A, SDHA, TUB1, and UBC4 were dramatically increased in C. glabrata following antifungal treatment, exhibiting changes ranging from 4.5- to 32.7-fold. We also assessed the expression stability of these reference genes using the 2-ΔΔCT method and three other software packages. The stability rankings of the reference genes by geNorm and the 2-ΔΔCT method were identical to those by hkgFinder, whereas the stability rankings by BestKeeper and NormFinder were notably different. We then validated the suitability of six candidate reference genes (ACT1, PGK1, RDN5.8, RDN18, UBC7, and UBC13 as internal controls for ten target genes in this system using the comparative CT method. Our validation experiments passed for all six reference genes analyzed except RDN18, where the amplification efficiency of RDN18 was different from that of the ten target genes. Finally, we demonstrated that the relative quantification of target gene expression varied according to the endogenous control used, highlighting the importance of the choice of internal controls in such

  19. Striking Difference in Antiproliferative Activity of Ruthenium- and Osmium-Nitrosyl Complexes with Azole Heterocycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Ruthenium nitrosyl complexes of the general formulas (cation)+[cis-RuCl4(NO)(Hazole)]−, where (cation)+ = (H2ind)+, Hazole = 1H-indazole (Hind) (1c), (cation)+ = (H2pz)+, Hazole = 1H-pyrazole (Hpz) (2c), (cation)+ = (H2bzim)+, Hazole = 1H-benzimidazole (Hbzim) (3c), (cation)+ = (H2im)+, Hazole = 1H-imidazole (Him) (4c) and (cation)+[trans-RuCl4(NO)(Hazole)]−, where (cation)+ = (H2ind)+, Hazole = 1H-indazole (1t), (cation)+ = (H2pz)+, Hazole = 1H-pyrazole (2t), as well as osmium analogues of the general formulas (cation)+[cis-OsCl4(NO)(Hazole)]−, where (cation)+ = (n-Bu4N)+, Hazole =1H-indazole (5c), 1H-pyrazole (6c), 1H-benzimidazole (7c), 1H-imidazole (8c), (cation)+ = Na+; Hazole =1H-indazole (9c), 1H-benzimidazole (10c), (cation)+ = (H2ind)+, Hazole = 1H-indazole (11c), (cation)+ = H2pz+, Hazole = 1H-pyrazole (12c), (cation)+ = (H2im)+, Hazole = 1H-imidazole (13c), and (cation)+[trans-OsCl4(NO)(Hazole)]−, where (cation)+ = n-Bu4N+, Hazole = 1H-indazole (5t), 1H-pyrazole (6t), (cation)+ = Na+, Hazole = 1H-indazole (9t), (cation)+ = (H2ind)+, Hazole = 1H-indazole (11t), (cation)+ = (H2pz)+, Hazole = 1H-pyrazole (12t), have been synthesized. The compounds have been comprehensively characterized by elemental analysis, ESI mass spectrometry, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV–vis, 1D and 2D NMR) and X-ray crystallography (1c·CHCl3, 1t·CHCl3, 2t, 3c, 6c, 6t, 8c). The antiproliferative activity of water-soluble compounds (1c, 1t, 3c, 4c and 9c, 9t, 10c, 11c, 11t, 12c, 12t, 13c) in the human cancer cell lines A549 (nonsmall cell lung carcinoma), CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), and SW480 (colon adenocarcinoma) has been assayed. The effects of metal (Ru vs Os), cis/trans isomerism, and azole heterocycle identity on cytotoxic potency and cell line selectivity have been elucidated. Ruthenium complexes (1c, 1t, 3c, and 4c) yielded IC50 values in the low micromolar concentration range. In contrast to most pairs of analogous ruthenium and osmium complexes known, they turned

  20. Characterization of Mononuclear Non-heme Iron(III)-Superoxo Complex with a Five-Azole Ligand Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddon, Frédéric; Chiba, Yosuke; Nakazawa, Jun; Ohta, Takehiro; Ogura, Takashi; Hikichi, Shiro

    2015-06-15

    Reaction of O2 with a high-spin mononuclear iron(II) complex supported by a five-azole donor set yields the corresponding mononuclear non-heme iron(III)-superoxo species, which was characterized by UV/Vis spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. (1)H NMR analysis reveals diamagnetic nature of the superoxo complex arising from antiferromagnetic coupling between the spins on the low-spin iron(III) and superoxide. This superoxo species reacts with H-atom donating reagents to give a low-spin iron(III)-hydroperoxo species showing characteristic UV/Vis, resonance Raman, and EPR spectra. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Synergistic effects of tacrolimus and azole antifungal compounds in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant Candida glabrata isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bedin Denardi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In vitro interaction between tacrolimus (FK506 and four azoles (fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole against thirty clinical isolates of both fluconazole susceptible and -resistant Candida glabrata were evaluated by the checkerboard microdilution method. Synergistic, indifferent or antagonism interactions were found for combinations of the antifungal agents and FK506. A larger synergistic effect was observed for the combinations of FK506 with itraconazole and voriconazole (43%, followed by that of the combination with ketoconazole (37%, against fluconazole-susceptible isolates. For fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata, a higher synergistic effect was obtained from FK506 combined with ketoconazole (77%, itraconazole (73%, voriconazole (63% and fluconazole (60%. The synergisms that we observed in vitro, notably against fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates, are promising and warrant further analysis of their applications in experimental in vivo studies.

  2. Combination effects of (tri)azole fungicides on hormone production and xenobiotic metabolism in a human placental cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, Svenja; Koehn, Sophie; Hirsch-Ernst, Karen; Pfeil, Rudolf; Kneuer, Carsten; Marx-Stoelting, Philip

    2014-09-17

    Consumers are exposed to multiple residues of different pesticides via the diet. Therefore, EU legislation for pesticides requires the evaluation of single active substances as well as the consideration of combination effects. Hence the analysis of combined effects of substances in a broad dose range represents a key challenge to current experimental and regulatory toxicology. Here we report evidence for additive effects for (tri)azole fungicides, a widely used group of antifungal agents, in the human placental cell line Jeg-3. In addition to the triazoles cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, flusilazole and tebuconazole and the azole fungicide prochloraz also pesticides from other chemical classes assumed to act via different modes of action (i.e., the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the triazinylsulfonylurea herbicide triflusulfuron-methyl) were investigated. Endpoints analysed include synthesis of steroid hormone production (progesterone and estradiol) and gene expression of steroidogenic and non-steroidogenic cytochrome-P-450 (CYP) enzymes. For the triazoles and prochloraz, a dose dependent inhibition of progesterone production was observed and additive effects could be confirmed for several combinations of these substances in vitro. The non-triazoles chlorpyrifos and triflusulfuron-methyl did not affect this endpoint and, in line with this finding, no additivity was observed when these substances were applied in mixtures with prochloraz. While prochloraz slightly increased aromatase expression and estradiol production and triflusulfuron-methyl decreased estradiol production, none of the other substances had effects on the expression levels of steroidogenic CYP-enzymes in Jeg-3 cells. For some triazoles, prochloraz and chlorpyrifos a significant induction of CYP1A1 mRNA expression and potential combination effects for this endpoint were observed. Inhibition of CYP1A1 mRNA induction by the AhR inhibitor CH223191 indicated AhR receptor dependence this effect.

  3. The widely used ATB FUNGUS 3 automated readings in China and its misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles: challenges for developing countries' clinical microbiology labs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available The rapid development in the clinical microbiology diagnostic assays presents more challenges for developing countries than for the developed world, especially in the area of test validation before the introduction of new tests. Here we report on the misleading high MICs of Candida spp. to azoles using the ATB FUNGUS 3 (bioMérieux, La Balme-les Grottes, France with automated readings in China to highlight the dangers of introducing a diagnostic assay without validation. ATB FUNGUS 3 is the most commonly used commercial antifungal susceptibility testing method in China. An in-depth analysis of data showed higher levels of resistance to azoles when ATB FUNGUS 3 strips were read automatically than when read visually. Based on this finding, the performance of ATB FUNGUS 3, read both visually and automatically, was evaluated by testing 218 isolates of five clinically important Candida species, using broth microdilution (BMD following CLSI M27-A3 as the gold-standard. The overall essential agreement (EA between ATB visual readings and BMD was 99.1%. In contrast, the ATB automated readings showed higher discrepancies with BMD, with overall EA of 86.2%, and specifically lower EA was observed for fluconazole (80.7%, voriconazole (77.5%, and itraconazole (73.4%, which was most likely due to the trailing effect of azoles. The major errors in azole drug susceptibilities by ATB automated readings is a concern in China that can result in misleading clinical antifungal drug selection and pseudo high rates of antifungal resistance. Therefore, the ATB visual reading is generally recommended. In the meantime, we propose a practical algorithm to be followed for ATB FUNGUS 3 antifungal susceptibility for Candida spp. before the improvement in the automated reading system.

  4. Synergistic antimicrobial activity of Boswellia serrata Roxb. ex Colebr. (Burseraceae) essential oil with various azoles against pathogens associated with skin, scalp and nail infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhasivam, S; Palanivel, S; Ghosh, S

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobials from natural sources have gained immense importance in recent times to combat the global challenge of antibiotic resistance. Essential oils are implicated in antimicrobial action against several species. Here, we have screened nine commercially available essential oils for their antimicrobial activity against organisms associated with skin, scalp and nail infections mainly Propionibacterium acnes, Malassezia spp., Candida albicans and Trichophyton spp. Among nine essential oils, Boswellia serrata essential oil demonstrated superior antimicrobial activity against all the micro-organisms and surprisingly it showed maximum activity against Trichophyton spp. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of B. serrata oil indicates a major composition of α thujene, ρ cymene and sabinene. Additionally, B. serrata oil was found to inhibit Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm, and its combination with azoles has shown synergistic activity against azole-resistant strain of C. albicans. These broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities of B. serrata oil will make it an ideal candidate for topical use. Eradication of skin and nail infections still remain a challenge and there are serious concerns regarding the recurrence of the diseases associated with these infections. Antimicrobials from plant sources are gaining importance in therapeutics because they encounter minimal challenges of emergence of resistance. We have demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of Boswellia serrata essential oil against micro-organisms involved in skin, scalp and nail infections, especially if it has shown favourable synergistic antifungal activity in combination with azoles against the azole-resistant Candida albicans strain. Thus, B. serrata oil can be one of the plausible therapeutic agents for management of skin, scalp and nail infections. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Screening of antifungal azole drugs and agrochemicals with an adapted alamarBlue-based assay demonstrates antibacterial activity of croconazole against Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Nicole; Röltgen, Katharina; Witschel, Matthias; Pluschke, Gerd

    2012-12-01

    An alamarBlue-based growth inhibition assay has been adapted for the thermosensitive and slow-growing pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. The standardized test procedure enables medium-throughput screening of preselected compound libraries. Testing of a set of 48 azoles with known antifungal activity led to the identification of an imidazole antifungal displaying an inhibitory dose (ID) of 9 μM for M. ulcerans.

  6. Measuring internal azole and pyrethroid pesticide concentrations in Daphnia magna using QuEChERS and GC-ECD--method development with a focus on matrix effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmann, Andreas; Cedergreen, Nina; Christensen, Jan H

    2016-02-01

    Pyrethroids are highly toxic towards aquatic macroinvertebrates such as Daphnia magna and can be synergized when co-occurring with azole fungicides. A sensitive analytical method for the measurement of azole-pyrethroid mixtures in aquatic macroinvertebrates is not available at present. We developed and validated an extraction, cleanup, and quantification procedure for four pyrethroid insecticides and four azole fungicides at the picograms per milligram wet weight level in D. magna using a QuEChERS approach and GC-ECD analysis. Short- and long-term matrix effects were analyzed by injection of a series of extracts from D. magna, and the best surrogate standards were identified through correlation analysis of analyte responses. The presence of matrix clearly stabilized the analyte responses (≤6% relative standard deviation of peak area compared to up to 22% when injected without matrix). The sensitivity was high with detection limits and limits of quantification between 58-168 and 119-571 pg mg(wet weight)(-1) for the azoles and 5.8-27 and 12-84 pg mg(wet weight)(-1) for the pyrethroids, respectively. Accuracy (% recovery) was between 95 and 111% and the precision (repeatability) below 10% relative standard deviation for all analytes. In the case of prochloraz, α-cypermethrin, and deltamethrin, normalization to surrogate standards led to a clear improvement of accuracy and precision by up to 8 and 4%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the measurement of internal α-cypermethrin concentrations in D. magna under environmentally relevant exposure conditions (exposure to a pulse in the micrograms per liter range) with and without co-exposure to propiconazole.

  7. Embryotoxic and pharmacologic potency ranking of six azoles in the rat whole embryo culture by morphological and transcriptomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto; Verhoef, Aart; Pennings, Jeroen L A; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Piersma, Aldert H

    2017-05-01

    Differential gene expression analysis in the rat whole embryo culture (WEC) assay provides mechanistic insight into the embryotoxicity of test compounds. In our study, we hypothesized that comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of rat embryos exposed to six azoles (flusilazole, triadimefon, ketoconazole, miconazole, difenoconazole and prothioconazole) could lead to a better mechanism-based understanding of their embryotoxicity and pharmacological action. For evaluating embryotoxicity, we applied the total morphological scoring system (TMS) in embryos exposed for 48h. The compounds tested showed embryotoxicity in a dose-response fashion. Functional analysis of differential gene expression after 4h exposure at the ID 10 (effective dose for 10% decreased TMS), revealed the sterol biosynthesis pathway and embryonic development genes, dominated by genes in the retinoic acid (RA) pathway, albeit in a differential way. Flusilazole, ketoconazole and triadimefon were the most potent compounds affecting the RA pathway, while in terms of regulation of sterol function, difenoconazole and ketoconazole showed the most pronounced effects. Dose-dependent analysis of the effects of flusilazole revealed that the RA pathway related genes were already differentially expressed at low dose levels while the sterol pathway showed strong regulation at higher embryotoxic doses, suggesting that this pathway is less predictive for the observed embryotoxicity. A similar analysis at the 24-hour time point indicated an additional time-dependent difference in the aforementioned pathways regulated by flusilazole. In summary, the rat WEC assay in combination with transcriptomics could add a mechanistic insight into the embryotoxic potency ranking and pharmacological mode of action of the tested compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) inspired azole-quinoline based fluorophores: Synthesis and photophysical properties study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padalkar, Vikas S.; Sekar, Nagaiyan, E-mail: n.sekar@ictmumbai.edu.in

    2014-11-15

    7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl)quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was obtained by the condensation reaction of p-amino salicylic acid and 4-nitrophenylmalonadialdehyde which was obtained from phenylacetonitrile through nitration, hydrolysis and Vilsmeier reaction. 7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl) quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was condensed with different o-aminophenols or o-aminothiophenol in ethanol in the presence of phosphorustrichloride. Synthesized quinoline contained benzimidazole and benzothiazole moieties. Photophysical behaviors of these compounds in solvents of different polarities were studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds showed single absorption in all the studied solvents. The dual emissions (normal emission and ESIPT emission) as well as large Stokes' shift emission pattern were observed for the synthesized fluorophores. The photophysical study shows that the emission properties of the compounds depend on the solvent polarity. The photophysical properties of the compounds were compared with structurally analogous ESIPT quinoline. Thermal stability of the compounds was studied using thermogravimetric analysis and results show that compounds are thermally stable up to 300 °C. The synthesized quinoline derivatives were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR and {sup 1}H –NMR, {sup 13}C –NMR spectroscopy and mass spectral analysis. - Highlights: • First and unique study of quinoline derivatives contain ESIPT azole unit at 6-position and hydroxyl group at 7-position. • Compounds are fluorescent with considerable quantum yields. • All compounds showed absorption in ultraviolet region and emission in visible region with large Stokes' shift. • The photophysical properties of new compounds were compared with reported ESIPT quinoline analogous.

  9. Combination Effects of (TriAzole Fungicides on Hormone Production and Xenobiotic Metabolism in a Human Placental Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja Rieke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Consumers are exposed to multiple residues of different pesticides via the diet. Therefore, EU legislation for pesticides requires the evaluation of single active substances as well as the consideration of combination effects. Hence the analysis of combined effects of substances in a broad dose range represents a key challenge to current experimental and regulatory toxicology. Here we report evidence for additive effects for (triazole fungicides, a widely used group of antifungal agents, in the human placental cell line Jeg-3. In addition to the triazoles cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, flusilazole and tebuconazole and the azole fungicide prochloraz also pesticides from other chemical classes assumed to act via different modes of action (i.e., the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the triazinylsulfonylurea herbicide triflusulfuron-methyl were investigated. Endpoints analysed include synthesis of steroid hormone production (progesterone and estradiol and gene expression of steroidogenic and non-steroidogenic cytochrome-P-450 (CYP enzymes. For the triazoles and prochloraz, a dose dependent inhibition of progesterone production was observed and additive effects could be confirmed for several combinations of these substances in vitro. The non-triazoles chlorpyrifos and triflusulfuron-methyl did not affect this endpoint and, in line with this finding, no additivity was observed when these substances were applied in mixtures with prochloraz. While prochloraz slightly increased aromatase expression and estradiol production and triflusulfuron-methyl decreased estradiol production, none of the other substances had effects on the expression levels of steroidogenic CYP-enzymes in Jeg-3 cells. For some triazoles, prochloraz and chlorpyrifos a significant induction of CYP1A1 mRNA expression and potential combination effects for this endpoint were observed. Inhibition of CYP1A1 mRNA induction by the AhR inhibitor CH223191 indicated AhR receptor dependence this

  10. Two missense mutations, E123Q and K151E, identified in the ERG11 allele of an azole-resistant isolate of Candida kefyr recovered from a stem cell transplant patient for acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Couzigou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first cloning and nucleotide sequencing of an ERG11 allele from a clinical isolate of Candida kefyr cross-resistant to azole antifungals. It was recovered from a stem cell transplant patient, in an oncohematology unit exhibiting unexpected high prevalence of C. kefyr. Two amino acid substitutions were identified: K151E, whose role in fluconazole resistance was already demonstrated in Candida albicans, and E123Q, a new substitution never described so far in azole-resistant Candida yeast.

  11. [In vitro antifungal activity of azoles and amphotericin B against Malassezia furfur by the CLSI M27-A3 microdilution and Etest®methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis-Marín, Juan Camilo; Rodríguez-Bocanegra, María Ximena; Pulido-Villamarín, Adriana Del Pilar; Castañeda-Salazar, Rubiela; Celis-Ramírez, Adriana Marcela; Linares-Linares, Melva Yomary

    Malassezia furfur is a human skin commensal yeast that can cause skin and opportunistic systemic infections. Given its lipid dependant status, the reference methods established by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) to evaluate antifungal susceptibility in yeasts are not applicable. To evaluate the in vitro susceptibility of M. furfur isolates from infections in humans to antifungals of clinical use. The susceptibility profile to amphotericin B, itraconazole, ketoconazole and voriconazole of 20 isolates of M. furfur, using the broth microdilution method (CLSI M27-A3) and Etest ® , was evaluated. Itraconazole and voriconazole had the highest antifungal activity against the isolates tested. The essential agreement between the two methods for azoles antifungal activity was in the region of 60-85% and the categorical agreement was around 70-80%, while the essential and categorical agreement for amphotericin B was 10%. The azoles were the compounds that showed the highest antifungal activity against M. furfur, as determined by the two techniques used; however more studies need to be performed to support that Etest ® is a reliable method before its implementation as a routine clinical laboratory test. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Overexpression of Aldo-Keto-Reductase in Azole-resistant Clinical Isolates of Candida Glabrata Determined by cDNA-AFLP

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    Mansour Heidari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida glabrata causes significant medical problems in immunocompromised patients. Many strains of this yeast are intrinsically resistant to azole antifungal agents, and treatment is problematic, leading to high morbidity and mortality rates in immunosuppressed individuals. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the genes involved in the drug resistance of clinical isolates of C. glabrata.Methods: The clinical isolates of C. glabrata were collected in an epidemiological survey of candidal infection inimmunocompromised patients and consisted of four fluconazole and itraconazole resistant isolates, two fluconazoleand itraconazole sensitive isolates, and C. glabrata CBS 138 as reference strain. Antifungal susceptibility patterns ofthe organisms were determined beforehand by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. The potentialgene(s implicated in antifungal resistance were investigated using complementary DNA- Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was carried out to evaluate the expression of gene(s in resistant isolates as compared to sensitive and reference strains.Results and conclusions: The aldo-keto-reductase superfamily (AKR gene was upregulated in the resistant clinicalisolates as assessed by cDNA-AFLP. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed AKR mRNA expression approximately twice that seen in the sensitive isolates. Overexpression of the AKR gene was associated with increased fluconazole and itraconazole resistance in C. glabrata. The data suggest that upregulation of the AKR gene might give a new insight into the mechanism of azole resistance.

  13. Assessment of azole fungicides as a tool to control growth of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin B1and B2production in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Eva M; Gómez, José Vicente; Gimeno-Adelantado, José Vicente; Romera, David; Mateo-Castro, Rufino; Jiménez, Misericordia

    2017-06-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a highly aflatoxin (AF)-producing species infecting maize and other crops. It is dominant in tropical regions, but it is also considered an emerging problem associated with climate change in Europe. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of azole fungicides (prochloraz, tebuconazole and a 2:1 (w/w) mixture of prochloraz plus tebuconazole) to control the growth of A. flavus and AF production in yeast-extract-sucrose (YES) agar and in maize kernels under different water activities (a w ) and temperatures. Aflatoxins B 1 and B 2 were determined by LC with fluorescence detection and post-column derivatisation of AFB 1 . In YES medium and maize grains inoculated with conidia of A. flavus, the growth rate (GR) of the fungus and AFB 1 and AFB 2 production were significantly influenced by temperature and treatment. In YES medium and maize kernels, optimal temperatures for GR and AF production were 37 and 25°C, respectively. In maize kernels, spore germination was not detected at the combination 37ºC/0.95 a w ; however, under these conditions germination was found in YES medium. All fungicides were more effective at 0.99 than 0.95 a w , and at 37 than 25ºC. Fungicides effectiveness was prochloraz > prochloraz plus tebuconazole (2:1) > tebuconazole. AFs were not detected in cultures containing the highest fungicide doses, and only very low AF levels were found in cultures containing 0.1 mg l - 1 prochloraz or 5.0 mg l - 1 tebuconazole. Azoles proved to be highly efficient in reducing A. flavus growth and AF production, although stimulation of AF production was found under particular conditions and low-dosage treatments. Maize kernels were a more favourable substrate for AF biosynthesis than YES medium. This paper is the first comparative study on the effects of different azole formulations against A. flavus and AF production in a semi-synthetic medium and in maize grain under different environmental conditions.

  14. Mutations and/or Overexpressions of ERG4 and ERG11 Genes in Clinical Azoles-Resistant Isolates of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenli; Yang, Jing; Xi, Zhiqin; Qiao, Zusha; Lv, Yaping; Wang, Yiru; Ma, Yan; Wang, Yanqing; Cen, Wen

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to investigate whether mutations and/or overexpressions of ERG4 and ERG11 genes were involved in drug resistance to azoles in Candida albicans. Totally, 34 clinical isolates of C. albicans were included in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests, including 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FCA), itraconazole (ITR), and voriconazole (VRC), were performed by broth microdilution method. Mutations in the ERG4 and ERG11 genes sequence were detected. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of ERG4 and ERG11 were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The correlation of the expression levels of ERG4 with ERG11 genes in susceptible isolates and resistant isolates was analyzed by Pearson's correlation analysis. Among 34 C. albicans isolates, 52.94%, 70.59%, and 50.00% isolates were resistant to FCA, ITR, and VRC, respectively. Sequencing results revealed that only 2 silent mutations were found in ERG4 gene, while 10 amino acid substitutions, including 6 reported previously and 4 new identified, were frequently found in ERG11 gene. The mRNA levels of ERG4 and ERG11 genes were significantly elevated in resistant compared with susceptible C. albicans isolates. Furthermore, the mRNA level of ERG4 was positively correlated with ERG11 in susceptible but not resistant C. albicans isolates. The resistance to azoles may be associated with the mutations in ERG11 but not ERG4 gene in C. albicans isolates. In addition, overexpressed ERG4 and ERG11 genes are found in resistant C. albicans isolates, and the mRNA levels of ERG4 may be irrelevant to ERG11 in resistant C. albicans isolates.

  15. Microbiological screening of Irish patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy reveals persistence of Candida albicans strains, gradual reduction in susceptibility to azoles, and incidences of clinical signs of oral candidiasis without culture evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Brenda A; McGovern, Eleanor; Moran, Gary P; Healy, Claire M; Nunn, June; Fleming, Pádraig; Costigan, Colm; Sullivan, Derek J; Coleman, David C

    2011-05-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) are prone to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, which is often treated with azoles. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oral Candida populations from 16 Irish APECED patients, who comprise approximately half the total number identified in Ireland, and to examine the effect of intermittent antifungal therapy on the azole susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates. Patients attended between one and four clinical evaluations over a 5-year period, providing oral rinses and/or oral swab samples each time. Candida was recovered from 14/16 patients, and Candida albicans was the only Candida species identified. Interestingly, clinical diagnosis of candidiasis did not correlate with microbiological evidence of Candida infection at 7/22 (32%) clinical assessments. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of C. albicans isolates recovered from the same patients on separate occasions identified the same sequence type each time. Fluconazole resistance was detected in isolates from one patient, and isolates exhibiting a progressive reduction in itraconazole and/or fluconazole susceptibility were identified in a further 3/16 patients, in each case correlating with the upregulation of CDR- and MDR-encoded efflux pumps. Mutations were also identified in the ERG11 and the TAC1 genes of isolates from these four patients; some of these mutations have previously been associated with azole resistance. The findings suggest that alternative Candida treatment options, other than azoles such as chlorhexidine, should be considered in APECED patients and that clinical diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be confirmed by culture prior to the commencement of anti-Candida therapy.

  16. Microbiological screening of Irish patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy reveals persistence of Candida albicans strains, gradual reduction in susceptibility to azoles, and incidences of clinical signs of oral candidiasis without culture evidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McManus, Brenda A

    2011-05-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) are prone to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, which is often treated with azoles. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oral Candida populations from 16 Irish APECED patients, who comprise approximately half the total number identified in Ireland, and to examine the effect of intermittent antifungal therapy on the azole susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates. Patients attended between one and four clinical evaluations over a 5-year period, providing oral rinses and\\/or oral swab samples each time. Candida was recovered from 14\\/16 patients, and Candida albicans was the only Candida species identified. Interestingly, clinical diagnosis of candidiasis did not correlate with microbiological evidence of Candida infection at 7\\/22 (32%) clinical assessments. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of C. albicans isolates recovered from the same patients on separate occasions identified the same sequence type each time. Fluconazole resistance was detected in isolates from one patient, and isolates exhibiting a progressive reduction in itraconazole and\\/or fluconazole susceptibility were identified in a further 3\\/16 patients, in each case correlating with the upregulation of CDR- and MDR-encoded efflux pumps. Mutations were also identified in the ERG11 and the TAC1 genes of isolates from these four patients; some of these mutations have previously been associated with azole resistance. The findings suggest that alternative Candida treatment options, other than azoles such as chlorhexidine, should be considered in APECED patients and that clinical diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be confirmed by culture prior to the commencement of anti-Candida therapy.

  17. Microbiological Screening of Irish Patients with Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy Reveals Persistence of Candida albicans Strains, Gradual Reduction in Susceptibility to Azoles, and Incidences of Clinical Signs of Oral Candidiasis without Culture Evidence▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Brenda A.; McGovern, Eleanor; Moran, Gary P.; Healy, Claire M.; Nunn, June; Fleming, Pádraig; Costigan, Colm; Sullivan, Derek J.; Coleman, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) are prone to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, which is often treated with azoles. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oral Candida populations from 16 Irish APECED patients, who comprise approximately half the total number identified in Ireland, and to examine the effect of intermittent antifungal therapy on the azole susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates. Patients attended between one and four clinical evaluations over a 5-year period, providing oral rinses and/or oral swab samples each time. Candida was recovered from 14/16 patients, and Candida albicans was the only Candida species identified. Interestingly, clinical diagnosis of candidiasis did not correlate with microbiological evidence of Candida infection at 7/22 (32%) clinical assessments. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of C. albicans isolates recovered from the same patients on separate occasions identified the same sequence type each time. Fluconazole resistance was detected in isolates from one patient, and isolates exhibiting a progressive reduction in itraconazole and/or fluconazole susceptibility were identified in a further 3/16 patients, in each case correlating with the upregulation of CDR- and MDR-encoded efflux pumps. Mutations were also identified in the ERG11 and the TAC1 genes of isolates from these four patients; some of these mutations have previously been associated with azole resistance. The findings suggest that alternative Candida treatment options, other than azoles such as chlorhexidine, should be considered in APECED patients and that clinical diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be confirmed by culture prior to the commencement of anti-Candida therapy. PMID:21367996

  18. Novel 3-Amino-6-chloro-7-(azol-2 or 5-yl-1,1-dioxo-1,4,2-benzodithiazine Derivatives with Anticancer Activity: Synthesis and QSAR Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Pogorzelska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of new 3-amino-6-chloro-7-(azol-2 or 5-yl-1,1-dioxo-1,4,2-benzodithiazine derivatives 5a–j have been synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their antiproliferative activity at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The most active compound 5h showed significant cytotoxic effects against ovarian (OVCAR-3 and breast (MDA-MB-468 cancer (10% and 47% cancer cell death, respectively as well as a good selectivity toward prostate (DU-145, colon (SW-620 and renal (TK-10 cancer cell lines. To obtain a deeper insight into the structure-activity relationships of the new compounds 5a–j QSAR studies have been applied. Theoretical calculations allowed the identification of molecular descriptors belonging to the RDF (RDF055p and RDF145m in the MOLT-4 and UO-31 QSAR models, respectively and 3D-MorSE (Mor32m and Mor16e for MOLT-4 and UO-31 QSAR models descriptor classes. Based on these data, QSAR models with good robustness and predictive ability have been obtained.

  19. Decreased susceptibility of Candida albicans to azole antifungals: a complication of long-term treatment in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautemaa, Riina; Richardson, Malcolm; Pfaller, Michael; Koukila-Kähkölä, Pirkko; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Saxén, Harri

    2007-10-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, APS1) is an autosomal recessive disease exceptionally common in Finland. Most patients have chronic oral candidiasis from early childhood and this infection has been shown to be carcinogenic. Hence, patients receive repeated treatment and prophylactic courses of antifungals throughout life. In Finland, 92 patients have been diagnosed with APECED and 66 of them are currently alive. Our aim was to study the effect of long-term azole treatment on the candidal colonization of APECED patients and the influence on antifungal susceptibilities. We evaluated the culture reports from 1994 to 2004 of 56 APECED patients followed in Helsinki University Central Hospital. Candida albicans strains of all 11 patients initially reported resistant (n = 27) and 12 patients reported susceptible (n = 16) to fluconazole were re-analysed for their susceptibility to fluconazole. Antifungal usage was analysed up to 30 years back. A total of 162 fungal cultures had been performed. Of these, 75% had been reported positive for Candida and 63% for C. albicans. Eleven patients (31.4%) had been reported to harbour at least once a C. albicans strain resistant to fluconazole. Re-analysis of the stored C. albicans strains originally reported to be resistant to fluconazole revealed a mean MIC of 19.5 mg/L. Multiple courses (>6) of fluconazole annually and low dose prophylaxis are major risk factors for persistent colonization with C. albicans with decreased susceptibility in APECED patients.

  20. Coordination preference and magnetic properties of Fe{sup II} assemblies with a bis-azole bearing 1,2,4-triazole and tetrazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, Anil D.; Railliet, Antoine P.; Dirtu, Marinela M.; Garcia, Yann, E-mail: yann.garcia@uclouvain.be [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, MOST-Inorganic Chemistry (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    With a new bis-azole molecular fragment (Htt) bearing 1,2,4-triazole and tetrazole, a mononuclear complex [Fe(tt){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (1), a trinuclear complex [Fe{sub 3}(tt){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2) and a 1D coordination polymer [Fe(tt)(Htt){sub 2}]BF{sub 4}{center_dot}2CH{sub 3}OH (3) were obtained by varying reaction conditions. Htt acts either as an anionic or neutral ligand depending upon the reaction medium and pH. Thermal variation of spin states of 1-3 were investigated in the range 77-300 K by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. 1 totally remains in high-spin state over the entire temperature range whereas no spin crossover was evidenced in 2. Nearly 1:1 high-spin and low-spin population ratio is found in 3, which remains constant over the entire temperature range investigated.

  1. Pharmacodynamics of Voriconazole against Wild-Type and Azole-Resistant Aspergillus flavus Isolates in a Nonneutropenic Murine Model of Disseminated Aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Dhaliwal, Manpreet; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Meis, Jacques F; Mouton, Johan W

    2017-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) due to Aspergillus flavus is associated with high mortality. Although voriconazole (VRC) is widely recommended as the first-line treatment for IA, emergence of azole resistance in Aspergillus spp. is translating to treatment failure. We evaluated the efficacy of voriconazole in a nonneutropenic murine model of disseminated A. flavus infection using two voriconazole-resistant isolates (one harboring the Y319H substitution in the cyp51C gene) and two wild-type isolates without mutations. All isolates exhibited a dose-response relationship, and voriconazole treatment improved mouse survival in a dose-dependent manner. At 40 mg/kg of body weight, 100% efficacy was observed for 1 susceptible isolate and 1 resistant isolate (with mutation), whereas for another susceptible isolate and resistant isolate (without mutation), survival rates were 81% and 72%, respectively. The Hill equation with a variable slope fitted the relationship between the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)/MIC ratio and 14-day survival well for each strain. An F test showed the 50% effective doses to be significantly different from each other (P = 0.0023). However, contrary to expectation, there was a significant difference in exposure-response relationships between strains, and it appeared that the susceptible strains required a relatively higher exposure than the resistant ones to result in the same treatment effect, the 50% effective pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index (EI 50 ) required being negatively and log-linearly related to the MIC (P = 0.04). We conclude that the efficacy of voriconazole depended on drug exposure and the voriconazole MIC of the isolates, but lower exposures are required for strains with higher MICs. These findings may have profound significance in clinical practice with respect to dosing and drug choice. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Extracellular phospholipase production of oral Candida albicans isolates from smokers, diabetics, asthmatics, denture wearers and healthy individuals following brief exposure to polyene, echinocandin and azole antimycotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjuna N.B. Ellepola

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Candida albicans is the primary causative agent of oral candidosis, and one of its key virulent attributes is considered to be its ability to produce extracellular phospholipases that facilitate cellular invasion. Oral candidosis can be treated with polyenes, and azoles, and the more recently introduced echinocandins. However, once administered, the intraoral concentration of these drugs tend to be sub-therapeutic and rather transient due to factors such as the diluent effect of saliva and cleansing effect of the oral musculature. Hence, intra-orally, the pathogenic yeasts may undergo a brief exposure to antifungal drugs. We, therefore, evaluated the phospholipase production of oral C. albicans isolates following brief exposure to sub-therapeutic concentrations of the foregoing antifungals. Materials and methods Fifty C. albicans oral isolates obtained from smokers, diabetics, asthmatics using steroid inhalers, partial denture wearers and healthy individuals were exposed to sub-therapeutic concentrations of nystatin, amphotericin B, caspofungin, ketoconazole and fluconazole for one hour. Thereafter the drugs were removed and the phospholipase production was determined by a plate assay using an egg yolk-agar medium. Results The phospholipase production of these isolates was significantly suppressed with a percentage reduction of 10.65, 12.14, 11.45 and 6.40% following exposure to nystatin, amphotericin B, caspofungin and ketoconazole, respectively. This suppression was not significant following exposure to fluconazole. Conclusions Despite the sub-therapeutic, intra oral, bioavailability of polyenes, echinocandins and ketoconazole, they are likely to produce a persistent antifungal effect by suppressing phospholipase production, which is a key virulent attribute of this common pathogenic yeast.

  3. Fungicidal activity of copper-sputtered flexible surfaces under dark and actinic light against azole-resistant Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballo, Myriam K S; Rtimi, Sami; Kiwi, John; Pulgarin, César; Entenza, José M; Bizzini, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Candida spp. are able to survive on hospital surfaces and causes healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). Since surface cleaning and disinfecting interventions are not totally effective to eliminate Candida spp., new approaches should be devised. Copper (Cu) has widely recognized antifungal activity and the use of Cu-sputtered surfaces has recently been proposed to curb the spread of HCAIs. Moreover, the activity of Cu under the action of actinic light remains underexplored. We investigated the antifungal activity of Cu-sputtered polyester surfaces (Cu-PES) against azole-resistant Candida albicans and Candida glabrata under dark and low intensity visible light irradiation (4.65mW/cm 2 ). The surface properties of Cu-PES photocatalysts were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Under dark, Cu-PES showed a fungicidal activity (≥3log 10 CFU reduction of the initial inoculum) against both C. albicans DSY296 and C. glabrata DSY565 leading to a reduction of the starting inoculum of 3.1 and 3.0log 10 CFU, respectively, within 60min of exposure. Under low intensity visible light irradiation, Cu-PES exhibited an accelerated fungicidal activity against both strains with a reduction of 3.0 and 3.4log 10 CFU, respectively, within 30min of exposure. This effect was likely due to the semiconductor Cu 2 O/CuO charge separation. The decrease in cell viability of the two Candida strains under dark and light conditions correlated with the progressive loss of membrane integrity. These results indicate that Cu-PES represent a promising strategy for decreasing the colonization of surfaces by yeasts and that actinic light can improve its self-disinfecting activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dose optimization of voriconazole/anidulafungin combination against Aspergillus fumigatus using an in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model and response surface analysis: clinical implications for azole-resistant aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siopi, Maria; Siafakas, Nikolaos; Vourli, Sophia; Mouton, Johan W; Zerva, Loukia; Meletiadis, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Combination therapy of voriconazole with an echinocandin is often employed in order to increase the efficacy of voriconazole monotherapy. Four clinical Aspergillus fumigatus isolates with different in vitro susceptibilities to voriconazole (MIC 0.125-2 mg/L) and anidulafungin (MEC 0.008-0.016 mg/L) were tested in an in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model simulating human serum concentrations of standard dosages of voriconazole and anidulafungin. Fungal growth was assessed using galactomannan production and quantitative PCR. Drug concentrations were determined with bioassays. Pharmacodynamic interactions were assessed using Bliss independence analysis (BI) and Loewe additivity-based canonical mixture response-surface non-linear regression analysis (LA). Probability of target attainment (PTA) was estimated with Monte Carlo analysis for different doses of anidulafungin (25, 50 and 100 mg) and azole resistance rates (5%-25%). Synergy [BI 51% (8%-80%), LA 0.63 (0.38-0.79)] was found at low anidulafungin (fC max /MEC voriconazole (fAUC/MIC voriconazole MIC distributions with high (>10%) resistance rates. PTAs for isolates with voriconazole MICs of 1, 2 and 4 mg/L was 78%, 12% and 0% with voriconazole monotherapy and 96%-100%, 68%-82% and 9%-20% with combination therapy, respectively. Optimal activity was associated with a voriconazole tC min /MIC ratio of 1.5 for monotherapy and 0.75 for combination therapy. The present study indicated that the combination of voriconazole with low-dose anidulafungin may increase the efficacy and reduce the cost and potential toxicity of antifungal therapy, particularly against azole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates and in patients with subtherapeutic serum levels. This hypothesis warrants further in vivo verification. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Evaluation of an early step-down strategy from intravenous anidulafungin to oral azole therapy for the treatment of candidemia and other forms of invasive candidiasis: results from an open-label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jose; Reboli, Annette C; Pappas, Peter G; Patterson, Thomas F; Reinhardt, John; Chin-Hong, Peter; Tobin, Ellis; Kett, Daniel H; Biswas, Pinaki; Swanson, Robert

    2014-02-21

    Hospitalized patients are at increased risk for candidemia and invasive candidiasis (C/IC). Improved therapeutic regimens with enhanced clinical and pharmacoeconomic outcomes utilizing existing antifungal agents are still needed. An open-label, non-comparative study evaluated an intravenous (i.v.) to oral step-down strategy. Patients with C/IC were treated with i.v. anidulafungin and after 5 days of i.v. therapy had the option to step-down to oral azole therapy (fluconazole or voriconazole) if they met prespecified criteria. The primary endpoint was the global response rate (clinical + microbiological) at end of treatment (EOT) in the modified intent-to-treat (MITT) population (at least one dose of anidulafungin plus positive Candida within 96 hours of study entry). Secondary endpoints included efficacy at other time points and in predefined patient subpopulations. Patients who stepped down early (≤ 7 days' anidulafungin) were identified as the "early switch" subpopulation. In total, 282 patients were enrolled, of whom 250 were included in the MITT population. The MITT global response rate at EOT was 83.7% (95% confidence interval, 78.7-88.8). Global response rates at all time points were generally similar in the early switch subpopulation compared with the MITT population. Global response rates were also similar across multiple Candida species, including C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. The most common treatment-related adverse events were nausea and vomiting (four patients each). A short course of i.v. anidulafungin, followed by early step-down to oral azole therapy, is an effective and well-tolerated approach for the treatment of C/IC. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00496197.

  6. Functional coordination polymers and MOFs from reactions of the lanthanides and barium with azole ligands. Synthesis and characterization with a focus on structure determination from X-ray powder diffraction data; Funktionale Koordinationspolymere und MOFs aus Reaktionen der Lanthanide und des Bariums mit Azol-Liganden. Synthese und Charakterisierung mit dem Fokus der Strukturbestimmung anhand von Roentgenpulverbeugungsdaten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybak, Jens-Christoph

    2012-07-01

    This thesis deals with the synthesis and characterization of coordination polymers and MOFs of the lanthanides and barium with different azolic N-heterocycles. A total of 18 new organic-inorganic hybrid materials, as well as a series of co-doped compounds is presented. Besides the structural characterization of these materials from X-ray diffraction powder data, the focus of the investigations is on the thermal and photoluminescence spectroscopic properties. The lanthanides La - Lu, except Eu and Pm, can be reacted with 1H-1,2,3-triazole to give the series of the isotypic dense 3D-MOFs {sup 3}{sub ∞}[Ln(Tz{sup *}){sub 3}]. Investigation of the photoluminescence properties of these compounds reveals a broad range of different luminescence phenomena, including the first observation of an intrinsic inner-filter effect of the Ln{sup 3+}-ions. The structure of this isotypic series of compounds was solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. A 2D-polymorph of these compounds {sup 2}{sub ∞}[Ln(Tz{sup *}){sub 3}], is observed for Ln = Sm, Tb and was characterized by single crystal data. The reaction of Eu with 1H-benzotriazole yields the 1D-coordination polymer {sup 1}{sub ∞}[Eu(Btz){sub 2}(BtzH){sub 2}], which is the first example of a divalent rare earth benzotriazolate. Analysis of the thermal properties reveals the transformation to the 3D-MOF {sup 3}{sub ∞}[Eu(Btz){sub 2}] at higher temperatures. The structure of this material was also solved from X-ray powder diffraction data. Investigation of the photoluminescence properties of the co-doped compounds {sup 3}{sub ∞}[Ba{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}(Im){sub 2}], which were obtained from reaction of the salt-like hydrides BaH{sub 2} and EuH{sub 2} with imidazole, show that the synthesis of luminescent MOF materials by co-doping of non-luminescent networks with luminescence centers is possible. The structure of these materials was solved from X-ray powder diffraction data of the undoped compound {sup 3}{sub

  7. Selective adsorption in two porous triazolate-oxalate-bridged antiferromagnetic metal-azolate frameworks obtained via in situ decarboxylation of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Juan-Juan; Xu, Xia; Jiang, Ning; Wu, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2015-03-01

    Solvothermal reactions of metal salts, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid (H2atzc) and ammonium oxalate in different temperature produced two metal azolate frameworks, namely, [Cu3(atzc)2(atz)(ox)]·1.5H2O (1) and [Co5(atz)4(ox)3(HCOO)2]·DMF (2) (H2atzc=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid, Hatz=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, and ox=oxalate), in which the atzc precusor was in situ decarboxylated. Structural determination reveals that 1 contains [Cu3(atzc)2(atz)]2- layers of mixed μ4-atzc and μ3-atz ligands, which are pillared by ox2- groups to form a 3D porous framework. Compound 2 contains 2D layers with basic spindle-shaped decanuclear units, which extended by ox2- and formates to form 3D porous framework. Gas adsorption investigation revealed that two kinds of frameworks exhibited selective CO2 over N2 sorption. Moreover, activated 2 shows H2 storage capacity. Additionally, magnetic properties of both the compounds have been investigated.

  8. Facultative sterol uptake in an ergosterol-deficient clinical isolate of Candida glabrata harboring a missense mutation in ERG11 and exhibiting cross-resistance to azoles and amphotericin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Claire M; Parker, Josie E; Bader, Oliver; Weig, Michael; Gross, Uwe; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2012-08-01

    We identified a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata (CG156) exhibiting flocculent growth and cross-resistance to fluconazole (FLC), voriconazole (VRC), and amphotericin B (AMB), with MICs of >256, >256, and 32 μg ml(-1), respectively. Sterol analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that CG156 was a sterol 14α-demethylase (Erg11p) mutant, wherein 14α-methylated intermediates (lanosterol was >80% of the total) were the only detectable sterols. ERG11 sequencing indicated that CG156 harbored a single-amino-acid substitution (G315D) which nullified the function of native Erg11p. In heterologous expression studies using a doxycycline-regulatable Saccharomyces cerevisiae erg11 strain, wild-type C. glabrata Erg11p fully complemented the function of S. cerevisiae sterol 14α-demethylase, restoring growth and ergosterol synthesis in recombinant yeast; mutated CG156 Erg11p did not. CG156 was culturable using sterol-free, glucose-containing yeast minimal medium ((glc)YM). However, when grown on sterol-supplemented (glc)YM (with ergosta 7,22-dienol, ergosterol, cholestanol, cholesterol, Δ(7)-cholestenol, or desmosterol), CG156 cultures exhibited shorter lag phases, reached higher cell densities, and showed alterations in cellular sterol composition. Unlike comparator isolates (harboring wild-type ERG11) that became less sensitive to FLC and VRC when cultured on sterol-supplemented (glc)YM, facultative sterol uptake by CG156 did not affect its azole-resistant phenotype. Conversely, CG156 grown using (glc)YM with ergosterol (or with ergosta 7,22-dienol) showed increased sensitivity to AMB; CG156 grown using (glc)YM with cholesterol (or with cholestanol) became more resistant (MICs of 2 and >64 μg AMB ml(-1), respectively). Our results provide insights into the consequences of sterol uptake and metabolism on growth and antifungal resistance in C. glabrata.

  9. Changes in germ tube formation and cell-surface hydrophobicity of oral Candida dubliniensis isolates following brief exposure to sub-cidal concentrations of polyene and azole antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellepola, Arjuna N B; Joseph, Bobby K; Khan, Z U

    2013-07-01

    Adherence of Candida has been implicated as the initial process in the pathogenesis of oral candidosis. Candidal germ tubes and its relative cell-surface hydrophobicity (CSH) are contributory attributes. Candida dubliniensis is currently documented as an opportunistic pathogen allied with recurrent oral candidosis. Oral candidosis can be treated with polyene and azole antifungals such as amphotericin B, ketoconazole and fluconazole. However, the intraoral concentration of these drugs fluctuates and becomes sub-therapeutic because of the diluent effect of saliva and cleansing effect of the oral musculature. Hence, intraorally, the pathogenic yeast may undergo a brief exposure to antifungal drugs. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of brief exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of these antifungals on the germ tube formation and CSH of C. dubliniensis. After determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of the drugs, 20 oral isolates of C. dubliniensis were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of these antifungals for 1 h. Following this brief exposure, the drugs were removed, and following subsequent incubation in a germ tube inducing medium and exposure to bi-phasic hydrocarbon assay, the germ tube formation and CSH of these isolates was quantified respectively. Compared with controls, exposure to amphotericin B almost completely suppressed the ability to form germ tubes with a mean percentage reduction of 95.91% (P formation but to a lesser degree with a mean percentage reduction of 18.73% and 12.01% respectively (P  0.05). In clinical terms it appears that, even a short exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of these drugs, a situation all too familiar in the oral environment, would continue to exert an antifungal effect by suppressing the pathogenic potency of C. dubliniensis. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Rationally designed transmembrane peptide mimics of the multidrug transporter protein Cdr1 act as antagonists to selectively block drug efflux and chemosensitize azole-resistant clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Indresh Kumar; Thota, Chaitanya Kumar; Verma, Sachin Dev; Sharma, Jyotsna; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Ravikumar, Balaguru; Sen, Sobhan; Chauhan, Neeraj; Lynn, Andrew M; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2013-06-07

    Drug-resistant pathogenic fungi use several families of membrane-embedded transporters to efflux antifungal drugs from the cells. The efflux pump Cdr1 (Candida drug resistance 1) belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. Cdr1 is one of the most predominant mechanisms of multidrug resistance in azole-resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida albicans. Blocking drug efflux represents an attractive approach to combat the multidrug resistance of this opportunistic human pathogen. In this study, we rationally designed and synthesized transmembrane peptide mimics (TMPMs) of Cdr1 protein (Cdr1p) that correspond to each of the 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) of the two transmembrane domains of the protein to target the primary structure of the Cdr1p. Several FITC-tagged TMPMs specifically bound to Cdr1p and blocked the efflux of entrapped fluorescent dyes from the AR (Gu5) isolate. These TMPMs did not affect the efflux of entrapped fluorescent dye from cells expressing the Cdr1p homologue Cdr2p or from cells expressing a non-ABC transporter Mdr1p. Notably, the time correlation of single photon counting fluorescence measurements confirmed the specific interaction of FITC-tagged TMPMs with their respective TMH. By using mutant variants of Cdr1p, we show that these TMPM antagonists contain the structural information necessary to target their respective TMHs of Cdr1p and specific binding sites that mediate the interactions between the mimics and its respective helix. Additionally, TMPMs that were devoid of any demonstrable hemolytic, cytotoxic, and antifungal activities chemosensitize AR clinical isolates and demonstrate synergy with drugs that further improved the therapeutic potential of fluconazole in vivo.

  11. Arylimidamide-Azole Combinations against Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Nothing listed Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION ...7 11. APPENDIX…………………………………………………………………………………..7 4 1. INTRODUCTION : Existing oral treatments of...Smith, Philip, Read, Lisa, Paris, Robert, Hickman, Mark and Grogl, Max. Antileishmanial Activity of Compounds Derived from the Medicines for Malaria

  12. Functional coordination polymers and MOFs from reactions of the lanthanides and barium with azole ligands. Synthesis and characterization with a focus on structure determination from X-ray powder diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybak, Jens-Christoph

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with the synthesis and characterization of coordination polymers and MOFs of the lanthanides and barium with different azolic N-heterocycles. A total of 18 new organic-inorganic hybrid materials, as well as a series of co-doped compounds is presented. Besides the structural characterization of these materials from X-ray diffraction powder data, the focus of the investigations is on the thermal and photoluminescence spectroscopic properties. The lanthanides La - Lu, except Eu and Pm, can be reacted with 1H-1,2,3-triazole to give the series of the isotypic dense 3D-MOFs 3 ∞ [Ln(Tz * ) 3 ]. Investigation of the photoluminescence properties of these compounds reveals a broad range of different luminescence phenomena, including the first observation of an intrinsic inner-filter effect of the Ln 3+ -ions. The structure of this isotypic series of compounds was solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. A 2D-polymorph of these compounds 2 ∞ [Ln(Tz * ) 3 ], is observed for Ln = Sm, Tb and was characterized by single crystal data. The reaction of Eu with 1H-benzotriazole yields the 1D-coordination polymer 1 ∞ [Eu(Btz) 2 (BtzH) 2 ], which is the first example of a divalent rare earth benzotriazolate. Analysis of the thermal properties reveals the transformation to the 3D-MOF 3 ∞ [Eu(Btz) 2 ] at higher temperatures. The structure of this material was also solved from X-ray powder diffraction data. Investigation of the photoluminescence properties of the co-doped compounds 3 ∞ [Ba 1-x Eu x (Im) 2 ], which were obtained from reaction of the salt-like hydrides BaH 2 and EuH 2 with imidazole, show that the synthesis of luminescent MOF materials by co-doping of non-luminescent networks with luminescence centers is possible. The structure of these materials was solved from X-ray powder diffraction data of the undoped compound 3 ∞ [BaEu(Im) 2 ]. Structural characterization of materials from X-ray powder diffraction data is an important aspect

  13. Dermatophyte susceptibilities to antifungal azole agents tested in vitro by broth macro and microdilution methods Suscetibilidade in vitro de dermatófitos a azóis pelos métodos macro e microdiluição em caldo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Roberto Siqueira

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro susceptibility of dermatophytes to the azole antifungals itraconazole, fluconazole and ketoconazole was evaluated by broth macro and microdilution methods, according to recommendations of the CLSI, with some adaptations. Twenty nail and skin clinical isolates, four of Trichophyton mentagrophytes and 16 of T. rubrum were selected for the tests. Itraconazole minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC varied from Foi avaliada a suscetibilidade in vitro de dermatófitos aos antifúngicos itraconazol, fluconazol e cetoconazol, pelos métodos macro e microdiluição em caldo, de acordo com as recomendações do CLSI, com algumas modificações. Foram estudados 20 isolados clínicos de lesões de unha e pele, sendo quatro Trichophyton mentagrophytes e 16 T. rubrum. A concentração inibitória mínima (CIM para itraconazol variou de < 0,03 a 0,25 µg/mL pelo método da macrodiluição, e de < 0,03 a 0,5 µg/mL pela microdiluição em caldo; de 0,5 a 64 µg/mL e de 0,125 a 16 µg/mL para fluconazol, respectivamente, pela macro e microdiluição; e de < 0,03 a 0,5 µg/mL por ambos os métodos para cetoconazol. A concordância entre os dois métodos (considerando ± uma diluição foi de 70% para itraconazol, 45% para fluconazol e 85% para cetoconazol. Conclui-se que os isolados estudados foram inibidos por concentrações relativamente baixas dos antifúngicos testados, e os dois métodos apresentam boa concordância, especialmente para itraconazol e cetoconazol.

  14. Management of Azole-Refractory Candida Species Using Boric Acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The samples were cultured in Sabouraud's dextrose agar (supplemented with 0.005% chloramphenicol and 0.05% cycloheximide) followed by aerobic incubation for 48 hours at 37ºC in order to obtain pure cultures. Identification was done by Gram stain, while the test for ability to ferment and assimilate different sugars was ...

  15. Desulfurization performance of azole-based ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubei CHENG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the addition of functional groups in ionic liquid anion and cation to achieve better absorbing of SO2, the 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine triazole ( is synthesized using 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine and triazole as raw materials. The desulfurization performance of the synthesized is systematically studied. The desulfurization performance and desulfurization mechanism of the are discussed. The results show that the has good performance of desulfurization and regeneration. At the atmospheric pressure, 1 mol of the absorbs 2.964 mol of SO2 at 20 ℃. With the increase of temperature, the desulfurization capacity of the decreases gradually. The molar absorption ratio increases with the increase of SO2 partial pressure, and under the conditions of 130 ℃, the desorption rate of the ionic liquid after saturated adsorption reaches over 95%. The mechanism investigation results show that the interaction of SO2 and is the combination of chemical absorption and physical absorption. The results have a certain reference value to improve the efficiency of flue gas treatment.

  16. Azole-Resistant Aspergillosis: Epidemiology, Molecular Mechanisms, and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chowdhary, A.; Sharma, C.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus remains the most common species in all pulmonary syndromes, followed by Aspergillus flavus which is a common cause of allergic rhinosinusitis, postoperative aspergillosis and fungal keratitis. The manifestations of Aspergillus infections include invasive aspergillosis, chronic

  17. Management of Azole-Refractory Candida Species Using Boric Acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    patterns of recurrent oral candidiasis in. HIV-positive patients. J. Infect. Dis. 168: 464-466. Ray D, Goswami R, Banerjee U, Dadhwal. V, Goswami D, Mandal P, Sreenivas V,. Kochupillai N. (2007). Prevalence of. Candida glabrata and Its Response to. Boric Acid Vaginal Suppositories in. Comparison With Oral Fluconazole in.

  18. Emerging azole resistance among Candida albicans from clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candida albicans is one of the most frequently isolated yeasts in clinical laboratories and accounts for up to 80 % of the yeasts recovered from sites of infection. The study was set out to determine antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida albicans and to establish the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) to ...

  19. Alternative developmental toxicity models for assessing the in vivo embryotoxicity of azoles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of regulations for protecting both humans and the environment from potential chemical health hazards, as well as the increase of global pressure for reducing, refining and replacing animal experiments promote the development and application of alternatives to in vivo

  20. Alternative developmental toxicity models for assessing the in vivo embryotoxicity of azoles

    OpenAIRE

    Dimopoulou, Myrto

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of regulations for protecting both humans and the environment from potential chemical health hazards, as well as the increase of global pressure for reducing, refining and replacing animal experiments promote the development and application of alternatives to in vivo developmental toxicity studies. Due to the complexity of the reproductive cycle, combined in vitro approaches, focusing on morphological, molecular and toxicokinetic parameters, could better define the developm...

  1. Clinicomycological Profile and Antifungal Sensitivity Pattern of Commonly Used Azoles in Dermatophytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Mathur

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: This study highlighted the increasing resistance of the antifungals, which is responsible for the treatment failure in dermatophye infections. Keywords: antifungal resistance; dermatophyte; epidemiology.

  2. Susceptibility of Sporothrix brasiliensis isolates to amphotericin B, azoles, and terbinafine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borba-Santos, Luana Pereira; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Gagini, Thalita Braga; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; Castro, Rafaela; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Nucci, Marcio; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria; Ishida, Kelly; Rozental, Sonia

    2015-02-01

    The in vitro activity of the antifungal agents amphotericin B (AMB), itraconazole (ITC), posaconazole (PSC), voriconazole (VRC), and terbinafine (TRB) against 32 Brazilian isolates of Sporothrix brasiliensis, including 16 isolates from a recent (2011-2012) epidemic in Rio de Janeiro state, was examined. We describe and genotype new isolates and clustered them with 16 older (from 2004 or earlier) S. brasiliensis isolates by phylogenetic analysis. We tested both the yeast and the mycelium form of all isolates using broth microdilution methods based on the reference protocols M38-A2 and M27-A3 (recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute). Considering minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs), TRB was found to be the most active drug in vitro for both fungal forms, followed by PSC. Several isolates showed high MICs for AMB and/or ITC, which are currently used as first-line therapy for sporotrichosis. VRC displayed very low activity against S. brasiliensis isolates. The primary morphological modification observed on treated yeasts by transmission electron microscopy analysis was changes in cell wall. Our results indicate that TRB is the antifungal with the best in vitro activity against S. brasiliensis and support the use of TRB as a promising option for the treatment of cutaneous and/or lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. High prevalence of azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus in adults with cystic fibrosis exposed to itraconazole.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgel, P.R.; Baixench, M.T.; Amsellem, M.; Audureau, E.; Chapron, J.; Kanaan, R.; Honore, I.; Dupouy-Camet, J.; Dusser, D.; Klaassen, C.H.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Hubert, D.; Paugam, A.

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most frequent fungus found in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. Itraconazole is prescribed for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) or Aspergillus bronchitis in CF subjects. We hypothesized that A. fumigatus isolates in the sputum of CF subjects with

  4. Aberrant lipogenesis is a metabolic marker for azole-resistant candida albicans (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanja, Caroline; Hong, Weili; Younis, Waleed; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Seleem, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    Candida is the single most important cause of fungal bloodstream infections worldwide causing significant mortality as high as 50%. This high mortality rate is, in part, due to the inability to rapidly diagnose and simultaneously initiate an effective antifungal therapy early in the disease process. Current culture-based diagnostics are often slow, requiring several days to complete, and are only 50% sensitive in diagnosing candidemia (Candida bloodstream infection). For every 12 hours of delay in starting correct antifungal therapy, the risk of death for a given patient with candidemia increases by 200%. To address this unmet need, we explored the potential of employing stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) imaging to diagnose candidemia and probe metabolic differences between resistant and susceptible strain at a single cell level. Metabolism is integral to pathogenicity; microorganism have very short life cycles, and therefore only a few hours are needed to observe a full metabolic cycle. SRS imaging at C-H vibration frequency at 2850 cm-1 revealed a substantial difference in lipogenesis between the susceptible and resistant C. albicans. Treating the C. albicans with fluconazole, an antimicrobial drug that targets ergosterol biosynthesis only affected the lipogenesis in the susceptible strain. Our results show that single-cell metabolic imaging under a SRS microscope can be used for diagnose candidemia and early detection of antimicrobial susceptibility.

  5. Seminational surveillance of fungemia in Denmark: notably high rates of fungemia and numbers of isolates with reduced azole susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Fuursted, Kurt; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the first set of comprehensive data on fungemia in Denmark including the distribution of species and range of susceptibility to major antifungal compounds based on a seminational surveillance study initiated in 2003. The catchment area of the participating hos...

  6. Ligand-Controlled Synthesis of Azoles via Ir-Catalyzed Reactions of Sulfoxonium Ylides with 2-Amino Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Alicia M; Chan, Vincent S; Napolitano, José G; Krabbe, Scott W; Schomaker, Jennifer M; Shekhar, Shashank

    2016-05-20

    An iridium-catalyzed method was developed for the synthesis of imidazo-fused pyrrolopyrazines. The presence or absence of a nitrogenated ligand controlled the outcome of the reaction, leading to simple β-keto amine products in the absence of added ligand and the cyclized 7- and 8-substituted-imidazo[1,2-a]pyrrolo[2,3-e]pyrazine products in the presence of ligand. This catalyst control was conserved across a variety of ylide and amine coupling partners. The substrate was shown to act as a ligand for the iridium catalyst in the absence of other ligands via NMR spectroscopy. Kinetic studies indicated that formation of the Ir-carbene was reversible and the slow step of the reaction. These mechanistic investigations suggest that the β-keto amine products form via an intramolecular carbene N-H insertion, and the imidazopyrrolopyrazines form via an intermolecular carbene N-H insertion.

  7. Seminational surveillance of fungemia in Denmark: notably high rates of fungemia and numbers of isolates with reduced azole susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Fuursted, Kurt; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2005-01-01

    hospitals had a population of 2.8 million, or 53% of the Danish population. A total of 303 episodes of fungemia were registered (annual rate, 11 of 100,000 people or 0.49 of 1,000 hospital discharges). Candida species accounted for 97.4% of the fungal pathogens. C. albicans was the predominant species (63......The aim of this study was to present the first set of comprehensive data on fungemia in Denmark including the distribution of species and range of susceptibility to major antifungal compounds based on a seminational surveillance study initiated in 2003. The catchment area of the participating......%), but the proportion varied from 57% to 72% among participating departments of clinical microbiology. C. glabrata was the second most frequent species (20%; range, 8% to 32%). C. krusei was a rare isolate (3%) and occurred only at two of the participating hospitals. Retrospective data retrieved from the Danish...

  8. The Synthesis and Study of New Ribavirin Derivatives and Related Nucleoside Azole Carboxamides as Agents Active against RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    agarose according to a modification of the procedure of Kimchi et al. 9 3 The interferon treated cells showed a 20-fold increase in the levels of the...Baglioni, Cell, 17, 255 (1979). 93. A. Kimchi , L. Shulman, A. Schmidt, Y. Chernajovsky, A. Fradin and M. Revel, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., USA, 76, 3208 (1979...ilberstein, A. Kimchi , A. Schmidt and M. Revel, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., USA, 75, 4734 (1978). 97. 1. W. Nilsen, S. G. Weissman and C. Baglioni, Biochem

  9. Mechanism elucidation of the cis-trans isomerization of an azole ruthenium-nitrosyl complex and its osmium counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriluta, Anatolie; Büchel, Gabriel E; Freitag, Leon; Novitchi, Ghenadie; Tommasino, Jean Bernard; Jeanneau, Erwann; Kuhn, Paul-Steffen; González, Leticia; Arion, Vladimir B; Luneau, Dominique

    2013-06-03

    Synthesis and X-ray diffraction structures of cis and trans isomers of ruthenium and osmium metal complexes of general formulas (nBu4N)[cis-MCl4(NO)(Hind)], where M = Ru (1) and Os (3), and (nBu4N)[trans-MCl4(NO)(Hind)], where M = Ru (2) and Os (4) and Hind = 1H-indazole are reported. Interconversion between cis and trans isomers at high temperatures (80-130 °C) has been observed and studied by NMR spectroscopy. Kinetic data indicate that isomerizations correspond to reversible first order reactions. The rates of isomerization reactions even at 110 °C are very low with rate constants of 10(-5) s(-1) and 10(-6) s(-1) for ruthenium and osmium complexes, respectively, and the estimated rate constants of isomerization at room temperature are of ca. 10(-10) s(-1). The activation parameters, which have been obtained from fitting the reaction rates at different temperatures to the Eyring equation for ruthenium [ΔH(cis-trans)‡ = 122.8 ± 1.3; ΔH(trans-cis)‡ = 138.8 ± 1.0 kJ/mol; ΔS(cis-trans)‡ = -18.7 ± 3.6; ΔS(trans-cis)‡ = 31.8 ± 2.7 J/(mol·K)] and osmium [ΔH(cis-trans)‡ = 200.7 ± 0.7; ΔH(trans-cis)‡ = 168.2 ± 0.6 kJ/mol; ΔS(cis-trans)‡ = 142.7 ± 8.9; ΔS(trans-cis)‡ = 85.9 ± 3.9 J/(mol·K)] reflect the inertness of these systems. The entropy of activation for the osmium complexes is highly positive and suggests the dissociative mechanism of isomerization. In the case of ruthenium, the activation entropy for the cis to trans isomerization is negative [-18.6 J/(mol·K)], while being positive [31.0 J/(mol·K)] for the trans to cis conversion. The thermodynamic parameters for cis to trans isomerization of [RuCl4(NO)(Hind)]-, viz. ΔH° = 13.5 ± 1.5 kJ/mol and ΔS° = -5.2 ± 3.4 J/(mol·K) indicate the low difference between the energies of cis and trans isomers. The theoretical calculation has been carried out on isomerization of ruthenium complexes with DFT methods. The dissociative, associative, and intramolecular twist isomerization mechanisms have been considered. The value for the activation energy found for the dissociative mechanism is in good agreement with experimental activation enthalpy. Electrochemical investigation provides further evidence for higher reactivity of ruthenium complexes compared to that of osmium counterparts and shows that intramolecular electron transfer reactions do not affect the isomerization process. A dissociative mechanism of cis↔trans isomerization has been proposed for both ruthenium and osmium complexes.

  10. Mechanism Elucidation of the cis–trans Isomerization of an Azole Ruthenium–Nitrosyl Complex and Its Osmium Counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis and X-ray diffraction structures of cis and trans isomers of ruthenium and osmium metal complexes of general formulas (nBu4N)[cis-MCl4(NO)(Hind)], where M = Ru (1) and Os (3), and (nBu4N)[trans-MCl4(NO)(Hind)], where M = Ru (2) and Os (4) and Hind = 1H-indazole are reported. Interconversion between cis and trans isomers at high temperatures (80–130 °C) has been observed and studied by NMR spectroscopy. Kinetic data indicate that isomerizations correspond to reversible first order reactions. The rates of isomerization reactions even at 110 °C are very low with rate constants of 10–5 s–1 and 10–6 s–1 for ruthenium and osmium complexes, respectively, and the estimated rate constants of isomerization at room temperature are of ca. 10–10 s–1. The activation parameters, which have been obtained from fitting the reaction rates at different temperatures to the Eyring equation for ruthenium [ΔHcis-trans‡= 122.8 ± 1.3; ΔHtrans-cis‡= 138.8 ± 1.0 kJ/mol; ΔScis-trans‡= −18.7 ± 3.6; ΔStrans-cis‡= 31.8 ± 2.7 J/(mol·K)] and osmium [ΔHcis-trans‡= 200.7 ± 0.7; ΔHtrans-cis‡= 168.2 ± 0.6 kJ/mol; ΔScis-trans‡= 142.7 ± 8.9; ΔStrans-cis‡= 85.9 ± 3.9 J/(mol·K)] reflect the inertness of these systems. The entropy of activation for the osmium complexes is highly positive and suggests the dissociative mechanism of isomerization. In the case of ruthenium, the activation entropy for the cis to trans isomerization is negative [−18.6 J/(mol·K)], while being positive [31.0 J/(mol·K)] for the trans to cis conversion. The thermodynamic parameters for cis to trans isomerization of [RuCl4(NO)(Hind)]−, viz. ΔH° = 13.5 ± 1.5 kJ/mol and ΔS° = −5.2 ± 3.4 J/(mol·K) indicate the low difference between the energies of cis and trans isomers. The theoretical calculation has been carried out on isomerization of ruthenium complexes with DFT methods. The dissociative, associative, and intramolecular twist isomerization mechanisms have been considered. The value for the activation energy found for the dissociative mechanism is in good agreement with experimental activation enthalpy. Electrochemical investigation provides further evidence for higher reactivity of ruthenium complexes compared to that of osmium counterparts and shows that intramolecular electron transfer reactions do not affect the isomerization process. A dissociative mechanism of cis↔trans isomerization has been proposed for both ruthenium and osmium complexes. PMID:23675748

  11. Photodegradation of the azole fungicide climbazole by ultraviolet irradiation under different conditions: Kinetics, mechanism and toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wang-Rong; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, You-Sheng; Hu, Li-Xin; Yao, Li; Liang, Yan-Qiu; Tian, Fei

    2016-11-15

    Climbazole (CZ) has been known to persist in various environmental media, and may cause potential risks to aquatic organisms. This study investigated the photodegradation of CZ by ultraviolet (UV, 254nm) under different conditions. The results revealed that CZ could be effectively degraded in aqueous solutions under UV-254 irradiation with a half-life of 9.78min (pH=7.5), and the photodegradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. pH had almost no effect on its rate constants and quantum yields; but the water quality of natural waters could affect the photolysis of CZ, and the coexisting constituents such as Fe(3+), NO3(-), and HA obviously inhibited its photolysis. The addition of different radical scavengers also inhibited the photodegradation of CZ due to the reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). CZ underwent direct and self-sensitized photolysis involving ROS. Based on the identified photodegradation by-products, the proposed pathways included hydroxylative dechlorination, dechlorination and de-pinacolone. Moreover, toxicity evaluation using duckweed found significant toxicity reduction in the photodegradation system of CZ after the irradiation of UV-254, and the remaining by-products did not pose extra toxicity compared with CZ itself. These findings from present study suggest that CZ in effluent could be further reduced by applying UV photolysis treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Multimedia fate modeling and risk assessment of a commonly used azole fungicide climbazole at the river basin scale in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ying, Guang-Guo; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Liu, You-Sheng; Liu, Wang-Rong; Zhao, Jian-Liang

    2015-07-01

    Climbazole is an antidandruff active ingredient commonly used in personal care products, but little is known about its environmental fate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fate of climbazole in water, sediment, soil and air compartments of the whole China by using a level III multimedia fugacity model. The usage of climbazole was calculated to be 345 t in the whole China according to the market research data, and after wastewater treatment a total emission of 245 t was discharged into the receiving environment with approximately 93% into the water compartment and 7% into the soil compartment. The developed fugacity model was successfully applied to estimate the contamination levels and mass inventories of climbazole in various environmental compartments of the river basins in China. The predicted environmental concentration ranges of climbazole were: 0.20-367 ng/L in water, and 0.009-25.2 ng/g dry weight in sediment. The highest concentration was mainly found in Haihe River basin and the lowest was in basins of Tibet and Xinjiang regions. The mass inventory of climbazole in the whole China was estimated to be 294 t, with 6.79% in water, 83.7% in sediment, 9.49% in soil, and 0.002% in air. Preliminary risk assessment showed high risks in sediment posed by climbazole in 2 out of 58 basins in China. The medium risks in water and sediment were mostly concentrated in north China. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report on the emissions and multimedia fate of climbazole in the river basins of the whole China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Iridium Complexes with Proton-Responsive Azole-Type Ligands as Effective Catalysts for CO2Hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suna, Yuki; Himeda, Yuichiro; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T; Ertem, Mehmed Z

    2017-11-23

    Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl iridium (Cp*Ir) complexes with bidentate ligands consisting of a pyridine ring and an electron-rich diazole ring were prepared. Their catalytic activity toward CO 2 hydrogenation in 2.0 m KHCO 3 aqueous solutions (pH 8.5) at 50 °C, under 1.0 MPa CO 2 /H 2 (1:1) have been reported as an alternative to photo- and electrochemical CO 2 reduction. Bidentate ligands incorporating an electron-rich diazole ring improved the catalytic performance of the Ir complexes compared to the bipyridine ligand. Complexes 2, 4, and 6, possessing both a hydroxy group and an uncoordinated NH group, which are proton-responsive and capable of generating pendent bases in basic media, recorded high initial turnover frequency values of 1300, 1550, and 2000 h -1 , respectively. Spectroscopic and computational investigations revealed that the reversible deprotonation changes the electronic properties of the complexes and causes interactions between pendent base and substrate and/or solvent water molecules, resulting in high catalytic performance in basic media. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Photodegradation of the azole fungicide climbazole by ultraviolet irradiation under different conditions: Kinetics, mechanism and toxicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wang-Rong; Ying, Guang-Guo, E-mail: guang-guo.ying@gig.ac.cn; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, You-Sheng; Hu, Li-Xin; Yao, Li; Liang, Yan-Qiu; Tian, Fei

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Climbazole (CZ) could be effectively degraded under UV-254 irradiation. • CZ underwent direct and self-sensitized photolysis involving ROS. • The main photodegradation by-products of CZ were identified and semi-quantitated. • Pathway includes hydroxylative dechlorination, dechlorination, and de-pinacolone. • The toxicity of the photodegradation system reduced after UV-254 irradiation. - Abstract: Climbazole (CZ) has been known to persist in various environmental media, and may cause potential risks to aquatic organisms. This study investigated the photodegradation of CZ by ultraviolet (UV, 254 nm) under different conditions. The results revealed that CZ could be effectively degraded in aqueous solutions under UV-254 irradiation with a half-life of 9.78 min (pH = 7.5), and the photodegradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. pH had almost no effect on its rate constants and quantum yields; but the water quality of natural waters could affect the photolysis of CZ, and the coexisting constituents such as Fe{sup 3+}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, and HA obviously inhibited its photolysis. The addition of different radical scavengers also inhibited the photodegradation of CZ due to the reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). CZ underwent direct and self-sensitized photolysis involving ROS. Based on the identified photodegradation by-products, the proposed pathways included hydroxylative dechlorination, dechlorination and de-pinacolone. Moreover, toxicity evaluation using duckweed found significant toxicity reduction in the photodegradation system of CZ after the irradiation of UV-254, and the remaining by-products did not pose extra toxicity compared with CZ itself. These findings from present study suggest that CZ in effluent could be further reduced by applying UV photolysis treatment.

  15. The origin, versatility and distribution of azole fungicide resistance in the banana black Sigatoka pathogen Pseudocercospora fijiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chong Aguirre, Pablo A.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudocercospora fijiensis causes black Sigatoka disease of banana. It is one of the most damaging threats of the crop requiring excessive fungicide applications for disease control as the major export “Cavendish” clones are highly susceptible. The consequence of this practice is the

  16. The origin, versatility and distribution of azole fungicide resistance in the banana black Sigatoka pathogen Pseudocercospora fijiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chong Aguirre, Pablo A.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudocercospora fijiensis causes black Sigatoka disease of banana. It is one of the most damaging threats of the crop requiring excessive fungicide applications for disease control as the major export “Cavendish” clones are highly susceptible. The consequence of this practice is the

  17. N-(4-Bromobenzyl-2-(5,6-dimethyl-1H-benzo[d]imid-azol-2-ylbenzeneamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Dziełak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available N-(4-Bromobenzyl-2-(5,6-dimethyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-ylbenzeneamine was obtained by condensation of N-(4-bromobenzyl-3,1-benzoxazine-2,4-dione (N-(4-bromobenzylisatoic anhydride with 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylenediamine in refluxing acetic acid. This is a rare example of condensation of N-substituted 3,1-benzoxazine-2,4-dione with 1,2-phenylenediamine, which resulted in the formation of a benzimidazole derivative with a moderate yield. Crystallographic studies and initial biological screening were performed for the obtained product.

  18. Identification of ABC transporter genes of Fusarium graminearum with roles in azole tolerance and/or virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Abou Ammar

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is a plant pathogen infecting several important cereals, resulting in substantial yield losses and mycotoxin contamination of the grain. Triazole fungicides are used to control diseases caused by this fungus on a worldwide scale. Our previous microarray study indicated that 15 ABC transporter genes were transcriptionally upregulated in response to tebuconazole treatment. Here, we deleted four ABC transporter genes in two genetic backgrounds of F. graminearum representing the DON (deoxynivalenol and the NIV (nivalenol trichothecene chemotypes. Deletion of FgABC3 and FgABC4 belonging to group I of ABC-G and to group V of ABC-C subfamilies of ABC transporters, respectively, considerably increased the sensitivity to the class I sterol biosynthesis inhibitors triazoles and fenarimol. Such effects were specific since they did not occur with any other fungicide class tested. Assessing the contribution of the four ABC transporters to virulence of F. graminearum revealed that, irrespective of their chemotypes, deletion mutants of FgABC1 (ABC-C subfamily group V and FgABC3 were impeded in virulence on wheat, barley and maize. Phylogenetic context and analyses of mycotoxin production suggests that FgABC3 may encode a transporter protecting the fungus from host-derived antifungal molecules. In contrast, FgABC1 may encode a transporter responsible for the secretion of fungal secondary metabolites alleviating defence of the host. Our results show that ABC transporters play important and diverse roles in both fungicide resistance and pathogenesis of F. graminearum.

  19. Study using 1 H and 13 V NMR of 3-aryl-s-triazole benzoate azole type compounds and intermediaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garske, Jose Emilio L.; Bacha, Catarina T.M.; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 62% of the compounds used for medical purposes are heterocyclic, and are distributed as follows: 95% containing hydrogen, 28% containing sulfur and 18% containing oxygen in the structural composition. Some triazole-s-triazole type hetero aromatic systems and intermediaries, such as 1-aryl hydrazides exhibited bactericide, anti inflammatory and fungi stat activities. All the triazoles are are obtained synthetically, and are not found in the Nature. The proton and carbon-13 spectra of the non usual I, II and III compounds that we obtained are discussed in this work

  20. Oxidative alkylation of azoles. 1. Reaction of N-chloro-3-nitro-1,2,4-triazoles with methyl iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pevzner, M.S.; Kurunkov, A.A.; Trubitsin, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    By the methods of chemical analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy it has been ascertained that interaction of methyl iodide with N-chloro-3-nitro- and 5-methyl-3-nitro-1,2,4-triazols results in iodine isolation and formation of a mixture of compounds: nonsubstituted in terms of nitrogen 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazols, N-mono- and N,N-dimethylated derivatives and products of their further transformations (1,4-dimethyl-5-triazolons)

  1. <研究論文>置換基導入がアゾール型イオン液体の粘度に及ぼす影響

    OpenAIRE

    北岡, 賢; 藤本, 泰徳; 西中, 信之祐

    2014-01-01

    [Abstract] We investigated the substituent effects on the viscosity of azole based ionic liquids. Introducing some electro withdrawing groups to the azole anion and some electron donating groups to the azole cation decreased the viscosity of ionic liquids. In these substituent effects to azole anion and azole cation, the anion and cation charge are delocalized over substituent groups. The decrease in the anion and cation charge density weakens the cation-anion interaction of ionic liquids. As...

  2. Semi-national surveillance of fungaemia in Denmark 2004-2006: increasing incidence of fungaemia and numbers of isolates with reduced azole susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M.C.; Fuursted, K.; Gahrn-Hansen, B.

    2008-01-01

    .2% to 6.4% (p 0.06). MIC distributions of amphotericin B and caspofungin were in close agreement with the patterns predicted by species identification; however, decreased susceptibility to voriconazole, defined as an MIC of >1 mg/L, was detected in one (2.5%) C. glabrata isolate in 2004 and in 12 (14......, and a new trend towards C. glabrata isolates with elevated voriconazole MICs was observed Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  3. Modelling inorganic and organic biocide leaching from CBA-amine (Copper-Boron-Azole) treated wood based on characterisation leaching tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupsea, Maria; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta; Schoknecht, Ute

    2013-09-01

    Numerical simulation of the leaching behaviour of treated wood is the most pertinent and less expensive method for the prediction of biocides' release in water. Few studies based on mechanistic leaching models have been carried out so far. In this work, a coupled chemistry-mass transport model is developed for simulating the leaching behaviour of inorganic (Cu, B) and organic (Tebuconazole) biocides from CBA-amine treated wood. The model is based on experimental investigations (lab-scale leaching tests coupled with chemical and structural analysis). It considers biocides' interactions with wood solid components and with extractives (literature confirmed reactions), as well as transport mechanisms (diffusion, convection) in different compartments. Simulation results helped at identifying the main fixation mechanisms, like (i) direct complexation of Cu by wood-phenolic and -carboxylic sites (and not via monoethanolamine; complex) on lignin and hemicellulose and strong dependence on extractives' nature, (ii) pH dependent binding of tebuconazole on polarized OH moieties on wood. The role of monoethanolamine is to provide a pore-solution pH of about 7.5, when copper solubility is found to be weakest. The capability of the developed model to simulate the chemical and transport behaviour is the main result of this study. Moreover, it proved that characterization leaching tests (pH dependency and dynamic tests), combined with appropriate analytical methods are useful experimental tools. Due to its flexibility for representing and simulating various leaching conditions, chemical-transport model developed could be used to further simulate the leaching behaviour of CBA treated wood at larger scales. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Semi-national surveillance of fungaemia in Denmark 2004-2006: increasing incidence of fungaemia and numbers of isolates with reduced azole susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M.C.; Fuursted, K.; Gahrn-Hansen, B.

    2008-01-01

    inhabitants. The annual number of episodes increased by 17% during the study period. Candida spp. accounted for 98% of the fungal pathogens. Although Candida albicans remained predominant, the proportion of C. albicans decreased from 66.1% in 2004 to 53.8% in 2006 (p ... participating departments, e.g., from 51.1% at a university hospital in Copenhagen to 67.6% in North Jutland County. Candida glabrata ranked second, and increased in proportion from 16.7% to 22.7% (p 0.04). Candida krusei was isolated rarely (4.1%), but the proportion doubled during the study period from 3...

  5. Stepwise emergence of azole, echinocandin and amphotericin B multidrug resistance in vivo in Candida albicans orchestrated by multiple genetic alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Thyssen Astvad, Karen Marie; Vale Silva, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms in consecutive clinical Candida albicans isolates from a single patient displaying stepwise-acquired multidrug resistance.  Methods: Nine clinical isolates (P-1 to P-9) were susceptibility tested by EU...

  6. Potent Antifungal Activity of Pure Compounds from Traditional Chinese Medicine Extracts against Six Oral Candida Species and the Synergy with Fluconazole against Azole-Resistant Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Yan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antifungal activities of four traditional Chinese medicine (TCM extracts. The inhibitory effects of pseudolaric acid B, gentiopicrin, rhein, and alion were assessed using standard disk diffusion and broth microdilution assays. They were tested against six oral Candida species, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida dubliniensis, and Candida guilliermondii, including clinical isolates from HIV-negative, HIV-positive, and Sjögren's syndrome patients. It was found that pseudolaric acid B had the most potent antifungal effect and showed similar antifungal activity to all six Candida spp, and to isolates from HIV-negative, HIV-positive, and Sjögren's syndrome patients. The MIC values ranged from 16 to 128 μg/mL. More interestingly, a synergistic effect of pseudolaric acid B in combination with fluconazole was observed. We suggest that pseudolaric acid B might be a potential therapeutic fungicidal agent in treating oral candidiasis.

  7. In vitro adhesion of oral Candida dubliniensis isolates to acrylic denture surfaces following brief exposure to sub-cidal concentrations of polyenes, azoles and chlorhexidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellepola, Arjuna N B; Joseph, Bobby K; Altarakemah, Yacoub; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Anil, Sukumaran; Hashem, Mohamed; Khan, Zia U

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of brief exposure to sub-cidal concentrations of nystatin, amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole and chlorhexidine gluconate on the adhesion of oral Candida dubliniensis isolates to the surface of acrylic dentures. After determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of each drug, 20 oral isolates of C. dubliniensis were exposed to sub-cidal concentrations of the drugs for 1 h. The drugs were then removed by dilution, and the adhesion of the isolates to denture acrylic strips was assessed by an in vitro adhesion assay. Compared to the controls, exposure to nystatin, amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole and chlorhexidine gluconate suppressed the ability of C. dubliniensis isolates to adhere to acrylic denture surfaces with a reduction of 74.68, 74.27, 57.31, 44.57 and 56.53% (p acrylic denture surfaces. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia furfur, Malassezia sympodialis, and Malassezia globosa to azole drugs and amphotericin B evaluated using a broth microdilution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Florencia D; Sosa, María de los A; Fernández, Mariana S; Cattana, María E; Córdoba, Susana B; Giusiano, Gustavo E

    2014-08-01

    We studied the in vitro activity of fluconazole (FCZ), ketoconazole (KTZ), miconazole (MCZ), voriconazole (VCZ), itraconazole (ITZ) and amphotericin B (AMB) against the three major pathogenic Malassezia species, M. globosa, M. sympodialis, and M. furfur. Antifungal susceptibilities were determined using the broth microdilution method in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute reference document M27-A3. To support lipid-dependent yeast development, glucose, peptone, ox bile, malt extract, glycerol, and Tween supplements were added to Roswell Park Memorial Institute RPMI 1640 medium. The supplemented medium allowed good growth of all three species studied. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were recorded after 72 h of incubation at 32ºC. The three species showed different susceptibility profiles for the drugs tested. Malassezia sympodialis was the most susceptible and M. furfur the least susceptible species. KTZ, ITZ, and VCZ were the most active drugs, showing low variability among isolates of the same species. FCZ, MCZ, and AMB showed high MICs and wide MIC ranges. Differences observed emphasize the need to accurately identify and evaluate antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia species. Further investigations and collaborative studies are essential for correlating in vitro results with clinical outcomes since the existing limited data do not allow definitive conclusions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Azole Antifungal Agents To Treat the Human Pathogens Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga through Inhibition of Sterol 14α-Demethylase (CYP51).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, David C; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Rolley, Nicola J; Parker, Josie E; Nes, W David; Smith, Stephen N; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the amebicidal activities of the pharmaceutical triazole CYP51 inhibitors fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole against Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga and assess their potential as therapeutic agents against Acanthamoeba infections in humans. Amebicidal activities of the triazoles were assessed by in vitro minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) determinations using trophozoites of A. castellanii and A. polyphaga. In addition, triazole effectiveness was assessed by ligand binding studies and inhibition of CYP51 activity of purified A. castellanii CYP51 (AcCYP51) that was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Itraconazole and voriconazole bound tightly to AcCYP51 (dissociation constant [Kd] of 10 and 13 nM), whereas fluconazole bound weakly (Kd of 2,137 nM). Both itraconazole and voriconazole were confirmed to be strong inhibitors of AcCYP51 activity (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50] of 0.23 and 0.39 μM), whereas inhibition by fluconazole was weak (IC50, 30 μM). However, itraconazole was 8- to 16-fold less effective (MIC, 16 mg/liter) at inhibiting A. polyphaga and A. castellanii cell proliferation than voriconazole (MIC, 1 to 2 mg/liter), while fluconazole did not inhibit Acanthamoeba cell division (MIC, >64 mg/liter) in vitro. Voriconazole was an effective inhibitor of trophozoite proliferation for A. castellanii and A. polyphaga; therefore, it should be evaluated in trials versus itraconazole for controlling Acanthamoeba infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Modelling inorganic and organic biocide leaching from CBA-amine (Copper–Boron–Azole) treated wood based on characterisation leaching tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupsea, Maria [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F–31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, DEE/Environment and Life Cycle Engineering Team, 24 Rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Tiruta-Barna, Ligia, E-mail: ligia.barna@insa-toulouse.fr [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F–31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Schiopu, Nicoleta [Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, DEE/Environment and Life Cycle Engineering Team, 24 Rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Schoknecht, Ute [BAM — Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 4.1, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    Numerical simulation of the leaching behaviour of treated wood is the most pertinent and less expensive method for the prediction of biocides' release in water. Few studies based on mechanistic leaching models have been carried out so far. In this work, a coupled chemistry-mass transport model is developed for simulating the leaching behaviour of inorganic (Cu, B) and organic (Tebuconazole) biocides from CBA-amine treated wood. The model is based on experimental investigations (lab-scale leaching tests coupled with chemical and structural analysis). It considers biocides' interactions with wood solid components and with extractives (literature confirmed reactions), as well as transport mechanisms (diffusion, convection) in different compartments. Simulation results helped at identifying the main fixation mechanisms, like (i) direct complexation of Cu by wood-phenolic and -carboxylic sites (and not via monoethanolamine; complex) on lignin and hemicellulose and strong dependence on extractives' nature, (ii) pH dependent binding of tebuconazole on polarized -OH moieties on wood. The role of monoethanolamine is to provide a pore-solution pH of about 7.5, when copper solubility is found to be weakest. The capability of the developed model to simulate the chemical and transport behaviour is the main result of this study. Moreover, it proved that characterization leaching tests (pH dependency and dynamic tests), combined with appropriate analytical methods are useful experimental tools. Due to its flexibility for representing and simulating various leaching conditions, chemical-transport model developed could be used to further simulate the leaching behaviour of CBA treated wood at larger scales. - Highlights: • Biocide and extractives leaching from ammonia-CBA treated wood were modelled. • The chemical-transport model identifies the main fixation/solubilisation mechanisms. • The model describes well the results of equilibrium and dynamic leaching tests. • Cu is complexed direct by phenolic and carboxylic sites on wood. • Tebuconazole is bound on polarized -OH moieties on wood (pH dependent leaching)

  11. Pharmacodynamics of isavuconazole in an Aspergillus fumigatus mouse infection model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyedmousavi, S.; Bruggemann, R.J.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Mouton, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Azole resistance is an emerging problem in Aspergillus fumigatus which translates into treatment failure. Alternative treatments with new azoles may improve therapeutic outcome in invasive aspergillosis (IA) even for strains with decreased susceptibility to current azoles. The in vivo efficacy of

  12. Facultative Sterol Uptake in an Ergosterol-Deficient Clinical Isolate of Candida glabrata Harboring a Missense Mutation in ERG11 and Exhibiting Cross-Resistance to Azoles and Amphotericin B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hull, Claire M.; Parker, Josie E.; Bader, Oliver; Weig, Michael; Gross, Uwe; Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Kelly, Diane E.; Kelly, Steven L.

    We identified a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata (CG156) exhibiting flocculent growth and cross-resistance to fluconazole (FLC), voriconazole (VRC), and amphotericin B (AMB), with MICs of >256, >256, and 32 mu g ml(-1), respectively. Sterol analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

  13. Oxidative alkylation of azoles. 6. Generation of active alkylating agents at oxidation of 1-iodo- and 1-bromo-adamantane by 3-nitro-1-chloro-1,2,4-triazole and chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsypin, V.G.; Pevzner, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Reactions of N-chloro-triazole with iodo-adamantane were carried out in chloroform at 15-20 Deg C with varied excess of iodine-derivative, up to 200 mol. %. 1-chloro-adamantane, 1-iodo-adamantane, adamantanol-1,3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole, 1-(1-adamantyl)-5-nitro-1,2,4-triazole, 1-(1-adamantyl)-3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole, I 2 , ICl and non-identification impurities are discovered in the reaction mass. Dosing of iodo-derivatives in the excess of oxidative gave rise to separation of I 2 , which was then as a reductant in the reaction with N-chloro-triazole. On further dosing of iodo-derivative steady iodine coloring appeared and unsubstituted triazole was the main product of the reaction. It is supposed that using chlorine for oxidation of iodo-derivative trends to formation of unstable intermediate AdICl 2 [ru

  14. (2RS)-2-(2,4-Difluoro-phen-yl)-1-[(4-iodo-benz-yl)(meth-yl)amino]-3-(1H-1,2,4-tri-azol-1-yl)propan-2-ol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hui-Ping; Gao, Shou-Hong; Li, Chun-Tong; Wu, Zhi-Jun

    2012-08-01

    IN THE TITLE COMPOUND (COMMON NAME: iodiconazole), C(19)H(19)F(2)IN(4)O, there is an intra-molecular O-H⋯N hydrogen bond and mol-ecules are linked by weak inter-actions only, namely C-H⋯N, C-H⋯O and C-H⋯F hydrogen bonds, and π-electron ring-π-electron ring inter-actions between the triazole rings with centroid-centroid distances of 3.725 (3) Å.

  15. Possible environmental origin of resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus to medical triazoles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelders, Eveline; Huis In 't Veld, Robert A. G.; Rijs, Anthonius J. M. M.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    We reported the emergence of resistance to medical triazoles of Aspergillus fumigatus isolates from patients with invasive aspergillosis. A dominant resistance mechanism was found, and we hypothesized that azole resistance might develop through azole exposure in the environment rather than in

  16. Possible environmental origin of resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus to medical triazoles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelders, E.; Huis In 't Veld, R.A.; Rijs, A.J.M.M.; Kema, G.H.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    We reported the emergence of resistance to medical triazoles of Aspergillus fumigatus isolates from patients with invasive aspergillosis. A dominant resistance mechanism was found, and we hypothesized that azole resistance might develop through azole exposure in the environment rather than in

  17. Triazole Fungicides Can Induce Cross-Resistance to Medical Triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelders, E.; Camps, S.M.T.; Karawajczyk, A.; Schaftenaar, G.; Kema, G.H.J.; Lee, van der H.A.; Klaassen, C.H.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Azoles play an important role in the management of Aspergillus diseases. Azole resistance is an emerging global problem in Aspergillus fumigatus, and may develop through patient therapy. In addition, an environmental route of resistance development has been suggested through exposure to

  18. Possible Environmental Origin of Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus to Medical Triazoles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelders, E.; Veld, R.; Rijs, A.; Kema, G.H.J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    We reported the emergence of resistance to medical triazoles of Aspergillus fumigatus isolates from patients with invasive aspergillosis. A dominant resistance mechanism was found, and we hypothesized that azole resistance might develop through azole exposure in the environment rather than in

  19. Triazole fungicides and the selection of resistance to medical triazoles in the opportunistic mould Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, P.E.; Kema, G.H.; Zwaan, B.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Azole resistance is an emerging problem in the opportunistic mould Aspergillus fumigatus. The triazoles are the most important agents for the management of Aspergillus diseases in humans. Selection for acquired resistance may occur in the hospital setting through exposure to high doses of azoles

  20. Triazole fungicides can induce cross-resistance to medical triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelders, E.; Camps, S.M.T.; Karawajczyk, A.; Schaftenaar, G.; Kema, G.H.; Lee, H.A.L. van der; Klaassen, C.H.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Azoles play an important role in the management of Aspergillus diseases. Azole resistance is an emerging global problem in Aspergillus fumigatus, and may develop through patient therapy. In addition, an environmental route of resistance development has been suggested through exposure to

  1. Expression of the CDR1 efflux pump in clinical Candida albicans isolates is controlled by a negative regulatory element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Naseem Akhtar; Manoharlal, Raman; Saini, Preeti; Prasad, Tulika; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Hoefer, Milan; Morschhaeuser, Joachim; Prasad, Rajendra

    2005-01-01

    Resistance to azole antifungal drugs in clinical isolates of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is often caused by constitutive overexpression of the CDR1 gene, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump of the ABC transporter superfamily. To understand the relevance of a recently identified negative regulatory element (NRE) in the CDR1 promoter for the control of CDR1 expression in the clinical scenario, we investigated the effect of mutation or deletion of the NRE on CDR1 expression in two matched pairs of azole-sensitive and resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Expression of GFP or lacZ reporter genes from the wild type CDR1 promoter was much higher in the azole-resistant C. albicans isolates than in the azole-susceptible isolates, reflecting the known differences in CDR1 expression in these strains. Deletion or mutation of the NRE resulted in enhanced reporter gene expression in azole-sensitive strains, but did not further increase the already high CDR1 promoter activity in the azole-resistant strains. In agreement with these findings, electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed a reduced binding to the NRE of nuclear extracts from the resistant C. albicans isolates as compared with extracts from the sensitive isolates. These results demonstrate that the NRE is involved in maintaining CDR1 expression at basal levels and that this repression is overcome in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates, resulting in constitutive CDR1 overexpression and concomitant drug resistance

  2. Clonal expansion and emergence of environmental multiple-triazole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus strains carrying the TR₃₄/L98H mutations in the cyp51A gene in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Chowdhary

    Full Text Available Azole resistance is an emerging problem in Aspergillus which impacts the management of aspergillosis. Here in we report the emergence and clonal spread of resistance to triazoles in environmental Aspergillus fumigatus isolates in India. A total of 44 (7% A. fumigatus isolates from 24 environmental samples were found to be triazole resistant. The isolation rate of resistant A. fumigatus was highest (33% from soil of tea gardens followed by soil from flower pots of the hospital garden (20%, soil beneath cotton trees (20%, rice paddy fields (12.3%, air samples of hospital wards (7.6% and from soil admixed with bird droppings (3.8%. These strains showed cross-resistance to voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole and to six triazole fungicides used extensively in agriculture. Our analyses identified that all triazole-resistant strains from India shared the same TR(34/L98H mutation in the cyp51 gene. In contrast to the genetic uniformity of azole-resistant strains the azole-susceptible isolates from patients and environments in India were genetically very diverse. All nine loci were highly polymorphic in populations of azole-susceptible isolates from both clinical and environmental samples. Furthermore, all Indian environmental and clinical azole resistant isolates shared the same multilocus microsatellite genotype not found in any other analyzed samples, either from within India or from the Netherlands, France, Germany or China. Our population genetic analyses suggest that the Indian azole-resistant A. fumigatus genotype was likely an extremely adaptive recombinant progeny derived from a cross between an azole-resistant strain migrated from outside of India and a native azole-susceptible strain from within India, followed by mutation and then rapid dispersal through many parts of India. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that exposure of A. fumigatus to azole fungicides in the environment causes cross-resistance to medical triazoles. The

  3. Mixed Valence Aspects of Diruthenium Complexes [{(L)ClRu}2(.mu.-tppz)]n+ Incorporating 2-(2-Pyridyl)azoles (L) as Ancillary Functions and 2,3,5,6-Tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (Tppz) as Bis-Tridentate Bridging Ligand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chanda, N.; Sarkar, B.; Kar, S.; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, W.; Lahiri, G. K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 16 (2004), s. 5128-5133 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D15.10; GA MŠk OC D14.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : electron-transfer * ruthenium complexes * spectroelectrochemical properties Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.454, year: 2004

  4. In vitro interaction of voriconazole and anidulafungin against triazole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyedmousavi, S.; Meletiadis, J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Rijs, A.J.M.M.; Mouton, J.W.; Verweij, P.E.

    2013-01-01

    Voriconazole is the recommended drug of first choice to treat infections caused by Aspergillus fumigatus. The efficacy of voriconazole might be hampered by the emergence of azole resistance. However, the combination of voriconazole with anidulafungin could improve therapeutic outcomes in

  5. Rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations in clinical Candida albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole by rolling circle amplification and DNA sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huiping; Kong, Fanrong; Sorrell, Tania C; Wang, Bin; McNicholas, Paul; Pantarat, Namfon; Ellis, David; Xiao, Meng; Widmer, Fred; Chen, Sharon CA

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Amino acid substitutions in the target enzyme Erg11p of azole antifungals contribute to clinically-relevant azole resistance in Candida albicans. A simple molecular method for rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations would be an advantage as a screening tool to identify potentially-resistant strains and to track their movement. To complement DNA sequencing, we developed a padlock probe and rolling circle amplification (RCA)-based method to detect a series of mutations in th...

  6. Toward a Modular Ionic Liquid Platform for the Custom Design of Energetic Materials: Understanding How the Dual Nature of Ionic Liquids Relates Key Physical Properties to Target Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-30

    prepared by treatment of the corresponding azoles la- c, e-g with potassium carbonate in acetone. The potassium azolates 2a-c, e-g were reacted with... treatment of crystals, how long they have been stored, and the purity of the salt. Electrochemical investigation. To test the ability of a perchlorate...Forsyth, M.; MacFarlane, D. R. Aust. J. Chem. 2007, 60, 15. 70 Borra , E. F.; Seddiki, O.; Angel, R.; Eisenstein, D.; Hickson, P.; Seddon, K. R

  7. Triazole fungicides can induce cross-resistance to medical triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Snelders, E.; Camps, S.M.T.; Karawajczyk, A.; Schaftenaar, G.; Kema, G.H.; Lee, H.A.L. van der; Klaassen, C.H.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Azoles play an important role in the management of Aspergillus diseases. Azole resistance is an emerging global problem in Aspergillus fumigatus, and may develop through patient therapy. In addition, an environmental route of resistance development has been suggested through exposure to 14alpha-demethylase inhibitors (DMIs). The main resistance mechanism associated with this putative fungicide-driven route is a combination of alterations in the Cyp51A-gene (TR(34)/L98H). We invest...

  8. Imidazole and Triazole Coordination Chemistry for Antifouling Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Andersson Trojer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fouling of marine organisms on the hulls of ships is a severe problem for the shipping industry. Many antifouling agents are based on five-membered nitrogen heterocyclic compounds, in particular imidazoles and triazoles. Moreover, imidazole and triazoles are strong ligands for Cu2+ and Cu+, which are both potent antifouling agents. In this review, we summarize a decade of work within our groups concerning imidazole and triazole coordination chemistry for antifouling applications with a particular focus on the very potent antifouling agent medetomidine. The entry starts by providing a detailed theoretical description of the azole-metal coordination chemistry. Some attention will be given to ways to functionalize polymers with azole ligands. Then, the effect of metal coordination in azole-containing polymers with respect to material properties will be discussed. Our work concerning the controlled release of antifouling agents, in particular medetomidine, using azole coordination chemistry will be reviewed. Finally, an outlook will be given describing the potential for tailoring the azole ligand chemistry in polymers with respect to Cu2+ adsorption and Cu2+→Cu+ reduction for antifouling coatings without added biocides.

  9. Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Luminescent Property of A Novel Cd(II) Coordination Polymer with Bis-imidazole Ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yong Hong [Huaibei Normal Univ., Huaibei (China)

    2013-04-15

    The key to the successful design of metal-organic coordination polymers is the judicious selection of organic ligand. Recently, polydentate aromatic nitrogen heterocyclic ligands with five-membered rings have been well-studied in the construction of supramolecular structure for their N-coordinated sites apt to coordinating to transition metals. Similar to six-membered N-heterocyclic ligands, the azole-based five-membered N-heterocyclic ligands, such as imidazoles, triazoles and tetrazoles have been extensively employed in the construction of various coordination polymers with diverse topologies and interesting properties. The bis(azole) ligands in which N-donor azole rings (imidazole, triazole, or tetrazole) are separated by alkyl, (CH{sub 2}){sub n}, spacers are good choices for flexible bridging ligands. The conformational flexibility of the spacers makes the ligands adaptable to various coordination networks with one-, two-, and three dimensional structures.

  10. Topical anti-inflammatory agents for seborrheic dermatitis of the face or scalp: summary of a Cochrane Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastarinen, Helena; Okokon, Enembe O; Verbeek, Jos H

    2015-02-01

    Are there differences in effectiveness between topical anti-inflammatory treatments (steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, or lithium salts) and placebo or azoles in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis of the face and scalp in adults? The topical anti-inflammatory treatments were more effective in achieving total clearance of symptoms than placebo by 1.4-fold to 8.5-fold, but there are no considerable differences in the anti-inflammatory topical treatments or in comparison with azoles for short-term treatment. There is no evidence of treatment effects in long-term, continuous, or intermittent use of these compounds despite the chronic nature of the disease.

  11. Comparison of Two Molecular Assays for Detection and Characterization of Aspergillus fumigatus Triazole Resistance and Cyp51A Mutations in Clinical Isolates and Primary Clinical Samples of Immunocompromised Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Postina; Julian Skladny; Tobias Boch; Oliver A. Cornely; Oliver A. Cornely; Axel Hamprecht; Peter-Michael Rath; Jörg Steinmann; Oliver Bader; Thomas Miethke; Anne Dietz; Natalia Merker; Wolf-Karsten Hofmann; Dieter Buchheidt; Birgit Spiess

    2018-01-01

    In hematological patients, the incidence of invasive aspergillosis (IA) caused by azole resistant Aspergillus fumigatus (ARAf) is rising. As the diagnosis of IA is rarely based on positive culture in this group of patients, molecular detection of resistance mutations directly from clinical samples is crucial. In addition to the in-house azole resistance ARAf polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays detecting the frequent mutation combinations TR34/L98H, TR46/Y121F/T289A, and M220 in the Aspergi...

  12. Mechanistic evidence for a ring-opening pathway in the Pd-catalyzed direct arylation of benzoxazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, R.S.; Zhuravlev, Fedor

    2007-01-01

    The direct Pd-catalyzed arylation of 5-substituted benzoxazoles, used as a mechanistic model for 1,3-azoles, was investigated experimentally and computationally. The results of the primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect, Hammett studies, and H/D exchange were shown to be inconsistent with the r......The direct Pd-catalyzed arylation of 5-substituted benzoxazoles, used as a mechanistic model for 1,3-azoles, was investigated experimentally and computationally. The results of the primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect, Hammett studies, and H/D exchange were shown to be inconsistent...

  13. Triazole Resistance Is Still Not Emerging in Aspergillus fumigatus Isolates Causing Invasive Aspergillosis in Brazilian Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negri, C.E.; Goncalves, S.S.; Sousa, A.C.P.; Bergamasco, M.D.; Martino, M.D.V.; Queiroz-Telles, F.; Aquino, V.R.; Castro, P.T.O.; Hagen, F.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Colombo, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus azole resistance has emerged as a global health problem. We evaluated the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of 221 clinical A. fumigatus isolates according to CLSI guidelines. Sixty-one isolates exhibiting MICs at the epidemiological cutoff value (ECV) for itraconazole or

  14. Mimicking of cyproconazole behavior in the presence of Cu and Zn

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakl, M.; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 23 (2017), s. 2043-2050 ISSN 0951-4198 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-21409P Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : triazole fungicides * azole fungicides * copper Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 1.998, year: 2016

  15. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bons with sodium periodate catalyzed by manga- nese(III) tetra-arylporphyrins, to study the axial ligation of imidazole. 429. Azomesogens. Mesogenic benzothiazole derivatives with methoxy substituents. 203. 1,3-Azoles. An unusual hydrogen addition of indolo-2,3-quino- dimethanes to dimethylindoles in the presence of 1 ...

  16. Effects of artea, a systemic fungicide, on the antioxidant system and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work aimed at the study of the effects of Artea, a systemic azole fungicide, on durum Wheat (Triticum durum L. cv. GTA dur). Seeds were grown in a medium containing respectively 25, 50, 75 and 100 ppm of Artea under controlled conditions. Roots of eight-day-old plants were used to determine catalase, ...

  17. Aspergillus species and other molds in respiratory samples from patients with cystic fibrosis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Klaus Leth; Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory tract colonization by molds in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were analyzed, with particular focus on the frequency, genotype, and underlying mechanism of azole resistance among Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Clinical and demographic data were also analyzed. A total of 3,336 resp...

  18. Mixture effects of endocrine disrupting compounds in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Taxvig, Camilla; Andersen, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    assuming additivity. Overall these and other studies show that weak endocrine disrupting compounds, like parabens and azole fungicides, give rise to combination effects when they occur in mixtures. These combination effects should be taken into account in regulatory risk assessment not to under...

  19. Vulvovaginal candidiasis in a Flemish patient population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, MM; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Boekhout, T; Theelen, B; Matthijs, N; Bauters, T; Nailis, H; Dhont, MA; Rodriguez-Tudela, JL; Nelis, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Increased resistance to fluconazole has been reported in oral, oesophageal and urinary Candida isolates, but this has not been observed commonly in genital tract isolates. The rate of isolation of Candida spp. and their susceptibility to amphotericin B, flucytosine and azoles were determined in a

  20. Advances in corrosion testing of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel Zelinka; D.S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    A January 2004 change in the regulation of wood preservatives used in the U.S.has increased the use of newer wood preservatives, such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) and copper azole (CuAz). These preservatives contain high amounts of cupric ions, which may be reduced to copper metal at the expense of less noble steel and galvanized fasteners in the wood....

  1. Transformation and Release of Micronized Cu Used as a Wood Preservative in Treated Wood in Wetland Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micronized Cu (µ-Cu) is used as a wood preservative, replacing toxic Chromated Copper Arsenates. Micronized Cu is Malachite [Cu2CO3(OH)2] that has been milled to micron/submicron particles, many with diameters less than 100 nm, and then mixed with quat or azol biocides. I...

  2. Epidemiology and antifungal resistance in invasive Aspergillosis according to primary disease: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, A; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2011-04-28

    Aspergilli, less susceptible to antifungals emerge and resistance to azoles have been found mainly in Aspergillus fumigatus; this has launched a new phase in handling aspergillosis. Resistant strains have currently been reported from Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Norway, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands, UK and the USA. Centres in the UK (Manchester) and The Netherlands (Nijmegen) have described particularly high frequencies (15 and 10% respectively), and a significant increase in azole resistance in recent years. The reason of this high incidence may be due to long term azole therapy in patients with chronic aspergillosis in Manchester, and due to high use of agricultural azoles in Nijmegen. The primary underlying mechanism of resistance is as a result of alterations in the cyp51A target gene, with a variety of mutations found in clinical isolates and one genotype identified in the environmental (LH98). Reports on well documented in vitro and in vivo resistance to echinocandins are rare for Aspergillus species and resistance may be under-diagnosed as susceptibility testing is less frequently performed due to technical reasons.

  3. Sodium dichloroiodate promoted C-C bond cleavage: An efficient ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAKET B BHAGAT

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... Abstract. An efficient aqueous sodium dichloroiodate (NaICl2) mediated protocol is developed for the synthesis of benzofused azoles by the cyclization of 2-amino anilines/thiophenols/phenols with β- diketone compounds. The reactions gave moderate to good yield of the corresponding 2-substituted.

  4. Separation of copper ions from iron ions using PVA-g-(acrylic acid/N-vinyl imidazole) membranes prepared by radiation-induced grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajji, Zaki; Ali, Ali M

    2010-01-15

    Acrylic acid (AAc), N-vinyl imidazole (Azol) and their binary mixtures were graft copolymerized onto poly(vinyl alcohol) membranes using gamma irradiation. The ability of the grafted membranes to separate Cu ions from Fe ions was investigated with respect to the grafting yield and the pH of the feed solution. The data showed that the diffusion of copper ions from the feed compartment to the receiver compartment depends on the grafting yield of the membranes and the pH of the feed solution. To the contrary, iron ions did not diffuse through the membranes of all grafting yields. However, a limited amount of iron ions diffused in strong acidic medium. This study shows that the prepared membranes could be considered for the separation of copper ions from iron ions. The temperature of thermal decomposition of pure PVA-g-AAc/Azol membrane, PVA-g-AAc/Azol membrane containing copper ions, and PVA-g-AAc/Azol membrane containing iron ions were determined using TGA analyzer. It was shown that the presence of Cu and Fe ions increases the decomposition temperature, and the membranes bonded with iron ions are more stable than those containing copper ions.

  5. Susceptibility breakpoints and target values for therapeutic drug monitoring of voriconazole and Aspergillus fumigatus in an in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siopi, M.; Mavridou, E.; Mouton, J.W.; Verweij, P.E.; Zerva, L.; Meletiadis, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although voriconazole reached the bedside 10 years ago and became the standard care in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis, reliable clinical breakpoints are still in high demand. Moreover, this has increased due to the recent emergence of azole resistance. METHODS: Four clinical

  6. Chemical approaches to zero blowdown operation (TP93-05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, G.E.; Ogg, J.; Hatch, M.R.

    1993-03-01

    Zero blowdown operation was evaluated at a cooling tower at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in an attempt to eliminate cooling water discharge. Testing was performed with and without acid feed for pH control using a state-of-the-art treatment which contained polymer, phosphonate, and azole. Supplemental additional of a proprietary calcium carbonate scale inhibitor was also evaluated

  7. Exceptional Hydrophobicity of a Large-Pore Metal-Organic Zeolite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, C.T.; Jiang, L.; Ye, Z.M.; Krishna, R.; Zhong, Z.S.; Liao, P.Q.; Xu, J.; Ouyang, G.; Zhang, J.P.; Chen, X.M.

    2015-01-01

    Porous materials combining high hydrophobicity, large surface area, as well as large and uniform pore size are very useful but rare. The nanoporous zeolitic metal azolate framework, RHO-[Zn(eim)(2)] (MAF-6, Heim = 2-ethylimidazole), is an attractive candidate but thought to be unobtainable/unstable.

  8. Combined exposure to endocrine disrupting pesticides impairs parturition and causes pup mortality in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille Reimer; Christiansen, Sofie; Boberg, Julie

    to five pesticides, i.e. procymidone, mancozeb, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and prochloraz. Common features for the three azole fungicides are that they increase gestational length possibly because of an increase in progesterone levels in dams. Groups of 8 time-mated Wistar rats (HanTac:WH) were gavaged...

  9. Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Heteroatom Bonds Formation and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    NH2. Page 3. 3. Cross-Dehydrogenative Coupling. Directed C-H Activation. Page 4. N. N. Me. N. N. Me. OH. O. Telmisartan. Treatment of high blood pressure. Examples of Biologically Important Benzofuzed Azoles. 4. Page 5. Advantages. • Wide Substrate Scope. • Mild Reaction Conditions. • Atom Economical. Drawbacks.

  10. Evaluation of Antifungal Activity and Mode of Action of New Coumarin Derivative, 7-Hydroxy-6-nitro-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one, against Aspergillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Felipe Queiroga Sarmento; de Araújo, Rodrigo Santos Aquino; de Sousa, Janiere Pereira; Pereira, Fillipe de Oliveira; Mendonça-Junior, Francisco J. B.; Barbosa-Filho, José M.; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus spp. produce a wide variety of diseases. For the treatment of such infections, the azoles and Amphotericin B are used in various formulations. The treatment of fungal diseases is often ineffective, because of increases in azole resistance and their several associated adverse effects. To overcome these problems, natural products and their derivatives are interesting alternatives. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of coumarin derivative, 7-hydroxy-6-nitro-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one (Cou-NO2), both alone and with antifungal drugs. Its mode of action against Aspergillus spp. Cou-NO2 was tested to evaluate its effects on mycelia growth and germination of fungal conidia of Aspergillus spp. We also investigated possible Cou-NO2 action on cell walls (0.8 M sorbitol) and on Cou-NO2 to ergosterol binding in the cell membrane. The study shows that Cou-NO2 is capable of inhibiting both the mycelia growth and germination of conidia for the species tested, and that its action affects the structure of the fungal cell wall. At subinhibitory concentration, Cou-NO2 enhanced the in vitro effects of azoles. Moreover, in combination with azoles (voriconazole and itraconazole) Cou-NO2 displays an additive effect. Thus, our study supports the use of coumarin derivative 7-hydroxy-6-nitro-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one as an antifungal agent against Aspergillus species. PMID:26175794

  11. The Ligand Substitution Reactions of Hydrophobic Vitamin B12 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Chemistry ... The equilibrium constants, K, for the reaction of five-membered heterocyclic nitrogenous bases (the azoles imidazole, pyrazole and 1,2,4-triazole) with displacement of ... Keywords: Hydrophobic vitamin B12, cobalt corrinoids, equilibrium constants, solvent polarity, trans influence.

  12. In vitro antifungal susceptibility profile and correlation of mycelial and yeast forms of molecularly characterized Histoplasma capsulatum strains from India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kathuria, S.; Singh, P.K.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Chowdhary, A.

    2014-01-01

    The antifungal susceptibility profiles of the mycelial and yeast forms of 23 Histoplasma capsulatum strains from pulmonary and disseminated histoplasmosis patients in India are reported here. The MIC data of this dimorphic fungus had good agreement between both forms for azoles, amphotericin B, and

  13. Evaluation of the in vitro activity of isavuconazole and comparator voriconazole against 2635 contemporary clinical Candida and Aspergillus isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, K. M.T.; Hare, R. K.; Arendrup, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The in vitro activity of isavuconazole was determined for 1677 Candida and 958 Aspergillus isolates from 2012 to 2014 with voriconazole as comparator. Methods Aspergillus isolates were screened for resistance using azole-agar. Aspergillus isolates that screened positive and all Candida...

  14. Incidence of Cyp51 A key mutations in Aspergillus fumigatus-a study on primary clinical samples of immunocompromised patients in the period of 1995-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Spiess

    Full Text Available As the incidence of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus is rising and the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA in immunocompromised patients is rarely based on positive culture yield, we screened our Aspergillus DNA sample collection for the occurrence of azole resistance mediating cyp51 A key mutations. Using two established, a modified and a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays followed by DNA sequence analysis to detect the most frequent mutations in the A. fumigatus cyp51 A gene conferring azole resistance (TR34 (tandem repeat, L98H and M220 alterations. We analyzed two itraconazole and voriconazole and two multi-azole resistant clinical isolates and screened 181 DNA aliquots derived from clinical samples (blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, biopsies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 155 immunocompromised patients of our Aspergillus DNA sample collection, previously tested positive for Aspergillus DNA and collected between 1995 and 2013. Using a novel PCR assay for the detection of the cyp51 A 46 bp tandem repeat (TR46 directly from clinical samples, we found the alteration in a TR46/Y121F/T289A positive clinical isolate. Fifty stored DNA aliquots from clinical samples were TR46 negative. DNA sequence analysis revealed a single L98H mutation in 2010, two times the L98H alteration combined with TR34 in 2011 and 2012 and a so far unknown N90K mutation in 1998. In addition, four clinical isolates were tested positive for the TR34/L98H combination in the year 2012. We consider our assay of epidemiological relevance to detect A. fumigatus azole resistance in culture-negative clinical samples of immunocompromised patients; a prospective study is ongoing.

  15. Analysis of cytochrome P450 CYP119 ligand-dependent conformational dynamics by two-dimensional NMR and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basudhar, Debashree; Madrona, Yarrow; Kandel, Sylvie; Lampe, Jed N; Nishida, Clinton R; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2015-04-17

    Defining the conformational states of cytochrome P450 active sites is critical for the design of agents that minimize drug-drug interactions, the development of isoform-specific P450 inhibitors, and the engineering of novel oxidative catalysts. We used two-dimensional (1)H,(15)N HSQC chemical shift perturbation mapping of (15)N-labeled Phe residues and x-ray crystallography to examine the ligand-dependent conformational dynamics of CYP119. Active site Phe residues were most affected by the binding of azole inhibitors and fatty acid substrates, in agreement with active site localization of the conformational changes. This was supported by crystallography, which revealed movement of the F-G loop with various azoles. Nevertheless, the NMR chemical shift perturbations caused by azoles and substrates were distinguishable. The absence of significant chemical shift perturbations with several azoles revealed binding of ligands to an open conformation similar to that of the ligand-free state. In contrast, 4-phenylimidazole caused pronounced NMR changes involving Phe-87, Phe-144, and Phe-153 that support the closed conformation found in the crystal structure. The same closed conformation is observed by NMR and crystallography with a para-fluoro substituent on the 4-phenylimidazole, but a para-chloro or bromo substituent engendered a second closed conformation. An open conformation is thus favored in solution with many azole ligands, but para-substituted phenylimidazoles give rise to two closed conformations that depend on the size of the para-substituent. The results suggest that ligands selectively stabilize discrete cytochrome P450 conformational states. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Prevalence and mechanism of triazole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus in a referral chest hospital in Delhi, India and an update of the situation in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha eChowdhary

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus causes varied clinical syndromes ranging from colonization to deep infections. The mainstay of therapy of Aspergillus diseases is triazoles but several studies globally highlighted variable prevalence of triazole resistance, which hampers the management of aspergillosis. We studied the prevalence of resistance in clinical A. fumigatus isolates during 4 years in a referral Chest Hospital in Delhi, India and reviewed the scenario in Asia and the Middle East. Aspergillus species (n=2117 were screened with selective plates for azole resistance. The isolates included 45.4% A. flavus, followed by 32.4% A. fumigatus, 15.6% Aspergillus species and 6.6% A. terreus. Azole resistance was found in only 12 (1.7% A. fumigatus isolates.These triazole resistant A. fumigatus (TRAF isolates were subjected to (a calmodulin and β tubulin gene sequencing (b in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing against triazoles using CLSI M38-A2 (c sequencing of cyp51A gene and real-time PCR assay for detection of mutations and (d microsatellite typing of the resistant isolates. TRAF harbored TR34/L98H mutation in 10 (83.3% isolates with a pan-azole resistant phenotype. Among the remaining 2 TRAF isolates, one had G54E and the other had three non-synonymous point mutations. The majority of patients were diagnosed as invasive aspergillosis followed by allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. The Indian TR34/L98H isolates had a unique genotype and were distinct from the Chinese, Middle East and European TR34/L98H strains. This resistance mechanism has been linked to the use of fungicide azoles in agricultural practices in Europe as it has been mainly reported from azole naïve patients. Reports published from Asia demonstrate the same environmental resistance mechanism in A. fumigatus isolates from two highly populated countries in Asia i.e., China and India and also from the neighboring Middle East.

  17. Disruption of the transcriptional regulator Cas5 results in enhanced killing of Candida albicans by Fluconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasicek, Erin M; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Bruno, Vincent M; Mitchell, Aaron P; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Barker, Katherine S; Rogers, P David

    2014-11-01

    Azole antifungal agents such as fluconazole exhibit fungistatic activity against Candida albicans. Strategies to enhance azole antifungal activity would be therapeutically appealing. In an effort to identify transcriptional pathways that influence the killing activity of fluconazole, we sought to identify transcription factors (TFs) involved in this process. From a collection of C. albicans strains disrupted for genes encoding TFs (O. R. Homann, J. Dea, S. M. Noble, and A. D. Johnson, PLoS Genet. 5:e1000783, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000783), four strains exhibited marked reductions in minimum fungicidal concentration (MFCs) in both RPMI and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) media. One of these genes, UPC2, was previously characterized with regard to its role in azole susceptibility. Of mutants representing the three remaining TF genes of interest, one (CAS5) was unable to recover from fluconazole exposure at concentrations as low as 2 μg/ml after 72 h in YPD medium. This mutant also showed reduced susceptibility and a clear zone of inhibition by Etest, was unable to grow on solid medium containing 10 μg/ml fluconazole, and exhibited increased susceptibility by time-kill analysis. CAS5 disruption in highly azole-resistant clinical isolates exhibiting multiple resistance mechanisms did not alter susceptibility. However, CAS5 disruption in strains with specific resistance mutations resulted in moderate reductions in MICs and MFCs. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed in the presence of fluconazole and was consistent with the suggested role of CAS5 in cell wall organization while also suggesting a role in iron transport and homeostasis. These findings suggest that Cas5 regulates a transcriptional network that influences the response of C. albicans to fluconazole. Further delineation of this transcriptional network may identify targets for potential cotherapeutic strategies to enhance the activity of the azole class of antifungals

  18. Association Between Use of Oral Fluconazole During Pregnancy and Risk of Spontaneous Abortion and Stillbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte; Svanström, Henrik; Melbye, Mads; Hviid, Anders; Pasternak, Björn

    2016-01-05

    Vaginal candidiasis is common during pregnancy. Although intravaginal formulations of topical azole antifungals are first-line treatment for pregnant women, oral fluconazole is often used despite limited safety information. To study the association between oral fluconazole exposure during pregnancy and the risk of spontaneous abortion and stillbirth. Nationwide register-based cohort study in Denmark, 1997-2013. From a cohort of 1,405,663 pregnancies, oral fluconazole-exposed pregnancies were compared with up to 4 unexposed pregnancies matched on propensity score, maternal age, calendar year, and gestational age (based on gestational age at first day of treatment with eligible controls surviving through this date). To test for confounding by indication, pregnancies exposed to intravaginal formulations of topical azoles were used as an additional comparator group. Filled prescriptions for oral fluconazole were obtained from the National Prescription Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) for spontaneous abortion and stillbirth, estimated using proportional hazards regression. Among 3315 women exposed to oral fluconazole from 7 through 22 weeks' gestation, 147 experienced a spontaneous abortion, compared with 563 among 13,246 unexposed matched women. There was a significantly increased risk of spontaneous abortion associated with fluconazole exposure (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.23-1.77). Among 5382 women exposed to fluconazole from gestational week 7 to birth, 21 experienced a stillbirth, compared with 77 among 21,506 unexposed matched women. There was no significant association between fluconazole exposure and stillbirth (HR, 1.32 [95% CI, 0.82-2.14]). Using topical azole exposure as the comparison, 130 of 2823 women exposed to fluconazole vs 118 of 2823 exposed to topical azoles had a spontaneous abortion (HR, 1.62 [95% CI, 1.26-2.07]); 20 of 4301 women exposed to fluconazole vs 22 of 4301 exposed to topical azoles had a stillbirth (HR, 1.18 [95% CI, 0.64-2.16]). In this nationwide

  19. Drug-drug interactions of antifungal agents and implications for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, Paul O; Amsden, Jarrett R

    2005-10-01

    Drug interactions in the gastrointestinal tract, liver and kidneys result from alterations in pH, ionic complexation, and interference with membrane transport proteins and enzymatic processes involved in intestinal absorption, enteric and hepatic metabolism, renal filtration and excretion. Azole antifungals can be involved in drug interactions at all the sites, by one or more of the above mechanisms. Consequently, azoles interact with a vast array of compounds. Drug-drug interactions associated with amphotericin B formulations are predictable and result from the renal toxicity and electrolyte disturbances associated with these compounds. The echinocandins are unknown cytochrome P450 substrates and to date are relatively devoid of significant drug-drug interactions. This article reviews drug interactions involving antifungal agents that affect other agents and implications for patient care are highlighted.

  20. A prospective survey of Aspergillus spp. in respiratory tract samples: prevalence, clinical impact and antifungal susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K L; Johansen, H K; Fuursted, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    for routine microbiologic investigation were examined for Aspergillus following routine procedures and with extended incubation (5 days). Identification was done by morphologic criteria and susceptibility testing using EUCAST method for azoles and amphotericin B E-test. Invasive aspergillosis (IA......) was evaluated using modified EORTC/MSG criteria. A total of 11,368 airway samples were received. Growth of Aspergillus spp. was found in 129 and 151 patients using routine and extended incubation, respectively. Three patients had proven IA (2%), 11 probable (7%), four had allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis...... μg/ml (3/112 A. fumigatus, 1/2 A. terreus). In conclusion, Aspergillus appears to be an important pathogen in Denmark. Elevated itraconazole MICs were detected in 4% of the isolates including a multi-azole resistant isolate....

  1. A calcium-dependent ergosterol mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J H; Tove, S; Parks, L W

    1998-08-01

    ERG24 is the structural gene for the C14-sterol reductase in yeast. A lack of activity in that enzyme, mediated either by the morpholine fungicides or the insertional inactivation of ERG24, causes the accumulation of the aberrant sterol ignosterol. Cells producing this sterol are unable to grow aerobically in the routine laboratory medium, YPD. However, growth does occur on a synthetic defined medium. A novel calcium-dependent phenotype associated with alterations in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway in yeast is described. In addition, reduction of yeast growth with an azole inhibitor of the C-14 sterol de-methylase was also modulated by an excess of calcium ions in the culture medium. These results define a new effect of ergosterol deficiency and provide important practical implications for utilizing morpholine and azole sterol biosynthetic-inhibiting fungicides.

  2. Structural and Functional Elucidation of Yeast Lanosterol 14?-Demethylase in Complex with Agrochemical Antifungals

    OpenAIRE

    Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Sabherwal, Manya; Sagatova, Alia A.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Negroni, Jacopo; Wilson, Rajni K.; Woods, Matthew A.; Tietjen, Klaus; Monk, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Azole antifungals, known as demethylase inhibitors (DMIs), target sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway of fungal pathogens of both plants and humans. DMIs remain the treatment of choice in crop protection against a wide range of fungal phytopathogens that have the potential to reduce crop yields and threaten food security. We used a yeast membrane protein expression system to overexpress recombinant hexahistidine-tagged S. cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase...

  3. Recurrent episodes of Candidemia due to Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida albicans with acquired echinocandin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Grosset

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed fungal infection and acquired echinocandin resistance of Candida spp. remain infrequent. In this study we have reported the case of a patient hospitalized for tuberculosis who experienced multiple infections due to three common Candida species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis. Furthermore, consecutive isolates from blood cultures and heart valve were found resistant to azoles (C. tropicalis and to echinocandin with either novel (C. tropicalis or previously described (C. albicans missense mutations in the Fks gene.

  4. Specificity of drug transport mediated by CaMDR1: a major facilitator ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    among these two tested drugs. Due to severe toxicity of these drugs to insect cells, further characterization of. CaMdr1p as a drug transporter could not be done with this system. Therefore, as an alternative, CaMdr1p and. Cdr1p, which is an ABC protein (ATP binding cassette) also involved in azole resistance in C. albicans, ...

  5. Azasordarins: Susceptibility of Fluconazole-Susceptible and Fluconazole-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Candida spp. to GW 471558

    OpenAIRE

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Mellado, Emilia; Díaz-Guerra, Teresa M.; Monzón, Araceli; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2001-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the azasordarin GW 471558 was compared with those of amphotericin B, flucytosine, itraconazole, and ketoconazole against 177 clinical isolates of Candida spp. GW 471558 showed potent activity against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Candida tropicalis, even against isolates with decreased susceptibility to azoles. Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida guilliermondii are resistant to GW 471558 in vitro (MICs, >128 μg/ml).

  6. Clotrimazole Drug Resistance in Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates Correlates with Increased Expression of the Drug:H(+) Antiporters CgAqr1, CgTpo1_1, CgTpo3, and CgQdr2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Catarina; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Miranda, Isabel M; Silva-Dias, Ana; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Rodrigues, Acácio G; Teixeira, Miguel C

    2016-01-01

    For years, antifungal drug resistance in Candida species has been associated to the expression of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters. More recently, a few drug efflux pumps from the Drug:H(+) Antiporter (DHA) family have also been shown to play a role in this process, although to date only the Candida albicans Mdr1 transporter has been demonstrated to be relevant in the clinical acquisition of antifungal drug resistance. This work provides evidence to suggest the involvement of the C. glabrata DHA transporters CgAqr1, CgQdr2, CgTpo1_1, and CgTpo3 in the clinical acquisition of clotrimazole drug resistance. A screening for azole drug resistance in 138 C. glabrata clinical isolates, from patients attending two major Hospitals in Portugal, was performed. Based on this screening, 10 clotrimazole susceptible and 10 clotrimazole resistant isolates were selected for further analysis. The transcript levels of CgAQR1, CgQDR2, CgTPO1_1, and CgTPO3 were found to be significantly up-regulated in resistant isolates when compared to the susceptible ones, with a level of correlation that was found to be similar to that of CgCDR2, an ABC gene known to be involved in the clinical acquisition of resistance. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the CgTPO3 gene was deleted in an azole resistant C. glabrata isolate, exhibiting high levels of expression of this gene. The deletion of CgTPO3 in this isolate was found to lead to decreased resistance to clotrimazole and fluconazole, and increased accumulation of azole drugs, thus suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the manifestation of azole resistance.

  7. Detection of Cryptococcus neoformans DNA in Tissue Samples by Nested and Real-Time PCR Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bialek, Ralf; Weiss, Michael; Bekure-Nemariam, Kubrom; Najvar, Laura K.; Alberdi, Maria B.; Graybill, John R.; Reischl, Udo

    2002-01-01

    Two PCR protocols targeting the 18S rRNA gene of Cryptococcus neoformans were established, compared, and evaluated in murine cryptococcal meningitis. One protocol was designed as a nested PCR to be performed in conventional block thermal cyclers. The other protocol was designed as a quantitative single-round PCR adapted to LightCycler technology. One hundred brain homogenates and dilutions originating from 20 ICR mice treated with different azoles were examined. A fungal burden of 3 × 101 to ...

  8. Molecular mechanisms associated with Fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida albicans isolates from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, Arati; Vidhate, Pallavi; Kusro, Chanchal; Waman, Vaishali; Saxena, Vandana; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Risbud, Arun

    2016-02-01

    Resistance to azole antifungals is a significant problem in Candida albicans. An understanding of resistance at molecular level is essential for the development of strategies to tackle resistance and rationale design of newer antifungals and target-based molecular approaches. This study presents the first evaluation of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical C.albicans isolates from India. Target site (ERG11) alterations were determined by DNA sequencing, whereas real-time PCRs were performed to quantify target and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2, MDR1) in 87 [Fluconazole susceptible (n = 30), susceptible-dose dependent (n = 30) and resistant (n = 27)] C.albicans isolates. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole was observed in 74.1% isolates. Six amino acid substitutions were identified, including 4 (E116D, F145L, E226D, I437V) previously reported ones and 2 (P406L, Q474H) new ones. CDR1 over-expression was seen in 77.7% resistant isolates. CDR2 was exclusively expressed with CDR1 and their concomitant over-expression was associated with azole cross-resistance. MDR1 and ERG11 over-expression did not seem to be associated with resistance. Our results show that drug efflux mediated by Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CDR1 is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance and azole cross-resistance in C. albicans and indicate the need for research directed towards developing strategies to tackle efflux mediated resistance to salvage azoles. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Ruthenium-catalyzed direct C3 alkylation of indoles with α,β-unsaturated ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai-Shuai; Lin, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Dong, Lin

    2015-01-28

    In this paper, a simple and highly efficient ruthenium-catalyzed direct C3 alkylation of indoles with various α,β-unsaturated ketones without chelation assistance has been developed. This novel C-H activation methodology exhibits a broad substrate scope such as different substituted indoles, pyrroles, and other azoles. Further synthetic applications of the alkylation products can lead to more attractive 3,4-fused tricyclic indoles.

  10. Infección orofacial por Conidiobolus coronatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Carolina Moncada

    2016-04-01

    Dada la poca frecuencia de esta enfermedad, no hay una estrategia de tratamiento establecida; sin embargo, el uso de azoles, como el itraconazol, se señala cada vez más en los diferentes reportes de caso, haya habido tratamiento quirúrgico adyuvante o no. En este reporte de caso se describe, además, la respuesta clínica y terapéutica a largo plazo de esta micosis infrecuente en Colombia.

  11. High Virulence and Antifungal Resistance in Clinical Strains of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Monroy-Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antifungal resistance and virulence properties of Candida albicans are a growing health problem worldwide. To study the expression of virulence and azole resistance genes in 39 clinical strains of C. albicans, we used a model of infection of human vaginal epithelial cells with C. albicans strains isolated from Mexican women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC. The strains were identified by PCR amplification of the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of rRNA. The detection and expression of virulence genes and azole resistance genes MDR1 and CDR1 were performed using PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. All strains were sensitive to nystatin and 38 (97.4% and 37 (94.9% were resistant to ketoconazole and fluconazole, respectively. ALS1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1, LIP2, LIP4, LIP6, LIP7, LIP9, LIP10, and PLB1-PLB2 were present in all strains; SAP1 was identified in 37 (94.8% isolates, HWP1 in 35 (89.7%, ALS3 in 14 (35.8%, and CDR1 in 26 (66.6%. In nearly all of the strains, ALS1, HWP1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1–LIP10, PLB1, and PLB2 were expressed, whereas CDR1 was expressed in 20 (51.3% and ALS3 in 14 (35.8%. In our in vitro model of infection with C. albicans, the clinical strains showed different expression profiles of virulence genes in association with the azole resistance gene CDR1. The results indicate that the strains that infect Mexican patients suffering from VVC are highly virulent and virtually all are insensitive to azoles.

  12. Multidrug resistance in fungi: regulation of transporter-encoding gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2014-01-01

    A critical risk to the continued success of antifungal chemotherapy is the acquisition of resistance; a risk exacerbated by the few classes of effective antifungal drugs. Predictably, as the use of these drugs increases in the clinic, more resistant organisms can be isolated from patients. A particularly problematic form of drug resistance that routinely emerges in the major fungal pathogens is known as multidrug resistance. Multidrug resistance refers to the simultaneous acquisition of tolerance to a range of drugs via a limited or even single genetic change. This review will focus on recent progress in understanding pathways of multidrug resistance in fungi including those of most medical relevance. Analyses of multidrug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided the most detailed outline of multidrug resistance in a eukaryotic microorganism. Multidrug resistant isolates of S. cerevisiae typically result from changes in the activity of a pair of related transcription factors that in turn elicit overproduction of several target genes. Chief among these is the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-encoding gene PDR5. Interestingly, in the medically important Candida species, very similar pathways are involved in acquisition of multidrug resistance. In both C. albicans and C. glabrata, changes in the activity of transcriptional activator proteins elicits overproduction of a protein closely related to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 called Cdr1. The major filamentous fungal pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, was previously thought to acquire resistance to azole compounds (the principal antifungal drug class) via alterations in the azole drug target-encoding gene cyp51A. More recent data indicate that pathways in addition to changes in the cyp51A gene are important determinants in A. fumigatus azole resistance. We will discuss findings that suggest azole resistance in A. fumigatus and Candida species may share more mechanistic similarities than previously thought.

  13. Special Issue: Novel Antifungal Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Del Poeta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue is designed to highlight the latest research and development on new antifungal compounds with mechanisms of action different from the ones of polyenes, azoles, and echinocandins. The papers presented here highlight new pathways and targets that could be exploited for the future development of new antifungal agents to be used alone or in combination with existing antifungals. A computational model for better predicting antifungal drug resistance is also presented.

  14. Influence of agronomic conditions on the efficacy of different fungicides applied to wheat at heading: effect on flag leaf senescence, Fusarium head blight attack, grain yield and deoxynivalenol contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Blandino

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of field experiments has been conducted in North West Italy over a period of 3 years to evaluate the effect of fungicide applications on common wheat yield and safety, combined with different agronomic conditions (high: a susceptible variety to FHB planted in an untilled field; low: a medium tolerant variety to FHB planted in a ploughed field for Fusarium head blight (FHB infection risk. A azole mixture (prochloraz + epoxiconazole, applied at heading, was compared in each year and for each agronomic condition with a triazole with high activity against F. graminearum and F. culmorum (metconazole, a strobilurin-azole mixture with elevated action to control leaf diseases and delay leaf senescence (azoxystrobin + prochloraz and an untreated control. The following parameters were analyzed: flag leaf greenness, grain yield, test weight, thousand kernel weight (TKW, FHB incidence and severity and deoxynivalenol (DON contamination. The results of this research, conducted over three years with different meteorological conditions, underline the important link between fungicide efficacy and environmental and agronomic conditions that can influence fungal disease pressure. The fungicide effect on the control of FHB and the increase in flag leaf longevity and grain yield were greater with an increase in the disease pressure. On the other hand, the DON contamination was reduced by the fungicide to a greater extent in the low risk agronomic and environmental conditions compared to the high risk ones. Prochloraz + epoxiconazole showed a lower efficacy in reducing DON contamination compared to metconazole, particularly in the higher FHB pressure conditions. No significant differences were observed between the azole mixture and the strobilurin-azole mixture for flag leaf greenness, grain yield, test weight or TKW. This study provides useful information that can be used to evaluate, in naturally-infected field conditions, the effect of a fungicide

  15. Posttreatment Antifungal Resistance among Colonizing Candida Isolates in Candidemia Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R H; Johansen, H K; Søes, L M

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of intrinsic and acquired resistance among colonizing Candida isolates from patients after candidemia was investigated systematically in a 1-year nationwide study. Patients were treated at the discretion of the treating physician. Oral swabs were obtained after treatment. Species...... distributions and MIC data were investigated for blood and posttreatment oral isolates from patients exposed to either azoles or echinocandins for assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and internal...

  16. Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome Induced by Posaconazole

    OpenAIRE

    Pilmis, Benoit; Coignard-Biehler, Hélène; Jullien, Vincent; Hermine, Olivier; Touraine, Philippe; Lecuit, Marc; Lortholary, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome is an undesirable outcome of glucocorticoids treatment. It can be increased by pharmacologic interactions. Glucocorticoid therapy, given in association with ritonavir, and some azole treatments are causes of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. We present a patient with common-variable immunodeficiency who received 7 years of itraconazole therapy for bronchial colonization with Aspergillus in combination with inhaled fluticasone without any Cushingoid symptoms. After a...

  17. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome induced by posaconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilmis, Benoit; Coignard-Biehler, Hélène; Jullien, Vincent; Hermine, Olivier; Touraine, Philippe; Lecuit, Marc; Lortholary, Olivier

    2013-11-01

    Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome is an undesirable outcome of glucocorticoids treatment. It can be increased by pharmacologic interactions. Glucocorticoid therapy, given in association with ritonavir, and some azole treatments are causes of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. We present a patient with common-variable immunodeficiency who received 7 years of itraconazole therapy for bronchial colonization with Aspergillus in combination with inhaled fluticasone without any Cushingoid symptoms. After a switch to posaconazole, the patient developed Cushingoid symptoms.

  18. Synthesis of New C- and N-β-d-Glucopyranosyl Derivatives of Imidazole, 1,2,3-Triazole and Tetrazole, and Their Evaluation as Inhibitors of Glycogen Phosphorylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor Kun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to broaden the structure-activity relationships of C- and N-β-d-glucopyranosyl azole type inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase. 1-Aryl-4-β-d-gluco-pyranosyl-1,2,3-triazoles were prepared by copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloadditions between O-perbenzylated or O-peracetylated β-d-glucopyranosyl ethynes and aryl azides. 1-β-d-Gluco-pyranosyl-4-phenyl imidazole was obtained in a glycosylation of 4(5-phenylimidazole with O-peracetylated α-d-glucopyranosyl bromide. C-β-d-Glucopyranosyl-N-substituted-tetrazoles were synthesized by alkylation/arylation of O-perbenzoylated 5-β-d-glucopyranosyl-tetrazole or from a 2,6-anhydroheptose tosylhydrazone and arenediazonium salts. 5-Substituted tetrazoles were glycosylated by O-peracetylated α-d-glucopyranosyl bromide to give N-β-d-glucopyranosyl-C-substituted-tetrazoles. Standard deprotections gave test compounds which were assayed against rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b. Most of the compounds proved inactive, the best inhibitor was 2-β-d-glucopyranosyl-5-phenyltetrazole (IC50 600 μM. These studies extended the structure-activity relationships of β-d-glucopyranosyl azole type inhibitors and revealed the extreme sensitivity of such type of inhibitors towards the structure of the azole moiety.

  19. Functional characterization of Candida albicans Hos2 histone deacetylase [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3i2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Karthikeyan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a mucosal commensal organism capable of causing superficial (oral and vaginal thrush infections in immune normal hosts, but is a major pathogen causing systemic and mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Azoles have been very effective anti-fungal agents and the mainstay in treating opportunistic mold and yeast infections. Azole resistant strains have emerged compromising the utility of this class of drugs. It has been shown that azole resistance can be reversed by the co-administration of a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor, suggesting that resistance is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms possibly involving Hos2, a fungal deacetylase. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of HOS2 (HighOsmolarity Sensitive, a gene coding for fungal histone deacetylase from C. albicans. Inhibition studies showed that Hos2 is susceptible to pan inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, but is not inhibited by class I inhibitors such as MS-275. This in vitro enzymatic assay, which is amenable to high throughput could be used for screening potent fungal Hos2 inhibitors that could be a potential anti-fungal adjuvant. Purified Hos2 protein consistently deacetylated tubulins, rather than histones from TSA-treated cells. Hos2 has been reported to be a putative NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, a feature of sirtuins. We assayed for sirtuin activation with resveratrol and purified Hos2 protein and did not find any sirtuin activity.

  20. Calcineurin controls drug tolerance, hyphal growth, and virulence in Candida dubliniensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Lien; Brand, Alexandra; Morrison, Emma L; Silao, Fitz Gerald S; Bigol, Ursela G; Malbas, Fedelino F; Nett, Jeniel E; Andes, David R; Solis, Norma V; Filler, Scott G; Averette, Anna; Heitman, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an emerging pathogenic yeast species closely related to Candida albicans and frequently found colonizing or infecting the oral cavities of HIV/AIDS patients. Drug resistance during C. dubliniensis infection is common and constitutes a significant therapeutic challenge. The calcineurin inhibitor FK506 exhibits synergistic fungicidal activity with azoles or echinocandins in the fungal pathogens C. albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this study, we show that calcineurin is required for cell wall integrity and wild-type tolerance of C. dubliniensis to azoles and echinocandins; hence, these drugs are candidates for combination therapy with calcineurin inhibitors. In contrast to C. albicans, in which the roles of calcineurin and Crz1 in hyphal growth are unclear, here we show that calcineurin and Crz1 play a clearly demonstrable role in hyphal growth in response to nutrient limitation in C. dubliniensis. We further demonstrate that thigmotropism is controlled by Crz1, but not calcineurin, in C. dubliniensis. Similar to C. albicans, C. dubliniensis calcineurin enhances survival in serum. C. dubliniensis calcineurin and crz1/crz1 mutants exhibit attenuated virulence in a murine systemic infection model, likely attributable to defects in cell wall integrity, hyphal growth, and serum survival. Furthermore, we show that C. dubliniensis calcineurin mutants are unable to establish murine ocular infection or form biofilms in a rat denture model. That calcineurin is required for drug tolerance and virulence makes fungus-specific calcineurin inhibitors attractive candidates for combination therapy with azoles or echinocandins against emerging C. dubliniensis infections.

  1. Calcineurin Controls Drug Tolerance, Hyphal Growth, and Virulence in Candida dubliniensis▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Lien; Brand, Alexandra; Morrison, Emma L.; Silao, Fitz Gerald S.; Bigol, Ursela G.; Malbas, Fedelino F.; Nett, Jeniel E.; Andes, David R.; Solis, Norma V.; Filler, Scott G.; Averette, Anna; Heitman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an emerging pathogenic yeast species closely related to Candida albicans and frequently found colonizing or infecting the oral cavities of HIV/AIDS patients. Drug resistance during C. dubliniensis infection is common and constitutes a significant therapeutic challenge. The calcineurin inhibitor FK506 exhibits synergistic fungicidal activity with azoles or echinocandins in the fungal pathogens C. albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this study, we show that calcineurin is required for cell wall integrity and wild-type tolerance of C. dubliniensis to azoles and echinocandins; hence, these drugs are candidates for combination therapy with calcineurin inhibitors. In contrast to C. albicans, in which the roles of calcineurin and Crz1 in hyphal growth are unclear, here we show that calcineurin and Crz1 play a clearly demonstrable role in hyphal growth in response to nutrient limitation in C. dubliniensis. We further demonstrate that thigmotropism is controlled by Crz1, but not calcineurin, in C. dubliniensis. Similar to C. albicans, C. dubliniensis calcineurin enhances survival in serum. C. dubliniensis calcineurin and crz1/crz1 mutants exhibit attenuated virulence in a murine systemic infection model, likely attributable to defects in cell wall integrity, hyphal growth, and serum survival. Furthermore, we show that C. dubliniensis calcineurin mutants are unable to establish murine ocular infection or form biofilms in a rat denture model. That calcineurin is required for drug tolerance and virulence makes fungus-specific calcineurin inhibitors attractive candidates for combination therapy with azoles or echinocandins against emerging C. dubliniensis infections. PMID:21531874

  2. Impact of echinocandin on prognosis of proven invasive candidiasis in ICU: A post-hoc causal inference model using the AmarCAND2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Sébastien; Leroy, Olivier; Azoulay, Elie; Montravers, Philippe; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Dupont, Hervé; Guillemot, Didier; Lortholary, Olivier; Mira, Jean-Paul; Perrigault, Pierre-François; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Timsit, Jean-François

    2017-04-01

    guidelines recommend first-line systemic antifungal therapy (SAT) with echinocandins in invasive candidiasis (IC), especially in critically ill patients. This study aimed at assessing the impact of echinocandins compared to azoles as initial SAT on the 28-day prognosis in adult ICU patients. From the prospective multicenter AmarCAND2 cohort (835 patients), we selected those with documented IC and treated with echinocandins (ECH) or azoles (AZO). The average causal effect of echinocandins on 28-day mortality was assessed using an inverse probability of treatment weight (IPTW) estimator. 397 patients were selected, treated with echinocandins (242 patients, 61%) or azoles (155 patients, 39%); septic shock: 179 patients (45%). The median SAPSII was higher in the ECH group (48 [35; 62] vs. 43 [31; 58], p = 0.01). Crude mortality was 34% (ECH group) vs. 25% (AZO group). After adjustment on baseline confounders, no significant association emerged between initial SAT with echinocandins and 28-day mortality (HR: 0.95; 95% CI: [0.60; 1.49]; p = 0.82). However, echinocandin tended to benefit patients with septic shock (HR: 0.46 [0.19; 1.07]; p = 0.07). Patients who received echinocandins were more severely ill. Echinocandin use was associated with a non-significant 7% decrease of 28-day mortality and a trend to a beneficial effect for patient with septic shock. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mycological Considerations in the Topical Treatment of Superficial Fungal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ted

    2016-02-01

    Trichophyton rubrum remains the most common pathogenic dermatophyte in the United States, Europe, and industrialized Asia, although other species are predminant elsewhere. Candida albicans is the most common pathogenic yeast, with other species occasionally encountered. Just a few of the 14 described species of Malassezia cause pityriasis versicolor worldwide. FDA approval does not always accurately reflect the potential utility of any given topical antifungal agent. Azole, hydroxypyridone, and allylamine agents are beneficial in the management of dermatophytosis; however, the allylamines may lead to faster symptom resolution and a higher degree of sustained response. Although in actual clinical use the allylamines have all shown some activity against superficial cutaneous candidiasis and pityriasis versicolor, the azole agents remain drugs of choice. Ciclopirox is an excellent broad-spectrum antifungal agent. Optimal topical therapy for superficial fungal infections cannot yet be reliably based upon in-vitro laboratory determination of sensitivity. Inherent antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties possessed by some antifungal agents may be exploited for clinical purposes. Candida species may be azole-insensitive due to efflux pumps or an altered target enzyme. So-called "antifungal resistance" of dermatophyets is actually due to poor patient adherence (either in dosing or treatment duration), or to reinfection.

  4. Mitochondrial dynamics in the pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus: therapeutic and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Michael; Zhu, Zhaojun; Penka, Mirjam; Helmschrott, Christoph; Wagener, Nikola; Wagener, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondria within eukaryotic cells continuously fuse and divide. This phenomenon is called mitochondrial dynamics and crucial for mitochondrial function and integrity. We performed a comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial dynamics in the pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. Phenotypic characterization of respective mutants revealed the general essentiality of mitochondrial fusion for mitochondrial genome maintenance and the mold's viability. Surprisingly, it turned out that the mitochondrial rhomboid protease Pcp1 and its processing product, s-Mgm,1 which are crucial for fusion in yeast, are dispensable for fusion, mtDNA maintenance and viability in A. fumigatus. In contrast, mitochondrial fission mutants show drastically reduced growth and sporulation rates and increased heat susceptibility. However, reliable inheritance of mitochondria to newly formed conidia is ensured. Strikingly, mitochondrial fission mutants show a significant and growth condition-dependent increase in azole resistance. Parallel disruption of fusion in a fission mutant partially rescues growth and sporulation defects and further increases the azole resistance phenotype. Taken together, our results indicate an emerging dispensability of the mitochondrial rhomboid protease function in mitochondrial fusion, the suitability of mitochondrial fusion machinery as antifungal target and the involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in azole susceptibility. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Rh(I)-Catalyzed Arylation of Heterocycles via C-H Bond Activation: Expanded Scope Through Mechanistic Insight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Jared; Berman, Ashley; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-07-18

    A practical, functional group tolerant method for the Rh-catalyzed direct arylation of a variety of pharmaceutically important azoles with aryl bromides is described. Many of the successful azole and aryl bromide coupling partners are not compatible with methods for the direct arylation of heterocycles using Pd(0) or Cu(I) catalysts. The readily prepared, low molecular weight ligand, Z-1-tert-butyl-2,3,6,7-tetrahydrophosphepine, which coordinates to Rh in a bidentate P-olefin fashion to provide a highly active yet thermally stable arylation catalyst, is essential to the success of this method. By using the tetrafluoroborate salt of the corresponding phosphonium, the reactions can be assembled outside of a glove box without purification of reagents or solvent. The reactions are also conducted in THF or dioxane, which greatly simplifies product isolation relative to most other methods for direct arylation of azoles employing high-boiling amide solvents. The reactions are performed with heating in a microwave reactor to obtain excellent product yields in two hours.

  6. Functional characterization of Candida albicans Hos2 histone deacetylase [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3xh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Karthikeyan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a mucosal commensal organism capable of causing superficial (oral and vaginal thrush infections in immune normal hosts, but is a major pathogen causing systemic and mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Azoles have been very effective anti-fungal agents and the mainstay in treating opportunistic mold and yeast infections. Azole resistant strains have emerged compromising the utility of this class of drugs. It has been shown that azole resistance can be reversed by the co-administration of a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor, suggesting that resistance is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms possibly involving Hos2, a fungal deacetylase. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of HOS2 (HighOsmolarity Sensitive, a gene coding for fungal histone deacetylase from C. albicans. Inhibition studies showed that Hos2 is susceptible to pan inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, but is not inhibited by class I inhibitors such as MS-275. This in vitro enzymatic assay, which is amenable to high throughput could be used for screening potent fungal Hos2 inhibitors that could be a potential anti-fungal adjuvant. Purified Hos2 protein consistently deacetylated tubulins, rather than histones from TSA-treated cells. Hos2 has been reported to be a putative NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, a feature of sirtuins. We assayed for sirtuin activation with resveratrol and purified Hos2 protein and did not find any sirtuin activity.

  7. In vitro interaction of voriconazole and anidulafungin against triazole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Meletiadis, Joseph; Melchers, Willem J G; Rijs, Antonius J M M; Mouton, Johan W; Verweij, Paul E

    2013-02-01

    Voriconazole is the recommended drug of first choice to treat infections caused by Aspergillus fumigatus. The efficacy of voriconazole might be hampered by the emergence of azole resistance. However, the combination of voriconazole with anidulafungin could improve therapeutic outcomes in azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis (IA). The in vitro interaction between voriconazole and anidulafungin was determined against voriconazole-susceptible and voriconazole-resistant (substitutions in the cyp51A gene, including single point [M220I and G54W] and tandem repeat [34-bp tandem repeat in the promoter region of the cyp51A gene in combination with substitutions at codon L98 and 46-bp tandem repeat in the promoter region of the cyp51A gene in combination with mutation at codons Y121 and T289] mutations) clinical A. fumigatus isolates using a checkerboard microdilution method with spectrophotometric analysis and a viability-based XTT {2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide} assay within 2 h of exposure after 24 and 48 h of incubation at 35 °C to 37 °C. Fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indexes (FICis) were determined using different MIC endpoints and Bliss independence analysis performed based on the response surface calculation of the no-drug interaction. Significant synergistic interactions obtained based on measuring the FIC index were dependent on the MIC endpoint, in which FICs were inversely related to voriconazole and anidulafungin MICs and were influenced by the CYP51A genotype. A statistically significant difference was observed between FIC indexes of isolates harboring tandem repeat mutations and wild-type controls (P = 0.006 by one-way analysis of variance [ANOVA]), indicating that synergy is decreased in azole-resistant strains. Our results indicated that a combination of voriconazole and anidulafungin might be effective against infections caused by both azole-susceptible and azole-resistant A

  8. Amino acid substitutions at the major insertion loop of Candida albicans sterol 14alpha-demethylase are involved in fluconazole resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidia Alvarez-Rueda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, amino acid substitutions of 14alpha-demethylase (CaErg11p, CaCYP51 are associated with azole antifungals resistance. This is an area of research which is very dynamic, since the stakes concern the screening of new antifungals which circumvent resistance. The impact of amino acid substitutions on azole interaction has been postulated by homology modeling in comparison to the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT-CYP51. Modeling of amino acid residues situated between positions 428 to 459 remains difficult to explain to date, because they are in a major insertion loop specifically present in fungal species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Fluconazole resistance of clinical isolates displaying Y447H and V456I novel CaErg11p substitutions confirmed in vivo in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Y447H and V456I implication into fluconazole resistance was then studied by site-directed mutagenesis of wild-type CaErg11p and by heterogeneously expression into the Pichia pastoris model. CLSI modified tests showed that V447H and V456I are responsible for an 8-fold increase in fluconazole MICs of P. pastoris mutants compared to the wild-type controls. Moreover, mutants showed a sustained capacity for producing ergosterol, even in the presence of fluconazole. Based on these biological results, we are the first to propose a hybrid homology structure-function model of Ca-CYP51 using 3 different homology modeling programs. The variable position of the protein insertion loop, using different liganded or non-liganded templates of recently solved CYP51 structures, suggests its inherent flexibility. Mapping of recognized azole-resistant substitutions indicated that the flexibility of this region is probably enhanced by the relatively high glycine content of the consensus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results highlight the potential role of the insertion loop in azole resistance in the human

  9. Rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations in clinical Candida albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole by rolling circle amplification and DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis David

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amino acid substitutions in the target enzyme Erg11p of azole antifungals contribute to clinically-relevant azole resistance in Candida albicans. A simple molecular method for rapid detection of ERG11 gene mutations would be an advantage as a screening tool to identify potentially-resistant strains and to track their movement. To complement DNA sequencing, we developed a padlock probe and rolling circle amplification (RCA-based method to detect a series of mutations in the C. albicans ERG11 gene using "reference" azole-resistant isolates with known mutations. The method was then used to estimate the frequency of ERG11 mutations and their type in 25 Australian clinical C. albicans isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole and in 23 fluconazole-susceptible isolates. RCA results were compared DNA sequencing. Results The RCA assay correctly identified all ERG11 mutations in eight "reference" C. albicans isolates. When applied to 48 test strains, the RCA method showed 100% agreement with DNA sequencing where an ERG11 mutation-specific probe was used. Of 20 different missense mutations detected by sequencing in 24 of 25 (96% isolates with reduced fluconazole susceptibility, 16 were detected by RCA. Five missense mutations were detected by both methods in 18 of 23 (78% fluconazole-susceptible strains. DNA sequencing revealed that mutations in non-susceptible isolates were all due to homozygous nucleotide changes. With the exception of the mutations leading to amino acid substitution E266D, those in fluconazole-susceptible strains were heterozygous. Amino acid substitutions common to both sets of isolates were D116E, E266D, K128T, V437I and V488I. Substitutions unique to isolates with reduced fluconazole susceptibility were G464 S (n = 4 isolates, G448E (n = 3, G307S (n = 3, K143R (n = 3 and Y123H, S405F and R467K (each n = 1. DNA sequencing revealed a novel substitution, G450V, in one isolate. Conclusion The sensitive RCA

  10. In silico analysis of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in chronic granulomatous infectious fungus Sporothrix schenckii: Special focus on CYP51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matowane, Retshedisitswe Godfrey; Wieteska, Lukasz; Bamal, Hans Denis; Kgosiemang, Ipeleng Kopano Rosinah; Van Wyk, Mari; Manume, Nessie Agnes; Abdalla, Sara Mohamed Hasaan; Mashele, Samson Sitheni; Gront, Dominik; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2018-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is an emerging chronic, granulomatous, subcutaneous, mycotic infection caused by Sporothrix species. Sporotrichosis is treated with the azole drug itraconazole as ketoconazole is ineffective. It is a well-known fact that azole drugs act by inhibiting cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), heme-thiolate proteins. To date, nothing is known about P450s in Sporothrix schenckii and the molecular basis of its resistance to ketoconazole. Here we present genome-wide identification, annotation, phylogenetic analysis and comprehensive P450 family-level comparative analysis of S. schenckii P450s with pathogenic fungi P450s, along with a rationale for ketoconazole resistance by S. schenckii based on in silico structural analysis of CYP51. Genome data-mining of S. schenckii revealed 40 P450s in its genome that can be grouped into 32 P450 families and 39 P450 subfamilies. Comprehensive comparative analysis of P450s revealed that S. schenckii shares 11 P450 families with plant pathogenic fungi and has three unique P450 families: CYP5077, CYP5386 and CYP5696 (novel family). Among P450s, CYP51, the main target of azole drugs was also found in S. schenckii. 3D modeling of S. schenckii CYP51 revealed the presence of characteristic P450 motifs with exceptionally large reductase interaction site 2. In silico analysis revealed number of mutations that can be associated with ketoconazole resistance, especially at the channel entrance to the active site. One of possible reason for better stabilization of itraconazole, compared to ketoconazole, is that the more extended molecule of itraconazole may form a hydrogen bond with ASN-230. This in turn may explain its effectiveness against S. schenckii vis-a-vis resistant to ketoconazole. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cytochrome P450 biodiversity and biotechnology, edited by Erika Plettner, Gianfranco Gilardi, Luet Wong, Vlada Urlacher, Jared Goldstone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous measurement of voriconazole, posaconazole and itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, John M; Milan, Anna M; Anson, James; Davison, Andrew S

    2017-11-01

    Background Azole-based antifungals are the first-line therapy for some of the most common mycoses and are now also being used prophylactically to protect immunocompromised patients. However, due to variability in both their metabolism and bioavailability, therapeutic drug monitoring is essential to avoid toxicity but still gain maximum efficacy. Methods Following protein precipitation of serum with acetonitrile, 20  µL of extract was injected onto a 2.1 × 50 mm Waters Atlantis dC18 3  µm column. Detection was via a Waters Quattro Premier XE tandem mass spectrometer operating in ESI-positive mode. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) detected two product ions for each compound and one for each isotopically labelled internal standard. Ion suppression, linearity, stability, matrix effects, recovery, imprecision, lower limits of measuring interval and detection were all assessed. Results Optimal chromatographic separation was achieved using gradient elution over 8 minutes. Voriconazole, posaconazole and itraconazole eluted at 1.71, 2.73 and 3.41 min, respectively. The lower limits of measuring interval for all three compounds was 0.1 mg/L. The assay was linear to 10 mg/L for voriconazole (R 2  = 0.995) and 5 mg/L for posaconazole (R 2  = 0.990) and itraconazole (R 2  = 0.991). The assay was both highly accurate and precise with % bias of voriconazole, posaconazole and itraconazole, respectively, when compared with previous NEQAS samples. The intra-assay precision (CV%) was 1.6%, 2.5% and 1.9% for voriconazole, posaconazole and itraconazole, respectively, across the linear range. Conclusion A simple and robust method has been validated for azole antifungal therapeutic drug monitoring. This new assay will result in a greatly improved sample turnaround time and will therefore vastly increase the clinical utility of azole antifungal drug monitoring.

  12. In vitro activity of the novel echinocandin CD101 at pH 7 and 4 against Candida spp. isolates from patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boikov, Dina A; Locke, Jeffrey B; James, Kenneth D; Bartizal, Ken; Sobel, Jack D

    2017-05-01

    The novel echinocandin CD101 has stability properties amenable to topical formulation for use in the treatment of acute vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and recurrent VVC (RVVC). CD101 has demonstrated potent antifungal activity at pH 7, but assessment of its activity at the physiological pH of the vaginal environment is needed. To evaluate the antifungal activity of CD101 against clinical VVC isolates of Candida spp., including azole-resistant strains, at pH 4. MIC values of CD101 and comparators (fluconazole, itraconazole, micafungin, caspofungin and anidulafungin) were assessed via broth microdilution. MIC assays were conducted at pH 7 and 4 after 24 and 48 h against a 108 VVC isolate panel of Candida spp., including Candida albicans ( n  =   60), Candida glabrata ( n  =   21), Candida parapsilosis ( n  =   14) and Candida tropicalis ( n  =   13). Overall, MIC values of all drugs were slightly higher at pH 4 versus 7 and at 48 versus 24 h of incubation. CD101 MIC values typically exhibited ∼4-fold shifts at pH 4 and were not affected by azole susceptibility. C. parapsilosis susceptibility was the least affected at pH 4 and did not increase for most drugs. CD101 had potent activity against all Candida isolates tested, including azole-resistant strains. Although there was some reduction in activity at pH 4 versus 7, the resulting MIC values were still well below the intravaginal CD101 drug concentrations anticipated to be present following topical administration. These results support continued development of topical CD101 for the treatment of VVC/RVVC. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  13. Whole Genome Sequencing of Candida glabrata for Detection of Markers of Antifungal Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Chayanika; Chen, Sharon C-A; Halliday, Catriona; Martinez, Elena; Rockett, Rebecca J; Wang, Qinning; Timms, Verlaine J; Dhakal, Rajat; Sadsad, Rosemarie; Kennedy, Karina J; Playford, Geoffrey; Marriott, Deborah J; Slavin, Monica A; Sorrell, Tania C; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2017-12-28

    Candida glabrata can rapidly acquire mutations that result in drug resistance, especially to azoles and echinocandins. Identification of genetic mutations is essential, as resistance detected in vitro can often be correlated with clinical failure. We examined the feasibility of using whole genome sequencing (WGS) for genome-wide analysis of antifungal drug resistance in C. glabrata. The aim was torecognize enablers and barriers in the implementation WGS and measure its effectiveness. This paper outlines the key quality control checkpoints and essential components of WGS methodology to investigate genetic markers associated with reduced susceptibility to antifungal agents. It also estimates the accuracy of data analysis and turn-around-time of testing. Phenotypic susceptibility of 12 clinical, and one ATCC strain of C. glabrata was determined through antifungal susceptibility testing. These included three isolate pairs, from three patients, that developed rise in drug minimum inhibitory concentrations. In two pairs, the second isolate of each pair developed resistance to echinocandins. The second isolate of the third pair developed resistance to 5-flucytosine. The remaining comprised of susceptible and azole resistant isolates. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes linked to echinocandin, azole and 5-flucytosine resistance were confirmed in resistant isolates through WGS using the next generation sequencing. Non-synonymous SNPs in antifungal resistance genes such as FKS1, FKS2, CgPDR1, CgCDR1 and FCY2 were identified. Overall, an average of 98% of the WGS reads of C. glabrata isolates mapped to the reference genome with about 75-fold read depth coverage. The turnaround time and cost were comparable to Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, WGS of C. glabrata was feasible in revealing clinically significant gene mutations involved in resistance to different antifungal drug classes without the need for multiple PCR/DNA sequencing reactions. This represents a

  14. Non-albicans Candida species in blood stream infections in a tertiary care hospital at New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Jaswinder Kaur; Wattal, Chand; Goel, Neeraj; Raveendran, Reena; Datta, S; Prasad, Kamaljeet

    2012-12-01

    During recent decades, there has been a change in the epidemiology of Candida infections, characterized by a progressive shift from a predominance of Candida albicans to non-albicans Candida species. This study was undertaken to analyze the change in the epidemiology of candidaemia and antifungal use at tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India, over a period of 10 years. A retrospective review of candidaemia between 1999 and 2008 and antifungal use from 2000 to 2008 was performed at Sir Ganga Ram Hosptial, New Delhi. Initially (1999-2005), isolates were differentiated as C. albicans and non- albicans Candida species. Between 2006-2008, these were identified to the species level and antifungal susceptibility was performed. The occurrence of candidaemia and total antifungal use increased significantly. Candidaemia due to non-albicans species increased and this was correlated with an increasing use of fluconazole. There was emergence and increased isolation of a novel species C. haemulonii with decreased susceptibility to both amphotericin B and azoles. Overall, sensitivities of 89.6, 90.9, 88.6, 68.8 and 54.3 per cent to amphotericin B, 5 flucytosine, voriconazole, fluconazole and itraconazole, respectively were observed. Cross-resistance or reduced susceptibility to both fluconazole (MIC >16 μg/ml) and voriconazole was observed in 11.3 per cent isolates. The study demonstrates a shift to non-albicans Candida species causing fungaemia and the emergence of amphotericin B and azole resistant novel species, C. haemulonii. Decreased susceptibility to fluconazole, as well as the threat of emergence of cross-resistance to voriconazole in the background of high azole consumption may limit the use of these agents as a presumptive therapy for Candida blood stream infections (BSI).

  15. Protective effect of an oral natural phytonutrient in recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: a 12-month study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, A; Bishier, M P; Naito, Y; Sharma, A; Solimene, U; Jain, S; Yadava, H; Minelli, E; Tomella, C; Marotta, F

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the clinical efficacy of a phytocompound with antimicotic properties (K-712, with the following 100 mg composition: 10 mg of oleoresin from Pseudowintera colorata at 30 percent concentration in Polygodial together with trace amounts of Olea europea) in recurrent vulvo-vaginal candidiasis (RVVC) as compared to an azole drug during a 12-month period: 6 months of treatment followed by 6 months of observation. This prospective randomized study involved 82 women (19-61 years) with complaints of abnormal vaginal discharge and with a history of at least four proven episodes of RVVC in the previous 12 months. Patients were divided into two groups of treatment of 41 patients each and were given: A) Itraconazole 200 mg orally daily for 4 days, then 200 mg once weekly for 6 months or B) 1 tablet twice a day of a K-712 for 4 weeks and then for the first 2 weeks of each month for a total of 6 months. Both groups were then followed-up for further 6 months. Each treatment schedule was well tolerated with only 4 patients in the azole group complaining of transient mild symptoms (nausea, abdominal discomfort, unpleasant taste). Itraconazole reached an earlier symptomatic relief during the first two weeks of observation as compared with K-712 (psymptom/sign score (itraconazole vs K-712: 9 vs 11). At 6-month observation, mycological cure was reached by 83 percent in the itraconazole group and in 78 percent of the K-712-treated patients. During the further 6-month observation period without treatment, the itraconazole group showed significantly more relapses (65.7 vs 34.2 in K-712, papproach seems to maintain a higher mycological success rate afterwards by reducing the number of relapses and probably of the growth of azole-resistant species.

  16. Prophylactic strategies in recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: a 2-year study testing a phytonutrient vs itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, V; Marotta, F; Kumari, A; Bishier, M P; He, F; Zerbinati, N; Agarwal, C; Naito, Y; Tomella, C; Sharma, A; Solimene, U

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical efficacy of a one week/month treatment with a phytocompound with antimycotic properties (K-712, with following 100 mg composition: 10 mg of oleoresin from Pseudowintera colorata at 30 percent concentration in Polygodial together with trace amounts of Olea europea) in recurrent vulvo-vaginal candidiasis (RVVC), as compared to once a week treatment with an azole drug for 24 months follow up. This prospective randomized study involving 122 women (19 to 63 years old) with a history of proven episodes of RVVC in the prior 12 months. Patients were allocated in two treatment groups of 61 patients each and given A) Itraconazole 200 mg orally once a week or B) 1 tab twice a day of K-712 for one week/month. Each treatment schedule was well tolerated with 19 patients in the azole group complaining of transient mild symptoms (nausea, abdominal discomfort, unpleasant taste), while only 3 patients on K-712 reported slight dyspepsia. The number of relapses was significantly lower in the K-712-treated group as compared to the itraconazole-group (22 vs 39, p less than 0.05). Moreover, the former group showed a significantly decreased number of cases resistant or dose-dependent susceptible as compared to group A (p less than 0.05 vs itraconazole) and the same occurred for the occurrence of non-albicans species (group A 64.1 percent vs group B 31.8 percent, p less than 0.05). The overall mycological cure at the end of the 2-year study showed a comparable benefit between the two groups. From these data it appears that the present antifungal phytonutrient is equally effective as itraconazole in the overall treatment of RVVC over a 2-year follow-up, but yielding a significantly better prophylactic effect and also maintenance benefit with lower relapse rate, antifungal susceptibility and growth of azole-resistant species.

  17. Synthesis of some novel hydrazono acyclic nucleoside analogues

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    Mohammad N. Soltani Rad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The syntheses of novel hydrazono acyclic nucleosides similar to miconazole scaffolds are described. In this series of acyclic nucleosides, pyrimidine as well as purine and other azole derivatives replaced the imidazole function in miconazole and the ether group was replaced with a hydrazone moiety using phenylhydrazine. To interpret the dominant formation of (E-hydrazone derivatives rather than (Z-isomers, PM3 semiempirical quantum mechanic calculations were carried out which indicated that the (E-isomers had the lower heats of formation.

  18. Voriconazole-associated visual disturbances and hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayhan, Gulsum Iclal; Garipardic, Mesut; Karaman, Kamuran; Akbayram, Sinan

    2016-03-01

    Voriconazole is a second-generation azole widely used for the prevention and treatment of fungal infection in leukemia patients. Voriconazole is considered the primary antifungal agent for invasive aspergillosis. We report a case of 16-year-old girl who developed visual disturbance and visual and auditory hallucinations after intravenous voriconazole treatment for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Due to the visual hallucinations and visual disturbance began acutely and shortly after the initiation of voriconazole, and no other cause could be determined, the symptoms were considered to be the side effects of voriconazole. Simultaneous development of visual side effects and hallucinations rarely have been reported before.

  19. Prevalencia de candidiasis vaginal en embarazadas: Identificación de levaduras y sensibilidad a los antifúngicos Prevalence of vaginal candidiasis in pregnant women: Identification of yeasts and susceptibility to antifungal agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. García Heredia

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available La mujer embarazada es más susceptible tanto a la colonización como a la infección vaginal por levaduras. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de levaduras aisladas de exudados vaginales de mujeres embarazadas y evaluar la sensibilidad a los antifúngicos de uso frecuente. Se estudiaron 493 pacientes en el período comprendido desde diciembre de 1998 hasta febrero de 2000. La prevalencia de Candida spp. fue 28% (Candida albicans 90,4%, Candida glabrata 6,3%, Candida parapsilosis 1,1%, Candida kefyr 1,1%, especies no identificadas 1,1%. Se determinó la sensibilidad a fluconazol, ketoconazol, itraconazol y nistatina por el método de difusión en agar Shadomy. Todos los aislamientos de C. albicans, C. kefyr y C. parapsilosis fueron sensibles in vitro a los antifúngicos probados, mientras que 1 de 6 aislamientos de C. glabrata presentó resistencia extendida a todos los azoles, pero sensibilidad a nistatina. En mujeres embarazadas C. albicans fue la levadura más frecuentemente aislada de exudados vaginales y continúa siendo ampliamente sensible a los antifúngicos; sólo en C. glabrata se observó resistencia a los azoles. Se recomienda la identificación de la levadura a nivel de especie particularmente en el caso de falla terapéutica y en infecciones recidivantes o crónicas.Pregnant women are more susceptible to both vaginal colonization and infection by yeast. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence in pregnant women of yeasts isolated from vaginal exudates and their susceptibility to current antifungal drugs. A total of 493 patients was studied between December 1998 and February 2000. The prevalence of Candida spp. was 28% (Candida albicans 90.4%; Candida glabrata 6.3%; Candida parapsilosis 1.1%, Candida kefyr 1.1%; unidentified species 1.1%. The diffusion test in Shadomy agar was employed to determine the susceptibility to fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and nistatine. All C. albicans, C. kefyr and

  20. Perfil de susceptibilidade e resultados da associação de antifúngicos: um novo método

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rita Daniela Teixeira dos, 1986-

    2010-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Microbiologia Aplicada). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2010 As infecções fúngicas invasivas provocadas por Candida spp. constituem uma importante causa de morbilidade e mortalidade em doentes críticos. Apesar de actualmente estarem disponíveis novos fármacos, como as equinocandinas e os azoles de espectro alargado, que aumentaram as opções terapeuticas, a resistência em ambos os grupos tem sido reportada. A associação de antifúngicos com diferen...

  1. Successful long-term terbinafine therapy in an asthmatic patient with Aspergillus sensitization and bronchiectasis

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    Isabel Rodriguez-Goncer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Severe asthma with fungal sensitization (SAFS is estimated to affect ~25% of patients with poorly controlled asthma. Tri-azole therapy is effective in only 60–80% and side effects are common. We report a 25 years-old woman with severe asthma, Aspergillus sensitization and marked bronchiectasis that developed a rare Achilles-tendinopathy with both itraconazole and voriconazole. She started a trial with terbinafine as salvage therapy that led to a striking improvement and long-term control of her respiratory disease.

  2. Candidíase em pacientes aidéticos

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    C.E.O.P. Campos

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Trinta e cinco aidéticos entre 19 e 55 anos admitidos e tratados de candidíase no Hospital Emílio Ribas, SP, com ELISA positivo para HIV e confirmado pelo Western Blot. Tuberculose em 9 sendo 2 com pericardite; neurotoxoplasmose em 6; neurocriptococose em 5; herpes labial em 4; pneumocistose em 3 e sarcoma de Kaposi em 2, achavam-se associadas. A concentração inibitória mínima 50% (MIC 50% para os azoles foi: ketoconazol= 2,2 µg/ml; itraconazol- 21,0 µg/ml; fluconazol = 19,0 µg/ml. O MIC 50% para ospolienos: nistatina- 50,0 µg/ml; anfotericina B= 0,12 µg/ml e para 5 fluorcitosina= 1,6 µg/ml nas 35 amostras de Candida isoladas. Testes não paramétricos de Siegel revelaram significante identificação (80% das Candida albicans na candidíase, e que a dose de AMB não modificou o número de óbitos, precoce e tardio, ocorridos nesses aidéticos. O uso prévio dos azoles e da nistatina explicaria, talvez, o elevado MIC 50% observado nas amostras de Candida isoladas.A total of 35 in patients admitted at Emilio Ribas Hospital - São Paulo, Brazil, with digestive candidiasis and AIDS clinical diagnostic were evaluated 10 month later, being 29 male and 6 female; white outnumbering black with age ranged from 30 to 50 years old. Agar Sabouraud culture and tube germinative tests identified 28 (80% Candida albicans out 35 strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC 50% was against azoles (ketoconazole= 2.2 µg/ml; itraconazole = 21.0 µg/ml and fluconazole- 19.0 µg/ml; polyenes (ny statine - 50.0 µg/ml and amphotericin B= 0.12 µg/ml and 5 fluorcytosine= 1.6µg/ml. Siegeltests showed significant Candida albicans proportions in strains isolated from 35 AIDS patients. There was no significant relation between AMB dosis and early or late death. Conclusions: candidiasis in AIDS patients showed high MIC 50% to azoles and nystatine and significant Candida albicans proportion in all strains isolated from AIDS patients. Previous amphotericin B

  3. Conazoles

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    Jan Heeres

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a historical overview of the analog based drug discovery of miconazole and its congeners, and is focused on marketed azole antifungals bearing the generic suffix “conazole”. The antifungal activity of miconazole, one of the first broad-spectrum antimycotic agents has been mainly restricted to topical applications. The attractive in vitro antifungal spectrum was a starting point to design more potent and especially orally active antifungal agents such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, fluconazole and voriconazole. The chemistry, in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity, pharmacology, and clinical applications of these marketed conazoles has been described.

  4. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis triggered by drug-drug interaction with itraconazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybro, Anne Mette; Damkier, Per; Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch

    2016-01-01

    -associated rhabdomyolysis, probably caused by a drug-drug interaction between simvastatin and itraconazole. The patient made full recovery. Three commonly used statins-simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin-are metabolised by the liver enzyme CYP3A4. Several potent inhibitors of this enzyme are known, for example, azole...... antifungal agents such as itraconazole and posaconazole. If antifungal treatment is indicated in a patient using a CYP3A4-metabolised statin, we recommend (1) topical administration of the antifungal agent if possible, (2) the use of a non-CYP3A4-inhibiting antifungal drug such as terbinafine or (3...

  5. Avances en el tratamiento de la aspergilosis broncopulmonar alérgica

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    Peña Durán A

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Los objetivos del tratamiento de la aspergilosis broncopulmonar alérgica (ABPA son la reducción de la inflamación pulmonar, el control del asma, el tratamiento del estadio agudo de ABPA, prevenir las exacerbaciones, evitar la apari- ción o progresión a la bronquiectasia y la aspergilosis pulmonar crónica. El tratamiento utilizado hasta la actualidad han sido corticoides a largo plazo, azoles y LABA/CI. En pacientes graves sin respuesta al tratamiento con corticoides ora- les y antifúngico recientemente se han utilizado otros tratamientos como omalizumab y antiIL5 (mepolizumab.

  6. Priešgrybelinis eterinių aliejų poveikis in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Taurozaitė-Valentė, Justina

    2017-01-01

    Candida species are commensal fungi that are found in 30 – 50% of human oral cavities. Candida is the most common yeast fungi which is find in the oral mucosa. Azole drugs are usually used to treat candidiasis, but they are toxic. In additional, the resistance to that group drugs are increasing. Candidiasis also might be treated with essential oils which have antimicrobial effect. The aim of the research. To determine the antifungal effect of the essential oils in in vit-ro conditions. ...

  7. Triazole resistance surveillance in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendiz Sharpe, Agustin; Lagrou, Katrien; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Lockhart, Shawn R; Verweij, Paul E

    2018-04-01

    Triazole resistance is an increasing concern in the opportunistic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. Resistance can develop through exposure to azole compounds during azole therapy or in the environment. Resistance mutations are commonly found in the Cyp51A-gene, although other known and unknown resistance mechanisms may be present. Surveillance studies show triazole resistance in six continents, although the presence of resistance remains unknown in many countries. In most countries, resistance mutations associated with the environment dominate, but it remains unclear if these resistance traits predominately migrate or arise locally. Patients with triazole-resistant aspergillus disease may fail to antifungal therapy, but only a limited number of cohort studies have been performed that show conflicting results. Treatment failure might be due to diagnostic delay or due to the limited number of alternative treatment options. The ISHAM/ECMM Aspergillus Resistance Surveillance working group was set up to facilitate surveillance studies and stimulate international collaborations. Important aims are to determine the resistance epidemiology in countries where this information is currently lacking, to gain more insight in the clinical implications of triazole resistance through a registry and to unify nomenclature through consensus definitions.

  8. Identification of small molecules that disrupt vacuolar function in the pathogen Candida albicans.

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    Helene Tournu

    Full Text Available The fungal vacuole is a large acidified organelle that performs a variety of cellular functions. At least a sub-set of these functions are crucial for pathogenic species of fungi, such as Candida albicans, to survive within and invade mammalian tissue as mutants with severe defects in vacuolar biogenesis are avirulent. We therefore sought to identify chemical probes that disrupt the normal function and/or integrity of the fungal vacuole to provide tools for the functional analysis of this organelle as well as potential experimental therapeutics. A convenient indicator of vacuolar integrity based upon the intracellular accumulation of an endogenously produced pigment was adapted to identify Vacuole Disrupting chemical Agents (VDAs. Several chemical libraries were screened and a set of 29 compounds demonstrated to reproducibly cause loss of pigmentation, including 9 azole antifungals, a statin and 3 NSAIDs. Quantitative analysis of vacuolar morphology revealed that (excluding the azoles a sub-set of 14 VDAs significantly alter vacuolar number, size and/or shape. Many C. albicans mutants with impaired vacuolar function are deficient in the formation of hyphal elements, a process essential for its pathogenicity. Accordingly, all 14 VDAs negatively impact C. albicans hyphal morphogenesis. Fungal selectivity was observed for approximately half of the VDA compounds identified, since they did not alter the morphology of the equivalent mammalian organelle, the lysosome. Collectively, these compounds comprise of a new collection of chemical probes that directly or indirectly perturb normal vacuolar function in C. albicans.

  9. Antifungal susceptibility of Candida species isolated from patients with candidemia in southern Taiwan, 2007-2012: impact of new antifungal breakpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Shu-Fang; Chen, Fang-Ju; Lee, Chen-Hsiang

    2017-02-01

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) revised the clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for the azoles and echinocandins against Candida species in 2012. We aimed to report the epidemiology of candidemia and antifungal susceptibility of Candida species and evaluate the impact of new CBPs on antifungal susceptibility in our region. All blood isolates of Candida species were obtained from 2007 to 2012. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole, voriconazole, echinocandins and flucytosine against Candida isolates were determined by Sensititre YeastOne system. Differences in susceptibility rates between the CBPs of previous and revised versions of CLSI were examined. Of 709 Candida isolates, the fluconazole-susceptible rate was 96.5% in Candida albicans, 85.8% in Candida tropicalis and 92.1% in Candida parapsilosis by the revised CBPs. Compared with the susceptibility results by previous CBPs, the marked reductions in susceptibility of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis to fluconazole, that of C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis to voriconazole, that of C. tropicalis and Candida glabrata to anidulafungin and that of C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and Candida krusei to caspofungin by revised CBPs were found. In conclusion, Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis remain highly susceptible to fluconazole. The non-susceptible rates of Candida species to azoles and echinocandins increase with interpretation by the revised CBPs. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Antifungal susceptibility and molecular typing of 115 Candida albicans isolates obtained from vulvovaginal candidiasis patients in 3 Shanghai maternity hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Chunmei; Zhang, Hongju; Tang, Zhenhua; Chen, Huifen; Gao, Jing; Yue, Chaoyan

    2016-05-01

    In our multicenter study, we studied the distribution of Candida species in vulvovaginal candidiasis patients and investigated antifungal susceptibility profile and genotype of Candida albicans in vaginal swab. A total of 115 Candida albicans strains were detected in 135 clinical isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration determinations showed that 83% and 81% of the 115 Candida albicans strains were susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD) was applied to identify clonally related isolates from different patients at the local level. All tested strains were classified into genotype A (77.4%), genotype B (18.3%), and genotype C (4.3%). Genotype A was further classified into five subtypes and genotype B into two subtypes.Candida albicans was the dominant pathogen of vulvovaginal candidiasis, the majority belonging to genotype A in this study. Exposure to azoles is a risk factor for the emergence of azole resistance among Candida albicans isolated from VVC patients. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. [A study for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast by the Japanese Society for Medical Mycology (JSMM) method. The proposal of the modified JSMM method 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yayoi; Abe, Michiko; Ikeda, Reiko; Uno, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Maesaki, Shigefumi; Mohri, Shinobu; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Hasumi, Yayoi; Abe, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    The Japanese Society for Medical Mycology (JSMM) method used for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast, the MIC end point for azole antifungal agents, is currently set at IC(80). It was recently shown, however that there is an inconsistency in the MIC value between the JSMM method and the CLSI M27-A2 (CLSI) method, in which the end- point was to read as IC(50). To resolve this discrepancy and reassess the JSMM method, the MIC for three azoles, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole were compared to 5 strains of each of the following Candida species: C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. krusei, for a total of 25 comparisons, using the JSMM method, a modified JSMM method, and the CLSI method. The results showed that when the MIC end- point criterion of the JSMM method was changed from IC(80) to IC(50) (the modified JSMM method) , the MIC value was consistent and compatible with the CLSI method. Finally, it should be emphasized that the JSMM method, using a spectrophotometer for MIC measurement, was superior in both stability and reproducibility, as compared to the CLSI method in which growth was assessed by visual observation.

  12. The European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) survey of candidaemia in Italy: in vitro susceptibility of 375 Candida albicans isolates and biofilm production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorano, Anna Maria; Prigitano, Anna; Biraghi, Emanuela; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2005-10-01

    To investigate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern of 375 Candida albicans bloodstream isolates recovered during the European Confederation of Medical Mycology survey of candidaemia performed in Lombardia, Italy and to test the ability to form biofilm. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin was performed by broth microdilution following the NCCLS guidelines. Biofilm production was measured using the XTT reduction assay in 59 isolates selected as representative of different patterns of susceptibility to flucytosine and azoles. MICs (mg/L) at which 90% of the strains were inhibited were < or =0.25 for flucytosine, 0.25 for caspofungin, 4 for fluconazole and 0.06 for itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole. Flucytosine resistance was detected in five isolates and was associated with serotype B in 2/29 and serotype A in 3/346. Resistance to fluconazole was detected in 10 isolates; nine of these exhibited reduced susceptibility to the other azoles. Among the 10 patients with fluconazole-resistant C. albicans bloodstream infection, only one, an AIDS patient, had been previously treated with fluconazole. Biofilm production was observed in 23 isolates (39%) and was significantly associated with serotype B. No relationship was detected with the pattern of antifungal susceptibility. Resistance is uncommon in C. albicans isolates recovered from blood cultures, while biofilm production is a relatively frequent event. Periodic surveillance is warranted to monitor the incidence of in vitro antifungal resistance as well as of biofilm production.

  13. Local, systemic, demographic, and health-related factors influencing pathogenic yeast spectrum and antifungal drug administration frequency in oral candidiasis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Moritz; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea Maria; Strietzel, Frank-Peter

    2016-09-01

    In order to identify oral candidiasis patients being at risk of carrying potentially drug-resistant Candida, the aim of the study was to detect local, systemic, demographic, and health-related factors influencing (I) yeast spectrum composition and (II) antifungal administration frequency. Additionally, the aim was to investigate (III) species shift occurrence. Data from 798 patients (496 females, 302 males; mean age 59.7) with oral candidiasis diagnosed based on positive clinical and microbial findings (species identification and CFU count) between 2006 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed using Pearson's chi(2) test and regression analysis. Among 958 isolates, Candida albicans was the most frequently detected (76.8 %). Also, species intrinsically resistant to azoles were frequently isolated (15.8 and 17.7 % of isolates and patients). (I) Infections only caused by C. albicans were significantly associated with the use of inhalation steroids (p = 0.001) and antibiotics (p = 0.04), super-infection of lichen planus (p = 0.002), and the absence of removable dentures (p oral candidiasis remains C. albicans. Nevertheless, therapeutic problems may be caused by the frequent presence of species intrinsically resistant to azoles, especially in patients wearing dentures.

  14. Multicenter Brazilian Study of Oral Candida Species Isolated from Aids Patients

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    Priscilla de Laet Sant'Ana

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal candidiasis continues to be considered the most common opportunistic disease in Aids patients. This study was designed to investigate species distribution, serotype and antifungal susceptibility profile among Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of Aids patients recruited from six Brazilian university centers. Oral swabs from 130 Aids patients were plated onto CHROMagar Candida medium and 142 isolates were recovered. Yeast isolates were identified by classical methods and serotyped using the Candida Check® system-Iatron. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed according to the NCCLS microbroth assay. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species (91%, and 70% of the isolates belonged to serotype A. We detected 12 episodes of co-infection (9%, including co-infection with both serotypes of C. albicans. Non-albicans species were isolated from 12 episodes, 50% of them exhibited DDS or resistance to azoles. Otherwise, only 8 out 130 isolates of C. albicans exhibited DDS or resistance to azoles. Brazilian Aids patients are infected mainly by C. albicans serotype A, most of them susceptible to all antifungal drugs.

  15. Species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of oral yeast isolates from Tanzanian HIV-infected patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis

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    Rijs Antonius JMM

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tanzania, little is known on the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profiles of yeast isolates from HIV-infected patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis. Methods A total of 296 clinical oral yeasts were isolated from 292 HIV-infected patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Identification of the yeasts was performed using standard phenotypic methods. Antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, clotrimazole, amphotericin B and nystatin was assessed using a broth microdilution format according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI; M27-A2. Results Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species from 250 (84.5% patients followed by C. glabrata from 20 (6.8% patients, and C. krusei from 10 (3.4% patients. There was no observed significant difference in species distribution between patients with primary and recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis, but isolates cultured from patients previously treated were significantly less susceptible to the azole compounds compared to those cultured from antifungal naïve patients. Conclusion C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species from patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis. Oral yeast isolates from Tanzania had high level susceptibility to the antifungal agents tested. Recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis and previous antifungal therapy significantly correlated with reduced susceptibility to azoles antifungal agents.

  16. Systemic vs. Topical Therapy for the Treatment of Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

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    Sebastian Faro

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 75% of all women will experience at least 1 episode of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC during their lifetimes. Most patients with acute VVC can be treated with short-term regimens that optimize compliance. Since current topical and oral antifungals have shown comparably high efficacy rates, other issues should be considered in determining the most appropriate therapy. It is possible that the use of short-duration narrow-spectrum agents may increase selection of more resistant organisms which will result in an increase of recurrent VVC (RVVC. Women who are known or suspected to be pregnant and women of childbearing age who are not using a reliable means of contraception should receive topical therapy, as should those who are breast-feeding or receiving drugs that can interact with an oral azole and those who have previously experienced adverse effects during azole therapy. Because of the potential risks associated with systemic treatment, topical therapy with a broad-spectrum agent should be the method of choice for VVC, whereas systemic therapy should be reserved for either RVVC or cases where the benefits outweigh any possible adverse reactions.

  17. Topical anti-inflammatory agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face or scalp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastarinen, Helena; Oksanen, Tuija; Okokon, Enembe O; Kiviniemi, Vesa V; Airola, Kristiina; Jyrkkä, Johanna; Oravilahti, Tuomas; Rannanheimo, Piia K; Verbeek, Jos H

    2014-05-19

    Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder affecting primarily the skin of the scalp, face, chest, and intertriginous areas, causing scaling and redness of the skin. Current treatment options include antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and keratolytic agents, as well as phototherapy. To assess the effects of topical pharmacological interventions with established anti-inflammatory action for seborrhoeic dermatitis occurring in adolescents and adults. We searched the following databases up to September 2013: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 9), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), LILACS (from 1982), and the GREAT database. We searched five trials databases and checked the reference lists of included studies for further references to relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We included RCTs in adults or adolescents (> 16 years) with diagnosed seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp or face, comparing topical anti-inflammatory treatments (steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and lithium salts) with other treatments. Pairs of authors independently assessed eligibility for inclusion, extracted data, and evaluated the risk of bias. We performed meta-analyses if feasible. We included 36 RCTs (2706 participants), of which 31 examined topical steroids; seven, calcineurin inhibitors; and three, lithium salts. The comparative interventions included placebo, azoles, calcipotriol, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compound, and zinc, as well as different anti-inflammatory treatments compared against each other. Our outcomes of interest were total clearance of symptoms, erythema, scaling or pruritus scores, and adverse effects. The risk of bias in studies was most frequently classified as unclear, due to unclear reporting of methods.Steroid treatment resulted in total clearance more often than placebo in short-term trials (four weeks or less) (relative risk (RR) 3.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22 to

  18. Augmenting the activity of antifungal agents against aspergilli using structural analogues of benzoic acid as chemosensitizing agents.

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    Kim, Jong H; Campbell, Bruce C; Mahoney, Noreen; Chan, Kathleen L; Molyneux, Russell J; Balajee, Arunmozhi

    2010-10-01

    A number of benzoic acid analogues showed antifungal activity against strains of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus terreus, causative agents of human aspergillosis, in in vitro bioassays. Structure-activity analysis revealed that antifungal activities of benzoic and gallic acids were increased by addition of a methyl, methoxyl or chloro group at position 4 of the aromatic ring, or by esterification of the carboxylic acid with an alkyl group, respectively. Thymol, a natural phenolic compound, was a potent chemosensitizing agent when co-applied with the antifungal azole drugs fluconazole and ketoconazole. The thymol-azole drug combination demonstrated complete inhibition of fungal growth at dosages far lower than the drugs alone. Co-application of thymol with amphotericin B had an additive effect on all strains of aspergilli tested with the exception of two of three strains of A. terreus, where there was an antagonistic effect. Use of two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) mutants of A. fumigatus, sakAΔ and mpkCΔ, having gene deletions in the oxidative stress response pathway, indicated antifungal and/or chemosensitization activity of the benzo analogues was by disruption of the oxidative stress response system. Results showed that both these genes play overlapping roles in the MAPK system in this fungus. The potential of safe, natural compounds or analogues to serve as chemosensitizing agents to enhance efficacy of commercial antifungal agents is discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Micronized Copper Wood Preservatives: Efficacy of Ion, Nano, and Bulk Copper against the Brown Rot Fungus Rhodonia placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Schubert, Mark; Fey, Angelika; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2015-01-01

    Recently introduced micronized copper (MC) formulations, consisting of a nanosized fraction of basic copper (Cu) carbonate (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2) nanoparticles (NPs), were introduced to the market for wood protection. Cu NPs may presumably be more effective against wood-destroying fungi than bulk or ionic Cu compounds. In particular, Cu- tolerant wood-destroying fungi may not recognize NPs, which may penetrate into fungal cell walls and membranes and exert their impact. The objective of this study was to assess if MC wood preservative formulations have a superior efficacy against Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungi due to nano effects than conventional Cu biocides. After screening a range of wood-destroying fungi for their resistance to Cu, we investigated fungal growth of the Cu-tolerant fungus Rhodonia placenta in solid and liquid media and on wood treated with MC azole (MCA). In liquid cultures we evaluated the fungal response to ion, nano and bulk Cu distinguishing the ionic and particle effects by means of the Cu2+ chelator ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (TTM) and measuring fungal biomass, oxalic acid production and laccase activity of R. placenta. Our results do not support the presence of particular nano effects of MCA against R. placenta that would account for an increased antifungal efficacy, but provide evidence that attribute the main effectiveness of MCA to azoles.

  20. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase in the Human Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Anderson, Spencer; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Furtak, Vyacheslav; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R. (Vanderbilt); (NWU); (Meharry)

    2010-09-02

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), which threatens the lives of millions of people and remains incurable in its chronic stage. The antifungal drug posaconazole that blocks sterol biosynthesis in the parasite is the only compound entering clinical trials for the chronic form of this infection. Crystal structures of the drug target enzyme, Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), complexed with posaconazole, another antifungal agent fluconazole and an experimental inhibitor, (R)-4{prime}-chloro-N-(1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imid-azol-1-yl)ethyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (VNF), allow prediction of important chemical features that enhance the drug potencies. Combined with comparative analysis of inhibitor binding parameters, influence on the catalytic activity of the trypanosomal enzyme and its human counterpart, and their cellular effects at different stages of the Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle, the structural data provide a molecular background to CYP51 inhibition and azole resistance and enlighten the path for directed design of new, more potent and selective drugs to develop an efficient treatment for Chagas disease.

  1. Evaluation of Mucoadhesive Gels with Propolis (EPP-AF in Preclinical Treatment of Candidiasis Vulvovaginal Infection

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    Andresa Aparecida Berretta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the second cause of vaginal infection in the USA. Clinical treatment of C. albicans infections is routinely performed with polyenes and azole derivatives. However, these drugs are responsible for undesirable side effects and toxicity. In addition, C. albicans azole and echinocandin resistance has been described. Propolis is a bee product traditionally used due to its antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and other properties. Therefore, the present work aimed to evaluate different propolis presentations in order to evaluate their in vitro and in vivo efficacy. The methodologies involved antifungal evaluation, chemical analysis, and the effects of the rheological and mucoadhesive properties of propolis based gels. The obtained results demonstrated the fungicide action of propolis extracts against all three morphotypes (yeast, pseudohyphae, and hyphae studied. The highest level of fungal cytotoxicity was reached at 6–8 hours of propolis cell incubation. Among the based gel formulations developed, the rheological and mucoadhesive results suggest that propolis based carbopol (CP1% and chitosan gels were the most pseudoplastic ones. CP1% was the most mucoadhesive preparation, and all of them presented low thixotropy. Results of in vivo efficacy demonstrated that propolis based gels present antifungal action similar to clotrimazole cream, suggesting that future clinical studies should be performed.

  2. Evaluation of Mucoadhesive Gels with Propolis (EPP-AF) in Preclinical Treatment of Candidiasis Vulvovaginal Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Fortes, Vanessa Silveira; Bom, Vinícius Pedro; Nascimento, Andresa Piacezzi; Marquele-Oliveira, Franciane; Pedrazzi, Vinícius; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the second cause of vaginal infection in the USA. Clinical treatment of C. albicans infections is routinely performed with polyenes and azole derivatives. However, these drugs are responsible for undesirable side effects and toxicity. In addition, C. albicans azole and echinocandin resistance has been described. Propolis is a bee product traditionally used due to its antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and other properties. Therefore, the present work aimed to evaluate different propolis presentations in order to evaluate their in vitro and in vivo efficacy. The methodologies involved antifungal evaluation, chemical analysis, and the effects of the rheological and mucoadhesive properties of propolis based gels. The obtained results demonstrated the fungicide action of propolis extracts against all three morphotypes (yeast, pseudohyphae, and hyphae) studied. The highest level of fungal cytotoxicity was reached at 6–8 hours of propolis cell incubation. Among the based gel formulations developed, the rheological and mucoadhesive results suggest that propolis based carbopol (CP1%) and chitosan gels were the most pseudoplastic ones. CP1% was the most mucoadhesive preparation, and all of them presented low thixotropy. Results of in vivo efficacy demonstrated that propolis based gels present antifungal action similar to clotrimazole cream, suggesting that future clinical studies should be performed. PMID:23997797

  3. Evidence of Fluconazole-Resistant Candida Species in Tortoises and Sea Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rodrigues, Pedro Henrique de Aragão; de Alencar, Lucas Pereira; Riello, Giovanna Barbosa; Ribeiro, Joyce Fonteles; de Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Monteiro, André Jalles; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. recovered from tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) and sea turtles (Chelonia mydas, Caretta caretta, Lepidochelys olivacea, Eretmochelys imbricata). For this purpose, material from the oral cavity and cloaca of 77 animals (60 tortoises and 17 sea turtles) was collected. The collected specimens were seeded on 2% Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol, and the identification was carried out by morphological and biochemical methods. Sixty-six isolates were recovered from tortoises, out of which 27 were C. tropicalis, 27 C. famata, 7 C. albicans, 4 C. guilliermondii and 1 C. intermedia, whereas 12 strains were obtained from sea turtles, which were identified as Candida parapsilosis (n = 4), Candida guilliermondii (n = 4), Candida tropicalis (n = 2), Candida albicans (n = 1) and Candida intermedia (n = 1). The minimum inhibitory concentrations for amphotericin B, itraconazole and fluconazole ranged from 0.03125 to 0.5, 0.03125 to >16 and 0.125 to >64, respectively. Overall, 19 azole-resistant strains (14 C. tropicalis and 5 C. albicans) were found. Thus, this study shows that Testudines carry azole-resistant Candida spp.

  4. PXR antagonists and implication in drug metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sridhar; Dou, Wei; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Adopted orphan nuclear receptor (NR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), plays a central role in the regulation of xeno- and endobiotic metabolism. Since the discovery of the functional role of PXR in 1998, there is evolving evidence for the role of PXR agonists in abrogating metabolic pathophysiology (e.g., cholestasis, hypercholesterolemia, and inflammation). However, more recently, it is clear that PXR is also an important mediator of adverse xeno- (e.g., enhances acetaminophen toxicity) and endobiotic (e.g., hepatic steatosis) metabolic phenotypes. Moreover, in cancer therapeutics, PXR activation can induce drug resistance, and there is growing evidence for tissue-specific enhancement of the malignant phenotype. Thus, in these instances, there may be a role for PXR antagonists. However, as opposed to the discovery efforts for PXR agonists, there are only a few antagonists described. The mode of action of these antagonists (e.g., sulforaphane) remains less clear. Our laboratory efforts have focused on this question. Since the original discovery of azoles analogs as PXR antagonists, we have preliminarily defined an important PXR antagonist pharmacophore and developed less-toxic PXR antagonists. In this review, we describe our published and unpublished findings on recent structure-function studies involving the azole chemical scaffold. Further work in the future is needed to fully define potent, more-selective PXR antagonists that may be useful in clinical application. PMID:23330542

  5. Candidíase em pacientes aidéticos

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    C.E.O.P. Campos

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Trinta e cinco aidéticos entre 19 e 55 anos admitidos e tratados de candidíase no Hospital Emílio Ribas, SP, com ELISA positivo para HIV e confirmado pelo Western Blot. Tuberculose em 9 sendo 2 com pericardite; neurotoxoplasmose em 6; neurocriptococose em 5; herpes labial em 4; pneumocistose em 3 e sarcoma de Kaposi em 2, achavam-se associadas. A concentração inibitória mínima 50% (MIC 50% para os azoles foi: ketoconazol= 2,2 µg/ml; itraconazol- 21,0 µg/ml; fluconazol = 19,0 µg/ml. O MIC 50% para ospolienos: nistatina- 50,0 µg/ml; anfotericina B= 0,12 µg/ml e para 5 fluorcitosina= 1,6 µg/ml nas 35 amostras de Candida isoladas. Testes não paramétricos de Siegel revelaram significante identificação (80% das Candida albicans na candidíase, e que a dose de AMB não modificou o número de óbitos, precoce e tardio, ocorridos nesses aidéticos. O uso prévio dos azoles e da nistatina explicaria, talvez, o elevado MIC 50% observado nas amostras de Candida isoladas.

  6. Solder flow over fine line PWB surface finishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    The rapid advancement of interconnect technology has stimulated the development of alternative printed wiring board (PWB) surface finishes to enhance the solderability of standard copper and solder-coated surfaces. These new finishes are based on either metallic or organic chemistries. As part of an ongoing solderability study, Sandia National Laboratories has investigated the solder flow behavior of two azole-based organic solderability preservations, immersion Au, immersion Ag, electroless Pd, and electroless Pd/Ni on fine line copper features. The coated substrates were solder tested in the as-fabricated and environmentally-stressed conditions. Samples were processed through an inerted reflow machine. The azole-based coatings generally provided the most effective protection after aging. Thin Pd over Cu yielded the best wetting results of the metallic coatings, with complete dissolution of the Pd overcoat and wetting of the underlying Cu by the flowing solder. Limited wetting was measured on the thicker Pd and Pd over Ni finishes, which were not completely dissolved by the molten solder. The immersion Au and Ag finishes yielded the lowest wetted lengths, respectively. These general differences in solderability were directly attributed to the type of surface finish which the solder came in contact with. The effects of circuit geometry, surface finish, stressing, and solder processing conditions are discussed.

  7. Antifungal Activity of Brazilian Propolis Microparticles against Yeasts Isolated from Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

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    Kelen Fátima Dalben Dota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis, a resinous compound produced by Apis mellifera L. bees, is known to possess a variety of biological activities and is applied in the therapy of various infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity of propolis ethanol extract (PE and propolis microparticles (PMs obtained from a sample of Brazilian propolis against clinical yeast isolates of importance in the vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC. PE was used to prepare the microparticles. Yeast isolates (n=89, obtained from vaginal exudates of patients with VVC, were exposed to the PE and the PMs. Moreover, the main antifungal drugs used in the treatment of VVC (Fluconazole, Voriconazole, Itraconazole, Ketoconazole, Miconazole and Amphotericin B were also tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined according to the standard broth microdilution method. Some Candida albicans isolates showed resistance or dose-dependent susceptibility for the azolic drugs and Amphotericin B. Non-C. albicans isolates showed more resistance and dose-dependent susceptibility for the azolic drugs than C. albicans. However, all of them were sensitive or dose-dependent susceptible for Amphotericin B. All yeasts were inhibited by PE and PMs, with small variation, independent of the species of yeast. The overall results provided important information for the potential application of PMs in the therapy of VVC and the possible prevention of the occurrence of new symptomatic episodes.

  8. Pityrosporum folliculitis: A retrospective review of 110 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prindaville, Brea; Belazarian, Leah; Levin, Nikki A; Wiss, Karen

    2018-03-01

    Pityrosporum folliculitis is an under-recognized eruption of the face and upper portion of the trunk that may be confused with, or occur simultaneously with, acne vulgaris. We sought to characterize risk factors for Pityrosporum folliculitis, its clinical presentation, and its response to treatment. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients age 0 to 21 years seen at our facility from 2010 to 2015 with Pityrosporum folliculitis confirmed by a potassium hydroxide preparation. Of 110 qualifying patients, more than 75% had acne that had recently been treated with antibiotics, and when recorded, 65% reported pruritus. Clinical examination demonstrated numerous 1- to 2-mm monomorphic papules and pustules that were typically on the forehead extending into the hairline and on the upper portion of the back. The most common treatment was ketoconazole shampoo, which led to improvement or resolution in most cases. Some patients required oral azole antifungals. This study was retrospective and relied on providers describing and interpreting the clinical findings and potassium hydroxide preparations. No standard grading system was used. Unlike classic acne vulgaris, Pityrosporum folliculitis was more common after antibiotic use. It presented as fine monomorphic, pruritic papules and pustules along the hairline and on the upper portion of the back, and it improved with topical or oral azole antifungal therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural complex of sterol 14[alpha]-demethylase (CYP51) with 14[alpha]-methylenecyclopropyl-[delta]7-24, 25-dihydrolanosterol[S

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    Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Jialin; Waterman, Michael R.; Nes, W. David; Lepesheva, Galina I. (Vanderbilt); (TTU); (NWU)

    2012-06-28

    Sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) that catalyzes the removal of the 14{alpha}-methyl group from the sterol nucleus is an essential enzyme in sterol biosynthesis, a primary target for clinical and agricultural antifungal azoles and an emerging target for antitrypanosomal chemotherapy. Here, we present the crystal structure of Trypanosoma (T) brucei CYP51 in complex with the substrate analog 14{alpha}-methylenecyclopropyl-{Delta}7-24,25-dihydrolanosterol (MCP). This sterol binds tightly to all protozoan CYP51s and acts as a competitive inhibitor of F105-containing (plant-like) T. brucei and Leishmania (L) infantum orthologs, but it has a much stronger, mechanism-based inhibitory effect on I105-containing (animal/fungi-like) T. cruzi CYP51. Depicting substrate orientation in the conserved CYP51 binding cavity, the complex specifies the roles of the contact amino acid residues and sheds new light on CYP51 substrate specificity. It also provides an explanation for the effect of MCP on T. cruzi CYP51. Comparison with the ligand-free and azole-bound structures supports the notion of structural rigidity as the characteristic feature of the CYP51 substrate binding cavity, confirming the enzyme as an excellent candidate for structure-directed design of new drugs, including mechanism-based substrate analog inhibitors.

  10. Evolutionary divergence in the fungal response to fluconazole revealed by soft clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Kuo, Dwight

    2010-07-23

    Background: Fungal infections are an emerging health risk, especially those involving yeast that are resistant to antifungal agents. To understand the range of mechanisms by which yeasts can respond to anti-fungals, we compared gene expression patterns across three evolutionarily distant species - Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida glabrata and Kluyveromyces lactis - over time following fluconazole exposure. Results: Conserved and diverged expression patterns were identified using a novel soft clustering algorithm that concurrently clusters data from all species while incorporating sequence orthology. The analysis suggests complementary strategies for coping with ergosterol depletion by azoles - Saccharomyces imports exogenous ergosterol, Candida exports fluconazole, while Kluyveromyces does neither, leading to extreme sensitivity. In support of this hypothesis we find that only Saccharomyces becomes more azole resistant in ergosterol-supplemented media; that this depends on sterol importers Aus1 and Pdr11; and that transgenic expression of sterol importers in Kluyveromyces alleviates its drug sensitivity. Conclusions: We have compared the dynamic transcriptional responses of three diverse yeast species to fluconazole treatment using a novel clustering algorithm. This approach revealed significant divergence among regulatory programs associated with fluconazole sensitivity. In future, such approaches might be used to survey a wider range of species, drug concentrations and stimuli to reveal conserved and divergent molecular response pathways.

  11. Evolution of ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors as fungicidal against Candida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aijaz; Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat; Khan, Luqman A

    2010-01-01

    Azoles target the ergosterol synthesizing enzyme lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase and are a widely applied class of antifungal agents. Unfortunately azoles are generally fungistatic, and resistance to fluconazole is emerging in several fungal pathogens. In contrast to the increasing number of agents for the treatment of invasive fungal infections, discoveries of new antifungal agents with therapeutic value in dermatomycoses are reported only rare. Attention has been drawn to the antimicrobial activity of plants and their active principles due to the challenge of growing incidences of drug-resistant pathogens. Eugenol and methyl eugenol were reported to possess antimycotic properties. To further explore the antifungal activity of these compounds, in vitro studies were conducted on various Candida isolates. Insight studies to mechanism suggested that both eugenol and methyl eugenol exerts their antifungal activity by targeting sterol biosynthesis. Furthermore, it was also observed that additional methyl group to eugenol increases its antifungal activity. The observed fungicidal characteristics of both eugenol and methyl eugenol indicate that both the compounds might be promising antifungal agents defining a new class of antimycotics.

  12. Ground- and excited-state structural orientation of 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzazoles in cyclodextrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, E.L.; Dey, J.; Warner, I.M. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1996-12-12

    The effects of {alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}-, and 2,6-di-O-methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrins (CDs) on the ground- and excited-state properties of 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole, 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, and 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole in aqueous media are investigated. Steady-state fluorescence measurements are used to characterize the interaction of CDs with these azoles. Absorbance measurements indicate increased solubility of the azoles in aqueous solutions of CDs. Measurements of acidity constants (pK{sub a}) and data from induced circular dichroism indicate increased ground- and excited-state acidities of the phenolic protons of the molecules in the presence of CDs and axial orientation of the molecules within the CD cavity, respectively. The data further suggest a planar structure for HBO and a twisted confirmation for both HBT and HBI. The association constants of the inclusion complexes have also been estimated. These studies are further supplemented by comparative spectroscopic studies of 2-(2`-methoxyphenyl)benzothiazole in aqueous solutions of CDs. On the basis of the spectral data acquired, it is believed that the HBA molecules exist as zwitterionic tautomers in the presence of CDs. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Application of 2-Trichloromethylbenzimidazole in Analytical Chemistry: A Highly Selective Chromogenic Reagent for Thin-Layer Chromatography and Some Other Analytical Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Konopski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-Trichloromethylbenzimidazole (TCMB was used as a chromogenic reagent in organic or inorganic analysis, mainly in thin-layer chromatography (TLC. In reactions of TCMB with some heteroaromatic nitrogen containing compounds, such as azines, azoles and benzazoles, a formation of high colored products occurred. For azines, the chromogenic reaction was highly regioselective, since the both adjacent α-positions versus the nitrogen atom(s must not be substituted. A TLC method of detection was developed. Thirty azines, azoles, and benzazoles were detected at the detection limit 10 ng to 1 μg. This method was also applied for detection of heteroaromatic pesticides, and the attempts to construct active and passive dosimeters for nicotine were made. In a prechromatographic reaction of aromatic o-diamines with methyl trichloroacetimidate, TCMB or its derivatives were formed in situ. Followed by TLC and visualization in pyridine vapors, this procedure was applied for detection of o-phenylenediamine derivatives. The reaction product of TCMB and pyridine (LI Complex was identified and fully characterized. Two different reaction mechanisms: with electron deficient basic heteroaromatic compounds, like pyridine, and with more acidic compounds, for example, pyrrole, were discussed. In aqueous solutions, the LI Complex may be also used as a new indicator for complexometric, adsorption and acid-base titration of inorganic compounds.

  14. [Pharmacology of the antifungals used in the treatment of aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, José Ramón; Sádaba, Belén; Gómez-Guíu, Almudena

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of invasive aspergillosis requires the use of drugs that characteristically have complex pharmacokinetic properties, the knowledge of which is essential to achieve maximum efficacy with minimal risk to the patient. The lipid-based amphotericin B formulations vary significantly in their pharmacokinetic behaviour, with very high plasma concentrations of the liposomal form, probably related to the presence of cholesterol in their structure. Azoles have a variable absorption profile, particularly in the case of itraconazole and posaconazole, with the latter very dependent on multiple factors. This may also lead to variations in voriconazole, which requires considering the possibility of monitoring plasma concentrations. The aim of this article is to review some of the most relevant aspects of the pharmacology of the antifungals used in the prophylaxis and treatment of the Aspergillus infection. For this reason, it includes the most relevant features of some of the azoles normally prescribed in this infection (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole) and the amphotericin B formulations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  15. Posaconazole: An Update of Its Clinical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Leung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Posaconazole (PCZ is a relatively new addition to the azole antifungals. It has fungicidal activities against Aspergillus fumigatus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, selected Candida species, Crytopcoccus neoformans, and Trichosporon. PCZ also has fungistatic activities against Candida, Coccidioides, selected Fusarium spp., Histoplasma, Scedosporium and Zygomycetes. In addition, combining the drug with caspofungin or amphotericin B results in a synergistic interaction against A. fumigatus, C. glabrata and C. neoformans. The absorption of PCZ suspension is enhanced when given with food, nutritional supplements, and carbonated beverages. Oral administration of PCZ in divided doses also increases its bioavailability. PCZ has a large volume of distribution and is highly protein bound (>95%. The main elimination route of PCZ is fecal. PCZ is an inhibitor of the CYP3A4 enzyme; therefore, monitoring for drug-drug interactions is warranted with other CYP3A4 substrates/inhibitors/inducers. The most common adverse effects include headache, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and elevated hepatic enzymes. PCZ, with its unique antifungal activities, expands the azole class of antifungal agents. Because of its limit in formulation, PCZ oral suspension is recommended in immunocompromised patients with functional gastrointestinaltracts who fail conventional antifungal therapies or who are suspected to have a breakthrough fungal infection. However, a delayed-release tablet formulation and intravenous (IV injection became available in 2014, expanding the use of PCZ in other patient populations, including individuals who are unable to take oral formulations.

  16. The effects of epoxiconazole and α-cypermethrin on Daphnia magna growth, reproduction, and offspring size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardi, Michele; Birch, Michala Rosa; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Cedergreen, Nina

    2017-08-01

    Two of the main classes of pesticides commonly used in agriculture are azole fungicides and pyrethroid insecticides. Because azoles have been shown to synergize the effect of pyrethroids, the effect of their mixture is of concern. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of sublethal concentrations of epoxiconazole and α-cypermethrin and their mixture on growth, reproduction, and in vivo cytochrome P450 activity of the aquatic crustacean Daphnia magna over 42 d. Continuous exposure to nonlethal concentrations of α-cypermethrin at 20 ng/L negatively affected adult growth and number and size of neonates within the first 14 d of exposure. Exposure to epoxiconazole at 25 μg/L increased protein content of adults within 1 to 3 d after initiating exposure and increased cumulative number of offspring at exposure times >31 d. Epoxiconazole enhanced the negative effect of α-cypermethrin up to 3-fold leading to decreased growth, cytochrome P450 activity, and reproduction of D. magna within the first 14 d of exposure. After 14 d, the synergistic interactions disappeared. The reported effects, although lacking direct negative consequence in the long term, might have cumulative toxicity with other stressors such as food scarcity, predation, and pathogens, posing an additional hazard for the organisms at the beginning of their life cycle. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2155-2166. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  17. Environmental impact of pesticides after sewage treatment plants removal in four Spanish Mediterranean rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Julian; Masiá, Ana; Blasco, Cristina; Picó, Yolanda; Andreu, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    The re-use of sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents is currently one of the most employed strategies in several countries to deal with the water shortage problem. Some pesticides are bio-accumulative and due to their toxicity they can affect non-target organisms, especially in the aquatic ecosystems, threating their ecological status. Despite these facts, and to our knowledge, there are few peer-reviewed articles that report concentrations of pesticides in Spanish STPs. This work presents the results of an extensive survey that was carried out in October of 2010 in 15 of the STPs of Ebro, Guadalquivir, Jucar and Llobregat rivers in Spain. Forty-three currently used pesticides, belonging to anilide, neonicotinoid, thiocarbamate, acaricide, juvenile hormone mimic, insect growth regulator, urea, azole, carbamate, chloroacetanilide, triazine and organophosphorus, have been monitored. Integrated samples of influent and effluent, and dehydrated, lyophilized sludge from 15 STPs located along the rivers were analyzed for pesticide residues. With these data, removal efficiencies are also calculated. Extraction of water samples was performed through Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) and sludge samples were extracted using the QuEchERS method. Pesticide determination was carried out using Liquid Chromatograph - tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Recoveries ranged from 48% to 70%, in water samples, and from 40 to 105 %, in sludge samples. The limits of quantification were 0.01-5 ng L-1 for the former, and 0.1-5.0 ng g-1 for the latter. In terms of frequency of detection, 31 analytes were detected in influent, 29 in effluent and 11 in sludge samples. Organophosphorus pesticides were the most frequently detected in all wastewater samples, but azole, urea, triazine, neonicotinoid and the insect growth regulator were also commonly found. Imazalil revealed the maximum concentration in wastewater samples from all rivers except the Guadalquivir, in which diuron presented the maximum

  18. Antifungal treatment for invasive Candida infections: a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachega Jean B

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of mortality among patients at risk. Treatment guidelines vary on optimal treatment strategies. We aimed to determine the effects of different antifungal therapies on global response rates, mortality and safety. Methods We searched independently and in duplicate 10 electronic databases from inception to May 2009. We selected any randomized trial assessing established antifungal therapies for confirmed cases of invasive candidiasis among predominantly adult populations. We performed a meta-analysis and then conducted a Bayesian mixed treatment comparison to differentiate treatment effectiveness. Sensitivity analyses included dosage forms of amphotericin B and fluconazole compared to other azoles. Results Our analysis included 11 studies enrolling a total of 965 patients. For our primary analysis of global response rates, we pooled 7 trials comparing azoles to amphotericin B, Relative Risk [RR] 0.87 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.78–0.96, P = 0.007, I2 = 43%, P = 0.09. We also pooled 2 trials of echinocandins versus amphotericin B and found a pooled RR of 1.10 (95% CI, 0.99–1.23, P = 0.08. One study compared anidulafungin to fluconazole and yielded a RR of 1.26 (95% CI, 1.06–1.51 in favor of anidulafungin. We pooled 7 trials assessing azoles versus amphotericin B for all-cause mortality, resulting in a pooled RR of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.74–1.05, P = 0.17, I2 = 0%, P = 0.96. Echinocandins versus amphotericin B (2 trials for all-cause mortality resulted in a pooled RR of 1.01 (95% CI, 0.84–1.20, P = 0.93. Anidulafungin versus fluconazole resulted in a RR of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.48–1.10, P = 0.34. Our mixed treatment comparison analysis found similar within-class effects across all interventions. Adverse event profiles differed, with amphotericin B exhibiting larger adverse event effects. Conclusion Treatment options appear to offer preferential effects on response rates and mortality. When

  19. Jjj1 Is a Negative Regulator of Pdr1-Mediated Fluconazole Resistance inCandida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Sarah G; Caudle, Kelly E; Simonicova, Lucia; Zhang, Qing; Moye-Rowley, W Scott; Rogers, P David

    2018-01-01

    The high prevalence of fluconazole resistance among clinical isolates of Candida glabrata has greatly hampered the utility of fluconazole for the treatment of invasive candidiasis. Fluconazole resistance in this yeast is almost exclusively due to activating mutations in the transcription factor Pdr1, which result in upregulation of the ABC transporter genes CDR1 , PDH1 , and SNQ2 and therefore increased fluconazole efflux. However, the regulation of Pdr1 is poorly understood. In order to identify genes that interact with the Pdr1 transcriptional pathway and influence the susceptibility of C. glabrata to fluconazole, we screened a collection of deletion mutants for those exhibiting increased resistance to fluconazole. Deletion of the gene coding for a protein homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae J protein Jjj1 resulted in decreased fluconazole susceptibility. We used the SAT1 flipper method to generate independent deletion mutants for JJJ1 in an SDD clinical isolate. Expression of both CDR1 and PDR1 was increased in the absence of JJJ1 . In the absence of CDR1 or PDR1 , deletion of JJJ1 has only a modest effect on fluconazole susceptibility. Transcriptional profiling using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) revealed upregulation of genes of the Pdr1 regulon in the absence of JJJ1 . Jjj1 appears to be a negative regulator of fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata and acts primarily through upregulation of the ABC transporter gene CDR1 via activation of the Pdr1 transcriptional pathway. IMPORTANCE Candida glabrata is the second most common species of Candida recovered from patients with invasive candidiasis. The increasing number of infections due to C. glabrata , combined with its high rates of resistance to the commonly used, well-tolerated azole class of antifungal agents, has limited the use of this antifungal class. This has led to the preferential use of echinocandins as empirical treatment for serious Candida infections. The primary mechanism of

  20. Candida albicans AGE3, the ortholog of the S. cerevisiae ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1, is required for hyphal growth and drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lettner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyphal growth and multidrug resistance of C. albicans are important features for virulence and antifungal therapy of this pathogenic fungus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show by phenotypic complementation analysis that the C. albicans gene AGE3 is the functional ortholog of the yeast ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1. The finding that the gene is required for efficient endocytosis points to an important functional role of Age3p in endosomal compartments. Most C. albicans age3Delta mutant cells which grew as cell clusters under yeast growth conditions showed defects in filamentation under different hyphal growth conditions and were almost completely disabled for invasive filamentous growth. Under hyphal growth conditions only a fraction of age3Delta cells shows a wild-type-like polarization pattern of the actin cytoskeleton and lipid rafts. Moreover, age3Delta cells were highly susceptible to several unrelated toxic compounds including antifungal azole drugs. Irrespective of the AGE3 genotype, C-terminal fusions of GFP to the drug efflux pumps Cdr1p and Mdr1p were predominantly localized in the plasma membrane. Moreover, the plasma membranes of wild-type and age3Delta mutant cells contained similar amounts of Cdr1p, Cdr2p and Mdr1p. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that the defect in sustaining filament elongation is probably caused by the failure of age3Delta cells to polarize the actin cytoskeleton and possibly of inefficient endocytosis. The high susceptibility of age3Delta cells to azoles is not caused by inefficient transport of efflux pumps to the cell membrane. A possible role of a vacuolar defect of age3Delta cells in drug susceptibility is proposed and discussed. In conclusion, our study shows that the ARF-GAP Age3p is required for hyphal growth which is an important virulence factor of C. albicans and essential for detoxification of azole drugs which are routinely used for antifungal therapy. Thus, it

  1. In-host adaptation and acquired triazole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus: a dilemma for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Paul E; Zhang, Jianhua; Debets, Alfons J M; Meis, Jacques F; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Schoustra, Sijmen E; Zwaan, Bas J; Melchers, Willem J G

    2016-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus causes a range of diseases in human beings, some of which are characterised by fungal persistence. A fumigatus can persist by adapting to the human lung environment through physiological and genomic changes. The physiological changes are based on the large biochemical versatility of the fungus, and the genomic changes are based on the capacity of the fungus to generate genetic diversity by spontaneous mutations or recombination and subsequent selection of the genotypes that are most adapted to the new environment. In this Review, we explore the adaptation strategies of A fumigatus in relation to azole resistance selection and the clinical implications thereof for management of diseases caused by Aspergillus spp. We hypothesise that the current diagnostic tools and treatment strategies do not take into account the biology of the fungus and might result in an increased likelihood of fungal persistence in patients. Stress factors, such as triazole exposure, cause mutations that render resistance. The process of reproduction-ie, sexual, parasexual, or asexual-is probably crucial for the adaptive potential of Aspergillus spp. As any change in the environment can provoke adaptation, switching between triazoles in patients with chronic pulmonary aspergillosis might result in a high-level pan-triazole-resistant phenotype through the accumulation of resistance mutations. Alternatively, when triazole therapy is stopped, an azole-free environment is created that could prompt selection for compensatory mutations that overcome any fitness costs that are expected to accompany resistance development. As a consequence, starting, switching, and stopping azole therapy has the risk of selecting for highly resistant strains with wildtype fitness. A similar adaptation is expected to occur in response to other stress factors, such as endogenous antimicrobial peptides; over time the fungus will become increasingly adapted to the lung environment, thereby limiting

  2. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida glabrata species complex, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis species complex and Candida tropicalis causing invasive candidiasis in China: 3 year national surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Fan, Xin; Chen, Sharon C-A; Wang, He; Sun, Zi-Yong; Liao, Kang; Chen, Shu-Lan; Yan, Yan; Kang, Mei; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Chu, Yun-Zhuo; Hu, Tie-Shi; Ni, Yu-Xing; Zou, Gui-Ling; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-03-01

    To define the antifungal susceptibility patterns of the most common non-albicans Candida spp. in China. We evaluated the susceptibilities to nine antifungal drugs of Candida parapsilosis species complex, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata species complex and Candida krusei isolates from patients with invasive candidiasis at 11 hospitals over 3 years. Isolates were identified by MALDI-TOF MS supplemented by DNA sequencing. MICs were determined by Sensititre YeastOne(TM) using current clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cut-off values to assign susceptibility (or WT), and by CLSI M44-A2 disc diffusion for fluconazole and voriconazole. Of 1072 isolates, 392 (36.6%) were C. parapsilosis species complex. C. tropicalis, C. glabrata species complex and C. krusei comprised 35.4%, 24.3% and 3.7% of the isolates, respectively. Over 99.3% of the isolates were of WT phenotype to amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine. Susceptibility/WT rates to azoles among C. parapsilosis species complex were ≥97.5%. However, 11.6% and 9.5% of C. tropicalis isolates were non-susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively (7.1% were resistant to both). Approximately 14.3% of C. glabrata sensu stricto isolates (n = 258) were fluconazole resistant, and 11.6% of C. glabrata sensu stricto isolates were cross-resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole. All C. krusei isolates were susceptible/WT to voriconazole, posaconazole and itraconazole. Overall, 97.7%-100% of isolates were susceptible to caspofungin, micafungin and anidulafungin, but 2.3% of C. glabrata were non-susceptible to anidulafungin. There was no azole/echinocandin co-resistance. Disc diffusion and Sensititre YeastOne(TM) methods showed >95% categorical agreement for fluconazole and voriconazole. In summary, reduced azole susceptibility was seen among C. tropicalis. Resistance to echinocandins was uncommon. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  3. Antifungal pharmacodynamics: Latin America's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Javier M; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Agudelo, Maria; Zuluaga, Andres F; Vesga, Omar

    The current increment of invasive fungal infections and the availability of new broad-spectrum antifungal agents has increased the use of these agents by non-expert practitioners, without an impact on mortality. To improve efficacy while minimizing prescription errors and to reduce the high monetary cost to the health systems, the principles of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) are necessary. A systematic review of the PD of antifungals agents was performed aiming at the practicing physician without expertise in this field. The initial section of this review focuses on the general concepts of antimicrobial PD. In vitro studies, fungal susceptibility and antifungal serum concentrations are related with different doses and dosing schedules, determining the PD indices and the magnitude required to obtain a specific outcome. Herein the PD of the most used antifungal drug classes in Latin America (polyenes, azoles, and echinocandins) is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. New composite materials to metal sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annenkov, V.V.; Danilovtseva, E.N.; Filina, E.A.; Trofimov, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    Complexing-active polymers are promising substances for detoxication of radioactive elements from the polluted soils and natural waters. Tis work is devoted to searching of new polymeric compositions for detoxication of soils and waters from heavy metals. Three systems (azole-carboxylic polyampholytes, polymer-polymer complexes of poly(1-vinylimidazole) (PVI), Ai- and Al-based organo/inorganic composites) were discussed. Sorption properties of new composites were studied using Cu 2+ ions as an example. The sorption equilibrium range time is equals to 20-60 min, sorption capacity attains 280 mg/g. The most effective sorbents are composites on the basis of PVI, poly(4-vinylpyridine) decrease sorption capacity due to hydrophobia of this polymer. Thus, composites on the basis of nitrogen-containing polymers are promising systems for heavy materials sorption. Introduction of Si-, Al-hydroxides into composites allows to decrease cost of the materials and increase their nature-compatibility

  5. Fungicide impacts on photosynthesis in crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Anne-Noëlle; Fontaine, Florence; Vatsa, Parul; Clément, Christophe; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie

    2012-03-01

    Fungicides are widely used to control pests in crop plants. However, it has been reported that these pesticides may have negative effects on crop physiology, especially on photosynthesis. An alteration in photosynthesis might lead to a reduction in photoassimilate production, resulting in a decrease in both growth and yield of crop plants. For example, a contact fungicide such as copper inhibits photosynthesis by destroying chloroplasts, affecting photosystem II activity and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Systemic fungicides such as benzimidazoles, anilides, and pyrimidine are also phytotoxic, whereas azoles stimulate photosynthesis. This article focuses on the available information about toxic effects of fungicides on photosynthesis in crop plants, highlighting the mechanisms of perturbation, interaction, and the target sites of different classes of fungicides. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

  6. Donor Derived Candida stellimalicola in a Clinical Specimen: Preservation Fluid Contamination During Pancreas Procurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Damien; Huguenin, Antoine; Tisserand, Elodie; Reiter, Véronique; Morelon, Emmanuel; Badet, Lionel; Villena, Isabelle; Wallon, Martine; Toubas, Dominique

    2017-07-05

    We report here a case of possible donor-derived Candida stellimalicola infection after pancreas transplantation. Candida stellimalicola, an environmental non-filamentous yeast, was isolated from both the peritoneal fluid of the graft donor and the preservation fluid of the transplanted pancreas. Interestingly, this strain exhibited high minimum inhibitory concentrations to azoles. These results justified the use of echinocandins as therapy instead of fluconazole. This switch permitted a favorable outcome. To our knowledge, this is the first report of C. stellimalicola from clinical samples and therefore the first reported case of a possible human infection. This case report highlights the need for standardized microbiological procedures in solid organ transplant settings. Moreover, it underlines the importance of using molecular identification technique when routine techniques do not allow successful identification of the pathogen. It is of utmost importance to determine sensitivity profile, even in the absence of species-level identification, because resistance to fluconazole is not uncommon, especially in emergent species.

  7. The Candida Pathogenic Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Siobhán A.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida species are the most common causes of fungal infection. Approximately 90% of infections are caused by five species: Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei. Three (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis) belong to the CTG clade, in which the CTG codon is translated as serine and not leucine. C. albicans remains the most commonly isolated but is decreasing relative to the other species. The increasing incidence of C. glabrata is related to its reduced susceptibility to azole drugs. Genome analysis suggests that virulence in the CTG clade is associated with expansion of gene families, particularly of cell wall genes. Similar independent processes took place in the C. glabrata species group. Gene loss and expansion in an ancestor of C. glabrata may have resulted in preadaptations that enabled pathogenicity. PMID:25183855

  8. In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meletiadis, J; Curfs-Breuker, I; Meis, J F; Mouton, J W

    2017-04-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 1,099 molecularly identified clinical Candida isolates against 8 antifungal drugs were determined using the EUCAST microdilution method. A new simple, objective, and mathematically solid method for determining epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFFs) was developed by derivatizing the MIC distribution and determining the derivatized ECOFF (dECOFF) as the highest MIC with the maximum second derivative. The dECOFFs were similar (95% agreement within 1 dilution) to the EUCAST ECOFFs. Overall, low non-wild-type/resistance rates were found. The highest rates were found for azoles with C. parapsilosis (2.7 to 9.8%), C. albicans (7%), and C. glabrata (1.7 to 2.3%) and for echinocandins with C. krusei (3.3%), C. albicans (1%), and C. tropicalis (1.7%). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Paracoccidioidomycosis: Current Perspectives from Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rinaldo Poncio; Cavalcante, Ricardo de Souza; Marques, Sílvio Alencar; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Venturini, James; Sylvestre, Tatiane Fernanda; Paniago, Anamaria Mello Miranda; Pereira, Ana Carla; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Fabro, Alexandre Todorovic; Bosco, Sandra de Moraes Gimenes; Bagagli, Eduardo; Hahn, Rosane Christine; Levorato, Adriele Dandara

    2017-01-01

    Background: This review article summarizes and updates the knowledge on paracoccidioidomycosis. P lutzii and the cryptic species of P. brasiliensis and their geographical distribution in Latin America, explaining the difficulties observed in the serological diagnosis. Objectives: Emphasis has been placed on some genetic factors as predisposing condition for paracoccidioidomycosis. Veterinary aspects were focused, showing the wide distribution of infection among animals. The cell-mediated immunity was better characterized, incorporating the recent findings. Methods: Serological methods for diagnosis were also compared for their parameters of accuracy, including the analysis of relapse. Results: Clinical forms have been better classified in order to include the pictures less frequently observesiod. Conclusion: Itraconazole and the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination was compared regarding efficacy, effectiveness and safety, demonstrating that azole should be the first choice in the treatment of paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:29204222

  10. Candida glabrata olecranon bursitis treated with bursectomy and intravenous caspofungin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedros, John G; Keenan, Kendra E; Trachtenberg, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons are becoming more involved in the care of patients with septic arthritis and bursitis caused by yeast species. This case report involves a middle-aged immunocompromised female who developed a Candida glabrata septic olecranon bursitis that developed after she received a corticosteroid injection in the olecranon bursa for presumed aseptic bursitis. Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata is the second most frequently isolated Candida species from the bloodstream in the United States. Increased use of fluconazole and other azole antifungal agents as a prophylactic treatment for recurrent Candida albicans infections in immunocompromised individuals is one reason why there appears to be increased resistance of C. glabrata and other nonalbicans Candida (NAC) species to fluconazole. In this patient, this infection was treated with surgery (bursectomy) and intravenous caspofungin, an echinocandin. This rare infectious etiology coupled with this intravenous antifungal treatment makes this case novel among cases of olecranon bursitis caused by yeasts.

  11. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Tracy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA, a progressive fungal allergic lung disease, is a common complication of asthma or cystic fibrosis. Although ABPA has been recognized since the 1950s, recent research has underscored the importance of Th2 immune deviation and granulocyte activation in its pathogenesis. There is also strong evidence of widespread under-diagnosis due to the complexity and lack of standardization of diagnostic criteria. Treatment has long focused on downregulation of the inflammatory response with prolonged courses of oral glucocorticosteroids, but more recently concerns with steroid toxicity and availability of new treatment modalities has led to trials of oral azoles, inhaled amphotericin, pulse intravenous steroids, and subcutaneously-injected anti-IgE monoclonal antibody omalizumab, all of which show evidence of efficacy and reduced toxicity.

  12. Role of inhaled amphotericin in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

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    I S Sehgal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA is an immunological pulmonary disorder caused by immune reactions mounted against the ubiquitous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. The disease clinically manifests with poorly controlled asthma, hemoptysis, systemic manifestations like fever, anorexia and weight loss, fleeting pulmonary opacities and bronchiectasis. The natural course of the disease is characterized by repeated episodes of exacerbations. Almost 30-40% of the patients require prolonged therapy, which currently consists of corticosteroids and anti-fungal azoles; both these agents have significant adverse reactions. Amphotericin B administered via the inhaled route can achieve a high concentration in the small airways with minimal systemic side-effects. Nebulized amphotericin B has been used in the management of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. The aim of this review is to study the utility of inhaled amphotericin in ABPA.

  13. A Case Report of Penile Infection Caused by Fluconazole- and Terbinafine-Resistant Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxuan; Hu, Yanqing; Lu, Yan; Huang, Shiyun; Liu, Kangxing; Han, Xue; Mao, Zuhao; Wu, Zhong; Zhou, Xianyi

    2017-04-01

    Candida albicans is the most common pathogen that causes balanoposthitis. It often causes recurrence of symptoms probably due to its antifungal resistance. A significant number of balanitis Candida albicans isolates are resistant to azole and terbinafine antifungal agents in vitro. However, balanoposthitis caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans has rarely been reported. Here, we describe a case of a recurrent penile infection caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans, as well as the treatments administered to this patient. The isolate from the patient was tested for drug susceptibility in vitro. It was sensitive to itraconazole, voriconazole, clotrimazole and amphotericin B, but not to terbinafine and fluconazole. Thus, oral itraconazole was administrated to this patient with resistant Candida albicans penile infection. The symptoms were improved, and mycological examination result was negative. Follow-up treatment of this patient for 3 months showed no recurrence.

  14. Artemisinins, new miconazole potentiators resulting in increased activity against Candida albicans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cremer, Kaat; Lanckacker, Ellen; Cools, Tanne L; Bax, Marijke; De Brucker, Katrijn; Cos, Paul; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal biofilm-related fungal infections are very common, and the incidence of recurrent oral and vulvovaginal candidiasis is significant. As resistance to azoles (the preferred treatment) is occurring, we aimed at identifying compounds that increase the activity of miconazole against Candida albicans biofilms. We screened 1,600 compounds of a drug-repositioning library in combination with a subinhibitory concentration of miconazole. Synergy between the best identified potentiators and miconazole was characterized by checkerboard analyses and fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Hexachlorophene, pyrvinium pamoate, and artesunate act synergistically with miconazole in affecting C. albicans biofilms. Synergy was most pronounced for artesunate and structural homologues thereof. No synergistic effect could be observed between artesunate and fluconazole, caspofungin, or amphotericin B. Our data reveal enhancement of the antibiofilm activity of miconazole by artesunate, pointing to potential combination therapy consisting of miconazole and artesunate to treat C. albicans biofilm-related infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Synthesis and antitubercular activity of new N,N-diaryl-4-(4,5-dichloroimidazole-2-yl-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-pyridinedicarboxamides

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    Amini M.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Dihydropyridines having carboxamides in 3 and 5 positions show anti-tuberculosis activity. The purpose of the present study was to synthesize new DHPs having possible anti-tuberculosis activity. Methods: 4,5-Dichloroimidazole-2-carboxaldehyde was condensed with N-arylaceto-acetamides and ammonium acetate in methanol to give N,N-diaryl-4-(4,5-dichloroimid-azole-2-yl-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-pyridinedicarboxamides. All compounds were screened for their antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv. Results and major conclusion: Some of the new synthesized compounds exhibited a moderate activity in comparison to rifampicin.

  16. Severe Dermatophytosis and Acquired or Innate Immunodeficiency: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Rouzaud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophytes are keratinophilic fungi responsible for benign and common forms of infection worldwide. However, they can lead to rare and severe diseases in immunocompromised patients. Severe forms include extensive and/or invasive dermatophytosis, i.e., deep dermatophytosis and Majocchi’s granuloma. They are reported in immunocompromised hosts with primary (autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency or acquired (solid organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases requiring immunosuppressive treatments, HIV infection immunodeficiencies. The clinical manifestations of the infection are not specific. Lymph node and organ involvement may also occur. Diagnosis requires both mycological and histological findings. There is no consensus on treatment. Systemic antifungal agents such as terbinafine and azoles (itraconazole or posaconazole are effective. However, long-term outcome and treatment management depend on the site and extent of the infection and the nature of the underlying immunodeficiency.

  17. (NHC)Cu-Catalyzed Mild C-H Amidation of (Hetero)arenes with Deprotectable Carbamates: Scope and Mechanistic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weilong; Yoon, Jung Hee; Chang, Sukbok

    2016-09-28

    Primary arylamines are an important unit broadly found in synthetic, biological, and materials science. Herein we describe the development of a (NHC)Cu system that mediates a direct C-H amidation of (hetero)arenes by using N-chlorocarbamates or their sodio derivatives as the practical amino sources. A facile stoichiometric reaction of reactive copper-aryl intermediates with the amidating reagent led us to isolate key copper arylcarbamate species with the formation of a C-N bond. The use of (t)BuONa base made this transformation catalytic under mild conditions. The present (NHC)Cu-catalyzed C-H amidation works efficiently and selectively on a large scale over a range of arenes including polyfluorobenzenes, azoles, and quinoline N-oxides. Deprotection of the newly installed carbamate groups such as Boc and Cbz was readily performed to afford the corresponding primary arylamines.

  18. Determining lower threshold concentrations for synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjergager, Maj-Britt Andersen; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Kretschmann, Andreas; Nørgaard, Katrine Banke; Mayer, Philipp; Cedergreen, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Though only occurring rarely, synergistic interactions between chemicals in mixtures have long been a point of focus. Most studies analyzing synergistic interactions used unrealistically high chemical concentrations. The aim of the present study is to determine the threshold concentration below which proven synergists cease to act as synergists towards the aquatic crustacean Daphnia magna. To do this, we compared several approaches and test-setups to evaluate which approach gives the most conservative estimate for the lower threshold for synergy for three known azole synergists. We focus on synergistic interactions between the pyrethroid insecticide, alpha-cypermethrin, and one of the three azole fungicides prochloraz, propiconazole or epoxiconazole measured on Daphnia magna immobilization. Three different experimental setups were applied: A standard 48h acute toxicity test, an adapted 48h test using passive dosing for constant chemical exposure concentrations, and a 14-day test. Synergy was defined as occuring in mixtures where either EC 50 values decreased more than two-fold below what was predicted by concentration addition (horizontal assessment) or as mixtures where the fraction of immobile organisms increased more than two-fold above what was predicted by independent action (vertical assessment). All three tests confirmed the hypothesis of the existence of a lower azole threshold concentration below which no synergistic interaction was observed. The lower threshold concentration, however, decreased with increasing test duration from 0.026±0.013μM (9.794±4.897μgL -1 ), 0.425±0.089μM (145.435±30.46μgL -1 ) and 0.757±0.253μM (249.659±83.44μgL -1 ) for prochloraz, propiconazole and epoxiconazole in standard 48h toxicity tests to 0.015±0.004μM (5.651±1.507μgL -1 ), 0.145±0.025μM (49.619±8.555μgL -1 ) and 0.122±0.0417μM (40.236±13.75μgL -1 ), respectively, in the 14-days tests. Testing synergy in relation to concentration addition provided

  19. Theoretical study on β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes with propiconazole and protonated propiconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Fifere

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the β-cyclodextrin/propiconazole nitrate inclusion complex and the advantages of the encapsulation of this drug were recently reported, but the experimental data only partially revealed the structure of the supramolecular complex due to the limitations in understanding the intermolecular association mechanism. The present work describes the equilibrium molecular geometries of β-cyclodextrin/propiconazole and β-cyclodextrin/protonated propiconazole, established by the AM1 and PM3 semi-empirical methods. The affinity between different parts of the guest molecule and the cyclodextrin cavity was studied considering that propiconazole possesses three residues able to be included into the host cavity through primary or secondary hydroxyl rims. The results have revealed that the most stable complex is formed when the azole residue of the propiconazole enters the cavity of the cyclodextrin through the narrow hydroxyl’s rim.

  20. Structure-reactivity relationships in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide with ruthenium complexes bearing pyridinylazolato ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Keven; Sun, Yu; Heimermann, Andreas; Menges, Fabian; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon; van Wüllen, Christoph; Thiel, Werner R

    2013-06-10

    Pyridinylazolato (N-N') ruthenium(II) complexes of the type [(N-N')RuCl(PMe3)3] have been obtained in high yields by treating the corresponding functionalised azolylpyridines with [RuCl2 (PMe3)4] in the presence of a base. (15)N NMR spectroscopy was used to elucidate the electronic influence of the substituents attached to the azolyl ring. The findings are in agreement with slight differences in the bond lengths of the ruthenium complexes. Furthermore, the electronic nature of the azolate moiety modulates the catalytic activity of the ruthenium complexes in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions and in the transfer hydrogenation of acetophenone. DFT calculations were performed to shed light on the mechanism of the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and to clarify the impact of the electronic nature of the pyridinylazolate ligands. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. [Invasive mould disease in haematological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mould infections (IMI) are a persistent problem with high morbidity and mortality rates among patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Management of IMI in this setting has become increasingly complex with the advent of new antifungal agents and diagnostic tests, which have resulted in different therapeutic strategies (prophylactic, empirical, pre-emptive, and directed). A proper assessment of the individual risk for IMI appears to be critical in order to use the best prophylactic and therapeutic approach and increase the survival rates. Among the available antifungal drugs, the most frequently used in the hematologic patient are fluconazole, mould-active azoles (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole), candins (anidulafungin, caspofungin and micafungin), and lipid formulations of amphotericin B. Specific recommendations for their use, and criteria for selecting the antifungal agents are discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  2. Tolerability and safety of antifungal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Scaglione

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available When treating critically ill patients, as those with fungal infections, attention should be focused on the appropriate use of drugs, especially in terms of dose, safety, and tolerability. The fungal infection itself and the concomitant physiological disorders concur to increase the risk of mortality in these patients, therefore the use of any antifungal agent should be carefully evaluated, considering both the direct action on the target fungus and the adverse effects eventually caused. Among antifungal drugs, echinocandins have the greatest tolerability. In fact, unlike amphotericin B, showing nephrotoxicity, and azoles, which are hepatotoxic, the use of echinocandins doesn’t result in major adverse events.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i2s.873

  3. An experimental and clinical assay with ketoconazole in the treatment of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigman Brener

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available Ketoconazole an azole antifungic drug which is already in the market has also been demonstrated to be active against Trypanossoma cruzi experimental infections. In this paper we confirmed the drug effect and investigated its range of activity against different T. cruzi strains naturally resistant or susceptible to both standard drugs Nifurtimox and Benznidazole used clinically in Chagas disease. Moreover, we have shown that the association of Ketoconazole plus Lovastatin (an inhibitor of sterol synthesis, which has an antiproliferative effect against T. cruzi in vitro, failed to enhance the supressive effect of Ketoconazole displayed when administered alone to infected mice. Finally, administration in chronic chagasic patients of Ketoconazole at doses used in the treatment of deep mycosis also failed to induce cure as demonstrated by parasitological and serological tests. The strategy of identify and test drugs which are already in the market and fortuitously are active against T. cruzi has been discussed.

  4. Antagonistic changes in sensitivity to antifungal drugs by mutations of an important ABC transporter gene in a fungal pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Guan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungal pathogens can be lethal, especially among immunocompromised populations, such as patients with AIDS and recipients of tissue transplantation or chemotherapy. Prolonged usage of antifungal reagents can lead to drug resistance and treatment failure. Understanding mechanisms that underlie drug resistance by pathogenic microorganisms is thus vital for dealing with this emerging issue. In this study, we show that dramatic sequence changes in PDR5, an ABC (ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter protein gene in an opportunistic fungal pathogen, caused the organism to become hypersensitive to azole, a widely used antifungal drug. Surprisingly, the same mutations conferred growth advantages to the organism on polyenes, which are also commonly used antimycotics. Our results indicate that Pdr5p might be important for ergosterol homeostasis. The observed remarkable sequence divergence in the PDR5 gene in yeast strain YJM789 may represent an interesting case of adaptive loss of gene function with significant clinical implications.

  5. Current perspective on emergence, diagnosis and drug resistance in Candida auris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Smita Sarma, Shalini Upadhyay Department of Microbiology, Medanta – The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana, India Abstract: Candida auris is an emerging fungus that presents a serious threat to global health. The organism is difficult to identify using conventional biochemical methods. C. auris has also attracted attention because of its reduced susceptibility to azoles, polyenes, and echinocandins, with a few strains even resistant to all three classes of antifungals. In this review paper we discuss the trends in emergence of C. auris in different parts of the world, associated risk factors, drug resistance, and diagnostic challenges. Strategies for prevention and therapeutic options for such infections is also addressed. Keywords: Candidemia, Candida haemulonii, outbreak, drug resistance

  6. Organonickel(II) complexes with anionic tridentate 1, 3-bis(azolylmethyl)phenyl ligands. synthesis, structural characterization and catalytic behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado, John; Rojas, Rene; Valderrama, Mauricio, E-mail: jmvalder@puc.cl [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Ibanez, Andres [Centro para la Investigacion Interdisciplinaria Avanzada en Ciencia de los Materiales (CIMAT), Santiago (Chile); Froehlich, Roland [Organisch Chemisches Institut der Universitaet Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    The reaction of 2-bromo-1,3-bis(bromomethyl)benzene with 3,5-dimethylpyrazole and {sup 1}H-indazole yields the tridentate ligands 2-bromo-1,3-bis(3,5-dimethylpirazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene (1) and 2-bromo-1,3-bis(indazol-2-ylmethyl)benzene (2). These compounds react with [Ni(cod)2] in tetrahydrofuran (thf) to form the oxidative addition complexes [NiBr{l_brace}1,3-bis(azolylmethyl)phenyl-N,C,N{r_brace}], azol 3,5-dimethylpyrazol (3), indazol (4), which were isolated in good yields as stable yellow solids and characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In addition, the molecular structures of 2 and 4 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Complex 4 was tested as a catalyst in ethylene polymerization reaction. (author)

  7. Antifungal pharmacodynamics: Latin America's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier M. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current increment of invasive fungal infections and the availability of new broad-spectrum antifungal agents has increased the use of these agents by non-expert practitioners, without an impact on mortality. To improve efficacy while minimizing prescription errors and to reduce the high monetary cost to the health systems, the principles of pharmacokinetics (PK and pharmacodynamics (PD are necessary. A systematic review of the PD of antifungals agents was performed aiming at the practicing physician without expertise in this field. The initial section of this review focuses on the general concepts of antimicrobial PD. In vitro studies, fungal susceptibility and antifungal serum concentrations are related with different doses and dosing schedules, determining the PD indices and the magnitude required to obtain a specific outcome. Herein the PD of the most used antifungal drug classes in Latin America (polyenes, azoles, and echinocandins is discussed.

  8. Photoelectrochemical synthesis of thin polyazole films on semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogan, Y.L.; Kozel, A.L.; Khidekel, M.L.

    1983-03-01

    The synthesis of thin films of conducting polymers on the surface of a semiconductor is of considerable interest for microelectronics and nonsilver photography, and also for the creation of solar energy converters. In the present article a method of synthesizing a poly-azole is proposed which consists of polymerizing the monomer at a semiconductor-electrolyte interface, with simultaneous application of a potential and illumination of the electrode surface. The method proposed here differs from the electrochemical method of Kanazawa et al. directors of the p-type; even with high-alloy samples (under certain conditions) the growth of polymer takes place only upon illumination and on those parts of the electrode on which the light is incident.

  9. Synthesis, In Vitro Biological Evaluation, and Molecular Docking of New Triazoles as Potent Antifungal Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Chao; Tang, Sheng; Wu, Qiuye; Hu, Honggang; Zhao, Qingjie; Zou, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Based on the structure of the active site of CYP51 and the structure-activity relationships of azole antifungal compounds that we designed in a previous study, a series of 1-{1-[2-(substitutedbenzyloxy)ethyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl}-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propan-2-ols (6a-n) were designed and synthesized utilizing copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Preliminary antifungal tests against eight human pathogenic fungi in vitro showed that all the title compounds exhibited excellent antifungal activities with a broad spectrum in vitro. Molecular docking results indicated that the interaction between the title compounds and CYP51 comprised π-π interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and the narrow hydrophobic cleft. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Antifungal prophylaxis with posaconazole vs. fluconazole or itraconazole in pediatric patients with neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, M; Eikemeier, M; Cabanillas Stanchi, K M; Hartmann, U; Ebinger, M; Schwarze, C-P; Schulz, A; Handgretinger, R; Müller, I

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric patients with hemato-oncological malignancies and neutropenia resulting from chemotherapy have a high risk of acquiring invasive fungal infections. Oral antifungal prophylaxis with azoles, such as fluconazole or itraconazole, is preferentially used in pediatric patients after chemotherapy. During this retrospective analysis, posaconazole was administered based on favorable results from studies in adult patients with neutropenia and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Retrospectively, safety, feasibility, and initial data on the efficacy of posaconazole were compared to fluconazole and itraconazole in pediatric and adolescent patients during neutropenia. Ninety-three pediatric patients with hemato-oncological malignancies with a median age of 12 years (range 9 months to 17.7 years) that had prolonged neutropenia (>5 days) after chemotherapy or due to their underlying disease, and who received fluconazole, itraconazole, or posaconazole as antifungal prophylaxis, were analyzed in this retrospective single-center survey. The incidence of invasive fungal infections in pediatric patients was low under each of the azoles. One case of proven aspergillosis occurred in each group. In addition, there were a few cases of possible invasive fungal infection under fluconazole (n = 1) and itraconazole (n = 2). However, no such cases were observed under posaconazole. The rates of potentially clinical drug-related adverse events were higher in the fluconazole (n = 4) and itraconazole (n = 5) groups compared to patients receiving posaconazole (n = 3). Posaconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole are comparably effective in preventing invasive fungal infections in pediatric patients. Defining dose recommendations in these patients requires larger studies.

  11. Structural and Functional Elucidation of Yeast Lanosterol 14α-Demethylase in Complex with Agrochemical Antifungals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel D A Tyndall

    Full Text Available Azole antifungals, known as demethylase inhibitors (DMIs, target sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51 in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway of fungal pathogens of both plants and humans. DMIs remain the treatment of choice in crop protection against a wide range of fungal phytopathogens that have the potential to reduce crop yields and threaten food security. We used a yeast membrane protein expression system to overexpress recombinant hexahistidine-tagged S. cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase and the Y140F or Y140H mutants of this enzyme as surrogates in order characterize interactions with DMIs. The whole-cell antifungal activity (MIC50 values of both the R- and S-enantiomers of tebuconazole, prothioconazole (PTZ, prothioconazole-desthio, and oxo-prothioconazole (oxo-PTZ as well as for fluquinconazole, prochloraz and a racemic mixture of difenoconazole were determined. In vitro binding studies with the affinity purified enzyme were used to show tight type II binding to the yeast enzyme for all compounds tested except PTZ and oxo-PTZ. High resolution X-ray crystal structures of ScErg11p6×His in complex with seven DMIs, including four enantiomers, reveal triazole-mediated coordination of all compounds and the specific orientation of compounds within the relatively hydrophobic binding site. Comparison with CYP51 structures from fungal pathogens including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Aspergillus fumigatus provides strong evidence for a highly conserved CYP51 structure including the drug binding site. The structures obtained using S. cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase in complex with these agrochemicals provide the basis for understanding the impact of mutations on azole susceptibility and a platform for the structure-directed design of the next-generation of DMIs.

  12. Structural and Functional Elucidation of Yeast Lanosterol 14α-Demethylase in Complex with Agrochemical Antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Joel D A; Sabherwal, Manya; Sagatova, Alia A; Keniya, Mikhail V; Negroni, Jacopo; Wilson, Rajni K; Woods, Matthew A; Tietjen, Klaus; Monk, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Azole antifungals, known as demethylase inhibitors (DMIs), target sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway of fungal pathogens of both plants and humans. DMIs remain the treatment of choice in crop protection against a wide range of fungal phytopathogens that have the potential to reduce crop yields and threaten food security. We used a yeast membrane protein expression system to overexpress recombinant hexahistidine-tagged S. cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase and the Y140F or Y140H mutants of this enzyme as surrogates in order characterize interactions with DMIs. The whole-cell antifungal activity (MIC50 values) of both the R- and S-enantiomers of tebuconazole, prothioconazole (PTZ), prothioconazole-desthio, and oxo-prothioconazole (oxo-PTZ) as well as for fluquinconazole, prochloraz and a racemic mixture of difenoconazole were determined. In vitro binding studies with the affinity purified enzyme were used to show tight type II binding to the yeast enzyme for all compounds tested except PTZ and oxo-PTZ. High resolution X-ray crystal structures of ScErg11p6×His in complex with seven DMIs, including four enantiomers, reveal triazole-mediated coordination of all compounds and the specific orientation of compounds within the relatively hydrophobic binding site. Comparison with CYP51 structures from fungal pathogens including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Aspergillus fumigatus provides strong evidence for a highly conserved CYP51 structure including the drug binding site. The structures obtained using S. cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase in complex with these agrochemicals provide the basis for understanding the impact of mutations on azole susceptibility and a platform for the structure-directed design of the next-generation of DMIs.

  13. The Effectiveness of Voriconazole in Therapy of Candida glabrata's Biofilms Oral Infections and Its Influence on the Matrix Composition and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Célia F; Gonçalves, Bruna; Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Silva, Sónia; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2017-08-01

    Candida glabrata is one of most prevalent yeast in fungal infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Its azole resistance results in a low therapeutic response, particularly when associated with biofilms. The main goal of this work was to study the effectiveness of voriconazole (Vcz) against C. glabrata biofilms oral pathologies, as esophageal or oropharyngeal candidiasis. Antifungal susceptibilities were determined in pre-formed 24-h-biofilms and ERG genes expression was determined by qRT-PCR. Protein quantification was performed using BCA ® Kit, carbohydrate was estimated according to the Dubois assay and β-1,3 glucans concentration were determined using Glucatell ® kit. Finally, ergosterol, Vcz, and fluconazole (Flu) concentrations within the biofilm matrices were determined by RP-HPLC. Results showed that C. glabrata biofilms were more susceptible to Vcz than to Flu and that ERG genes expression evidenced an overexpression of the three ERG genes in the presence of both azoles. The matrix content presented a remarked decrease in proteins and an increase in carbohydrates, namely β-1,3 glucans. Ergosterol was successfully detected and quantified in the biofilm matrices, with no differences in all the considered conditions. Vcz demonstrated better diffusion through the biofilms and better cell penetration capacities, than Flu, indicating that the structure of the drug molecule fully influences its dissemination through the biofilm matrices. This work showed that Vcz is notably more effective than Flu for the treatment of resistant C. glabrata oral biofilms, which demonstrates a clinical relevance in its future use for the treatment of oropharyngeal/esophageal candidiasis caused by this species.

  14. Pesticides in the Ebro River basin: Occurrence and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ccanccapa, Alexander; Masiá, Ana; Navarro-Ortega, Alícia; Picó, Yolanda; Barceló, Damià

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 50 pesticides were analyzed in the Ebro River basin in 2010 and 2011 to assess their impact in water, sediment and biota. A special emphasis was placed on the potential effects of both, individual pesticides and their mixtures, in three trophic levels (algae, daphnia and fish) using Risk Quotients (RQs) and Toxic Units (TUs) for water and sediments. Chlorpyrifos, diazinon and carbendazim were the most frequent in water (95, 95 and 70% of the samples, respectively). Imazalil (409.73 ng/L) and diuron (150 ng/L) were at the highest concentrations. Sediment and biota were less contaminated. Chlorpyrifos, diazinon and diclofenthion were the most frequent in sediments (82, 45 and 21% of the samples, respectively). The only pesticide detected in biota was chlorpyrifos (up to 840.2 ng g −1 ). Ecotoxicological risk assessment through RQs showed that organophosphorus and azol presented high risk for algae; organophosphorus, benzimidazoles, carbamates, juvenile hormone mimic and other pesticides for daphnia, and organophosphorus, azol and juvenile hormone mimics for fish. The sum TU site for water and sediments showed values < 1 for the three bioassays. In both matrices, daphnia and fish were more sensitive to the mixture of pesticide residues present. - Highlights: • Wide occurrence of pesticides in water and in lesser extent in sediment and biota. • Ecotoxicological pesticide risk assessment in the Ebro river and its tributaries. • Sum TU site pointed out daphnia as more sensitive to the pesticide residue mixture. • Chronic toxicity test (RQ) showed risk in three trophic level (algae, daphnia and fish). - Evidence of water, sediment and biota contamination by a cocktail of pesticide residues especially hazardous for Daphnia.

  15. Longitudinal genotyping of Candida dubliniensis isolates reveals strain maintenance, microevolution, and the emergence of itraconazole resistance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleischhacker, M

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the population structure of 208 Candida dubliniensis isolates obtained from 29 patients (25 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 4 HIV negative) as part of a longitudinal study. The isolates were identified as C. dubliniensis by arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and then genotyped using the Cd25 probe specific for C. dubliniensis. The majority of the isolates (55 of 58) were unique to individual patients, and more than one genotype was recovered from 15 of 29 patients. A total of 21 HIV-positive patients were sampled on more than one occasion (2 to 36 times). Sequential isolates recovered from these patients were all closely related, as demonstrated by hybridization with Cd25 and genotyping by PCR. Six patients were colonized by the same genotype of C. dubliniensis on repeated sampling, while strains exhibiting altered genotypes were recovered from 15 of 21 patients. The majority of these isolates demonstrated minor genetic alterations, i.e., microevolution, while one patient acquired an unrelated strain. The C. dubliniensis strains could not be separated into genetically distinct groups based on patient viral load, CD4 cell count, or oropharyngeal candidosis. However, C. dubliniensis isolates obtained from HIV-positive patients were more closely related than those recovered from HIV-negative patients. Approximately 8% (16 of 194) of isolates exhibited itraconazole resistance. Cross-resistance to fluconazole was only observed in one of these patients. Two patients harboring itraconazole-resistant isolates had not received any previous azole therapy. In conclusion, longitudinal genotyping of C. dubliniensis isolates from HIV-infected patients reveals that isolates from the same patient are generally closely related and may undergo microevolution. In addition, isolates may acquire itraconazole resistance, even in the absence of prior azole therapy.

  16. Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii isolates from both HIV-infected and uninfected patients: antifungal susceptibility and outcome of cryptococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Nascimento

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT One of the factors causing treatment failure in cryptococcosis is the resistance of Cryptococcus spp. to antifungal drugs, which has motivated the susceptibility assessment of isolates from patients with cryptococcosis, different clinical conditions and infections outcomes. Clinical isolates of Cryptococcus spp. from three different groups of patients were studied in the present investigation: 19 HIV-positive patients with relapsing and/or refractory meningitis (Group 1, 30 HIV-positive patients who experienced a single and limited episode of cryptococcosis (Group 2, and 19 HIV-negative patients with cryptococcosis (Group 3. Eighty C. neoformans var. grubii isolates and 7 C. gattii isolates were studied. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of amphotericin B, azole drugs and flucytosine was determined for Cryptococcus spp. by broth microdilution test and E-test. The MIC50 and MIC90 were 0.25 and 0.50 µg/mL for amphotericin B, 4.0 and 8.0 µg /mL for fluconazole, 0.06 and 0.25 µg/mL for itraconazole, 0.25 and 0.50 µg/mL for voriconazole, and 8.0 and 16.0 µg/mL for flucytosine, respectively. Amphotericin B and itraconazole showed higher MICs for C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii, respectively. The MICs of fluconazole and itraconazole obtained with the E-test were higher than those obtained with broth microdilution. Isolates from non-HIV coinfected were less sensitive to the azoles. There was no difference in the susceptibility of C. neoformans var. grubii isolates from patients with a favorable or unfavorable outcome or along the episodes of relapsing and/or refractory meningitis.

  17. Challenges in microbiological diagnosis of invasive Aspergillus infections [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Alanio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA has been increasingly reported in populations other than the historical hematology patients and there are new questions about the performance of microbiological tools. Microscopy and culture have been completed by biomarkers, either antigens or DNA, and in blood or respiratory specimens or both. First studied in hematology, the antigen galactomannan performance in serum is low in other patient populations where the pathophysiology of the infection can be different and the prevalence of IA is much lower. DNA detection with polymerase chain reaction (PCR in blood or serum (or both has reached a certain level of acceptance thanks to consensus methods based on real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. When used on respiratory specimens, galactomannan and qPCR depend on standardization of the sampling and the diverse mycological procedures. Thus, culture remains the main diagnostic criterion in critically ill patients. The current trend toward more effective anti-mold prophylaxis in hematology hampers the yield of a screening strategy, as is usually performed in hematology. Therefore, circulating biomarkers as confirmatory tests should be considered and their performance should be reappraised in each new setting. The use of azole prophylaxis also raises the issue of selecting azole-resistance Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Ideally, the biomarkers will be more efficient when individual genetic risks of IA are defined. Culture, though not standardized, remains a key element for the diagnosis of IA and has the advantage to easily detect molds other than A. fumigatus. It is still unclear whether next-generation sequencing will replace culture in the future.

  18. Successful management of chronic disseminated candidiasis in hematologic patients treated with high-dose liposomal amphotericin B: a retrospective study of the SEIFEM registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Pepa, Roberta; Picardi, M; Sorà, F; Stamouli, M; Busca, A; Candoni, A; Delia, M; Fanci, R; Perriello, V; Zancanella, M; Nosari, A; Salutari, P; Marchesi, F; Pane, F; Pagano, L

    2016-09-01

    Chronic disseminated candidiasis (CDC) is a complication of Candida infection in immunocompromised patients, involving the liver and spleen, and rarely other organs. The aim of the study is to identify the best antifungal drug for hematologic immunocompromised patients with CDC. In this multicentric retrospective study, the charts of 20 patients with CDC following cytotoxic agent protocols for hematological malignancies, diagnosed from 2003 to 2013, were analyzed. The response to systemic antifungal therapy within 90 days from CDC diagnosis and the possible delay in chemotherapy plan, due to the infection, were evaluated. Six patients were treated with high-dose (HD; 5 mg/kg/daily) liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB), whereas three received standard-dose (SD) L-AmB (3 mg/kg/daily). Azoles were given to six patients; the remaining five were treated with echinocandins. All patients treated with HD L-AmB (6/6-100 %) achieved complete resolution of CDC; one of them had to interrupt the chemotherapy program for the infection. In the SD L-AmB group, treatment failed in the 100 % of cases and one patient had to delay chemotherapy for the infection. Of the six patients who received azoles, two achieved complete resolution of the infection, four experienced treatment failure, and only three performed chemotherapy as planned. Echinocandins treatment resulted in complete resolution of the infection in 2/5 cases, partial response in 2/5 cases, and failure in one case. In this group, 3/5 patients completed chemotherapy as planned. This study shows that HD L-AmB was particularly effective against CDC in hematologic patients, allowing most patients to continue cytotoxic agent program.

  19. Spinal Coccidioidomycosis: A Current Review of Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Kalb, Samuel; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Moon, Karam; Moran, Ana; Gonzalez, Omar; Soriano-Baron, Hector; Theodore, Nicholas

    2017-12-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is an invasive fungal disease that may present with extrathoracic dissemination. Patients with spinal coccidioidomycosis require unique medical and surgical management. We review the risk factors and clinical presentations, discuss the indications for surgical intervention, and evaluate outcomes and complications after medical and surgical management. A review of the English-language literature was performed. Eighteen articles included the management of 140 patients with spinal coccidioidomycosis. For the 140 patients, risk factors included male sex (95%), African American ethnicity (52%), and a recent visit to endemic areas (16%). The most frequent clinical presentation was pain (n = 80, 57%), followed by neurologic compression (52%). One-third of patients had concurrent pulmonary disease. The sensitivity of culture and histology for coccidioidomycosis was 80% and 90%, respectively. Complement fixation titers >1:128 suggest extensive or refractory vertebral infection. The most commonly affected spinal segments were the thoracic and lumbar spine (69%); an additional 40 patients (29%) had epidural and paravertebral abscesses. All patients received therapy with azoles (60%) and/or amphotericin B (43%). Surgical and medical management were used conjunctively to treat 110 patients (79%), with debridement (95% [105/110]) and fusion (64% [70/110]) being the most common surgical procedures. Clinical outcome improved/remained unchanged in 83 patients (59%) and worsened in 4 patients (3%). The mortality was 7%. Infection recurrence and disease progression were the most frequent complications. Emphasis should be placed on continuous and lifelong appropriate azole therapy. Spinal instability and neurologic compromise are surgical indications for decompression and fusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of preemptive treatment to prevent severe candidiasis in critically ill surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piarroux, Renaud; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Balvay, Patrick; Tran, Véronique; Blasco, Gilles; Millon, Laurence; Boillot, Annie

    2004-12-01

    To assess the efficacy of a preemptive antifungal therapy in preventing proven candidiasis in critically ill surgical patients. Before/after intervention study, with 2-yr prospective and 2-yr historical control cohorts. Surgical intensive care unit (SICU) in a university-affiliated hospital. Nine hundred and thirty-three patients, 478 in the prospective group and 455 in the control group, with SICU stay > or =5 days. During the prospective period, systematic mycological screening was performed on all patients admitted to the SICU, immediately at admittance and then weekly until discharge. A corrected colonization index was used to assess intensity of Candida mucosal colonization. Patients with corrected colonization index > or =0.4 received early preemptive antifungal therapy (fluconazole intravenously: loading dose 800 mg, then 400 mg/day for 2 wks). End points of this study were the frequency of proven candidiasis, especially SICU-acquired candidiasis. During the retrospective period, 32 patients of 455 (7%) presented with proven candidiasis: 22 (4.8%) were imported and 10 (2.2%) were SICU-acquired cases. During the prospective period, 96 patients with corrected colonization index > or =0.4 of 478 received preemptive antifungal treatment and only 18 cases (3.8%) of proven candidiasis were diagnosed; all were imported infections. Candida infections occurred more frequently in the control cohort (7% vs. 3.8%; p = .03). Incidence of SICU-acquired proven candidiasis significantly decreased from 2.2% to 0% (p test). Incidence of proven imported candidiasis remained unchanged (4.8% vs. 3.8%; p = .42). No emergence of azole-resistant Candida species (especially Candida glabrata, Candida krusei) was noted during the prospective period. Targeted preemptive strategy may efficiently prevent acquisition of proven candidiasis in SICU patients. Further studies are being performed to assess cost-effectiveness of this strategy and its impact on selection of azole

  1. Comparison of two in vitro antifungal sensitivity tests and monitoring during therapy of Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto in Malaysian cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hock Siew; Kano, Rui; Chen, Charles; Noli, Chiara

    2017-02-01

    Feline sporotrichosis is common in Malaysia. Thermosensitivity and effects of azole treatment on fungal susceptibility are unknown. To evaluate thermotolerance and antifungal susceptibility of feline Malaysian Sporothrix isolates, compare microdilution (MD) and E-test results, and investigate changes in susceptibility during azole therapy. Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto was isolated from 44 cats. Thermotolerance was determined via culture at 37°C for 7 days. Susceptibility to itraconazole (ITZ), ketoconazole (KTZ) and terbinafine (TRB) was assessed in 40 isolates by MD; to amphotericin B (AMB), KTZ, ITZ, fluconazole (FLC) and posaconazole (POS) by E-test. Results were statistically compared by Pearson's Product Moment. In eight ketoconazole treated cats, susceptibility testing to itraconazole and ketoconazole was repeated every two months for six months. Thermotolerance was observed in 36 of 44 (82%) isolates. Assuming that isolates growing at antifungal concentrations ≥4 mg/mL were resistant, all were resistant on E-test to FLC and AMB, 11 (28%) to POS, 6 (15%) to ITZ and 1 (3%) to KTZ. On MD, 27 of 40 (68%) were resistant to TRB, 2 (5%) to ITZ and 3 (8%) to KTZ. There was no correlation between E-test and MD results (KTZ r = 0.10, P = 0.54, and ITZ r = 0.11, P = 0.48). MD values for ITZ and KTZ did not exceed 4 mg/L during KTZ therapy. The majority of feline isolates in Malaysia are thermosensitive. Lack of correlation between E-test and MD suggests that the E-test is unreliable to test antifungal susceptibility for Sporothrix spp. compared to MD. KTZ was the antifungal drug with the lowest MIC. Prolonged KTZ administration may not induce changes in antifungal susceptibility. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  2. Structural and Functional Elucidation of Yeast Lanosterol 14α-Demethylase in Complex with Agrochemical Antifungals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagatova, Alia A.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Negroni, Jacopo; Wilson, Rajni K.; Woods, Matthew A.; Monk, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Azole antifungals, known as demethylase inhibitors (DMIs), target sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway of fungal pathogens of both plants and humans. DMIs remain the treatment of choice in crop protection against a wide range of fungal phytopathogens that have the potential to reduce crop yields and threaten food security. We used a yeast membrane protein expression system to overexpress recombinant hexahistidine-tagged S. cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase and the Y140F or Y140H mutants of this enzyme as surrogates in order characterize interactions with DMIs. The whole-cell antifungal activity (MIC50 values) of both the R- and S-enantiomers of tebuconazole, prothioconazole (PTZ), prothioconazole-desthio, and oxo-prothioconazole (oxo-PTZ) as well as for fluquinconazole, prochloraz and a racemic mixture of difenoconazole were determined. In vitro binding studies with the affinity purified enzyme were used to show tight type II binding to the yeast enzyme for all compounds tested except PTZ and oxo-PTZ. High resolution X-ray crystal structures of ScErg11p6×His in complex with seven DMIs, including four enantiomers, reveal triazole-mediated coordination of all compounds and the specific orientation of compounds within the relatively hydrophobic binding site. Comparison with CYP51 structures from fungal pathogens including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Aspergillus fumigatus provides strong evidence for a highly conserved CYP51 structure including the drug binding site. The structures obtained using S. cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase in complex with these agrochemicals provide the basis for understanding the impact of mutations on azole susceptibility and a platform for the structure-directed design of the next-generation of DMIs. PMID:27907120

  3. Evaluation of Virulence FactorsIn vitro, Resistance to Osmotic Stress and Antifungal Susceptibility ofCandida tropicalisIsolated from the Coastal Environment of Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza-Alves, Diana L; de Medeiros, Sayama S T Q; de Souza, Luanda B F C; Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison P; Francisco, Elaine C; de Araújo, Maria C B; Lima-Neto, Reginaldo G; Neves, Rejane P; Melo, Analy S de Azevedo; Chaves, Guilherme M

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have been developed regarding human health risks associated with the recreational use of beaches contaminated with domestic sewage. These wastes contain various micro-organisms, including Candida tropicalis . In this context, the objective of this study was to characterize C. tropicalis isolates from the sandy beach of Ponta Negra, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, regarding the expression of in vitro virulence factors, adaptation to osmotic stress and susceptibility to antifungal drugs. We analyzed 62 environmental isolates and observed a great variation among them for the various virulence factors evaluated. In general, environmental isolates were more adherent to human buccal epithelial cells (HBEC) than C. tropicalis ATCC13803 reference strain, and they also showed increased biofilm production. Most of the isolates presented wrinkled phenotypes on Spider medium (34 isolates, 54.8%). The majority of the isolates also showed higher proteinase production than control strains, but low phospholipase activity. In addition, 35 isolates (56.4%) had high hemolytic activity (hemolysis index > 0.55). With regard to C. tropicalis resistance to osmotic stress, 85.4% of the isolates were able to grow in a liquid medium containing 15% sodium chloride. The strains were highly resistant to the azoles tested (fluconazole, voriconazole and itraconazole). Fifteen strains were resistant to the three azoles tested (24.2%). Some strains were also resistant to amphotericin B (14 isolates; 22.6%), while all of them were susceptible for the echinocandins tested, except for a single strain of intermediate susceptibility to micafungin. Our results demonstrate that C. tropicalis isolated from the sand can fully express virulence attributes and showed a high persistence capacity on the coastal environment; in addition of showing high minimal inhibitory concentrations to several antifungal drugs used in current clinical practice, demonstrating that environmental isolates

  4. Effects of a triazole fungicide and a pyrethroid insecticide on the decomposition of leaves in the presence or absence of macroinvertebrate shredders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jes Jessen; Monberg, Rikke Juul; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Cedergreen, Nina; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Strobel, Bjarne; Kronvang, Brian

    2012-08-15

    Previously, laboratory experiments have revealed that freely diluted azole fungicides potentiate the direct toxic effect of pyrethroid insecticides on Daphnia magna. More ecologically relevant exposure scenarios where pesticides are adsorbed have not been addressed. In this study we exposed beech leaves (Fagus sylvatica) to the azole fungicide propiconazole (50 or 500 μg L(-1)), the pyrethroid insecticide alpha-cypermethrin (0.1 or 1 μg L(-1)) or any combination of the two for 3h. Exposed leaves were transferred to aquaria with or without an assemblage of macroinvertebrate shredders, and we studied treatment effects on rates of microbial leaf decomposition, microbial biomass (using C:N ratio as a surrogate measure) and macroinvertebrate shredding activity during 26 days post-exposure. Microbial leaf decomposition rates were significantly reduced in the propiconazole treatments, and the reduction in microbial activity was significantly correlated with loss of microbial biomass (increased C:N ratio). Macroinvertebrate shredding activity was significantly reduced in the alpha-cypermethrin treatments. In addition, the macroinvertebrate assemblage responded to the propiconazole treatments by increasing their consumption of leaf litter with lower microbial biomass, probably to compensate for the reduced nutritional quality of this leaf litter. We found no interaction between the two pesticides on macroinvertebrate shredding activity, using Independent Action as a reference model. In terms of microbial leaf decomposition rates, however, alpha-cypermethrin acted as an antagonist on propiconazole. Based on these results we emphasise the importance of considering indirect effects of pesticides in the risk assessment of surface water ecosystems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Direct molecular diagnosis of aspergillosis and CYP51A profiling from respiratory samples of French patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microbiological diagnosis of aspergillosis and triazole resistance is limited by poor culture yield. To better estimate this shortcoming, we compared culture and molecular detection of A. fumigatus in respiratory samples from French patients at risk for aspergillosis. Methods: A total of 97 respiratory samples including bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL, bronchial aspirates (BA, tracheal aspirates, sputa, pleural fluids, and lung biopsy were collected from 33 patients having invasive aspergillosis (n=12, chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (n=3, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (n=7 or colonization (n=11 and 28 controls. Each specimen was evaluated by culture, pan-Aspergillus qPCR, and CYP51A PCR and sequencing. Results: One A. flavus and 19 A. fumigatus with one multiazole resistant strain (5.3% were cultured from 20 samples. Culture positivity was 62.5%, 75%, 42.9%, and 15.8% in ABPA, CPA, IA and colonized patients, respectively. Aspergillus detection rate was significantly higher by pan-Aspergillus qPCR than by culture in IA (90.5% vs 42.9%; P<0.05 and colonization group (73.7% vs 15.8%; P<0.05. The CYP51A PCR found one TR34/L98H along with 5 novel cyp51A mutations (4 non-synonymous and 1 promoter mutations, yet no association can be established currently between these novel mutations and azole resistance. The analysis of 11 matched pairs of BA and BAL samples found that 9/11 BA carried greater fungal load than BAL and CYP51A detection was more sensitive in BA than in BAL. Conclusion: Direct molecular detection of Aspergillus spp. and azole resistance markers are useful adjunct tools for comprehensive aspergillosis diagnosis. The observed superior diagnostic value of BAs to BAL fluids warrants more in-depth study.

  6. Vaginitis: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladine, Heather L; Desai, Urmi A

    2018-03-01

    Vaginitis is defined as any condition with symptoms of abnormal vaginal discharge, odor, irritation, itching, or burning. The most common causes of vaginitis are bacterial vaginosis, vulvovaginal candidiasis, and trichomoniasis. Bacterial vaginosis is implicated in 40% to 50% of cases when a cause is identified, with vulvovaginal candidiasis accounting for 20% to 25% and trichomoniasis for 15% to 20% of cases. Noninfectious causes, including atrophic, irritant, allergic, and inflammatory vaginitis, are less common and account for 5% to 10% of vaginitis cases. Diagnosis is made using a combination of symptoms, physical examination findings, and office-based or laboratory testing. Bacterial vaginosis is traditionally diagnosed with Amsel criteria, although Gram stain is the diagnostic standard. Newer laboratory tests that detect Gardnerella vaginalis DNA or vaginal fluid sialidase activity have similar sensitivity and specificity to Gram stain. Bacterial vaginosis is treated with oral metronidazole, intravaginal metronidazole, or intravaginal clindamycin. The diagnosis of vulvovaginal candidiasis is made using a combination of clinical signs and symptoms with potassium hydroxide microscopy; DNA probe testing is also available. Culture can be helpful for the diagnosis of complicated vulvovaginal candidiasis by identifying nonalbicans strains of Candida. Treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis involves oral fluconazole or topical azoles, although only topical azoles are recommended during pregnancy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends nucleic acid amplification testing for the diagnosis of trichomoniasis in symptomatic or high-risk women. Trichomoniasis is treated with oral metronidazole or tinidazole, and patients' sex partners should be treated as well. Treatment of noninfectious vaginitis should be directed at the underlying cause. Atrophic vaginitis is treated with hormonal and nonhormonal therapies. Inflammatory vaginitis may improve with

  7. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical species belonging to Aspergillus genus and Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuei, R; Khodavaisy, S; Rezaie, S; Sharifynia, S

    2016-03-01

    Among filamentous fungal pathogens, Aspergillus spp. and zygomycetes account for highest rates of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. Recently developed antifungal drugs offer the potential to improve management and therapeutic outcomes of fungal infections. The aim of this study was to analyse the in vitro activities of voriconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin against clinical isolates of Aspergillus spp. and Rhizopus oryzae. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility of 54 isolates belonging to different clinical isolates of Aspergillus spp. and R. oryzae was tested for four antifungal agents using a microdilution reference method (CLSI, M38-A2). All isolates were identified by typical colony and microscopic characteristics, and also characterized by molecular methods. Caspofungin (MEC range: 0.008-0.25 and MEC50: 0.0023μg/mL) was the most active drug in vitro against Aspergillus spp., followed by voriconazole (MIC range: 0.031-8 and MIC50: 0.5μg/mL), itraconazole (MIC range: 0.031-16 and MIC50: 0.25μg/mL), and amphotericin B (MIC range: 0.125-4 and MIC50: 0.5μg/mL), in order of decreasing activity. The caspofungin, voriconazole, and itraconazole demonstrated poor in vitro activity against R. oryzae isolates evaluated, followed by amphotericin B. This study demonstrates that caspofungin had good antifungal activity and azole agents had better activity than amphotericin B against Aspergillus species. Although, azole drugs are considered ineffective against R. oryzae. This result is just from a small scale in vitro susceptibility study and we did not take other factors into consideration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Genomic Analysis of the Basal Lineage Fungus Rhizopus oryzae Reveals a Whole-Genome Duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Jun; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Skory, Christopher; Grabherr, Manfred G.; Burger, Gertraud; Butler, Margi; Elias, Marek; Idnurm, Alexander; Lang, B. Franz; Sone, Teruo; Abe, Ayumi; Calvo, Sarah E.; Corrochano, Luis M.; Engels, Reinhard; Fu, Jianmin; Hansberg, Wilhelm; Kim, Jung-Mi; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Koehrsen, Michael J.; Liu, Bo; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; O'Leary, Sinead; Ortiz-Castellanos, Lucila; Poulter, Russell; Rodriguez-Romero, Julio; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Shen, Yao-Qing; Zeng, Qiandong; Galagan, James; Birren, Bruce W.

    2009-01-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is the primary cause of mucormycosis, an emerging, life-threatening infection characterized by rapid angioinvasive growth with an overall mortality rate that exceeds 50%. As a representative of the paraphyletic basal group of the fungal kingdom called “zygomycetes,” R. oryzae is also used as a model to study fungal evolution. Here we report the genome sequence of R. oryzae strain 99–880, isolated from a fatal case of mucormycosis. The highly repetitive 45.3 Mb genome assembly contains abundant transposable elements (TEs), comprising approximately 20% of the genome. We predicted 13,895 protein-coding genes not overlapping TEs, many of which are paralogous gene pairs. The order and genomic arrangement of the duplicated gene pairs and their common phylogenetic origin provide evidence for an ancestral whole-genome duplication (WGD) event. The WGD resulted in the duplication of nearly all subunits of the protein complexes associated with respiratory electron transport chains, the V-ATPase, and the ubiquitin–proteasome systems. The WGD, together with recent gene duplications, resulted in the expansion of multiple gene families related to cell growth and signal transduction, as well as secreted aspartic protease and subtilase protein families, which are known fungal virulence factors. The duplication of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway, especially the major azole target, lanosterol 14α-demethylase (ERG11), could contribute to the variable responses of R. oryzae to different azole drugs, including voriconazole and posaconazole. Expanded families of cell-wall synthesis enzymes, essential for fungal cell integrity but absent in mammalian hosts, reveal potential targets for novel and R. oryzae-specific diagnostic and therapeutic treatments. PMID:19578406

  9. Evaluation of Virulence Factors In vitro, Resistance to Osmotic Stress and Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida tropicalis Isolated from the Coastal Environment of Northeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza-Alves, Diana L.; de Medeiros, Sayama S. T. Q.; de Souza, Luanda B. F. C.; Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison P.; Francisco, Elaine C.; de Araújo, Maria C. B.; Lima-Neto, Reginaldo G.; Neves, Rejane P.; Melo, Analy S. de Azevedo; Chaves, Guilherme M.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have been developed regarding human health risks associated with the recreational use of beaches contaminated with domestic sewage. These wastes contain various micro-organisms, including Candida tropicalis. In this context, the objective of this study was to characterize C. tropicalis isolates from the sandy beach of Ponta Negra, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, regarding the expression of in vitro virulence factors, adaptation to osmotic stress and susceptibility to antifungal drugs. We analyzed 62 environmental isolates and observed a great variation among them for the various virulence factors evaluated. In general, environmental isolates were more adherent to human buccal epithelial cells (HBEC) than C. tropicalis ATCC13803 reference strain, and they also showed increased biofilm production. Most of the isolates presented wrinkled phenotypes on Spider medium (34 isolates, 54.8%). The majority of the isolates also showed higher proteinase production than control strains, but low phospholipase activity. In addition, 35 isolates (56.4%) had high hemolytic activity (hemolysis index > 0.55). With regard to C. tropicalis resistance to osmotic stress, 85.4% of the isolates were able to grow in a liquid medium containing 15% sodium chloride. The strains were highly resistant to the azoles tested (fluconazole, voriconazole and itraconazole). Fifteen strains were resistant to the three azoles tested (24.2%). Some strains were also resistant to amphotericin B (14 isolates; 22.6%), while all of them were susceptible for the echinocandins tested, except for a single strain of intermediate susceptibility to micafungin. Our results demonstrate that C. tropicalis isolated from the sand can fully express virulence attributes and showed a high persistence capacity on the coastal environment; in addition of showing high minimal inhibitory concentrations to several antifungal drugs used in current clinical practice, demonstrating that environmental isolates may

  10. Stairway to Heaven or Hell? Perspectives and Limitations of Chagas Disease Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomao, Kelly; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo Sadok; de Castro, Solange Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we intend to provide a general view of the evolution of experimental studies in the area of chemotherapy for Chagas disease. We can follow the process of drug development through three phases. The first phase began almost at the same time as the discovery made by Carlos Chagas and proceeds to 1970, during which time an extensive list of compounds was subjected to preclinical and clinical trials. The second phase began with the introduction of nifurtimox and benznidazole into the clinical setting, followed with the search for alternative drugs. In this phase, a dichotomy existed between rational and empirical approaches in preclinical studies. The third phase began with the unravelling of the T. cruzi genome. The development of transgenic parasites has allowed the development of solid HTS protocols, and the establishment of bioluminescent T. cruzi has allowed in vivo drug evaluations using a reduced number of animals. Among the wide variety of compounds subjected to preclinical studies, we have discovered azolic and non-azolic inhibitors of sterol C14α-demethylase (CYP51) and nitro compounds. Two compounds evaluated during the second phase, namely, MK-436 and allopurinol, could be revisited. Clinical studies of posaconazole and E1224 yielded disappointing results, and it is critical to understand the reason for their failure as a monotherapy. Currently, the combination and repositioning of drugs with different mechanisms of action are complementary approaches. The use of drug combinations, particularly those of nitro compounds with CYP51 inhibitors, is considered a real alternative for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  11. Synthesis, Single Crystal X-ray Analysis, and Antifungal Profiling of Certain New Oximino Ethers Bearing Imidazole Nuclei

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    Reem I. Al-Wabli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections threaten human health, particularly in immune-compromised patients worldwide. Although there are a large number of antifungal agents available, the desired clinical attributes for the treatment of fungal infections have not yet been achieved. Azoles are the mainstay class of the clinically used antifungal agents. In the current study, the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and antifungal activity of certain new oximino ethers Va–n bearing imidazole nuclei are reported. The (E-configuration of the imine double bond of the synthesized compounds Va–n has been confirmed via single crystal X-ray analysis of compound Vi as a representative example of this class of compounds. The molecular structure of compound Vi was crystallized in the monoclinic, P21/c, a = 18.7879(14 Å, b = 5.8944(4 Å, c = 16.7621(12 Å, β = 93.063(3°, V = 1855.5(2 Å3, Z = 4. The in vitro antifungal activity of the synthesized compounds Va–n were evaluated using diameter of the inhibition zone (DIZ and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC assays against different fungal strains. Compound Ve manifested anti-Candida albicans activity with an MIC value of 0.050 µmol/mL, being almost equipotent with the reference antifungal drug fluconazole (FLC,while compounds Vi and Vn are the most active congeners against Candida parapsilosis, being equipotent and about twenty-three times more potent than FLC with an MIC value of 0.002 µmol/mL. The results of the current report might support the development of new potent and safer antifungal azoles.

  12. Clinico-mycological and Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Candiduria in A Tertiary Care Hospital From South India

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    Dinoop Korol Ponnambath

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Candida is one of the common causative agent of Urinary Tract Infections (UTI worldwide. The most common reported species causing UTI is Candida albicans. Incidence of UTI due to non-albicans Candida species. is on rise in recent years because of their better adaptability and increased resistance to antifungals. Susceptibility profile reports of various Candida species. to newer azoles like voriconazole and betaglucan inhibitors (e.g., caspofungin are deficient in India, since the reference broth microdilution method is not widely utilized. In this study, a rapid reliable and easier alternative, VITEK 2 compact system was utilized to determine the antifungal susceptibility profile. Aim: To analyse the clinical and mycological profile with determination of drug susceptibility pattern of Candida isolates from urine samples. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in PSG Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, during April to September 2015. Candida isolated with a colony count of ≥103 CFU/ml of urine from clinically suspected cases of UTI were included in the study. Urine samples (n=3821 from clinically suspected UTI cases (n=3821 were subjected to microscopic examination and semi quantitative estimation of yeast culture obtained by inoculated of calibrated volume of urine onto blood, Mac-conkey and HiCrome UTI agar. Clinical parameters of the cases were obtained for analysis. Speciation of Candida was performed using germ tube test, observation of morphology in corn-meal agar and pigment production in HiChrome Candida differential agar. Confirmation of the species identification and anti-fungal susceptibility profile were obtained using VITEK-2 compact system. Results: Total 101 patients were identified with significant candiduria. Community-Acquired Candiduria (CAC was seen in 11 (10.8% of the cases. 23 (22.7% cases of candiduria were associated with pyuria. Concomitant candidemia was observed in 4 (3

  13. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

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    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  14. Antifungal agents. 10. New derivatives of 1-[(aryl)[4-aryl-1H-pyrrol-3-yl]methyl]-1H-imidazole, synthesis, anti-candida activity, and quantitative structure-analysis relationship studies.

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    Tafi, Andrea; Costi, Roberta; Botta, Maurizio; Di Santo, Roberto; Corelli, Federico; Massa, Silvio; Ciacci, Andrea; Manetti, Fabrizio; Artico, Marino

    2002-06-20

    The synthesis, anti-Candida activity, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies of a series of 2,4-dichlorobenzylimidazole derivatives having a phenylpyrrole moiety (related to the antibiotic pyrrolnitrin) in the alpha-position are reported. A number of substituents on the phenyl ring, ranging from hydrophobic (tert-butyl, phenyl, or 1-pyrrolyl moiety) to basic (NH(2)), polar (CF(3), CN, SCH(3), NO(2)), or hydrogen bond donors and acceptor (OH) groups, were chosen to better understand the interaction of these compounds with cytochrome P450 14-alpha-lanosterol demethylase (P450(14DM)). Finally, the triazole counterpart of one of the imidazole compounds was synthesized and tested to investigate influence of the heterocyclic ring on biological activity. The in vitro antifungal activities of the newly synthesized azoles 10p-v,x-c' were tested against Candida albicans and Candida spp. at pH 7.2 and pH 5.6. A CoMFA model, previously derived for a series of antifungal agents belonging to chemically diverse families related to bifonazole, was applied to the new products. Because the results produced by this approach were not encouraging, Catalyst software was chosen to perform a new 3D-QSAR study. Catalyst was preferred this time because of the possibility of considering each compound as a collection of energetically reasonable conformations and of considering alternative stereoisomers. The pharmacophore model developed by Catalyst, named HYPO1, showed good performances in predicting the biological activity data, although it did not exhibit an unequivocal preference for one enantiomeric series of inhibitors relative to the other. One aromatic nitrogen with a lone pair in the ring plane (mapped by all of the considered compounds) and three aromatic ring features were recognized to have pharmacophoric relevance, whereas neither hydrogen bond acceptor nor hydrophobic features were found. These findings confirmed that the key interaction of azole

  15. Visible Light Photocatalysis for the Generation and Use of Reactive Azolyl and Polyfluoroaryl Intermediates.

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    Arora, Amandeep; Weaver, Jimmie D

    2016-10-18

    Photocatalysis offers several mechanistically unique pathways that are not rivaled by mainstream catalysis. Primarily, the ability to convert photochemical energy into single electron oxidation and reduction events provides a new dimension for chemists to consider when choosing how to activate a molecule or approach a complex synthesis. Since most organic molecules do not absorb light in the visible region, they are impervious to direct visible light photochemistry, which provides an opportunity for photocatalysis in which a visible light absorbing compound can serve as a mediator. In this Account, we discuss the consequences of catalyst mediated, photoinduced electron transfer to several classes of reducible arenes. While the bulk of the work discussed within this Account utilizes iridium-based photocatalysts, in principle the chemistry is not limited to this class of photocatalyst, and the principles should be more general. Instead, this Account focuses largely on the consequences of single electron transfer to poly- and perfluorinated arenes and 2-halo azoles. Electron transfer converts these stable molecules into reactive intermediates whose behavior often depends entirely on the identity of the halogen that undergoes substitution. The result is both diverse chemistry and an alternative way of thinking about the chemical reactivity of these motifs. Specifically, we discuss our efforts and those of others to develop strategies for the generation of radicals or radical anions from perfluoroarenes and azoles and the behavior of these intermediates as implied by reactions in which they participate. The divergent pathway is illustrated by 2-bromoazoles, which yield azolyl radicals and can be utilized for addition to π-bonds, while use of the 2-chloroazole substrate leads to an entirely different reaction profile. Under the appropriate reaction conditions, the reactive and transient intermediates are useful coupling partners and often provide unrivaled access to new

  16. PENINGKATAN KELARUTAN KETOKONAZOL DENGAN TEKNIK DISPERSI PADAT MENGGUNAKAN EUDRAGIT® E 100

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    Angga Cipta Narsa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ketoconazole is an antifungal azole synthetic which derivatived from imidazole. Ketoconazole is practically insoluble in water and its bioavailability depend on pH condition of the gastrointestinal tract. The purpose of the research is to increase the solubility of ketoconazole by solid dispersion method using Eudragit® E 100, PEG 6000, and glycerol. Solid dispersion was evaluated with respect to solubility, cristalinity, complexation and morphology of solid dispersion. The optimum formulation with the highest solubility was resulted by solid dispersion with ratio ketoconazole - Eudragit® E 100 - glycerol of 1:8:0.5. X-ray diffraction test revealed the change of crystalline ketoconazole and similar to Eudragit® E 100. This result was also supported by spectrum of infrared and endothermic peak of differential scanning calorimetry. Based on scanning electron microscopy morphology of pure Eudragit® E 100 and solid dispersion was similar. Solid dispersion of ketoconazole with Eudragit® E 100 and glycerol improved solubilty. Keywords : ketoconazole, solid dispersion, Eudragit® E 100   ABSTRAK Ketokonazol merupakan zat antijamur sintetik golongan azol yang merupakan turunan imidazol.Ketokonazol praktis tidak larut dalam air dan ketersediaan hayati melalui rute oral sangat beragam tergantung dari kondisi pH saluran pencernaan.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan kelarutan ketokonazol dengan cara pembuatan dispersi padat mengunakan Eudragit® E 100, PEG 6000, serta gliserol. Dispersi padat di evaluasi dengan uji kelarutan jenuh, kristalinitas, kompleksasi, dan morfologinya.Formula optimal dengan peningkatan kelarutan tertinggi dihasilkan oleh perbandingan dispersi padat ketokonazol - Eudragit® E 100 - gliserol 1:8:0,5. Pengujian difraksi sinar-X menunjukkan adanya perubahan kristalinitas ketokonazol yaitu sama seperti Eudragit® E 100.Hasil ini juga didukung oleh hasil pengujian spetkrofotometer infra merah dan puncak endotermik

  17. Antifungal activity of a prenylated flavonoid from Dalea elegans against Candida albicans biofilms.

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    Peralta, Mariana Andrea; da Silva, María Angel; Ortega, María Gabriela; Cabrera, José Luis; Paraje, María Gabriela

    2015-10-15

    The continuing emergence of infections with antifungal resistant Candida strains requires a constant search for new antifungal drugs, with the plant kingdom being an important source of chemical structures. The present study investigated the antifungal effect of 2',4'-dihydroxy-5'-(1''',1'''-dimethylallyl)-8-prenylpinocembrin (8PP, formerly 6PP), a natural prenylflavonoid, on Candida albicans biofilms, and compared this with an azole antifungal (fluconazole) by studying the cellular stress and antioxidant response. The fluconazole sensitive (SCa) and azole-resistant (RCa) C. albicans strains were used, with biofilm formation being studied using crystal violet (CV) and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The minimal inhibitory concentration for sessile cells (SMIC) was defined as the concentration of antifungal that caused a 50% (SMIC 50) and 80% (SMIC 80) reduction of treated biofilms. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT), and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) were determined by the Griess assay. The activities of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) antioxidant enzymes and the total antioxidant capacity of the biofilms were measured by spectrophotometric methods. ROS accumulation was also detected inside biofilms by using the fluorogenic dye 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), which was visualized by CSLM. The SCa and RCa biofilms were strongly inhibited by 8PP at 100 µM (SMIC 80). We observed that cellular stress affected biofilms growth, resulting in an increase of ROS and also of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI), with SOD and CAT being increased significantly in the presence of 8PP. The basal level of the biofilm total antioxidant capacity was higher in RCa than SCa. Moreover, in SCa, the total antioxidant capacity rose considerably in the presence of both 8PP and fluconazole. Our data suggest that 8PP may be useful for the treatment of biofilm

  18. Úlcera de lengua como presentación del Histoplasma capsulatum Tongue ulceration as a presentation of Histoplasma capsulatum infection

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    E J Carbó Amoroso

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available La histoplasmosis diseminada progresiva es una enfermedad que se manifiesta como reactivación de una infección latente en pacientes inmunodeprimidos, especialmente en personas con déficit en la inmunidad celular. Existen formas agudas, subagudas y crónicas. Las lesiones focales, en especial úlceras mucocutáneas, predominan en la forma diseminada crónica. Reportamos el caso de una paciente con artritis reumatoidea, que controlaba su patología con fármacos antirreumáticos modificadores de la enfermedad (DMARD, la que consultó por úlcera de lengua como única manifestación de una histoplasmosis diseminada crónica. La histopatología fue compatible y el cultivo positivo para Histoplasma capsulatum. La serología para el HIV fue negativa. Existen pocos casos publicados de pacientes con esta localización atípica en forma aislada, en particular aquellos HIV negativos. El itraconazol y la anfotericina B son las dos drogas más utilizadas para tratar esta enfermedad. Los datos clínicos sobre los nuevos azoles, voriconazol y posaconazol son limitados.The progressive disseminated histoplasmosis is a disease produced by reactivation of latent infection in immunocompromised host, specially in persons with defective cell-mediated immunity. There are acute, subacute and chronic forms in the progressive illness. Focal lesions, specially mucocutaneous ulcers, are most frequent in the chronic disseminated forms. We reported a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD, with an ulcer of the tongue as only clinical manifestation of a chronic disseminated histoplasmosis. The histopathology was compatible, and the culture was positive for Histoplasma capsulatum. The serology for the HIV was negative. There are few published cases of this isolated form, particularly in patients with HIV negative serological test. Itraconazole and amphotericin B are the most frequently drugs used for the treatment in this

  19. Comparison of Two Molecular Assays for Detection and Characterization of Aspergillus fumigatus Triazole Resistance and Cyp51A Mutations in Clinical Isolates and Primary Clinical Samples of Immunocompromised Patients

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    Patricia Postina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In hematological patients, the incidence of invasive aspergillosis (IA caused by azole resistant Aspergillus fumigatus (ARAf is rising. As the diagnosis of IA is rarely based on positive culture in this group of patients, molecular detection of resistance mutations directly from clinical samples is crucial. In addition to the in-house azole resistance ARAf polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays detecting the frequent mutation combinations TR34/L98H, TR46/Y121F/T289A, and M220 in the Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus Cyp51A gene by subsequent DNA sequence analysis, we investigated in parallel the commercially available AsperGenius® real time PCR system in detecting the Cyp51A alterations TR34/L98H and Y121F/T289A directly from 52 clinical samples (15 biopsies, 22 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, 15 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples and ARAf isolates (n = 3 of immunocompromised patients. We analyzed DNA aliquots and compared both methods concerning amplification and detection of Aspergillus DNA and Cyp51A alterations. As positive control for the feasibility of our novel Y121F and T289A PCR assays, we used two A. fumigatus isolates with the TR46/Y121F/T289A mutation combination isolated from hematological patients with known Cyp51A alterations and a lung biopsy sample of a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The rate of positive ARAf PCR results plus successful sequencing using the ARAf PCR assays was 61% in biopsies, 29% in CSF, 67% in BAL samples and 100% in isolates. In comparison the amount of positive PCRs using the AsperGenius® assays was 47% in biopsies, 42% in CSF, 59% in BAL samples and 100% in isolates. Altogether 17 Cyp51A alterations were detected using our ARAf PCRs plus DNA sequencing and therefrom 10 alterations also by the AsperGenius® system. The comparative evaluation of our data revealed that our conventional PCR assays are more sensitive in detecting ARAf in BAL and biopsy samples, whereby differences were not significant

  20. Overcoming the heterologous bias: An in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika [Membrane Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Sanglard, Dominique [Institut de Microbiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Prasad, Rajendra, E-mail: rp47jnu@gmail.com [Membrane Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} First report to demonstrate an in vivo expression system of an ABC multidrug transporter CgCdr1p of C. glabrata. {yields} First report on the structure and functional characterization of CgCdr1p. {yields} Functional conservation of divergent but typical residues of CgCdr1p. {yields} CgCdr1p elicits promiscuity towards substrates and has a large drug binding pocket with overlapping specificities. -- Abstract: We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplished by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the arte-factual concerns

  1. [Genotyping of Vaginal Candida glabrata Isolates Using Microsatellite Marker Analysis and DNA Sequencing to Identify Mutations Associated with Antifungal Resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döğen, Aylin; Durukan, Hüseyin; Güzel, Ahmet Barış; Oksüz, Zehra; Kaplan, Engin; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Serin, Ayşe; Emekdaş, Gürol; Aslan, Gönül; Tezcan, Seda; Kalkancı, Ayşe; Ilkit, Macit

    2013-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidosis is the second most common cause of vaginitis (17-39%) after bacterial vaginosis (22-50%). Since the diagnosis of vulvovaginal candidosis mainly depends on clinical findings without mycologic confirmatory tests and treated empirically, the actual incidence rate of vulvovaginal candidosis is unknown. Approximately 70-90% of vulvovaginal candidosis cases are caused by Candida albicans, however the increasing incidence of C.glabrata infections and its reduced susceptibility to azole drug therapy have generated increasing attention. The epidemiology and population structure of vulvovaginal candidosis due to C.glabrata are poorly characterized. This study was aimed to genotype the C.glabrata strains isolated from vaginal samples in Cukurova region, Turkey by microsatellite markers, to investigate the antifungal susceptibility profiles of the strains and to determine the molecular mechanisms leading to phenotypical azole resistance. A total of 34 unrelated vaginal C.glabrata strains isolated from patients with acute (n= 11) and recurrent (n= 14) vulvovaginal candidosis, control group (n= 9) without vaginitis symptoms, and a reference strain of C.glabrata CBS 138 (ATCC 2001) were included in the study. These isolates were genotyped using multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis of three microsatellite markers (RPM2, MTI, and Cg6). Analysis of microsatellite markers was performed by fragment size determination of RPM2, MTI, and Cg6 PCR products through capillary electrophoresis. For each of the evaluated strains, DNA sequence analysis was performed for one gene (CgERG11) and four loci (CgPDR1, NTM1, TRP1, and URA3) to detect mutations possibly associated with antifungal resistance in each strain. In vitro susceptibility profiles of the strains to 13 antifungals and boric acid were determined according to CLSI document M27-A3 to investigate possible relationships between detected mutations and phenotypic resistance. C.glabrata CBS 138

  2. AKTIVITAS ANTIFUNGI FRAKSI ETILASETAT AKAR SINGAWALANG (PETIVERIA ALLIACEA L. TERHADAP ASPERGILLUS NIGER

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    Niken Indriyanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus niger is a mold that can infect respiratory tract in certain condition. Azoles are used to solve this infection. Drug development on antifungal drugs still continued, one of the resorce is from plant. A plant that widely studied as antifungi is singawalang (Petiveria alliacea L.. Activity of ethanol extract and fraction of singawalang roots on Aspergillus niger tested by microdilution broth method appropriate to Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI standard. Microdilution test results showed that Singawalang roots extract has antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger with Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC 32 μg/mL and Minimum Fungicidal Concentration (MFC 1048 μg/mL. Fraction that has high activity against Aspergillus niger was ethylacetate fraction of Singawalang roots with MIC 128 µg/ml dan MFC 512 μg/mL. The higher activity of the extract than the fraction was predicted as the impact of multiple compounds that have synergic activity. The growth profile of Aspergillus niger showed unconstant result and tends to descend. However, further research needed to ensure this effect.   Keywords:    antifungal, microdilution, singawalang (Petiveria alliacea L., Aspergillus niger      ABSTRAK   Aspergillus niger merupakan kapang penginfeksi saluran pernafasan pada kondisi tertentu. Obat-obat golongan azol biasa digunakan untuk mengatasi infeksi ini. Pengembangan obat antifungi saat ini terus dilakukan, termasuk dari tanaman. Salah satu tanaman yang telah banyak diteliti memiliki efek antifungi adalah tanaman singawalang (Petiveria alliacea L.. Pengujian dilakukan dengan Broth Microdilution sesuai standar Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI. Ekstrak akar singawalang menghambat pertumbuhan Aspergillus niger dan memiliki KHM 32 ppm dan KFM 1048 ppm. Hasil dan Fraksi Ekstrak Akar Singawalang Terhadap Aspergillus niger pada fraksi etilasetat ekstrak etanol akar singawalang adalah Konsentrasi Hambat

  3. Triazole Fungicides Can Induce Cross-Resistance to Medical Triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karawajczyk, Anna; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Kema, Gert H. J.; van der Lee, Henrich A.; Klaassen, Corné H.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Azoles play an important role in the management of Aspergillus diseases. Azole resistance is an emerging global problem in Aspergillus fumigatus, and may develop through patient therapy. In addition, an environmental route of resistance development has been suggested through exposure to 14α-demethylase inhibitors (DMIs). The main resistance mechanism associated with this putative fungicide-driven route is a combination of alterations in the Cyp51A-gene (TR34/L98H). We investigated if TR34/L98H could have developed through exposure to DMIs. Methods and Findings Thirty-one compounds that have been authorized for use as fungicides, herbicides, herbicide safeners and plant growth regulators in the Netherlands between 1970 and 2005, were investigated for cross-resistance to medical triazoles. Furthermore, CYP51-protein homology modeling and molecule alignment studies were performed to identify similarity in molecule structure and docking modes. Five triazole DMIs, propiconazole, bromuconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and difenoconazole, showed very similar molecule structures to the medical triazoles and adopted similar poses while docking the protein. These DMIs also showed the greatest cross-resistance and, importantly, were authorized for use between 1990 and 1996, directly preceding the recovery of the first clinical TR34/L98H isolate in 1998. Through microsatellite genotyping of TR34/L98H isolates we were able to calculate that the first isolate would have arisen in 1997, confirming the results of the abovementioned experiments. Finally, we performed induction experiments to investigate if TR34/L98H could be induced under laboratory conditions. One isolate evolved from two copies of the tandem repeat to three, indicating that fungicide pressure can indeed result in these genomic changes. Conclusions Our findings support a fungicide-driven route of TR34/L98H development in A. fumigatus. Similar molecule structure characteristics of five triazole DMIs

  4. Antifungal susceptibility of invasive yeast isolates in Italy: the GISIA3 study in critically ill patients

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    Mussap Michele

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeasts are a common cause of invasive fungal infections in critically ill patients. Antifungal susceptibility testing results of clinically significant fungal strains are of interest to physicians, enabling them to adopt appropriate strategies for empiric and prophylactic therapies. We investigated the antifungal susceptibility of yeasts isolated over a 2-year period from hospitalised patients with invasive yeast infections. Methods 638 yeasts were isolated from the blood, central venous catheters and sterile fluids of 578 patients on general and surgical intensive care units and surgical wards. Etest strips and Sensititre panels were used to test the susceptibility of the isolates to amphotericin B, anidulafungin, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole in 13 laboratories centres (LC and two co-ordinating centres (CC. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI reference broth microdilution method was used at the CCs for comparison. Results Etest and Sensititre (LC/CC MIC90 values were, respectively: amphotericin B 0.5/0.38, 1/1 mg/L; anidulafungin 2/1.5 and 1/1 mg/L; caspofungin 1/0.75 and 0.5/0.5 mg/L; fluconazole 12/8 and 16/16 mg/L; itraconazole 1/1.5, 0.5/0.5 mg/L; posaconazole 0.5 mg/L and voriconazole 0.25 mg/L for all. The overall MIC90 values were influenced by the reduced susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis isolates to echinocandins and a reduced or lack of susceptibility of Candida glabrata and Candida krusei to azoles, in particular fluconazole and itraconazole. Comparison of the LC and CC results showed good Essential Agreement (90.3% for Etest and 92.9% for Sensititre, and even higher Categorical Agreement (93.9% for Etest and 96% for Sensititre; differences were observed according to the species, method, and antifungal drug. No cross-resistance between echinocandins and triazoles was detected. Conclusions Our data confirm the different antifungal susceptibility

  5. Triazole fungicides can induce cross-resistance to medical triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus.

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    Eveline Snelders

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Azoles play an important role in the management of Aspergillus diseases. Azole resistance is an emerging global problem in Aspergillus fumigatus, and may develop through patient therapy. In addition, an environmental route of resistance development has been suggested through exposure to 14α-demethylase inhibitors (DMIs. The main resistance mechanism associated with this putative fungicide-driven route is a combination of alterations in the Cyp51A-gene (TR(34/L98H. We investigated if TR(34/L98H could have developed through exposure to DMIs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Thirty-one compounds that have been authorized for use as fungicides, herbicides, herbicide safeners and plant growth regulators in The Netherlands between 1970 and 2005, were investigated for cross-resistance to medical triazoles. Furthermore, CYP51-protein homology modeling and molecule alignment studies were performed to identify similarity in molecule structure and docking modes. Five triazole DMIs, propiconazole, bromuconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and difenoconazole, showed very similar molecule structures to the medical triazoles and adopted similar poses while docking the protein. These DMIs also showed the greatest cross-resistance and, importantly, were authorized for use between 1990 and 1996, directly preceding the recovery of the first clinical TR(34/L98H isolate in 1998. Through microsatellite genotyping of TR(34/L98H isolates we were able to calculate that the first isolate would have arisen in 1997, confirming the results of the abovementioned experiments. Finally, we performed induction experiments to investigate if TR(34/L98H could be induced under laboratory conditions. One isolate evolved from two copies of the tandem repeat to three, indicating that fungicide pressure can indeed result in these genomic changes. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support a fungicide-driven route of TR(34/L98H development in A. fumigatus. Similar molecule structure

  6. Triazole fungicides can induce cross-resistance to medical triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelders, Eveline; Camps, Simone M T; Karawajczyk, Anna; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Kema, Gert H J; van der Lee, Henrich A; Klaassen, Corné H; Melchers, Willem J G; Verweij, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    Azoles play an important role in the management of Aspergillus diseases. Azole resistance is an emerging global problem in Aspergillus fumigatus, and may develop through patient therapy. In addition, an environmental route of resistance development has been suggested through exposure to 14α-demethylase inhibitors (DMIs). The main resistance mechanism associated with this putative fungicide-driven route is a combination of alterations in the Cyp51A-gene (TR(34)/L98H). We investigated if TR(34)/L98H could have developed through exposure to DMIs. Thirty-one compounds that have been authorized for use as fungicides, herbicides, herbicide safeners and plant growth regulators in The Netherlands between 1970 and 2005, were investigated for cross-resistance to medical triazoles. Furthermore, CYP51-protein homology modeling and molecule alignment studies were performed to identify similarity in molecule structure and docking modes. Five triazole DMIs, propiconazole, bromuconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and difenoconazole, showed very similar molecule structures to the medical triazoles and adopted similar poses while docking the protein. These DMIs also showed the greatest cross-resistance and, importantly, were authorized for use between 1990 and 1996, directly preceding the recovery of the first clinical TR(34)/L98H isolate in 1998. Through microsatellite genotyping of TR(34)/L98H isolates we were able to calculate that the first isolate would have arisen in 1997, confirming the results of the abovementioned experiments. Finally, we performed induction experiments to investigate if TR(34)/L98H could be induced under laboratory conditions. One isolate evolved from two copies of the tandem repeat to three, indicating that fungicide pressure can indeed result in these genomic changes. Our findings support a fungicide-driven route of TR(34)/L98H development in A. fumigatus. Similar molecule structure characteristics of five triazole DMIs and the three medical triazoles

  7. Functional analysis of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Aspergillus fumigatus by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2013-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the major filamentous fungal pathogen in humans. Although A. fumigatus can be treated with many of the available antifungal drugs, including azole compounds, drug resistant isolates are being recovered at an increasing rate. In other fungal pathogens such as the Candida species, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins play important roles in development of clinically-significant azole resistance phenotypes. Central among these ABC transporter proteins are homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr5 multidrug transporter. In this work, we test the two A. fumigatus genes encoding proteins sharing the highest degree of sequence similarity to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 for their ability to be function in a heterologous pdr5Δ strain of S. cerevisiae. Expression of full-length cDNAs for these two Afu proteins failed to suppress the drug sensitive phenotype of a pdr5Δ strain and no evidence could be obtained for their expression as green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions. To improve the expression of one of these Afu ABC transporters (XP_755847), we changed the sequence of the cDNA to use codons corresponding to the major tRNA species in S. cerevisiae. This codon-optimized (CO Afu abcA) cDNA was efficiently expressed in pdr5Δ cells and able to be detected as a GFP fusion protein. The CO Afu abcA did not correct the drug sensitivity of the pdr5Δ strain and exhibited a high degree of perinuclear fluorescence suggesting that this fusion protein was localized to the S. cerevisiae ER. Interestingly, when these experiments were repeated at 37 °C, the CO Afu abcA was able to complement the drug sensitive phenotype of pdr5Δ cells and exhibited less intracellular fluorescence. Additionally, we found that the CO Afu abcA was able to reduce resistance to drugs like phytosphingosine that act via causing mislocalization of amino acid permeases in fungi. These data suggest that the Afu abcA protein can carry out two different functions of Pdr5: drug

  8. Production of zearalenone-4-glucoside, a-zearalenol-4-glucoside and ß-zearalenol-4-glucoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, P; Berthiller, F; Schweiger, W; Hametner, C; Ludwig, R; Adam, G; Krska, R; Schuhmacher, R

    2007-12-01

    The work at hand describes the production of the zearalenone (ZON) metabolites zearalenone-4-glucoside (ZON-4G), a-zearalenol-4-glucoside (oc-ZOL-4G) and ß-zearalenol-4-glucoside (ß-ZOL-4G). In a first step a genetically modified yeast strain, expressing theArabidopsis thaliana UDP-glu-cosyltransferase UGT73C6, was treated with ZON to produce ZON-4G. The substance was purified by solid phase extraction and subsequent reversed phase preparative HPLC prior to the reduction with sodium borohydride to yield 0C-ZOL-4G and ß-ZOL-4G. The identity and purity of the substances were confirmed by(13)C-and(1)H-NMR as well as by HPLC-UV. In total, 50 mg of ZON were used to produce 5 mg of a-ZOL-4G with a purity of 98%, 6 mg of ß-ZOL-4G with a purity of 99% and 5 mg of ZON-4G with a purity of 99%.

  9. Metabolism of Zearalenone in the Course of Beer Fermentation

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    Naoki Mochizuki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Zearalenone (ZON is a mycotoxin with estrogenic activity, produced by members of Fusarium species, and is found worldwide in a number of cereal crops. It is known to have four active metabolites (a-zearalenol (a-ZOL, b-zearalenol (b-ZOL, a-zearalanol (a-ZAL, and b-zearalanol (b-ZAL. A highly sensitive analytical method using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization (LC-ESI-MS/MS has been established and validated in order to analyze ZON and its metabolites in beer and malt samples. The metabolism of ZON in the course of beer fermentation was further characterized using the artificially contaminated wort by this established method. In the fermented sample, 85.9% of ZON was converted to b-ZOL, which has lower estrogenic activity than that of ZON. These findings indicate that the health risk to humans due to ZON in beer is reduced during the fermentation process.

  10. Identification and Determination of Drug Resistant of Candida species isolated from Hospital Acquired Infections

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    Kambiz Diba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Currently, the use of antifungal azole group and yeasts resistant to these drugs is increasing. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify the yeasts obtained from candidiasis patients and furthermore determining thier antifungal resistance. Methods: In the present descriptive study, infections samples were collected from 256 patients with suspected nosocomial candidiasis, then direct exam and culture were performed. Yeast colonies were identified using phenotypic methods, polymerase chain reaction method and enzyme digestion. Data were analyzed using Descriptive statistical tests. Results: Of sixty isolated yeast, thirty-seven cases of Candida albicans (61.6%, seven cases of C. krusei and C. glabrata (11.6% each, five cases of C. dubliniensis (8.3% and four cases of C. tropicalis (6.6% were indicated. The study showed that the sensitivity of C. albicans and C. cruise species to amphotericin B was negligible in disk diffusion and very sensitve in microdilution. Conclusion: Inspite of the results of antifungal susceptibility test of strains studied did not show high resistance, but screening for drug-resistant Candida isolates in Candida infection by disk diffusion and microdilution methods for new cases of drug resistance is reasonable.

  11. Genotyping and antifungal susceptibility testing of multiple Malassezia pachydermatis isolates from otitis and dermatitis cases in pets: is it really worth the effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E; Peláez, Teresa; Blanco, José L

    2016-01-01

    A total of 216 colonies of Malassezia pachydermatis from 28 cases of fungal otitis or dermatitis in pets were genotyped by M13 fingerprinting and tested for antifungal susceptibility. A huge genetic diversity was found (157 M13 types in total), with all animals having a polyclonal pattern of infection (5.4 ± 1.5 genotypes/sample). Furthermore, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that most genetic diversity (44%) was found at the within sample level. In contrast, variability in antifungal susceptibility among isolates from the same sample was less important, with different M13 types displaying in most cases identical or very similar MIC results. Most isolates displayed high in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, terbinafine and all azoles tested except fluconazole, for which MIC values were always ≥4 μg/ml and a 26.9% of isolates displayed values ≥32 μg/ml. We conclude that although characterization of multiple yeast isolates results in a considerable increase in laboratory workload and expenses, it may help to get a better understanding of the epidemiology of M. pachydermatis in a given patient population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  13. Efficacy of Oral E1210, a New Broad-Spectrum Antifungal with a Novel Mechanism of Action, in Murine Models of Candidiasis, Aspergillosis, and Fusariosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Katsura; Horii, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Mamiko; Watanabe, Nao-aki; Okubo, Miyuki; Sonoda, Jiro; Nakamoto, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Keigo; Shirotori, Syuji; Murai, Norio; Inoue, Satoshi; Matsukura, Masayuki; Abe, Shinya; Yoshimatsu, Kentaro; Asada, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class, broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action—inhibition of fungal glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. In this study, the efficacies of E1210 and reference antifungals were evaluated in murine models of oropharyngeal and disseminated candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. Oral E1210 demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy in infections caused by Candida species, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium solani. In the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis, E1210 and fluconazole each caused a significantly greater reduction in the number of oral CFU than the control treatment (P candidiasis model, mice treated with E1210, fluconazole, caspofungin, or liposomal amphotericin B showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis caused by azole-resistant Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis. A 24-h delay in treatment onset minimally affected the efficacy outcome of E1210 in the treatment of disseminated candidiasis. In the Aspergillus flavus pulmonary aspergillosis model, mice treated with E1210, voriconazole, or caspofungin showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. These data suggest that further studies to determine E1210's potential for the treatment of disseminated fungal infections are indicated. PMID:21788462

  14. Anidulafungin in the treatment of invasive fungal infections

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    Kathryn Sabol

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Sabol, Tawanda GumboUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: More antifungal agents have reached clinical use in the past two decades than at any other time. The echinocandins have been a welcome addition to this group, with the latest being anidulafungin. There are several lines of evidence to support anidulafungin’s role as primary therapy for the treatment of invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic patients, and as alternative therapy to fluconazole in patients with esophageal candidiasis with azole intolerance or triazole-resistant Candida. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies in animals have demonstrated superior efficacy, defined as maximal microbial kill, when compared to fluconazole, regardless of the fluconazole susceptibility of the Candida species. These studies, as well as dose-effect studies in patients, also support the currently recommended dose of anidulafungin. A well designed randomized controlled trial has demonstrated anidulafungin’s efficacy in patients with invasive candidiasis. In this paper, we argue that anidulafungin may be preferable to fluconazole for the treatment of candidemia. However, as of yet, the difference between anidulafungin and the other two licensed echinocandins as first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis is unclear. On the other hand, there is insufficient evidence as of yet to support first-line use of anidulafungin in patients with neutropenia or aspergillosis.Keywords: anidulafungin, pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics, efficacy, candidiasis

  15. Prospective observational multicenter study to define a diagnostic algorithm for biliary candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Philipp; Eckelskemper, Franziska; Erichsen, Thomas; Lankisch, Tim; Dechêne, Alexander; Lubritz, Gabriele; Lenze, Frank; Beyna, Torsten; Ullerich, Hansjörg; Schmedt, Andre; Domagk, Dirk

    2014-09-14

    To develop an algorithm to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with biliary candidiasis. We performed a prospective study of 127 patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, for various biliary disorders, at 3 tertiary referral centers in Germany from July 2011 through July 2012 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01109550). Bile, buccal, and stool samples were collected. When indicated, endoscopic transpapillary bile duct biopsies were performed to clarify the etiology of bile duct strictures and to prove invasive fungal infections. Candida species were detected in 38 of the 127 bile samples (29.9%). By multivariate analysis patients' age and previous endoscopic sphincterotomy were independent risk factors for biliary candidiasis (P 7 d) (P = 0.089) tend to be at risk for biliary candidiasis. One patient was negative in mycological culture of bile fluid but invasive biliary candidiasis was diagnosed histologically. Of Candida subspecies detected, 36.7% were azole-resistant, such as C glabrata. Eight patients received anti-mycotic therapy, based on our algorithm. Of these, 3 had cancer with biliary tract involvement, 2 had secondary sclerosing cholangitis, 1 had retroperitoneal fibrosis, and 5 had septicemia. In all patients contamination was ruled out by smears of the endoscope channel. Gastroenterologists should be aware of frequent candida colonization in patients with cholangitis and biliary disorders. Our suggested algorithm facilitates the further clinical management.

  16. Fluconazole therapy for treatment of invasive candidiasis in Intensive Care patients. Is it still valid from a pharmacological point of view?

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    Mario Musu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluconazole – antimycotic belonging to the first generation azoles – is widely used as treatment for invasive candidiasis and candidemia in numerous clinical settings as Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU and adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU, as well as oncology, onco-hematology and solid organ transplantation. More recently use of antimycotics has spread to medical divisions, where fungal infections represent an emerging problem due to population’s ageing, malnourishment and important comorbidities. Fluconazole is effective against numerous Candida species, particularly against albicans, tropicalis and parapsilosis strains. On the other hand, C. krusei is intrinsically resistant to fluconazole and C. glabrata can be sensitive or resistant in a dose dependent fashion. Epidemiological variability is noteworthy and depends on the geographical location of the institution, the clinical setting, and the frequency and intensity of fluconazole employment for invasive candidiasis. In many ICUs fluconazole sensitive C. albicans is cultured in 50% of positive samples, while the remaining 50% show growth of variably sensitive fungal species, often resistant to fluconazole. Due to increasingly frequent emergence of resistant strains of Candida spp., American guidelines (IDSA in 2009, and European ones (ESCMID in 2012, recommended substitution of fluconazole with echinocandines as first line therapy in patients with severe disease, as defined by an APACHE II score greater than 15. Thus fluconazole must be limited to low risk cases, treatment of sensitive strains and de-escalation from echinocandin therapy, after microbiological diagnosis and drug resistance profile characterization.

  17. Biofilm Formation by Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium Species: A Comparative Study

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    Rodrigo Rollin-Pinheiro

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species are medically important fungi that are present in soil and human impacted areas and capable of causing a wide spectrum of diseases in humans. Although little is known about their pathogenesis, their growth process and infection routes are very similar to those of Aspergillus species, which grow as biofilms in invasive infections. All nine strains tested here displayed the ability to grow as biofilms in vitro and to produce a dense network of interconnected hyphae on both polystyrene and the surfaces of central venous catheters, but with different characteristics. Scedosporium boydii and S. aurantiacum clinical isolates were able to form biofilms faster than the corresponding environmental strains, as evidenced in kinetic assays for S. boydii and CLSM for S. aurantiacum. Biofilms formed by Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species had significantly higher resistance to the class of antifungal azole than was observed in planktonic cells, indicating a protective role for this structure. In addition, the clinical S. aurantiacum isolate that formed the most robust biofilms was also more virulent in a larvae Galleria mellonella infection model, suggesting that the ability to form biofilms enhances virulence in Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species.

  18. Species distribution and susceptibility profile of Candida species in a Brazilian public tertiary hospital

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    Montelli Augusto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species identification and antifungal susceptibility tests were carried out on 212 Candida isolates obtained from bloodstream infections, urinary tract infections and dialysis-associated peritonitis, from cases attended at a Brazilian public tertiary hospital from January 1998 to January 2005. Findings Candida albicans represented 33% of the isolates, Candida parapsilosis 31.1%, Candida tropicalis 17.9%,Candida glabrata 11.8%, and others species 6.2%. In blood culture, C. parapsilosis was the most frequently encountered species (48%. The resistance levels to the antifungal azoles were relatively low for the several species, except for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. Amphotericin B resistance was observed in 1 isolate of C. parapsilosis. Conclusions The species distribution and antifungal susceptibility herein observed presented several epidemiological features common to other tertiary hospitals in Latin American countries. It also exhibited some peculiarity, such as a very high frequency of C. parapsilosis both in bloodstream infections and dialysis-associated peritonitis. C. albicans also occurred in an important number of case infections, in all evaluated clinical sources. C. glabrata presented a high proportion of resistant isolates. The data emphasize the necessity to carry out the correct species identification accompanied by the susceptibility tests in all tertiary hospitals.

  19. Computational Study on Substituted s-Triazine Derivatives as Energetic Materials

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    Vikas D. Ghule

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available s-Triazine is the essential candidate of many energetic compounds due to its high nitrogen content, enthalpy of formation and thermal stability. The present study explores s-triazine derivatives in which different -NO2, -NH2 and -N3 substituted azoles are attached to the triazine ring via C-N linkage. The density functional theory is used to predict geometries, heats of formation and other energetic properties. Among the designed compounds, -N3 derivatives show very high heats of formation. The densities for designed compounds were predicted by using the crystal packing calculations. Introduction of -NO2 group improves density as compared to -NH2 and -N3, their order of increasing density can be given as NO2>N3>NH2. Analysis of the bond dissociation energies for C-NO2, C-NH2 and C-N3 bonds indicates that substitutions of the -N3 and -NH2 group are favorable for enhancing the thermal stability of s-triazine derivatives. The nitro and azido derivatives of triazine are found to be promising candidates for the synthetic studies.

  20. Prevalence, virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. isolated from bloodstream infections in a tertiary care hospital in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Heliara Maria Spina; Cardoso, Bárbara; Vitali, Lucia Helena; Coelho, Harnoldo Colares; Martinez, Roberto; Ferreira, Márcia Eliana da Silva

    2018-01-01

    Candida spp. are responsible for 80% of all systemic fungal infections and are associated with high mortality rates. This study characterised 79 bloodstream isolates of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. orthopsilosis, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis from patients in a Brazilian hospital. The susceptibility to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole and voriconazole was determined; virulence factor production was assessed based on haemolysin, phospholipase and proteinase activities, and the patients' clinical characteristics were analysed. C. albicans was the predominant species (44%), followed by C. glabrata (19%), C. tropicalis (19%), C. parapsilosis (14%) and C. orthopsilosis (4%). The candidemia incidence was 1.52 per 1000 admissions, and the crude mortality rate was 52%. One C. albicans isolate was resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole. Moreover, 20.2%, 2.5% and 3.8% of the isolates exhibited dose-dependent susceptibility to fluconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin, respectively. In conclusion, although the C. glabrata incidence was higher than that usually described in Brazil, its increase was previously observed in studies conducted worldwide. Furthermore, the azole resistance of the C. albicans isolate could be due to previous exposure to these antifungals. These results highlight the importance of epidemiological studies and will facilitate an improved understanding of candidemia in the studied hospital. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Ruthenium-catalyzed cycloadditions of 1-haloalkynes with nitrile oxides and organic azides: synthesis of 4-haloisoxazoles and 5-halotriazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakdale, James S; Sit, Rakesh K; Fokin, Valery V

    2014-08-25

    (Cyclopentadienyl)(cyclooctadiene) ruthenium(II) chloride [CpRuCl(cod)] catalyzes the reaction between nitrile oxides and electronically deficient 1-choro-, 1-bromo-, and 1-iodoalkynes leading to 4-haloisoxazoles. Organic azides are also suitable 1,3-dipoles, resulting in 5-halo-1,2,3-triazoles. These air-tolerant reactions can be performed at room temperature with 1.25 equivalents of the respective 1,3-dipole relative to the alkyne component. Reactive 1-haloalkynes include propiolic amides, esters, ketones, and phosphonates. Post-functionalization of the halogenated azole products can be accomplished by using palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions and by manipulation of reactive amide groups. The lack of catalysis observed with [Cp*RuCl(cod)] (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) is attributed to steric demands of the Cp* (η(5)-C5Me5) ligand in comparison to the parent Cp (η(5)-C5H5). This hypothesis is supported by the poor reactivity of [(η(5)-C5Me4CF3)RuCl(cod)], which serves as a an isosteric mimic of Cp* and as an isoelectronic analogue of Cp. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Beta-cyclodextrin-centered star-shaped amphiphilic polymers for doxorubicin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Li Yan; Wang, Rong Juan; Zheng, Cheng; Jin, Yi; Jin, Le Qun

    2010-02-01

    Delivery of doxorubicin could be achieved by a novel micellar system based on beta-cyclodextrin-centered star-shaped amphiphilic polymers (sPEL/CD). This study specifically explored the effect of polylactide segments in sPEL/CD on various micelle properties, such as the critical micelle concentration, size, drug loading, cytotoxicity and drug resistance reversing effect. The sPEL/CD was synthesized by the arm-first method. The critical micelle concentrations of polymeric micelles were determined by fluorescence spectrophotometry using pyrene as a probe. The oil/water method was applied to prepare doxorubicin-loaded micelles. 3-(4,5-dimethylthi-azol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, confocal laser-scanning microscopy and flow cytometry were used to examine cell cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of the doxorubicin-loaded micelles. Finally, rhodamine-123 cellular uptake was determined to evaluate the polymer action on MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADR cells. All polymers exhibited low cytotoxicity and their micelles had a desirable release-acceleration pH (pH 5.0) for cytoplasmic drug delivery. With the introduction of polylactide into the polymer, the micelle critical micelle concentration can be effectively decreased and the drug-loading content was enhanced. Most importantly, the drug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells was significantly reversed via the interaction between polymer and Pgp. Therefore, this type of polymer has potential superiority for cancer therapy.

  3. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay to quantify serum voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Justin; Sujishi, Kirk K; French, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Voriconazole is an azole antifungal drug indicated for use in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis. Due to the large intra- and interindividual variation seen in voriconazole pharmacokinetics along with a high probability of drug-drug interactions, therapeutic drug monitoring is of considerable clinical value. As such, we developed and validated a LC-MS/MS assay to quantify serum voriconazole to improve turnaround time and decrease costs. After protein precipitation with D3-voriconazole (deuterated internal standard) in acetonitrile was performed, samples were separated by gradient elution and injected into the mass spectrometer with a total run-time of 4 min per sample. Multiple reaction monitoring was employed using Q1/Q3 transitions of 350/127 and 350/281 for voriconazole and 353/284 and 353/127 for D3-voriconazole. Sample preparation took 30 min for 6 patient samples. The limit of quantitation was 0.1 μg/mL and the linearity ranged from 0.1 μg/mL to 10.0 μg/mL. Extraction recovery was ∼69% and ion suppression ∼13%. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision (%CV) was voriconazole. Our assay reduces current specimen volume requirements, decreases result turnaround time, and saves institutional funds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Voriconazole on Candida tropicalis Biofilms: Relation with ERG Genes Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tânia; Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-10-01

    Candida tropicalis has emerged as the third most prevalent fungal pathogens and its ability to form biofilms has been considered one of the most important virulence factors, since biofilms represent high tolerance to antifungal agents. However, the mechanisms of C. tropicalis biofilm resistance to antifungals remain poorly understood. Thus, the main aim of this work was to infer about the effect of voriconazole on the formation and control of C. tropicalis biofilms and disclose its relationship with ERG genes' expression. Planktonic cells tolerance of several C. tropicalis clinical isolates to voriconazole was determined through of antifungal susceptibility test, and the effect of this azole against C. tropicalis biofilm formation and pre-formed biofilms was evaluated by cultivable cells determination and total biomass quantification. ERG genes expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. This work showed that C. tropicalis resistance to voriconazole is strain dependent and that voriconazole was able to partially control biofilm formation, but was unable to eradicate C. tropicalis pre-formed biofilms. Moreover, C. tropicalis biofilms resistance to voriconazole seems to be associated with alterations of sterol content in the cell membrane, resulting in ERG genes overexpression. Voriconazole is unable to control C. tropicalis biofilms, and the overexpression of ERG genes is a possible mechanism of biofilm resistance.

  5. Safety of Voriconazole and Sirolimus Coadministration after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceberio, Izaskun; Dai, Kefei; Devlin, Sean M.; Barke, Juliet N.; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Goldberg, Jenna D.; Giralt, Sergio; Adel, Nelly G.; Perales, Miguel-Angel

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis with azoles is considered standard in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (allo-HCT). Although sirolimus is being used increasingly for prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), it is a substrate of CYP3A4, which is inhibited by voriconazole, and concurrent administration can lead to significantly increased exposure to sirolimus. We identified 67 patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent allo-HCT with sirolimus, tacrolimus, and low-dose methotrexate and received concomitant voriconazole prophylaxis from April-2008 to June-2011. All patients underwent a non-myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioned allo-HCT. Patients received sirolimus and voriconazole concurrently for a median of 113 days. The median daily dose reduction of sirolimus at start of coadministration was 90%. The median serum sirolimus trough-level before and at steady-state of coadministration were 5.8ng/mL (range 0-47.6) and 6.1ng/mL (range 1-14.2) (p=0.45), respectively. One patient with an average sirolimus level of 6 ng/mL developed sirolimus-related thrombotic microangiopathy that resolved after sirolimus discontinuation. No sinusoidal-obstructive syndrome was reported. Seventeen patients (25%) prematurely discontinued voriconazole because of adverse events. Only 2 patients (3%) presented with possible IFI at day100. We demonstrate that sirolimus and voriconazole coadministration with an empiric 90% sirolimus dose-reduction and close monitoring of sirolimus trough levels is safe and well tolerated. PMID:25599164

  6. Invasive Trichosporon Infection: A systematic review on a re-emerging fungal pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Nobrega De Almeida Júnior

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review aimed to better depict the clinical features and address the issue of therapeutic management of Trichosporon deep-seated infections.Methods: We comprehensively reviewed the cases of invasive Trichosporon infection reported in the literature from 1994 (date of taxonomic modification to 2015. Data from antifungal susceptibility testing (AST studies were also analyzed. Results: Two hundred and three cases were retained and split into four groups: hemopathy (n=79, other immunodeficiency conditions (n =41, miscellaneous (n=58 and newborns (n=25. Trichosporon asahii was the main causative species (46.7% and may exhibit cross-resistance to different antifungal classes. The unfavorable outcome rate was at 44.3%. By multivariate analysis, breakthrough infection (OR 2.45 was associated with unfavorable outcome, whilst the use of an azole-based therapy improved the prognosis (OR 0.16. Voriconazole-based treatment was associated with favorable outcome in hematological patients (73.6% vs. 41.8%; p=0.016. Compiled data from AST demonstrated that (i T. asahii exhibits the highest MICs to amphotericin B and (ii voriconazole has the best in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates of Trichosporon spp. Conclusions: Trichosporon infection is not only restricted to hematological patients. Analysis of compiled data from AST and clinical outcome support the use of voriconazole as first line therapy.

  7. Multidrug-Resistant Candida: Epidemiology, Molecular Mechanisms, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Patterson, Thomas F

    2017-08-15

    Invasive Candida infections remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in hospitalized and immunocompromised or critically ill patients. A limited number of antifungal agents from only a few drug classes are available to treat patients with these serious infections. Resistance can be either intrinsic or acquired. Resistance mechanisms are not exchanged between Candida; thus, acquired resistance either emerges in response to an antifungal selection pressure in the individual patient or, more rarely, occur due to horizontal transmission of resistant strains between patients. Although multidrug resistance is uncommon, increasing reports of multidrug resistance to the azoles, echinocandins, and polyenes have occurred in several Candida species, most notably Candida glabrata and more recently Candida auris. Drivers are overall antifungal use, subtherapeutic drug levels at sites of infection/colonization, drug sequestration in the biofilm matrix, and, in the setting of outbreaks, suboptimal infection control. Moreover, recent research suggests that DNA mismatch repair gene mutations may facilitate acquisition of resistance mutations in C. glabrata specifically. Diagnosis of antifungal-resistant Candida infections is critical to the successful management of patients with these infections. Reduction of unnecessary use of antifungals via antifungal stewardship is critical to limit multidrug resistance emergence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, β-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  9. An Update on Candida tropicalis Based on Basic and Clinical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza-Alves, Diana L.; Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison P.; Chaves, Guilherme M.

    2017-01-01

    Candida tropicalis has emerged as one of the most important Candida species. It has been widely considered the second most virulent Candida species, only preceded by C. albicans. Besides, this species has been recognized as a very strong biofilm producer, surpassing C. albicans in most of the studies. In addition, it produces a wide range of other virulence factors, including: adhesion to buccal epithelial and endothelial cells; the secretion of lytic enzymes, such as proteinases, phospholipases, and hemolysins, bud-to-hyphae transition (also called morphogenesis) and the phenomenon called phenotypic switching. This is a species very closely related to C. albicans and has been easily identified with both phenotypic and molecular methods. In addition, no cryptic sibling species were yet described in the literature, what is contradictory to some other medically important Candida species. C. tropicalis is a clinically relevant species and may be the second or third etiological agent of candidemia, specifically in Latin American countries and Asia. Antifungal resistance to the azoles, polyenes, and echinocandins has already been described. Apart from all these characteristics, C. tropicalis has been considered an osmotolerant microorganism and this ability to survive to high salt concentration may be important for fungal persistence in saline environments. This physiological characteristic makes this species suitable for use in biotechnology processes. Here we describe an update of C. tropicalis, focusing on all these previously mentioned subjects. PMID:29081766

  10. [Candida biofilm-related infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozo, José Luis; Cantón, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The number of biomedical devices (intravascular catheters, heart valves, joint replacements, etc.) that are implanted in our hospitals has increased exponentially in recent years. Candida species are pathogens which are becoming more significant in these kinds of infections. Candida has two forms of development: planktonic and in biofilms. A biofilm is a community of microorganisms which adhere to a surface and are enclosed by an extracellular matrix. This form of development confers a high resistance to the antimicrobial agents. This is the reason why antibiotic treatments usually fail and biomedical devices may have to be removed in most cases. Unspecific adhesion mechanisms, the adhesion-receptor systems, and an intercellular communication system called quorum sensing play an essential role in the development of Candida biofilms. In general, the azoles have poor activity against Candida biofilms, while echinocandins and polyenes show a greater activity. New therapeutic strategies need to be developed due to the high morbidity and mortality and high economic costs associated with these infections. Most studies to date have focused on bacterial biofilms. The knowledge of the formation of Candida biofilms and their composition is essential to develop new preventive and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Paracoccidioidomycosis: eco-epidemiology, taxonomy and clinical and therapeutic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Amaral, André Corrêa; Teixeira, Marcus Melo; Sato, Paula Keiko; Sato, Paula; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Soares Felipe, Maria Sueli

    2013-09-01

    Acquired by inhalation of the thermal dimorphic fungi Paracoccidioides spp. conidia, paracoccidioidomycosis ranges from symptomatic to severe and potentially fatal disseminated disease. The main focus of this review is to highlight clinical aspects of paracoccidioidomycosis and, its pathogens' diversity ecology and particularities. In addition, we present strategies for therapy, including DNA vaccines and nanostructured drugs. Molecular and morphological data supported the split of the Paracoccidioides genus into two species, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii. An acute form of the disease affects approximately 5% of cases and involves the phagocytic mononuclear system, resulting in progressive lymphadenopathy. The chronic form affects adult men and frequently involves lungs, skin and mucous membranes, lymph nodes, and adrenal glands. The clinical manifestations depend on the ability of the host to control the fungal multiplication and dissemination. The long survival time of the fungus in the host tissues allows it to evade immune responses; therefore, successful treatment often requires long-time therapy. The consensus for treatment must consider the severity of the disease and includes sulfone derivatives, amphotericin B and azoles. Novel strategies for therapy, based on DNA vaccines and nanostructured drugs are also presented and discussed in this review.

  12. PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS: CHALLENGES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A VACCINE AGAINST AN ENDEMIC MYCOSIS IN THE AMERICAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda, Carlos P; Urán, M E; Nosanchuk, J D; Travassos, L R

    2015-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by Paracoccidioides spp, is an important endemic mycosis in Latin America. There are two recognized Paracoccidioides species, P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii, based on phylogenetic differences; however, the pathogenesis and disease manifestations of both are indistinguishable at present. Approximately 1,853 (~51,2%) of 3,583 confirmed deaths in Brazil due to systemic mycoses from 1996-2006 were caused by PCM. Antifungal treatment is required for patients with PCM. The initial treatment lasts from two to six months and sulfa derivatives, amphotericin B, azoles and terbinafine are used in clinical practice; however, despite prolonged therapy, relapses are still a problem. An effective Th1-biased cellular immune response is essential to control the disease, which can be induced by exogenous antigens or modulated by prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines. Stimulation of B cells or passive transference of monoclonal antibodies are also important means that may be used to improve the efficacy of paracoccidioidomycosis treatment in the future. This review critically details major challenges facing the development of a vaccine to combat PCM.

  13. PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHIKANAI-YASUDA, Maria Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Considered to be an emerging endemic mycosis in Latin America, paracoccidioidomycosis is characterized by a chronic course and involvement of multiple organs in immunocompromised hosts. Infection sequelae are mainly related to pulmonary and adrenal insufficiency. The host-parasite interaction results in different expressions of the immune response depending on parasite pathogenicity, fungal load and genetic characteristics of the host. A few controlled and case series reports have shown that azoles and fast-acting sulfa derivatives are useful treatment alternatives in milder forms of the disease. For moderate/severe cases, more prolonged treatments or even parenteral routes are required especially when there is involvement of the digestive tract mucosa, resulting in poor drug absorption. Although comparative studies have reported that shorter treatment regimens with itraconazole are able to induce cure in chronically-infected patients, there are still treatment challenges such as the need for more controlled studies involving acute cases, the search for new drugs and combinations, and the search for compounds capable of modulating the immune response in severe cases as well as the paradoxical reactions. PMID:26465367

  14. Cdr2p contributes to fluconazole resistance in Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The development of resistance to azole antifungals used in the treatment of fungal infections can be a serious medical problem. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms associated with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole in clinical isolates of Candida dubliniensis , showing evidence of the trailing growth phenomenon. The changes in membrane sterol composition were studied in the presence of subinhibitory fluconazole concentrations. Despite lanosterol and eburicol accumulating as the most prevalent sterols after fluconazole treatment, these ergosterol precursors still support growth of Candida isolates. The overexpression of ABC transporters was demonstrated by immunoblotting employing specific antibodies against Cdr1p and Cdr2p. The presence of a full-length 170 kDa protein Cdr1p was detected in two isolates, while a truncated form of Cdr1p with the molecular mass of 85 kDa was observed in isolate 966\\/3(2). Notably, Cdr2p was detected in this isolate, and the expression of this transporter was modulated by subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis can display the trailing growth phenomenon, and such isolates express similar molecular mechanisms like that of fluconazole-resistant isolates and can therefore be associated with recurrent infections.

  15. Occurrence and ecological potential of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in groundwater and reservoirs in the vicinity of municipal landfills in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xianzhi; Ou, Weihui; Wang, Chunwei; Wang, Zhifang; Huang, Qiuxin; Jin, Jiabin; Tan, Jianhua

    2014-08-15

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), including antibiotics, azole anti-fungals, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, lipid regulators, parabens, antiseptics, and bisphenol A, were investigated in groundwater and reservoirs in the vicinity of two municipal landfills in the metropolis of Guangzhou, South China. Dehydroerythromycin, sulfamethoxazole, fluconazole, salicylic acid, methylparaben, triclosan, and bisphenol A were the mostly frequently detected PPCPs in the groundwater at low ng L(-1) levels. In the reservoirs, the PPCPs were widely detected at higher frequencies and concentrations, especially sulfamethoxazole, propiconazole, and ibuprofen, with maximal concentrations above 1 μg L(-1). The PPCPs in the groundwater did not show significant seasonal differences or spatial trends. However, in the reservoirs, higher PPCP concentrations were observed in spring than in other seasons. The anti-bacterials in the groundwater posed medium risks to algae. In the reservoirs, the sulfonamides and macrolides posed low to high risks, while ibuprofen, salicylic acid, and clofibric acid presented low to medium risks to aquatic organisms. Overall, the results showed that the PPCP contaminants and subsequent ecological risks in the groundwater and surface water in the vicinity of the landfills may be of serious concern. More research is needed to better correlate the landfill leachates and PPCP contamination in the nearby aquatic environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A new face of phenalenyl-based radicals in the transition metal-free C-H arylation of heteroarenes at room temperature: trapping the radical initiatorviaC-C σ-bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Jasimuddin; P, Sreejyothi; Vijaykumar, Gonela; Jose, Anex; Raj, Manthan; Mandal, Swadhin K

    2017-11-01

    The radical-mediated transition metal-free approach for the direct C-H bond functionalization of arenes is considered as a cost effective alternative to transition metal-based catalysis. An organic ligand-based radical plays a key role by generating an aryl radical which undergoes a subsequent functionalization process. The design principle of the present study takes advantage of a relatively stable odd alternant hydrocarbon-based phenalenyl (PLY) radical. In this study, the first transition metal-free catalyzed direct C-H arylation of a variety of heteroarenes such as azoles, furan, thiophene and pyridine at room temperature has been reported using a phenalenyl-based radical without employing any photoactivation step. This protocol has been successfully applied to the gram scale synthesis of core moieties of bioactive molecules. The phenalenyl-based radical initiator has been characterized crystallographically by trapping it via the formation of a C-C σ-bond between the phenalenyl radical and solvent-based radical species.

  17. Comparative efficacy of topical application of tacrolimus and clotrimazole in the treatment of pityriasis versicolor: A single blind, randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepaskhah, Mozhdeh; Sadat, Maryam Sadat; Pakshir, Keyvan; Bagheri, Zahra

    2017-05-01

    Pityriasis versicolor (PV) is a common superficial fungal disease. Possibility of emergence of resistant strains to azoles, and difficulty in differentiation of hypopigmented PV and early vitiligo, encouraged us to evaluate the efficacy of topical tacrolimus (a calcineurin inhibitor agent with proven in vitro anti-Malassezia effect) for PV treatment generally and its effect on PV-induced hypopigmentation specifically. To evaluate the efficacy of topical tacrolimus on pityriasis versicolor. Fifty PV patients were randomly allocated into two equal groups applying either topical clotrimazol or tacrolimus twice daily for 3 weeks. They were evaluated at the beginning of study, in the third and fifth weeks clinically and mycologically (direct smear). Although both treatments resulted in global, clinical, and mycological cure of PV, there was no significant difference regarding the mentioned aspects of cure between tacrolimus and clotrimazole treated patients. (P-value: .63, .45, and .26, respectively) Tacrolimus had no significant effect on hypopigmentation in the fifth week follow-up. (P-value: .62). In spite of the lack of efficacy of tacrolimus on PV-induced hypopigmentation, the therapeutic effect on PV introduces tacrolimus as a therapeutic option for PV, especially when early vitiligo is among the differential diagnoses without concerning the aggravating effect of topical corticosteroids on PV. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Neutral alkaline-metal and alkaline-earth-metal derivatives of imidazole and benzimidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Fernando; Lloyd, David G; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2014-06-12

    A theoretical study of the minima and connecting transition states of the neutral complexes formed by alkaline-metal and alkaline-earth-metal derivatives of imidazolate and benzimidazolate anions has been carried out using B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p), and G3B3 methods. Two and three nondegenerated minima and two and four TS structures have been identified for imidazole and benzimidazole derivatives, respectively. The most stable minima of the alkaline-metal derivatives of both systems correspond to the metal interacting with the imidazole ring, whereas in the alkaline-earth-metal derivatives, the preferred minima depend on the substituent. A remarkable feature of some minima is the fact that some of the metal-aromatic interactions follow the classical π-cation pattern, even though the global structure corresponds to a neutral salt, constituting a class of noncovalent interaction of great interest in the chemistry of aromatic and heterocyclic complexes. A CSD search has confirmed that the two bonding modes, N-σ and π, are present in the solid phase. The π mode has been analyzed by comparison with other azoles.

  19. Fungal spondylodiscitis in a patient recovered from H7N9 virus infection: a case study and a literature review of the differences between Candida and Aspergillus spondylodiscitis * #

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lie-dao; Feng, Zhi-yun; Wang, Xuan-wei; Ling, Zhi-heng; Lin, Xiang-jin

    2016-01-01

    To report a rare case of fungal spondylodiscitis in a patient recovered from H7N9 virus infection and perform a literature review of the different characteristics of Candida and Aspergillus spondylodiscitis, we reviewed cases of spondylodiscitis caused by Candida and Aspergillus species. Data, including patients’ information, pathogenic species, treatment strategy, outcomes, and relapses, were collected and summarized. The characteristics of Candida and Aspergillus spondylodiscitis were compared to see if any differences in clinical features, management, or consequences could be detected. The subject of the case study was first misdiagnosed as having a vertebral tumor, and then, following open biopsy, was diagnosed as having fungal spondylodiscitis. The patient made a good recovery following radical debridement. Seventy-seven additional cases of Candida spondylodiscitis and 94 cases of Aspergillus spondylodiscitis were identified in the literature. Patients with Candida spondylodiscitis tended to have a better outcome than patients with Aspergillus spondylodiscitis (cure rate 92.3% vs. 70.2%). Candida was found more frequently (47.8%) than Aspergillus (26.7%) in blood cultures, while neurological deficits were observed more often in patients with Aspergillus spondylodiscitis (43.6% vs. 25.6%). Candida spinal infections were more often treated by radical debridement (60.5% vs. 39.6%). Patients with Candida spondylodiscitis have better outcomes, which may be associated with prompt recognition, radical surgical debridement, and azoles therapy. A good outcome can be expected in fungal spondylodiscitis with appropriate operations and anti-fungal drugs. PMID:27819134

  20. Fungal spondylodiscitis in a patient recovered from H7N9 virus infection: a case study and a literature review of the differences between Candida and Aspergillus spondylodiscitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lie-Dao; Feng, Zhi-Yun; Wang, Xuan-Wei; Ling, Zhi-Heng; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    To report a rare case of fungal spondylodiscitis in a patient recovered from H7N9 virus infection and perform a literature review of the different characteristics of Candida and Aspergillus spondylodiscitis, we reviewed cases of spondylodiscitis caused by Candida and Aspergillus species. Data, including patients' information, pathogenic species, treatment strategy, outcomes, and relapses, were collected and summarized. The characteristics of Candida and Aspergillus spondylodiscitis were compared to see if any differences in clinical features, management, or consequences could be detected. The subject of the case study was first misdiagnosed as having a vertebral tumor, and then, following open biopsy, was diagnosed as having fungal spondylodiscitis. The patient made a good recovery following radical debridement. Seventy-seven additional cases of Candida spondylodiscitis and 94 cases of Aspergillus spondylodiscitis were identified in the literature. Patients with Candida spondylodiscitis tended to have a better outcome than patients with Aspergillus spondylodiscitis (cure rate 92.3% vs. 70.2%). Candida was found more frequently (47.8%) than Aspergillus (26.7%) in blood cultures, while neurological deficits were observed more often in patients with Aspergillus spondylodiscitis (43.6% vs. 25.6%). Candida spinal infections were more often treated by radical debridement (60.5% vs. 39.6%). Patients with Candida spondylodiscitis have better outcomes, which may be associated with prompt recognition, radical surgical debridement, and azoles therapy. A good outcome can be expected in fungal spondylodiscitis with appropriate operations and anti-fungal drugs.

  1. Multidrug-resistant Fusarium in keratitis: a clinico-mycological study of keratitis infections in Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupaki-Sreepurna, Ananya; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Kindo, Anupma J; Sundaram, Murugan; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we aimed to present the first molecular epidemiological data from Chennai, India, analyse keratitis cases that have been monitored in a university hospital during 2 years, identify the responsible Fusarium species and determine antifungal susceptibilities. A total of 10 cases of keratitis were included in the study. Fusarium isolates were identified using the second largest subunit of the RNA polymerase gene (RPB2) and the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (TEF1). Antifungal susceptibility was tested by the broth microdilution method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methodology. The aetiological agents belonged to Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) (n = 9) and Fusarium sambucinum species complex (FSAMSC) (n = 1), and the identified species were Fusarium keratoplasticum (n = 7), Fusarium falciforme (n = 2) and Fusarium sporotrichioides (n = 1). All strains showed multidrug resistance to azoles and caspofungin but exhibited lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to natamycin and amphotericin B. Fusarium keratoplasticum and Fusarium falciforme belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex were the major aetiological agents of Fusarium keratitis in this study. Early presentation and 5% topical natamycin was associated with better patient outcome. Preventative measures and monitoring of local epidemiological data play an important role in clinical practice. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Antifungal effect of Echinophora platyloba on expression of CDR1 and CDR2 genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh, Elias; Hosseini Shokouh, Seyed Javad; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Roudbary, Maryam; Rafiei, Sajad; Aslani, Peyman; Farahnejad, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Several studies examined the effect of the Echinophora platyloba extract in treatment of azole-resistant Candida albicans clinical isolates. We investigated the effect of E. platyloba extract on expression of CDR1 and CDR2 genes in fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans using real-time PCR. The crude extract of E. platyloba was obtained using percolation method. Using serial dilution method, different concentrations of extract were achieved. Two hundred microlitres of fungal suspension (10(6) CFU/ml) was added to the media and cultured with different concentrations and then incubated at 37 °C for 48 h. The concentration of extract in the first tube, which inhibited the growth of C. albicans, was recorded as the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). In order to analyse the expression of CDR1 and CDR2 genes, RNA was extracted from C. albicans isolates before and after treatment with MIC of E. platyloba using glass beads and the denaturing buffer agents in an RNase-free environment and then the cDNA was synthesised and used for real-time PCR assay. Twenty of total of 148 isolates were resistant to fluconazole. The MIC and MFC for the alcoholic extract of E. Platyloba were 64 mg/ml and 128 mg/ml, respectively. Real-time PCR results revealed that the mRNA levels of CDR1 and CDR2 genes significantly declined after incubation with E. Platyloba (both p values Candida species.

  3. Epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and outcome of candidemia among Internal Medicine Wards of community hospitals of Udine province, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Silvestri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Candidemia is an emerging problem among patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine Wards (IMW. We performed a retrospective study to assess the epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and outcome of candidaemia recorded over a 3-year period (2010-2012 among IMW of community hospitals of Udine province in Italy: forty-eight patients were identified, with an overall incidence of 1.44 cases/1000 hospital admissions/year. Candida albicans was the most frequent species, followed by Candida parapsilosis that accounted for 42.9% of Tolmezzo cases. All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin and caspofungin, while 11.4% of strains were not-susceptible to voriconazole and 14.3% to fluconazole. Crude mortality was 41.7%. In conclusion, in community hospitals overall incidence of candidemia is similar to tertiary care hospitals, but 80% of cases are detected in IMW. Candida species distribution is overlapping, but differences in local epidemiology were found and should be taken into consideration. No resistance to amphotericin and caspofungin was found while resistance to azoles was observed. Knowledge of this data might be useful when planning the best therapeutic strategy.

  4. Extraction of chromium, copper, and arsenic from CCA-treated wood by using wood vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Ahn, Byoung Jun; Kim, Gyu-Hyeok

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, wood vinegar was used to extract chromium, copper, and arsenic from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. The extraction efficiency for CCA elements was evaluated using various concentrations of wood vinegar, extraction temperatures, and extraction periods. The extraction efficiency for CCA elements increased with increasing the concentration of wood vinegar and the extraction conditions, resulting in maximal removal rate of copper (95.7%), followed by arsenic (92.7%) and chromium (86.3%). Since wood vinegar afforded high levels of copper extraction, its use was extended to copper-based preservative-treated wood, wherein significant extraction of copper up to 97.6% and 95.7% was obtained from alkaline copper quats (ACQ)- and copper azole (CuAz)-treated sawdust, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the application of wood vinegar for the extraction of metal elements from CCA-treated wood. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. (R,S)-2-chlorophenoxyl pyrazolides as novel substrates for improving lipase-catalyzed hydrolytic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Min-fang; Lu, Pei-yu; Kao, Jou-yan; Wang, Pei-yun; Wu, An-chi; Tsai, Shau-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The best reaction condition of Candida antartica lipase B as biocatalyst, 3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazole as leaving azole, and water-saturated methyl t-butyl ether as reaction medium at 45°C were first selected for performing the hydrolytic resolution of (R,S)-2-(4-chlorophenoxyl) azolides (1-4). In comparison with the kinetic resolution of (R,S)-2-phenylpropionyl 3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazolide or (R,S)-α-methoxyphenylacetyl 3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazolide at the same reaction condition, excellent enantioselectivity with more than two order-of-magnitudes higher activity for each enantiomer was obtained. The resolution was then extended to other (R,S)-3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazolides (5-7) containing 2-chloro, 3-chloro, or 2,4-dichloro substituent, giving good (E > 48) to excellent (E > 100) enantioselectivity. The thermodynamic analysis for 1, 2, and 4-7 demonstrates profound effects of the acyl or leaving moiety on varying enthalpic and entropic contributions to the difference of Gibbs free energies. A thorough kinetic analysis further indicates that on the basis of 6, the excellent enantiomeric ratio for 4 and 7 is due to the higher reactivity of (S)-4 and lower reactivity of (R)-7, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of an Atypical Metschnikowia sp. Strain from the Skin Scraping of a Dermatitis Patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Sian Kuan

    Full Text Available A yeast-like organism was isolated from the skin scraping sample of a stasis dermatitis patient in the Mycology Unit Department of Medical Microbiology, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The isolate produced no pigment and was not identifiable using chromogenic agar and API 20C AUX. The fungus was identified as Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034, which is close to that of Metschnikowia drosophilae based on ITS- and D1/D2 domain-based phylogenetic analysis. However, the physiology of the strain was not associated to M. drosophilae. This pathogen exhibited low sensitivity to all tested azoles, echinocandins, 5-flucytosine and amphotericin B. This study provided insight into Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 phenotype profiles using a Biolog phenotypic microarray (PM. The isolate utilized 373 nutrients of 760 nutrient sources and could adapt to a broad range of osmotic and pH environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of Metschnikowia non-pulcherrima sp. from skin scraping, revealing this rare yeast species as a potential human pathogen that may be misidentified as Candida sp. using conventional methods. Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 can survive in flexible and diverse environments with a generalist lifestyle.

  7. Current issues in onychomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trépanier, E F; Amsden, G W

    1998-02-01

    To review the epidemiology, mycology, clinical features and diagnosis, current pharmacotherapy, and pharmacoeconomics of onychomycosis. We conducted a MEDLINE search from 1966 to May 1997. References from these articles, manufacturers of the discussed antimycotics, and relevant abstracts from recent dermatology conferences were used to collect pertinent data. Data were obtained from published controlled studies and case reports. In the pharmacotherapy section, the most weight was placed on fully reported, randomized, controlled comparative trials, but abstracts and case series were included when well-controlled studies were unavailable. Onychomycosis is a common nail disorder that has a substantial impact on patients' quality of life. It is most commonly caused by dermatophytes, but yeasts and molds can also be involved. Diagnosis is made through clinical presentation, potassium hydroxide preparations, and culture of tissue/nail samples. Griseofulvin was the drug of choice for many years, but its low cure rates and the development of newer, more effective drugs made it fall out of favor. Current therapeutic alternatives include fluconazole, itraconazole, and terbinafine. Data on the use of fluconazole are limited to case series and reports. Continuous dosing of itraconazole and terbinafine are well-proven therapies. New data are becoming available on the use of pulse itraconazole dosing, which has recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for fingernail infections. These drugs are well tolerated, but attention to drug interactions is necessary with the azoles. Currently, continuous terbinafine appears to be the most cost-effective drug for dermatophyte onychomycosis.

  8. Release of copper-amended particles from micronized copper-pressure-treated wood during mechanical abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Hirsch, Cordula; Mucchino, Claudio; Wichser, Adrian; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2016-11-28

    We investigated the particles released due to abrasion of wood surfaces pressure-treated with micronized copper azole (MCA) wood preservative and we gathered preliminary data on its in vitro cytotoxicity for lung cells. The data were compared with particles released after abrasion of untreated, water (0% MCA)-pressure-treated, chromated copper (CC)-pressure-treated wood, and varnished wood. Size, morphology, and composition of the released particles were analyzed. Our results indicate that the abrasion of MCA-pressure-treated wood does not cause an additional release of nanoparticles from the unreacted copper (Cu) carbonate nanoparticles from of the MCA formulation. However, a small amount of released Cu was detected in the nanosized fraction of wood dust, which could penetrate the deep lungs. The acute cytotoxicity studies were performed on a human lung epithelial cell line and human macrophages derived from a monocytic cell line. These cell types are likely to encounter the released wood particles after inhalation. Our findings indicate that under the experimental conditions chosen, MCA does not pose a specific additional nano-risk, i.e. there is no additional release of nanoparticles and no specific nano-toxicity for lung epithelial cells and macrophages.

  9. [Antifungal therapy for infants, children and adolescents with suspected or documented invasive fungal infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, C M

    2010-04-01

    Fungal nosocomial infections have gradually and consistently increased since the 90s.This increasing threat is closely related with the growing number of people with immune system disorders and their survival. It is also related with the destruction of their physical barriers against infection due to the use of cytotoxic drugs or invasive procedures, such is the case of cancer patients and bone marrow and solid organ transplant patients. Increased survival of patients with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency, premature babies and patients with complex congenital malformations, especially in the gastrointestinal tract, also add up to this scenario. The occurrence of yeast and filamentous fungi infections, especially of the Candida species, has been on the rise. Azole agents overuse, especially fluconazole, for the treatment and prophylaxis of fungal infections has put selective pressure on Candida spp. which resulted in an increase of non-albican species such as C. krusei, C. glabrata and C. famata, among others, as well as their growing resistance to these antifungal agents.

  10. Sensitivity of Fusarium culmorum to triazoles: impact of trichothecene chemotypes, oxidative stress response and genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellin, Pierre; Scauflaire, Jonathan; Van Hese, Viviane; Munaut, Françoise; Legrève, Anne

    2017-06-01

    Fusarium culmorum is a fungal pathogen occurring worldwide on various weeds and important crops. Triazoles have been shown to be the most effective fungicide for managing Fusarium spp., but little is known about their specific activity on F. culmorum. The sensitivity of 107 F. culmorum strains to triazoles was assessed using microtitre plate assays. The EC 50 values ranged from 0.14 to 1.53 mg L -1 for tebuconazole and from 0.25 to 2.47 mg L -1 for epoxiconazole. Cross-resistance to both azoles was found (r = 0.61). F. culmorum appeared to be significantly more sensitive than F. graminearum or F. cerealis. No increase in the mean EC 50 was observed over time, which might be related to an unfavourable fitness cost, measured here as fungal growth. On average, nivalenol-producing strains of F. culmorum were significantly more resistant than deoxynivalenol-producing strains. The relationship between resistance and chemotype-dependent adaptation to oxidative stress was investigated, but remained unclear. No link between inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) genetic diversity and triazole resistance could be established. Fungicide use might not be a driving force in the evolution of F. culmorum, and the benefit of a resistance trait probably does not outweigh its costs. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Antifungal susceptibility profiles of 1698 yeast reference strains revealing potential emerging human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Desnos-Ollivier

    Full Text Available New molecular identification techniques and the increased number of patients with various immune defects or underlying conditions lead to the emergence and/or the description of novel species of human and animal fungal opportunistic pathogens. Antifungal susceptibility provides important information for ecological, epidemiological and therapeutic issues. The aim of this study was to assess the potential risk of the various species based on their antifungal drug resistance, keeping in mind the methodological limitations. Antifungal susceptibility profiles to the five classes of antifungal drugs (polyens, azoles, echinocandins, allylamines and antimetabolites were determined for 1698 yeast reference strains belonging to 992 species (634 Ascomycetes and 358 Basidiomycetes. Interestingly, geometric mean minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of all antifungal drugs tested were significantly higher for Basidiomycetes compared to Ascomycetes (p<0.001. Twenty four strains belonging to 23 species of which 19 were Basidiomycetes seem to be intrinsically "resistant" to all drugs. Comparison of the antifungal susceptibility profiles of the 4240 clinical isolates and the 315 reference strains belonging to 53 shared species showed similar results. Even in the absence of demonstrated in vitro/in vivo correlation, knowing the in vitro susceptibility to systemic antifungal agents and the putative intrinsic resistance of yeast species present in the environment is important because they could become opportunistic pathogens.

  12. Invasive candidiasis in pediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit; Deep, Akash

    2009-10-01

    Candidemia and disseminated candidiasis are major causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients especially in the intensive care units (ICU). The incidence of invasive candidasis is on a steady rise because of increasing use of multiple antibiotics and invasive procedures carried out in the ICUs. Worldwide there is a shifting trend from C. albicans towards non albicans species, with an associated increase in mortality and antifungal resistance. In the ICU a predisposed host in one who is on broad spectrum antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and central venous catheters. There are no pathognomonic signs or symptoms. The clinical clues are: unexplained fever or signs of severe sepsis or septic shock while on antibiotics, multiple, non-tender, nodular erythematous cutaneous lesions. The spectrum of infection with candida species range from superficial candidiasis of the skin and mucosa to more serious life threatening infections. Treatment of candidiasis involves removal of the most likely source of infection and drug therapy to speed up the clearance of infection. Amphotericin B remains the initial drug of first choice in hemodynamically unstable critically ill children in the wake of increasing resistance to azoles. Evaluation of newer antifungal agents and precise role of prophylactic therapy in ICU patients is needed.

  13. Efficacy of oral E1210, a new broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action, in murine models of candidiasis, aspergillosis, and fusariosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Katsura; Horii, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Mamiko; Watanabe, Nao-Aki; Okubo, Miyuki; Sonoda, Jiro; Nakamoto, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Keigo; Shirotori, Syuji; Murai, Norio; Inoue, Satoshi; Matsukura, Masayuki; Abe, Shinya; Yoshimatsu, Kentaro; Asada, Makoto

    2011-10-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class, broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action-inhibition of fungal glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. In this study, the efficacies of E1210 and reference antifungals were evaluated in murine models of oropharyngeal and disseminated candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. Oral E1210 demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy in infections caused by Candida species, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium solani. In the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis, E1210 and fluconazole each caused a significantly greater reduction in the number of oral CFU than the control treatment (P candidiasis model, mice treated with E1210, fluconazole, caspofungin, or liposomal amphotericin B showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis caused by azole-resistant Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis. A 24-h delay in treatment onset minimally affected the efficacy outcome of E1210 in the treatment of disseminated candidiasis. In the Aspergillus flavus pulmonary aspergillosis model, mice treated with E1210, voriconazole, or caspofungin showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. These data suggest that further studies to determine E1210's potential for the treatment of disseminated fungal infections are indicated.

  14. Recent trends: Medical management of infectious keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Solanki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article highlights the newer diagnostic modalities and approaches in the medical management of infectious keratitis. A Medline literature search conducted to March 2014 has been included. Recent studies or publications were selected from international indexed journals using suitable key words. Development of specular microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR has a promising role as diagnostic modalities in infectious keratitis, especially in refractory cases. Previously fortified antibiotics have been the mainstay of treatment for bacterial keratitis. Recently, the advent of fourth-generation fluoroquinolones monotherapy has shown promising results in the management of bacterial keratitis. Corneal collagen cross-linking is being considered in the refractory cases. Topical natamycin and amphotericin B should be considered as the first choice anti-fungal agents in suspected filamentous or yeast infection respectively. Voriconazole and newer routes of administration such as intrastromal and intracameral injection of conventional anti-fungal agents have demonstrated a positive clinical response. Ganciclovir is a newer anti-viral agent with promising results in herpes simplex keratitis. Thus, introduction of newer diagnostic modalities and collagen cross-linking along with fourth-generation fluoroquinolones and newer azoles have a promising role in the management of infectious keratitis.

  15. Interactions between antifungal and antiretroviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christine A; Foisy, Michelle; Tseng, Alice

    2010-09-01

    Since the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy, the incidence of opportunistic infections has declined and the life expectancy of HIV-infected people has significantly increased. However, opportunistic infections, including fungal diseases, remain a leading cause of hospitalizations and mortality in HIV-infected people. With the availability of several new antiretroviral and antifungal agents, drug-drug interactions emerge as a potential safety concern. Relevant literature was identified using a Medline search of articles published up to March 2010 and a review of conference abstracts. Search terms included HIV, antifungal agents and drug interactions. Original papers and relevant citations were considered for this review. Readers will gain an understanding of the pharmacokinetic properties of antiretroviral and antifungal agents, and insight into significant drug-drug interactions which may require dosage adjustments or a change in therapy. Azole antifungal drugs, with the exception of fluconazole, pose the greatest risk of two-way interactions with antiretroviral drugs through CYP450 enzymes effects. Limited studies suggest the risk of interactions between antiretroviral drugs and echinocandins is much lower. The combination of tenofovir and amphotericin B should be used with caution and close monitoring of renal function is required.

  16. Characterization of Miconazole Effects on Mice Fetus Liver Tissue Using FTIR-MSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtarinezhad, Azadeh; Panahyab, Ataollah; Mohamadzadehasl, Baharak; Shirazi, Farshad H

    2017-01-01

    Azole agents especially Miconazole are widely used even during pregnancy as antifungal agents. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of FTIR Micro-Spectroscopy for discriminating of Miconazole treated liver tissue from control liver tissue. The mice were injected with Miconazole (60 mg/Kg) on gestation day 9 and they were dissected on pregnancy day 15. The fetus fixed, dehydrated, and embedded in paraffin. Sections of liver (10 μM) were prepared from control and treated fetus groups by Microtome and deparaffinized with xylene. The spectra were collected using FTIR-MSP in the region of 4000-400 cm -1 . All spectra were normalized to amide II band (1454 cm -1 ) after baseline correction of entire spectrum. The results were shown by 2nd derivatization of spectra and also subtracting from control spectra. Miconazole induces some minor changes in the mouse fetus liver at cellular levels when mother is exposed. The most important calculated alterations are in the production of fetus liver proteins. α helical and β sheet structures have shown significant variations, indicating protein alterations configurationally.

  17. Fungal infection as a risk factor for HIV disease progression among patients with a CD4 count above 200/microl in the era of cART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2008-01-01

    The identification of clinical risk factors for AIDS in patients with preserved immune function is of significant interest. We examined whether patients with fungal infection (FI) and CD4 cell count >/=200/microl were at higher risk of disease progression in the era of cART. 11,009 EuroSIDA...... patients were followed from their first CD4 cell count >/=200/microl after 1 January 1997 until progression to any non-azoles/amphotericin B susceptible (AAS) AIDS disease, last visit or death. Initiation of antimycotic therapy (AMT) was used as a marker of FI and was modelled as a time-updated covariate...... using Poisson regression. After adjustment for current CD4 cell count, HIV-RNA, starting cART and diagnosis of AAS-AIDS, AMT was significantly associated with an increased incidence of non-AAS-AIDS (IRR=1.55, 95% CI 1.17-2.06, p=0.0024). Despite low incidence of AIDS in the cART era, FI in patients...

  18. Penetration and Effectiveness of Micronized Copper in Refractory Wood Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Schubert, Mark; Michel, Elisabeth; Butron, Maria Isabel; Boone, Matthieu N; Dierick, Manuel; Van Acker, Joris; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2016-01-01

    The North American wood decking market mostly relies on easily treatable Southern yellow pine (SYP), which is being impregnated with micronized copper (MC) wood preservatives since 2006. These formulations are composed of copper (Cu) carbonate particles (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2), with sizes ranging from 1 nm to 250 μm, according to manufacturers. MC-treated SYP wood is protected against decay by solubilized Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuCO3·Cu(OH)2 particles that successively release Cu2+ ions (reservoir effect). The wood species used for the European wood decking market differ from the North American SYP. One of the most common species is Norway spruce wood, which is poorly treatable i.e. refractory due to the anatomical properties, like pore size and structure, and chemical composition, like pit membrane components or presence of wood extractives. Therefore, MC formulations may not suitable for refractory wood species common in the European market, despite their good performance in SYP. We evaluated the penetration effectiveness of MC azole (MCA) in easily treatable Scots pine and in refractory Norway spruce wood. We assessed the effectiveness against the Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungus Rhodonia placenta. Our findings show that MCA cannot easily penetrate refractory wood species and could not confirm the presence of a reservoir effect.

  19. Determining lower threshold concentrations for synergistic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergager, Maj-Britt Andersen; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Kretschmann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    which proven synergists cease to act as synergists towards the aquatic crustacean Daphnia magna. To do this, we compared several approaches and test-setups to evaluate which approach gives the most conservative estimate for the lower threshold for synergy for three known azole synergists. We focus.......619±8.555μgL(-1)) and 0.122±0.0417μM (40.236±13.75μgL(-1)), respectively, in the 14-days tests. Testing synergy in relation to concentration addition provided the most conservative values. The threshold values for the vertical assessments in tests where the two could be compared were in general 1.2 to 4.......7 fold higher than the horizontal assessments. Using passive dosing rather than dilution series or spiking did not lower the threshold significantly. Below the threshold for synergy, slight antagony could often be observed. This is most likely due to induction of enzymes active in metabolization of alpha...

  20. A pilot study of the efficacy of wipes containing chlorhexidine 0.3%, climbazole 0.5% and Tris-EDTA to reduce Malassezia pachydermatis populations on canine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavana, Paola; Peano, Andrea; Petit, Jean-Yanique; Tizzani, Paolo; Perrot, Sébastien; Bensignor, Emmanuel; Guillot, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    Wipes containing chlorhexidine and azole derivates have been recommended for veterinary use. No study has been published about their activity against Malassezia pachydermatis. To evaluate the in vivo and in vitro activity of wipes soaked in a chlorhexidine, climbazole and Tris-EDTA solution against Malassezia pachydermatis. Five research colony shar-pei dogs. Wipes were applied once daily onto the left axilla, left groin and perianal area (protocol A), and twice daily on the right axilla, right groin and umbilical region (protocol B) for 3 days. In vivo activity was evaluated by quantifying Malassezia colonies through contact plates on the selected body areas before and after wipe application. The activity of the solution in which the wipes were soaked was assessed in vitro by contact tests following the European Standard UNI EN 1275 guidelines. Samples collected after wipe application showed a significant and rapid reduction of Malassezia yeast CFU. No significant difference in the Malassezia reduction was found between protocols A and B. In vitro assay showed 100% activity against Malassezia yeasts after a 15 min contact time with the wipe solution. Wipes containing chlorhexidine, climbazole and Tris-EDTA substantially reduced the M. pachydermatis population on the skin of dogs. The results, although this was an uncontrolled study performed on a small number of dogs, suggest that these wipes may be useful for topical therapy of Malassezia dermatitis involving the lips, paws, perianal area and skin folds. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  1. Targeting Malassezia species for Novel Synthetic and Natural Antidandruff Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiolella, Letizia; Carradori, Simone; Maccallini, Cristina; Giusiano, Gustavo; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-01-01

    Malassezia spp. are lipophilic yeasts not only present in the normal skin microflora, but also responsible of skin-related diseases (pityriasis versicolor, seborrheic/atopic dermatitis and dandruff) as well as systemic fungal infections in humans and animals. Their treatment and eradication are mainly based on old azole drugs, which are characterized by poor compliance, unpredictable clinical efficacy, emerging resistance and several side effects. These drawbacks have prompted the research toward novel synthetic and natural derivatives/ nanomaterials targeting other pivotal enzymes/pathways such as carbonic anhydrase (MgCA) and lipases, alone or in combination, in order to improve the eradication rate of this fungus. This review accomplished an update on this important topic dealing with the latest discoveries of synthetic scaffolds and natural products for the treatment of Malassezia spp.-related diseases, thus suggesting new opportunities to design innovative and alternative anti-dandruff drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. [Cutaneous Malassezia infections and Malassezia associated dermatoses: An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, P; Krüger, C; Mayser, P

    2015-06-01

    The lipophilic yeast fungus Malassezia (M.) spp. is the only fungal genus or species which is part of the physiological human microbiome. Today, at least 14 different Malassezia species are known; most of them can only be identified using molecular biological techniques. As a facultative pathogenic microorganism, Malassezia represents the causative agent both of superficial cutaneous infections and of blood stream infections. Pityriasis versicolor is the probably most frequent infection caused by Malassezia. Less common, Malassezia folliculitis occurs. There is only an episodic report on Malassezia-induced onychomycosis. Seborrhoeic dermatitis represents a Malassezia-associated inflammatory dermatosis. In addition, Malassezia allergenes should be considered as the trigger of "Head-Neck"-type atopic dermatitis. Ketoconazole possesses the strongest in vitro activity against Malassezia, and represents the treatment of choice for topical therapy of pityriasis versicolor. Alternatives include other azole antifungals but also the allylamine terbinafine and the hydroxypyridone antifungal agent ciclopirox olamine. "Antiseborrhoeic" agents, e.g. zinc pyrithione, selenium disulfide, and salicylic acid, are also effective in pityriasis versicolor. The drug of choice for oral treatment of pityriasis versicolor is itraconazole; an effective alternative represents fluconazole. Seborrhoeic dermatitis is best treated with topical medication, including topical corticosteroids and antifungal agents like ketoconazole or sertaconazole. Calcineurin inhibitors, e.g. pimecrolimus and tacrolimus, are reliable in seborrhoeic dermatitis, however are used off-label.

  3. Management of mycoses in daily practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Lorenzo; Micali, Giuseppe; Papini, Manuela; Piraccini, Bianca M; Veraldi, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    The guideline recommendations, albeit founded on thorough reviews of clinically relevant literature data, are often not immediately adaptable to everyday life. Considering the marked heterogeneity of superficial mycoses, each of them requires specific management in a real life context; in all cases diagnostic confirmation is required with microscopic and culture examination. In tinea capitis oral therapy is necessary (minimum six weeks) and should be continued until clinical and, above all, mycological healing. In cases of tinea corporis, cruris or pedis, it may be necessary to associate oral therapy to topical treatment. The main oral antifungals are fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine. Fluconazole has favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics, and is effective in most superficial mycoses, for example in cases of diffuse or recurrent pityriasis versicolor in which oral therapy with an azole derivative is useful. Topical treatment, lasting 6-12 months, is indicated in onychomycosis that is confined to one nail. In frequent cases of onychomycosis involving multiple nails or recurrence, oral therapy is necessary. Pharmacological history is important, given the possible interactions of some systemic drugs. In chronic or recurrent relapsing vulvovaginitis, first-choice therapy is oral fluconazole with a therapeutic regimen that respects the mycotic biorhythm (200 mg on days 1, 4, 11, 26, and subsequently 200 mg/week for 3 months).

  4. Agronomic efficiency and physiologic efficiency determination of Azolla-N and Urea-N applied to lowland rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisworo, Elsje L.; Rasjid, Havid; Sisworo, Widjang H.; Wemay, Johannis; Djawanas, Amrin

    1994-01-01

    Data from three field experiments using 15 N labelled Azolla and urea as an N source have been used to determine the agronomical and physiological efficiency of the N-Azoll and N-Urea applied tolowland rice. In general physiological efficiency of N from N-sources applied was lower than the agronomical efficiency. It seems that the increase of N-rates would enhance the agronomical and physiological efficiency of N applied to lowland rice but on the other hand the efficiency of N derived from the applied N-source decreased. Azolla+inorganic N-fertilizer when applied to lowland rice could increase rice yield expresses in dry weight of grain and straw above the control plants. Applying Azolla+inorganic N-fertilizer in the farmer's field located in West Java and West Sumatera often showed higher yields compared to when applied with inorganic N-fertilizer alone although the latter has higher total N-rates. (author). 9 refs, 8 tabs, 5 figs

  5. Deciphering the role of Sodium Lignosulfonate against Candida spp. as persuasive anticandidal agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Anubhuti; Kumar, Awanish

    2018-02-01

    In spite of therapeutic development against life threatening fungal pathogens like Candida albicans, the repertoire of effective antifungal drugs is lagging. The emergence and persistence of azole/echinocandin resistance and other cases of multi-drug resistance have led to the failure of the antifungal treatment regime. This troublesome scenario has steered a need for the development of novel leads. Computer aided in-silico drug design using virtual screening, molecular docking, drug likeness, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity analysis for the identification of lead compounds for further in-vitro analysis is a cost effective and time-saving strategy. The present study used these strategies to discover novel lead antifungal from the pool of second largest occurring natural compound lignin. After the virtual screening of lignin derivatives, Sodium lignosulfonate (LIG) was identified as the best lead for further analysis. After this vigorous in-silico analysis, LIG was then tested in-vitro against 5 different Candida species. MIC value of LIG against Candida spp. was found to be 64-128μg/ml. The study is revealing LIG as a potent and persuasive antifungal agent. In the race of Candida therapeutics, the revelation of the antifungal potential of such natural compounds might impact and diversify the discovery and development of novel antifungal agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ascorbic Acid Inhibition of Candida albicans Hsp90-Mediated Morphogenesis Occurs via the Transcriptional Regulator Upc2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hauwenhuyse, Frédérique; Fiori, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Morphogenetic transitions of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans are influenced by temperature changes, with induction of filamentation upon a shift from 30 to 37°C. Hsp90 was identified as a major repressor of an elongated cell morphology at low temperatures, as treatment with specific inhibitors of Hsp90 results in elongated growth forms at 30°C. Elongated growth resulting from a compromised Hsp90 is considered neither hyphal nor pseudohyphal growth. It has been reported that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) interferes with the yeast-to-hypha transition in C. albicans. In the present study, we show that ascorbic acid also antagonizes the morphogenetic change caused by hampered Hsp90 function. Further analysis revealed that Upc2, a transcriptional regulator of genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, and Erg11, the target of azole antifungals, whose expression is in turn regulated by Upc2, are required for this antagonism. Ergosterol levels correlate with elongated growth and are reduced in cells treated with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GdA) and restored by cotreatment with ascorbic acid. In addition, we show that Upc2 appears to be required for ascorbic acid-mediated inhibition of the antifungal activity of fluconazole. These results identify Upc2 as a major regulator of ascorbic acid-induced effects in C. albicans and suggest an association between ergosterol content and elongated growth upon Hsp90 compromise. PMID:25084864

  7. Reversible Capture and Release of Cl2 and Br2 with a Redox-Active Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulchinsky, Yuri; Hendon, Christopher H; Lomachenko, Kirill A; Borfecchia, Elisa; Melot, Brent C; Hudson, Matthew R; Tarver, Jacob D; Korzyński, Maciej D; Stubbs, Amanda W; Kagan, Jacob J; Lamberti, Carlo; Brown, Craig M; Dincă, Mircea

    2017-04-26

    Extreme toxicity, corrosiveness, and volatility pose serious challenges for the safe storage and transportation of elemental chlorine and bromine, which play critical roles in the chemical industry. Solid materials capable of forming stable nonvolatile compounds upon reaction with elemental halogens may partially mitigate these challenges by allowing safe halogen release on demand. Here we demonstrate that elemental halogens quantitatively oxidize coordinatively unsaturated Co(II) ions in a robust azolate metal-organic framework (MOF) to produce stable and safe-to-handle Co(III) materials featuring terminal Co(III)-halogen bonds. Thermal treatment of the oxidized MOF causes homolytic cleavage of the Co(III)-halogen bonds, reduction to Co(II), and concomitant release of elemental halogens. The reversible chemical storage and thermal release of elemental halogens occur with no significant losses of structural integrity, as the parent cobaltous MOF retains its crystallinity and porosity even after three oxidation/reduction cycles. These results highlight a material operating via redox mechanism that may find utility in the storage and capture of other noxious and corrosive gases.

  8. Emerging role of Amiodarone and Dronedarone, as antiarrhythmic drugs, in treatment of leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, A; Bemani, E; Bahrami, S

    2018-04-21

    Leishmaniasis is a group of human and animal diseases causing 20,000 to 40,000 annual deaths and its etiological agents belong to the Leishmania genus. The most current treatment against leishmaniasis is chemotherapy. Pentavalent antimonials such as glucantime and pentostam have been administrated as the first-line drugs in treatment of various forms of leishmaniasis. The second-line drugs such as amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, miltefosine, pentamidine, azole drugs and paromomycin are used in resistant cases to pentavalent antimonials. Because of drawbacks of the first-line and second-line drugs including adverse side effects on different organs, increasing resistance, high cost, need to hospitalization and long-term treatment, it is necessary to find an alternative drug for leishmaniasis treatment. Several investigations have reported the effectiveness of amiodarone, the most commonly used antiarrhythmic drug, against fungi, Trypanosomes and Leishmania spp. in vitro, in vivo and clinical conditions. Moreover, the beneficial effects of dronedarone, amiodarone analogues, against Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania mexicana have recently been demonstrated and such treatment regimens resulted in lower side effects. The anti- leishmanial and anti- trypanosomal effectiveness of amiodarone and dronedarone has been attributed to destabilization of intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis, inhibition of sterol biosynthesis and collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. Because of relative low cost, excellent pharmacokinetic properties, easy accessibility and beneficial effects of amiodarone and dronedarone on leishmaniasis, they are proper candidates to replace the current drugs used in leishmaniasis treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro activities of antifungal drugs against environmental Exophiala isolates and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülmez, Dolunay; Doğan, Özlem; Boral, Barış; Döğen, Aylin; İlkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren; Arikan-Akdagli, Sevtap

    2018-04-03

    Exophiala is a genus of black fungi isolated worldwide from environmental and clinical specimens. Data on antifungal susceptibility of Exophiala isolates are limited and the methodology on susceptibility testing is not yet standardized. In this study, we investigated in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of environmental Exophiala isolates. A total of 87 Exophiala isolated from dishwashers or railway ties were included. CLSI M38-A2 microdilution method with modifications was used to determine antifungal susceptibility for fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B, and terbinafine. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined visually at 48h, 72h, and 96h. MIC-0 endpoint (complete inhibition of growth) was used for amphotericin B and azoles, except fluconazole, for which MIC-2 endpoint (~50% inhibition compared to growth control) was used. Both MIC-0 and MIC-1 (~80% inhibition compared to growth control) results were analysed for terbinafine, to enable comparison with previous studies. Fungal growth was sufficient for determination of MICs at 48h for all isolates except two Exophiala dermatitidis strains. At 72h, most active antifungal agents according to GM MIC were voriconazole and terbinafine, followed by posaconazole, itraconazole, and amphotericin B in rank order of decreasing activity. While amphotericin B displayed adequate in vitro activity despite relatively high MICs, fluconazole showed no meaningful antifungal activity against Exophiala. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Aspergillus spp. by Using a Composite Correlation Index (CCI)-Based Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Method Appears To Not Offer Benefit over Traditional Broth Microdilution Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitman, Melissa R; McTaggart, Lisa; Spinato, Joanna; Poopalarajah, Rahgavi; Lister, Erin; Husain, Shahid; Kus, Julianne V

    2017-07-01

    Aspergillus spp. cause serious invasive lung infections, and Aspergillus fumigatus is the most commonly encountered clinically significant species. Voriconazole is considered to be the drug of choice for treating A. fumigatus infections; however, rising resistance rates have been reported. We evaluated a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based method for the differentiation between wild-type and non-wild-type isolates of 20 Aspergillus spp. (including 2 isolates of Aspergillus ustus and 1 of Aspergillus calidoustus that were used as controls due their intrinsic low azole susceptibility with respect to the in vitro response to voriconazole). At 30 and 48 h of incubation, there was complete agreement between Cyp51A sequence analysis, broth microdilution, and MALDI-TOF MS classification of isolates as wild type or non-wild type. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrated that MALDI-TOF MS can be used to accurately detect A. fumigatus strains with reduced voriconazole susceptibility. However, rather than proving to be a rapid and simple method for antifungal susceptibility testing, this particular MS-based method showed no benefit over conventional testing methods. © Crown copyright 2017.

  11. [Potential antimicrobial drug interactions in clinical practice: consequences of polypharmacy and multidrug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Múgica, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Polypharmacy is a growing problem nowadays, which can increase the risk of potential drug interactions, and result in a loss of effectiveness. This is particularly relevant to the anti-infective therapy, especially when infection is produced by resistant bacteria, because therapeutic options are limited and interactions can cause treatment failure. All antimicrobial prescriptions were retrospectively reviewed during a week in the Pharmacy Department, in order to detect potential drug-interactions and analysing their clinical significance. A total of 314 antimicrobial prescriptions from 151 patients were checked. There was at least one potential interaction detected in 40% of patients, being more frequent and severe in those infected with multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Drugs most commonly involved were quinolones, azoles, linezolid and vancomycin. Potential drug interactions with antimicrobial agents are a frequent problem that can result in a loss of effectiveness. This is why they should be detected and avoided when possible, in order to optimize antimicrobial therapy, especially in case of multidrug resistant infections.

  12. CYP1A inhibition in fish gill filaments: A novel assay applied on pharmaceuticals and other chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beijer, Kristina; Abrahamson, Alexandra; Brunstroem, Bjoern [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Norbyvaegen 18A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Brandt, Ingvar, E-mail: ingvar.brandt@ebc.uu.se [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Norbyvaegen 18A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-01-31

    The gill filament 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) assay was originally developed as a biomarker for cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) induction by Ah-receptor agonists in water. In this study, the assay was adapted to measure inhibition of CYP1A activity in fish gill filaments ex vivo. The experiments were carried out using gill arch filaments from {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}NF)-exposed three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Candidate CYP1A inhibitors were added to the assay buffer. Nine selected pharmaceuticals and five known or suspected CYP1A-modulating chemicals were examined with regard to their ability to reduce EROD activity in gill filaments. Ellipticine, a well characterized CYP1A inhibitor, was the most effective inhibitor of the compounds tested. At a concentration in the assay buffer of 1 {mu}M the antifungal azoles ketoconazole, miconazole and bitertanol, and the plant flavonoid acacetin reduced gill EROD activity by more than 50%, implying IC50 values below 1 {mu}M. These compounds have previously been shown to inhibit EROD activity in liver microsomes from fish and mammals at similar concentrations. The proton pump inhibitor omeprazole reduced the gill EROD activity by 39% at 10 {mu}M. It is concluded that the modified gill filament EROD assay is useful to screen for waterborne pollutants that inhibit catalytic CYP1A activity in fish gills.

  13. Central Nervous System Histoplasmosis in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyalakonda, Harita; Albuerne, Marisol; Suazo Hernandez, Lia Patricia; Sarria, Juan C

    2016-02-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) by Histoplasma capsulatum in AIDS is uncommon and not easily recognized. CNS histoplasmosis cases from our institution were identified by a retrospective chart review from 2004-2014. A thorough literature search was performed for additional cases and their characteristics were compared. Clinical findings, treatment and outcomes are discussed. A total of 5 cases from our institution were identified. They had a clinical presentation that included classic signs of meningitis, often with evidence of disseminated involvement, and was typically severe with important neurological impairment. These cases were treated with antifungal agents, including a lipid amphotericin B formulation and azole drugs, but eventually 3 experienced nonresolution of their disease likely because of lack of adherence to therapy and died from their infection. The clinical presentation, treatment and outcome of these cases did not significantly differ from cases found in the review of the literature. Clinicians practicing in endemic areas should be aware of this rare but serious form of histoplasmosis. The recognition of 5 cases of CNS histoplasmosis in AIDS patients from a single institution suggests that histoplasmosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of the CNS complications of AIDS. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Phytochemical profile and biological activities of Deverra tortuosa (Desf.)DC.: a desert aromatic shrub widespread in Northern Region of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guetat, Arbi; Boulila, Abdennacer; Boussaid, Mohamed

    2018-04-16

    The present study describes the chemical composition of the essential oil of different plant parts of Devrra tortuosa; in vivo and in vitro biological activities of plant extract and essential oils. Apiol was found to be the major component of the oil (between 65.73% and 74.41%). The best antioxidant activities were observed for the oil of flowers (IC50 = 175 μg/ml). The samples of stems and roots exhibit lower antioxidant activity (IC50 = 201 μg/ml and 182 μg/ml, respectively). The values of IC50 showed that the extracts of methanol exhibit the highest antioxidants activities (IC50 = 64.8 102 μg/ml). EOs showed excellent antifungal activity against yeasts with low azole susceptibilities (i.e. Malassezia spp. and Candida krusei). The MIC values of oils varied between 2.85 mg/mL and 27 mg/mL. The obtained results also showed that the plant extracts inhibited the germination and the shoot and root growth of Triticum æstivum seedlings.

  15. Identification and characterization of Daldinia eschscholtzii isolated from skin scrapings, nails, and blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee Peng Ng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Daldinia eschscholtzii is a filamentous wood-inhabiting endophyte commonly found in woody plants. Here, we report the identification and characterization of nine D. eschscholtzii isolates from skin scrapings, nail clippings, and blood. Methods The nine isolates were identified based on colony morphology, light microscopy, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS-based phylogeny. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of the fungal isolates was evaluated by the Etest to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. Results The nine isolates examined were confirmed as D. eschscholtzii. They exhibited typical features of Daldinia sp. on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar, with white felty colonies and black-gray coloration on the reverse side. Septate hyphae, branching conidiophore with conidiogenous cells budding from its terminus, and nodulisporium-like conidiophores were observed under the microscope. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the nine isolates were clustered within the D. eschscholtzii species complex. All the isolates exhibited low MICs against azole agents (voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole, as well as amphotericin B, with MIC of less than 1 µg/ml. Discussion Early and definitive identification of D. eschscholtzii is vital to reducing misuse of antimicrobial agents. Detailed morphological and molecular characterization as well as antifungal profiling of D. eschscholtzii provide the basis for future studies on its biology, pathogenicity, and medicinal potential.

  16. First report of Candida auris in America: Clinical and microbiological aspects of 18 episodes of candidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Belinda; Melo, Analy S A; Perozo-Mena, Armindo; Hernandez, Martin; Francisco, Elaine Cristina; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2016-10-01

    Characterization of a hospital outbreak of Candida auris candidemia that involved 18 critically ill patients in Venezuela. Bloodstream isolates of C. auris obtained from 18 patients admitted at a medical center in Maracaibo, between March, 2012 and July, 2013 were included. Species identification was confirmed by ITS rDNA sequencing. Isolates were subsequently typed by amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting (AFLP). Susceptibility testing was performed according to CLSI. Clinical data were collected from all cases by using a standard clinical form. A total of 13 critically ill pediatric and 5 adult patients, with a median age of 26 days, were included. All were previously exposed to antibiotics and multiple invasive medical procedures. Clinical management included prompt catheter removal and antifungal therapy. Thirteen patients (72%) survived up to 30 days after onset of candidemia. AFLP fingerprinting of all C. auris isolates suggested a clonal outbreak. The isolates were considered resistant to azoles, but susceptible to anidulafungin and 50% of isolates exhibited amphotericin B MIC values of >1 μg/ml. The study demonstrated that C. auris is a multiresistant yeast pathogen that can be a source of health-care associated infections in tertiary care hospitals with a high potential for nosocomial horizontal transmission. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profile of Candida spp. bloodstream isolates from Latin American hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godoy Patrício

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available From March 1999 to March 2000, we conducted a prospective multicenter study of candidemia involving five tertiary care hospitals from four countries in Latin America. Yeast isolates were identified by classical methods and the antifungal susceptibility profile was determined according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards microbroth assay method. During a 12 month-period we were able to collect a total of 103 bloodstream isolates of Candida spp. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species accounting for 42% of all isolates. Non-albicans Candida species strains accounted for 58% of all episodes of candidemia and were mostly represented by C. tropicalis (24.2% and C. parapsilosis (21.3%. It is noteworthy that we were able to identify two cases of C. lusitaniae from different institutions. In our casuistic, non-albicans Candida species isolates related to candidemic episodes were susceptible to fluconazole. Continuously surveillance programs are needed in order to identify possible changes in the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility patterns of yeasts that may occurs after increasing the use of azoles in Latin American hospitals.

  18. Review of the pharmacology and clinical studies of micafungin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Bormann

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Alison M Bormann1, Vicki A Morrison21Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Division of Hematology/Oncology and Infectious Disease, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Micafungin, like other members of the echinocandin class, has a unique mechanism of action that inhibits the synthesis of 1,3-β-D glucans in the fungal cell wall. It has been approved for treatment of esophageal candidiasis, invasive candidiasis including candidemia, and for prophylaxis of Candida infections in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although efficacy and safety have also been demonstrated in pediatric populations, micafungin is approved for this indication in Europe and Japan, but not in the United States. It has demonstrated activity against Candida spp. including those that are azole-resistant as well as Aspergillus and a few other clinically important molds. It is administered intravenously as a once daily infusion and does not require dose adjustments for renal or moderate hepatic dysfunction. Its safety record, favorable tolerability profile, and few drug interactions make it an important agent for the treatment of invasive fungal infections.Keywords: micafungin, antifungal therapy, echinocandins, fungal infections, Candida, Aspergillus

  19. Epidemiology, risk factor, species distribution, antifungal resistance and outcome of Candidemia at a single French hospital: a 7-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadec, Laurent; Talarmin, Jean-Philippe; Gastinne, Thomas; Bretonnière, Cédric; Miegeville, Michel; Le Pape, Patrice; Morio, Florent

    2016-05-01

    Candidemia remains a major cause of disease worldwide and is associated with a high mortality rate. We conducted a retrospective study of candidemia at Nantes Hospital, France, between 2004 and 2010. A total of 191 episodes (n = 188 patients) were reviewed. Incidence, demographics, risk factors, antifungal management, species identification, in vitro susceptibility and 12 weeks survival were analysed. Global incidence of candidemia was 0.37‰ admissions. Higher incidences were observed in haematology (6.65‰) and intensive care units (2‰). Central venous catheter and antibiotic exposure were the most frequent risk factors (77% and 76% respectively). Candida albicans was the predominant species (51.8%) followed by C. parapsilosis (14.5%), C. glabrata (9.8%), C. tropicalis (9.8%) and C. krusei (4.1%). However, species distribution differed significantly between medical units with frequency of C. tropicalis being higher in haematology compared to other medical units. Fluconazole and caspofungin were the main antifungals given as first-line therapy. Although not significant, 12 weeks mortality rate was 30.9%, being higher for C. tropicalis (44.4%) than for C. parapsilosis (16%). Acquired azole or echinocandin resistance was noted in some isolates, underlining the need for systematic antifungal susceptibility testing in patients with candidemia. These epidemiological findings will be of interest for antifungal stewardship at our hospital. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Silver nanoparticle conjugation affects antiacanthamoebic activities of amphotericin B, nystatin, and fluconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Ayaz; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Hussain, Muhammad Asim; Ahmed, Dania; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality, killing more than 15 million people worldwide. This is despite our advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. Nanoparticles offer a promising technology to enhance drug efficacy and formation of effective vehicles for drug delivery. Here, we conjugated amphotericin B, nystatin (macrocyclic polyenes), and fluconazole (azole) with silver nanoparticles. Silver-conjugated drugs were synthesized successfully and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Conjugated and unconjugated drugs were tested against Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype using amoebicidal assay and host cell cytotoxicity assay. Viability assays revealed that silver nanoparticles conjugated with amphotericin B (Amp-AgNPs) and nystatin (Nys-AgNPs) exhibited significant antiamoebic properties compared with drugs alone or AgNPs alone (P < 0.05) as determined by Trypan blue exclusion assay. In contrast, conjugation of fluconazole with AgNPs had limited effect on its antiamoebic properties. Notably, AgNP-coated drugs inhibited amoebae-mediated host cell cytotoxicity as determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release. Overall, here we present the development of a new formulation of more effective antiamoebic agents based on AgNPs coated with drugs that hold promise for future applications.

  1. SERS and DFT study of copper surfaces coated with corrosion inhibitor

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    Maurizio Muniz-Miranda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Azole derivatives are common inhibitors of copper corrosion due to the chemical adsorption occurring on the metal surface that gives rise to a protective film. In particular, 1,2,4-triazole performs comparable to benzotriazole, which is much more widely used, but is by no means an environmentally friendly agent. In this study, we have analyzed the adsorption of 1,2,4-triazole on copper by taking advantage of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS effect, which highlights the vibrational features of organic ligand monolayers adhering to rough surfaces of some metals such as gold, silver and copper. To ensure the necessary SERS activation, a roughening procedure was implemented on the copper substrates, resulting in nanoscale surface structures, as evidenced by microscopic investigation. To obtain sufficient information on the molecule–metal interaction and the formation of an anticorrosive thin film, the SERS spectra were interpreted with the aid of theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT approach.

  2. In vitro susceptibility of Trichosporon beigelii to antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perparim, K; Nagai, H; Hashimoto, A; Goto, Y; Tashiro, T; Nasu, M

    1996-12-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) of amphotericin B, flucytosine, miconazole, fluconazole and itraconazole against 21 isolates of Trichosporon beigelii in RPMI-1640 medium were determined using National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) methodology in microdilution method. Most isolates were sensitive to miconazole (MIC90 0.78 microgram/ml), fluconazole (MIC90 6.25 micrograms/ml), and itraconazole (MIC90 0.19 microgram/ml), with the former being the most active agent tested (MFC90 3.12 mu/ml). Although amphotericin B inhibited most strains (MIC range, 0.78-3.12 micrograms/ml), poor fungicidal activity was observed (MFC range, 1.56-12.5 micrograms/ml) showing a pattern of relative resistance in vitro. Flucytosine showed generally poor activity against most isolates tested. These in vitro findings confirm the resistance of T.beigelii to amphotericin B and suggest that azoles may be an alternative to the former for the treatment of disseminated trichosporonosis. However, in vivo studies would better validate these in vitro findings.

  3. Squalene synthase as a target for Chagas disease therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Shang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatid parasites are the causative agents of many neglected tropical diseases and there is currently considerable interest in targeting endogenous sterol biosynthesis in these organisms as a route to the development of novel anti-infective drugs. Here, we report the first x-ray crystallographic structures of the enzyme squalene synthase (SQS from a trypanosomatid parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. We obtained five structures of T. cruzi SQS and eight structures of human SQS with four classes of inhibitors: the substrate-analog S-thiolo-farnesyl diphosphate, the quinuclidines E5700 and ER119884, several lipophilic bisphosphonates, and the thiocyanate WC-9, with the structures of the two very potent quinuclidines suggesting strategies for selective inhibitor development. We also show that the lipophilic bisphosphonates have low nM activity against T. cruzi and inhibit endogenous sterol biosynthesis and that E5700 acts synergistically with the azole drug, posaconazole. The determination of the structures of trypanosomatid and human SQS enzymes with a diverse set of inhibitors active in cells provides insights into SQS inhibition, of interest in the context of the development of drugs against Chagas disease.

  4. [Effects of cultural factors on yield of Linum usitatissimum (Tianya 9)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Zhang, Jin; Du, Yan-bin; Cui, Tong-xia; Wang, Li-jun

    2016-02-01

    Cultural factors influencing high yield and good quality Linum usitatissimum (Tianya 9) were investigated. The correlations between these factors and its yield were analyzed. Path coefficient and principal component analysis were conducted, adopting uniform design of the 8 cultivating factors, i.e. planting density (X1), base nitrogen quantity (X2), base phosphorus quantity (X3), base potassium quantity (X4), foliar fertilizer (potassium dihydrogen phosphate, X5), foliar fertilizer (boron fertilizer, X6), growth regulator (multi-effect azole, X7) and growth duration irrigation amount (X8), aiming at exploring better cultivating plan of L. usitatissimum for Gansu Province. The results indicated that the factors influencing the yield of L. usitatissimum were X1, X7, X2, X3, X5 and X4 in a descending order. Simulation and optimization of the highest yield was further implemented. Frequency analysis showed that the cultivating factors resulting in yield higher than 173.58 kg . hm-2 were 4. 68 - 4. 92 kg . hm-2 (X1) , 11. 59 - 14. 75 kg . hm-2 (X2), 17.26- 21.95 kg . hm-2 (X3), 7.00-12.50 kg . hm-2 (X4) , 1.41-1.81 kg . hm-2 (X5) and 751.74- 954.04 g . hm-2 (X7).

  5. Analysis of the CYP51 gene and encoded protein in propiconazole-resistant isolates of Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas-Gutiérrez, Gloria P; Angarita-Velásquez, Mónica J; Restrepo-Flórez, Juan M; Rodríguez, Paola; Moreno, Claudia X; Arango, Rafael

    2009-08-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet causes black sigatoka, the most important disease in bananas and plantains. Disease control is mainly through the application of systemic fungicides, including sterol demethylation inhibitors (DMIs). Their intensive use has favoured the appearance of resistant strains. However, no studies have been published on the possible resistance mechanisms. In this work, the CYP51 gene was isolated and sequenced in 11 M. fijiensis strains that had shown different degrees of in vitro sensitivity to propiconazole, one of the most widely used DMI fungicides. Six mutations that could be related to the loss in sensitivity to this fungicide were found: Y136F, A313G, Y461D, Y463D, Y463H and Y463N. The mutations were analysed using a homology model of the protein that was constructed from the crystallographic structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Zoff.) Lehmann & Neumann. Additionally, gene expression was determined in 13 M. fijiensis strains through quantitative analysis of products obtained by RT-PCR. Several changes in the sequence of the gene encoding sterol 14alpha-demethylase were found that have been described in other fungi as being correlated with resistance to azole fungicides. No correlation was found between gene expression and propiconazole resistance.

  6. Effect of photoisomerization of azobenzene dopants on the flexoelectric properties of short-pitch cholesteric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komitov, Lachezar; Ruslim, Christian; Ichimura, Kunihiro

    2000-05-01

    The flexoelectric properties of short-pitch cholesteric mixtures doped with three different azobenzenes, 4,4'-dihexyloxyazobenzene (4,4'-azo), 3,3'-dihexyloxy-2,2'-dimethylazobenzene (3,3'-azol), and 3,3'- dihexanoyloxy-2,2'-dimethylazobenzene (3,3'-azo2), respectively, were studied upon illumination with uv light. Their effective flexoelectric coefficients were derived from the flexoelectro-optic response of the mixtures aligned in uniform lying helix texture. Considering the fact that the pitch of the mixtures became shorter upon uv illumination, an increase of their effective flexoelectric coefficients was found to take place due to the photoisomerization of the dyes. The largest change was found for the coefficient of the guest-host mixture containing 4,4'-azo dye, most probably due to the bent shape of the dye cis-isomer. This observation is in good agreement with our previous studies on the influence of the molecular shape on the liquid-crystal flexoelectric properties and it suggests a possible way for enhancement of the amplitude of flexoelectro-optic response in cholesterics by using liquid-crystal materials with pronounced molecular shape dissymmetry.

  7. Sterol biosynthesis is required for heat resistance but not extracellular survival in leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sterol biosynthesis is a crucial pathway in eukaryotes leading to the production of cholesterol in animals and various C24-alkyl sterols (ergostane-based sterols in fungi, plants, and trypanosomatid protozoa. Sterols are important membrane components and precursors for the synthesis of powerful bioactive molecules, including steroid hormones in mammals. Their functions in pathogenic protozoa are not well characterized, which limits the development of sterol synthesis inhibitors as drugs. Here we investigated the role of sterol C14α-demethylase (C14DM in Leishmania parasites. C14DM is a cytochrome P450 enzyme and the primary target of azole drugs. In Leishmania, genetic or chemical inactivation of C14DM led to a complete loss of ergostane-based sterols and accumulation of 14-methylated sterols. Despite the drastic change in lipid composition, C14DM-null mutants (c14dm(- were surprisingly viable and replicative in culture. They did exhibit remarkable defects including increased membrane fluidity, failure to maintain detergent resistant membrane fraction, and hypersensitivity to heat stress. These c14dm(- mutants showed severely reduced virulence in mice but were highly resistant to itraconazole and amphotericin B, two drugs targeting sterol synthesis. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of toxic sterol intermediates in c14dm(- causes strong membrane perturbation and significant vulnerability to stress. The new knowledge may help improve the efficacy of current drugs against pathogenic protozoa by exploiting the fitness loss associated with drug resistance.

  8. Analysis of the cytotoxic effects of ruthenium-ketoconazole and ruthenium-clotrimazole complexes on cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Escajeda, Elisa; Martínez, Alberto; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Sánchez-Delgado, Roberto A.; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium-based compounds have intriguing anti-cancer properties and some of these novel compounds are currently in clinical trials. To continue the development of new metal-based drug combinations, we coupled ruthenium (Ru) with the azole compounds ketoconazole (KTZ) and clotrimazole (CTZ), which are well-known antifungal agents that also display anticancer properties. We report the activity of a series of twelve Ru-KTZ and Ru-CTZ compounds against three prostate tumor cell lines with different androgen sensitivity, as well as cervical cancer and lymphoblastic lymphoma cell lines. In addition, human cell lines were used to evaluate the toxicity against non-transformed cells and to establish selectivity indexes. Our results indicate that the combination of ruthenium and KTZ/CTZ in a single molecule results in complexes that are more cytotoxic than the individual components alone, displaying in some cases low micromolar CC50 values and high selectivity indexes. Additionally, all compounds are more cytotoxic against prostate cell lines with lower cytotoxicity against non-transformed epidermal cell lines. Some of the compounds were found to primarily induce cell death via apoptosis yet weakly interact with DNA. Our studies also demonstrate that the cytotoxicity induced by our Ru-based compounds is not directly related to their ability to interact with DNA. PMID:24272524

  9. Yeasts from Macrobrachium amazonicum: a focus on antifungal susceptibility and virulence factors of Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhante, Raimunda S N; Paiva, Manoel A N; Sampaio, Célia M S; Teixeira, Carlos E C; Castelo-Branco, Débora S C M; Leite, João J G; Moreira, Camila A; Silva, Liliane P; Cordeiro, Rossana A; Monteiro, André J; Sidrim, José J C; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, it was sought to compare yeast microbiota of wild and captive Macrobrachium amazonicum and evaluate the antifungal susceptibility and production of virulence factors by the recovered isolates of Candida spp. Additionally, cultivation water was monitored for the presence of fungi. Overall, 26 yeast isolates belonging to three genera and seven species were obtained, out of which 24 were Candida spp., with Candida famata as the most prevalent species for both wild and captive prawns. From cultivation water, 28 isolates of filamentous fungi were obtained, with Penicillium spp., Cladosporium spp. and Aspergillus spp. as the most frequent genera. Eight out of 24 Candida spp. isolates were resistant to azole derivatives, out of which four were recovered from wild-harvested prawns. As for production of virulence factors, three (12.5%) and eight (33.3%) isolates presented phospholipase and protease activity, respectively. This is the first comparative study between wild and captive prawns and the first report on yeast microbiota of M. amazonicum. The most relevant finding was the high percentage of resistant Candida spp., including from wild individuals, which suggests the occurrence of an environmental imbalance in the area where these prawns were captured. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Unmet clinical needs in the treatment of systemic fungal infections: The role of amphotericin B and drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Raquel; de Pablo, Esther; Ballesteros, María Paloma; Serrano, Dolores R

    2017-06-15

    Recently an increase in both the prevalence and incidence of invasive fungal infections have been reported. The number of fungal species that can cause systemic mycoses are higher and current antifungal therapies are still far from ideal. The emergence of antifungal resistances has a major clinical impact when using azoles and echinocandins leading to possible treatment failure and ultimately putting the patient's life at risk. Amphotericin B can play a key role in treating severe invasive mycoses as the incidence of antifungal resistance is very low combined with a high efficacy against a wide range of fungi. However, the use of this drug is limited due to its high toxicity and the infusion-related side effects often necessitating patient hospitalisation. New medicines based on lipid-based systems have been commercialised in the last decade, these treatments are able to reduce the toxicity of the drug but intravenous administration is still required. An oral or topically self-administered amphotericin B formulation can overcome these challenges, however such a product is not yet available. Several drug delivery systems such as cochleates, nanoparticulate and self-emulsifying systems are under development in order to enhance the solubility of the drug in aqueous media and promote oral absorption and cutaneous permeation across the skin. In this review, the type of drug delivery system and the effect of particle size on efficacy, toxicity and biodistribution will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cushing's syndrome due to pharmacological interaction in a cystic fibrosis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, K M; Skov, M; Sillesen, I B; Dige-Petersen, H; Müller, J; Koch, C; Lanng, S

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis with itraconazole is becoming more widespread in chronic lung diseases. A considerable number of patients is concomitantly treated with topical or systemic glucocorticoids for anti-inflammatory effect. As azole compounds inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes such as CYP3A isoforms, they may compromise the metabolic clearance of glucocorticoids, thereby causing serious adverse effects. A patient with cystic fibrosis is reported who developed iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome after long-term treatment with daily doses of 800 mg itraconazole and 1,600 microg budesonide. The patient experienced symptoms of striae, moon-face, increased facial hair growth, mood swings, headaches, weight gain, irregular menstruation despite oral contraceptives and increasing insulin requirement for diabetes mellitus. Endocrine investigations revealed total suppression of spontaneous and stimulated plasma cortisol and adrenocorticotropin. Discontinuation of both drugs led to an improvement in clinical symptoms and recovery of the pituitary-adrenal axis after 3 mo. This observation suggests that the metabolic clearance of buDesonide was compromised by itraconazole's inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes, especially the CYP3A isoforms, causing an elevation in systemic budesonide concentration. This provoked a complete suppression of the endogenous adrenal function, as well as iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. Patients on combination therapy of itraconazole and budesonide inhalation should be monitored regularly for adrenal insufficiency. This may be the first indicator of increased systemic exogenous steroid concentration, before clinical signs of Cushing's syndrome emerge.

  12. Posaconazole-Induced Adrenal Insufficiency in a Case of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

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    Ann Miller

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Posaconazole is an azole used in treatment and prophylaxis of a broad spectrum of fungal infections. Antifungals such as ketoconazole have been shown to cause primary adrenal insufficiency (AI as a result of direct inhibition on the steroidogenesis pathway. There is only one reported case of primary AI induced by posaconazole in a patient with mucormycosis. We report a case of posaconazole-related primary AI. Case. A 63-year-old man with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia was admitted for fatigue and intermittent nausea and vomiting. He had recently discontinued prophylactic posaconazole 300 mg daily. He was assessed for AI with a morning cortisol of 1.9 mcg/dL followed by a failed cosyntropin stimulation (CS test. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH level was 154.6 pg/mL with negative 21-hydroxylase antibodies. The patient’s symptoms improved with initiation of hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. One year after discontinuation of posaconazole, he underwent a repeat CS test which showed normal adrenal function with normal ACTH at 34.1 pg/mL. Conclusion. In this case, we demonstrate that prolonged use of posaconazole is associated with primary AI. As use of posaconazole increases, knowledge of the potential risk of AI is important and must be included in the differential diagnosis when these patients present with hypotension, hypoglycemia, and failure to thrive.

  13. Calcium dependence of eugenol tolerance and toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Stephen K Roberts

    Full Text Available Eugenol is a plant-derived phenolic compound which has recognised therapeutical potential as an antifungal agent. However little is known of either its fungicidal activity or the mechanisms employed by fungi to tolerate eugenol toxicity. A better exploitation of eugenol as a therapeutic agent will therefore depend on addressing this knowledge gap. Eugenol initiates increases in cytosolic Ca2+ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae which is partly dependent on the plasma membrane calcium channel, Cch1p. However, it is unclear whether a toxic cytosolic Ca2+elevation mediates the fungicidal activity of eugenol. In the present study, no significant difference in yeast survival was observed following transient eugenol treatment in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, using yeast expressing apoaequorin to report cytosolic Ca2+ and a range of eugenol derivatives, antifungal activity did not appear to be coupled to Ca2+ influx or cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. Taken together, these results suggest that eugenol toxicity is not dependent on a toxic influx of Ca2+. In contrast, careful control of extracellular Ca2+ (using EGTA or BAPTA revealed that tolerance of yeast to eugenol depended on Ca2+ influx via Cch1p. These findings expose significant differences between the antifungal activity of eugenol and that of azoles, amiodarone and carvacrol. This study highlights the potential to use eugenol in combination with other antifungal agents that exhibit differing modes of action as antifungal agents to combat drug resistant infections.

  14. CYP1A inhibition in fish gill filaments: A novel assay applied on pharmaceuticals and other chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijer, Kristina; Abrahamson, Alexandra; Brunstroem, Bjoern; Brandt, Ingvar

    2010-01-01

    The gill filament 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) assay was originally developed as a biomarker for cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) induction by Ah-receptor agonists in water. In this study, the assay was adapted to measure inhibition of CYP1A activity in fish gill filaments ex vivo. The experiments were carried out using gill arch filaments from β-naphthoflavone (βNF)-exposed three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Candidate CYP1A inhibitors were added to the assay buffer. Nine selected pharmaceuticals and five known or suspected CYP1A-modulating chemicals were examined with regard to their ability to reduce EROD activity in gill filaments. Ellipticine, a well characterized CYP1A inhibitor, was the most effective inhibitor of the compounds tested. At a concentration in the assay buffer of 1 μM the antifungal azoles ketoconazole, miconazole and bitertanol, and the plant flavonoid acacetin reduced gill EROD activity by more than 50%, implying IC50 values below 1 μM. These compounds have previously been shown to inhibit EROD activity in liver microsomes from fish and mammals at similar concentrations. The proton pump inhibitor omeprazole reduced the gill EROD activity by 39% at 10 μM. It is concluded that the modified gill filament EROD assay is useful to screen for waterborne pollutants that inhibit catalytic CYP1A activity in fish gills.

  15. The Point Mutation G461S in the MfCYP51 Gene is Associated with Tebuconazole Resistance in Monilinia fructicola Populations in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtemberg, Paulo S F; Luo, Yong; Morales, Rafael G; Muehlmann-Fischer, Juliana M; Michailides, Themis J; May De Mio, Louise L

    2017-12-01

    The ascomycete Monilinia fructicola is the causal agent of brown rot of stone fruit in Brazil, causing major pre- and postharvest losses. For many years, the demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicide tebuconazole has been used as the most effective active ingredient for controlling brown rot and, as a result, strains of M. fructicola resistant to this ingredient have emerged in many Brazilian states producing stone fruit. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms associated with the resistance of M. fructicola to DMI tebuconazole. By sequencing the M. fructicola CYP51 (MfCYP51) gene, encoding the azole target sterol 14α-demethylase, a mutation was identified at the nucleotide position 1,492, causing the amino acid substitution from glycine to serine at the codon position 461, associated with reduced tebuconazole sensitivity. In addition, it was observed that MfCYP51 gene expression could play a secondary role in DMI fungicide resistance of M. fructicola strains in Brazil. However, for the specific isolate found to exhibit elevated expression levels of MfCYP51, no insertions that would trigger gene expression were found. Based on the point mutation associated with tebuconazole resistance, an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method was developed to quickly identify resistant genotypes within the Brazilian population. This is the first report determining molecular mechanisms for DMI resistance identification for M. fructicola isolates from Brazil. This information provides an important advancement for risk assessment of DMI fungicides used to manage brown rot of stone fruit.

  16. Interaction of gelatin with polyenes modulates antifungal activity and biocompatibility of electrospun fiber mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Loh, Xian Jun; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Kalaipriya, Madhaiyan; Kwan, Jia Lin; Liu, Shou Ping; Beuerman, Roger Wilmer; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of antifungals does not have predictable or well-controlled release characteristics and requires reapplication to achieve therapeutic local concentration in a reasonable time period. In this article, the efficacy of five different US Food and Drug Administration-approved antifungal-loaded (amphotericin B, natamycin, terbinafine, fluconazole, and itraconazole) electrospun gelatin fiber mats were compared. Morphological studies show that incorporation of polyenes resulted in a two-fold increase in fiber diameter and the mats inhibit the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungal pathogens. Terbinafine-loaded mats were effective against three filamentous fungal species. Among the two azole antifungals compared, the itraconazole-loaded mat was potent against Aspergillus strains. However, activity loss was observed for fluconazole-loaded mats against all of the test organisms. The polyene-loaded mats displayed rapid candidacidal activities as well. Biophysical and rheological measurements indicate strong interactions between polyene antifungals and gelatin matrix. As a result, the polyenes stabilized the triple helical conformation of gelatin and the presence of gelatin decreased the hemolytic activity of polyenes. The polyene-loaded fiber mats were noncytotoxic to primary human corneal and sclera fibroblasts. The reduction of toxicity with complete retention of activity of the polyene antifungal-loaded gelatin fiber mats can provide new opportunities in the management of superficial skin infections. PMID:24920895

  17. A zeolite-like zinc triazolate framework with high gas adsorption and separation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rui-Biao; Chen, Da; Lin, Yan-Yong; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2012-09-17

    The reaction of commercially available 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (Hatz) and Zn(OH)(2) at room temperature produced a porous zeolite-like metal azolate framework, [Zn(atz)(2)] (MAF-66). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies of MAF-66 showed that atz(-) served as an imidazolate-type ligand, linking tetrahedral Zn(II) ions to form a noninterpenetrated dia framework, which contains a narrow, three-dimensional intersecting channel system (void = 49.8%) functionalized by amino groups and uncoordinated triazolate N atoms on the pore surface. Gas-sorption measurements of MAF-66 revealed high CO(2) uptakes (27.6/19.4 wt % at 273/298 K and 1 atm) and high Henry's law CO(2)/N(2) selectivity (403/225 at 273/298 K). The host-guest interactions between CO(2) and the pore surface were also studied by in situ IR absorption spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction measurements.

  18. Identification of isolates of the plant pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans with resistance to the triazole fungicide fluquinconazole using a novel In Planta assay.

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    Angela P Van de Wouw

    Full Text Available Leptosphaeria maculans is the major pathogen of canola (oilseed rape, Brassica napus worldwide. In Australia, the use of azole fungicides has contributed to the 50-fold increase in canola production in the last 25 years. However, extensive application of fungicides sets the stage for the selection of fungal populations with resistance. A high-throughput in planta assay was developed to allow screening of thousands of isolates from multiple populations. Using this screen, isolates were identified with decreased sensitivity to the fungicide fluquinconazole when applied at field rates as a protective seed dressing: these isolates cause significantly larger lesions on cotyledons and true leaves and increased disease severity at plant maturity. This increased in planta resistance was specific to fluquinconazole, with no cross resistance to flutriafol or tebuconazole/prothioconazole. In a limited set of 22 progeny from a cross between resistant and susceptible parents, resistance segregated in a 1:1 ratio, suggesting a single gene is responsible. A survey of 200 populations from across canola growing regions of Australia revealed fungicide resistance was present in 15% of the populations. Although in vitro analysis of the fungicide resistant isolates showed a significant shift in the average EC50 compared to the sensitive isolates, this was not as evident as the in planta assays. The development of this novel, high-throughput in planta assay has led to the identification of the first fungicide resistant L. maculans isolates, which may pose a threat to the productivity of the Australian canola industry.

  19. Medical image of the week: actinomycosis

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    Siddiqi TA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 55-year-old man with history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, presented with unresolving pneumonia despite treatment with moxifloxacin. It was thought to be possible coccidioidomycosis and an azole was started. However, he returned with increasing dyspnea and hypoxemia. He had leukocytosis with a thoracic CT revealing a loculated empyema, multifocal necrotizing infection and a large intrapulmonary abscess (Figure 1. He was admitted to MICU, intubated and ventilated. He was in septic shock requiring fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, and broad antibiotics. Bronchoscopy revealed erythematous and edematous airways, with drainage of over one liter of purulent fluid. A chest tube was placed to drain pleural fluid with removal of around two liters of blood-tinged, purulent fluid. His condition worsened with development of disseminated intravascular coagulation leading to hemorrhagic shock. He arrested and died. Gram stain on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed mixed gram negative and gram variable rods, and cultures grew lactobacillus species. GMS ...

  20. A flexible ligand-based wavy layered metal-organic framework for lithium-ion storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Tiance; Wang, Yuhang; Tang, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Lijuan; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2015-05-01

    A substantial challenge for direct utilization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as lithium-ion battery anodes is to maintain the rigid MOF structure during lithiation/delithiation cycles. In this work, we developed a flexible, wavy layered nickel-based MOF (C20H24Cl2N8Ni, designated as Ni-Me4bpz) by a solvothermal approach of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole (H2Me4bpz) with nickel(II) chloride hexahydrate. The obtained MOF materials (Ni-Me4bpz) with metal azolate coordination mode provide 2-dimensional layered structure for Li(+) intercalation/extraction, and the H2Me4bpz ligands allow for flexible rotation feature and structural stability. Lithium-ion battery anodes made of the Ni-Me4bpz material demonstrate excellent specific capacity and cycling performance, and the crystal structure is well preserved after the electrochemical tests, suggesting the potential of developing flexible layered MOFs for efficient and stable electrochemical storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Oral diseases in auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Guyot, Sylvie

    2017-09-01

    Auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) also called Auto-immune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare monogenic childhood-onset auto-immune disease. This autosomal recessive disorder is caused by mutations in the auto-immune regulator (AIRE) gene, and leads to autoimmunity targeting peripheral tissues. There is a wide variability in clinical phenotypes in patients with APSI, with auto-immune endocrine and non-endocrine disorders, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. These patients suffer from oral diseases such as dental enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis. Both are frequently described, and in recent series, enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis are even the most frequent components of APS1 together with hypoparathyroidism. Both often occur during childhood (before 5 years old for canrdidiasis, and before 15 years old for enamel hypoplasia). Oral candidiasis is recurrent all life long, could become resistant to azole antifungal after years of treatment, and be carcinogenic, leading to severe oral squamous cell carcinoma. Oral components of APS1 should be diagnosed and rigorously treated. Dental enamel hypoplasia and/or recurrent oral candidiasis in association with auto-immune diseases in a young child should prompt APS1 diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidemiology of antifungal resistance in human pathogenic yeasts: current viewpoint and practical recommendations for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2017-09-01

    In this review, we describe the epidemiology and clinical significance of resistance in Candida spp. and other non-Cryptococcus yeasts. The rise in echinocandin resistance, azole resistance and cross-resistance to two or more antifungal classes [multidrug resistance (MDR)] has been a worrisome trend, mainly in US large tertiary and oncology centres, particularly as it relates to Candida glabrata. Candida kefyr is also a concern as it can be resistant to echinocandins and polyenes, especially in patients with haematological malignancies. Lately, Candida auris has drawn a lot of attention: this uncommon Candida spp. is the first globally emerging fungal pathogen that exhibits MDR and strong potential for nosocomial transmission. Its almost simultaneous spread in four continents could be indicative of increasing selection pressures from the use of antifungal agents. Echinocandin non-susceptibility is also common among non-Candida, non-Cryptococcus yeasts. As Candida resistance patterns reflect, in part, institutional practices of antifungal administration, the benefits of antifungal stewardship protocols are increasingly recognised and endorsed in recent guidelines. Development of rapid diagnostic methods for detecting or ruling out the presence of candidaemia and antifungal resistance, as well as discovery of novel antifungals, are key priorities in medical mycology research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanoparticles as safe and effective delivery systems of antifungal agents: Achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ghareb M

    2017-05-15

    Invasive fungal infections are becoming a major health concern in several groups of patients leading to severe morbidity and mortality. Moreover, cutaneous fungal infections are a major cause of visits to outpatient dermatology clinics. Despite the availability of several effective agents in the antifungal drug arena, their therapeutic outcome is less than optimal due to limitations related to drug physicochemical properties and toxicity. For instance, poor aqueous solubility limits the formulation options and efficacy of several azole antifungal drugs while toxicity limits the benefits of many other drugs. Nanoparticles hold great promise to overcome these limitations due to their ability to enhance drug aqueous solubility, bioavailability and antifungal efficacy. Further, drug incorporation into nanoparticles could greatly reduce its toxicity. Despite these interesting nanoparticle features, there are only few marketed nanoparticle-based antifungal drug formulations. This review sheds light on different classes of nanoparticles used in antifungal drug delivery, such as lipid-based vesicles, polymeric micelles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, nanoemulsions and dendrimers with emphasis on their advantages and limitations. Translation of these nanoformulations from the lab to the clinic could be facilitated by focusing the research on overcoming problems related to nanoparticle stability, drug loading and high cost of production and standardization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of nitrogen atoms of benzotriazole and its derivatives on the properties of electrodeposited Cu films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hoe Chul; Kim, Myung Jun; Lim, Taeho; Park, Kyung Ju; Kim, Kwang Hwan; Choe, Seunghoe [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Institute of Chemical Process, Seoul National University, Gwanak 1, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo-Kil, E-mail: sookilkim@cau.ac.kr [School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Jeong, E-mail: jjkimm@snu.ac.kr [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Institute of Chemical Process, Seoul National University, Gwanak 1, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    Additives having azole groups with different numbers of nitrogen atoms, such as indole, benzimidazole, indazole, benzotriazole (BTA), and 1H-benzotriazole-methanol (BTA-MeOH) were adopted to improve the mechanical hardness of electrodeposited Cu films. The effects of these additives on the film properties were elucidated in relation to their number of nitrogen atoms. Electrochemical current–potential behaviors showed that the additives containing three nitrogen atoms (BTA and BTA-MeOH) more effectively inhibited Cu electrodeposition. The inhibition strongly affected the film properties, resulting in reduced grain size and surface roughness, and increased resistivity and hardness. Cu films deposited with BTA or BTA-MeOH also exhibited 35% reduced grain size and 1.5-time higher hardness than Cu films deposited in electrolyte containing other BTA-derivatives having fewer nitrogen atoms. This notable grain refining effect of BTA and BTA-MeOH can be evaluated with respect to the strong interaction of their nitrogen atoms with the substrate and the copper ions, as well. - Highlights: • Additives of similar structure containing 1, 2, and 3 nitrogen atoms were used. • Additives with 3 nitrogen atoms more strongly inhibited Cu deposition than others. • Additives containing 3 nitrogen atoms efficiently affected film properties. • Additives having 3 nitrogen atoms remarkably improved film hardness.

  5. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Cycloaddition of 1-Haloalkynes with Nitrile Oxides and Organic Azides; Synthesis of 4-Halo Isoxazoles and 5-Halo Triazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakdale, James S.; Sit, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    (Cyclopentadienyl)(cyclooctadiene) ruthenium(II) chloride [CpRuCl(cod)] catalyzes the reaction between nitrile oxides and electronically deficient 1-choro-, 1-bromo- and 1-iodoalkynes leading to 4-haloisoxazoles. Organic azides are also suitable 1,3-dipoles, resulting in 5-halo-1,2,3-triazoles. These air tolerant reactions can be performed at room temperature with 1.25 equiv of the respective 1,3-dipole relative to the alkyne component. Reactive 1-haloalkynes include propiolic amides, esters, ketones and phosphonates. Post-functionalization of the halogenated azole products can be accomplished using palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions as well as via manipulation of reactive amide groups. The lack of catalysis observed with Cp*RuCl(cod) is attributed to steric demands of the Cp* (η5-C5Me5) ligand in comparison to the parent Cp (η5-C5H5). This hypothesis is supported by the poor reactivity of (η5-C5Me4CF3)RuCl(cod), which serves as a an isosteric mimic of Cp* and as an isoelectronic analog of Cp. PMID:25059647

  6. Antifungal agents in non-neonatologic pediatrics

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    Elio Castagnola

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of action of antifungal agents helps driving the choice of the treatment, basing on the activity against the fungus of interest. Pharmacokinetics should also be taken into account, considering the time-dependent and the concentration-dependent drugs. Triazoles belong to the first group, while amphotericin B and echinocandins belong to the second one. The effectiveness of time-dependent drugs hangs on the time spent above the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC, whereas that of concentration-dependent drugs is related to the peak of concentration achieved. Thetissue penetration is another important factor that should be taken into account while prescribing an antifungal agent. Interactions with other drugs, above all with those used to treat underlying pathologies, should also be considered. Fungicidal drugs are generally preferred to fungistatic agents, therefore echinocandins and amphotericin B are more prescribed than azoles. Combination therapies are not recommended.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i1S.860

  7. Antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida in the Clinical Laboratory: how to do it, when to do it, and how to interpret it

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    Esther Manso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Significant changes in the management of fungaemia have occurred in the last decade with increased use of fluconazole prophylaxis, of empirical treatment and of echinocandins as first-line agents for documented disease. The emergence of drug resistance in fungal pathogens has a profound impact on human health given limited number of antifungal drugs. Antifungal resistance in Candida may be either intrinsic or acquired and may be encountered in the antifungal drug exposed but also the antifungal drug naïve patient The variation in resistance rates between centers emphasizes that it is essential to have knowledge of the local Candida species distribution and antifungal resistance rates to guide initial therapy for Candida BSI. Moreover, all Candida isolates from blood and normally sterile sites should be identified to the species level. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing have developed breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values that are now established for Candida spp. Clinical microbiology laboratories will be employed commercial susceptibility assays, rather than reference broth microdilution methods and comparative studies are particularly important. Vitek 2®, Etest® and Sensititre YeastOne® provided a high degree of essential agreement and comparable sensitivity and specificity to BMD-RPMI for identifying resistance to azole and echinocandins in Candida spp.

  8. First itraconazole resistant Aspergillus fumigatus clinical isolate harbouring a G54E substitution in Cyp51Ap in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardelli, Florencia; Theill, Laura; Nardin, María Elena; Macedo, Daiana; Dudiuk, Catiana; Mendez, Emilce; Gamarra, Soledad; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    A 27-year-old male rural worker was admitted with a fungal keratitis due to an injury involving plant detritus. Specimens were collected for microscopy examination and culture. The isolate was identified by morphological and molecular criteria. Susceptibility testing was performed using CLSI methods. CYP51A gene was PCR amplified and sequenced. An Aspergillus fumigatus strain resistant to itraconazole (MIC>8μg/ml) was isolated. The isolate was susceptible to amphotericin B, posaconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin. CYP51A sequencing showed two mutations leading on the G54E substitution. The patient received natamycin as treatment. This is the first report in South America of a clinical A. fumigatus strain carrying the substitution G54E at Cyp51Ap associated with itraconazole resistance. Considering the patient was azole-naive, this resistant isolate may have been acquired from the environment. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast isolated from corneal infections Teste de susceptibilidade a antifúngicos de leveduras isoladas de infecções corneais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Degaspare Monte Mascaro

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report the antifungal susceptibility profile of yeast isolates obtained from cases of keratitis. METHODS: Susceptibility testing of 15 yeast strains isolated from corneal infections to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was performed using the NCCLS broth microdilution assay. RESULTS: Most episodes of eye infections were caused by Candida albicans. The antifungal drugs tested showed the following minimal inhibitory concentration values against yeast isolates: 0.125-0.5 µg/ml for amphotericin B; 0.125->64.0 µg/ml for fluconazole; 0.015-1.0 µg/ml for itraconazole and 0.015-0.125 µg/ml for ketoconazole. Despite the fact that all Candida isolates were judged to be susceptible to azoles, one isolate showed a minimal inhibitory concentration value significantly higher than a 90% minimal inhibitory concentration of all tested isolates. Rhodotorula rubra was resistant to fluconazole and itraconazole. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the fact that most yeast isolates from corneal infections are usually susceptible to amphotericin B and azoles, they exhibit a wide range of minimal inhibitory concentration values for antifungal drugs. The identification of strains at species level and their susceptibility pattern to antifungal drugs should be considered before determining the concentration to be used in topical antifungal formulations in order to optimize therapeutic response in eye infections.OBJETIVO: Relatar resultados e avaliar a aplicabilidade do teste de suscetibilidade a antifúngicos de leveduras isoladas de infecções corneais oculares. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se teste de suscetibilidade pelo método de microdiluição em caldo, padronizado pelo NCCLS-EUA, em 15 amostras de leveduras de infecções corneanas a anfotericina B, fluconazol, itraconazol e ketoconazol. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos episódios de infecção corneal foi causada por Candida albicans. As drogas antifúngicas testadas exibiram valores de concentra

  10. Evaluación de tres métodos para la detección de la sensibilidad in vitro de especies de Candida a los antifúngicos Evaluation of three methods for in vitro detection of antifungal susceptibility of Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Maldonado

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Los métodos de referencia E. Def 7.1 y M27-A3, que detectan resistencia in vitro a los antifúngicos, son onerosos y muy laboriosos, por lo que su implementación en los laboratorios hospitalarios es limitada. Existen técnicas comerciales de simple realización, que permitirían obtener resultados comparables a los que se obtienen con los métodos estándares. Los objetivos de esta investigación fueron: a comparar los resultados de concentración inhibitoria mínima obtenidos según el método de referencia E.Def 7.1 con los obtenidos mediante el empleo del equipo comercial ATB® Fungus 3 en un conjunto de 82 aislamientos clínicos de Candida spp. frente a los siguientes antifúngicos: anfotericina B, 5-fluorocitosina, fluconazol e itraconazol; b comparar en ese mismo conjunto de aislamientos los resultados del estudio de sensibilidad al fluconazol por difusión en agar empleando tabletas Neo-SensitabsTM o discos Malbrán con los que se obtienen por el método de referencia. La concordancia general entre el método de referencia y el ATB® Fungus 3 fue del 90,2 %, mientras que la concordancia del método de referencia con los métodos por difusión con discos y con tabletas alcanzó el 96,3% y el 92,7 %, respectivamente. El ATB® Fungus 3 fue eficaz para determinar la sensibilidad a la anfotericina B y a la 5-fluorocitosina, pero se observaron discrepancias al evaluar la sensibilidad a los azoles. Los métodos por difusión resultaron útiles para determinar la sensibilidad al fluconazol; sin embargo, observamos 3 discrepancias muy mayores, 1 mayor y 2 menores con el método de difusión con tabletas, mientras que con los discos solo se produjeron 3 discrepancias menores.Reference methods E.Def 7.1 and M27-A3 detect in vitro resistance; however, they are expensive and very laborious. Thus, their actual use in hospital laboratories is limited. There are commercial techniques available, having easier accessibility and development, which would

  11. Suscetibilidade a antifúngicos de cepas de Candida albicans isoladas de pacientes com estomatite protética Susceptibility to antifungal drugs of Candida albicans strains isolated from patients with denture stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Moreira BATISTA

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes portadores de próteses totais, apresentam, com freqüência a chamada estomatite protética, com a qual associa-se Candida albicans determinando a chamada candidíase eritematosa. Assim, procuramos avaliar a suscetibilidade dessa levedura a agentes antifúngicos. A suscetibilidade de dezenove cepas de Candida albicans isoladas de pacientes apresentando estomatite protética foi estudada frente a: um derivado poliênico representado, pela anfotericina B (AnB, e dois derivados azóicos, cetoconazol e miconazol. A atividade antifúngica foi estudada a partir da determinação da concentração inibitória mínima (CIM e da concentração fungicida mínima (CFM, pela técnica de diluição em ágar. Os resultados obtidos, mostraram baixos valores de CIMs e CFMs (mg/ml para a AnB frente a todas as leveduras. Para o miconazol e o cetoconazol, foram observadas CIMs invariavelmente £ 4,00 mg/ml; para as CFMs, foram obtidos valores ³ 16,00 mg/ml frente a maioria das cepas. Conclui-se que a AnB apresentou maior ação fungicida in vitro enquanto os azóis demonstraram ação fungistática mas não fungicida. Acreditamos que a pesquisa de novas drogas, principalmente de uso tópico ainda é necessária, a fim de se tratar, com sucesso, a candidíase eritematosa, comumente observada nas chamadas estomatites protéticas.Users of total prosthesis present in general a high frequency of the so called denture stomatitis, associated to erythematous candidiasis. So, we evaluated the susceptibility of oral yeast to three antifungal agents. Strains of Candida albicans isolated from patients with denture stomatitis were evaluated in relation to the susceptibility of the antifungal drugs as amphotericin B (polyenic derivatives, and azole agents as ketoconazole and miconazole. The antifungal activity was evaluated, and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal fungicide concentration (MFC were determined utilizing the agar dilution method. The

  12. Inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr5p by a natural compound extracted from Brazilian Red Propolis

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    Cinzia Lotti

    2011-08-01

    demonstrate that Brazilian propolis could be a source of promising compounds that can alleviate the MDR phenomenon, particularly in some fungi, where it could be used as an adjuvant for the treatment with azoles.

  13. A multicenter multinational study of abdominal candidiasis: epidemiology, outcomes and predictors of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, Matteo; Righi, Elda; Ansaldi, Filippo; Merelli, Maria; Scarparo, Claudio; Antonelli, Massimo; Garnacho-Montero, Jose; Diaz-Martin, Ana; Palacios-Garcia, Inmaculada; Luzzati, Roberto; Rosin, Chiara; Lagunes, Leonel; Rello, Jordi; Almirante, Benito; Scotton, Pier Giorgio; Baldin, Gianmaria; Dimopoulos, George; Nucci, Marcio; Munoz, Patricia; Vena, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; de Egea, Viviana; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes; Tascini, Carlo; Menichetti, Francesco; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Mesini, Alessio; Sganga, Gabriele; Viscoli, Claudio; Tumbarello, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Clinical data on patients with intra-abdominal candidiasis (IAC) is still scarce. We collected data from 13 hospitals in Italy, Spain, Brazil, and Greece over a 3-year period (2011-2013) including patients from ICU, medical, and surgical wards. A total of 481 patients were included in the study. Of these, 27% were hospitalized in ICU. Mean age was 63 years and 57% of patients were male. IAC mainly consisted of secondary peritonitis (41%) and abdominal abscesses (30%); 68 (14%) cases were also candidemic and 331 (69%) had concomitant bacterial infections. The most commonly isolated Candida species were C. albicans (n = 308 isolates, 64%) and C. glabrata (n = 76, 16%). Antifungal treatment included echinocandins (64%), azoles (32%), and amphotericin B (4%). Septic shock was documented in 40.5% of patients. Overall 30-day hospital mortality was 27% with 38.9% mortality in ICU. Multivariate logistic regression showed that age (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.07, P < 0.001), increments in 1-point APACHE II scores (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.08, P = 0.028), secondary peritonitis (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.02-2.89, P = 0.019), septic shock (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.88-5.86, P < 0.001), and absence of adequate abdominal source control (OR 3.35, 95% CI 2.01-5.63, P < 0.001) were associated with mortality. In patients with septic shock, absence of source control correlated with mortality rates above 60% irrespective of administration of an adequate antifungal therapy. Low percentages of concomitant candidemia and high mortality rates are documented in IAC. In patients presenting with septic shock, source control is fundamental.

  14. Therapeutic use of a cationic antimicrobial peptide from the spider Acanthoscurria gomesiana in the control of experimental candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial peptides are present in animals, plants and microorganisms and play a fundamental role in the innate immune response. Gomesin is a cationic antimicrobial peptide purified from haemocytes of the spider Acanthoscurria gomesiana. It has a broad-spectrum of activity against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and tumour cells. Candida albicans is a commensal yeast that is part of the human microbiota. However, in immunocompromised patients, this fungus may cause skin, mucosal or systemic infections. The typical treatment for this mycosis comprises three major categories of antifungal drugs: polyenes, azoles and echinocandins; however cases of resistance to these drugs are frequently reported. With the emergence of microorganisms that are resistant to conventional antibiotics, the development of alternative treatments for candidiasis is important. In this study, we evaluate the efficacy of gomesin treatment on disseminated and vaginal candidiasis as well as its toxicity and biodistribution. Results Treatment with gomesin effectively reduced Candida albicans in the kidneys, spleen, liver and vagina of infected mice. The biodistribution of gomesin labelled with technetium-99 m showed that the peptide is captured in the kidneys, spleen and liver. Enhanced production of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 was detected in infected mice treated with gomesin, suggesting an immunomodulatory activity. Moreover, immunosuppressed and C. albicans-infected mice showed an increase in survival after treatment with gomesin and fluconazole. Systemic administration of gomesin was also not toxic to the mic Conclusions Gomesin proved to be effective against experimental Candida albicans infection. It can be used as an alternative therapy for candidiasis, either alone or in combination with fluconazole. Gomesin's mechanism is not fully understood, but we hypothesise that the peptide acts through the permeabilisation of the yeast membrane leading to death and/or releasing the yeast

  15. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel 1,2-diaryl-4-substituted-benzylidene-5(4H)-imidazolone derivatives as cytotoxic agents and COX-2/LOX inhibitors.

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    Lamie, Phoebe F; Philoppes, John N; Rárová, Lucie

    2018-04-01

    A new series of 1,2-diaryl-4-substituted-benzylidene-5(4H)-imidazolone derivatives 4a-l was synthesized. Their structures were confirmed by different spectroscopic techniques (IR, 1 H NMR, DEPT-Q NMR, and mass spectroscopy) and elemental analyses. Their cytotoxic activities in vitro were evaluated against breast, ovarian, and liver cancer cell lines and also normal human skin fibroblasts. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2 and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitory activities were measured. The synthesized compounds showed selectivity toward COX-2 rather than COX-1, and the IC 50 values (0.25-1.7 µM) were lower than that of indomethacin (IC 50  = 9.47 µM) and somewhat higher than that of celecoxib (IC 50  = 0.071 µM). The selectivity index for COX-2 of the oxazole derivative 4e (SI = 3.67) was nearly equal to that of celecoxib (SI = 3.66). For the LOX inhibitory activity, the new compounds showed IC 50 values of 0.02-74.03 µM, while the IC 50 of the reference zileuton was 0.83 µM. The most active compound 4c (4-chlorobenzoxazole derivative) was found to have dual COX-2/LOX activity. All the synthesized compounds were docked inside the active site of the COX-2 and LOX enzymes. They linked to COX-2 through the N atom of the azole scaffold, while CO of the oxazolone moiety was responsible for the binding to amino acids inside the LOX active site. © 2018 Deutsche Pharmazeutische Gesellschaft.

  16. In vitro activity of Spirulina platensis water extract against different Candida species isolated from vulvo-vaginal candidiasis cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahui Palomino, Rogers Alberto; Gallina Toschi, Tullia; Vitali, Beatrice; Camarda, Luca; Mandrioli, Mara; De Giorgio, Marta; Aldini, Rita; Corazza, Ivan; Chiarini, Alberto; Cevenini, Roberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    The high incidence of vulvo-vaginal candidiasis, combined with the growing problems about azole resistance and toxicity of antifungal drugs, highlights the need for the development of new effective strategies for the treatment of this condition. In this context, natural compounds represent promising alternatives. The cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, a blue-green alga, exhibits antimicrobial activities against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, only few data about the antifungal properties of Spirulina platensis are available and its potential toxic effects have not been largely investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of a fully-characterized water extract of Spirulina platensis against 22 strains of Candida spp. Prior to considering its potential topical use, we both investigated whether the extract exerted target activities on guinea pig uterine smooth muscle, and the impact of Spirulina platensis on the dominant microorganisms of the vaginal microbiota (i.e., lactobacilli), in order to exclude possible adverse events. By means of a broth microdilution assay, we found that the microalga extract possesses good antifungal properties (MIC: 0.125–0.5 mg/ml), against all the Candida species with a fungicidal activity. At the concentrations active against candida, Spirulina platensis did not modify the spontaneous basic waves pattern of uterine myometrium as underlined by the absence of aberrant contractions, and did not affect the main health-promoting bacteria of the vaginal ecosystem. Finally, we evaluated the selectivity index of our extract by testing its cytotoxicity on three different cell lines and it showed values ranging between 2 and 16. Further in vivo studies are needed, in particular to evaluate the use of control-release formulations in order to maintain Spirulina platensis concentrations at anti-Candida active doses but below the toxic levels found in the present work. PMID:29190763

  17. Clotrimazole preferentially inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation, viability and glycolysis.

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    Cristiane M Furtado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clotrimazole is an azole derivative with promising anti-cancer effects. This drug interferes with the activity of glycolytic enzymes altering their cellular distribution and inhibiting their activities. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of clotrimazole on the growth pattern of breast cancer cells correlating with their metabolic profiles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three cell lines derived from human breast tissue (MCF10A, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 that present increasingly aggressive profiles were used. Clotrimazole induces a dose-dependent decrease in glucose uptake in all three cell lines, with K(i values of 114.3±11.7, 77.1±7.8 and 37.8±4.2 µM for MCF10A, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. Furthermore, the drug also decreases intracellular ATP content and inhibits the major glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase-1 and pyruvate kinase, especially in the highly metastatic cell line, MDA-MB-231. In this last cell lineage, clotrimazole attenuates the robust migratory response, an effect that is progressively attenuated in MCF-7 and MCF10A, respectively. Moreover, clotrimazole reduces the viability of breast cancer cells, which is more pronounced on MDA-MB-231. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Clotrimazole presents deleterious effects on two human breast cancer cell lines metabolism, growth and migration, where the most aggressive cell line is more affected by the drug. Moreover, clotrimazole presents little or no effect on a non-tumor human breast cell line. These results suggest, at least for these three cell lines studied, that the more aggressive the cell is the more effective clotrimazole is.

  18. Synergy testing of FDA-approved drugs identifies potent drug combinations against Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Joseph D Planer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 8 million persons, mainly in Latin America, are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Existing antiparasitic drugs for Chagas disease have significant toxicities and suboptimal effectiveness, hence new therapeutic strategies need to be devised to address this neglected tropical disease. Due to the high research and development costs of bringing new chemical entities to the clinic, we and others have investigated the strategy of repurposing existing drugs for Chagas disease. Screens of FDA-approved drugs (described in this paper have revealed a variety of chemical classes that have growth inhibitory activity against mammalian stage Trypanosoma cruzi parasites. Aside from azole antifungal drugs that have low or sub-nanomolar activity, most of the active compounds revealed in these screens have effective concentrations causing 50% inhibition (EC50's in the low micromolar or high nanomolar range. For example, we have identified an antihistamine (clemastine, EC50 of 0.4 µM, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, EC50 of 4.4 µM, and an antifolate drug (pyrimethamine, EC50 of 3.8 µM and others. When tested alone in the murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, most compounds had insufficient efficacy to lower parasitemia thus we investigated using combinations of compounds for additive or synergistic activity. Twenty-four active compounds were screened in vitro in all possible combinations. Follow up isobologram studies showed at least 8 drug pairs to have synergistic activity on T. cruzi growth. The combination of the calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, plus the antifungal drug, posaconazole, was found to be more effective at lowering parasitemia in mice than either drug alone, as was the combination of clemastine and posaconazole. Using combinations of FDA-approved drugs is a promising strategy for developing new treatments for Chagas disease.

  19. Diazole-based powdered cocrystal featuring a helical hydrogen-bonded network: structure determination from PXRD, solid-state NMR and computer modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardo, Mariana; Santos, Sérgio M; Babaryk, Artem A; López, Concepción; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Claramunt, Rosa M; Mafra, Luís

    2015-02-01

    We present the structure of a new equimolar 1:1 cocrystal formed by 3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole (dmpz) and 4,5-dimethyl-1H-imidazole (dmim), determined by means of powder X-ray diffraction data combined with solid-state NMR that provided insight into topological details of hydrogen bonding connectivities and weak interactions such as CH···π contacts. The use of various 1D/2D (13)C, (15)N and (1)H high-resolution solid-state NMR techniques provided structural insight on local length scales revealing internuclear proximities and relative orientations between the dmim and dmpz molecular building blocks of the studied cocrystal. Molecular modeling and DFT calculations were also employed to generate meaningful structures. DFT refinement was able to decrease the figure of merit R(F(2)) from ~11% (PXRD only) to 5.4%. An attempt was made to rationalize the role of NH···N and CH···π contacts in stabilizing the reported cocrystal. For this purpose four imidazole derivatives with distinct placement of methyl substituents were reacted with dmpz to understand the effect of methylation in blocking or enabling certain intermolecular contacts. Only one imidazole derivative (dmim) was able to incorporate into the dmpz trimeric motif thus resulting in a cocrystal, which contains both hydrophobic (methyl groups) and hydrophilic components that self-assemble to form an atypical 1D network of helicoidal hydrogen bonded pattern, featuring structural similarities with alpha-helix arrangements in proteins. The 1:1 dmpz···dmim compound I is the first example of a cocrystal formed by two different azoles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional characterization of ent-kaurene oxidase, MtKO, from Montanoa tomentosa (Zoapatle

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    Villa-Ruano Nemesio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaurene oxidases are P450 proteins that catalyze the conversion of ent-kaurene into kaurenoic acid, the final enzymatic product with a wide range of pharmacological properties. We describe the functional characterization of an ent-kaurene oxidase (EC 1.14.13.78 isolated from Montanoa tomentosa after heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the detection of the enzymatic activity in the plant itself. In the presence of NADPH and FAD, the microsomal fraction from transformed INVSc1 cells, ent-kaurene produced ent-kaurenoic acid, which was confirmed by GC-MS analyses. The kinetic parameters for ent-kaurene using 0.5 mg of microsomal protein were Km app= 80.63±1.2 μM and V max app= 31.80±1.8 μmol-1mg-1h-1. Optimal temperature and pH were 30°C and 7.6, respectively. Similar kinetic parameters were observed when leaf microsomes from M. tomentosa were assayed under the same conditions as for yeast microsomes. This result strongly suggests that ent-kaurene oxidase activity is present in leaf microsomes. The enzymatic activity was competitively inhibited by paclobutrazol, with IC50=43.9 μM, implying that MtKO is resistant to inhibition by azolic-type compounds. This study confirmed the biochemical detection of ent-kaurene oxidase activity in the plant, and the heterologous functionality of a cDNA with an ent-kaurene oxidase identity from M. tomentosa (zoapatle.

  1. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

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    Natesan SK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suganthini Krishnan Natesan,1,2 Pranatharthi H Chandrasekar1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Keywords: isavuconazole, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, efficacy, antifungal therapy, novel azole, tolerability, drug interactions

  2. A rapid MCM-41 dispersive micro-solid phase extraction coupled with LC/MS/MS for quantification of ketoconazole and voriconazole in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Noorfatimah; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Abd Aziz, Noorizan; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Nur, Hadi; Loh, Saw Hong; Kamaruzaman, Sazlinda

    2017-02-01

    A rapid dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) combined with LC/MS/MS method was developed and validated for the determination of ketoconazole and voriconazole in human urine and plasma samples. Synthesized mesoporous silica MCM-41 was used as sorbent in d-μ-SPE of the azole compounds from biological fluids. Important D-μ-SPE parameters, namely type desorption solvent, extraction time, sample pH, salt addition, desorption time, amount of sorbent and sample volume were optimized. Liquid chromatographic separations were carried out on a Zorbax SB-C 18 column (2.1 × 100 mm, 3.5 μm), using a mobile phase of acetonitrile-0.05% formic acid in 5 mm ammonium acetate buffer (70:30, v/v). A triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with positive ionization mode was used for the determination of target analytes. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curves showed good linearity in the range of 0.1-10,000 μg/L with satisfactory limit of detection (≤0.06 μg/L) and limit of quantitation (≤0.3 μg/L). The proposed method also showed acceptable intra- and inter-day precisions for ketoconazole and voriconazole from urine and human plasma with RSD ≤16.5% and good relative recoveries in the range 84.3-114.8%. The MCM-41-D-μ-SPE method proved to be rapid and simple and requires a small volume of organic solvent (200 μL); thus it is advantageous for routine drug analysis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Proteomic profiling of the antifungal drug response of Aspergillus fumigatus to voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarsaikhan, Nansalmaa; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Sasse, Christoph; Braus, Gerhard H; Ogel, Zumrut B; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    Antifungal resistance is an emerging problem and one of the reasons for treatment failure of invasive aspergillosis (IA). Voriconazole has become a standard therapeutic for the treatment of this often fatal infection. We studied the differentially expressed proteins as a response of Aspergillus fumigatus to voriconazole by employing the two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technique. Due to addition of drug, a total of 135 differentially synthesized proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-mass spectrometry. In particular, the level of proteins involved in the general stress response and cell detoxification increased prominently. In contrast, cell metabolism and energy proteins were down-regulated, which suggests the cellular effort to maintain balance in energy utilization while trying to combat the cellular stress exerted by the drug. We detected several so-far uncharacterized proteins which may play a role in stress response and drug metabolism and which could be future targets for antifungal treatment. A mutant strain, which is deleted in the cross-pathway control gene cpcA, was treated with voriconazole to investigate the contribution of the general control of amino acid biosynthesis to drug resistance. We compared the mutant strain's protein expression profile with the wild-type strain. The absence of CpcA led to an increased resistance to voriconazole and a reduced activation of some general stress response proteins, while the transcript level of the triazole target gene erg11A (cyp51A) remained unchanged. In contrast, the sensitivity of strain ΔcpcA to terbinafine and amphotericin B was slightly increased. These findings imply a role of CpcA in the cellular stress response to azole drugs at the post transcriptional level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Frequent detection of ‘azole’ resistant Candida species among late presenting AIDS patients in northwest Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The chronic use of antifungal agents in the treatment of fungal infection in general and oropharyngeal candidiasis mainly in AIDS patient’s leads to the selection of strain resistant to these therapies and a shift in the spectrum of Candida species. This study determines the species diversity and in vitro susceptibility of Candida isolates from late presenting AIDS patients in northwest Ethiopia. Methods Two hundred and twenty one HIV/AIDS patients were assessed with a standardized evaluation form at enrolment. Oral rinses were cultured on CHROMagar plates at 37°C for 48 hours and Candida species identification were made following standard microbiological techniques. In vitro drug susceptibility tests were made using broth microdilution method. Results The colonization rate of Candida species was found to be 82.3% (177/215). C. albicans was the predominant species isolated from 139 (81%) patients but there was a diversity of other species. C. glabrata was the most frequent non-albicans species isolated in 22.5% (40/177) of the patients followed by C. tropicalis 14.1% (27/177), C. krusei 5.6% (10) and other unidentifiable Candida species 4% (7/177). Recurrent episodes of oropharyngeal candidiasis and previous exposure to antifungal drugs were found to be predisposing factors for colonization by non-albicans species. Irrespective of the Candida species identified 12.2% (11/90), 7.7% (7/90) and 4.7% (4) of the isolates were resistant to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole, respectively. In contrast, resistance to micafungin, amphotericin B and 5-Fluorocytosine was infrequent. Conclusion HIV/AIDS patients are orally colonized by single or multiple albicans and non- albicans Candida species that are frequently resistant to azoles and occasionally to amphotericin B, 5-Fluorocytosine and micafungin. These highlight the need for national surveillance for examining Candida epidemiology and resistance to antifungal drugs. PMID:23398783

  5. Evaluation of antifungal activity of standardized extract of Salvia rhytidea Benth. (Lamiaceae) against various Candida isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, S; Bakhshi, T; Sharififar, F; Naseri, A; Ghasemi Nejad Almani, P

    2016-12-01

    Salvia species have long been described in traditional medicine for various indications. Owing to the widespread use of this genus by ethnic populations, especially for various infections ranging from skin disease to gastrointestinal disorders, we were encouraged to determine whether Salvia rhytidea could be effective against fungal infections. Given the increased incidence of candidiasis in the past decade, limits on the use of antifungal drugs, emergence of azole-resistant Candida species and increased incidence of treatment failures, it is necessary to identify a novel agent with antifungal properties. Aim of the study was to evaluate the antifungal properties of S. rhytidea against various Candida isolates. In this study, at first rosmarinic acid content of plant extract was determined. A total of 96 Candida isolates were tested, including the following species: Candida albicans (n=42), Candida glabrata (n=16), Candida tropicalis (n=11), Candida krusei (n=9), Candida parapsilosis (n=9), Candida lusitaniae (n=7) and Candida guilliermondii (n=2). The in vitro antifungal activity of methanolic extracts of S. rhytidea Benth. was evaluated against Candida isolates and compared with that of the standard antifungal drug nystatin by using a broth microdilution method, according to CLSI. Phytochemical screening results showed that the methanolic extract of S. rhytidea Benth. was rich in flavonoids and tannins. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) values of S. rhytidea Benth. ranged from 3.125 to>100μg/ml and 6.25 to>100μg/ml respectively. The growth inhibition value displayed that C. tropicalis, C. krusei and C. albicans isolates were most susceptible to S. rhytidea. Findings show that S. rhytidea possesses an antifungal effect against Candida isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Species distribution and antifungal susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates from a public tertiary teaching hospital in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa.

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    Mnge, P; Okeleye, B I; Vasaikar, S D; Apalata, T

    2017-05-15

    Candida species are the leading cause of invasive fungal infections, and over the past decade there has been an increased isolation of drug resistant Candida species. This study aimed to identify the species distribution of Candida isolates and to determine their unique antifungal susceptibility and resistance patterns. During a cross-sectional study, 209 Candida isolates (recovered from 206 clinical samples) were collected and their species distribution was determined using ChromAgar Candida. The Vitek-2 system (Biomerieux, South Africa) was used to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to azoles (fluconazole, voriconazole), echinocandins (caspofungin, micafungin), polyenes (amphotericin B) and flucytosine. Four species of Candida were isolated, of which C. albicans was the most frequent, isolated in 45.4% (95/209) of the isolates, followed by C. glabrata: 31.1% (65/209). The MICs of the different antifungal drugs varied amongst the species of Candida. From the 130 isolates tested for MICs, 90.77% (112/130) were susceptible to all antifungal drugs and 6.9% (9/130) of the isolates were multi-drug resistant. C. dubliniensis (n=2) isolates were susceptible to all the above mentioned antifungal drugs. There was no significant difference in species distribution amongst clinical specimens and between patients' genders (P>0.05). An increase in MIC values for fluconazole and flucytosine towards the resistance range was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report on surveillance of Candida species distribution and antifungal susceptibility at a public tertiary teaching hospital in Eastern Cape, South Africa.

  7. Fungal diseases: could nanostructured drug delivery systems be a novel paradigm for therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltan AR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aline Raquel Voltan,1 Guillermo Quindós,2 Kaila P Medina Alarcón,3 Ana Marisa Fusco-Almeida,3 Maria José Soares Mendes-Giannini,3 Marlus Chorilli1 1Department of Drugs and Medicines, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2Immunology, Microbiology, and Parasitology Department, Facultad de Medicina y Odontología, Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao, Spain; 3Department of Clinical Analysis, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Invasive mycoses are a major problem for immunocompromised individuals and patients in intensive care units. Morbidity and mortality rates of these infections are high because of late diagnosis and delayed treatment. Moreover, the number of available antifungal agents is low, and there are problems with toxicity and resistance. Alternatives for treating invasive fungal infections are necessary. Nanostructured systems could be excellent carriers for antifungal drugs, reducing toxicity and targeting their action. The use of nanostructured systems for antifungal therapy began in the 1990s, with the appearance of lipid formulations of amphotericin B. This review encompasses different antifungal drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, carriers based on solid lipids and nanostructure lipids, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and others. All these delivery systems have advantages and disadvantages. Main advantages are the improvement in the antifungal properties, such as bioavailability, reduction in toxicity, and target tissue, which facilitates innovative therapeutic techniques. Conversely, a major disadvantage is the high cost of production. In the near future, the use of nanosystems for drug delivery strategies can be used for delivering peptides, including mucoadhesive systems for the treatment of oral and vaginal candidiasis. Keywords: fungal diseases, antifungal agents, amphotericin B, azoles

  8. Biocide leaching from CBA treated wood - a mechanistic interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupsea, Maria; Mathies, Helena; Schoknecht, Ute; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta

    2013-02-01

    Treated wood is frequently used for construction. However, there is a need to ensure that biocides used for the treatment are not a threat for people or environment. The paper focused on Pinus sylvestris treated with copper-boron-azole (CBA), containing tebuconazole as organic biocide and monoethanolamine (Mea). This study investigates chemical mechanisms of fixation and mobilisation involved in the leaching process of the used inorganic and organic biocides in CBA. A pH dependent leaching test was performed, followed by a set of complementary analysis methods in order to identify and quantify the species released from wood. The main findings of this study are: - Organic compounds are released from untreated and treated wood; the quantity of released total organic carbon, carboxylic and phenolic functions increasing with the pH. - Nitrogen containing compounds, i.e. mainly Mea and its reaction products with extractives, are released in important quantities from CBA treated wood, especially at low pH. - The release of copper is the result of competitive reactions: fixation via complexation reactions and complexation with extractives in the liquid phase. The specific pH dependency of Cu leaching is explained by the competition of ligands for protonation and complexation. - Tebuconazole is released to a lesser extent relative to its initial content. Its fixation on solid wood structure seems to be influenced by pH, suggesting interactions with \\OH groups on wood. Boron release appears to be pH independent and very high. This confirms its weak fixation on wood and also no or weak interaction with the extractives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Experience of chemical treatment for controlling corrosion in IDCT water of KGS 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uday Kumar, V.; Sahu, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    KGS (Kaiga Generating Station) - 3 and 4 is 220 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor. Active Process Water Cooling system (APWC) cool active process cooling water through plate type heat exchanger. The heat from this system is dissipated to the atmosphere through Induced Draught Cooling Tower (IDCT). Continuous make up of system is carried out with raw water to compensate evaporation and blow down loss. Average Langlier Index (LI) of makeup water is -2.0. Cycle of concentration (COC) of APWC system water is around 4.0 and LI at this COC is around - 0.1. As per design chlorination of water is carried out and 0.2-0.5 ppm free residual chlorine (FRC) is maintained. Other than chlorination no chemical treatment was considered in the design. Considering that cooling water may have corrosion, scaling and bio-fouling problems, a detailed study was carried out. Corrosion, scaling and bio-fouling studies were carried out for three months by maintaining the COC around 4.0 and during this period normal chlorination was carried out. The results of the study had shown high corrosion rate for Carbon Steel (CS) but water did not have high scaling and the bio-fouling tendency. Sulphate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) and Total Bacteria Count (TBC) were evaluated and found within the limits. This indicated that water is corrosive in nature and a suitable chemical treatment needs to be carried out to control the corrosion of cooling water system. Chemical treatment in IDCT water with the formulation consisting of Zinc, Phosphonate, Azole and low molecular formulation was started along with chlorination. Biocide (Benzalkonium chloride) dosing was also started at regular intervals. After chemical dosing a downtrend trend of corrosion rate of CS was observed but still it was higher than limit. After increasing Zinc concentration in water from 0.2 to 0.5 ppm, CS corrosion was reduced to <2.0. (author)

  10. Antifungal therapy and management of complications of cryptococcosis due to Cryptococcus gattii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sharon C-A; Korman, Tony M; Slavin, Monica A; Marriott, Deborah; Byth, Karen; Bak, Narin; Currie, Bart J; Hajkowicz, Krispin; Heath, Christopher H; Kidd, Sarah; McBride, William J H; Meyer, Wieland; Murray, Ronan; Playford, E Geoffrey; Sorrell, Tania C

    2013-08-01

    We describe antifungal therapy and management of complications due to Cryptococcus gattii infection in 86 Australian patients followed for at least 12 months. Patient data from culture-confirmed cases (2000-2007) were recorded at diagnosis, 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Clinical, laboratory, and treatment variables associated with raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) were determined. Seven of 10 patients with lung infection received amphotericin B (AMB) induction therapy (6 with 5-flucytosine [5-FC] for a median of 2 weeks); median duration of therapy including azole eradication therapy was 41 weeks, with a complete/partial clinical response in 78%. For neurologic disease, 88% of patients received AMB, 78% with 5-FC, for a median of 6 weeks. The median total course was 18 months. Nine patients receiving fluconazole induction therapy were reinduced with AMB plus 5-FC for clinical failure. Raised ICP (31 patients) was associated with initial abnormal neurology, and neurologic sequelae and/or death at 12 months (both P = .02); cerebrospinal fluid drains/shunts were placed in 58% of patients and in 64% of 22 patients with hydrocephalus. IRIS developed 2-12 months after starting antifungals in 8 patients, who presented with new/enlarging brain lesions. Risk factors included female sex, brain involvement at presentation, and higher median CD4 counts (all P < .05); corticosteroids reduced cryptococcoma-associated edema. Induction AMB plus 5-FC is indicated for C. gattii neurologic cryptococcosis (6 weeks) and when localized to lung (2 weeks). Shunting was often required to control raised ICP. IRIS presents with cerebral manifestations.

  11. A prospective study of AIDS-associated cryptococcal meningitis in Thailand treated with high-dose amphotericin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitisuttithum, P; Tansuphasawadikul, S; Simpson, A J; Howe, P A; White, N J

    2001-11-01

    To assess kinetic of cryptococci in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and outcome of AIDS-associated cyptococcal meningitis after high-dose amphotericin B. A prospective study involving Thai adults (n=106) with cryptococcal meningitis associated with AIDS was conducted to determine the kinetic of cryptococci in CSF and prognostic factors affecting survival after high-dose amphotericin B (0.7 mg/kg/day) followed by oral azole treatment. Cerebrospinal fluids were collected for cryptococcal count and culture at weekly intervals for at least 2 weeks or until CSF cultures were negative for cryptococci. All patients were followed monthly for 1 year or until death in order to detect relapse or occurrence of any other opportunistic infection. A total of 106 AIDS patients with cryptococcal meningitis were enrolled. The geometric mean (range) total and viable cryptococcal counts in CSF on admission were 430,000 (1000 to 3.4 x 10(7)) and 31,000 (10 to 1.4 x 10(7)) per ml, respectively. Both total and viable cryptococcal counts declined monoexponentially with an elimination half life of 4 days. The cumulative CSF yeast clearance rates were 38% and 56% at 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. Early death was associated significantly with previous history of weight loss [relative risk (RR)=2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-3.9], Glasgow Coma Score <13 (RR=2.33; 95% CI, 1.55-3.50), and hypoalbuminaemia (P<0.001). Later mortality was associated delayed CSF yeast clearance (RR=3.6; 95% CI, 1.9--6.4) and relapse (RR=3.9; 95% CI, 1.4-10.8). High-dose amphotericin B was not as effective as previously thought. Cumulative mortality at 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 1 year were 16%, 24% and 76%, respectively. Copyright 2001 The British Infection Society.

  12. Epidemiology and risk factors for nosocomial Non-Candida albicans candidemia in adult patients at a tertiary care hospital in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiurong; Yan, Donghui; Sun, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyin; Su, Ruirui; Su, Jianrong

    2015-09-01

    Nosocomial candidemia extends the length of hospital stay, increases the costs of medical care, and is associated with a high mortality rate. Epidemiological data that assist in the choice of initial therapy may help to improve the prognosis. The present study was undertaken to investigate the epidemiology of nosocomial candidemia and identify risk factors for nosocomial candidemia caused by C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species (NAC). A retrospective chart review was undertaken to analyze cases of nosocomial candidemia treated at the Beijing Friendship Hospital between January 2008 and December 2012. All cases of candidemia were identified using the previously published criteria. Among 106 patients analyzed, 53.8% had nosocomial candidemia caused by NAC. Candida albicans was the most common causative agent, accounting for 46.2% of all cases, followed by C. glabrata (25.5%), C. tropicalis (15.1%), C. parapsilosis (10.4%) and C. Krusei (0.9%). Comparison of nosocomial C. albicans and NAC candidemia by multivariate logistic regression showed that factors independently associated with nosocomial NAC candidemia included exposure to azole agents (odds ratio [OR]: 3.359; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.136-10.154; P = .031) and artificial surgical implants (OR: 37.519; 95% CI: 2.5-562.998; P = .009). A significant risk factor for nosocomial C. albicans candidemia was cancer surgery (OR: 0.075; 95% CI: 0.013-0.437; P = .004). Clinical and epidemiological differences in the risk factors between nosocomial candidemia caused by C. albicans and NAC should be considered when selecting an initial antifungal regimen for the treatment of adult patients. This should be undertaken before the availability of species identification and/or antifungal susceptibility results. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Comparative Phenotypic Analysis of the Major Fungal Pathogens Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Linda M.; Schröder, Markus S.; Turner, Siobhán A.; Taff, Heather; Andes, David; Grózer, Zsuzsanna; Gácser, Attila; Ames, Lauren; Haynes, Ken; Higgins, Desmond G.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans are human fungal pathogens that belong to the CTG clade in the Saccharomycotina. In contrast to C. albicans, relatively little is known about the virulence properties of C. parapsilosis, a pathogen particularly associated with infections of premature neonates. We describe here the construction of C. parapsilosis strains carrying double allele deletions of 100 transcription factors, protein kinases and species-specific genes. Two independent deletions were constructed for each target gene. Growth in >40 conditions was tested, including carbon source, temperature, and the presence of antifungal drugs. The phenotypes were compared to C. albicans strains with deletions of orthologous transcription factors. We found that many phenotypes are shared between the two species, such as the role of Upc2 as a regulator of azole resistance, and of CAP1 in the oxidative stress response. Others are unique to one species. For example, Cph2 plays a role in the hypoxic response in C. parapsilosis but not in C. albicans. We found extensive divergence between the biofilm regulators of the two species. We identified seven transcription factors and one protein kinase that are required for biofilm development in C. parapsilosis. Only three (Efg1, Bcr1 and Ace2) have similar effects on C. albicans biofilms, whereas Cph2, Czf1, Gzf3 and Ume6 have major roles in C. parapsilosis only. Two transcription factors (Brg1 and Tec1) with well-characterized roles in biofilm formation in C. albicans do not have the same function in C. parapsilosis. We also compared the transcription profile of C. parapsilosis and C. albicans biofilms. Our analysis suggests the processes shared between the two species are predominantly metabolic, and that Cph2 and Bcr1 are major biofilm regulators in C. parapsilosis. PMID:25233198

  14. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida albicans and its related species Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana isolated from vulvovaginal samples in a hospital of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theill, Laura; Dudiuk, Catiana; Morano, Susana; Gamarra, Soledad; Nardin, María Elena; Méndez, Emilce; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Candida africana taxonomical status is controversial. It was proposed as a separate species within the Candida albicans species complex; however, phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is an unusual variety of C. albicans. The prevalence of C. albicans-related species (Candi