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Sample records for azaguanine

  1. X-ray-induced mutants resistant to 8-azaguanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, J.H.; Dewey, W.C.; Hopwood, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    Asynchronous Chinese hamster ovary cells were irradiated and colony survival in Alpha MEM medium with dialyzed serum was determined with or without 15 μg/ml 8-Azaguanine (AG). Data indicated that a reproducible assay for the system was dependent upon controlling cell density at least two days prior to induction as well as throughout the expression period. Generally, spontaneous and radiation-induced mutant frequencies decreased when cell densities exceeded a critical density of 3-6 x 10 4 cells/cm 2 . Infrequently, the critical density was exceeded by a factor of two with no observed decrease, possibly correlated with a longer cell doubling time. Drug depletion artifacts can occur because of drug degradation, or because wild-type cells utilize the drug or produce conditions which reduce uptake of the drug. Thus, as the effective drug concentration is lowered, the observed mutant frequency increases because a spectrum of mutants resistant to only low concentrations can now survive. In fact, refeeding with AG at intervals during the incubation period lowered spontaneous and radiation-induced frequencies approx. 5-fold. Therefore, to standardize conditions, cells were trypsinized at the end of the expression time and replated at a constant cell number for mutant selection by AG. Over two generations of growth during the expression period were required for optimal manifestation of induced mutants, and when densities were kept below 4 x 10 4 cells/cm 2 at all times, observed mutant frequencies did not change significantly over a period between 80 and 140 h post-induction (over 4 generations for irradiated cells and over 6 generations for controls). Previous reports of observed mutant frequencies decreasing beyond three generations may be due to cell interaction prior to mutant selection

  2. Stimulation of cytolytic T lymphocytes by azaguanine-resistant mouse tumor cells in selective hat medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snick, J. van; Uyttenhove, C.; Pel, A. van; Boon, T.

    1981-01-01

    Primed syngeneic or umprimed allogeneic mouse spleen cells were stimulated with azaguanine-resistant P815 tumor cells that were killed by the addition of aminopterin to the stimulation medium. The recovery of lymphocytes and their cytolytic activity and specificity were similar to those obtained after stimulation with irradiated cells. This method conveniently replaces the inactivation of stimulatory cells by irradiation or mitomycin treatment. Moreover, it has the advantage of inactivating not only the stimulatory cells but also the tumor cells that often contaminate the spleens of tumor-bearing animals, provided these animals have been inoculated with azaguanine-resistant tumor cell mutants. (Auth.)

  3. Protective action of DNA preparations on the survival of cells and yield of 8-azaguanine resistant mutations in X-irradiated cell culture of chinese hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsova, N.N.; Feoktistova, T.P.

    1976-01-01

    A DNA preparation (molecular weight 19.6-21.0x1O 6 daltons) administered to cell culture of Chinese hamsters in concentrations of 100 to 122 μg/ml 60 minutes before and in the course of 3 days after X-irradiation (600 R) decreased the lethality of irradiated cells and reduced induction of 8-azaguanine resistant genic mutations. DNA preparations with the concentrations under study had no toxic action on cells and were not mutagenous

  4. Enzymatic Incorporation of Modified Purine Nucleotides in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El Asrar, Rania; Margamuljana, Lia; Abramov, Mikhail; Bande, Omprakash; Agnello, Stefano; Jang, Miyeon; Herdewijn, Piet

    2017-12-14

    A series of nucleotide analogues, with a hypoxanthine base moiety (8-aminohypoxanthine, 1-methyl-8-aminohypoxanthine, and 8-oxohypoxanthine), together with 5-methylisocytosine were tested as potential pairing partners of N 8 -glycosylated nucleotides with an 8-azaguanine or 8-aza-9-deazaguanine base moiety by using DNA polymerases (incorporation studies). The best results were obtained with the 5-methylisocytosine nucleotide followed by the 1-methyl-8-aminohypoxanthine nucleotide. The experiments demonstrated that small differences in the structure (8-azaguanine versus 8-aza-9-deazaguanine) might lead to significant differences in recognition efficiency and selectivity, base pairing by Hoogsteen recognition at the polymerase level is possible, 8-aza-9-deazaguanine represents a self-complementary base pair, and a correlation exists between in vitro incorporation studies and in vivo recognition by natural bases in Escherichia coli, but this recognition is not absolute (exceptions were observed). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Molecular Biology and Physiology of Methanogenic Archaebacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-27

    anaerobic food chains, the methanogens contribute to the mineralization of large amounts of organic matter. The end product of their metabolism...of radiolabelled substrate to product [8; Worrell and Nagle, in preparation]. Strain RT103, a formate auxotroph was isolated from the kanamycin...methylmercaptopurine riboside 0. 16 Bacteriocidald 8-aza-2, 6-diaminopurine 0.0011 6-thioguanine 0.0004 8-azaguanine 0.0004 6- mercaptopurine 0 8

  6. Mutagenic activity of phthalate esters in bacterial liquid suspension assays.

    OpenAIRE

    Seed, J L

    1982-01-01

    The mutagenic activities of several phthalate esters have been evaluated in an 8-azaguanine resistance assay in Salmonella typhimurium. Three phthalate esters were found to be mutagenic: dimethyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate and di-n-butyl phthalate. A number of other phthalate esters were not found to be mutagenic, including di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, di-n-octyl phthalate, diallyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate and diisodecyl phthalate. A metabolite of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, 2-ethylhe...

  7. Extracellular polysaccharidases synthesized by the epiphytic lichen Evernia prunastri (L.) Ach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagüe, E; Orus, M I; Estevez, M P

    1984-03-01

    Evernia prunastri Ach., an epiphytic lichen growing on Quercus rotundifolia Lam., produces a β-1,4-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.4) and a polygalacturonase (EC 3.2.1.15). The activity of these polysaccharidases increases as a response to incubation of the lichen with carboxymethylcellulose or sodium polygalacturonate, respectively. This increase in activity is thought to be the result of enzyme induction because it is inhibited by both cycloheximide and 8-azaguanine. Both polysaccharide-degrading enzymes are partially secreted into the incubation media.

  8. Detection of pathogenic Leptospira from selected environment in Kelantan and Terengganu, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridzlan, F R; Bahaman, A R; Khairani-Bejo, S; Mutalib, A R

    2010-12-01

    Leptospirosis is recognized as one of the important zoonotic diseases in the world including Malaysia. A total of 145 soil and water samples were collected from selected National Service Training Centres (NSTC) in Kelantan and Terengganu. The samples were inoculated into modified semisolid Ellinghausen McCullough Johnson Harris (EMJH) medium, incubated at room temperature for 1 month and examined under the dark-field microscope. Positive growth of the leptospiral isolates were then confirmed with 8-Azaguanine Test, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay and Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). Fifteen cultures (10.34%) exhibited positive growths which were seen under dark field microscope whilst only 20% (3/15) were confirmed as pathogenic species. based on 8-Azaguanine Test and PCR. Serological identification of the isolates with MAT showed that hebdomadis was the dominant serovar in Terengganu. Pathogenic leptospires can be detected in Malaysian environment and this has the potential to cause an outbreak. Therefore, precautionary steps against leptospirosis should be taken by camp authorities to ensure the safety of trainees.

  9. Recovery during radiation and chemical mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, D.F.

    1975-01-01

    These investigations were directed toward the study of recovery in radiation and chemical mutagenesis in cultured mammalian cells. A mutagenesis system was established in which mutation of V79-17lb Chinese hamster cells to 8-azaguanine resistance was tested. The effects of split dose and postirradiation treatments upon both x-ray and EMS induced mutagenesis were determined. Increasing the cell inoculum by a factor of 5 (from 10 5 to 5 x 10 5 ) decreased both the spontaneous and x-ray induced mutation frequencies by two orders of magnitude. The x-ray induced mutation frequency was found to be higher for those cells allowed to attach for 5 hours before irradiation, in comparison to those allowed to attach for 2 hours. The uv spectrum of 8-azaguanine changes as a function of storage time at low temperature, but not when diluted to either 10 μg/ml or 30 μg/ml and maintained at 37 0 C. The optimal expression time required after irradiation is dose dependent and can be determined from the relationship: E.T. = 1.93(10 -2 )D + 15.5. (E.T. = hours; D = rads). The duration of the optimal expression time can be estimated by summing the cell cycle time and the radiation induced lag time

  10. Site-Selective Ribosylation of Fluorescent Nucleobase Analogs Using Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase as a Catalyst: Effects of Point Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Stachelska-Wierzchowska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic ribosylation of fluorescent 8-azapurine derivatives, like 8-azaguanine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, with purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP as a catalyst, leads to N9, N8, and N7-ribosides. The final proportion of the products may be modulated by point mutations in the enzyme active site. As an example, ribosylation of the latter substrate by wild-type calf PNP gives N7- and N8-ribosides, while the N243D mutant directs the ribosyl substitution at N9- and N7-positions. The same mutant allows synthesis of the fluorescent N7-β-d-ribosyl-8-azaguanine. The mutated form of the E. coli PNP, D204N, can be utilized to obtain non-typical ribosides of 8-azaadenine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine as well. The N7- and N8-ribosides of the 8-azapurines can be analytically useful, as illustrated by N7-β-d-ribosyl-2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, which is a good fluorogenic substrate for mammalian forms of PNP, including human blood PNP, while the N8-riboside is selective to the E. coli enzyme.

  11. Recovery during radiation mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, D.F.; Shaw, E.I.

    1976-01-01

    Many variables (e.g. cell inoculum size, mutagen dose, expression time, and concentration of the selective agent) are known to affect the induced mutation frequency obtained in cultured mammalian cells. The authors have studied the effects of several parameters on the frequency of radiation-induced resistance to 8-azaguanine in asynchronous V79-171B hamster cells. Inoculation with 10 5 cells was followed by graded doses of radiation, expression times were optimized to maximize mutation frequency, and then the treated cells were challenged with 8-azaguanine for ten days. The optimal expression times which maximized mutation frequency were dose dependent and are in the range of 14-24, 24, and 24-36 hours respectively for doses of 250, 40 and 800 rads. A time interval of 24 hours between two 250-rad fractions resulted in a mutation frequency smaller than that obtained from administration of a single 500-rad dose. With 36 hours between halves of the dose, the induced mutation frequency was an order of magnitude lower than that produced by a single dose and actually below the unirradiated (spontaneous) frequency. Maintenance of cells after irradation first at 18 0 C for 24 hours, and then allowance of expression at 37 0 C for 24 hours, increased both the spontaneous and induced mutation frequency. A one-hour postirradiation balanced salt-solution treatment did not affect the number of spontaneous mutants that arose, but reduced the number of induced mutants. Thus, the balanced salt treatment lowers the induced mutation frequency about a factor of two. The possible significance of these results are discussed with respect to the role of radiation repair mechanisms during mutagenesis, and to recovery at low dose rates. A working hypothesis is advanced to explain the possible mechanism which causes expression time to vary as a function of the dose of mutagen. (author)

  12. MMS induction of different types of genetic damage in Aspergillus nidulans: a comparative analysis in mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualandi, G; Bellincampi, D; Puppo, S

    1979-09-01

    Methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) was used to test the induction of gene mutation, somatic crossing-over and mitotic non-disjunction in A. nidulans. Gene mutation was tested by inducing mutants resistant to 8-azaguanine and revertants of methG1 in a haploid strain. Somatic crossing-over was tested in heterozygous diploids, both with a selective method, i.e. inducing homozygosis to FPA resistance in a heterozygous fpa A1/+ strain, and with a non-selective method, i.e. identifying the frequencies of colour sectors. This latter method was also used to estimate the induction of non-disjunction because additional markers were present which permitted us to distinguish the two types of colour segregant. Generally, 3 different experimental procedures were used, namely the "plate test", i.e. plating of conidia in agar media containing MMS, and two types of "liquid test", i.e. brief treatment of quiescent or pre-germinated conidia in MMS solution before they were plated on agar media. Point mutations were induced with about equal efficiency with each method, whereas crossing-over was induced preferentially when germinating conidia were exposed to MMS. On the other hand, non-disjunction was induced in germinating and quiescent spores with equal efficiency, but such segregants were not recovered with the selective (fpa) method. The results are discussed for both their practical use in the mutagenic testing procedure and their theoretical implication.

  13. Selective effects of purine and pyrimidine analogues and of respiratory inhibitors on perithecial development and branching in sordaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, A; Schoen, H F

    1967-08-01

    The initiation of perithecia in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria fimicola was completely suppressed, without seriously inhibiting vegetative growth, by growing the fungus on an agar medium containing one of the following additions: 1) 1 mum 5-fluorouracil, 2) 10 to 100 mum 6-azauracil, 8-azaguanine or 8-azaadenine, 3) 50 to 500 mum cyanide or azide, 4) 5% (w/v) casein hydrolysate. In contrast to the selective activity of the analogues of 3 RNA bases, whose inhibition could be reversed by the appropriate normal bases only, none of the analogues of thymine were active, neither were the thio-derivatives of RNA bases. Other inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis, like actinomycin D, puromycin and cycloheximide, were also without selective activity, although the last of these inhibited perithecial maturation at 0.1 mum concentration but not initiation. Amino acid analogues were inactive, as were the metabolic inhibitors thiourea, 2,4-dinitrophenol and fluoride. The compounds which inhibited the formation of perithecia also lowered the branching frequency of leading hyphae, but not their linear growth rates. Consequently, the branch densities were diminished in their presence. Hypotheses to account for these findings are discussed in terms of inhibition of growth in general, of the synthesis of some specific messenger RNAs, and of RNA-mediated transport across membranes, the last of which seeming the most fruitful for further work.

  14. Selective Effects of Purine and Pyrimidine Analogues and of Respiratory Inhibitors on Perithecial Development and Branching in Sordaria 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, Aristid; Schoen, Howard F.

    1967-01-01

    The initiation of perithecia in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria fimicola was completely suppressed, without seriously inhibiting vegetative growth, by growing the fungus on an agar medium containing one of the following additions: 1) 1 μm 5-fluorouracil, 2) 10 to 100 μm 6-azauracil, 8-azaguanine or 8-azaadenine, 3) 50 to 500 μm cyanide or azide, 4) 5% (w/v) casein hydrolysate. In contrast to the selective activity of the analogues of 3 RNA bases, whose inhibition could be reversed by the appropriate normal bases only, none of the analogues of thymine were active, neither were the thio-derivatives of RNA bases. Other inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis, like actinomycin D, puromycin and cycloheximide, were also without selective activity, although the last of these inhibited perithecial maturation at 0.1 μm concentration but not initiation. Amino acid analogues were inactive, as were the metabolic inhibitors thiourea, 2,4-dinitrophenol and fluoride. The compounds which inhibited the formation of perithecia also lowered the branching frequency of leading hyphae, but not their linear growth rates. Consequently, the branch densities were diminished in their presence. Hypotheses to account for these findings are discussed in terms of inhibition of growth in general, of the synthesis of some specific messenger RNAs, and of RNA-mediated transport across membranes, the last of which seeming the most fruitful for further work. PMID:16656614

  15. Enzymatic Synthesis of Highly Fluorescent 8-Azapurine Ribosides Using a Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase Reverse Reaction: Variable Ribosylation Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Mikleušević

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP were used as catalysts of enzymatic ribosylation of selected fluorescent 8-azapurines. It was found that the recombinant calf PNP catalyzes ribosylation of 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine in a phosphate-free medium, with ribose-1-phosphate as ribose donor, but the ribosylation site is predominantly N7 and N8, with the proportion of N8/N7 ribosylated products markedly dependent on the reaction conditions. Both products are fluorescent. Application of the E. coli PNP gave a mixture of N8 and N9-substituted ribosides. Fluorescence of the ribosylated 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine has been briefly characterized. The highest quantum yield, ~0.9, was obtained for N9-β-d-riboside (λmax 365 nm, while for N8-β-d-riboside, emitting at ~430 nm, the fluorescence quantum yield was found to be close to 0.4. Ribosylation of 8-azaguanine with calf PNP as a catalyst goes exclusively to N9. By contrast, the E. coli PNP ribosylates 8-azaGua predominantly at N9, with minor, but highly fluorescent products ribosylated at N8/N7.

  16. Leptospira mayottensis sp. nov., a pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira isolated from humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourhy, Pascale; Collet, Louis; Brisse, Sylvain; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2014-12-01

    A group of strains representing species of the genus Leptospira, isolated from patients with leptospirosis in Mayotte (Indian Ocean), were previously found to be considerably divergent from other known species of the genus Leptospira. This was inferred from sequence analysis of rrs (16S rRNA) and other genetic loci and suggests that they belong to a novel species. Two strains from each serogroup currently identified within this novel species were studied. Spirochaete, aerobic, motile, helix-shaped strains grew well at 30-37 °C, but not at 13 °C or in the presence of 8-azaguanine. Draft genomes of the strains were also analysed to study the DNA relatedness with other species of the genus Leptospira. The new isolates formed a distinct clade, which was most closely related to Leptospira borgpetersenii, in multilocus sequence analysis using concatenated sequences of the genes rpoB, recA, fusA, gyrB, leuS and sucA. Analysis of average nucleotide identity and genome-to-genome distances, which have recently been proposed as reliable substitutes for classical DNA-DNA hybridization, further confirmed that these isolates should be classified as representatives of a novel species. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 39.5 mol%. These isolates are considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Leptospira mayottensis sp. nov. is proposed, with 200901116(T) ( = CIP 110703(T) = DSM 28999(T)) as the type strain. © 2014 IUMS.

  17. Characterization of a panel of somatic cell hybrids for regional mapping of the mouse X chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avner, P.; Arnaud, D.; Amar, L.; Cambrou, J.; Winking, H.; Russell, L.B.

    1987-01-01

    A panel of five hybrid cell lines containing mouse X chromosomes with various deletions has been obtained by fusing splenocytes from male mice carrying one of a series of reciprocal X-autosome translocations with the azaguanine-resistant Chinese hamster cell line CH3g. These hybrids have been extensively characterized by using the allozymes hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (encoded by the Hprt locus) and α-galactosidase (Ags) and a series of 11 X-chromosome-specific DNA probes whose localization had been previously established by linkage studies. Such studies have established the genetic breakpoints of the T(X;12)13R1 and T(X;2)14R1 X-autosome translocations on the X chromosome and provided additional information as to the X-chromosome genetic breakpoints of the T(X;16)16H, T(X;4)7R1, and T(X;7)6R1 translocations. The data establish clearly that both the T(X;7)5RI and T(X;12)13R1 X-chromosome breakpoints are proximal to Hprt, the breakpoint of the former being more centromeric, lying as it does in the 9-centimorgan interval between the ornithine transcarbamoylase (Otc) and DXPas7 (M2C) loci. These five hybrid cell lines provide, with the previously characterized EBS4 hybrid cell line, a nested series of seven mapping intervals distributed along the length of the mouse X chromosome. Their characterization not only allows further correlation of the genetic and cytological X-chromosome maps but also should permit the rapid identification of DNA probes specific for particular regions of the mouse X chromosome