WorldWideScience

Sample records for axoplasmic pressure waves

  1. Pressure wave model for action potential propagation in excitable cells

    CERN Document Server

    Rvachev, M M

    2003-01-01

    Speed of propagation of small-amplitude pressure waves through the cytoplasmic interior of myelinated and unmyelinated axons of different diameters is theoretically estimated and is found to generally agree with the action potential (AP) conduction velocities. This remarkable coincidence allows to surmise a model in which AP spread along axon is propelled not by straggling ionic currents as in the widely accepted local circuit theory, but by mechanoactivation of the membrane ion channels by a traveling pressure pulse. Hydraulic pulses propagating in the viscous axoplasm are calculated to decay over ~1 mm distances, and it is further hypothesized that it is the role of influxing during the AP calcium ions to activate membrane skeletal protein network attached to the membrane cytoplasmic side for a brief radial contraction amplifying the pressure pulse and preventing its decay. The model correctly predicts that the AP conduction velocity should vary as the one-half power of axon diameter for large unmyelinated ...

  2. Effects of pressure waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Two parameters, side on overpressure and side on impulse loads, and their application to the determination of structural damage to buildings and vehicles in the vicinity of an explosion are investigated. Special consideration was given to what constitutes damage and what level of damage is acceptable. Solutions were sorted through the examination of glass breakage, curve fit to bomb damage, overturning of marginal structures (buses, trucks, mobile homes) subject to toppling, and initiation of yielding in either beam or plate structural components. Three different empirical pressure versus impulse diagrams were presented - the first is for minor structural damage involving wrenched joints and partitions, the second is for major damage structural damage with load bearing members at least partially destroyed, and the third is for 50% to 75% of the building demolished. General guidelines were obtained from the results when the accurate structural details are unknown.

  3. Wave effects on a pressure sensor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; DeSa, E.J.; Desa, E.; McKeown, J.; Peshwe, V.B.

    Wave flume experiments indicated that for waves propagating on quiescent waters the sensor's performance improved (i.e. the difference Delta P between the average hydrostatic and measured pressures was small and positive) when the inlet...

  4. Supratentorial pressures. Part II: Intracerebral pulse waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J D; Peeler, D F; Pattisapu, J; Parent, A D

    1987-09-01

    Intracerebral pulse waves were recorded in cat and monkey while intracranial pressure (ICP) manipulations were performed. The intracerebral pulse waves appeared comparable to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations. The wave forms were divided into multiple smaller waves, designated P1 to P4. The P1 component was primarily of arterial origin and was accentuated by increasing ICP unrelated to increased venous pressure, most commonly from a mass lesion. Bilateral carotid occlusion resulted in decreased amplitude of P1. Venous hypertension from jugular venous or sagittal sinus occlusion, on the other hand, accentuated waves P2 and P3 more than P1. This is consistent with a Starling resistor model of the cerebral venous system in which mass lesions may compress low-pressure veins and accentuate the arterial pressure-dependent P1 wave, whereas venous hypertension causes increased prominence of the later P2 and P3 waves. PMID:2891069

  5. Pressure diffusion waves in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, Dmitry; Korneev, Valeri; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2003-04-08

    Pressure diffusion wave in porous rocks are under consideration. The pressure diffusion mechanism can provide an explanation of the high attenuation of low-frequency signals in fluid-saturated rocks. Both single and dual porosity models are considered. In either case, the attenuation coefficient is a function of the frequency.

  6. Blast wave parameters at diminished ambient pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silnikov, M. V.; Chernyshov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    Relation between blast wave parameters resulted from a condensed high explosive (HE) charge detonation and a surrounding gas (air) pressure has been studied. Blast wave pressure and impulse differences at compression and rarefaction phases, which traditionally determine damage explosive effect, has been analyzed. An initial pressure effect on a post-explosion quasi-static component of the blast load has been investigated. The analysis is based on empirical relations between blast parameters and non-dimensional similarity criteria. The results can be directly applied to flying vehicle (aircraft or spacecraft) blast safety analysis.

  7. Pressure waves in a supersaturated bubbly magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzon, I.; Lyakhovsky, V.; Navon, O.; Chouet, B.

    2011-01-01

    We study the interaction of acoustic pressure waves with an expanding bubbly magma. The expansion of magma is the result of bubble growth during or following magma decompression and leads to two competing processes that affect pressure waves. On the one hand, growth in vesicularity leads to increased damping and decreased wave amplitudes, and on the other hand, a decrease in the effective bulk modulus of the bubbly mixture reduces wave velocity, which in turn, reduces damping and may lead to wave amplification. The additional acoustic energy originates from the chemical energy released during bubble growth. We examine this phenomenon analytically to identify conditions under which amplification of pressure waves is possible. These conditions are further examined numerically to shed light on the frequency and phase dependencies in relation to the interaction of waves and growing bubbles. Amplification is possible at low frequencies and when the growth rate of bubbles reaches an optimum value for which the wave velocity decreases sufficiently to overcome the increased damping of the vesicular material. We examine two amplification phase-dependent effects: (1) a tensile-phase effect in which the inserted wave adds to the process of bubble growth, utilizing the energy associated with the gas overpressure in the bubble and therefore converting a large proportion of this energy into additional acoustic energy, and (2) a compressive-phase effect in which the pressure wave works against the growing bubbles and a large amount of its acoustic energy is dissipated during the first cycle, but later enough energy is gained to amplify the second cycle. These two effects provide additional new possible mechanisms for the amplification phase seen in Long-Period (LP) and Very-Long-Period (VLP) seismic signals originating in magma-filled cracks.

  8. Pressure measurements of nonplanar stress waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A useful gage has been developed for measuring pressure of nonplanar or obliquely incident stress waves. The measurements made with these gages are not as precise as direct strain gage measurements, but are very good considering the conditions under which these gages are used. We feel a need to further develop our ability to measure nonplanar stress waves in the 0 to 10 kbar range. Carbon or ytterbium will probably be chosen for the sensing element

  9. Uplift Pressure of Waves on A Horizontal Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周益人; 陈国平; 黄海龙; 王登婷

    2003-01-01

    Uplift pressures of waves acting on horizontal plates are the important basis for design of maritime hollow-trussed structures. In this paper, an experimental study on the uplift pressures of waves on a horizontal plate is conducted by use of a series of model tests. Detailed analysis has been given to the formation mechanism of uplift pressures of waves. It is considered that the impact pressure intensity is mainly affected by geometrical factors (tangential angle of waves), dynamic factors (wave height, wave velocity, etc.) and air cushion. Based on the test results, an equation for calculation of the maximum uplift pressure intensity of waves on a plate is presented. A large quantity of test data shows good agreement of the present equation with the test results.

  10. Accumulation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum in Alzheimer's disease: new morphological evidence of axoplasmic flow disturbances.

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, S; Brion, Jean Pierre; Couck, A. M.; Flament Durand, Jacqueline

    1989-01-01

    Numerous enlarged neurites and presynaptic terminals containing tubulovesicular profiles of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) were observed in frontal biopsies from six patients with Alzheimer's disease. These accumulations of SER probably reflect disturbances of axoplasmic flows. In addition, curvilinear tubular inclusions similar to those characteristic of Farber's disease were found in one patient. Finally, accumulation of glycogen within neurites and enlarged mitochondria were observed i...

  11. Soluble axoplasm enriched from injured CNS axons reveals the early modulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Garland

    Full Text Available Axon injury and degeneration is a common consequence of diverse neurological conditions including multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. The molecular events underlying axon degeneration are poorly understood. We have developed a novel method to enrich for axoplasm from rodent optic nerve and characterised the early events in Wallerian degeneration using an unbiased proteomics screen. Our detergent-free method draws axoplasm into a dehydrated hydrogel of the polymer poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, which is then recovered using centrifugation. This technique is able to recover axonal proteins and significantly deplete glial contamination as confirmed by immunoblotting. We have used iTRAQ to compare axoplasm-enriched samples from naïve vs injured optic nerves, which has revealed a pronounced modulation of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton. To confirm the modulation of the actin cytoskeleton in injured axons we focused on the RhoA pathway. Western blotting revealed an augmentation of RhoA and phosphorylated cofilin in axoplasm-enriched samples from injured optic nerve. To investigate the localisation of these components of the RhoA pathway in injured axons we transected axons of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. We observed an early modulation of filamentous actin with a concomitant redistribution of phosphorylated cofilin in injured axons. At later time-points, RhoA is found to accumulate in axonal swellings and also colocalises with filamentous actin. The actin cytoskeleton is a known sensor of cell viability across multiple eukaryotes, and our results suggest a similar role for the actin cytoskeleton following axon injury. In agreement with other reports, our data also highlights the role of the RhoA pathway in axon degeneration. These findings highlight a previously unexplored area of axon biology, which may open novel avenues to prevent axon degeneration. Our method for isolating CNS axoplasm

  12. Measuring Projectile Velocity using Shock Wave Pressure Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankarsan Padhy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with development of velocity measurement methodology based on projectile shock wave pressure measurements. The measurement principle is based on the fact that, whenever a projectile moves with supersonic velocity, shock wave fronts are produced along the trajectory of the projectile. Measurement configuration has been developed for measuring the shock wave pressure associated with projectile in flight, and hence, projectile velocity has been calculated. This paper covers various aspects of shock waves, generation of N Waves, feasibility study for capturing shock wave using dynamic microphone. Finally, suitable piezo-electric sensor has been selected and deployed in the trials and shock wave signature has been captured. From shock wave pressure, the projectile velocity has been computed.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 64, No. 6, November 2014, pp.499-501, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.8108

  13. Wave-induced pore water pressure in marine cohesive soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Cyclic triaxial tests and numerical analyses were undertaken, in order to evaluate the wave-induced pore water pressure in seabed sediments in the Hangzhou Bay. The cyclic triaxial tests indicate that the rate of pore water pressure generation in cohesive soils decreases with time, and the development of the pore water pressure can be represented by a hyperbolic curve. Numerical analyses, taking into account the generation and dissipation of pore water pressure simultaneously, suggest that the pore water pressure buildup in cohesive soils may increase with time continuously until the pore water pressure ratio approaches to 1, or it may decrease after a certain time, which is controlled by drain conditions. These phenomena are different from those in sands. For waves with a return period of 100 a in the Hangzhou Bay, ifthe wave duration is more than 60 h, then the pore water pressure ratio will be close to 1 and soil fabric failure will take place.

  14. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance

  15. Numerical Study of Unsteady Supercavitation Perturbed by a Pressure Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J. G.; Khoo, B. C.

    2016-06-01

    The unsteady features of supercavitation disturbed by an introduced pressure wave are investigated numerically using a one-fluid cavitation model. The supercavitating flow is assumed to be the homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapour which are locally under both kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. The compressibility effects of liquid water are taken into account to model the propagation of pressure wave through flow and its interaction with supercavitation bubble. The interaction between supercavity enveloping an underwater flat-nose cylinder and pressure wave is simulated and the resulting unsteady behavior of supercavitation is illustrated. It is observed that the supercavity will become unstable under the impact of the pressure wave and may collapse locally, which depends on the strength of perturbation. The huge pressure surge accompanying the collapse of supercavitation may cause the material erosion, noise, vibration and efficiency loss of operating underwater devices.

  16. The Ballistic Pressure Wave Theory of Handgun Bullet Incapacitation

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of seven distinct chains of evidence, which, taken together, provide compelling support for the theory that a ballistic pressure wave radiating outward from the penetrating projectile can contribute to wounding and incapacitating effects of handgun bullets. These chains of evidence include the fluid percussion model of traumatic brain injury, observations of remote ballistic pressure wave injury in animal models, observations of rapid incapacitation highly correlated with pressure magnitude in animal models, epidemiological data from human shootings showing that the probability of incapacitation increases with peak pressure magnitude, case studies in humans showing remote pressure wave damage in the brain and spinal cord, and observations of blast waves causing remote brain injury.

  17. Change of guinea pig inner ear pressure by square wave middle ear cavity pressure variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen, RA; Segenhout, JM; Albers, FWJ; Wit, HP

    2002-01-01

    The inner ear fluid pressure of guinea pigs was measured during square wave middle ear cavity pressure variation. Time constants were derived for the slopes of the inner ear pressure recovery curves after middle ear pressure change. A "single exponential" function did not fit well and therefore more

  18. The Measurement and Analysis of Pressure Square Wave Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigating the dynamic characteristics is a significant study for actual hydraulic pressure system because the dynamic environment is used more often than static one. A dynamic pressure generator is called pressure square wave generator (PSWG) that developed in our team and generate square-like waveform and change testing pressure and frequency form 0.1 to 5 MPa and 12 to 2 KHz, respectively. In this study, dynamic performance of PSWG was investigated under different testing tangent velocity of rotor of PSWG including detailed transient response of a pressure square-like wave, rise time and deviation of magnitude. Results show that the tangent velocity of the rotor of PSWG affects the transient response of pressure square-like wave form. The desired transient response can be obtained when the tangent velocity is larger than 0.5 m/s. Furthermore, the larger the tangent velocity used, the smaller the rise time will be

  19. Damping Pressure Pulsations in a Wave-Powered Desalination System

    OpenAIRE

    Padhye, Nikhil; Torres, James, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.; Thomas, Levon; Ljubicic, Dean M.; Kassner, Mortiz P.; Slocum, Alexander H.; Hopkins, Brandon James; Greenlee, Alison S.

    2014-01-01

    Wave-driven reverse osmosis desalination systems can be a cost-effective option for providing a safe and reliable source of drinking water for large coastal communities. Such systems usually require the stabilization of pulsating pressures for desalination purposes. The key challenge is to convert a fluctuating pressure flow into a constant pressure flow. To address this task, stub-filters, accumulators, and radially elastic-pipes are considered for smoothing the pressure fluctuations in the ...

  20. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics.

  1. Ultrahigh pressure laser-driven shock wave experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review recent laser-driven shock wave experiments, with a view toward assessing the prospects of making accurate physical properties measurements at ultrahigh pressures. Recent experimental results on the scaling of shock pressure with laser intensity and wavelength are presented, and preliminary impedance matching experiments are discussed

  2. Nonlinear Pressure Wave Analysis by Concentrated Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Satoshi; Kondou, Takahiro; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro

    A pressure wave propagating in a tube often changes to a shock wave because of the nonlinear effect of fluid. Analyzing this phenomenon by the finite difference method requires high computational cost. To lessen the computational cost, a concentrated mass model is proposed. This model consists of masses, connecting nonlinear springs, connecting dampers, and base support dampers. The characteristic of a connecting nonlinear spring is derived from the adiabatic change of fluid, and the equivalent mass and equivalent damping coefficient of the base support damper are derived from the equation of motion of fluid in a cylindrical tube. Pressure waves generated in a hydraulic oil tube, a sound tube and a plane-wave tube are analyzed numerically by the proposed model to confirm the validity of the model. All numerical computational results agree very well with the experimental results carried out by Okamura, Saenger and Kamakura. Especially, the numerical analysis reproduces the phenomena that a pressure wave with large amplitude propagating in a sound tube or in a plane tube changes to a shock wave. Therefore, it is concluded that the proposed model is valid for the numerical analysis of nonlinear pressure wave problem.

  3. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  4. A Thoracic Mechanism of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Blast Pressure Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating b...

  5. Ultrasonic wave based pressure measurement in small diameter pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Song, Zhengxiang; Wu, Yuan; Jiang, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    An effective non-intrusive method of ultrasound-based technique that allows monitoring liquid pressure in small diameter pipeline (less than 10mm) is presented in this paper. Ultrasonic wave could penetrate medium, through the acquisition of representative information from the echoes, properties of medium can be reflected. This pressure measurement is difficult due to that echoes' information is not easy to obtain in small diameter pipeline. The proposed method is a study on pipeline with Kneser liquid and is based on the principle that the transmission speed of ultrasonic wave in pipeline liquid correlates with liquid pressure and transmission speed of ultrasonic wave in pipeline liquid is reflected through ultrasonic propagation time providing that acoustic distance is fixed. Therefore, variation of ultrasonic propagation time can reflect variation of pressure in pipeline. Ultrasonic propagation time is obtained by electric processing approach and is accurately measured to nanosecond through high resolution time measurement module. We used ultrasonic propagation time difference to reflect actual pressure in this paper to reduce the environmental influences. The corresponding pressure values are finally obtained by acquiring the relationship between variation of ultrasonic propagation time difference and pressure with the use of neural network analysis method, the results show that this method is accurate and can be used in practice.

  6. Air pressure waves from Mount St. Helens eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J.W.

    1987-10-20

    Weather station barograph records as well as infrasonic recordings of the pressure wave from the Mount St. Helens eruption of May 18, 1980, have been used to estimate an equivalent explosion airblast yield for this event. Pressure amplitude versus distance patterns in various directions compared with patterns from other large explosions, such as atmospheric nuclear tests, the Krakatoa eruption, and the Tunguska comet impact, indicate that the wave came from an explosion equivalent of a few megatons of TNT. The extent of tree blowdown is considerably greater than could be expected from such an explosion, and the observed forest damage is attributed to outflow of volcanic material. The pressure-time signature obtained at Toledo, Washington, showed a long, 13-min duration negative phase as well as a second, hour-long compression phase, both probably caused by ejacta dynamics rather than standard explosion wave phenomenology. The peculiar audibility pattern, with the blast being heard only at ranges beyond about 100 km, is explicable by finite amplitude propagation effects. Near the source, compression was slow, taking more than a second but probably less than 5 s, so that it went unnoticed by human ears and susceptible buildings were not damaged. There was no damage as Toledo (54 km), where the recorded amplitude would have broken windows with a fast compression. An explanation is that wave emissions at high elevation angles traveled to the upper stratosphere, where low ambient air pressures caused this energetic pressure oscillation to form a shock wave with rapid, nearly instantaneous compression. Atmospheric refraction then returned part of this wave to ground level at long ranges, where the fast compressions were clearly audible. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  7. Influence of ambient air pressure on impact pressure caused by breaking waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moutzouris, C.

    1979-01-01

    Engineers are interested in the dynamics of the interface waterstructure. In case of breaking of water waves on a structure high positive and sometimes negative pressures of very short duration occur. Not only the maxima and minima of the pressures on the structure are important to a designing engin

  8. Dynamic Wave Pressures on Deeply Embedded Large Cylindrical Structures due to Random Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海笑; 唐云; 周锡礽

    2003-01-01

    The response of dynamic wave pressures on structures would be more complicated and bring about new phenomena under the dynamic interaction between soil and structure. In order to better understand the response characteristics on deeply embedded large cylindrical structures under random waves, and accordingly to offer valuable findings for engineering, the authors designed wave flume experiments to investigate comparatively dynamic wave pressures on a single and on continuous cylinders with two different embedment depths in response to two wave spectra.The time histories of the water surface elevation and the corresponding dynamic wave pressures exerted on the cylinder were analyzed in the frequency domain. By calculating the transfer function and spectral density for dynamic wave pressures along the height and around the circumference of the cylinder, experimental results of the single cylinder were compared with the theoretical results based on the linear diffraction theory, and detailed comparisons were also carried out between the single and continuous cylinders. Some new findings and the corresponding analysis are reported in present paper. The investigation on continuous cylinders will be used in particular for reference in engineering applications because information is scarce on studying such kind of problem both analytically and experimentally.

  9. Pressure induced Superconductivity in the Charge Density Wave Compound Tritelluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlin, J.J.; Zocco, D.A.; Sayles, T.A.; Maple, M.B.; /UC, Davis; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    A series of high-pressure electrical resistivity measurements on single crystals of TbTe{sub 3} reveal a complex phase diagram involving the interplay of superconducting, antiferromagnetic and charge density wave order. The onset of superconductivity reaches a maximum of almost 4 K (onset) near {approx} 12.4 GPa.

  10. Attenuation characteristics of nonlinear pressure waves propagating in pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to investigate temporal and spatial velocity distributions of fluid flow in 3-in. open-end pipes of various lengths up to 210 ft, produced by the propagation of nonlinear pressure waves of various intensities. Velocity profiles across each of five sections along the pipes were measured as a function of time with the use of hot-film and hot-wire anemometers for two pressure waves produced by a piston. Peculiar configurations of the velocity profiles across the pipe section were noted, which are uncommon for steady pipe flow. Theoretical consideration was given to this phenomenon of higher velocity near the pipe wall for qualitative confirmation. Experimentally time-dependent velocity distributions along the pipe axis were compared with one-dimensional theoretical results obtained by the method of characteristics with or without diffusion term for the purpose of determining the attenuation characteristics of the nonlinear wave propagation in the pipes.

  11. Measurement of Blast Waves from Bursting Pressureized Frangible Spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Small-scale experiments were conducted to obtain data on incident overpressure at various distances from bursting pressurized spheres. Complete time histories of blast overpressure generated by rupturing glass spheres under high internal pressure were obtained using eight side-on pressure transducers. A scaling law is presented, and its nondimensional parameters are used to compare peak overpressures, arrival times, impulses, and durations for different initial conditions and sizes of blast source. The nondimensional data are also compared, whenever possible, with results of theoretical calculations and compiled data for Pentolite high explosive. The scaled data are repeatable and show significant differences from blast waves generated by condensed high-explosives.

  12. Shock wave velocity and shock pressure for low density powders : A novel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, D.K.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new mod

  13. SHOCK-WAVE VELOCITY AND SHOCK PRESSURE FOR LOW-DENSITY POWDERS - A NOVEL-APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKEN, DK; DEHOSSON, JTM

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new mod

  14. Evaluation and performance enhancement of a pressure transducer under flows, waves, and a combination of flows and waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desa, J.A.E.; Foden, P.; Taylor, K.; McKeown, J.; Desa, E.

    The performance of a pressure transducer, with its inlet attached to differing hydromechanical front ends, has been evaluated in flow flume and wave flume experiments in which laminar and turbulent flows, and regular progressive gravity waves...

  15. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  16. Identification of a MAP 2-like ATP-binding protein associated with axoplasmic vesicles that translocate on isolated microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Axoplasmic vesicles were purified and observed to translocate on isolated microtubules in an ATP-dependent, trypsin-sensitive manner, implying that ATP-binding polypeptides essential for force generation were present on the vesicle surface. To identify these proteins [alpha 32P]8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate ([alpha 32P]8-N3ATP), a photoaffinity analogue of ATP, was used. The results presented here identify and characterize a vesicle-associated polypeptide having a relative molecular mass o...

  17. Nonlinear Modeling and Analysis of Pressure Wave inside CEUP Fuel Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaisar Hayat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating conditions dependent large pressure variations are one of the working characteristics of combination electronic unit pump (CEUP fuel injection system for diesel engines. We propose a precise and accurate nonlinear numerical model of pressure inside HP fuel pipeline of CEUP using wave equation (WE including both viscous and frequency dependent frictions. We have proved that developed hyperbolic approximation gives more realistic description of pressure wave as compared to classical viscous damped wave equation. Frictional effects of various frequencies on pressure wave have been averaged out across valid frequencies to represent the combined effect of all frequencies on pressure wave. Dynamic variations of key fuel properties including density, acoustic wave speed, and bulk modulus with varying pressures have also been incorporated. Based on developed model we present analysis on effect of fuel pipeline length on pressure wave propagation and variation of key fuel properties with both conventional diesel and alternate fuel rapeseed methyl ester (RME for CEUP pipeline.

  18. Impact Pressure of Incident Regular Waves and Irregular Waves on the Subface of Open-Piled Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任冰; 王永学

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of comparison of impact pressures on open-plied structures induced by regular waves and irregular waves in a laboratory channel. Regular waves with wave heights ranging from 0.1 ~ 0.2 m and periods ranging from 1.0 ~ 2.0 s are tested. The target spectrm for the irregular wave is JONSWAP spectrum. Irregular waves with significant wave heights in the range of 0.10 ~ 0.25 m and peak periods in the range of 1.0 ~ 2.0 s are tested. The relative clearance s/H1/3(H) is between - 0.1 and 0.4, s being the subface level of structure model above the still water level. Time series of impact pressure are analyzed to indicate whether the property of impact pressures induced by the regular wave significantly deviates from that by the irregular wave. The distribution of the impact pressure along the underside of the structure is compared for different types of incident waves. The effects of wave parameters, structure dimension and structure clearance on the impact pressure are also discussed.

  19. Wave-Induced Pressure Under an Internal Solitary Wave and Its Impact at the Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Gustavo; Diamesis, Peter; Jenkins, James; Berzi, Diego

    2015-11-01

    The bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a mode-1 internal solitary wave (ISW) of depression propagating against an oncoming model barotropic current is examined using 2-D direct numerical simulation based on a spectral multidomain penalty method model. Particular emphasis is placed on the diffusion into the bed of the pressure field driven by the wake and any near-bed instabilities produced under specific conditions. To this end, a spectral nodal Galerkin approach is used for solving the diffusion equation for the wave-induced pressure. At sufficiently high ISW amplitude, the BBL undergoes a global instability which produces intermittent vortex shedding from within the separation bubble in the lee of the wave. The interplay between the bottom shear stress field and pressure perturbations during vortex ejection events and the subsequent evolution of the vortices is examined. The potential for bed failure upon the passage of the ISW trough and implications for resuspension of bottom particulate matter are both discussed in the context of specific sediment transport models.

  20. Differential proteomics reveals multiple components in retrogradely transported axoplasm after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlson, Eran; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Munno, David W; Syed, Naweed I; Burlingame, Alma L; Fainzilber, Mike

    2004-05-01

    Information on axonal damage is conveyed to neuronal cell bodies by a number of signaling modalities, including the post-translational modification of axoplasmic proteins. Retrograde transport of a subset of such proteins is thought to induce or enhance a regenerative response in the cell body. Here we report the use of a differential 2D-PAGE approach to identify injury-correlated retrogradely transported proteins in nerves of the mollusk Lymnaea. A comprehensive series of gels at different pI ranges allowed resolution of approximately 4000 spots by silver staining, and 172 of these were found to differ between lesioned versus control nerves. Mass spectrometric sequencing of 134 differential spots allowed their assignment to over 40 different proteins, some belonging to a vesicular ensemble blocked by the lesion and others comprising an up-regulated ensemble highly enriched in calpain cleavage products of an intermediate filament termed RGP51 (retrograde protein of 51 kDa). Inhibition of RGP51 expression by RNA interference inhibits regenerative outgrowth of adult Lymnaea neurons in culture. These results implicate regulated proteolysis in the formation of retrograde injury signaling complexes after nerve lesion and suggest that this signaling modality utilizes a wide range of protein components.

  1. A Comparison of Measured and Predicted Wave-Impact Pressures from Breaking and Non-breaking Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Fullerton, Anne M; Brewton, Susan; Brucker, Kyle A; O'Shea, Thomas T; Dommermuth, Douglas G

    2014-01-01

    Impact loads from waves on vessels and coastal structures are complex and may involve wave breaking, which has made these loads difficult to estimate numerically or empirically. Results from previous experiments have shown a wide range of forces and pressures measured from breaking and nonbreaking waves, with no clear trend between wave characteristics and the localized forces and pressures that they generate. In 2008, a canonical breaking wave impact data set was obtained at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, by measuring the distribution of impact pressures of incident nonbreaking and breaking waves on one face of a cube. This experimental effort was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), under the Dynamics of Interacting Platforms Program, Program Manager Dr. Ron Joslin. The effects of wave height, wavelength, face orientation, face angle, and submergence depth were investigated. Additionally, a limited number of runs were made at low forward speeds, ranging from about 0.5 to 2...

  2. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, Philip J.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2016-05-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field J =p u , which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields p and u , respectively. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous J (x ,z ,t ) from density perturbations alone: A Green's function-based calculation yields p ; u is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: The Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations and the result for J is found to agree typically to within 1% with J computed directly using p and u from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to density perturbation data from laboratory schlieren measurements of internal waves in a stratified fluid and the result for J agrees to within 6 % with results from Navier-Stokes simulations. Our method for determining the instantaneous velocity, pressure, and energy flux fields applies to any system described by a linear approximation of the density perturbation field, e.g., to small-amplitude lee waves and propagating vertical modes. The method can be applied using our matlab graphical user interface EnergyFlux.

  3. Wave-induced stresses and pore pressures near a mudline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Sawicki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for the determination of water-wave induced stresses inseabeds composed of granular soils are based on Biot-type models, in which the soilskeleton is treated as an elastic medium. Such methods predict effective stressesin the soil that are unacceptable from the physical point of view, as they permittensile stresses to occur near the upper surface of the seabed. Therefore, in thispaper the granular soil is assumed to behave as an elastic-ideally plastic material,with the Coulomb-Mohr yield criterion adopted to bound admissible stress states inthe seabed. The governing equations are solved numerically by a~finite differencemethod. The results of simulations, carried out for the case of time-harmonicwater waves, illustrate the depth distributions of the excess pore pressures and theeffective stresses in the seabed, and show the shapes of zones of soil in the plastic state.~In particular, the effects on the seabed behaviour of suchparameters as the degree of pore water saturation, the soil permeability, and theearth pressure coefficient, are illustrated.

  4. An Inexpensive Arterial Pressure Wave Sensor and its application in different physiological condition

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Sur, Shantanu

    2005-01-01

    Arterial Blood Pressure wave monitoring is considered to be important in assessment of cardiovascular system. We developed a novel pulse wave detection system using low frequency specific piezoelectric material as pressure wave sensor. The transducer detects the periodic change in the arterial wall diameter produced by pressure wave and the amplified signal after integration represents the pressure wave. The signal before integration is proportional to the rate of change of pressure wave and it not only reproduces the pressure waveform faithfully, but also its sharper nature helps to reliably detect the heart period variability (HPV). We have studied the position-specific (e.g. over carotid or radial artery) nature of change of this pulse wave signal (shape and amplitude) and also the changes at different physiological states.

  5. Mathematical Modeling of the Pressure Field Generated by Ocean Wave at the Bottom of the Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚沈光; 唐劲飞; 颜冰

    2002-01-01

    This paper develops a new method for calculating the pressure-tirme processof the pressure field generated by ocean wave at sea bottom based on the surface wavespectrum of the ocean wave. The basic assumptions of modeling are that the surfaceocean wave pressure equals to the atmospheric pressure and that the viscidity of seawater is neglected. The steps of modeling are described below. First the power spectraldensity of ocean wave is discretized and the amplitude spectra of harmonic ocean waveare obtained. Then the amplitude spectra of harmonic pressure are obtained accordingto the amplitude spectrum of surface wave and the depth of the sea. Finally, based onthe oceanographic theory of representing a fixed wave surface by summing up random-phase sinusoids, the pressure-time process of pressure field at sea bottom is obtained bysumming up the amplitude spectrum of pressure. The paper also develops a method ofdetermining the relationship between mean wave period and wave heights undershallow water condition, thus the pressure-time process of pressure field produced bynon-well-developed ocean wave can be directly calculated once the mean wave heightand period are known.

  6. Effect of the initial pressure of multicomponent bubble media on the characteristics of detonation waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychev, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of the initial pressure of multicomponent bubble media on the conditions of initiation, the structure, the velocity, and the pressure of detonation waves is experimentally studied. The variation of the initial pressure of a bubble medium is found to be an effective method to control the parameters of bubble detonation waves.

  7. Mass Spectrometry of Atmospheric Pressure Surface Wave Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenti, M. A.; Souza-Corrêa, J. A.; Amorim, J.

    2016-05-01

    By applying mass spectrometry techniques, we carried out measurements of ionic mass spectrum and their energy distribution in order to investigate an atmospheric argon discharge by using a surfatron surface-wave device. The mass and energy distribution measurements were performed with fixed flow rate (2.5 SLM) of pure argon gas (99.999%) and different Ar-O2 gas mixture compositions (99-1, 98-2 and 97-3). The mass spectra and energy distributions were recorded for Ar+, O+, O+ 2, N+ and N2 +. The axial distribution profiles of ionic mass and their energy were obtained for different experimental conditions as a function of the plasma length. The results showed that the peak of the positive ion energy distributions shifted to higher energies and also that the distribution width increased as the distance between the sampling orifice and the launcher gap was increased. It was also found that under certain experimental conditions the ion flux of atomic species were higher than the ion flux of their diatomic counterpart. The motivation of this study was to obtain a better understanding of a surface wave discharge in atmospheric pressure that may play a key role on new second generation biofuel technologies.

  8. Ballistic pressure wave contributions to rapid incapacitation in the Strasbourg goat tests

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This article presents empirical models for the relationship between peak ballistic pressure wave magnitude and incapacitation times in the Strasbourg goat test data. Using a model with the expected limiting behavior at large and small pressure wave magnitudes, the average incapacitation times are highly correlated (R = 0.91) with peak pressure wave magnitude. The cumulative incapacitation probability as a function of time reveals both fast (t 5 s) incapacitation mechanisms. The fast incapacitation mechanism can be accurately modeled as a function of peak pressure wave magnitude. The slow incapacitation mechanism is presumably due to blood loss via damaged vascular tissue.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF AREA CONTRACTION ON SHOCK WAVE STRENGTH AND PEAK PRESSURE IN SHOCK TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of area contraction on shock wave strength and peak pressure in a shock tube. The shock tube is an important component of the short duration, high speed fluid flow test facility, available at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN, Malaysia. The area contraction was facilitated by positioning a bush adjacent to the primary diaphragm section, which separates the driver and driven sections. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the presence of the bush, at various diaphragm pressure ratios, which is the ratio of air pressure between the driver (high pressure and driven (low pressure sections. The instantaneous static pressure variations were measured at two locations close to the driven tube end wall, using high sensitivity pressure sensors, which allow the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure to be analysed. The results reveal that the area contraction significantly reduces the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure. At a diaphragm pressure ratio of 10, the shock wave strength decreases by 18%, the peak pressure decreases by 30% and the shock wave speed decreases by 8%.

  10. Experimental investigation on the wave-induced pore pressure around shallowly embedded pipelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A series of regular wave experiments have been done in a large-scale wave flume to investigate the wave-induced pore pressure around the submarine shallowly embedded pipelines. The model pipelines are buried in three kinds of soils, including gravel, sand and silt with different burial depth. The input waves change with height and period. The results show that the amplitudes of wave-induced pore pressure increase as the wave period increase, and decay from the surface to the bottom of seabed. Higher pore pressures are recorded at the pipeline top and the lower pore pressures at the bottom, especially in the sand seabed. The normalized pressure around pipeline decreases as the relative water depth, burial depth or scattering parameters increase. For the silt seabed, the wavelet transform has been successfully used to analyze the signals of wave-induced pore pressure, and the oscillatory and residual pore pressure can be extracted by wavelet analysis. Higher oscillatory pressures are recorded at the bottom and the lower pressures at the top of the pipeline. However, higher residual pressures are recorded at the top and the lower pressures at the bottom of the pipeline.

  11. A Thoracic Mechanism of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Blast Pressure Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Amy; 10.1016/j.mehy.2008.08.015

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. ...

  12. A mathematical model and numerical simulation of pressure wave in horizontal gas-liquid bubbly flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Fei; BAI Bofeng; GUO Liejin

    2004-01-01

    By using an ensemble-averaged two-fluid model,with valid closure conditions of interfacial momentum exchange due to virtual mass force,viscous shear stress and drag force,a model for pressure wave propagation in a horizontal gas-liquid bubbly flow is proposed.According to the small perturbation theory and solvable condition of one-order linear uniform equations,a dispersion equation of pressure wave is induced.The pressure wave speed calculated from the model is compared and in good agreement with existing data.According to the dispersion equation,the propagation and attenuation of pressure wave are investigated systemically.The factors affecting pressure wave,such as void fraction,pressure,wall shear stress,perturbation frequency,virtual mass force and drag force,are analyzed.The result shows that the decrease in system pressure,the increase in void fraction and the existence of wall shear stress,will cause a decrease in pressure wave speed and an increase in the attenuation coefficient in the horizontal gas-liquid bubbly flow.The effects of perturbation frequency,virtual mass and drag force on pressure wave in the horizontal gas-liquid bubbly flow at low perturbation frequency are different from that at high perturbation frequency.

  13. Predicting S-wave velocities for unconsolidated sediments at low effective pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate S-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important in performing a reliable elastic inversion for gas hydrate-bearing sediments and in evaluating velocity models for predicting S-wave velocities, but few S-wave velocities are measured at low effective pressure. Predicting S-wave velocities by using conventional methods based on the Biot-Gassmann theory appears to be inaccurate for laboratory-measured velocities at effective pressures less than about 4-5 megapascals (MPa). Measured laboratory and well log velocities show two distinct trends for S-wave velocities with respect to P-wave velocity: one for the S-wave velocity less than about 0.6 kilometer per second (km/s) which approximately corresponds to effective pressure of about 4-5 MPa, and the other for S-wave velocities greater than 0.6 km/s. To accurately predict S-wave velocities at low effective pressure less than about 4-5 MPa, a pressure-dependent parameter that relates the consolidation parameter to shear modulus of the sediments at low effective pressure is proposed. The proposed method in predicting S-wave velocity at low effective pressure worked well for velocities of water-saturated sands measured in the laboratory. However, this method underestimates the well-log S-wave velocities measured in the Gulf of Mexico, whereas the conventional method performs well for the well log velocities. The P-wave velocity dispersion due to fluid in the pore spaces, which is more pronounced at high frequency with low effective pressures less than about 4 MPa, is probably a cause for this discrepancy.

  14. Inner ear pressure changes following square wave intracranial or ear canal pressure manipulation in the same guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thalen, E; Wit, H; Segenhout, H; Albers, F

    2002-01-01

    Inner ear pressure was measured in scala tympani with a micropipette during square wave pressure manipulation of the intracranial compartment and, subsequently, of the external ear canal (EEC) in the same guinea pig. As expected, the combination of the cochlear aqueduct and the inner ear behaves as

  15. Influence of the initial pressure in bubble media on the detonation wave parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychev, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of the initial pressure in bubble media on the initiation, structure, velocity, and pressure of detonation waves in single-component bubble media is studied. The test medium (bubbles of a stoichiometric acetylene-oxygen mixture in a hydroglyceric solution) falls under the category of "chemically inactive liquid—bubbles of a chemically active gas." It is found that one can effectively control the parameters of bubble detonation waves by varying the initial pressure in the bubble medium.

  16. Links between traumatic brain injury and ballistic pressure waves originating in the thoracic cavity and extremities

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Identifying patients at risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important because research suggests prophylactic treatments to reduce risk of long-term sequelae. Blast pressure waves can cause TBI without penetrating wounds or blunt force trauma. Similarly, bullet impacts distant from the brain can produce pressure waves sufficient to cause mild to moderate TBI. The fluid percussion model of TBI shows that pressure impulses of 15-30 psi cause mild to moderate TBI in laboratory animals. In pig...

  17. Experimental Study of Pore Water Pressure and Bed Profile Change Under Regular Breaking Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yong-zhou; JIANG Chang-bo; ZHAO Li-ping; PAN Yun; LI Qing-feng

    2012-01-01

    There lies a close relationship between the seabed destruction and the distribution of pore water pressure under the action of breaking wave.The experiments were carried out in a wave flume with a 1∶30 sloping sandy seabed to study regular breaking wave induced pore water pressure.A wide range of measurements from the regular wave runs were reported,including time series of wave heights,pore pressures.The video records were analysed to measure the time development of the seabed form and the characteristics of the orbital motion of the sand in the wave breaking region.The pore water pressure in the breaker zone showed the time variation depending on the wave phases including wave breaking and bore propagation.The time-averaged pore water pressure was higher near the seabed surface.The peak values of pore water pressure increase significantly at the breaking point.The direction of pore water pressure difference forces in the breaker zone is of fundamental importance for a correct description of the sediment dynamics.The upwardsdirected pressure differences may increase sand transport by reducing the effective weight of the sediment,thereby increasing the bed form evolution.The seabed configuration changed greatly at the wave breaking zone and a sand bar was generated remarkably.The amplitude of the pore water pressure changed with the seabed surface:The results are to improve the understanding of sand transport mechanisms and seabed responses due to breaking regular waves over a sloping sandy bed.

  18. Relationship between orientation to a blast and pressure wave propagation inside the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavko, Mikulas; Watanabe, Tomas; Adeeb, Saleena; Lankasky, Jason; Ahlers, Stephen T; McCarron, Richard M

    2011-01-30

    Exposure to a blast wave generated during an explosion may result in brain damage and related neurological impairments. Several mechanisms by which the primary blast wave can damage the brain have been proposed, including: (1) a direct effect of the shock wave on the brain causing tissue damage by skull flexure and propagation of stress and shear forces; and (2) an indirect transfer of kinetic energy from the blast, through large blood vessels and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), to the central nervous system. To address a basic question related to the mechanisms of blast brain injury, pressure was measured inside the brains of rats exposed to a low level of blast (~35kPa), while positioned in three different orientations with respect to the primary blast wave; head facing blast, right side exposed to blast and head facing away from blast. Data show different patterns and durations of the pressure traces inside the brain, depending on the rat orientation to blast. Frontal exposures (head facing blast) resulted in pressure traces of higher amplitude and longer duration, suggesting direct transmission and reflection of the pressure inside the brain (dynamic pressure transfer). The pattern of the pressure wave inside the brain in the head facing away from blast exposures assumes contribution of the static pressure, similar to hydrodynamic pressure to the pressure wave inside the brain. PMID:21129403

  19. A Non-Intrusive Pressure Sensor by Detecting Multiple Longitudinal Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongliang; Lin, Weibin; Ge, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Jian

    2016-08-05

    Pressure vessels are widely used in industrial fields, and some of them are safety-critical components in the system-for example, those which contain flammable or explosive material. Therefore, the pressure of these vessels becomes one of the critical measurements for operational management. In the paper, we introduce a new approach to the design of non-intrusive pressure sensors, based on ultrasonic waves. The model of this sensor is built based upon the travel-time change of the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) and the reflected longitudinal waves with the pressure. To evaluate the model, experiments are carried out to compare the proposed model with other existing models. The results show that the proposed model can improve the accuracy compared to models based on a single wave.

  20. Rogue wave formation under the action of quasi-stationary pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrashkin, A. A.; Oshmarina, O. E.

    2016-05-01

    The process of rogue wave formation on deep water is considered. A wave of extreme amplitude is born against the background of uniform waves (Gerstner waves) under the action of external pressure on free surface. The pressure distribution has a form of a quasi-stationary "pit". The fluid motion is supposed to be a vortex one and is described by an exact solution of equations of 2D hydrodynamics for an ideal fluid in Lagrangian coordinates. Liquid particles are moving around circumferences of different radii in the absence of drift flow. Values of amplitude and wave steepness optimal for rogue wave formation are found numerically. The influence of vorticity distribution and pressure drop on parameters of the fluid is investigated.

  1. Cardiac output in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: association with arterial blood pressure and intracranial pressure wave amplitudes and outcome of shunt surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eide Per K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH responding to shunt surgery, we have consistently found elevated intracranial pressure (ICP wave amplitudes during diagnostic ICP monitoring prior to surgery. It remains unknown why ICP wave amplitudes are increased in these patients. Since iNPH is accompanied by a high incidence of vascular co-morbidity, a possible explanation is that there is reduced vascular compliance accompanied by elevated arterial blood pressure (ABP wave amplitudes and even altered cardiac output (CO. To investigate this possibility, the present study was undertaken to continuously monitor CO to determine if it is correlated to ABP and ICP wave amplitudes and the outcome of shunting in iNPH patients. It was specifically addressed whether the increased ICP wave amplitudes seen in iNPH shunt responders were accompanied by elevated CO and/or ABP wave amplitude levels. Methods Prospective iNPH patients (29 were clinically graded using an NPH grading scale. Continuous overnight minimally-invasive monitoring of CO and ABP was done simultaneously with ICP monitoring; the CO, ABP, and ICP parameters were parsed into 6-second time windows. Patients were assessed for shunt surgery on clinical grade, Evan's index, and ICP wave amplitude. Follow-up clinical grading was performed 12 months after surgery. Results ICP wave amplitudes but not CO or ABP wave amplitude, showed good correlation with the response to shunt treatment. The patients with high ICP wave amplitude did not have accompanying high levels of CO or ABP wave amplitude. Correlation analysis between CO and ICP wave amplitudes in individual patients showed different profiles [significantly positive in 10 (35% and significantly negative in 16 (55% of 29 recordings]. This depended on whether there was also a correlation between ABP and ICP wave amplitudes and on the average level of ICP wave amplitude. Conclusions These results gave no

  2. Role of the vertical pressure gradient in wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Lindegård; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Vittori, Giovanna;

    2014-01-01

    By direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the flow in an oscillatory boundary layer, it is possible to obtain the pressure field. From the latter, the vertical pressure gradient is determined. Turbulent spots are detected by a criterion involving the vertical pressure gradient. The vertical pressure...... gradient is also treated as any other turbulence quantity like velocity fluctuations and statistical properties of the vertical pressure gradient are calculated from the DNS data. The presence of a vertical pressure gradient in the near bed region has significant implications for sediment transport....

  3. The Importance of Pressure Sampling Frequency in Models for Determination of Critical Wave Loadings on Monolithic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Meinert, Palle

    2008-01-01

    Wave induced pressures on model scale monolithic structures like caissons and concrete superstructures on rubble mound breakwaters show very peaky variations, even in cases without impacts from slamming waves.......Wave induced pressures on model scale monolithic structures like caissons and concrete superstructures on rubble mound breakwaters show very peaky variations, even in cases without impacts from slamming waves....

  4. Harmonics tracking of intracranial and arterial blood pressure waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Sima; McKelvey, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Considering cardiorespiratory interaction and heart rate variability, a new approach is proposed to decompose intracranial pressure and arterial blood pressure to their different harmonics. The method is based on tracking the amplitudes of the harmonics by a Kalman filter based tracking algorithm. The algorithm takes benefit of combined frequency estimation technique which uses both Fast Fourier Transform and RR-interval detection. The result would be of use in intracranial pressure and arterial blood pressure waveform analysis as well as other investigations which need to estimate contribution of specific harmonic in above mentioned signals such as Pressure-Volume Compensatory Reserve assessment.

  5. Physical-chemical studies of proteins of squid nerve axoplasm, with special reference to the axon fibrous protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAVISON, P F; TAYLOR, E W

    1960-03-01

    The proteins in the axoplasm of the squid, Dosidicus gigas, have been resolved electrophoretically into a major fraction including the fibrous protein, and possibly its structural subunits, and a minor fraction including at least two proteins with low sedimentation coefficients. A partially reversible change in the structure of the fibrous protein occurs under the action of 0.4 M salt or high pH. These experiments have been interpreted to indicate that in the intact fiber one, or a few, protofibrils are arranged helically or longitudinally along the fiber axis, and linked by electrostatic bonds. On the dissociation of these bonds the separated protofibrils assume a less extended form and sediment more rapidly than the intact fibers. Some material with a lower sedimentation rate is also released on the dissociation. This fraction may comprise smaller chain fragments. The volume fraction and the approximate refractive index of the fibers have been calculated. PMID:13814536

  6. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age

    OpenAIRE

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W.; Rihani, Ryan J.; Laine, Glen A.; Quick, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (Ctot) and increases in total peripheral resistance (Rtot) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (cph) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systol...

  7. Non-invasive measurement of aortic pressure in patients: Comparing pulse wave analysis and applanation tonometry

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, M.U.R; C Prabhakar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to validate and compare novel methods to determine aortic blood pressure non-invasively based on Oscillometric Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) measurement using four limb-cuff pressure waveforms and two lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) with a validated tonometric pulse wave analysis system in patients. Materials and Methods: After receiving the consent, in 49 patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, PWV, and central blood p...

  8. Vertical pressure gradient and particle motions in wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Lindegård

    The present study covers both a numerical and experimental investigation of the processes in the oscillatory boundary layer. In the first part a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is conducted to study the vertical pressure gradient, and its role in relation to laminar to turbulent transition...... and its role in the fully turbulent boundary layer. The pressure in the flow is obtained from the flow fields of the oscillatory boundary layer. What differs, the vertical pressure gradient, from other turbulent quantities, like e.g. velocity fluctuations is that it can detect newly generated turbulence....... This is in contrast to velocity fluctuations that are diffusive, so they can also contain residual turbulence from the previous half cycle until they are dissipated. Furthermore, the magnitude of the mean value of conditionally averaged vertical pressure gradient (for −∂p∗/∂x∗ 2 > 0) is compared to the submerged...

  9. On the recovery of traveling water waves with vorticity from the pressure at the bed

    CERN Document Server

    Hur, Vera Mikyoung

    2015-01-01

    We propose higher-order approximation formulae recovering the surface elevation from the pressure at the bed and the background shear flow for small-amplitude Stokes and solitary water waves. They offer improvements over the pressure transfer function and the hydrostatic approximation. The formulae compare reasonably well with asymptotic approximations of the exact relation between the pressure at the bed and the surface wave in the zero vorticity case, but they incorporate the effects of vorticity through solutions of the Rayleigh equation. Several examples are discussed.

  10. Links between traumatic brain injury and ballistic pressure waves originating in the thoracic cavity and extremities

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Identifying patients at risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important because research suggests prophylactic treatments to reduce risk of long-term sequelae. Blast pressure waves can cause TBI without penetrating wounds or blunt force trauma. Similarly, bullet impacts distant from the brain can produce pressure waves sufficient to cause mild to moderate TBI. The fluid percussion model of TBI shows that pressure impulses of 15-30 psi cause mild to moderate TBI in laboratory animals. In pigs and dogs, bullet impacts to the thigh produce pressure waves in the brain of 18-45 psi and measurable injury to neurons and neuroglia. Analyses of research in goats and epidemiological data from shooting events involving humans show high correlations (r > 0.9) between rapid incapacitation and pressure wave magnitude in the thoracic cavity. A case study has documented epilepsy resulting from a pressure wave without the bullet directly hitting the brain. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that bullet imp...

  11. Rubber-induced uniform laser shock wave pressure for thin metal sheets microforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Zongbao, E-mail: szb@ujs.edu.cn; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Yayuan; Wang, Cuntang

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • The rubber is introduced to smooth laser shock wave pressure. • The mechanism of rubber-induced smoothing effect is proposed. • Smoothing effect is mainly due to the radial expansion of plasma cloud on rubber. • The good surface quality can be obtained under rubber dynamic loading. - Abstract: Laser shock microforming of thin metal sheets is a new high velocity forming technique, which employs laser shock wave to deform the thin metal sheets. The spatial distribution of forming pressure is mainly dependent on the laser beam. A new type of laser shock loading method is introduced which gives a uniform pressure distribution. A low density rubber is inserted between the laser beam and the thin metal sheets. The mechanism of rubber-induced smoothing effect on confined laser shock wave is proposed. Plasticine is used to perform the smoothing effect experiments due to its excellent material flow ability. The influence of rubber on the uniformity of laser shock wave pressure is studied by measuring the surface micro topography of the deformed plasticine. And the four holes forming experiment is used to verify the rubber-induced uniform pressure on thin metal sheets surface. The research results show the possibility of smoothing laser shock wave pressure using rubber. And the good surface quality can be obtained under rubber dynamic loading.

  12. Quantification of wave reflection in the human aorta from pressure alone: a proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhof, Berend E; Guelen, Ilja; Westerhof, Nico; Karemaker, John M; Avolio, Alberto

    2006-10-01

    Wave reflections affect the proximal aortic pressure and flow waves and play a role in systolic hypertension. A measure of wave reflection, receiving much attention, is the augmentation index (AI), the ratio of the secondary rise in pressure and pulse pressure. AI can be limiting, because it depends not only on the magnitude of wave reflection but also on wave shapes and timing of incident and reflected waves. More accurate measures are obtainable after separation of pressure in its forward (P(f)) and reflected (P(b)) components. However, this calculation requires measurement of aortic flow. We explore the possibility of replacing the unknown flow by a triangular wave, with duration equal to ejection time, and peak flow at the inflection point of pressure (F(tIP)) and, for a second analysis, at 30% of ejection time (F(t30)). Wave form analysis gave forward and backward pressure waves. Reflection magnitude (RM) and reflection index (RI) were defined as RM=P(b)/P(f) and RI=P(b)/(P(f)+P(b)), respectively. Healthy subjects, including interventions such as exercise and Valsalva maneuvers, and patients with ischemic heart disease and failure were analyzed. RMs and RIs using F(tIP) and F(t30) were compared with those using measured flow (F(m)). Pressure and flow were recorded with high fidelity pressure and velocity sensors. Relations are: RM(tIP)=0.82RM(mf)+0.06 (R(2)=0.79; n=24), RM(t30)=0.79RM(mf)+0.08 (R(2)=0.85; n=29) and RI(tIP)=0.89RI(mf)+0.02 (R(2)=0.81; n=24), RI(t30)=0.83RI(mf)+0.05 (R(2)=0.88; n=29). We suggest that wave reflection can be derived from uncalibrated aortic pressure alone, even when no clear inflection point is distinguishable and AI cannot be obtained. Epidemiological studies should establish its clinical value. PMID:16940207

  13. Frequency interpretation of tidal peak in intracranial pressure wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Sima; McKelvey, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to locate different components of ICP signal for each cardiac induced ICP beat is presented. In this method an initial timing map is used to define the appropriate part of the ICP wave which should be searched for the specific component. In parallel a recently proposed method was used to decompose the ICP wave to its different frequency harmonics. This algorithm, which is based on tracking the amplitude of the harmonic components using Kalman filtering, brings both heart rate variability and cardiorespiratory interaction into account and provides good time and frequency resolution. Comparing the results of two methods for seventeen ICP records, each one hour long, it has been observed that the fundamental cardiac component has the most significant contribution in the construction of the tidal peak in ICP and therefore tracking of this harmonic could be informative of the tidal peak evolution over the time.

  14. The impact of hepatic pressurization on liver shear wave speed estimates in constrained versus unconstrained conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased hepatic venous pressure can be observed in patients with advanced liver disease and congestive heart failure. This elevated portal pressure also leads to variation in acoustic radiation-force-derived shear wave-based liver stiffness estimates. These changes in stiffness metrics with hepatic interstitial pressure may confound stiffness-based predictions of liver fibrosis stage. The underlying mechanism for this observed stiffening behavior with pressurization is not well understood and is not explained with commonly used linear elastic mechanical models. An experiment was designed to determine whether the stiffness increase exhibited with hepatic pressurization results from a strain-dependent hyperelastic behavior. Six excised canine livers were subjected to variations in interstitial pressure through cannulation of the portal vein and closure of the hepatic artery and hepatic vein under constrained conditions (in which the liver was not free to expand) and unconstrained conditions. Radiation-force-derived shear wave speed estimates were obtained and correlated with pressure. Estimates of hepatic shear stiffness increased with changes in interstitial pressure over a physiologically relevant range of pressures (0–35 mmHg) from 1.5 to 3.5 m s−1. These increases were observed only under conditions in which the liver was free to expand while pressurized. This behavior is consistent with hyperelastic nonlinear material models that could be used in the future to explore methods for estimating hepatic interstitial pressure noninvasively. (paper)

  15. A new method to record subglottal pressure waves : potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, K; Gall, [No Value; Schutte, HK; Miller, DG

    2003-01-01

    Rapid subglottal pressure changes related to the glottal cycles influence the aerodynamics of phonation. Various methods to measure these have been developed, but are not practical for routine phoniatric use. For that reason, a noninvasive measurement tool is necessary. This article presents a techn

  16. Comparative experimental study on several methods for measuring elastic wave velocities in rocks at high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Hongsen(谢鸿森); ZHOU; Wenge; 周文戈); LIU; Yonggang; (刘永刚); GUO; Jie; (郭捷); HOU; Wei; (侯渭); ZHAO; Zhidan(赵志丹)

    2002-01-01

    To measure elastic wave velocities in rocks at high temperature and high pressure is an important way to acquire the mechanics and thermodynamics data of rocks in the earth's interior and also a substantial approach to studying the structure and composition of materials there. In recent years, a rapid progress has been made in methodology pertaining to the measurements of elastic wave velocities in rocks at high temperature and high pressure with solids as the pressure-transfer media. However, no strict comparisons have been made of the elastic wave velocity data of rocks measured at high temperature and high pressure by various laboratories. In order to compare the experimental results from various laboratories, we have conducted a comparative experimental study on three measuring methods and made a strict comparison with the results obtained by using the transmission method with fluid as the pressure-transfer medium. Our experimental results have shown that the measurements obtained by the three methods are comparable in the pressure ranges of their application. The cubic sample pulse transmission method used by Kern is applicable to measuring elastic wave velocities in crustal rocks at lower temperature and lower pressure. The prism sample pulse reflection-transmission method has some advantages in pressure range, heating temperature and measuring precision. Although the measurements obtained under relatively low pressure conditions by the prism sample pulse transmission method are relatively low in precision, the samples are large in length and their assemblage is simple. So this method is suitable to the experiments that require large quantities of samples and higher pressures. Therefore, in practical application the latter two methods are usually recommended because their measurements can be mutually corrected and supplemented.

  17. Generation and Propagation of Long Waves due to Spatial and Temporal Pressure Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, A. D.; Yalçıner, A. C.; Ozyurt Tarakcıoglu, G.; Zaytsev, A.

    2015-12-01

    An abnormal wave event was observed between 23 and 27 June 2014 in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. First, sea level oscillations began in Ciutadella Inlet (Spain) after midnight of 22 June. The phenomena continued with observation of strong oscillations (up to 3 m wave height) in the Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea on 25-26 June. Finally, at noon on 27 June on a calm and sunny day, the abnormal waves suddenly struck coasts of Odessa with 1-2 m wave height injuring a number of people. This tsunami-like event which is called meteotsunami is generated by different types of meteorological disturbances such as atmospheric gravity waves, pressure jumps and squall lines and the significant consequences necessitates the research to understand, model and simulate such events accurately. Thus, using the 2014 event as a case study, the waves generated by the change of atmospheric pressure distribution is studied. A static water level drop due to high atmospheric pressure in a region and rise due to low atmospheric pressure in another region deform the water level throughout the entire sea area. To compute the sea level change, the relation between the pressure difference and change of water level from normal position (ζ=0.99ΔP) is used where ζ is the change of water level (cm) according to the pressure difference from normal pressure ΔP. This relation gives that 1 hPa (1millibar) depression in air pressure from normal water level position (under 1000millibar) creates almost 1 cm rise in mean sea level. The respective small amplitude long waves propagate along the sea which is continuously excited by the spatial and temporal changes of atmospheric pressure. And, the amplification becomes important to understand the occurrence of unexpected water level changes, especially near the coastal zone. In this study, this long wave propagation due to water surface deformation is modelled by solving nonlinear shallow water equations. The model results are compared

  18. Low-pressure hydro turbines and control equipment for wave energy converters (Wave Dragon). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, H.C.; Hansen, R.

    2001-06-01

    The Wave Dragon is a 4 MW floating offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type. Through performing tests on a scale 1:50 model of the Wave Dragon, real-time overtopping time series were provided. These allowed the development of a feasible turbine and regulation strategy for handling the varying heads and flows occurring in the reservoir. A model turbine with a runner diameter of 340 mm was designed, and tested in a conventional turbine test stand. The results revealed very high efficiencies (91.3% peak efficiency), and more importantly a very flat performance curve yielding high turbine efficiency for the complete range of heads available at the Wave Dragon. A suitable power take-off and grid connection system was developed, addressing power quality issues, as well as more practical issues of flexible cabling solutions. It was concluded that feasible solutions to the technical barriers envisioned prior to the project had been found. Also means for improving the overtopping characteristics of the device were put forward. The feasibility of the Wave Dragon at original 1st generation design was investigated and key performance figures were given as net annual power production of 5.1-3.1 GWh/year, 2,775-3,150 Euro/kW in construction costs and a power production price of 0.19-0.27 Euro/kWh. The figures includes availability losses, all losses in the power train, and losses from restricted freedom of movement for two of the scenarios, with a wave energy potential of 16 and 24 kW/m wave front respectively. Significant scope for improvement, especially from enhanced overtopping from improved design, mass production and learning effects were also identified. Through implementing the known technical improvements to the Wave Dragon design identified through the project an annual net power production of 8.9 GWh/year and a production price of 0.12 Euro/kWh is foreseen for a 24 kW/m wave potential. With additional technical improvements, mass production benefits and

  19. Stone Comminution Correlates with the Average Peak Pressure Incident on a Stone during Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, N; P Zhong

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the roles of lithotripter shock wave (LSW) parameters and cavitation in stone comminution, a series of in vitro fragmentation experiments have been conducted in water and 1,3-butanediol (a cavitation-suppressive fluid) at a variety of acoustic field positions of an electromagnetic shock wave lithotripter. Using field mapping data and integrated parameters averaged over a circular stone holder area (Rh = 7 mm), close logarithmic correlations between the average peak pressure (P+...

  20. Wave pattern in the wake of an arbitrary moving surface pressure disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Sha; Liu, Yuming

    2015-12-01

    We study the problem of wave pattern in the wake of an arbitrary surface pressure disturbance that moves forward at constant speed U in deep water. We seek the dependence of the location of the maximum amplitude of waves upon the pressure distribution and the Froude number F ≡ U / √{ g L } , where L is the characteristic length of the pressure disturbance and g is the gravitational acceleration. We show by theoretical analysis and direct numerical evaluation that half of the included angle (ϕmax) of the V-shape corresponding to the maximum amplitude of the waves in the wake at large Froude numbers behaves asymptotically as ϕ max = C F - a for F > F c , with the constant a, coefficient C, and threshold value of Froude number F c all being functions of the pressure distribution. It is found that for most pressure disturbances, a equals 1, but a can equal 2 for special non-smooth pressure disturbances. The condition in terms of the order of discontinuity and distribution shape of the pressure disturbance for the result of a = 2 is provided. These findings imply that for ship wakes, ϕmax generally decreases with increasing F at large Froude numbers, while the exact value of ϕmax is dependent on ship geometry and F .

  1. Influence of ambient air pressure on the energy conversion of laser-breakdown induced blast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of ambient pressure on energy conversion efficiency from a Nd : glass laser pulse (λ = 1.053 µm) to a laser-induced blast wave was investigated at reduced pressure. Temporal incident and transmission power histories were measured using sets of energy meters and photodetectors. A half-shadowgraph half-self-emission method was applied to visualize laser absorption waves. Results show that the blast energy conversion efficiency ηbw decreased monotonically with the decrease in ambient pressure. The decrease was small, from 40% to 38%, for the pressure change from 101 kPa to 50 kPa, but the decrease was considerable, to 24%, when the pressure was reduced to 30 kPa. Compared with a TEA-CO2-laser-induced blast wave (λ = 10.6 µm), higher fraction absorption in the laser supported detonation regime ηLSD of 90% was observed, which is influenced slightly by the reduction of ambient pressure. The conversion fraction ηbw/ηLSD≈90% was achieved at pressure >50 kPa, which is significantly higher than that in a CO2 laser case. (paper)

  2. Molecular modeling of high-pressure ramp waves in tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Lim, Hojun; Brown, Justin L.

    2015-03-01

    Ramp wave compression experiments of bcc metals under extreme conditions have produced differing measurements of material strength response. These variations are often attributed to differing experimental techniques, and varying material factors such as microstructure, and strain-rate. We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of tantalum for single crystal and two polycrystalline nanostructures out to 250 GPa, over strain states ranging from 108 to 1011 1/s. Results will be compared to recent Z-machine strength experiments, meso-scale crystal plasticity models and continuum-scale polycrystalline model. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Reconstruction of stratified steady water waves from pressure readings on the ocean bed

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Robin Ming

    2015-01-01

    Consider a two-dimensional stratified solitary wave propagating through a body of water that is bounded below by an impermeable ocean bed. In this work, we study how such a wave can be reconstructed from data consisting of the wave speed, upstream and downstream density profile, and the trace of the pressure on the bed. First, we prove that this data uniquely determines the wave, both in the (real) analytic and Sobolev regimes. Second, for waves that consist of multiple layers of constant density immiscible fluids, we provide an exact formula describing each of the interfaces in terms of the data. Finally, for continuously stratified fluids, we detail a reconstruction scheme based on approximation by layer-wise constant density flows.

  4. The Oblique Incident Effects of Electromagnetic Wave in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yong; JIANG Zhonghe; HU Xiwei; LIU Minghai

    2008-01-01

    The propagating behaviours, i.e. phase shift, transmissivity, reflectivity and absorptivity, of an electromagnetic (EM) wave in a two-dimensional atmospheric pressure plasma layer are described by the numerical solutions of integral-differential Maxwell's equations through a generalized finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) algorithm. These propagating behaviours are found to be strongly affected by five factors: two EM wave characteristics relevan.t to the oblique incident and three dimensionless factors. The two EM wave factors are the polarization mode (TM mode or TE mode) and its incident angle. The three dimensionless factors are: the ratio of the maximum electron density to the critical density n0/ncr, the ratio of the plasma layer width to the wave length d/λ, and the ratio of the collision frequency between electrons and neutrals to the incident wave frequency ve0/f.

  5. a New Approach of Dynamic Blood Pressure Measurement Based on the Time Domain Analysis of the Pulse Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimei, Su; Wei, Xu; Hui, Yu; Fei, Du; Jicun, Wang; Kexin, Xu

    2009-08-01

    In this study the pulse wave characteristics were used as a new approach to measure the human blood pressure. Based the principle of pulse wave and theory of the elastic vascular, the authors analyzed the characteristic of the pulse waveforms and revealed the characteristics points which could be used to represent the blood pressure. In this investigation the relevant mathematical feature was used to identify the relationship between the blood pressure and pulse wave parameters in a more accurate way. It also provided an experimental basis to carry out continuing non-invasive blood pressure monitoring using the pulse wave method.

  6. Experimental Study on Peak Pressure of Shock Waves in Quasi-Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxiong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the similarity laws of the explosion, this research develops similarity requirements of the small-scale experiments of underwater explosions and establishes a regression model for peak pressure of underwater shock waves under experimental condition. Small-scale experiments are carried out with two types of media at the bottom of the water and for different water depths. The peak pressure of underwater shock waves at different measuring points is acquired. A formula consistent with the similarity law of explosions is obtained and an analysis of the regression precision of the formula confirms its accuracy. Significance experiment indicates that the influence of distance between measuring points and charge on peak pressure of underwater shock wave is the greatest and that of water depth is the least within the range of geometric parameters. An analysis of data from experiments with different media at the bottom of the water reveals an influence on the peak pressure, as the peak pressure of a shock wave in a body of water with a bottom soft mud and rocks is about 1.33 times that of the case where the bottom material is only soft mud.

  7. Acoustic Pressure Waves in Vibrating 3-D Laminated Beam-Plate Enclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Osheku

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of structural vibration on the propagation of acoustic pressure waves through a cantilevered 3-D laminated beam-plate enclosure is investigated analytically. For this problem, a set of well-posed partial differential equations governing the vibroacoustic wave interaction phenomenon are formulated and matched for the various vibrating boundary surfaces. By employing integral transforms, a closed form analytical expression is computed suitable for vibroacoustic modeling, design analysis, and general aerospace defensive applications. The closed-form expression takes the form of a kernel of polynomials for acoustic pressure waves showing the influence of linear interface pressure variation across the axes of vibrating boundary surfaces. Simulated results demonstrate how the mode shapes and the associated natural frequencies can be easily computed. It is shown in this paper that acoustic pressure waves propagation are dynamically stable through laminated enclosures with progressive decrement in interfacial pressure distribution under the influence of high excitation frequencies irrespective of whether the induced flow is subsonic, sonic , supersonic, or hypersonic. Hence, in practice, dynamic stability of hypersonic aircrafts or jet airplanes can be further enhanced by replacing their noise transmission systems with laminated enclosures.

  8. Modeling and simulation of pressure waves generated by nano-thermite reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Karen S.; Zyskin, Maxim; Jenkins, Charles M.; (Yuki) Horie, Yasuyuki

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the modeling of pressure waves from the explosive reaction of nano-thermites consisting of mixtures of nanosized aluminum and oxidizer granules. Such nanostructured thermites have higher energy density (up to 26 kJ/cm3) and can generate a transient pressure pulse four times larger than that from trinitrotoluene (TNT) based on volume equivalence. A plausible explanation for the high pressure generation is that the reaction times are much shorter than the time for a shock wave to propagate away from the reagents region so that all the reaction energy is dumped into the gaseous products almost instantaneously and thereby a strong shock wave is generated. The goal of the modeling is to characterize the gas dynamic behavior for thermite reactions in a cylindrical reaction chamber and to model the experimentally measured pressure histories. To simplify the details of the initial stage of the explosive reaction, it is assumed that the reaction generates a one dimensional shock wave into an air-filled cylinder and propagates down the tube in a self-similar mode. Experimental data for Al/Bi2O3 mixtures were used to validate the model with attention focused on the ratio of specific heats and the drag coefficient. Model predictions are in good agreement with the measured pressure histories.

  9. Rubber-induced uniform laser shock wave pressure for thin metal sheets microforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zongbao; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Yayuan; Wang, Cuntang

    2015-02-01

    Laser shock microforming of thin metal sheets is a new high velocity forming technique, which employs laser shock wave to deform the thin metal sheets. The spatial distribution of forming pressure is mainly dependent on the laser beam. A new type of laser shock loading method is introduced which gives a uniform pressure distribution. A low density rubber is inserted between the laser beam and the thin metal sheets. The mechanism of rubber-induced smoothing effect on confined laser shock wave is proposed. Plasticine is used to perform the smoothing effect experiments due to its excellent material flow ability. The influence of rubber on the uniformity of laser shock wave pressure is studied by measuring the surface micro topography of the deformed plasticine. And the four holes forming experiment is used to verify the rubber-induced uniform pressure on thin metal sheets surface. The research results show the possibility of smoothing laser shock wave pressure using rubber. And the good surface quality can be obtained under rubber dynamic loading.

  10. Influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yu-Zhu; Wang Guang-An; Zhu Jin-Rong; Shen Zhong-Hua; Ni Xiao-Wu; Lu Jian

    2007-01-01

    The influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave in a vacuum chamber produced by a Nd:YAG laser has been studied. The laser pulses with pulse width of 10ns and pulse energy of about 320mJ at 1.06μm wavelength is focused on the aluminium target mounted on a ballistic pendulum, and the air pressure in the chamber changes from 2.8 × 103 to 1.01×105pa. The experimental results show that the impulse coupling coefficient changes as the air pressure and the distance of the target from focus change. The mechanical effects of the plasma shock wave on the target are analysed at different distances from focus and the air pressure.

  11. Non-invasive measurement of local pulse pressure by pulse wave-based ultrasound manometry (PWUM)

    OpenAIRE

    Vappou, J.; Luo, J; Okajima, K.; Di Tullio, M; Konofagou, E E

    2011-01-01

    The central Blood Pressure (CBP) has been established as a relevant indicator of cardiovascular disease. Despite its significance, CBP remains particularly challenging to measure in standard clinical practice. The objective of this study is to introduce Pulse Wave-based Ultrasound Manometry (PWUM) as a simple-touse, non-invasive ultrasound-based method for quantitative measurement of the central pulse pressure. Arterial wall displacements are estimated using radiofrequency (RF) ultrasound sig...

  12. Magnetosheath waves under very low solar wind dynamic pressure: Wind/Geotail observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The expanded bow shock on and around "the day the solar wind almost disappeared" (11 May 1999 allowed the Geotail spacecraft to make a practically uninterrupted 54-h-long magnetosheath pass near dusk (16:30-21:11 magnetic local time at a radial distance of 24 to 30 RE (Earth radii. During most of this period, interplanetary parameters varied gradually and in such a way as to give rise to two extreme magnetosheath structures, one dominated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD effects and the other by gas dynamic effects. We focus attention on unusual features of electromagnetic ion wave activity in the former magnetosheath state, and compare these features with those in the latter. Magnetic fluctuations in the gas dynamic magnetosheath were dominated by compressional mirror mode waves, and left- and right-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EIC waves transverse to the background field. In contrast, the MHD magnetosheath, lasting for over one day, was devoid of mirror oscillations and permeated instead by EIC waves of weak intensity. The weak wave intensity is related to the prevailing low solar wind dynamic pressures. Left-hand polarized EIC waves were replaced by bursts of right-hand polarized waves, which remained for many hours the only ion wave activity present. This activity occurred when the magnetosheath proton temperature anisotropy (= $T_{p, perp}/T_{p, parallel}{-}1$ became negative. This was because the weakened bow shock exposed the magnetosheath directly to the (negative temperature anisotropy of the solar wind. Unlike the normal case studied in the literature, these right-hand waves were not by-products of left-hand polarized waves but derived their energy source directly from the magnetosheath temperature anisotropy. Brief entries into the

  13. Experimental study on pressure wave propagation through the open end of pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steam generators of a double pool type liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) are used in a large sodium pool which is formed between the primary vessel and the secondary vessel and accommodates the entire secondary heat transport system. Therefore, if there is a sodium-water reaction event in the steam generator, it becomes important to evaluate the pressure rises at the walls of the primary and secondary vessels as well as those at the other secondary components. An experimental study was performed, focusing on the propagation of the initial pressure spike of the-sodium-water reaction from the bottom end of the steam generator to the sodium pool. Pressure wave propagation from inside of a pipe to an open space through the pipe end was measured. Two kinds of pressure propagation media, water and air, ensured a wide range of experimental conditions. The experimental results revealed that the pressure attenuation at the open end of a pipe can be put in order using the concept of inertial length, and that the dimensionless inertial length, i.e., the inertial length divided by the half wave length of the pressure pulse, is proportional to the square of the dimensionless diameter. These results provide a prediction method for a pressure rise by the initial pressure spike in the secondary sodium pool of the Double Pool LMFBR

  14. Reliable intraocular pressure measurement using automated radio-wave telemetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschalis EI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleftherios I Paschalis,* Fabiano Cade,* Samir Melki, Louis R Pasquale, Claes H Dohlman, Joseph B CiolinoMassachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: To present an autonomous intraocular pressure (IOP measurement technique using a wireless implantable transducer (WIT and a motion sensor.Methods: The WIT optical aid was implanted within the ciliary sulcus of a normotensive rabbit eye after extracapsular clear lens extraction. An autonomous wireless data system (AWDS comprising of a WIT and an external antenna aided by a motion sensor provided continuous IOP readings. The sensitivity of the technique was determined by the ability to detect IOP changes resulting from the administration of latanoprost 0.005% or dorzolamide 2%, while the reliability was determined by the agreement between baseline and vehicle (saline IOP.Results: On average, 12 diurnal and 205 nocturnal IOP measurements were performed with latanoprost, and 26 diurnal and 205 nocturnal measurements with dorzolamide. No difference was found between mean baseline IOP (13.08±2.2 mmHg and mean vehicle IOP (13.27±2.1 mmHg (P=0.45, suggesting good measurement reliability. Both antiglaucoma medications caused significant IOP reduction compared to baseline; latanoprost reduced mean IOP by 10% (1.3±3.54 mmHg; P<0.001, and dorzolamide by 5% (0.62±2.22 mmHg; P<0.001. Use of latanoprost resulted in an overall twofold higher IOP reduction compared to dorzolamide (P<0.001. Repeatability was ±1.8 mmHg, assessed by the variability of consecutive IOP measurements performed in a short period of time (≤1 minute, during which the IOP is not expected to change.Conclusion: IOP measurements in conscious rabbits obtained without the need for human interactions using the AWDS are feasible and provide reproducible results.Keywords: IOP, pressure transducer, wireless, MEMS, implant, intraocular

  15. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Allshouse, Michael R; Morrison, Philip J; Swinney, Harry L

    2016-01-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field $\\mathbf{J} = p \\mathbf{u}$, which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields, $p$ and $\\mathbf{u}$. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous $\\mathbf{J}(x,z,t)$ from density perturbations alone: a Green's function-based calculation yields $p$, and $\\mathbf{u}$ is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: the Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations, and the result for $\\mathbf{J}$ is found to agree typically to within $1\\%$ with $\\mathbf{J}$ computed directly using $p$ and $ \\mathbf{u}$ from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to densit...

  16. Development of microbubble generator for suppression of pressure waves in mercury target of spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A MW-class mercury target for the spallation neutron source is subjected to the pressure waves and cavitation erosion induced by high-intense pulsed-proton beam bombardment. Helium-gas microbubbles injection into mercury is one of the effective techniques to suppress the pressure waves. The microbubble injection technique was developed. The selection test of bubble generators indicated that the bubble generator utilizing swirl flow of liquid (swirl-type bubble-generator) will be suitable from the viewpoint of the produced bubble size. However, when single swirl-type bubble-generator was used in flowing mercury, swirl flow of mercury remains at downstream of the generator. The remaining swirl flow causes the coalescence of bubbles which results in ineffective suppression of pressure waves. To solve this concern, a multi-swirl type bubble-generator, which consists of several single swirl-type bubble-generators arraying in the plane perpendicular to mercury flow direction, was invented. The multi-swirl type bubble-generator was tested in mercury and the geometry was optimized to generate small bubble with low flow resistance based on the test results. It is estimated to generate the microbubbles of 65 μm in radius under the operational condition of the Japanese Spallation Neutron Source mercury target, which is the sufficient size to suppress the pressure waves. (author)

  17. Internal combustion engine supercharging: turbocharger vs. pressure wave compressor. Performance comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Atanasiu; Chiru, Anghel

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims on comparison between a turbocharged engine and a pressure wave charged engine. The comparison was accomplished using the engine simulation software AVL Boost, version 2010. The grahps were extracted using AVL Impress, version 2010. The performance increase is limited by the mechanical side of the simulated engine.

  18. Arterial blood pressure measurement and pulse wave analysis--their role in enhancing cardiovascular assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Alberto P; Butlin, Mark; Walsh, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The most common method of clinical measurement of arterial blood pressure is by means of the cuff sphygmomanometer. This instrument has provided fundamental quantitative information on arterial pressure in individual subjects and in populations and facilitated estimation of cardiovascular risk related to levels of blood pressure obtained from the brachial cuff. Although the measurement is taken in a peripheral limb, the values are generally assumed to reflect the pressure throughout the arterial tree in large conduit arteries. Since the arterial pressure pulse becomes modified as it travels away from the heart towards the periphery, this is generally true for mean and diastolic pressure, but not for systolic pressure, and so pulse pressure. The relationship between central and peripheral pulse pressure depends on propagation characteristics of arteries. Hence, while the sphygmomanometer gives values of two single points on the pressure wave (systolic and diastolic pressure), there is additional information that can be obtained from the time-varying pulse waveform that enables an improved quantification of the systolic load on the heart and other central organs. This topical review will assess techniques of pressure measurement that relate to the use of the cuff sphygmomanometer and to the non-invasive registration and analysis of the peripheral and central arterial pressure waveform. Improved assessment of cardiovascular function in relation to treatment and management of high blood pressure will result from future developments in the indirect measurement of arterial blood pressure that involve the conventional cuff sphygmomanometer with the addition of information derived from the peripheral arterial pulse. PMID:19940350

  19. Arterial blood pressure measurement and pulse wave analysis—their role in enhancing cardiovascular assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most common method of clinical measurement of arterial blood pressure is by means of the cuff sphygmomanometer. This instrument has provided fundamental quantitative information on arterial pressure in individual subjects and in populations and facilitated estimation of cardiovascular risk related to levels of blood pressure obtained from the brachial cuff. Although the measurement is taken in a peripheral limb, the values are generally assumed to reflect the pressure throughout the arterial tree in large conduit arteries. Since the arterial pressure pulse becomes modified as it travels away from the heart towards the periphery, this is generally true for mean and diastolic pressure, but not for systolic pressure, and so pulse pressure. The relationship between central and peripheral pulse pressure depends on propagation characteristics of arteries. Hence, while the sphygmomanometer gives values of two single points on the pressure wave (systolic and diastolic pressure), there is additional information that can be obtained from the time-varying pulse waveform that enables an improved quantification of the systolic load on the heart and other central organs. This topical review will assess techniques of pressure measurement that relate to the use of the cuff sphygmomanometer and to the non-invasive registration and analysis of the peripheral and central arterial pressure waveform. Improved assessment of cardiovascular function in relation to treatment and management of high blood pressure will result from future developments in the indirect measurement of arterial blood pressure that involve the conventional cuff sphygmomanometer with the addition of information derived from the peripheral arterial pulse. (topical review)

  20. Acoustoelastic effects on mode waves in a fluid-filled pressurized borehole in triaxially stressed formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping'en Li; Youquan Yin; Xianyue Su

    2006-01-01

    Based on the nonlinear theory of acoustoelasticity,considering the triaxial terrestrial stress,the fluid static pressure in the borehole and the fluid nonlinear effect jointly,the dispersion curves of the monopole Stoneley wave and dipole flexural wave propagating along the borehole axis in a homogeneous isotropic formation are investigated by using the perturbation method.The relation of the sensitivity coefficient and the velocity-stress coefficient to frequency are also analyzed.The results show that variations of the phase velocity dispersion curve are mainly affected by three sensitivity coefficients related to third-order elastic constant.The borehole stress concentration causes a split of the flexural waves and an intersection of the dispersion curves of the flexural waves polarized in directions parallel and normal to the uniaxial horizontal stress direction.The stress-induced formation anisotropy is only dependent on the horizontal deviatoric terrestrial stress and independent of the horizontal mean terrestrial stress,the superimposed stress and the fluid static pressure.The horizontal terrestrial stress ratio ranging from 0 to 1 reduces the stress-induced formation anisotropy.This makes the intersection of flexural wave dispersion curves not distinguishable.The effect of the fluid nonlinearity on the dispersion curve of the mode wave is small and can be ignored.

  1. Modeling wave-induced pore pressure and effective stress in a granular seabed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtès, Luc; Chareyre, Bruno; Michallet, Hervé; Catalano, Emanuele; Marzougui, Donia

    2015-01-01

    The response of a sandy seabed under wave loading is investigated on the basis of numerical modeling using a multi-scale approach. To that aim, the discrete element method is coupled to a finite volume method specially enhanced to describe compressible fluid flow. Both solid and fluid phase mechanics are upscaled from considerations established at the pore level. Model's predictions are validated against poroelasticity theory and discussed in comparison with experiments where a sediment analog is subjected to wave action in a flume. Special emphasis is put on the mechanisms leading the seabed to liquefy under wave-induced pressure variation on its surface. Liquefaction is observed in both dilative and compactive regimes. It is shown that the instability can be triggered for a well-identified range of hydraulic conditions. Particularly, the results confirm that the gas content, together with the permeability of the medium are key parameters affecting the transmission of pressure inside the soil.

  2. Effect of the dynamic pressure on the shock wave structure in a rarefied polyatomic gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Shigeru, E-mail: taniguchi@stat.nitech.ac.jp; Sugiyama, Masaru, E-mail: sugiyama@nitech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Arima, Takashi, E-mail: tks@stat.nitech.ac.jp [Center for Social Contribution and Collaboration, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ruggeri, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.ruggeri@unibo.it [Department of Mathematics and Research Center of Applied Mathematics (CIRAM), University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    We study the shock wave structure in a rarefied polyatomic gas based on a simplified model of extended thermodynamics in which the dissipation is due only to the dynamic pressure. In this case the differential system is very simple because it is a variant of Euler system with a new scalar equation for the dynamic pressure [T. Arima, S. Taniguchi, T. Ruggeri, and M. Sugiyama, Phys. Lett. A 376, 2799–2803 (2012)]. It is shown that this theory is able to describe the three types of the shock wave structure observed in experiments: the nearly symmetric shock wave structure (Type A, small Mach number), the asymmetric structure (Type B, moderate Mach number), and the structure composed of thin and thick layers (Type C, large Mach number)

  3. Effects of Shelves on Amplification of Long Waves Generated by Atmospheric Pressure Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duha Metin, Ayse; Cevdet Yalciner, Ahmet; Ozyurt Tarakcıoglu, Gulizar; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Meteotsunami is a type of long period ocean wave generated by different types of meteorological disturbances such as atmospheric gravity waves, spatial and temporal pressure distributions and squall lines. The main idea behind the occurrence of this type of long wave is that low atmospheric pressure leads to static water level rise in a part of the marine area and high atmospheric pressure leads to static water level drop in another zone. Then, it causes deformation of the water level throughout the entire sea area. The relation between the pressure difference and change of water level from normal position (η =0.99Δ P where η is the water level change (cm) according to the pressure difference from normal pressure Δ P) can be used to determine the sea level deformation. The relation represents that 1 hPa decrease in air pressure causes 1 cm rise in mean sea level. Due to the spatial and temporal changes of atmospheric pressure, the respective small amplitude long waves propagate along the entire marine area. This type of tsunami-like waves can propagate through long distances and can also be amplified due to resonant effects in the enclosed basins, offshore shelves, and nearshore/offshore coastal morphology. Therefore, it can result in considerable amplifications and causes unexpected effects in some coastal regions. This study is mainly focused on understanding of amplification of long waves generated by atmospheric pressure differences when they encounter the offshore shelves while it is propagating towards to the shore. The problem is investigated by numerically solving nonlinear shallow water equations by using regular shaped basins with different depth and shelf characteristics. In all cases, the rectangular shape large basin is triggered by spatial and temporal distributions of atmospheric pressure. The water depth and shelf formation is changed for different cases. Initially, a deep flat bottom basin is used in simulations and the reference data of water

  4. Experimental Study on a Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Prime Mover with Air Working Gas at Various Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Ikhsan; Achmadin, Wahyu N.; Murti, Prastowo; Nohtomi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Thermoacoustic prime mover is an energy conversion device which converts thermal energy into acoustic work (sound wave). The advantages of this machine are that it can work with air as the working gas and does not produce any exhaust gases, so that it is environmentally friendly. This paper describes an experimental study on a standing wave thermoacoustic prime mover with air as the working gas at various pressures from 0.05 MPa to 0.6 MPa. We found that 0.2 MPa is the optimum pressure which gives the lowest onset temperature difference of 355 °C. This pressure value would be more preferable in harnessing low grade heat sources to power the thermoacoustic prime mover. In addition, we find that the lowest onset temperature difference is obtained when rh /δ k ratio is 2.85, where r h is the hydraulic radius of the stack and δ k is the thermal penetration depth of the gas. Moreover, the pressure amplitude of the sound wave is significantly getting larger from 2.0 kPa to 9.0 kPa as the charged pressure increases from 0.05 MPa up to 0.6 MPa.

  5. Pressure transducer used for measuring close-in shock waves of nuclear explosions in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces a variable reluctance pressure transducer. It has been successfully used for the measurement of close-in shock waves of nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. This transducer's highest pressure range is 100kg/cm2 and its response rise time for all ranges is lms. It uses a specially made oil-filled pressure which allows the transducer to be able to realize underground installation. In this way, it can endure the intense nuclear radiation of nuclear explosions without losing its fast speed response characteristics. This transducer has undergone a series of environmental tests and dynamic standardizations. Therefore, it was used to measure the complete waveform of shock wave overpressure in areas near the fire ball of nuclear explosions. This paper lists the test data of a group of nuclear explosion tests

  6. Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of 239Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

  7. Theory of azimuthally small-scale hydromagnetic waves in the axisymmetric magnetosphere with finite plasma pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Klimushkin

    Full Text Available The structure of monochromatic MHD-waves with large azimuthal wave number m≫1 in a two-dimensional model of the magnetosphere has been investigated. A joint action of the field line curvature, finite plasma pressure, and transversal equilibrium current leads to the phenomenon that waves, standing along the field lines, are travelling across the magnetic shells. The wave propagation region, the transparency region, is bounded by the poloidal magnetic surface on one side and by the resonance surface on the other. In their meaning these surfaces correspond to the usual and singular turning points in the WKB-approximation, respectively. The wave is excited near the poloidal surface and propagates toward the resonance surface where it is totally absorbed due to the ionospheric dissipation. There are two transparency regions in a finite-beta magnetosphere, one of them corresponds to the Alfvén mode and the other to the slow magnetosound mode.

    Key words. Magnetosphere · Azimuthally small-scale waves · MHD waves

  8. Water Waves from General, Time-Dependent Surface Pressure Distribution in the Presence of a Shear Current

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We obtain a general solution for the water waves resulting from a general, time-dependent surface pressure distribution, in the presence of a shear current of uniform vorticity beneath the surface, in three dimensions. Linearized governing equations and boundary conditions including the effects of gravity, a distributed external pressure disturbance, and constant finite depth, are solved analytically, and particular attention is paid to classic initial value problems: an initial pressure impulse and a steady pressure distribution which appears suddenly. In the present paper, good agreement with previous results is demonstrated. We subsequently show both analytically and numerically how transient waves from a suddenly appearing steady pressure distribution vanis for large times, and steady ship waves remain. The transient contribution to wave resistance was derived. The results show that a shear current has significant impact on the transient wave motions, resulting in asymmetry between upstream and downstream...

  9. Thermal-hydraulic behaviors of vapor-liquid interface due to arrival of a pressure wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Akira; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    In the vapor explosion, a pressure wave (shock wave) plays a fundamental role for triggering, propagation and enhancement of the explosion. Energy of the explosion is related to the magnitude of heat transfer rate from hot liquid to cold volatile one. This is related to an increasing rate of interface area and to an amount of transient heat flux between the liquids. In this study, the characteristics of transient heat transfer and behaviors of vapor film both on the platinum tube and on the hot melt tin drop, under same boundary conditions have been investigated. It is considered that there exists a fundamental mechanism of the explosion in the initial expansion process of the hot liquid drop immediately after arrival of pressure wave. The growth rate of the vapor film is much faster on the hot liquid than that on the solid surface. Two kinds of roughness were observed, one due to the Taylor instability, by rapid growth of the explosion bubble, and another, nucleation sites were observed at the vapor-liquid interface. Based on detailed observation of early stage interface behaviors after arrival of a pressure wave, the thermal fragmentation mechanism is proposed.

  10. The dynamics of pressure and form drag on a sloping headland: Internal waves versus eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Sally J.; MacCready, Parker

    2014-03-01

    Topographically generated eddies and internal waves have traditionally been studied separately even though bathymetry that creates both phenomena is abundant in coastal regions. Here a numerical model is used to understand the dynamics of eddy and wave generation as tidal currents flow past Three Tree Point, a 1 km long, 200 m deep, sloping headland in Puget Sound, WA. Bottom pressure anomalies due to vertical perturbations of the sea surface and isopycnals are used to calculate form drag in different regions of the topography to assess the relative importance of eddies versus internal waves. In regions where internal waves dominate, sea surface and isopycnal perturbations tend to work together to create drag, whereas in regions dominated by eddies, sea surface, and isopycnal perturbations tend to counteract each other. Both phenomena are found to produce similar amounts of form drag even though the bottom pressure anomalies from the eddy have much larger magnitudes than those created by the internal waves. Topography like Three Tree Point is common in high latitude, coastal regions, and therefore the findings here have implications for understanding how coastal topography removes energy from tidal currents.

  11. Characterization of a Setup to test the Impact of High-Amplitude Pressure Waves on Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mischa; Kahlert, Ulf; Wessolleck, Johanna; Maciaczyk, Donata; Merkt, Benjamin; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Osterholz, Jens; Nikkhah, Guido; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of pressure waves on cells may provide several possible applications in biology and medicine including the direct killing of tumors, drug delivery or gene transfection. In this study we characterize the physical properties of mechanical pressure waves generated by a nanosecond laser pulse in a setup with well-defined cell culture conditions. To systematically characterize the system on the relevant length and time scales (micrometers and nanoseconds) we use photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and obtain velocity profiles of the cell culture vessel at the passage of the pressure wave. These profiles serve as input for numerical pressure wave simulations that help to further quantify the pressure conditions on the cellular length scale. On the biological level we demonstrate killing of glioblastoma cells and quantify experimentally the pressure threshold for cell destruction.

  12. Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-off of an HMX Based Explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2001-05-09

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  13. Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-Off of an HMX Based High Explosive PBX 9501

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2001-05-31

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  14. Pressure wave measurements from thermal cook-off of an HMX based high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2000-10-10

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  15. Arterial pulse pressure amplification described by means of a nonlinear wave model: characterization of human aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, M.; Cymberknop, L.; Armentano, R.; Pessana, F.; Wray, S.; Legnani, W.

    2016-04-01

    The representation of blood pressure pulse as a combination of solitons captures many of the phenomena observed during its propagation along the systemic circulation. The aim of this work is to analyze the applicability of a compartmental model for propagation regarding the pressure pulse amplification associated with arterial aging. The model was applied to blood pressure waveforms that were synthesized using solitons, and then validated by waveforms obtained from individuals from differentiated age groups. Morphological changes were verified in the blood pressure waveform as a consequence of the aging process (i.e. due to the increase in arterial stiffness). These changes are the result of both a nonlinear interaction and the phenomena present in the propagation of nonlinear mechanic waves.

  16. Central blood pressure assessment using 24-hour brachial pulse wave analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muiesan ML

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Lorenza Muiesan, Massimo Salvetti, Fabio Bertacchini, Claudia Agabiti-Rosei, Giulia Maruelli, Efrem Colonetti, Anna Paini Clinica Medica, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy Abstract: This review describes the use of central blood pressure (BP measurements during ambulatory monitoring, using noninvasive devices. The principles of measuring central BP by applanation tonometry and by oscillometry are reported, and information on device validation studies is described. The pathophysiological basis for the differences between brachial and aortic pressure is discussed. The currently available methods for central aortic pressure measurement are relatively accurate, and their use has important clinical implications, such as improving diagnostic and prognostic stratification of hypertension and providing a more accurate assessment of the effect of treatment on BP. Keywords: aortic blood pressure measurements, ambulatory monitoring, pulse wave analysis

  17. Combined ultrasonic elastic wave velocity and microtomography measurements at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined ultrasonic and microtomographic measurements were conducted for simultaneous determination of elastic property and density of noncrystalline materials at high pressures. A Paris-Edinburgh anvil cell was placed in a rotation apparatus, which enabled us to take a series of x-ray radiography images under pressure over a 180 deg. angle range and construct accurately the three-dimensional sample volume using microtomography. In addition, ultrasonic elastic wave velocity measurements were carried out simultaneously using the pulse reflection method with a 10 deg. Y-cut LiNbO3 transducer attached to the end of the lower anvil. Combined ultrasonic and microtomographic measurements were carried out for SiO2 glass up to 2.6 GPa and room temperature. A decrease in elastic wave velocities of the SiO2 glass was observed with increasing pressure, in agreement with previous studies. The simultaneous measurements on elastic wave velocities and density allowed us to derive bulk (Ks) and shear (G) moduli as a function of pressure. Ks and G of the SiO2 glass also decreased with increasing pressure. The negative pressure dependence of Ks is stronger than that of G, and as a result the value of Ks became similar to G at 2.0-2.6 GPa. There is no reason why we cannot apply this new technique to high temperatures as well. Hence the results demonstrate that the combined ultrasonic and microtomography technique is a powerful tool to derive advanced (accurate) P-V-Ks-G-(T) equations of state for noncrystalline materials.

  18. CMOS-compatible ruggedized high-temperature Lamb wave pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of a novel ruggedized high-temperature pressure sensor operating in lateral field exited (LFE) Lamb wave mode. The comb-like structure electrodes on top of aluminum nitride (AlN) were used to generate the wave. A membrane was fabricated on SOI wafer with a 10 µm thick device layer. The sensor chip was mounted on a pressure test package and pressure was applied to the backside of the membrane, with a range of 20–100 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) was experimentally measured in the temperature range of −50 °C to 300 °C. By using the modified Butterworth–van Dyke model, coupling coefficients and quality factor were extracted. Temperature-dependent Young's modulus of composite structure was determined using resonance frequency and sensor interdigital transducer (IDT) wavelength which is mainly dominated by an AlN layer. Absolute sensor phase noise was measured at resonance to estimate the sensor pressure and temperature sensitivity. This paper demonstrates an AlN-based pressure sensor which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications. (paper)

  19. CMOS-compatible ruggedized high-temperature Lamb wave pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropelnicki, P.; Muckensturm, K.-M.; Mu, X. J.; Randles, A. B.; Cai, H.; Ang, W. C.; Tsai, J. M.; Vogt, H.

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel ruggedized high-temperature pressure sensor operating in lateral field exited (LFE) Lamb wave mode. The comb-like structure electrodes on top of aluminum nitride (AlN) were used to generate the wave. A membrane was fabricated on SOI wafer with a 10 µm thick device layer. The sensor chip was mounted on a pressure test package and pressure was applied to the backside of the membrane, with a range of 20-100 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. By using the modified Butterworth-van Dyke model, coupling coefficients and quality factor were extracted. Temperature-dependent Young's modulus of composite structure was determined using resonance frequency and sensor interdigital transducer (IDT) wavelength which is mainly dominated by an AlN layer. Absolute sensor phase noise was measured at resonance to estimate the sensor pressure and temperature sensitivity. This paper demonstrates an AlN-based pressure sensor which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications.

  20. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Mori, Naoto; Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-01

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t0 to a characteristic time of wave propagation tS, η = t0/ts, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  1. On the pressure wave problem in liquid metal targets for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A liquid metal target for a pulsed spallation source was modelled on the computer to investigate the effect of the high instantaneous power deposition (60 KJ in 1 μs) on the pressure in the liquid and the resulting stress on the container. It was found that for the short pulse duration the resulting stress would be likely to exceed the allowable design stress for steels of the HT-9 type with low nickel content. Adding a small volume fraction of gas bubbles might be a way to suppress almost completely the generation of pressure waves. (author) 12 figs., 5 refs

  2. New experimental capabilities and theoretical insights of high pressure compression waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlikowski, D; Nguyen, J; Patterson, J R; Minich, R; Martin, L P; Holmes, N

    2007-07-20

    Currently there are three platforms that offer quasi-isentropic compression or ramp-wave compression (RWC): light-gas gun, magnetic flux (Z-pinch), and laser. We focus here on the light-gas gun technique and on some current theoretical insights from experimental data. A gradient impedance through the length of the impactor provides the pressure pulse upon impactor to the subject material. Applications and results are given concerning high-pressure strength and liquid to solid, phase transition of water plus its associated phase fraction history. We also introduce the Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equation as a means to understand the evolution these RWC waves that propagate through the thickness of the subject material. This equation has the necessary competition between non-linear, dispersion, and dissipation processes, which is shown through observed structures that are manifested in the experimental particle velocity histories. Such methodology points towards a possible quantifiable dissipation, through which RWC experiments may be analyzed.

  3. Pressure broadening measurement of submillimeter-wave lines of O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M. M.; Amano, T.

    2005-10-01

    The pressure broadening coefficients and their temperature dependences for two submillimeter-wave transitions of ozone, one being monitored with Odin and the other to be monitored with JEM/SMILES and EOS-MLS, have been determined by using a BWO based submillimeter-wave spectrometer. The measurements have also been extended to one of the symmetric isotopic species, 16O18O16O. The isotopic species is observed in natural abundance and as a consequence the temperature dependence is not determined due to weak signal intensity. The pressure broadening parameters are determined with better than 1% accuracy, while the temperature dependence exponents are obtained within 1.5 3% accuracy for the normal species transitions.

  4. Pressure broadening measurement of submillimeter-wave lines of O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, M.M. [Institute for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Amano, T. [Institute for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito 310-8512 (Japan)]. E-mail: amano@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp

    2005-10-01

    The pressure broadening coefficients and their temperature dependences for two submillimeter-wave transitions of ozone, one being monitored with Odin and the other to be monitored with JEM/SMILES and EOS-MLS, have been determined by using a BWO based submillimeter-wave spectrometer. The measurements have also been extended to one of the symmetric isotopic species, {sup 16}O{sup 18}O{sup 16}O. The isotopic species is observed in natural abundance and as a consequence the temperature dependence is not determined due to weak signal intensity. The pressure broadening parameters are determined with better than 1% accuracy, while the temperature dependence exponents are obtained within 1.5-3% accuracy for the normal species transitions.

  5. Numerical simulation of pressure waves in the cochlea induced by a microwave pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitzhak, Nir M; Ruppin, Raphael; Hareuveny, Ronen

    2014-10-01

    The pressure waves developing at the cochlea by the irradiation of the body with a plane wave microwave pulse are obtained by numerical simulation, employing a two-step finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm. First, the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution is obtained by solving the Maxwell equations on a FDTD grid. Second, the temperature rise due to this SAR distribution is used to formulate the thermoelastic equations of motion, which are discretized and solved by the FDTD method. The calculations are performed for anatomically based full body human models, as well as for a head model. The dependence of the pressure amplitude at the cochlea on the frequency, the direction of propagation, and the polarization of the incident electromagnetic radiation, as well as on the pulse width, was investigated.

  6. Shock wave reflection induced detonation (SWRID) under high pressure and temperature condition in closed cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Qi, Y.; Liu, H.; Zhang, P.; He, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-09-01

    Super-knock is one of the major obstacles for improving power density in advanced internal combustion engines (ICE). This work studied the mechanism of super-knock initiation using a rapid compression machine that simulated conditions relevant to ICEs and provided excellent optical accessibility. Based on the high-speed images and pressure traces of the stoichiometric iso-octane/oxygen/nitrogen combustion under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions, it was observed that detonation was first initiated in the near-wall region as a result of shock wave reflection. Before detonation was initiated, the speed of the combustion wave front was less than that of the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed (around 1840 m/s). In the immediate vicinity of the initiation, the detonation speed was much higher than that of the C-J detonation.

  7. Shock wave reflection induced detonation (SWRID) under high pressure and temperature condition in closed cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Qi, Y.; Liu, H.; Zhang, P.; He, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-07-01

    Super-knock is one of the major obstacles for improving power density in advanced internal combustion engines (ICE). This work studied the mechanism of super-knock initiation using a rapid compression machine that simulated conditions relevant to ICEs and provided excellent optical accessibility. Based on the high-speed images and pressure traces of the stoichiometric iso-octane/oxygen/nitrogen combustion under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions, it was observed that detonation was first initiated in the near-wall region as a result of shock wave reflection. Before detonation was initiated, the speed of the combustion wave front was less than that of the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed (around 1840 m/s). In the immediate vicinity of the initiation, the detonation speed was much higher than that of the C-J detonation.

  8. Relative incapacitation contributions of pressure wave and wound channel in the Marshall and Sanow data set

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Marshall and Sanow data set is the largest and most comprehensive data set available quantifying handgun bullet effectiveness in humans. This article presents an empirical model for relative incapacitation probability in humans hit in the thoracic cavity by handgun bullets. The model is constructed by employing the hypothesis that the wound channel and ballistic pressure wave effects each have an associated independent probability of incapacitation. Combining models for these two independent probabilities using the elementary rules of probability and performing a least-squares fit to the Marshall and Sanow data provides an empirical model with only two adjustable parameters for modeling bullet effectiveness with a standard error of 5.6% and a correlation coefficient R = 0.939. This supports the hypothesis that wound channel and pressure wave effects are independent (within the experimental error), and it also allows assignment of the relative contribution of each effect for a given handgun load. This mode...

  9. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W; Rihani, Ryan J; Laine, Glen A; Quick, Christopher M

    2012-07-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (C(tot)) and increases in total peripheral resistance (R(tot)) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (c(ph)) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in c(ph) do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in c(ph) cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), R(tot), C(tot), and c(ph) to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, c(ph) was theoretically maintained constant, while C(tot), R(tot), and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, C(tot), R(tot), and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and c(ph) was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in c(ph) have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in C(tot). PMID:22561301

  10. Low-frequency pressure wave propagation in liquid-filled, flexible tubes. (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnø, Leif; Bjelland, C.

    1992-01-01

    . The complex, frequency-dependent moduli of relevant tube materials have been measured in a series of experiments using three different experimental procedures, and the data obtained are compared. The three procedures were: (1) ultrasonic wave propagation, (2) transversal resonance in bar samples, and (3......A model has been developed for propagation of low-frequency pressure waves in viscoelastic tubes with distensibility of greater importance than compressibility of the liquid. The dispersion and attenuation are shown to be strongly dependent on the viscoelastic properties of the tube wall......) moduli determined by stress wave transfer function measurements in simple extension experiments. The moduli are used in the model to produce realistic dispersion relations and frequency dependent attenuation. Signal transfer functions between positions in the liquid-filled tube can be synthesized from...

  11. Interactions of Delta Shock Waves for Zero-Pressure Gas Dynamics with Energy Conservation Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the interactions of delta shock waves and vacuum states for the system of conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy in zero-pressure gas dynamics. The Riemann problems with initial data of three piecewise constant states are solved case by case, and four different configurations of Riemann solutions are constructed. Furthermore, the numerical simulations completely coinciding with theoretical analysis are shown.

  12. Non-invasive measurement of aortic pressure in patients: Comparing pulse wave analysis and applanation tonometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.U.R. Naidu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to validate and compare novel methods to determine aortic blood pressure non-invasively based on Oscillometric Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV measurement using four limb-cuff pressure waveforms and two lead Electrocardiogram (ECG with a validated tonometric pulse wave analysis system in patients. Materials and Methods: After receiving the consent, in 49 patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, PWV, and central blood pressures were recorded in a randomised manner using both the oscillometric and tonometric devices. All recordings were performed 10 minutes after the patient lying comfortably in a noise-free temperature-controlled room. The test was performed between 09 am and 10 am after overnight fast. A minimum of three measurements were performed by the same skilled and trained operator. From the raw data obtained with two devices, software calculated the final vascular parameters. Results: A total of 49 patients (8 women and 41 men, of mean age 40.5 years (range: 19-81 years participated in the present study. After transforming the brachial pressures into aortic pressures, the correlation coefficient between the Aortic Systolic Pressure (ASP values obtained with two methods was 0.9796 (P<0.0001. The mean difference between ASP with two methods was 0.3 mm Hg. Similarly, Aortic Diastolic Pressure (ADP values obtained with two methods also correlated significantly with correlation coefficient of 0.9769 (P<0.0001. The mean difference of ADP was 0.2 mm Hg. In case of Aortic Pulse Pressure (APP, the mean difference was 0.1 mm Hg. All parameters of central aortic pressures obtained with two methods correlated significantly. Conclusion: The new method of transforming the Carotid Femoral PWV (cfPWV and brachial blood pressure values into aortic blood pressure values seems to be reasonably good. The significant correlation between the values obtained by tonometric device and

  13. Underwater blast wave pressure sensor based on polymer film fiber Fabry-Perot cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjie; Wang, Meng; Xu, Jian; Peng, Li; Yang, Minghong; Xia, Minghe; Jiang, Desheng

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the theoretical and experimental aspects of an optical underwater shock wave sensor based on a polymer film optical fiber Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured by vacuum deposition technology. The transduction mechanism of the sensor involves a normally incident acoustic stress wave that changes the thickness of the polymer film, thereby giving rise to a phase shift. This transient interferometric phase is interrogated by a three-phase-step algorithm. Theoretically, the sensor-acoustic-field interaction principle is analyzed, and the phase modulation sensitivity based on the theory of waves in the layered media is calculated. Experimentally, a static calibration test and a dynamic calibration test are conducted using a piston-type pressure calibration machine and a focusing-type electromagnetic shock wave. Results indicate that the repeatability, hysteresis, nonlinearity, and the overall measurement accuracy of the sensor within the full pressure range of 55 MPa are 1.82%, 0.86%, 1.81%, and 4.49%, respectively. The dynamic response time is less than 0.767 μs. Finally, three aspects that need further study for practical use are pointed out. PMID:25322237

  14. Drift wave excitation in the THETA-pinch high pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excitation of low-frequency (LF) drift waves has been experimentally investigated in a high-pressure plasma in a gas discharge of the direct THETA-pinch type. The electrodeless inductive gas discharge is produced in an alundum tube of 150 cm length and 6.5 cm internal diameter filled with hydrogen at the pressure of (1-20).10-3 mm Hg. The discharge magnetic field (MF) has been investigated by a system of five magnetic probes both oriented along the radius and the length of the discharge chamber. The longitudinal temperature of electrons reaches 4 keV at the 6 kV voltage on the coil. Successive development of two types of instability has been observed: HF ''starting'' and LF ones. The LF oscillations observed have been identified as drift waves in a system with large β. The amplitude of the MF oscillations for the given instability may be compared with the value of the main MF, and the transverse wave lengths for these oscillations are of the order of the plasma filament radius. The longitudinal wave lengths are comparable with the magnetic system length

  15. Calculation Analysis of Pressure Wave Velocity in Gas and Drilling Mud Two-Phase Fluid in Annulus during Drilling Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanhua Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of propagation characteristics of a pressure wave is of great significance to the solution of the transient pressure problem caused by unsteady operations during management pressure drilling operations. With consideration of the important factors such as virtual mass force, drag force, angular frequency, gas influx rate, pressure, temperature, and well depth, a united wave velocity model has been proposed based on pressure gradient equations in drilling operations, gas-liquid two-fluid model, the gas-drilling mud equations of state, and small perturbation theory. Solved by adopting the Runge-Kutta method, calculation results indicate that the wave velocity and void fraction have different values with respect to well depth. In the annulus, the drop of pressure causes an increase in void fraction along the flow direction. The void fraction increases first slightly and then sharply; correspondingly the wave velocity first gradually decreases and then slightly increases. In general, the wave velocity tends to increase with the increase in back pressure and the decrease of gas influx rate and angular frequency, significantly in low range. Taking the virtual mass force into account, the dispersion characteristic of the pressure wave weakens obviously, especially at the position close to the wellhead.

  16. Analytical solutions for dynamic pressures of coupling fluid-solid-porous medium due to P wave incidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王进廷; 张楚汉; 金峰

    2004-01-01

    Wave reflection and refraction in layered media is a topic closely related to seismology, acoustics, geophysics and earthquake engineering. Analytical solutions for wave reflection and refraction coefficients in multi-layered media subjected to P wave incidence from the elastic half-space are derived in terms of displacement potentials. The system is composed of ideal fluid, porous medium, and underlying elastic solid. By numerical examples, the effects of porous medium and the incident wave angle on the dynamic pressures of ideal fluid are analyzed. The results show that the existence of the porous medium, especially in the partially saturated case, may significantly affect the dynamic pressures of the overlying fluid.

  17. Non-invasive measurement of local pulse pressure by pulse wave-based ultrasound manometry (PWUM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central blood pressure (CBP) has been established as a relevant indicator of cardiovascular disease. Despite its significance, CBP remains particularly challenging to measure in standard clinical practice. The objective of this study is to introduce pulse wave-based ultrasound manometry (PWUM) as a simple-to-use, non-invasive ultrasound-based method for quantitative measurement of the central pulse pressure. Arterial wall displacements are estimated using radiofrequency ultrasound signals acquired at high frame rates and the pulse pressure waveform is estimated using both the distension waveform and the local pulse wave velocity. The method was tested on the abdominal aorta of 11 healthy subjects (age 35.7±16 y.o.). PWUM pulse pressure measurements were compared to those obtained by radial applanation tonometry using a commercial system. The average intra-subject variability of the pulse pressure amplitude was found to be equal to 4.2 mmHg, demonstrating good reproducibility of the method. Excellent correlation was found between the waveforms obtained by PWUM and those obtained by tonometry in all subjects (0.94 < r < 0.98). A significant bias of 4.7 mmHg was found between PWUM and tonometry. PWUM is a highly translational method that can be easily integrated in clinical ultrasound imaging systems. It provides an estimate of the pulse pressure waveform at the imaged location, and may offer therefore the possibility to estimate the pulse pressure at different arterial sites. Future developments include the validation of the method against invasive estimates on patients, as well as its application to other large arteries

  18. Pressure Wave Measurements During Thermal Explosion of HMX-Based High Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, J W; Garcia, F; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2002-06-27

    Five different experiments on thermal heating of explosive materials have been performed. Three experiments thermally exploded PBX 9501 (HMX/Estane/BDNPA-F; 9512.512.5 wt %) donor charges while two others thermally exploded LX-04 (HMX/Viton A; 85/15 wt %). These donor charges were encased in 304 stainless steel. The transmitted two-dimensional pressure waves were measured by gauges in acceptor cylinders of Teflon, PBX 9501, or LX-04 that were in contact with the donors' steel case. A fifth experiment measured the pressure in an acceptor charge of PBX 9501 that had a 100 mm stand-off from the top of the steel case of the thermally cooked off PBX 9501 donor charge. Reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling using a rapid deflagration velocity of approximately 500 m/s was able to reproduce the pressure gauge records for both the in contact and stand off experiments that used PBX 9501 donors and acceptors.

  19. Laboratory measurement of longitudinal wave velocity of artificial gas hydrate under different temperatures and pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong; LI DongLiang; ZHANG HaiLan; FAN ShuanShi; ZHAO HaiBo

    2008-01-01

    The longitudinal wave velocity and attenuation measurements of artificial gas hy-drate samples at a low temperature are reported.And the temperature and pressure dependence of longitudinal wave velocity is also investigated.In order to under-stand the acoustic properties of gas hydrate,the pure ice,the pure tetrahydrofuran (THF),the pure gas hydrate samples and sand sediment containing gas hydrate are measured at a low temperature between 0℃ and -15℃.For the pure ice,the pure THF and the pure gas hydrate samples,whose density is 898 kg/m3,895 kg/m3 and 475 kg/m3,the velocity of longitudinal wave is respectively 3574 m/s,3428 m/s and 2439 m/s.For synthesized and compacted samples,the velocity of synthesized samples is lower than that of compacted samples.The velocities increase when the densities of the samples increase,while the attenuation decreases.Under the con-dition of low temperature,the results show that the velocity is slightly affected by the temperature.The results also show that wave velocities increase with the in-crease of piston pressures.For example,the velocity of one sample increases from 3049 up to 3337 m/s and the other increases from 2315 up to 2995 m/s.But wave velocity decreases from 3800 to 3546 m/s when the temperature increases from -153 to 53 and changes significantly close to the melting point.Formation con-ditions of the two samples are the same but with different conversion ratios of wa-ter.The results of the experiment are important for exploration of the gas hydrate resources and development of acoustic techniques.

  20. Laboratory measurement of longitudinal wave velocity of artificial gas hydrate under different temperatures and pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The longitudinal wave velocity and attenuation measurements of artificial gas hy- drate samples at a low temperature are reported. And the temperature and pressure dependence of longitudinal wave velocity is also investigated. In order to under- stand the acoustic properties of gas hydrate, the pure ice, the pure tetrahydrofuran (THF), the pure gas hydrate samples and sand sediment containing gas hydrate are measured at a low temperature between 0℃ and –15℃. For the pure ice, the pure THF and the pure gas hydrate samples, whose density is 898 kg/m3, 895 kg/m3 and 475 kg/m3, the velocity of longitudinal wave is respectively 3574 m/s, 3428 m/s and 2439 m/s. For synthesized and compacted samples, the velocity of synthesized samples is lower than that of compacted samples. The velocities increase when the densities of the samples increase, while the attenuation decreases. Under the con- dition of low temperature, the results show that the velocity is slightly affected by the temperature. The results also show that wave velocities increase with the in- crease of piston pressures. For example, the velocity of one sample increases from 3049 up to 3337 m/s and the other increases from 2315 up to 2995 m/s. But wave velocity decreases from 3800 to 3546 m/s when the temperature increases from –15℃ to 5℃ and changes significantly close to the melting point. Formation con- ditions of the two samples are the same but with different conversion ratios of wa- ter. The results of the experiment are important for exploration of the gas hydrate resources and development of acoustic techniques.

  1. An Improved Negative Pressure Wave Method for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Location Using FBG Based Strain Sensor and Wavelet Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Qingmin Hou; Liang Ren; Wenling Jiao; Pinghua Zou; Gangbing Song

    2013-01-01

    Methods that more quickly locate leakages in natural gas pipelines are urgently required. In this paper, an improved negative pressure wave method based on FBG based strain sensors and wavelet analysis is proposed. This method takes into account the variation in the negative pressure wave propagation velocity and the gas velocity variation, uses the traditional leak location formula, and employs Compound Simpson and Dichotomy Searching for solving this formula. In addition, a FBG based strain...

  2. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki, E-mail: takahira@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki, E-mail: oga@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Mori, Naoto, E-mail: su101064@edu.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, Moe [Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai-shi, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-10-28

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t{sub 0} to a characteristic time of wave propagation t{sub S}, η = t{sub 0}/t{sub s}, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  3. First hints of pressure waves in a helical extragalactic jet: S5~0836+710

    CERN Document Server

    Perucho, Manel

    2013-01-01

    One of the open questions in extragalactic jet Astrophysics is related to the nature of the observed radio jet, namely whether it traces a pattern or the flow structure itself. In this paper I summarize the evidence collected for the presence of waves in extragalactic jets. The evidence points towards the peak of emission in helical jets corresponding to pressure-maxima of a wave that is generated within the core region and propagates downstream. Making use of a number of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the radio jet in the quasar S5~0836+710 at different frequencies and epochs, Perucho et al. (2012) were able to observe wave-like behavior within the observed radio-jet. The ridge-line of the emission in the jet coincides within the errors at all frequencies. Moreover, small differences between epochs at 15 GHz reveal wave-like motion of the ridge-line transversal to the jet propagation axis. The authors conclude that the helicity is a real, physical structure. I report here on those r...

  4. An Improved Negative Pressure Wave Method for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Location Using FBG Based Strain Sensor and Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingmin Hou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods that more quickly locate leakages in natural gas pipelines are urgently required. In this paper, an improved negative pressure wave method based on FBG based strain sensors and wavelet analysis is proposed. This method takes into account the variation in the negative pressure wave propagation velocity and the gas velocity variation, uses the traditional leak location formula, and employs Compound Simpson and Dichotomy Searching for solving this formula. In addition, a FBG based strain sensor instead of a traditional pressure sensor was developed for detecting the negative pressure wave signal produced by leakage. Unlike traditional sensors, FBG sensors can be installed anywhere along the pipeline, thus leading to high positioning accuracy through more frequent installment of the sensors. Finally, a wavelet transform method was employed to locate the pressure drop points within the FBG signals. Experiment results show good positioning accuracy for natural gas pipeline leakage, using this new method.

  5. Analytical analysis of slow and fast pressure waves in a two-dimensional cellular solid with fluid-filled cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, Vladimir; Van Damme, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Wave propagation in cellular and porous media is widely studied due to its abundance in nature and industrial applications. Biot's theory for open-cell media predicts the existence of two simultaneous pressure waves, distinguished by its velocity. A fast wave travels through the solid matrix, whereas a much slower wave is carried by fluid channels. In closed-cell materials, the slow wave disappears due to a lack of a continuous fluid path. However, recent finite element (FE) simulations done by the authors of this paper also predict the presence of slow pressure waves in saturated closed-cell materials. The nature of the slow wave is not clear. In this paper, an equivalent unit cell of a medium with square cells is proposed to permit an analytical description of the dynamics of such a material. A simplified FE model suggests that the fluid-structure interaction can be fully captured using a wavenumber-dependent spring support of the vibrating cell walls. Using this approach, the pressure wave behavior can be calculated with high accuracy, but with less numerical effort. Finally, Rayleigh's energy method is used to investigate the coexistence of two waves with different velocities. PMID:27369159

  6. All-Optical Detection of Acoustic Pressure Waves with applications in Photo-Acoustic Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Westergaard, Philip G

    2016-01-01

    An all-optical detection method for the detection of acoustic pressure waves is demonstrated. The detection system is based on a stripped (bare) single-mode fiber. The fiber vibrates as a standard cantilever and the optical output from the fiber is imaged to a displacement-sensitive optical detector. The absence of a conventional microphone makes the demonstrated system less susceptible to the effects that a hazardous environment might have on the sensor. The sensor is also useful for measurements in high temperature (above $200^{\\circ}$C) environments where conventional microphones will not operate. The proof-of-concept of the all-optical detection method is demonstrated by detecting sound waves generated by the photo-acoustic effect of NO$_2$ excited by a 455 nm LED, where a detection sensitivity of approximately 50 ppm was achieved.

  7. Optimal pressure-sensitive cuts for surface acoustic waves on langasite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The crystal langasite manifests its unique advantages and potentials for high temperature applications due to a high electromechanical coupling coefficient, temperature compensated orientations for surface acoustic wave (SAW), and temperature stability. In order to analyze the pressure-induced frequency shift in SAW resonator type sensors at high temperature, this paper presents the electroelastic wave equations employing the effective material constants for small vibrations superimposed on biases originated from homogeneous temperature and external pressure fields in the Lagrangian description. Incorporated with the first-order perturbation integration, a model including both the mechanical and electrical perturbation items originating from thermal biases and small pressure fields is proposed. This universal model is suitable for substrate with high piezoelectricity and can be applied at either room temperature or high temperature circumstance. The criteria of optimal cuts for SAW pressure sensitivity, I.e., high electromechanical coupling coefficient and low temperature coefficient of delay, are proposed. A thorough investigation in trebly rotated cuts has shown that optimal pressure sensitive crystallographic areas can be obtained. The areas suitable for pressure sensors at room temperature are defined with Euler anglesThe areas suitable for pressure sensors at high temperature are defined with Euler anglesΩ1: φ= 0°―0.6°,θ= 144.4°―145.8°, ψ= 23.2°―24.1°,Ω2: φ=59.4°―61°,θ= 34.2°―36.2°, ψ= 24.1°―22.3°,Ω3: φ=119°―120°,θ = 143.8°―145.5°, ψ= 22.3°―23.5°.The areas suitable for pressure sensors at high temperature are defined with Euler anglesI:φ= 8°―30°,θ= 24°―36°,ψ= 4°―25°,II:φ = 30°―55°,θ= 144°―158°,ψ= 4°―28°.A set of experiments employing LGS (0, 150°, 22°) and (0, 90°, 0) has been performed to check the validity of the proposed calculation. The experimental relative sensitivity is

  8. Seismic attenuation: effects of interfacial impedance on wave-induced pressure diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qiaomu; Müller, Tobias M.; Rubino, J. Germán

    2014-12-01

    Seismic attenuation and dispersion in layered sedimentary structures are often interpreted in terms of the classical White model for wave-induced pressure diffusion across the layers. However, this interlayer flow is severely dependent on the properties of the interface separating two layers. This interface behaviour can be described by a pressure jump boundary condition involving a non-vanishing interfacial impedance. In this paper, we incorporate the interfacial impedance into the White model by solving a boundary value problem in the framework of quasi-static poroelasticity. We show that the White model predictions for attenuation and dispersion substantially change. These changes can be attributed to petrophysically plausible scenarios such as imperfect hydraulic contacts or the presence of capillarity.

  9. Studies on an improved indigenous pressure wave generator and its testing with a pulse tube cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S.; Karunanithi, R.; Narsimham, G. S. V. L.; Kranthi, J. Kumar; Damu, C.; Praveen, T.; Samir, M.; Mallappa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Earlier version of an indigenously developed Pressure Wave Generator (PWG) could not develop the necessary pressure ratio to satisfactorily operate a pulse tube cooler, largely due to high blow by losses in the piston cylinder seal gap and due to a few design deficiencies. Effect of different parameters like seal gap, piston diameter, piston stroke, moving mass and the piston back volume on the performance is studied analytically. Modifications were done to the PWG based on analysis and the performance is experimentally measured. A significant improvement in PWG performance is seen as a result of the modifications. The improved PWG is tested with the same pulse tube cooler but with different inertance tube configurations. A no load temperature of 130 K is achieved with an inertance tube configuration designed using Sage software. The delivered PV power is estimated to be 28.4 W which can produce a refrigeration of about 1 W at 80 K.

  10. High Definition Oscillometry: Non-invasive Blood Pressure Measurement and Pulse Wave Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive monitoring of blood pressure has become increasingly important in research. High-Definition Oscillometry (HDO) delivers not only accurate, reproducible and thus reliable blood pressure but also visualises the pulse waves on screen. This allows for on-screen feedback in real time on data validity but even more on additional parameters like systemic vascular resistance (SVR), stroke volume (SV), stroke volume variances (SVV), rhythm and dysrhythmia. Since complex information on drug effects are delivered within a short period of time, almost stress-free and visible in real time, it makes HDO a valuable technology in safety pharmacology and toxicology within a variety of fields like but not limited to cardiovascular, renal or metabolic research. PMID:26091643

  11. The Loss Spiral of Work Pressure, Work-Home Interference and Exhaustion: Reciprocal Relations in a Three-Wave Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B.; Bulters, Annemieke J.

    2004-01-01

    This study tested the "loss spiral" hypothesis of work-home interference (WHI). Accordingly, work pressure was expected to lead to WHI and exhaustion, and, vice versa, exhaustion was expected to result in more WHI and work pressure over time. Results of SEM-analyses using three waves of data obtained from 335 employees of an employment agency…

  12. Probabilistic safety verification for the overturning of a service water pump house against 'over pressure wave'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atucha II Nuclear Power Plant is being built in a riverside site located about 100 km north of the city of Buenos Aires. When completed it will become Argentina's third operating station. The Service Water Pump House of the 740 MW Natural Uranium NPP is supplied directly by the Parana de las Palmas River, which is a navigable waterway with heavy fluvial traffic that links the River Plate Estuary with ports along the Parana River, including Rosario, Argentina's third city. Although dolphins were built to protect the water intake structures from direct impact from ships or barges, an accidental escape of gas or flammable material outside the protected area that may result in an explosion with a subsequent pressure wave, could not be precluded. Thus, the water intake structures had to be designed against this event. In addition, concern with the margin of safety against foundation instability due to the overturning moment associated to the induced pressures, made an evaluation of the conditional probability of failure for this loading condition, desirable. The task placed still uncommon demands on the Project Engineers, who were required to provide estimates of the Pump House reliability. In the process, it became necessary to introduce assumptions concerning the unspecified variability of the loads which, according to current international practice, were defined in the form of 'deterministic' design criteria. It seems appropriate to underline these deficiencies in current standards, as well as in aspects of the dynamic of soils that are responsible for a quite large model uncertainty. On the basis of available information, it may be established that the probability of occurrence of a pressure wave at the site is less than 10-3 per year. Accordingly, the probability of failure of the foundation due to a pressure wave does not exceed 1.5 -8 per year, value that is considered admissible by current standards. The use of triangular probability density functions for

  13. On the influence of the hysteretic behavior of the capillary pressure on the wave propagation in partially saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Bettina

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that the capillary pressure curve of partially saturated soils exhibits a hysteresis. For the same degree of saturation it has different values depending on the initial state of the soil, thus for drying of a wet soil or wetting of a dry soil. The influence of these different values of the capillary pressure on the propagation of sound waves is studied by use of a linear hyperbolic model. Even if the model does not contain a hysteresis operator, the effect of hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve is accounted for. In order to obtain the limits of phase speeds and attenuations for the two processes the correspondent values for main drying and main wetting are inserted into the model separately. This is done for two examples of soils, namely for Del Monte sand and for a silt loam both filled by an air-water mixture. The wave analysis reveals four waves: one transversal wave and three longitudinal waves. The waves which are driven by the immiscible pore fluids are influenced by the hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve while the waves which are mainly driven by the solid are not.

  14. Response of NPP structures to simultaneously acting air pressure loads and ground waves caused by a gas cloud explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas cloud explosions cause air pressure waves which propagate over the ground surface. The ground motion induced by these loads and their effect on structures are studied. The soil is modelled as a linear viscoelastic medium. A semianalytical method is used to compute the ground motion produced by a deflagration and by a detonation in a stiff and a soft layered soil. For a PWR reactor building subjected to the direct impact of an air pressure wave the additional effects of the ground waves on the motion of the building are studied. Whereas the vertical structural response is increased, the horizontal response decreases, when the effect of the ground waves is included. For the case studied the additional effect of the ground waves is small. (orig.)

  15. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Frank M; Swinney, Harry L; Morrison, P J

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux $\\left$ and total radiated power $P$ for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both $\\left$ and $P$ are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function $\\psi$. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method agree to within 0.5% with results obtained using pressure and velocity data from the numerical simulation. The results for the radiated power computed from the stream function agree well with power computed from the velocity and pressure if the starting point for the stream function computation is on a solid boundary, but if a boundary point is not available, care must be taken to choose an appropriate starting point. We also test the stream function method by applying it to laboratory data for tidal flow past a knife ed...

  16. DAPSY - a computer program for the pressure wave propagation in reactor cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code DAPSY is developed to calculate pressure wave phenomena in the primary coolant system. For this purpose it is necessary to treat 3-dimensional single-phase and two-phase flow of water and steam. The technique used in DAPSY is the simulation of the real geometry by a pipe network with connected one-dimensional flow paths. The calculation of the unsteady one-dimensional flow is taken from the BLAST code. In this code pressure wave propagation and delayed attainment of thermal equilibrium is taken into consideration. Integration by the method of characteristics in a fixed grid, which is used in this code, is very convenient for the computation of boundary value problems, especially for critical state of flow. In order to determine the boundary conditions of each pipe, calculated by the one-dimensional code, subroutines were developed, which simulate several components of the primary system, e.g. strong cross-section variations with eventual critical flow, valves, pumps, dead ends of pipes, perhaps with a gas bulb, breaking points with critical mass-flow rate and eventual orifices, connection points of several pipes, free surfaces of water with transition to steam phase, and separators in which two-phase mixture is divided in steam and water flow. These components can be composed in any way so that a whole primary system is described. (orig.)

  17. P-wave velocities of main upper mantle minerals at high temperature and high pressure and its geological implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋茂双; 谢鸿森; 郑海飞; 徐有生; 郭捷; 许祖鸣

    1996-01-01

    At 0 - 5.0GPa and room temperature to 1400℃, the P-wave velocities of olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene, which are three common minerals from upper mantle, are measured under both simulated oceanic and continental geothermal gradients. The experimental results indicate that the P-wave velocities of these minerals increase with depth under both geothermal gradients. This implicates that pressure is more important than temperature in deep earth in controlling the P-wave velocities of mantle minerals, but the increase of temperature has greater effect on P-wave velocities of main mantle minerals at greater depth than at smaller depth. At low pressure, the measured P-wave velocities of mantle minerals are smaller than their true values due to fracturing, compaction process and recrystallization of mineral powder. The true P-wave velocities of mantle minerals can be obtained at lower pressure by the extrapolation of measured velocities at a high pressure. At higher depth, all these three minerals sho

  18. Reference values of central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation with 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in Belgian healthy young subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Saint-Remy, Annie; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to define reference values of central blood pressure (cBP) and Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) together with 24H ABPM in healthy normotensive young adults before starring a follow-up of their CV profile modifications over time. Peer reviewed

  19. Reference values of central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity in relations with 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in Belgian normotensive young subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Saint-Remy, Annie; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to define reference values of central blood pressure (cBP) and Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) together with 24H APPM in healththy normotensive young adults before starting a follow-up of their CV profile modifications over time. Peer reviewed

  20. LIGHT PRESSURE: Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzatov, D. V.; Gaida, L. S.; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A.

    2008-12-01

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves.

  1. Experimental research on characteristic of start-up pressure wave propagation in gelled crude oil by large-scale flow loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔秀国; 艾慕阳; 姜保良; 霍连风; 张立新

    2008-01-01

    In order to research start-up pressure wave propagation mechanism and determine pressure wave speed in gelled crude oil pipelines accurately,experiment of Large-scale flow loop was carried out.In the experiment,start-up pressure wave speeds under various operation conditions were measured,and effects of correlative factors on pressure wave were analyzed.The experimental and theoretical analysis shows that thermal shrinkage and structural properties of gelled crude oils are key factors influencing on start-up pressure wave propagation.The quantitative analysis for these effects can be done by using volume expansion coefficient and structural property parameter of gelled crude oil.A new calculation model of pressure wave speed was developed on the basis of Large-scale flow loop experiment and theoretical analysis.

  2. Geometric Scaling for a Detonation Wave Governed by a Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate and Yielding Confinement

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jianling; Mi, XiaoCheng; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of detonation waves in reactive media bounded by an inert, compressible layer is examined via computational simulations in two different geometries, axisymmetric cylinders and two dimensional, planar slabs. For simplicity, an ideal gas equation of state is used with a pressure-dependent reaction rate that results in a stable detonation wave structure. The detonation is initiated as an ideal Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation with a one-dimensional structure, and then allowed to p...

  3. Magnetospheric ULF waves with increasing amplitude related to solar wind dynamic pressure changes: The Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X. C.; Zong, Q.-G.; Shi, Q. Q.; Tian, A. M.; Sun, W. J.; Wang, Y. F.; Zhou, X. Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Hartinger, M. D.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-09-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves play an important role in transferring energy by buffeting the magnetosphere with solar wind pressure impulses. The amplitudes of magnetospheric ULF waves, which are induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements or shocks, are thought to damp in one half a wave cycle or an entire wave cycle. We report in situ observations of solar wind dynamic pressure impulse-induced magnetospheric ULF waves with increasing amplitudes. We found six ULF wave events induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements with slow but clear wave amplitude increase. During three or four wave cycles, the amplitudes of ion velocities and electric field of these waves increased continuously by 1.3-4.4 times. Two significant events were selected to further study the characteristics of these ULF waves. We found that the wave amplitude growth is mainly contributed by the toroidal mode wave. Three possible mechanisms of causing the wave amplitude increase are discussed. First, solar wind dynamic pressure perturbations, which are observed in a duration of 20-30 min, might transfer energy to the magnetospheric ULF waves continually. Second, the wave amplitude increase in the radial electric field may be caused by superposition of two wave modes, a standing wave excited by the solar wind dynamic impulse and a propagating compressional wave directly induced by solar wind oscillations. When superposed, the two wave modes fit observations as does a calculation that superposes electric fields from two wave sources. Third, the normal of the solar wind discontinuity is at an angle to the Sun-Earth line. Thus, the discontinuity will affect the dayside magnetopause continuously for a long time.

  4. The transfer of atmospheric-pressure ionization waves via a metal wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yang; Liu, Dongping, E-mail: Dongping.liu@dlnu.edu.cn [Liaoning Key Lab of Optoelectronic Films & Materials, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Wenchun [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Peng, Yifeng; Niu, Jinhai; Bi, Zhenhua; Ji, Longfei; Song, Ying; Wang, Xueyang; Qi, Zhihua [Liaoning Key Lab of Optoelectronic Films & Materials, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Our study has shown that the atmospheric-pressure He ionization waves (IWs) may be transferred from one dielectric tube (tube 1) to the other one (tube 2) via a floating metal wire. The propagation of IWs along the two tubes is not affected by the diameter of a floating metal wire, however, their propagation is strongly dependent on the length of a floating metal wire. The propagation of one IW along the tube 1 may result in the second IW propagating reversely inside the tube in vicinity of a floating metal wire, which keeps from their further propagation through the tube 1. After they merge together as one conduction channel inside the tube 1, the transferred plasma bullet starts to propagate along the tube 2. The propagation of transferred plasma bullets along the tube 2 is mainly determined by the capacitance and inductance effects, and their velocity and density can be controlled by the length of a floating metal wire.

  5. The transfer of atmospheric-pressure ionization waves via a metal wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our study has shown that the atmospheric-pressure He ionization waves (IWs) may be transferred from one dielectric tube (tube 1) to the other one (tube 2) via a floating metal wire. The propagation of IWs along the two tubes is not affected by the diameter of a floating metal wire, however, their propagation is strongly dependent on the length of a floating metal wire. The propagation of one IW along the tube 1 may result in the second IW propagating reversely inside the tube in vicinity of a floating metal wire, which keeps from their further propagation through the tube 1. After they merge together as one conduction channel inside the tube 1, the transferred plasma bullet starts to propagate along the tube 2. The propagation of transferred plasma bullets along the tube 2 is mainly determined by the capacitance and inductance effects, and their velocity and density can be controlled by the length of a floating metal wire

  6. On the influence of low initial pressure and detonation stochastic nature on Mach reflection of gaseous detonation waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. J.; Guo, C. M.

    2014-09-01

    The two-dimensional, time-dependent and reactive Navier-Stokes equations were solved to obtain an insight into Mach reflection of gaseous detonation in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture diluted by 25 % argon. This mixture generates a mode-7 detonation wave under an initial pressure of 8.00 kPa. Chemical kinetics was simulated by an eight-species, forty-eight-reaction mechanism. It was found that a Mach reflection mode always occurs for a planar detonation wave or planar air shock wave sweeping over wedges with apex angles ranging from to . However, for cellular detonation waves, regular reflection always occurs first, which then transforms into Mach reflection. This phenomenon is more evident for detonations ignited under low initial pressure. Low initial pressure may lead to a curved wave front, that determines the reflection mode. The stochastic nature of boundary shape and transition distance, during deflagration-to-detonation transition, leads to relative disorder of detonation cell location and cell shape. Consequently, when a detonation wave hits the wedge apex, there appears a stochastic variation of triple point origin and variation of the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface. As the wedge apex angle increases, the distance between the triple point trajectory origin and the wedge apex increases, and the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface decreases exponentially.

  7. One-Dimensional Simulation of the Pressure Wave near the Exit of a High-Speed Train Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宇光; 朱克勤; 席葆树

    2001-01-01

    The one-dimensional (1-D) unsteady flow induced by a high-speed train entering a tunnel isnumerically studied by the method of characteristics. The tube area is dependent on time and distance. Theenergy equation used by Kage et al. is corrected to avoid the conflict with the isentropic assumption. Theeffect of the tunnel hood on the pressure wave is studied near the tunnel exit. Results show that the tunnel hoodis useful in reducing the peak value and the time derivative of the pressure wave.``

  8. An algorithm for extracting intracranial pressure latency relative to electrocardiogram R wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) latency is defined as the time interval between the peak of the QRS complex of the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the corresponding onset of intracranial pressure (ICP) pulse. Due to its inherent relationship with arterial pulse wave velocity, ICP latency may allow continuous monitoring of pathophysiological changes in the cerebrovasculature. The objective of the present work was to develop and validate a computerized algorithm for extracting ICP latency in a beat-by-beat fashion. The proposed ICP latency extraction algorithm exploits the mature technique of ECG QRS detection and includes a new adaptive peak detection methodology. The results were validated by comparing the performance of two human observers versus the algorithm in terms of locating the onset points of ICP pulses for 59 recordings extracted from 25 adult patients. The average ICP latency was 72.6 ± 19.5 ms (range 40.0–159.8). The ICP pulse detection algorithm demonstrated a baseline sensitivity of 0.97 and a positive predictivity of 0.88. No difference was found in the mean location errors from comparing the results obtained by the two observers and those from comparing the results from the algorithm to those from the two observers. Further investigation is needed to demonstrate the role of ICP latency in characterizing dynamic cerebral vascular pathophysiological changes in clinical states such as subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury

  9. Design and Experiment for Exhaust Pipes of Pressure Wave Supercharged Diesel Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Chang-wei; ZHAO Yong; MA Hui; HAN Ai-min; LI Chao

    2007-01-01

    NOx and soot emissions from diesel engines can be greatly reduced by pressure wave supercharging (PWS). The diesel engine matched with PWS needs redesigning its exhaust pipes. Except for meeting the installation requirements, the exhaust gas must be stable in pressure before rushing into PWS. In this paper the lateral and center ported divergent exhaust pipes are designed, modeled geometrically and analyzed structurally based on a 3-D design software-CATIA to determine the structure of two exhaust pipes having the required inner volume. Then flow analysis for two exhaust pipes is done using a flow analysis software-ANASYS. Moreover, the optimal exhaust pipes are determined comprehensively and cast for engine test. Engine test results show that PWS is superior to turbocharging at low engine speeds and inferior to turbocharging in power and emissions at medium-to-high engine speeds. The performance of PWS engine under high speed operating conditions can be improved by contriving larger surge volume intake and exhaust pipes.

  10. Optimization of pressure waveform, distribution and sequence in shock wave lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    This work aims to improve shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) technology by increasing stone comminution efficiency while reducing simultaneously the propensity of tissue injury. First, the mechanism of vascular injury in SWL was investigated. Based on in vitro vessel phantom experiment and theoretical calculation, it was found that SWL-induced large intraluminal bubble expansion may constitute a primary mechanism for the rupture of capillaries and small blood vessels. However, when the large intraluminal bubble expansion is suppressed by inversion of the pressure waveform of the lithotripter shock wave (LSW), rupture of a 200-mum cellulose hollow fiber vessel phantom can be avoided. Based on these experimental observations and theoretical assessment of bubble dynamics using the Gilmore model an in situ pulse superposition technique was developed to reduce tissue injury without compromising stone comminution in SWL. A thin shell ellipsoidal reflector insert was fabricated to fit snugly with the original HM-3 reflector. Using the Hamilton model, the effects of reflector geometry on the pulse profile and sequence of the shock waves were evaluated qualitatively. Guided by this analysis, the design of the reflector insert had been refined to suppress the intraluminal bubble expansion, which was confirmed by high-speed imaging of bubble dynamics both in free field and inside a vessel phantom. The pulse pressure, beam size and stone comminution efficiency of the upgraded reflector were all found to be comparable to those of the original reflector. However, the greatest difference lies in the propensity for tissue injury. At the lithotripter focus, about 30 shocks are needed to cause a rupture of the vessel phantom using the original reflector, but no rupture can be produced after 200 shocks by the upgraded reflector. Overall, the upgraded reflector could significantly reduce the propensity of vessel rupture while maintaining satisfactory stone comminution. Second, to improve

  11. MARS-KS Code Analysis of the Pressure Wave test 0 performed at the PMK-2 test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressure waves might be expected in the nuclear reactor systems due to sudden rupture of pipes, or quick opening or closure of the system valves. If generated, they can result in large mechanical loads on the RPV internal structures and pipelines, threatening their integrity. This kind of phenomena is an important issue and a limiting accident case for the nuclear power plant safety, which requires extensive analysis to ensure nuclear power plant safety. To study these phenomena, four PWP (Pressure Wave Propagation) tests have been performed in the PMK-2 test facility in MTA EK. In addition, these tests have been used to assess the capability of the MARS-KS code in simulating the PWP phenomena. Then, an input model representing the PMK-2 test facility was developed to simulate the tests. The MARS-KS simulation results are then compared with the test results. The comparison shows that the MARS code can simulate the PWP frequencies and initial pressure peaks well. After the qualified assessment, the MARS-KS code is then deployed to conduct the sensitivity analysis on the effect of the break size, break time, coolant initial conditions on the PWP phenomena. The sensitivity analysis on the break sizes shows that the pressure wave amplitude is relevant to the break times: the shorter the break opening time is, the faster the pressure decreases. The sensitivity analysis on the break sizes shows that the larger the break size is, the higher the pressure peak is

  12. Macro-mechanical modeling of blast-wave mitigation in foams. Part II: reliability of pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britan, A.; Liverts, M.; Shapiro, H.; Ben-Dor, G.

    2013-02-01

    A phenomenological study of the process occurring when a plane shock wave reflected off an aqueous foam column filling the test section of a vertical shock tube has been undertaken. The experiments were conducted with initial shock wave Mach numbers in the range 1.25le {M}_s le 1.7 and foam column heights in the range 100-450 mm. Miniature piezotrone circuit electronic pressure transducers were used to record the pressure histories upstream and alongside the foam column. The aim of these experiments was to find a simple way to eliminate a spatial averaging as an artifact of the pressure history recorded by the side-on transducer. For this purpose, we discuss first the common behaviors of the pressure traces in extended time scales. These observations evidently quantify the low frequency variations of the pressure field within the different flow domains of the shock tube. Thereafter, we focus on the fronts of the pressure signals, which, in turn, characterize the high-frequency response of the foam column to the shock wave impact. Since the front shape and the amplitude of the pressure signal most likely play a significant role in the foam destruction, phase changes and/or other physical factors, such as high capacity, viscosity, etc., the common practice of the data processing is revised and discussed in detail. Generally, side-on pressure measurements must be used with great caution when performed in wet aqueous foams, because the low sound speed is especially prone to this effect. Since the spatial averaged recorded pressure signals do not reproduce well the real behaviors of the pressure rise, the recorded shape of the shock wave front in the foam appears much thicker. It is also found that when a thin liquid film wet the sensing membrane, the transducer sensitivity was changed. As a result, the pressure recorded in the foam could exceed the real amplitude of the post-shock wave flow. A simple procedure, which allows correcting this imperfection, is discussed in

  13. A Novel Dynamic Model for Predicting Pressure Wave Velocity in Four-Phase Fluid Flowing along the Drilling Annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Kong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic pressure wave velocity model is presented based on momentum equation, mass-balance equation, equation of state, and small perturbation theory. Simultaneously, the drift model was used to analyze the flow characteristics of oil, gas, water, and drilling fluid multiphase flow. In addition, the dynamic model considers the gas dissolution, virtual mass force, drag force, and relative motion of the interphase as well. Finite difference and Newton-Raphson iterative are introduced to the numerical simulation of the dynamic model. The calculation results indicate that the wave velocity is more sensitive to the increase of gas influx rate than the increase of oil/water influx rate. Wave velocity decreases significantly with the increase of gas influx. Influenced by the pressure drop of four-phase fluid flowing along the annulus, wave velocity tends to increase with respect to well depth, contrary to the gradual reduction of gas void fraction at different depths with the increase of backpressure (BP. Analysis also found that the growth of angular frequency will lead to an increase of wave velocity at low range. Comparison with the calculation results without considering virtual mass force demonstrates that the calculated wave velocity is relatively bigger by using the presented model.

  14. Geometric Scaling for a Detonation Wave Governed by a Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate and Yielding Confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Jianling, Li; Higgins, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of detonation waves in reactive media bounded by an inert, compressible layer is examined via computational simulations in two different geometries, axisymmetric cylinders and two dimensional, planar slabs. For simplicity, an ideal gas equation of state is used with a pressure-dependent reaction rate that results in a stable detonation wave structure. The detonation is initiated as an ideal Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation with a one-dimensional structure, and then allowed to propagate into a finite diameter or thickness layer of explosive surrounded by an inert layer. The yielding confinement of the inert layer results in the detonation wave decaying to a sub-CJ steady state velocity or failing entirely. Simulations are performed with different values of the reaction rate pressure exponent (n = 2 and 3) and different impedance confinement (greater than, less than, and equal to the confinement of the explosive). The velocity decrement and critical dimension (critical diameter or thickness) are ...

  15. Effect of thermal pressure on upward plasma fluxes due to ponderomotive force of Alfvén waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Nekrasov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the action of the ponderomotive force of low-frequency Alfvén waves on the distribution of the background plasma. It is assumed that the ponderomotive force for traveling waves arises as a result of the background inhomogeneity of medium under study. Expressions for the ponderomotive force obtained in this paper differ from previous analogous results. The induced magnetic moment of medium is taken into account. It is shown that the well-known Pitayevsky's formula for the magnetic moment is not complete. The role of the induced nonlinear thermal pressure in the evolution of the background plasma is considered. We give estimations for plasma displacement due to the long- and short-acting nonlinear wave perturbations. Some discussion of the ponderomotive action of standing waves is provided.

  16. Relations between diabetes, blood pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity in haemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Kjærgaard, Krista Dybtved; Dzeko, Mirela;

    Diabetes (DM) is common in haemodialysis (HD) patients and affects both blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness. Carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects the stiffness of the aorta and is regarded as a strong risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) mortality in HD patients. However, PWV...... is highly influenced by the BP-level. Higher PWV-values among HD patients with DM could reflect a higher BP-level rather than increased arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of DM on BP and PWV in a group of HD patients. BP and PWV were measured in 66 HD patients without DM...... (HD) and 32 HD patients with DM (HD+DM). The SphygmoCor system was used for estimation of PWV. HD-duration, age, gender and BP medication were similar in the two groups. Mean DM-duration was 23±11 years and 25(78%) had type 2 DM. HD+DM had higher BMI (26±5 vs. 29±5 kg/m2, p=0.02), systolic BP (142...

  17. Properties of wave velocity for two types of granitoids at high pressure and temperature and their geological meaning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨树锋; 陈汉林; 姜继双; 竺国强; 谢鸿森; 侯渭; 张月明; 徐惠刚

    1997-01-01

    The wave velocity for two types of granitoids was measured using the analytic method of full-wave vibration at high pressure and high temperature. The laws of velocity changes for them differ with the pressure hoost and temperature rise, and the velocity change of S-type is more violent than that of I-type. The "softening point" of compressional wave velocity ( Vp) is also revealed during the measurement for two types of granitoids imitating the pressure and temperature at a certain depth. But the depth of "softening", Vp after "softening" and the percentage of Vp’ s drop around the "softening point" for two types of granitoids are obviously different. The depth of "softening" is 15 km approximately and Vp after "softening" is 5. 62 km/s for S-type granitoid. But for I-type granitoid the depth of "softening" is 26 km approximately and Vp after "softening" is 6. 08 km/s. Through careful analysis of rock slices after the experiment, it was found that the "softening" of elastic-wave velocity is caused by t

  18. Numerical simulation of magnetospheric ULF waves excited by positive and negative impulses of solar wind dynamic pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The sources of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves in the magnetosphere are generally believed to be either the external solar wind perturbations or the internal plasma instabilities. When a sudden impulse of the solar wind dynamic pressure impinges on the magnetopause, ULF waves might be excited and thus the solar wind energy is transported into the earth’s magnetosphere. In this paper, we study the ULF waves excited by different kinds of sudden solar wind pressure impulses through an MHD simulation. We primarily focus on the responses of the earth’s magnetosphere to positive/negative impulses of solar wind dynamic pressure, and positive-negative impulse pairs. The simulation results show that the ULF waves excited by positive and negative impulse have the same amplitude and frequency, with 180° difference in phase, if the amplitude and durations of the input impulses are the same. In addition, it is found that field line resonances (FLRs) occur at certain L-shell regions of the earth’s magneto-sphere after the impact of different positive-negative impulse pairs, which appear to be related to the duration of the impulses and the time interval between the sequential impulses. Another result is that the energy from the solar wind could be transported deeper into the inner magnetosphere by an impulse pair than by a single pulse impact. The results presented in this paper could help us to better understand how energy is transported from solar wind to the earth’s magnetosphere via ULF waves. Also, these results provide some new clues to understanding of how energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere response to different kinds of solar wind pressure impulse impacts including inter-planetary shocks.

  19. Direct analysis of dispersive wave fields from near-field pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horchens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Flexural waves play a significant role for the radiation of sound from plates. The analysis of flexural wave fields enables the detection of sources and transmission paths in plate-like structures. The measurement of these wave fields can be carried out indirectly by means of near-field acoustic hol

  20. High speed interference heating loads and pressure distributions resulting from elevon deflections. [shock wave interaction effects on hypersonic aircraft surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. B.; Kaufman, L. G., III

    1979-01-01

    Effects of elevon-induced three-dimensional shock-wave turbulent boundary-layer interactions on hypersonic aircraft surfaces are analyzed. Detailed surface pressure and heating rate distributions obtained on wing-elevon-fuselage models representative of aft portions of hypersonic aircraft are compared with analytical and experimental results from other sources. Examples are presented that may be used to evaluate the adequacy of current theoretical methods for estimating the effects of three-dimensional shock-wave turbulent boundary-layer interactions on hypersonic aircraft surfaces.

  1. The mechanical response of piles with consideration of pile-soil interactions under a periodic wave pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱峰; 徐卫亚; 王环玲

    2014-01-01

    The pile-soil interaction under wave loads is an extremely complex and difficult issue in engineering. In this study, a physical model test is designed based on the principle of the gravity similarity to obtain time histories of wave forces of unsteady regular waves, and to measure the magnitude and the distribution of wave forces acting on the piles. A numerical model and relevant numerical methods for the pile-soil contact surface are adopted based on the principles of elastic dynamics. For a practical project, the time histories of wave forces on the piles are obtained through physical model tests. The deformations of the piles in the pile-soil interactions and the distribution of the bending moment on the piles are studied. It is shown that, with the increase of the period of wave pressures, the absolute value of the horizontal displacement of the piles increases, the embedment depth of the piles increases, and the scope of influence of soils increases. The change of the bending moment on the piles is consistent with that of its theoretical results, and the proposed numerical method can very well simulate the properties of the piles.

  2. Pressure waves in liquid mercury target from pulsed heat loads and the possible way controlling their effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, L.; Skala, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villingen (Switzerland)

    1996-06-01

    In ESS project liquid metals are selected as the main target for the pulsed spallation neutron source. Since the very high instantaneous energy is deposited on the heavy molten target in a very short period time, pressure waves are generated. They travel through the liquid and cause high stress in the container. Also, additional stress should be considered in the wall which is the result of direct heating of the target window. These dynamic processes were simulated with computational codes with the static response being analized first. The total resulting dynamic wall stress has been found to have exceeded the design stress for the selected container material. Adding a small amount of gas bubbles in the liquid could be a possible way to reduce the pressure waves.

  3. The Relationship among Pulse Wave Velocity, Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index and Heart Rate Variability in Adult Males

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jeong-Hwan; Kong, Mihee

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) are non-invasive tools to measure atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Heart rate variability (HRV) has proven to be a non-invasive powerful tool in the investigation of the autonomic cardiovascular control. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship among PWV, ABI, and HRV parameters in adult males. Methods The study was carried out with 117 males who visited a health care center from ...

  4. SMALL-SCALE PRESSURE-BALANCED STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY OBLIQUE SLOW MODE WAVES MEASURED IN THE SOLAR WIND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, small-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) were identified in the solar wind, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. This work aims to reveal the dependence of the properties of small-scale PBSs on the background magnetic field (B0) direction and thus to corroborate the in situ mechanism that forms them. We analyze the plasma and magnetic field data obtained by WIND in the quiet solar wind at 1 AU. First, we use a developed moving-average method to obtain B0(s, t) for every temporal scale (s) at each time moment (t). By wavelet cross-coherence analysis, we obtain the correlation coefficients between the thermal pressure Pth and the magnetic pressure PB, distributing against the temporal scale and the angle θxB between B0(s, t) and Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates (GSE)-x. We note that the angle coverage of a PBS decreases with shorter temporal scale, but the occurrence of the PBSs is independent of θxB. Suspecting that the isolated small PBSs are formed by compressive waves in situ, we continue this study by testing the wave modes forming a small-scale PBS with B0(s, t) quasi-parallel to GSE-x. As a result, we identify that the cross-helicity and the compressibility attain values for a slow mode from theoretical calculations. The wave vector is derived from minimum variance analysis. Besides, the proton temperatures obey T ∥ derived from the velocity distribution functions, excluding a mirror mode, which is the other candidate for the formation of PBSs in situ. Thus, a small-scale PBS is shown to be driven by oblique, slow-mode waves in the solar wind

  5. SMALL-SCALE PRESSURE-BALANCED STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY OBLIQUE SLOW MODE WAVES MEASURED IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Shuo [School of Geophysics and Information Technology, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); He, J.-S.; Tu, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-H. [Department of Geophysics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Marsch, E., E-mail: yaoshuo@cugb.edu.cn [Christian Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    Recently, small-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) were identified in the solar wind, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. This work aims to reveal the dependence of the properties of small-scale PBSs on the background magnetic field (B{sub 0}) direction and thus to corroborate the in situ mechanism that forms them. We analyze the plasma and magnetic field data obtained by WIND in the quiet solar wind at 1 AU. First, we use a developed moving-average method to obtain B{sub 0}(s, t) for every temporal scale (s) at each time moment (t). By wavelet cross-coherence analysis, we obtain the correlation coefficients between the thermal pressure P{sub th} and the magnetic pressure P{sub B}, distributing against the temporal scale and the angle {theta}{sub xB} between B{sub 0}(s, t) and Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates (GSE)-x. We note that the angle coverage of a PBS decreases with shorter temporal scale, but the occurrence of the PBSs is independent of {theta}{sub xB}. Suspecting that the isolated small PBSs are formed by compressive waves in situ, we continue this study by testing the wave modes forming a small-scale PBS with B{sub 0}(s, t) quasi-parallel to GSE-x. As a result, we identify that the cross-helicity and the compressibility attain values for a slow mode from theoretical calculations. The wave vector is derived from minimum variance analysis. Besides, the proton temperatures obey T < T{sub Parallel-To} derived from the velocity distribution functions, excluding a mirror mode, which is the other candidate for the formation of PBSs in situ. Thus, a small-scale PBS is shown to be driven by oblique, slow-mode waves in the solar wind.

  6. Aortic pressure wave reconstruction during exercise is improved by adaptive filtering: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stok, Wim J; Westerhof, Berend E; Guelen, Ilja; Karemaker, John M

    2011-08-01

    Reconstruction of central aortic pressure from a peripheral measurement by a generalized transfer function (genTF) works well at rest and mild exercise at lower heart rates, but becomes less accurate during heavy exercise. Particularly, systolic and pulse pressure estimations deteriorate, thereby underestimating central pressure. We tested individualization of the TF (indTF) by adapting its resonance frequency at the various levels of exercise. In seven males (age 44-57) with coronary artery disease, central and peripheral pressures were measured simultaneously. The optimal resonance frequency was predicted from regression formulas using variables derived from the individual's peripheral pressure pulse, including a pulse contour estimation of cardiac output (pcCO). In addition, reconstructed pressures were calibrated to central mean and diastolic pressure at each exercise level. Using a genTF and without calibration, the error in estimated aortic pulse pressure was -7.5 ± 6.4 mmHg, which was reduced to 0.2 ± 5.7 mmHg with the indTFs using pcCO for prediction. Calibration resulted in less scatter at the cost of a small bias (2.7 mmHg). In exercise, the indTFs predict systolic and pulse pressure better than the genTF. This pilot study shows that it is possible to individualize the peripheral to aortic pressure transfer function, thereby improving accuracy in central blood pressure assessment during exercise. PMID:21720842

  7. PROGRESS OF ACOUSTIC WAVE TECHNIQUE AND ITS APPLICATION IN UNDERGROUND PRESSURE MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周楚良; 李新元; 张晓龙

    1994-01-01

    This paper carries out the experiment study on the correlation between full stress-strain process of rock samples and the acoustic parameter change of rock by using the measurement system of KS acoustic wave data processing device. On the spot, the stability of surrounding rock is studied by means of experiments on the relationship between the change process (from elastic to plastic failure zone) in surrounding rock of roadway and the change law of acoustic parameters of rock. These acoustic parameters include wave amplitude, spectral amplitude, spectrum area, spectral density, wave velocity and attenuation coefficient etc.

  8. Experimental study on the pressure and pulse wave propagation in viscoelastic vessel tubes-effects of liquid viscosity and tube stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaga, Yuki; Nishi, Shohei; Komagata, Yuka; Saito, Masashi; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Asada, Takaaki; Matsukawa, Mami

    2013-11-01

    A pulse wave is the displacement wave which arises because of ejection of blood from the heart and reflection at vascular bed and distal point. The investigation of pressure waves leads to understanding the propagation characteristics of a pulse wave. To investigate the pulse wave behavior, an experimental study was performed using an artificial polymer tube and viscous liquid. A polyurethane tube and glycerin solution were used to simulate a blood vessel and blood, respectively. In the case of the 40 wt% glycerin solution, which corresponds to the viscosity of ordinary blood, the attenuation coefficient of a pressure wave in the tube decreased from 4.3 to 1.6 dB/m because of the tube stiffness (Young's modulus: 60 to 200 kPa). When the viscosity of liquid increased from approximately 4 to 10 mPa·s (the range of human blood viscosity) in the stiff tube, the attenuation coefficient of the pressure wave changed from 1.6 to 3.2 dB/m. The hardening of the blood vessel caused by aging and the increase of blood viscosity caused by illness possibly have opposite effects on the intravascular pressure wave. The effect of the viscosity of a liquid on the amplitude of a pressure wave was then considered using a phantom simulating human blood vessels. As a result, in the typical range of blood viscosity, the amplitude ratio of the waves obtained by the experiments with water and glycerin solution became 1:0.83. In comparison with clinical data, this value is much smaller than that seen from blood vessel hardening. Thus, it can be concluded that the blood viscosity seldom affects the attenuation of a pulse wave.

  9. PASSIVE WIRELESS MULTI-SENSOR TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE SENSING SYSTEM USING ACOUSTIC WAVE DEVICES Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of...

  10. Passive Wireless Multi-Sensor Temperature and Pressure Sensing System Using Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive, orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems, an...

  11. Bramwell-Hill modeling for local aortic pulse wave velocity estimation: a validation study with velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance and invasive pressure assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Westenberg Jos JM; van Poelgeest Eveline P; Steendijk Paul; Grotenhuis Heynric B; Jukema JW; de Roos Albert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Bramwell-Hill model describes the relation between vascular wall stiffness expressed in aortic distensibility and the pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is the propagation speed of the systolic pressure wave through the aorta. The main objective of this study was to test the validity of this model locally in the aorta by using PWV-assessments based on in-plane velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), with invasive pressure measurements serving as the gol...

  12. Aortic pressure wave reconstruction during exercise is improved by adaptive filtering: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Stok, W.J.; Westerhof, B E; Guelen, I.; Karemaker, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Reconstruction of central aortic pressure from a peripheral measurement by a generalized transfer function (genTF) works well at rest and mild exercise at lower heart rates, but becomes less accurate during heavy exercise. Particularly, systolic and pulse pressure estimations deteriorate, thereby underestimating central pressure. We tested individualization of the TF (indTF) by adapting its resonance frequency at the various levels of exercise. In seven males (age 44–57) with coronary artery ...

  13. Dynamic Stress and Pore Pressure Around Circular Cavity in Saturated Porous Elastic Half-space Under Harmonic Plane Dilatational Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic stress concentration and pore pressure concentration around an infinitely long cylindrical cavity of circular cross-section subjected to harmonic plane dilatational waves in fluid-saturated porous elastic half-space were obtained by a complex function method based on potential function and multi-polar coordinate. The steady state Biot's dynamic field equations of porous elastic solid with a viscous liquid were uncoupled into Helmholtz equations via given potential functions. A circular cavity with large radius is used to replace the straight boundary of the saturated porous elastic half-space. The stresses and pore pressures were obtained by using complex functions in multi-polar coordinates with certain boundary conditions of the solid matrix and the fluid matrix. The approximate solutions were compared to existing numerical solutions. Then the variations of the coefficients of dynamic stress concentration and the pore pressures concentration on boundaries of the cavity were discussed with different parameter conditions. The results of the given numerical example indicate that the method used is useful and efficient to the scattering and dynamic stress concentration of plane dilatational waves in saturated porous elastic half-space.

  14. Pulse wave myelopathy: An update of an hypothesis highlighting the similarities between syringomyelia and normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Grant A

    2015-12-01

    Most hypotheses trying to explain the pathophysiology of idiopathic syringomyelia involve mechanisms whereby CSF is pumped against a pressure gradient, from the subarachnoid space into the cord parenchyma. On review, these theories have universally failed to explain the disease process. A few papers have suggested that the syrinx fluid may originate from the cord capillary bed itself. However, in these papers, the fluid is said to accumulate due to impaired fluid drainage out of the cord. Again, there is little evidence to substantiate this. This proffered hypothesis looks at the problem from the perspective that syringomyelia and normal pressure hydrocephalus are almost identical in their manifestations but only differ in their site of effect within the neuraxis. It is suggested that the primary trigger for syringomyelia is a reduction in the compliance of the veins draining the spinal cord. This reduces the efficiency of the pulse wave dampening, occurring within the cord parenchyma, increasing arteriolar and capillary pulse pressure. The increased capillary pulse pressure opens the blood-spinal cord barrier due to a direct effect upon the wall integrity and interstitial fluid accumulates due to an increased secretion rate. An increase in arteriolar pulse pressure increases the kinetic energy within the cord parenchyma and this disrupts the cytoarchitecture allowing the fluid to accumulate into small cystic regions in the cord. With time the cystic regions coalesce to form one large cavity which continues to increase in size due to the ongoing interstitial fluid secretion and the hyperdynamic cord vasculature.

  15. Determination of the elastic wave velocities in porous rocks with the change of overburden pressure and its universal significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史謌; 杨东全

    2002-01-01

    Typical rock samples with different lithologic characteristics were collected from exploring wells drilled in sandstone-conglomerate sedimental reservoirs with positive rhythm. In different pore fluid states (fully saturated with gas, water and oil), the velocities of compressional and shear waves (Vp, Vs) were measured under different overburden pressure in laboratory. The effects of pore fluid and different fluid types on the velocities were analyzed. The velocities (Vp, Vs) of the samples fully saturated with water were calculated by use of Gassmann's formula that is suitable for low frequency. The calculated values were compared with the experimental values obtained at high frequency. The result shows that Gassmann's theory can be used to calculate elastic wave velocities in porous rocks saturated with fluid. By this result, the change of elastic velocities with the change of fluid can be predicted. The error is allowable in petroleum engineering. This conclusion is useful for sonic logging interpretation and seismic datum processing.

  16. Multidimensional Hall magnetohydrodynamics with isotropic or anisotropic thermal pressure: numerical scheme and its validation using solitary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Strumik, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical solver for plasma dynamics simulations in Hall magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD) approximation in one, two and three dimensions. We consider both isotropic and anisotropic thermal pressure cases, where a general gyrotropic approximation is used. Both explicit energy conservation equation and general polytropic state equations are considered. The numerical scheme incorporates second-order Runge-Kutta advancing in time and Kurganov-Tadmor scheme with van Leer flux limiter for the approximation of fluxes. A flux-interpolated constrained-transport approach is used to preserve solenoidal magnetic field in the simulations. The implemented code is validated using several test problems previously described in the literature. Additionally, we propose a new validation method for HMHD codes based on solitary waves that provides a possibility of quantitative rigorous testing in nonlinear (large amplitude) regime as an extension to standard tests using small-amplitude whistler waves. Quantitative tests of ...

  17. Tracking Ocean Gravity Waves in Real-time: Highlights of Bottom Pressure Data Recorded on Ocean Networks Canada's NEPTUNE observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesemann, Martin; Mihaly, Steve; Gemmrich, Johannes; Davis, Earl; Thomson, Richard; Dewey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Ocean Networks Canada operates two cabled ocean observatories off Vancouver Island on Canada's west coast. The regional NEPTUNE observatory spans the entire Juan de Fuca tectonic plate from the coast across the subduction zone to the hydrothermally active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Segment while the VENUS observatory focuses on coastal processes. Both observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex earth processes. High-precision bottom pressure recorders (BPR) deployed on the NEPTUNE observatory are capable of detecting a wide range of phenomena related to sea level variations. The observatory BPRs provide observations of nano-resolution (with respect to full scale of the instrument) pressure variations which correspond to sub-millimeter scale surface water displacements in several kilometers of water. Detected signals include tides, tsunamis, infragravity waves, swell, wave-induced microseisms, storm surge, and seismic signals. Spectral analysis reveals many of these phenomena with periods ranging from a few seconds to many hours. Dispersion patterns from distant swells are prominent in the swell and microseism bands. By comparing the difference of arrival times between longer period waves, which arrive first, and shorter period waves we can estimate the distance the swells travelled since they were generated. Using this information, swell can be tracked back to specific storms across the Pacific. The presentation will high-light some examples of the mentioned phenomena in the continuous time-series that in some instances are more than seven years long.

  18. High-frequency bottom-pressure and acoustic variations in a sea strait: internal wave turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, H.

    2012-01-01

    During a period of 3 days, an accurate bottom-pressure sensor and a four-beam acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) were mounted in a bottom frame at 23 m in a narrow sea strait with dominant near-rectilinear tidal currents exceeding 1 m s(-1) in magnitude. The pressure record distinguishes small

  19. Signal-Pressure Curves of Cascaded Four-Wave Mixing in Gas-Filled Capillary by fs Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bao-Zhen; HUANG Zu-Qia

    2005-01-01

    The theoretical framework for the cascaded four waves mixing (CFWM) in gas-filled capillary by fs pulses is constructed. Based on the theoretical framework, the signal-pressure curves (SPC) of the CFWM in gas-filled capillary by fs pulses are calculated. With a comparison between the theoretical and experimental SPC we have discussed the influence of the walk-off and Phase modulation on the SPC. At the same time, we have discussed the possible origin of the first three peaks of the SPC.

  20. Shock wave velocity measurement in the Al2O3 under ultrahigh pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feng; Peng Xiao-Shi; Liu Shen-Ye; Li Yong-Sheng; Jiang Xiao-Hua; Ding Yong-Kun

    2011-01-01

    In indirect-drive experiment, the blank effect caused by X-rays from Hohlraum will show the dark area in time scale of optical streak camera (OSC). This blank effect, which was a serious problem in indirect-drive shock wave experiments,has been explained by the semiconductor model. The X-rays cause the band to band transition and the probe laser is absorbed by the intraband transition, which leads to a dark region in time scale of the OSC image. In the experiment,the refiectivity of shock wave front was measured to be about 50% at shock wave velocity 32 km/s and was compared to the theoretical calculations with the Drude free electron model. From the experimental data, it is found that the blank effect can be avoided at radiation temperature of 170 eV if the Al layer is thicker than 60 μm.

  1. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  2. Study of atmospheric gravity waves and infrasonic sources using the USArray Transportable Array pressure data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlin, Michael; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hoffmann, Lars; Alexander, M. Joan; Stephan, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The upgrade of the USArray Transportable Array (TA) with microbarometers and infrasound microphones has created an opportunity for a broad range of new studies of atmospheric sources and the large- and small-scale atmospheric structure through which signals from these events propagate. These studies are akin to early studies of seismic events and the Earth's interior structure that were made possible by the first seismic networks. In one early study with the new dataset we use the method of de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin (2015) to recast the TA as a massive collection of 3-element arrays to detect and locate large infrasonic events. Over 2,000 events have been detected in 2013. The events cluster in highly active regions on land and offshore. Stratospherically ducted signals from some of these events have been recorded more than 2,000 km from the source and clearly show dispersion due to propagation through atmospheric gravity waves. Modeling of these signals has been used to test statistical models of atmospheric gravity waves. The network is also useful for making direct observations of gravity waves. We are currently studying TA and satellite observations of gravity waves from singular events to better understand how the waves near ground level relate to those observed aloft. We are also studying the long-term statistics of these waves from the beginning of 2010 through 2014. Early work using data bandpass filtered from 1-6 hr shows that both the TA and satellite data reveal highly active source regions, such as near the Great Lakes. de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin, 2015, A method for detecting and locating geophysical events using clusters of arrays, Geophysical Journal International, v203, p960-971, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggv345.

  3. Numerical survey of pressure wave propagation around and inside an underground cavity with high order FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterhazy, Sofi; Schneider, Felix; Schöberl, Joachim; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    The research on purely numerical methods for modeling seismic waves has been more and more intensified over last decades. This development is mainly driven by the fact that on the one hand for subsurface models of interest in exploration and global seismology exact analytic solutions do not exist, but, on the other hand, retrieving full seismic waveforms is important to get insides into spectral characteristics and for the interpretation of seismic phases and amplitudes. Furthermore, the computational potential has dramatically increased in the recent past such that it became worthwhile to perform computations for large-scale problems as those arising in the field of computational seismology. Algorithms based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) are becoming increasingly popular for the propagation of acoustic and elastic waves in geophysical models as they provide more geometrical flexibility in terms of complexity as well as heterogeneity of the materials. In particular, we want to demonstrate the benefit of high-order FEMs as they also provide a better control on the accuracy. Our computations are done with the parallel Finite Element Library NGSOLVE ontop of the automatic 2D/3D mesh generator NETGEN (http://sourceforge.net/projects/ngsolve/). Further we are interested in the generation of synthetic seismograms including direct, refracted and converted waves in correlation to the presence of an underground cavity and the detailed simulation of the comprehensive wave field inside and around such a cavity that would have been created by a nuclear explosion. The motivation of this application comes from the need to find evidence of a nuclear test as they are forbidden by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). With this approach it is possible for us to investigate the wave field over a large bandwidth of wave numbers. This again will help to provide a better understanding on the characteristic signatures of an underground cavity, improve the protocols for

  4. Modeling and experiments with low-frequency pressure wave propagation in liquid-filled, flexible tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelland, C; Bjarnø, Leif

    1992-01-01

    A model for wave propagation in a liquid-filled viscoelastic tube with arrays of receivers inside, is being used to analyze the influence of noise generated by in-line vibrational noise sources. In this model, distensibility is of greater importance than compressibility of the liquid...... relations and frequency-dependent attenuation. A 12-m-long, liquid-filled tube with interior stress members and connectors in each end is hanging vertically from an upper fixture. The lower end connector is excited by a power vibrator to generate the relevant wave modes. Measurements with reference...

  5. Consolidation and dynamics of 3D unsaturated porous seabed under rigid caisson breakwater loaded by hydrostatic pressure and wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE JianHong; JENG DongSheng; CHAN A H C

    2012-01-01

    In this study,based on the dynamic Biot's theory "u-p" approximation,a 3D finite element method (FEM) numerical soil model is developed,in which the Generalized Newmark-β method is adopted to determine the time integration.The developed 3D FEM soil model is a part of the coupled model PORO-WSSI 3D for 3D wave-seabed-marine structures interaction problem,and is validated by the analytical solution proposed by Wang (2000) for a laterally infinite seabed loaded by a uniform force.By adopting the developed 3D soil model,the consolidation of seabed under a caisson breakwater and hydrostatic pressure is investigated.The numerical results show that the caisson breakwater built on seabed has very significant effect on the stresses/displacements fields in the seabed foundation after the transient deformation and primary consolidation are completed.The parametric study indicates that the Young's modulus E of seabed is the most important parameter to affect the settlement of breakwater,and the displacement fields in seabed foundation.Taking the consolidation status as the initial condition,the interaction between ocean wave,caisson breakwater and seabed foundation is briefly investigated.The 3D ocean wave is determined by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with finite volume method (FVM).The numerical results indicate that there is intensive interaction between ocean wave,caisson breakwater and seabed foundation; and the breakwater indeed can effectively block the wave energy propagating to the coastline.

  6. Measurements of blast waves from bursting frangible spheres pressurized with flash-evaporation vapor or liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparaza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Incident overpressure data from frangible spheres pressurized with a flash-evaporating fluid in liquid and vapor form were obtained in laboratory experiments. Glass spheres under higher than ambient internal pressure of Freon-12 were purposely burst to obtain time histories of overpressure. Nondimensional peak pressures, arrival and duration times, and impulses are presented, and whenever possible plotted and compared with compiled data for Pentolite high-explosive. The data are generally quite repeatable and show differences from blast data produced by condensed high-explosives.

  7. Frequency based approach for simulating pressure waves at the inlet of internal combustion engines using a parameterized model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Transfer function technique for engine intake wave action simulation. ► Frequency domain characterization of dynamic pressure using shock tube experiments. ► Simulink and GT-Power coupling using transfer function methodology. ► Parameterized analytical model depending on tube geometry for dynamic pressure. ► Intake pressure simulation. - Abstract: Today’s downsized turbocharged engines mainly focus on improving low end torque and increasing mass flow rate, this is done in order to improve the overall thermodynamic efficiency of the engine and to gain a lower BSFC. An integral part of any combustion engine is the air intake line that has a first order effect on engine filling and emptying. The wave action that takes place is usually simulated using one-dimensional codes. This paper presents a novel technique based on a frequency domain characterization of the intake line. A link over a wide frequency spectrum is identified between the instantaneous mass flow at the valve and the dynamic pressure response. This model is implemented into Simulink via a transfer function and coupled to GT-Power to produce an engine simulation. A shock tube experimental campaign was conducted for a number of tubes with varying lengths and diameters. The parameters of this transfer function are measured for each case then combined with gas dynamic theory and a frequency analysis to identify a law of behavior as a function of pipe geometry. The final model is validated on a single cylinder engine in GT-Power for a variety of pipe geometry

  8. Experimental Study and Numerical Modeling of Wave Induced Pore Pressure Attenuation Inside a Rubble Mound Breakwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troch, Peter; Rouck, Julien De; Burcharth, Hans Falk

    2003-01-01

    attenuation is studied using experimental data (in Section 2) and using a numerical wave flume (in Section 3). The experimental study includes the analysis of large scale data from a physical breakwater model and prototype data from the Zeebrugge breakwater. The large scale data are taken from literature...

  9. The Importance of Pressure Sampling Frequency in Models for Determination of Critical Wave Loadingson Monolithic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Meinert, Palle

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence of wave load sampling frequency on calculated sliding distance in an overall stability analysis of a monolithic caisson. It is demonstrated by a specific example of caisson design that for this kind of analyses the sampling frequency in a small scale model could...

  10. The analysis of ultrasonic examination wave for pressure-retraining studs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the mechanism and characteristics of echo signals produced from various false defects in ultrasonic examination of the pressure-retaining studs and the distinction of false defect signals

  11. Pressure-induced forces and shear stresses on rubble mound breakwater armour layers in regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    measurements in the core material: (1) core material with an idealized armour layer made out of spherical objects that also allowed for detailed velocity measurements between and above the armour, and (2) core material with real rock armour stones. The same core material was applied through the entire......This paper presents the results from an experimental investigation of the pressure-induced forces in the core material below the main armour layer and shear stresses on the armour layer for a porous breakwater structure. Two parallel experiments were performed which both involved pore pressure...... pressure gradients were found which exerted a lift force up to ≈60% of the submerged weight of the core material. These maximum outward directed pressure gradients were linked to the maximum run-down event and were in general situated at, or slightly below, the maximum run-down level. Detailed velocity...

  12. Model of a surface-wave discharge at atmospheric pressure with a fixed profile of the gas temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikovski, M.; Kiss'ovski, Zh; Tatarova, E.

    2016-03-01

    We present a 3D model of a surface-wave-sustained discharge at 2.45 GHz at atmospheric pressure. A small plasma source creates a plasma column in a dielectric tube and a plasma torch is observed above the top. The plasma parameters and the axial profile of the gas temperature are significantly changed in the presence of the substrate above the plasma torch. The Boltzmann equation for electrons under the local approximation is solved, together with the heavy particle balance equations at a fixed axial profile of the gas temperature. The model of this finite length plasma column includes also the dispersion relation of azimuthally-symmetric surface waves. A detailed collisional-radiative model is also implemented for argon discharge at atmospheric pressure, which includes 21 rate balance equations for excited Ar atoms [(Ar(1s5-1s2), Ar(2p10-2p1), Ar(2s3d), Ar(3p)], for positive Ar+ and Ar2 + ions and for excited molecules. The changes in the EEDF shape and the mean electron energy along the plasma column are investigated and the axial structures of the discharge and plasma parameters are obtained.

  13. Influence of field emission on the propagation of cylindrical fast ionization wave in atmospheric-pressure nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of field emission of electrons from surfaces on the fast ionization wave (FIW) propagation in high-voltage nanosecond pulse discharge in the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. A strong influence of field emission on the FIW dynamics and plasma parameters is obtained. Namely, the accounting for the field emission makes possible the bridging of the cathode-anode gap by rather dense plasma (˜1013 cm-3) in less than 1 ns. This is explained by the generation of runaway electrons from the field emitted electrons. These electrons are able to cross the entire gap pre-ionizing it and promoting the ionization wave propagation. We have found that the propagation of runaway electrons through the gap cannot be accompanied by the streamer propagation, because the runaway electrons align the plasma density gradients. In addition, we have obtained that the field enhancement factor allows controlling the speed of ionization wave propagation.

  14. Black Tea Lowers Blood Pressure and Wave Reflections in Fasted and Postprandial Conditions in Hypertensive Patients: A Randomised Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Grassi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period. Digital volume pulse and BP were measured before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after tea consumption. Measurements were performed in a fasted state and after a fat load. Compared to placebo, reflection index and stiffness index decreased after tea consumption (p < 0.0001. Fat challenge increased wave reflection, which was counteracted by tea consumption (p < 0.0001. Black tea decreased systolic and diastolic BP (−3.2 mmHg, p < 0.005 and −2.6 mmHg, p < 0.0001; respectively and prevented BP increase after a fat load (p < 0.0001. Black tea consumption lowers wave reflections and BP in the fasting state, and during the challenging haemodynamic conditions after a fat load in hypertensives. Considering lipemia-induced impairment of arterial function may occur frequently during the day, our findings suggest regular consumption of black tea may be relevant for cardiovascular protection.

  15. Unusual properties of high-compliance porosity extracted from measurements of pressure-dependent wave velocities in rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.; Radostin, Andrey V.; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady

    2016-04-01

    Conventionally the interpretation of wave velocities and their variations under load is conducted assuming that closable cracks have simple planar shapes, like the popular model of penny-shape cracks. For such cracks, the proportion between complementary variations in different elastic parameters of rocks (such as S- and P-wave velocities) is strictly pre-determined, in particular, it is independent of the crack aspect ratio and rather weakly dependent on the Poisson's ratio of the intact rock. Real rocks, however, contain multitude of cracks of different geometry. Faces of such cracks can exhibit complex modes of interaction when closed by external load, which may result in very different ratios between normal- and shear compliances of such defects. In order to describe the reduction of different elastic moduli, we propose a model in which the compliances of crack-like defects are explicitly decoupled and are not predetermined, so that the ratio q between total normal- and shear- compliances imparted to the rock mass (as well as individual values of these compliances) can be estimated from experimental data on reduction of different elastic moduli (e.g., pressure dependences of P- and S-wave velocities). Physically, the so-extracted ratio q can be interpreted as intrinsic property of individual crack-like defects similar to each other, or as a characteristic of proportion between concentrations of pure normal cracks with very large q and pure shear cracks with q→0. The latter case can correspond, e.g., to saturated cracks in which weakly-compressible liquid prevents crack closing under normal loading. It can be shown that for conventional dry planar cracks, the compliance ratio is q ˜2. The developed model applied to the data on wave-velocity variations with external pressure indicates that elastic properties of the real crack-like defects in rocks can differ considerably from the usually assumed ones. Comparison with experimental data on variations P- and S-wave

  16. Experimental and numerical characterization of the sound pressure in standing wave acoustic levitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stindt, A.; Andrade, M. A. B.; Albrecht, M.; Adamowski, J. C.; Panne, U.; Riedel, J.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for predictions of the sound pressure distribution in acoustic levitators is based on a matrix representation of the Rayleigh integral. This method allows for a fast calculation of the acoustic field within the resonator. To make sure that the underlying assumptions and simplifications are justified, this approach was tested by a direct comparison to experimental data. The experimental sound pressure distributions were recorded by high spatially resolved frequency selective microphone scanning. To emphasize the general applicability of the two approaches, the comparative studies were conducted for four different resonator geometries. In all cases, the results show an excellent agreement, demonstrating the accuracy of the matrix method.

  17. Experimental studies of electrical conductivities and P-wave velocities of gabbro at high pressures and high temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Liping(白利平); DU; Jianguo(杜建国); LIU; Wei(刘巍); ZHOU; Wenge(周文戈)

    2003-01-01

    The P-wave velocities and electrical conductivities of gabbro were measured using ultrasonic transmission method and impedance spectroscopy from room temperature to 1100℃ at 1-2 GPa, and the factors controlling the P-wave velocity and the microscopic conductance mechanisms of the rock were analyzed. The experimental results show that the P-wave velocities of gabbro drop abruptly at temperatures of 800-850℃ and under pressures of 1-2 GPa due to the occurrence of grain boundary phases and dehydration melting; however, the electrical conductivities and electronic conduction mechanisms have not changed obviously at temperatures of 800-850℃. At temperatures Below 680℃, only one impedance arc (I) corresponding to grain interior conduction occurs at frequencies between 12 Hz and 105 Hz, the second arc (II) corresponding to grain boundary conduction occurs at temperatures above 680℃. The total conductivity of this rock is dominated by the grain interior conductivity as the occurrence of grain boundary conduction has a small effect on the total conductivity. The laboratory-measured velocities are consistent with the average P-wave velocity observations of lower crust and upper mantle. The conductivity values correspond well with the gabbroite composition of the lower crust and upper mantle; however, they are about 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than MT data from the high conductive layers. The experiments confirm that the dehydration of hydrous minerals can induce the partial melting, and the low seismic velocity zones might be correlated with the high conductive layers if partial melting occurs.

  18. Characteristics of pressure wave in common rail fuel injection system of high-speed direct injection diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Herfatmanesh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The latest generation of high-pressure common rail equipment now provides diesel engines possibility to apply as many as eight separate injection pulses within the engine cycle for reducing emissions and for smoothing combustion. With these complicated injection arrangements, optimizations of operating parameters for various driving conditions are considerably difficult, particularly when integrating fuel injection parameters with other operating parameters such as exhaust gas recirculation rate and boost pressure together for evaluating calibration results. Understanding the detailed effects of fuel injection parameters upon combustion characteristics and emission formation is therefore particularly critical. In this article, the results and discussion of experimental investigations on a high-speed direct injection light-duty diesel engine test bed are presented for evaluating and analyzing the effects of main adjustable parameters of the fuel injection system on all regulated emission gases and torque performance. Main injection timing, rail pressure, pilot amount, and particularly pilot timing have been examined. The results show that optimization of each of those adjustable parameters is beneficial for emission reduction and torque improvement under different operating conditions. By exploring the variation in the interval between the pilot injection and the main injection, it is found that the pressure wave in the common rail has a significant influence on the subsequent injection. This suggests that special attentions must be paid for adjusting pilot timing or any injection interval when multi-injection is used. With analyzing the fuel amount oscillation of the subsequent injections to pilot separation, it demonstrates that the frequency of regular oscillations of the actual fuel amount or the injection pulse width with the variation in pilot separation is always the same for a specified fuel injection system, regardless of engine speed

  19. One-dimensional model for propagation of a pressure wave in a model of the human arterial network: comparison of theoretical and experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masashi; Ikenaga, Yuki; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Asada, Takaaki; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2011-12-01

    Pulse wave evaluation is an effective method for arteriosclerosis screening. In a previous study, we verified that pulse waveforms change markedly due to arterial stiffness. However, a pulse wave consists of two components, the incident wave and multireflected waves. Clarification of the complicated propagation of these waves is necessary to gain an understanding of the nature of pulse waves in vivo. In this study, we built a one-dimensional theoretical model of a pressure wave propagating in a flexible tube. To evaluate the applicability of the model, we compared theoretical estimations with measured data obtained from basic tube models and a simple arterial model. We constructed different viscoelastic tube set-ups: two straight tubes; one tube connected to two tubes of different elasticity; a single bifurcation tube; and a simple arterial network with four bifurcations. Soft polyurethane tubes were used and the configuration was based on a realistic human arterial network. The tensile modulus of the material was similar to the elasticity of arteries. A pulsatile flow with ejection time 0.3 s was applied using a controlled pump. Inner pressure waves and flow velocity were then measured using a pressure sensor and an ultrasonic diagnostic system. We formulated a 1D model derived from the Navier-Stokes equations and a continuity equation to characterize pressure propagation in flexible tubes. The theoretical model includes nonlinearity and attenuation terms due to the tube wall, and flow viscosity derived from a steady Hagen-Poiseuille profile. Under the same configuration as for experiments, the governing equations were computed using the MacCormack scheme. The theoretical pressure waves for each case showed a good fit to the experimental waves. The square sum of residuals (difference between theoretical and experimental wave-forms) for each case was <10.0%. A possible explanation for the increase in the square sum of residuals is the approximation error for flow

  20. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  1. Effects of density profile and multi-species target on laser-heated thermal-pressure-driven shock wave acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shock wave acceleration of ions driven by laser-heated thermal pressure is studied through one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and analysis. The generation of high-energy mono-energetic protons in recent experiments (D. Haberberger et al., 2012 Nat. Phys. 8 95) is attributed to the use of exponentially decaying density profile of the plasma target. It does not only keep the shock velocity stable but also suppresses the normal target normal sheath acceleration. The effects of target composition are also examined, where a similar collective velocity of all ion species is demonstrated. The results also give some reference to future experiments of producing energetic heavy ions. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  2. Atmospheric pressure ionization waves propagating through a flexible high aspect ratio capillary channel and impinging upon a target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure ionization waves (IWs) propagating in flexible capillary tubes are a unique way of transporting a plasma and its active species to remote sites for applications such as biomedical procedures, particularly in endoscopic procedures. The propagation mechanisms for such IWs in tubes having aspect ratios of hundreds to thousands are not clear. In this paper, results are discussed from a numerical investigation of the fundamental properties of ionization waves generated by nanosecond voltage pulses inside a 15 cm long, 600 µm wide (aspect ratio 250), flexible dielectric channel. The channel, filled with a Ne/Xe = 99.9/0.1 gas mixture at 1 atm, empties into a small chamber separated from a target substrate by 1 cm. The IWs propagate through the entire length of the channel while maintaining similar strength and magnitude. Upon exiting the channel into the chamber, the IW induces a second streamer discharge at the channel–chamber junction. This streamer then propagates across the chamber and impinges upon the target. The average speeds of the capillary-bounded IW are about 5 × 107 cm s−1 and 1 × 108 cm s−1 for positive and negative polarities, respectively. The propagation speed is sensitive to the curvature of the channel. In both cases, the peak in ionization tends to be located along the channel walls and alternates from side-to-side depending on the direction of the local instantaneous electric field and curvature of the channel. The ionization region following the IW extends up to several centimeters inside the channel, as opposed to being highly localized at the ionization front in unconstrained, atmospheric pressure IWs. The maximum speed of the IW in the chamber is about twice that in the channel. (paper)

  3. The product of resting heart rate times blood pressure is associated with high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anxin Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential associations between resting heart rate, blood pressure and the product of both, and the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV as a maker of arterial stiffness. METHODS: The community-based "Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities in Community (APAC Study" examined asymptomatic polyvascular abnormalities in a general Chinese population and included participants with an age of 40+ years without history of stroke and coronary heart disease. Arterial stiffness was defined as baPWV≥1400 cm/s. We measured and calculated the product of resting heart rate and systolic blood pressure (RHR-SBP and the product of resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure (RHR-MAP. RESULTS: The study included 5153 participants with a mean age of 55.1 ± 11.8 years. Mean baPWV was 1586 ± 400 cm/s. Significant (P<0.0001 linear relationships were found between higher baPWV and higher resting heart rate or higher arterial blood pressure, with the highest baPWV observed in individuals from the highest quartiles of resting heart rate and blood pressure. After adjusting for confounding parameters such as age, sex, educational level, body mass index, fasting blood concentrations of glucose, blood lipids and high-sensitive C-reactive protein, smoking status and alcohol consumption, prevalence of arterial stiffness increased significantly (P<0.0001 with increasing RHR-SBP quartile (Odds Ratio (OR: 2.72;95%Confidence interval (CI:1.46,5.08 and increasing RHR-MAP (OR:2.10;95%CI:1.18,3.72. Similar results were obtained in multivariate linear regression analyses with baPWV as continuous variable. CONCLUSIONS: Higher baPWV as a marker of arterial stiffness was associated with a higher product of RHR-SBP and RHR-MAP in multivariate analysis. In addition to other vascular risk factors, higher resting heart rate in combination with higher blood pressure are risk factors for arterial stiffness.

  4. Black tea lowers blood pressure and wave reflections in fasted and postprandial conditions in hypertensive patients: a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Davide; Draijer, Richard; Desideri, Giovambattista; Mulder, Theo; Ferri, Claudio

    2015-02-04

    Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP) and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids) or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period). Digital volume pulse and BP were measured before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after tea consumption. Measurements were performed in a fasted state and after a fat load. Compared to placebo, reflection index and stiffness index decreased after tea consumption (ptea consumption (pBlack tea decreased systolic and diastolic BP (-3.2 mmHg, pBlack tea consumption lowers wave reflections and BP in the fasting state, and during the challenging haemodynamic conditions after a fat load in hypertensives. Considering lipemia-induced impairment of arterial function may occur frequently during the day, our findings suggest regular consumption of black tea may be relevant for cardiovascular protection.

  5. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Lewis J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  6. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2015-09-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  7. Experimental study of pressure and heating rate on a swept cylindrical leading edge resulting from swept shock wave interference. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cylindrical leading edge sweep on surface pressure and heat transfer rate for swept shock wave interference were investigated. Experimental tests were conducted in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 8, nominal unit Reynolds number of 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power per foot, leading edge and incident shock generator sweep angles of 0, 15, and 30 deg, and incident shock generator angle-of-attack fixed at 12.5 deg. Detailed surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylindircal leading edge of a swept shock wave interference model were measured at the region of the maximum surface pressure and heat transfer rate. Results show that pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylindrical leading edge of the shock wave interference model were reduced as the sweep was increased over the range of tested parameters. Peak surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylinder were about 10 and 30 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point value, respectively, for the 0 deg sweep test. A comparison of the 15 and 30 deg swept results with the 0 deg swept results showed that peak pressure was reduced about 13 percent and 44 percent, respectively, and peak heat transfer rate was reduced about 7 percent and 27 percent, respectively.

  8. EMS wave logger data processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Waves can be measured in several ways. One way of measuring waves is by measuring the wave pressure at a certain depth using a pressure sensor and calculate the wave information from the pressure record. The EMS wave logger uses a Honeywell MLH 050 PGP 06A pressure sensor. The information is stored

  9. Estimation of beat-to-beat changes in stroke volume from arterial pressure: A comparison of two pressure wave analysis techniques during head- up tilt testing in young, healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, W.T.; Imholz, B.P.M.; Oosting, H.; Wesseling, K.H.; Lieshout, J.J. van

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare beat-to-beat changes in stroke volume (SV) estimated by two different pressure wave analysis techniques during orthostatic stress testing: pulse contour analysis and Modelflow, ie, simulation of a three-element model of aortic input impedance. Methods:

  10. Developing a platform for high-resolution phase contrast imaging of high pressure shock waves in matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schropp, Andreas; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Arnold, Brice; Galtier, Eric C.; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Hastings, Jerome B.; Schroer, Christian G.

    2012-10-01

    Current and upcoming X-ray sources, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC, USA), the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser (SACLA, Japan), or the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL, Germany) will provide X-ray beams with outstanding properties.1, 2 Short and intense X-ray pulses of about 50 fs time duration and even shorter will push X-ray science to new frontiers such as, e. g., in high-resolution X-ray imaging, high-energy-density physics or in dynamical studies based on pump-probe techniques. Fast processes in matter often require high-resolution imaging capabilities either by magnified imaging in direct space or diffractive imaging in reciprocal space. In both cases highest resolutions require focusing the X-ray beam.3, 4 In order to further develop high-resolution imaging at free-electron laser sources we are planning a platform to carry out high-resolution phase contrast imaging experiments based on Beryllium compound refractive X-ray lenses (Be-CRLs) at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the LCLS. The instrument provides all necessary equipment to induce high pressure shock waves by optical lasers. The propagation of a shock wave is then monitored with an X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) pulse by magnified phase contrast imaging. With the CRL optics, X-ray beam sizes in the sub-100nm range are expected, leading to a similar spatial resolution in the direct coherent projection image. The experiment combines different state-of-the art scientific techniques that are currently available at the LCLS. In this proceedings paper we describe the technical developments carried out at the LCLS in order to implement magnified X-ray phase contrast imaging at the MEC endstation.

  11. 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves in a biotite gneiss, measured in oil as the pressure medium: Comparison with velocity measurements in a multi-anvil pressure apparatus and with texture-based calculated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokajíček, T.; Kern, H.; Svitek, T.; Ivankina, T.

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic measurements of the 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves were performed on a spherical sample of a biotite gneiss from the Outokumpu scientific drill hole. Measurements were done at room temperature and pressures up to 400 and 70 MPa, respectively, in a pressure vessel with oil as a pressure medium. A modified transducer/sample assembly and the installation of a new mechanical system allowed simultaneous measurements of P- and S-wave velocities in 132 independent directions of the sphere on a net in steps of 15°. Proper signals for P- and S-waves could be recorded by coating the sample surface with a high-viscosity shear wave gel and by temporal point contacting of the transmitter and receiver transducers with the sample surface during the measurements. The 3D seismic measurements revealed a strong foliation-related directional dependence (anisotropy) of P- and S-wave velocities, which is confirmed by measurements in a multi-anvil apparatus on a cube-shaped specimen of the same rock. Both experimental approaches show a marked pressure sensitivity of P- and S-wave velocities and velocity anisotropies. With increasing pressure, P- and S-wave velocities increase non-linearly due to progressive closure of micro-cracks. The reverse is true for velocity anisotropy. 3D velocity calculations based on neutron diffraction measurements of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of major minerals show that the intrinsic bulk anisotropy is basically caused by the CPO of biotite constituting about 23 vol.% of the rock. Including the shape of biotite grains and oriented low-aspect ratio microcracks into the modelling increases bulk anisotropy. An important finding from this study is that the measurements on the sample sphere and on the sample cube displayed distinct differences, particularly in shear wave velocities. It is assumed that the differences are due to the different geometries of the samples and the configuration of the transducer-sample assembly

  12. Simulation of pressure waves in the coolant loop of PWR type reactors with a network of one-dimensional flow channels, taking the structural flexibility into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DAPSY code is explained to be a universal tool for simulating and describing dynamic load effects on pipings, internals and components, and valves in the coolant loop. Excitation of pressure waves primarily is due to pipe rupture which leads to rapid pressure reduction. This is why the code very carefully calculates critical blowdown rates also for the case of only partial rupture with reduced outflow, as thus the course of disturbance is described that affects the system. A network method is presented for calculation of multidimensional geometries. As the pressure wave phenomena are observed in a low-compressibility fluid and in a system with sometimes very flexible structural components, the fluid-structure interactions are taken into account. The model presented allows to consider either quasi-static structural behaviour, or dynamic interaction of fluid and structure, depending on the configuration characteristics. (orig./HP)

  13. Unified Application of Vapor Screen Flow Visualization and Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurement Techniques to Vortex- and Shock Wave-Dominated Flow Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization and pressure sensitive paint (PSP) techniques were applied in a unified approach to wind tunnel testing of slender wing and missile configurations dominated by vortex flows and shock waves at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds. The off-surface cross-flow patterns using the LVS technique were combined with global PSP surface static pressure mappings to characterize the leading-edge vortices and shock waves that coexist and interact at high angles of attack. The synthesis of LVS and PSP techniques was also effective in identifying the significant effects of passive surface porosity and the presence of vertical tail surfaces on the flow topologies. An overview is given of LVS and PSP applications in selected experiments on small-scale models of generic slender wing and missile configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) and 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-Foot TPT).

  14. Unified Application Vapor Screen Flow Visualization and Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurement Techniques to Vortex- and Shock Wave-Dominated Flow Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2008-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization and pressure sensitive paint (PSP) techniques were applied in a unified approach to wind tunnel testing of slender wing and missile configurations dominated by vortex flows and shock waves at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds. The off-surface cross-flow patterns using the LVS technique were combined with global PSP surface static pressure mappings to characterize the leading-edge vortices and shock waves that coexist and interact at high angles of attack (alpha). The synthesis of LVS and PSP techniques was also effective in identifying the significant effects of passive surface porosity and the presence of vertical tail surfaces on the flow topologies. An overview is given of LVS and PSP applications in selected experiments on small-scale models of generic slender wing and missile configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) and 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-Foot TPT).

  15. Small gas bubble experiment for mitigation of cavitation damage and pressure waves in short-pulse mercury spallation targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center–Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE–WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated small bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 μm in radius with achieved gas volume fractions in the 10−5–10−4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was pitting damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was to one-third that of stagnant mercury. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three Laser Doppler Vibrometers (LDV), test loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones

  16. Dependence of P-wave dispersion on mean arterial pressure as an independent hemodynamic variable in school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elibet Chávez González

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The relationship between diastolic dysfunction and P-wave dispersion (PWD in the electrocardiogram has been studied for some time. In this regard, echocardiography is emerging as a diagnostic tool to improve risk stratification for mild hypertension.Objective:To determine the dependence of PWD on the electrocardiogram and on echocardiographic variables in a pediatric population.Methods: Five hundred and fifteen children from three elementary schools were studiedfrom a total of 565 children. Those whose parents did not want them to take part in the study, as well as those with known congenital diseases, were excluded. Tests including 12-lead surface ECGs and 4 blood pressure (BP measurements were performed. Maximum and minimum P-values were measured, and the PWD on the electrocardiogram was calculated. Echocardiography for structural measurements and the pulsed Doppler of mitral flow were also performed.Results: A significant correlation in statistical variables was found between PWD and mean BP for pre-hypertensive and hypertensive children, i.e., r= 0.32, p <0.01 and r= 0.33, p <0.01, respectively. There was a significant correlation found between PWD and the left atrial area (r= 0.45 and p <0.01.Conclusions: We highlight the dependency between PWD, the electrocardiogram and  mean  blood pressure. We also draw attention to the dependence of PWD on the left atrial area.  This result provides an explanation for earlier changes in atrial electrophysiological and hemodynamic characteristics in pediatric patients.

  17. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Sangrey, Robert L [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL; Shea, Thomas J [ORNL; Hasegawa, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Kogawa, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Naoe, Dr. Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Farny, Dr. Caleb H. [Boston University; Kaminsky, Andrew L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  18. The Generation of Gravity-Capillary Solitary Waves by a Pressure Source Moving at a Trans-critical Speed

    CERN Document Server

    Masnadi, Naeem

    2016-01-01

    The unsteady response of a water free surface to a localized pressure source moving at constant speed $U$ in the range $0.95c_\\mathrm{min} \\lesssim U \\leq 1.02 c_\\mathrm{min}$, where $c_\\mathrm{min}$ is the minimum phase speed of linear gravity-capillary waves in deep water, is investigated through experiments and numerical simulations. This unsteady response state, which consists of a V-shaped pattern behind the source and features periodic shedding of pairs of depressions from the tips of the V, was first observed qualitatively by Diorio et al. (Phys. Rev. Let., 103, 214502, 2009) and called state III. In the present investigation, cinematic shadowgraph and refraction-based techniques are utilized to measure the temporal evolution of the free surface deformation pattern downstream of the source as it moves along a towing tank, while numerical simulations using the model equation proposed by Cho et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 672, 288-306, 2011) are used to extend the experimental results over longer times than are...

  19. Simulation of the pressure field beneath a turbulent boundary layer using realizations of uncorrelated wall plane waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxit, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the modeling of a vibrating structure excited by a turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Although the wall pressure field (WPF) of the TBL constitutes a random excitation, the element-based methods generally used for describing complex mechanical structures consider deterministic loads. The response of such structures to a random excitation like TBL is generally deduced from calculations of numerous Frequency Response Functions. Consequently, the process is computationally expansive. To tackle this issue, an efficient process is proposed for generating realizations of the WPF corresponding to the TBL. This process is based on a formulation of the problem in the wavenumber space and the interpretation of the WPF as uncorrelated wall plane waves. Once the WPF has been synthesized, the local vibroacoustic responses are calculated for the different realizations and averaged together in the last step. A numerical application of this process to a plate located beneath a TBL is used to verify its efficiency and ability to reproduce the partial space correlation of the excitation. To further illustrate the proposed method, a stiffened panel modeled using the finite element method is finally examined. PMID:27586754

  20. Method of optical self-mixing for pulse wave transit time in comparison with other methods and correlation with blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigas, Kalju; Lass, Jaanus; Kattai, Rain; Karai, Deniss; Kaik, Juri

    2004-07-01

    This paper is a part of research to develop convenient method for continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure by non-invasive and non-oscillometric way. A simple optical method, using self-mixing in a diode laser, is used for detection of skin surface vibrations near the artery. These vibrations, which can reveal the pulsate propagation of blood pressure waves along the vasculature, are used for pulse wave registration. The registration of the Pulse Wave Transit Time (PWTT) is based on computing the time delay in different regions of the human body using an ECG as a reference signal. In this study, the comparison of method of optical self-mixing with other methods as photoplethysmographic (PPG) and bioimpedance (BI) for PWTT is done. Also correlation of PWTT, obtained with different methods, with arterial blood pressure is calculated. In our study, we used a group of volunteers (34 persons) who made the bicycle exercise test. The test consisted of cycling sessions of increasing workloads during which the HR changed from 60 to 180 beats per minute. In addition, a blood pressure (NIBP) was registered with standard sphygmomanometer once per minute during the test and all NIBP measurement values were synchronized to other signals to find exact time moments where the systolic blood pressure was detected (Korotkoff sounds starting point). Computer later interpolated the blood pressure signal in order to get individual value for every heart cycle. The other signals were measured continuously during all tests. At the end of every session, a recovery period was included until person's NIBP and heart rate (HR) normalized. As a result of our study it turned out that time intervals that were calculated from plethysmographic (PPG) waveforms were in the best correlation with systolic blood pressure. The diastolic pressure does not correlate with any of the parameters representing PWTT. The pulse wave signals measured by laser and piezoelectric transducer are very similar

  1. Ultrasonic P and S wave Velocity Measurements at Mid-to-Lower Crustal Conditions of Pressure and Temperature in a Piston Cylinder Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, M.; Arima, M.

    2007-12-01

    In order to interpret seismic structures in terms of rock type, temperature anomaly, degree of partial melting and distribution of fluids, we have carried out research on the elastic properties of the crustal rocks using ultrasonic measurements. We have developed techniques to perform ultrasonic velocity measurements at mid-to-lower crustal conditions of pressure and temperature. These techniques are now been applied to study the rock physics of exposed deep crustal sections and crustal xenoliths, including gabbro, tonalite, granite, anorthosite, granulite and amphibolite, which were collected from the Tanzawa Mountain of central Japan, Kohistan area of Pakistan, Ichinomegata of NE Japan, Takashima and Kurose of SW Japan, and granulite-facies complex of East Antarctica. Compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocities for these rock specimens are measured in piston cylinder apparatus. In order to compare directly to seismic velocities at the deep island arc pressures and temperatures, we developed ultrasonic velocity measurements using buffer rod technique. Pt buffer rod is used to isolate the piezoelectric transducer from the high-temperature condition. Travel times through the rock sample were determined with the pulse reflection technique. We are developing a method for simultaneous P-wave and S-wave velocity measurements using dual-mode piezoelectric transducer which generates P-waves and S-waves simultaneously. Using these techniques, we can determine Vp/Vs ratio and Poisson's ratio precisely.

  2. Effect of porosity on shock wave propagation in the low shock pressure range using mesoscale modelling in comparison to laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güldemeister, N.; Kowitz, A.; Wünnemann, K.; Reimold, W. U.; Schmitt, R. T.

    2012-09-01

    Porosity plays an important role in impact crater formation and shock wave propagation. Where present, it causes fast attenuation of shock pressure. In the framework of the "MEMIN" (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact crater research Network) project, the effect of porosity in dry and water-saturated sandstone on shock wave loading is investigated [1]. We are focusing on shock recovery experiments that have been carried out within one sub-project of MEMIN. The experiments are subject to investigate shock effects in experimentally shocked quartz at low shock pressure (5 - 12.5 GPa) where diagnostic shock features and calibration data are lacking at the moment. The influence of porosity on progressive shock metamorphism is investigated. The laboratory impact experiments were accompanied by meso-scale numerical modeling in order to quantify processes beyond the optical and electron optical observational capabilities. The model enables a detailed description and quantification of thermo-dynamic parameters during single pore collapse.

  3. High Pressure-Differential Thermal Analysis and Ultrasonic Wave Amplitude Analysis of Ice-Water Equilibrium at 1.5-5.0GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Water is the most active component in all geological systems.It has an important effect on the physical properties of minerals and melts.It also plays a key role in the evolution of the Earth.Accurate thermodynamics data on water are currently confined to pressures below 1.0GPa and temperatures below 900℃.Presented in this paper are new data available on the P-T properties of water at pressures up to 5.0GPa,develoged from differential thermal analysis and ultrasonic wave amplitude analysis.It has been found that there may exist another ternary point at 3.0GPa and that ultrasonic wave amplitude change of ice-water transition shows two inflection points above 2.0GPa, consistent with the two peaks of differential thermal curves above 2.0GPa .It may be a new phenomenon which needs further study.

  4. On the Analytical Approach to Present Engineering Problems: Photovoltaic Systems Behavior, Wind Speed Sensors Performance, and High-Speed Train Pressure Wave Effects in Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pindado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, engineering problems required quite a sophisticated calculation means. However, analytical models still can prove to be a useful tool for engineers and scientists when dealing with complex physical phenomena. The mathematical models developed to analyze three different engineering problems: photovoltaic devices analysis; cup anemometer performance; and high-speed train pressure wave effects in tunnels are described. In all cases, the results are quite accurate when compared to testing measurements.

  5. Shock wave negative pressure characteristics of underwater plasma sound source%水下等离子体声源的冲击波负压特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小龙; 黄建国; 雷开卓

    2013-01-01

    The propagation process of intense acoustic shock wave, generated by the discharge of underwater plasma sound source, is analyzed based on a modified Rayleigh model. The bunching sound field model of underwater plasma sound source is established by using the Euler equation as the control equations. The formation mechanism of the shock wave negative pressure is analyzed theoretically and intuitively through the sound field charts obtained by simulation. The results demonstrate that the water around the bunching wave will be stretched and form a zone of negative pressure with the combination of the rarefaction wave and the inertia of water. It will make the water form a discontinuous phenomenon if the stretching force is greater than the ultimate tensile strength of the water, the phenomenon of cavitation bubble will appear at this time. Besides that, negative pressure will be aggravated by the diffracted wave generated at the edge of the energy-gathered reflector, and the shock wave negative pressure will reach a maximum value by the superimposition of the edge diffraction wave and the stretch wave. The reasons for the formation of the shock wave negative pressure is testified and revealed further by comparing the waveforms of simulation and experiment. The study results provide a theoretical guide for understanding the propagation law of underwater shock wave and further improving the design of the underwater plasma sound source.%基于修正的Rayleigh气泡脉动方程对水下等离子体声源放电产生的强声冲击波的传播过程进行了分析;利用Euler方程作为控制方程组,建立了水下等离子体声源的聚束声场模型,通过仿真计算获得的传播云图对冲击波负压的形成机理进行了直观的理论分析。结果表明:经过聚能反射罩反射汇聚得到的聚束波在反射稀疏波和水的惯性作用下,聚束波周围水域产生了拉伸,形成负压区,如果拉伸力大于水的抗拉上限,

  6. l-Citrulline supplementation attenuates blood pressure, wave reflection and arterial stiffness responses to metaboreflex and cold stress in overweight men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Arturo; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Jaime, Salvador J; Kalfon, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Combined isometric exercise or metaboreflex activation (post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI)) and cold pressor test (CPT) increase cardiac afterload, which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events. l-Citrulline supplementation (l-CIT) reduces systemic arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV)) at rest and aortic haemodynamic responses to CPT. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of l-CIT on aortic haemodynamic and baPWV responses to PEMI+CPT. In all, sixteen healthy, overweight/obese males (age 24 (sem 6) years; BMI 29·3 (sem 4·0) kg/m2) were randomly assigned to placebo or l-CIT (6 g/d) for 14 d in a cross-over design. Brachial and aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), aortic augmented pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx), baPWV, reflection timing (Tr) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated at rest and during isometric handgrip exercise (IHG), PEMI and PEMI+CPT at baseline and after 14 d. No significant effects were evident after l-CIT at rest. l-CIT attenuated the increases in aortic SBP and wave reflection (AP and AIx) during IHG, aortic DBP, MAP and AIx during PEMI, and aortic SBP, DBP, MAP, AP, AIx and baPWV during PEMI+CPT compared with placebo. HR and Tr were unaffected by l-CIT in all conditions. Our findings demonstrate that l-CIT attenuates aortic blood pressure and wave reflection responses to exercise-related metabolites. Moreover, l-CIT attenuates the exaggerated arterial stiffness response to combined metaboreflex activation and cold exposure, suggesting a protective effect against increased cardiac afterload during physical stress. PMID:27160957

  7. Lactotripeptides effect on office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure, blood pressure stress response, pulse wave velocity and cardiac output in patients with high-normal blood pressure or first-degree hypertension: a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Rosticci, Martina; Gerocarni, Beatrice; Bacchelli, Stefano; Veronesi, Maddalena; Strocchi, Enrico; Borghi, Claudio

    2011-09-01

    Contrasting data partially support a certain antihypertensive efficacy of lactotripeptides (LTPs) derived from enzymatic treatment of casein hydrolysate. Our aim was to evaluate this effect on a large number of hemodynamic parameters. We conducted a prospective double-blind randomized clinical trial, which included 52 patients affected by high-normal blood pressure (BP) or first-degree hypertension. We investigated the effect of a 6-week treatment with the LTPs isoleucine-proline-proline and valine-proline-proline at 3 mg per day, assumed to be functional food, on office BP, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) values, stress-induced BP increase and cardiac output-related parameters. In the LTP-treated subjects, we observed a significant reduction in office systolic BP (SBP; -5±8 mm Hg, P=0.013) and a significant improvement in pulse wave velocity (PWV; -0.66±0.81 m s(-1), P=0.001; an instrumental biomarker of vascular rigidity). No effect on 24-h ABPM parameters and BP reaction to stress was observed from treatment with the combined LTPs. LTPs, but not placebo, were associated with a mild but significant change in the stroke volume (SV), SV index (markers of cardiac flow), the acceleration index (ACI) and velocity index (VI) (markers of cardiac contractility). No effect was observed on parameters related to fluid dynamics or vascular resistance. LTPs positively influenced the office SBP, PWV, SV, SV index, ACI and VI in patients with high-normal BP or first-degree hypertension. PMID:21753776

  8. CTD, current meter, pressure gauge, and wave spectra data from fixed platforms and other platforms from the Coastal Waters of California as part of the Santa Barbara Channel project from 27 April 1983 to 04 January 1985 (NODC Accession 8500177)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD, current meter, pressure gauge, and wave spectra data were collected from fixed platforms and other platforms from the Coastal Waters of California from 27...

  9. Pressure gauge and other data from MOANA WAVE in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 March 1976 to 22 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7601926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure gauge and other data were collected from the MOANA WAVE in the Gulf of Alaska from 04 March 1976 to 22 August 1976. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  10. Underway pressure, temperature, and salinity data from the MOANA WAVE from the Pacific warm pool in support of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) from 02 February 1993 to 21 February 1993 (NODC Accession 9600090)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure, temperature, and salinity data were collected while underway from the MOANA WAVE from the Pacific warm pool. Data were collected in support of the Coupled...

  11. An innovative method to measure the peripheral arterial elasticity: spring constant modeling based on the arterial pressure wave with radial vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ching-Chuan

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we propose an innovative method for the direct measurement of the peripheral artery elasticity using a spring constant model, based on the arterial pressure wave equation, vibrating in a radial direction. By means of the boundary condition of the pressure wave equation at the maximum peak, we can derive the spring constant used for evaluating peripheral arterial elasticity. The calculated spring constants of six typical subjects show a coincidence with their proper arterial elasticities. Furthermore, the comparison between the spring constant method and pulse wave velocity (PWV) was investigated in 70 subjects (21-64 years, 47 normotensives and 23 hypertensives). The results reveal a significant negative correlation for the spring constant vs. PWV (correlation coefficient = -0.663, p constant method to assess the arterial elasticity is carefully verified, and it is shown to be effective as well as fast. This method should be useful for healthcare, not only in improving clinical diagnosis of arterial stiffness but also in screening subjects for early evidence of cardio-vascular diseases and in monitoring responses to therapy in the future.

  12. Wave Pressures and Loads on a Small Scale Model of the Svåheia SSG Pilot Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buccino, Mariano; Vicinanza, Diego; Ciardulli, Francesco;

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports on 2D small scale experiments conducted to investigate wave loadings acting on a pilot project of device for the conversion of wave energy into electricity. The conversion concept is based on the overtopping principle and the structure is worldwide known with the acronym SSG...... interval. It is also shown that two calculation methods widely employed in the Japanese design practice of vertical face breakwaters, could be used to achieve safe estimates of the hydrodynamic loadings....

  13. On the response of a water surface to a surface pressure source moving at trans-critical gravity-capillary wave speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnadi, Naeem; Cho, Yeunwoo; Duncan, James H.; Akylas, Triantaphyllos

    2015-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water free surface to a pressure source moving at speeds near the minimum speed of linear gravity-capillary waves (Cmin ~ 23 cm/s) is investigated with experiments and theory. In the experiments, waves are generated by a vertically oriented air-jet that moves at a constant speed over the water surface in a long tank. The 3-D surface shape behind the air-jet is measured using a cinematic refraction-based technique combined with an LIF technique. At towing speeds just below Cmin, an unsteady pattern is formed where localized depressions periodically appear in pairs and move away from the source along the arms of a downstream V-shaped pattern. This behavior is analogous to the periodic shedding of solitary waves upstream of a source moving at the maximum wave speed in shallow water. The gravity-capillary depressions are rapidly damped by viscosity and their speed-amplitude characteristics closely match those from inviscid calculations of gravity-capillary lumps. The shedding frequency of the lumps in the present experiments increases with both increasing towing speed and air-flow rate. Predictions of this behavior using a model equation that incorporates damping and a quadratic nonlinearity are in good agreement with the experiments. The partial support of the National Science Foundation under grant OCE0751853 is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Utility of continuous wave Doppler echocardiography in the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular outflow tract pressure gradient in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panza, J A; Petrone, R K; Fananapazir, L; Maron, B J

    1992-01-01

    Subaortic obstruction is an important determinant of the clinical presentation of and therapeutic approach to patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Therefore, assessment of the presence and magnitude of the intraventricular pressure gradient is paramount in the clinical evaluation of these patients. To establish the utility of continuous wave Doppler echocardiography in assessing the pressure gradient in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 28 patients representing the wide hemodynamic spectrum of this disease underwent simultaneous determination of the subaortic gradient by continuous wave Doppler ultrasound and cardiac catheterization. With use of the modified Bernoulli equation, the Doppler-estimated gradient showed a strong correlation with the maximal instantaneous pressure difference measured at catheterization, both under basal conditions (r = 0.93; p less than 0.0001) and during provocative maneuvers (r = 0.89; p less than 0.0001). In 26 of the 28 patients, all assessments of the subaortic gradient were in agreement within 15 mm Hg (average difference 5 +/- 3 mm Hg). In the other two patients there were substantial differences between these measurements (under basal conditions in one patient and after provocation in another), although the Doppler technique predicted the presence of marked subaortic obstruction in each. In both patients the erroneous interpretation was due to superimposition of the mitral regurgitation signal on that of left ventricular outflow. Doppler waveforms from the left ventricular outflow tract showed variability in contour among different patients and in individual patients. Hence, continuous wave Doppler echocardiography is a useful noninvasive method for estimating the subaortic gradient in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, technical factors such as contamination of the outflow tract jet with that of mitral regurgitation and variability in waveform configuration may importantly influence such assessments of the

  15. Effect of pore water pressure on P-wave velocity in water-filled sands with partial air saturation; Fukanzen howa jotai no suna shiryo wo denpasuru P ha sokudo ni oyobosu kangeki suiatsu no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanema, T. [Chishitsu-Keisoku Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    With an objective to elucidate change in velocity of elastic waves in association with water pressure increase in a sand bed below the groundwater level in a shallow portion of the ground, a measurement experiment was carried out on P-wave velocity in sand samples with partial air saturation. The experiment has used fine sand having an equivalent coefficient of 2.40, a soil particle density of 2.68 g/cm {sup 3} or 60%, and a grain size of 0.36 mm. Inside the water-filled sand sample, two accelerometers were embedded 20 cm apart from each other as vibration receivers. An electromagnetic hammer for P-wave was used as the vibration source. In the experiment, measurement was carried out on the P-wave velocity in association with increase in pore water pressure by applying water pressure afresh to the water-filled sample. As a result of the experiment, the following matters were disclosed: the P-wave velocity increases as the pore water pressure was increased, and a phenomenon was recognized that the dominant frequency changes into high frequency; the degree of increase in the P-wave velocity varies depending on initial saturation of the sample; and bubbles in the pore fluid have their volume decreased due to compression resulted from increased pore water pressure and dissolution of air into the pore water. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  16. Microfluidic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2011-11-21

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s(-1) result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  17. Characterization of pressure-wave propagation during the condensation of R404A and R134a refrigerants in pipe mini-channels that undergo periodic hydrodynamic disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Studied the pressure wave propagation velocity during condensation of refrigerants R134a and R404A. ► Condensation process occurred in minichannels. ► In the calculations used two-phase flow model. ► Having regard to relevant flow regime obtained satisfactory agreement with experimental results of computational. -- Abstract: In the present paper, an attempt was undertaken to model the propagation of a pressure wave triggered by periodic hydrodynamic instabilities in the condensation of the R404A and R134a refrigerants in pipe mini-channels. A homogenous transient two-fluid model was used based on balance equations. The model presents the complexity of multi-phase flows. The heat exchange between the phases in the condensation process was calculated using the one-dimensional form of Fourier’s equation. The dependence which defines the interfacial the drag forces for the flow in mini-channels was also taken into consideration. The results of the numerical calculations were verified with experimental investigations and satisfactory compliance was obtained

  18. Numerical research on density wave oscillation of two-phase flow in parallel inclined internally ribbed pipes for supercritical pressure boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An instability theoretical model for multi-channel system had been developed by building one-dimensional homogeneous model and adopting nonlinear analysis for two-phase flow in vertical single pipe, supplied by Clausse and Lahey. With the same parameters as the experiment, two-phase flow density wave oscillation in parallel inclined inner ribbed pipes was analyzed and solved in this paper. The variation of the working fluid inlet velocity perturbation with time was found using the time domain method. The criteria of density wave oscillation were defined according to the convergence or divergence of the velocity. The pulse cycle of calculated results was mostly between 5 and 16 seconds, which was quite similar to the data between 7 and 19 seconds in the experiment. It is shown that the calculated results have a good agreement with the experimental data. Therefore, the method can be used to determine whether the incidence of density wave instabilities. It can also provide a reference for the safety parameters of the water wall in the supercritical pressure boiler. (authors)

  19. Bramwell-Hill modeling for local aortic pulse wave velocity estimation: a validation study with velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance and invasive pressure assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westenberg Jos JM

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bramwell-Hill model describes the relation between vascular wall stiffness expressed in aortic distensibility and the pulse wave velocity (PWV, which is the propagation speed of the systolic pressure wave through the aorta. The main objective of this study was to test the validity of this model locally in the aorta by using PWV-assessments based on in-plane velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, with invasive pressure measurements serving as the gold standard. Methods Seventeen patients (14 male, 3 female, mean age ± standard deviation = 57 ± 9 years awaiting cardiac catheterization were prospectively included. During catheterization, intra-arterial pressure measurements were obtained in the aorta at multiple locations 5.8 cm apart. PWV was determined regionally over the aortic arch and locally in the proximal descending aorta. Subsequently, patients underwent a CMR examination to measure aortic PWV and aortic distention. Distensibility was determined locally from the aortic distension at the proximal descending aorta and the pulse pressure measured invasively during catheterization and non-invasively from brachial cuff-assessment. PWV was determined regionally in the aortic arch using through-plane and in-plane velocity-encoded CMR, and locally at the proximal descending aorta using in-plane velocity-encoded CMR. Validity of the Bramwell-Hill model was tested by evaluating associations between distensibility and PWV. Also, theoretical PWV was calculated from distensibility measurements and compared with pressure-assessed PWV. Results In-plane velocity-encoded CMR provides stronger correlation (p = 0.02 between CMR and pressure-assessed PWV than through-plane velocity-encoded CMR (r = 0.69 versus r = 0.26, with a non-significant mean error of 0.2 ± 1.6 m/s for in-plane versus a significant (p = 0.006 error of 1.3 ± 1.7 m/s for through-plane velocity-encoded CMR. The Bramwell-Hill model shows a

  20. 深圳地铁11号线隧道空气压力波研究%Study on Air Pressure Waves in Tunnels on Shenzhen Metro Line 11

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海天; 陈健

    2011-01-01

    The article proposes pressure comfort standards in high-speed metro tunnels. By using the tunnel pressure wave analysis software ThermoTun, authors analyzed tunnel pressure waves and comfort of pressure considering different section design for tunnels on Shenzhen metro line 11. They also put forward design proposals for tunnel pressure relief system and tunnel profile.%分析并提出高速地铁隧道压力舒适度标准.采用隧道压力波分析软件ThermoTun,对深圳地铁11号线隧道段不同断面设计情况下的压力波及压力舒适度进行分析,提出对隧道泄压系统及隧道断面的设计建议.

  1. The experimental studies on electrical conductivities and P-wave velocities of anorthosite at high pressure and high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白利平; 杜建国; 刘巍; 周文戈

    2002-01-01

    Results of P-wave velocity (vP) and electrical conductivity measurements on anorthosite are presented from room temperature to 880 (C at 1.0 GPa using ultrasonic transmission technique and impedance spectra technique respectively. The experiments show that the P-wave velocities in anorthosite decrease markedly above 680 (C following the dehydration of hydrous minerals in the rock, and the complex impedances collected from 12 Hz to 105 Hz only indicate the grain interior conduction mechanism at 1.0 GPa, from 410 (C to 750 (C. Because the fluids in the rock have not formed an interconnected network, the dehydration will not pronouncedly enhance the electrical conductivity and change the electrical conduction mechanism. It is concluded that the formation and evolution of the low-velocity zones and high-conductivity layers in the crust may have no correlations, and the dehydration can result in the formation of the low-velocity zones, but cannot simultaneously result in the high-conductivity layers.

  2. 基于OpenFOAM的波浪对舰船水压场识别影响研究磁%Ocean Wave Impact on Ship Hydrodynamic Pressure Field Based on OpenFOAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕连立; 孙鹤泉; 王继光; 黄鹏飞

    2014-01-01

    The numerical wave tanks are established to study the ocean waves by using OpenFOAM .The characteris-tics of wave pressure field can be calculated at different water depths .The wave impact on the ship pressure field can be esti-mated .Some useful comments can be obtained .%利用开源软件OpenFOAM 建立数值波浪水槽,实现了数值造波与消波,计算了不同波况下波压场随水深的变化特点,研究了波浪对舰船水压场识别的影响,得出了有益的结论。

  3. 空气波压力治疗仪治疗奥沙利铂神经毒性的临床观察%Observe the efficacy of the air wave pressure therapeutic equipment in treatment of oxaliplatin nerve toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Qian; Yingying Pan; Yimin Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to observe the efficacy of air wave pressure therapeutic equipment in prevention of oxaliplatin-inducted neurotoxicity. Methods: Forty-five patients with colorectal cancer were randomly divided into treatment group and control group, treatment group were given the treatment of air wave pressure therapeutic equipment during chemotherapy with oxaliplatin, the control group were given preventive treatment, the oxaliplatin-inducted neurotoxicity was evaluated after each cycle of chemotherapy. Evaluate the chemotherapy efficacy after the third cycle and sixth cycle of chemotherapy. Results: The treatment group have lower incidence of peripheral nerve toxicity than the control group, the difference was statistically significant (χ2 = 13.93; P 0.05). Conclusion: Treatment with air wave pressure therapeutic equipment can reduce the incidence of peripheral nerve toxicity during oxaliplatin chemotherapy.

  4. Relation between burnout and differential pressure fluctuation characteristics by the disturbance waves near the flow obstacle in a vertical annular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Shoji; Fukano, Tohru [Kyushu Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    If a flow obstruction such as a spacer is set in a boiling two-phase flow within an annular channel, the inner tube of which is used as a heater, the temperature on the surface of the heater tube is severely affected by the existence of the spacer. In some cases the spacer has a cooling effect, and in the other case it causes the dryout of the cooling liquid film on the heating surface resulting in the burnout of the tube. But the thermo-fluid dynamic mechanism to cause burnout near the spacer is not still clear. In the present paper we discuss temperature fluctuation characteristics in relation to the change of the differential pressure across the spacer caused by the passing of the disturbance waves in case that the burnout generates. (author)

  5. Relation between burnout and differential pressure fluctuation characteristics by the disturbance waves near the flow obstacle in a vertical annular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a flow obstruction such as a spacer is set in a boiling two-phase flow within an annular channel, the inner tube of which is used as a heater, the temperature on the surface of the heater tube is severely affected by the existence of the spacer. In some cases the spacer has a cooling effect, and in the other case it causes the dryout of the cooling liquid film on the heating surface resulting in the burnout of the tube. But the thermo-fluid dynamic mechanism to cause burnout near the spacer is not still clear. In the present paper we discuss temperature fluctuation characteristics in relation to the change of the differential pressure across the spacer caused by the passing of the disturbance waves in case that the burnout generates. (author)

  6. Detection of Cracks in feeder Pipes of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor Using an EMAT Torsional Guided Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A torsional guided wave mode was applied to detect a crack in a pipe. An array of electromagnetic acoustic transduce. (EMAT that can generate and receive torsional guided ultrasound with the frequency of 200kHz was designed and fabricated for testing a pipe of 2.5 inch diameter Artificial notches with various depths were fabricated in a bent feeder pipe mock-up and the detectability was examined from the distance of 2m of the specimen. The axial notches with the depth of 5% of wall thickness were successfully detected by a torsional mode (T(0,1)) generated by the EMAT However, it was found that the depth of defects was not related to the signal amplitude

  7. Pressure and stress waves in a spallation neutron source mercury target generated by high-power proton pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Futakawa, M; Conrad, H; Stechemesser, H

    2000-01-01

    The international ASTE collaboration has performed a first series of measurements on a spallation neutron source target at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) in Brookhaven. The dynamic response of a liquid mercury target hit by high-power proton pulses of about 40 ns duration has been measured by a laser Doppler technique and compared with finite elements calculations using the ABAQUS code. It is shown that the calculation can describe the experimental results for at least the time interval up to 100 mu s after the pulse injection. Furthermore, it has been observed that piezoelectric pressure transducers cannot be applied in the high gamma-radiation field of a spallation target.

  8. Low-Pressure Burst-Mode Focused Ultrasound Wave Reconstruction and Mapping for Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: A Preclinical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jingjing; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-06-01

    Burst-mode focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure has been shown to induce transient blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening for potential CNS drug delivery. FUS-BBB opening requires imaging guidance during the intervention, yet current imaging technology only enables postoperative outcome confirmation. In this study, we propose an approach to visualize short-burst low-pressure focal beam distribution that allows to be applied in FUS-BBB opening intervention on small animals. A backscattered acoustic-wave reconstruction method based on synchronization among focused ultrasound emission, diagnostic ultrasound receiving and passively beamformed processing were developed. We observed that focal beam could be successfully visualized for in vitro FUS exposure with 0.5–2 MHz without involvement of microbubbles. The detectable level of FUS exposure was 0.467 MPa in pressure and 0.05 ms in burst length. The signal intensity (SI) of the reconstructions was linearly correlated with the FUS exposure level both in-vitro (r2 = 0.9878) and in-vivo (r2 = 0.9943), and SI level of the reconstructed focal beam also correlated with the success and level of BBB-opening. The proposed approach provides a feasible way to perform real-time and closed-loop control of FUS-based brain drug delivery.

  9. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ.

  10. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ. PMID:27137045

  11. Improvement of erectile dysfunction by the active pepide from Urechis unicinctus by high temperature/pressure and ultra - wave assisted lysis in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kang Sup; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Kang, Kyong-Hwa; Kim, Se-Kwon; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: We investigate the effect of active peptide from Urechis unicinctus (UU) by high temperature/pressure and ultra-wave assisted lysis on erectile dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Forty 12-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Diabetes was induced by a one-time intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50mg/kg). One week later, the diabetic rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal control, untreated diabetes control, and groups treated with 100 or 500mg/kg/d UU peptide. Rats were fed with UU peptide by intragastric administration for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, penile hemodynamic function was evaluated in all groups by measuring the intracavernosal pressure after electrostimulating the cavernous nerve. Nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) activities were measured and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) protein expression was determined by Western blot. Results: Maximum intracavernosal pressure in diabetic control rats decreased significantly compared to normal control rats, and was increased significantly compared to untreated diabetic rats after UU peptide supplementation. Treatment with the higher dose of UU peptide significantly increased the NO and cGMP levels compared with the diabetic control group. Decreased activity and expression eNOS and nNOS were found in the diabetic rats compared with the normal control group. Decreased eNOS and nNOS in diabetic rats were improved by UU peptide administration. Conclusions: Active peptide from UU ameliorates erectile function in a streptozotocin induced diabetic rat model of erectile dysfunction. PMID:27564297

  12. The propagation of pressure wave in closed channel filed of periodic alternate corks with the gas–liquid mixture and gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoryan Sh.A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of wave in closed channel filed of corks is considered. It is supposed that the discrete structure of corks is periodic. The dispersion equation of the Bloch wave number dependence on wave numbers of corks is derived. It is obtained the frequencies bands of transmitting waves.

  13. Submillimeter-wave measurements of N2 and O2 pressure broadening for HO2 radical generated by Hg-photosensitized reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The N2 and O2 pressure broadening coefficients of the pure rotational transitions at 625.66 GHz (NKaKc=101-9-100-10, J=10.5-10.5) and 649.70 GHz (NKaKc=102-9-92-8, J=9.5-8.5) in the vibronic ground state X2A′ of the perhydroxyl (HO2) radical have been determined by precise laboratory measurements. For the production of HO2, the mercury-photosensitized reaction of the H2 and O2 precursors was used to provide an optimum condition for measurement of the pressure broadening coefficient. The Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to monitor the volume mixing ratio of trace gases including HO2 in the Earth's upper atmosphere using these transitions. The precise measurement of pressure broadening coefficient γ in terms of the half width at half maximum is required in order to retrieve the atmospheric volume mixing ratio. In this work, γ coefficients of the 625.66 GHz transition were determined for N2 and O2 at room temperature as γ(N2)=4.085±0.049 MHz/Torr and γ(O2)=2.578±0.047 MHz/Torr with 3σ uncertainty. Similarly, the coefficients of the 649.70 GHz transition were determined as γ(N2)=3.489±0.094 MHz/Torr and γ(O2)=2.615±0.099 MHz/Torr. The air broadening coefficients for the 625.66 GHz and 649.70 GHz lines were estimated at γ(air)=3.769±0.067 MHz and 3.298±0.099 MHz respectively, where the uncertainty includes possible systematic errors. The newly determined coefficients are compared with previous results and we discuss the advantage of the mercury-photosensitized reaction for HO2 generation. In comparison with those of other singlet molecules, the pressure broadening coefficients of the HO2 radical are not much affected by the existence of an unpaired electron.

  14. 隧道内缓冲结构对高速列车微压波的影响%The Influence of Baffle Structure on Micro-pressure Wave Generated by High-speed Train Entering a Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    臧俊; 薛雷平

    2013-01-01

    采用数值方法模拟列车通过隧道的过程,并使用前人的实验数据对计算模型进行了验证.研究了隧道内挡板缓冲结构对微压波强度的影响,揭示挡板装置产生微压波的双峰特征,得到挡板大小和挡板安装位置对微压波强度的影响规律.结果表明,在隧道内合理地安装挡板能有效地削减隧道内压缩波强度,从而削减隧道出口处徼压波强度.%A compressive wave will be generated when a high-speed train enters a tunnel. Then the com-pressive wave will travel with the velocity of sound to the outlet of the tunnel and radiate a micro-pressure wave into the field outside of the tunnel. A numerical method was used to simulate the process that the high-speed train enters a tunnel. Also the experimental data was used to verify the computational model. On this base, the influence of the baffle structure on the micro-pressure wave was studied. The result shows that two micro-pressure waves will be generated with the baffle assembled in the tunnel. Also we the influence of the position and size of the baffle on the micro-pressure wave was got.

  15. 一种基于APDL语言的船舶波浪压力自动加载方法%An Approach to Automatically Loading Wave Pressure Using APDL in ANSYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁德勇; 郑杰; 谢伟; 胡要武; 杨龙

    2011-01-01

    针对全船结构强度直接计算中,波浪加载较为麻烦的问题,提出了一种ANSYS环境下的波浪压力自动加载的方法。该方法将三维水动力程序计算的船体表面的波浪压力经过插值算法转换到有限元结构单元上,压力数据文件读入ANSYS实现了自动加载。最后,利用该自动加载方法对一艘穿浪双体船进行加载。结果表明,该方法将波浪载荷计算和结构强度分析有机结合起来了,提高了波浪压力加载的准确性和效率。%Since wave pressure loading in the direct calculation of overall ship structural strength is a time-consuming job, an automatic loading approach in the ANSYS environment was proposed. Using this method, wave pressure on ship surface calculated by 3D hydrodynamic program was transferred to Finite Element model by interpolation algorithm. The pressure data file was read into ANSYS to fulfill the automatic loading process. The automatic approach was applied to a wave piercing catamaran as an example. The results show that the proposed approach can combine the wave load calculation with ship structural strength analysis, greatly improving accuracy and efficiency of wave pressure loading.

  16. The Wave Energy Device:Wave Dragon

    OpenAIRE

    Frigaard, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Tedd, James William

    2006-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is a 4 to 11 MW offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type. It basically consists of two wave reflectors focusing the waves towards a ramp, a reservoir for collecting the overtopping water and a number of hydro turbines for converting the pressure head into power. In the period from 1998 to 2001 extensive testing on a scale 1:50 model was carried at Aalborg University. During the last two years, testing has started on a prototype of the Wave Dragon in Nissum Bredni...

  17. Pulse Pressure in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Parenica

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The review presents basic information about the pulse pressure. The variables related to pulse pressure are briefly explained - arterial stiffness, arterial compliance, pulse wave velocity, pulse pressure amplification and augmentation index. We present some recent trials and observational studies that show the importance of pulse pressure in clinical practice. Briefly the possibilities of influencing the pulse pressure are discussed.

  18. Characterization of the pressure wave originating in the explosion of an extended heavy gas cloud: critical analysis of the treatment of its propagation in air and interaction with obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protection of nuclear power plants against external explosions of heavy gas clouds is a relevant topic of nuclear safety studies. The ultimate goal of such studies is to provide realistic inputs for the prediction of structure loadings and transient response. To obtain those inputs, relatively complex computer codes have been constructed to describe the propagation in air of strong perturbations due to unconfined gas cloud explosions. A detailed critical analysis of those codes is presented. In particular, the relative errors on wave speed, induced flow velocity, as well as on reflected wave speed and overpressure, respectively due to the use of a simplified non-linear isentropic approximation and of linear acoustic models, are estimated as functions of the overpressure of the incident pulse. The ability of the various models to accurately predict the time and distance required for sharp pressure front formation is discussed. Simple computer codes using implicit finite-difference discretizations are proposed to compare the results obtained with the various models for spherical wave propagation. Those codes are also useful to study the reflection of the waves on an outer spherical flexible wall and to investigate the effect of the elasticity and damping coefficients of the wall on the characteristics of the reflected pressure pulse

  19. Wave Loads on Cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Frigaard, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Wave loads may be defined as time varying forces on a body resulting from the wave induced flow fields which surrounds the body in whole or in part. Such unsteady fluid forces are the net result of pressure and shear forces integrated over the instantaneous wetted area.......Wave loads may be defined as time varying forces on a body resulting from the wave induced flow fields which surrounds the body in whole or in part. Such unsteady fluid forces are the net result of pressure and shear forces integrated over the instantaneous wetted area....

  20. 基于容积脉搏波的无创连续血压测量系统%A Non-invasive Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement System Based on Plethysmographic Pulse Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁永波; 陈真诚; 朱健铭; 殷世民

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a non-invasive continuous blood pressure measurement system without the cuff based on plethysmographic pulse wave. Methods A blood pressure estimation equation was established by the stepwise regression analysis on blood pressure and pulse wave transit time which was extracted from a single circle of plethysmographic pulse wave, and then the non-invasive continuous blood pressure measurement was realized. Results Compared blood pressure value with detection by the system and Yu-Yue brand mercury sphygmomanometer from various populations, the results indicated that the two methods exhibit good coherence , and the measurement error is better than the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) recommendation standard. Conclusion Compared with traditional blood pressure measurement method , the non-invasive continuous blood pressure measurement method is more convenient. It can measure blood pressure continuously without cuff and invasion, and may have promising application in the future.%目的 设计一种基于容积脉搏波的无袖套连续血压测量系统.方法 从单一容积脉搏波中提取脉搏波传导时间,经逐步回归分析与血压建立血压估算方程,实现无创连续血压测量.结果 通过对不同人群血压检测,并与鱼跃牌水银血压计进行对比,结果表明该方法和传统方法具有较好的测试一致性,测量误差优于美国医疗仪器促进协会(AAMI)推荐标准.结论 该方法同传统血压测量方法相比,测量方便,可彻底摆脱缚带,并能实现无创连续测量,具有更广阔的应用前景.

  1. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Slaughter, Daniel S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Rude, Bruce S.; Bluhm, Hendrik [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neppl, Stefan; Cryan, James P.; Siefermann, Katrin R.; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P.; Fraund, Matthew W.; Khurmi, Champak; Wright, Travis W.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Gessner, Oliver, E-mail: ogessner@lbl.gov [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hertlein, Marcus P.; Tyliszczak, Tolek [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Huse, Nils [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of Hamburg and Max-Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2014-09-15

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ∼0.1 mm spatial resolution and ∼150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E{sub p} = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503–508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ∼9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ∼1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular

  2. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S; Cryan, James P; Siefermann, Katrin R; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P; Wright, Travis W; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A; Rude, Bruce S; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ~0.1 mm spatial resolution and ~150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E(p) = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ~9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ~1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  3. The Independent and Joint Association of Blood Pressure, Serum Total Homocysteine, and Fasting Serum Glucose Levels With Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Hypertensive Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Ningling; Yu, Tao; Fan, Fangfang; Zheng, Meili; Qian, Geng; Wang, Binyan; Wang, Yu; Tang, Genfu; Li, Jianping; Qin, Xianhui; Hou, Fanfan; Xu, Xiping; Yang, Xinchun; Chen, Yundai; Wang, Xiaobin; Huo, Yong

    2016-09-28

    This study aimed to investigate the independent and joint association of blood pressure (BP), homocysteine (Hcy), and fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, a measure of arterial stiffness) in Chinese hypertensive adults.The analyses included 3967 participants whose BP, Hcy, FBG, and baPWV were measured along with other covariates. Systolic BP (SBP) was analyzed as 3 categories (SBP < 160 mmHg; 160 to 179 mmHg; ≥ 180 mmHg); Hcy as 3 categories (< 10 μmol/L; 10 to 14.9 μmol/L; ≥ 15.0 μmol/L) and FBG: normal (FBG < 5.6 mmol/L), impaired (5.6 mmol/L ≤ FBG < 7.0 mmol/L), and diabetes mellitus (FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L). We performed linear regression analyses to evaluate their associations with baPWV with adjustment for covariables.When analyzed individually, BP, Hcy, and FBG were each associated with baPWV. When BP and FBG were analyzed jointly, the highest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 2227 ± 466 cm/s) was observed in participants with FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and SBP ≥ 180 mmHg (β = 432.5, P < 0.001), and the lowest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 1692 ± 289 cm/s) was seen in participants with NFG and SBP < 160 mmHg. When Hcy and FBG were analyzed jointly, the highest baPWV value (2072 ± 480 cm/s) was observed in participants with FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and Hcy ≥ 15.0 μmol/L (β = 167.6, P < 0.001), while the lowest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 1773 ± 334 cm/s) was observed in participants with NFG and Hcy < 10 μmol/L.In Chinese hypertensive adults, SBP, Hcy, and FBG are individually and jointly associated with baPWV.Our findings underscore the importance of identifying individuals with multiple risk factors of baPWV including high SBP, FBG, and Hcy.

  4. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S; Cryan, James P; Siefermann, Katrin R; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P; Wright, Travis W; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A; Rude, Bruce S; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ~0.1 mm spatial resolution and ~150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E(p) = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ~9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ~1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  5. High pressure generation by laser driven shock waves: application to equation of state measurement; Generation de hautes pressions par choc laser: application a la mesure d'equations d'etat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benuzzi, A

    1997-12-15

    This work is dedicated to shock waves and their applications to the study of the equation of state of compressed matter.This document is divided into 6 chapters: 1) laser-produced plasmas and abrasion processes, 2) shock waves and the equation of state, 3) relative measuring of the equation of state, 4) comparison between direct and indirect drive to compress the target, 5) the measurement of a new parameter: the shock temperature, and 6) control and measurement of the pre-heating phase. In this work we have reached relevant results, we have shown for the first time the possibility of generating shock waves of very high quality in terms of spatial distribution, time dependence and of negligible pre-heating phase with direct laser radiation. We have shown that the shock pressure stays unchanged as time passes for targets whose thickness is over 10 {mu}m. A relative measurement of the equation of state has been performed through the simultaneous measurement of the velocity of shock waves passing through 2 different media. The great efficiency of the direct drive has allowed us to produce pressures up to 40 Mbar. An absolute measurement of the equation of state requires the measurement of 2 parameters, we have then performed the measurement of the colour temperature of an aluminium target submitted to laser shocks. A simple model has been developed to infer the shock temperature from the colour temperature. The last important result is the assessment of the temperature of the pre-heating phase that is necessary to know the media in which the shock wave propagates. The comparison of the measured values of the reflectivity of the back side of the target with the computed values given by an adequate simulation has allowed us to deduce the evolution of the temperature of the pre-heating phase. (A.C.)

  6. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño-Sánchez Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. Methods/Design Design: This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. Setting: The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Study population: Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Measurements: Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The

  7. Fascial hierarchies and the relevance of crossed-helical arrangements of collagen to changes in shape; part II: The proposed effect of blood pressure (Traube-Hering-Mayer) waves on the fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, Graham

    2016-07-01

    Periodic changes in arterial pressure and volume have long been related to respiratory and sympathetic nerve activity (Traube-Hering-Mayer waves) but their origins and nomenclature have caused considerable confusion since they were first discovered in the eighteenth century. However, although they remain poorly understood and the underlying details of their control are complicated, these waves do provide valuable clinical information on the state of blood pressure regulation in both normal and pathological conditions; and a correlation with oscillatory motions observed by certain practitioners suggests that they may also have some physiological value that relates to changes in the volume of fascial 'tubes'. Part I of this paper (Scarr, 2016) described a complex fascial network of collagen-reinforced tubular sheaths that are an integral part of muscle structure and function, and continuous with 'higher-level' fascial tubes surrounding groups of muscles, the limbs and entire body. The anisotropic arrangements of collagen fibres within the walls of these tubes reflect the most efficient distribution of mechanical stresses and have been considered to coordinate changes in shape, and a proposed link between cyclic variations in arterial pressure and volume, and the behaviour of these fascial compartments is now described. PMID:27634089

  8. Experimental investigation of influence of ambient pressure on properties of laser-induced cavitation bubble collapse sound waves%环境压强对激光空泡声波特性影响的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李胜勇; 王晓宇; 王江安; 宗思光; 刘涛

    2015-01-01

    The ambient pressure is one of the basic factors determining cavitation. In order to investigate the influence of ambient pressure on properties of laser-induced cavitation bubble collapse sound waves, besides analysing the influence of ambient pressure on properties of laser-induced cavitation bubble oscillation, the experimental investigation of the laser-induced cavitation bubble callapse in liquids with different ambient pressure was done with high-speed video, the cavity sound waves generated by the cavitation bubble was detected with the high-frequency hydrophone. The pressure inside the tank was accurately controlled by an air pump. The results show that the ambient pressure has obvious influence on the bubble oscillation, but has no influence on sound intensity and spectrum. The radiation frequency range is 0- 50 kHz, the radiation sound wave energy is 0- 20 kHz, and have two obvious frequency peak value at 2 kHz and 8 kHz.%环境压强是影响空泡脉动的一个重要因素。为了研究环境压强对激光空泡声波特性的影响,采用理想液体中单空泡运动的理论模型,对不同环境压强下液体中空泡运动过程进行了数值模拟,并通过充气泵精确调节高压水箱内的气压,采用高速照相机、高频测量水听器,得到了在不同压强条件下,空泡脉动特性的序列图像和声谱图,根据实验数据研究了不同环境压强下液体中激光诱导产生的空泡脉动规律与声波特性。结果表明:环境压强的改变影响了空泡生存周期和脉动的剧烈程度,但对声波的强度和声谱分布没有影响。辐射的频率集中在0~50 kHz范围内,所辐射的声波能量主要集中在0~20 kHz频段范围,并在2 kHz与8 kHz有两个明显的频率峰值。

  9. Effect of initial pressure on propagation of detonation wave in round tube%初始压力对爆轰波在管道内传播的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻健良; 高远; 闫兴清; 高伟

    2014-01-01

    建立爆轰管道研究不同初始压力下爆轰波在管道内传播规律。选用 CH4+2O2气体,采用光纤探针测量爆轰波在管道内的传播速度,采用烟迹法记录爆轰波胞格结构。结果表明:爆轰波在管道内传播时出现5种不同传播模式,分别为稳态式、快速波动式、结巴式、驰振式与失效模式。在稳态传播模式下,爆轰波局部速度波动很小且平均速度接近理论爆轰 CJ 速度,并呈现多头胞格结构。随着初始压力的降低,爆轰波局部速度波动增加且其平均速度产生衰减。在驰振式爆轰解耦处,爆轰波胞格结构消失,过载爆轰时,重新形成胞格结构。进一步降低初始压力至爆轰失效时,则无胞格结构。%Detonation tube was built to investigate the effect of initial pressure on the propagation of detonation wave in round tube.The premixed gas of CH4+2O2 was selected as experimental gas. Optical fiber probe was used to measure the local velocity of detonation wave.Smoked foils were used to register the cellular structure of detonation wave in tubes.The experimental results show that there are five distinct modes during the propagation of detonation wave in tubes,which are stable mode,rapid fluctuation mode,stuttering mode,galloping mode and failure mode.Under the mode of stable detonation,the fluctuations of the local velocity of detonation wave are generally small and the averaged velocity of detonation wave is close to the theoretical CJ value.The detonation wave has multi-headed cellular structure.With decreasing of the initial pressure,the fluctuations of the local velocity of detonation wave increase,and the averaged velocity of detonation wave decreases.For the galloping detonation,at the decoupled position,cellular structure disappears.Cellular structure forms again when overdriven detonation occurs.If the initial pressure is further decreased till the detonation failure,no cellular structure is

  10. The Wave Energy Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Tedd, James William

    2006-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is a 4 to 11 MW offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type. It basically consists of two wave reflectors focusing the waves towards a ramp, a reservoir for collecting the overtopping water and a number of hydro turbines for converting the pressure head into power....... In the period from 1998 to 2001 extensive testing on a scale 1:50 model was carried at Aalborg University. During the last two years, testing has started on a prototype of the Wave Dragon in Nissum Bredning, Denmark (scale 1:4.5 of the North Sea). The prototype was grid connected in May 2003 as the world...... is instrumented in order to be able to monitor power production, wave climate, forces in mooring lines, stresses in the structure and movements of the Wave Dragon. The paper gives the present status of the Nissum Bredning Prototype....

  11. Study of Combustible Case Effects on Pressure Waves for Low-zone of Bi-modular Charge%可燃容器对小号模块装药压力波影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王育维; 郭映华; 董彦诚; 张洪汉

    2016-01-01

    An analysis is made of the interior ballistics structural characteristics of low-zone in Bi-modular charge. In response to the problem of much more prominent pressure wave of zone 2,a two-phase and one-dimensional model of interior ballistics was built with combustible case combustion law provided. An analysis is made of the effects of combustible case energy parameter on pressure waves. Through the comparative experimental study of different energy combustible cases and theoretical simu-lation analysis of interior ballistics multiphase flow,the effect laws of combustible case energy parame-ter on zone 2 pressure waves was obtained. Great agreement is shown between model and experimental measurements. The study results can serve as a guideline for pressure wave and optimizing combustible case energy parameter of zone 2 in Bi-modular charge.%分析了双元模块装药小号装药的结构特点,针对小号装药的2号装药压力波现象较为突出的问题,建立了双一维多相流内弹道模型,给出了可燃容器燃烧规律,分析了可燃容器能量参数对压力波的影响。通过对可燃容器不同能量参数的对比试验研究及利用多相流内弹道理论仿真分析,得到了可燃容器能量特性对2号装药压力波的影响规律,理论仿真结果与试验结果一致,为分析小号装药压力波现象及可燃容器参数优化设计提供一定参考。

  12. Validation of a new non-invasive blood pressure measurement method on mice via pulse wave propagation time measurement on a cuff

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Xuan P.; Kronemayer, Ralf; Herrmann, Peter; Mejía, Atila; Daw, Zamira; Nguyen, Xuan D.; Kränzlin, Bettina; Gretz, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    In the present article, we describe the validation of a new non-invasive method for measuring blood pressure (BP) which also enables to determine the three BP values: systolic, diastolic and mean value. Our method is based on the pulse transit time (PTT) measurement along an artery directly at the BP cuff. The accuracy of this method was evaluated by comparison with the direct simultaneous measurement of blood pressure from 40 anesthetized female mice. Close correlation ...

  13. Relation between the occurrence of Burnout and differential pressure fluctuation characteristics caused by the disturbance waves passing by a flow obstacle in a vertical boiling two-phase upward flow in a narrow annular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Shoji [Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: morisho@ynu.ac.jp; Fukano, Tohru [Kurume Institute of University, Fukuoka 830-0052 (Japan)]. E-mail: fukanot@cc.kurume-it.ac.jp

    2006-05-15

    If a flow obstacle such as a spacer is placed in a boiling two-phase flow within a channel, the temperature on the surface of the heating tube is severely affected by the existence of the spacer. Under certain conditions the spacer has a cooling effect, and under other conditions the spacer causes dryout of the cooling water film on the heating surface, resulting in burnout of the tube. The burnout mechanism near the spacer, however, remains unclear. In a previous paper (Fukano, T., Mori, S., Akamatsu, S., Baba, A., 2002. Relation between temperature fluctuation of a heating surface and generation of drypatch caused by a cylindrical spacer in a vertical boiling two-phase upward flow in a narrow annular channel. Nucl. Eng. Des. 217, 81-90), we reported that the disturbance wave has a significant effect on dryout occurrence. Therefore, in the present paper, the relation between dryout, burnout occurrence, and interval between two successive disturbance waves obtained from the differential pressure fluctuation caused by the disturbance waves passing by a spacer, is further discussed in detail.

  14. Relation between the occurrence of Burnout and differential pressure fluctuation characteristics caused by the disturbance waves passing by a flow obstacle in a vertical boiling two-phase upward flow in a narrow annular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a flow obstacle such as a spacer is placed in a boiling two-phase flow within a channel, the temperature on the surface of the heating tube is severely affected by the existence of the spacer. Under certain conditions the spacer has a cooling effect, and under other conditions the spacer causes dryout of the cooling water film on the heating surface, resulting in burnout of the tube. The burnout mechanism near the spacer, however, remains unclear. In a previous paper (Fukano, T., Mori, S., Akamatsu, S., Baba, A., 2002. Relation between temperature fluctuation of a heating surface and generation of drypatch caused by a cylindrical spacer in a vertical boiling two-phase upward flow in a narrow annular channel. Nucl. Eng. Des. 217, 81-90), we reported that the disturbance wave has a significant effect on dryout occurrence. Therefore, in the present paper, the relation between dryout, burnout occurrence, and interval between two successive disturbance waves obtained from the differential pressure fluctuation caused by the disturbance waves passing by a spacer, is further discussed in detail

  15. Dynamics of coupled light waves and electron-acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P K; Stenflo, L; Hellberg, M

    2002-08-01

    The nonlinear interaction between coherent light waves and electron-acoustic waves in a two-electron plasma is considered. The interaction is governed by a pair of equations comprising a Schrödinger-like equation for the light wave envelope and a driven (by the light pressure) electron-acoustic wave equation. The newly derived nonlinear equations are used to study the formation and dynamics of envelope light wave solitons and light wave collapse. The implications of our investigation to space and laser-produced plasmas are pointed out.

  16. Prototype Testing of the Wave Energy Converter Wave Dragon

    OpenAIRE

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter Bak; Friis-Madsen, Erik; Sørensen, Hans Chr.

    2004-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is an offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type. It consists of two wave reflectors focusing the incoming waves towards a ramp, a reservoir for collecting the overtopping water and a number of hydro turbines for converting the pressure head into power. In the period from 1998 to 2001 extensive wave tank testing on a scale model was carried at Aalborg University. Then, a 57 x 27 m wide and 237 tonnes heavy (incl. ballast) prototype of the Wave Dragon, placed in Nis...

  17. Prototype Testing of the Wave Energy Converter Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter Bak; Friis-Madsen, Erik;

    2004-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is an offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type. It consists of two wave reflectors focusing the incoming waves towards a ramp, a reservoir for collecting the overtopping water and a number of hydro turbines for converting the pressure head into power. In the period...... from 1998 to 2001 extensive wave tank testing on a scale model was carried at Aalborg University. Then, a 57 x 27 m wide and 237 tonnes heavy (incl. ballast) prototype of the Wave Dragon, placed in Nissum Bredning, Denmark, was grid connected in May 2003 as the world's first offshore wave energy...... converter. The prototype is fully equipped with hydro turbines and automatic control systems, and is instrumented in order to monitor power production, wave climate, forces in mooring lines, stresses in the structure and movements of the Wave Dragon. During the last months, extensive testing has started...

  18. Prototype Testing of the Wave Energy Converter Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik;

    2006-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is an offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type. It consists of two wave reflectors focusing the incoming waves towards a ramp, a reservoir for collecting the overtopping water and a number of hydro turbines for converting the pressure head into power. In the period...... from 1998 to 2001 extensive wave tank testing on a scale model was carried at Aalborg University. Then, a 57!27 m wide and 237 tonnes heavy (incl. ballast) prototype of the Wave Dragon, placed in Nissum Bredning, Denmark, was grid connected in May 2003 as the world’s first offshore wave energy...... converter. The prototype is fully equipped with hydro turbines and automatic control systems, and is instrumented in order to monitor power production, wave climate, forces in mooring lines, stresses in the structure and movements of the Wave Dragon. In the period May 2003 to January 2005 an extensive...

  19. Wave Forces Acting on Vertical Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ben-xia; YU Yu-xiu; YU Xi-ping

    2008-01-01

    Regular and irregular wave forces acting on vertical walls are studied by a previously developed numerical model. The computed wave forces are compared with the available experimental data to verify the numerical model, and satisfactory agreements are obtained. The variation of wave forces with incident angles and the shape of simultaneous pressure distribution are investigated, and the comparisons between numerical results and Goda's predictions are also carried out. It is concluded that the maximum wave forces acting on the unit length of vertical wall is often induced by the obliquely incident waves instead of normally incident waves, while Goda's formula may be inapplicable for oblique wave incidence. The shape of simultaneous pressure distribution is not significantly influenced by incident angles, and it can be favorably predicted by Goda's formula. When regular wave heights are taken as the same as irregular wave height H1%, the irregular wave forces Ph,1% are slightly larger than regular wave forces in most cases.

  20. Effects of Shock Pressure on Transition Pressure in Zr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying-Hua; ZHANG Lin; CAI Ling-Cang

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of free surface velocity profiles of high-purity Zr samples under shock-wave loading are performed to study the dynamic strength and phase transition parameters. The peak pressure of the compression waves is within the range from 9 to 14 GPa, and the Hugoniot elastic limit is 0.5 GPa. An anomalous structure of shock waves is observed due to the α - ω phase transition in Zr. Shock pressure has effects on transition pressure which increases with increasing compression strength, and the stronger shocks have a lower transit time.

  1. Subduction Factory 3: An Excel worksheet and macro for calculating the densities, seismic wave speeds, and H2O contents of minerals and rocks at pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Abers, Geoffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    An Excel macro to calculate mineral and rock physical properties at elevated pressure and temperature is presented. The workbook includes an expandable database of physical parameters for 52 rock-forming minerals stable at high pressures and temperatures. For these minerals the elastic moduli, densities, seismic velocities, and H2O contents are calculated at any specified P and T conditions, using basic thermodynamic relationships and third-order finite strain theory. The mineral modes of suites of rocks are also specifiable, so that their predicted aggregate properties can be calculated using standard solid mixing theories. A suite of sample rock modes taken from the literature provides a useful starting point. The results of these calculations can be applied to a wide variety of geophysical questions including estimating the alteration of the oceanic crust and mantle; predicting the seismic velocities of lower-crustal xenoliths; estimating the effects of changes in mineralogy, pressure and temperature on buoyancy; and assessing the H2O content and mineralogy of subducted lithosphere from seismic observations.

  2. Relation between the occurrence of burnout and differential-pressure fluctuation characteristics caused by the disturbance waves passing by a flow obstacle in a vertical boiling two-phase upward flow in a narrow annular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a flow obstacle such as a spacer is set in a boiling two-phase flow within an annular channel, where the inner tube is used as a heater, the temperature on the surface of the heater tube is severely affected by the existence of the spacer. In some case the spacer has a cooling effect, and in the other case it causes the dryout of the cooling liquid film on the heating surface resulting in the burnout of the tube. The burnout mechanism near the spacer, however, is not still clear. In the present paper we focus our attention on the occurrence of the burnout near a spacer, and discuss the occurrence location of dryout and burnout and the relation between the occurrence of burnout and differential-pressure fluctuation characteristics caused by the disturbance waves passing by a spacer. (author)

  3. Chiral Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Srimoyee

    2016-01-01

    We study shock waves in relativistic chiral matter. We argue that the conventional Rankine- Hugoinot relations are modified due to the presence of chiral transport phenomena. We show that the entropy discontinuity in a weak shock wave is linearly proportional to the pressure discontinuity when the effect of chiral transport becomes sufficiently large. We also show that rarefaction shock waves, which do not exist in usual nonchiral fluids, can appear in chiral matter. These features are exemplified by shock propagation in dense neutrino matter in the hydrodynamic regime.

  4. Velocidade da onda de pulso, pressão arterial e adipocitocinas em adultos jovens: estudo do Rio de Janeiro Pulse wave velocity, blood pressure and adipocytokines in young adults: the Rio de Janeiro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Luiz Pizzi

    2012-01-01

    identificação do acometimento vascular nessa faixa etária.BACKGROUND: Data on noninvasive vascular assessment and their association with cardiovascular risk variables are scarce in young individuals. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between pulse wave velocity and blood pressure, anthropometric and metabolic variables, including adipocytokines, in young adults. METHODS: A total of 96 individuals aged 26 to 35 years (mean 30.09 ± 1.92; 51 males were assessed in the Rio de Janeiro study. Pulse wave velocity (Complior method, blood pressure, body mass index, glucose, lipid profile, leptin, insulin, adiponectin and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR were analyzed. Subjects were stratified into three groups according to the PWV tertile for each gender. RESULTS: The group with the highest pulse wave velocity (PWV tertile showed higher mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, body mass index, insulin, and HOMA-IR, as well as lower mean adiponectin; higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus/glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. There was a significant positive correlation of PWV with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean blood pressure, body mass index, and LDL-cholesterol, and a negative correlation with HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin. In the multiple regression model, after adjustment of HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and adiponectin for gender, age, body mass index and mean blood pressure, only the male gender and mean blood pressure remained significantly correlated with PWV. CONCLUSION: PWV in young adults showed a significant association with cardiovascular risk variables, especially in the male gender, and mean blood pressure as important determinant variables. The findings suggest that PWV measurement can be useful for the identification of vascular impairment in this age group.

  5. Velocidade da onda de pulso, pressão arterial e adipocitocinas em adultos jovens: estudo do Rio de Janeiro Pulse wave velocity, blood pressure and adipocytokines in young adults: the Rio de Janeiro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Luiz Pizzi

    2013-01-01

    identificação do acometimento vascular nessa faixa etária.BACKGROUND: Data on noninvasive vascular assessment and their association with cardiovascular risk variables are scarce in young individuals. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between pulse wave velocity and blood pressure, anthropometric and metabolic variables, including adipocytokines, in young adults. METHODS: A total of 96 individuals aged 26 to 35 years (mean 30.09 ± 1.92; 51 males were assessed in the Rio de Janeiro study. Pulse wave velocity (Complior method, blood pressure, body mass index, glucose, lipid profile, leptin, insulin, adiponectin and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR were analyzed. Subjects were stratified into three groups according to the PWV tertile for each gender. RESULTS: The group with the highest pulse wave velocity (PWV tertile showed higher mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, body mass index, insulin, and HOMA-IR, as well as lower mean adiponectin; higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus/glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. There was a significant positive correlation of PWV with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean blood pressure, body mass index, and LDL-cholesterol, and a negative correlation with HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin. In the multiple regression model, after adjustment of HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and adiponectin for gender, age, body mass index and mean blood pressure, only the male gender and mean blood pressure remained significantly correlated with PWV. CONCLUSION: PWV in young adults showed a significant association with cardiovascular risk variables, especially in the male gender, and mean blood pressure as important determinant variables. The findings suggest that PWV measurement can be useful for the identification of vascular impairment in this age group.

  6. 基于负压波-流量法的管道泄漏检测试验系统%Pipeline Leak Detection Testing System Based on Negative Pressure Wave and Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡琼; 范世东

    2009-01-01

    构建了一套基于负压波和流量的管道泄漏检测试验系统.该系统利用研华PCI-1710HG数据采集卡实时采集管道的压力和流量数据,利用小波变换去除混杂在压力和流量数据中的噪声信号,采用连续小波变换检测压力和流量数据的奇异点从而实现泄漏的检测与定位.监测系统的软件部分采用NI公司的图形化编程语言LabVIEW开发.该系统能及时检测管道泄漏并进行定位.%To solve the problem of pipeline leak detection and meet the demand of student's learning,an experimental system of pipeline leak detection based on negative pressure wave and flow is estab-lished in the laboratory. Advantech DAQ board PCI-1710HG is used to acquire pressure and flow flux, wavelet transform is utilized to analyze the test data; the software of the monitoring system is developed by National Instruments' graphical programming language LabVIEW. It can detect and locate pipeline leak point in time. Finally, a set of testing results is provided.

  7. Study on wave rotor refrigerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuqiang DAI; Dapeng HU; Meixia DING

    2009-01-01

    As a novel generation of a rotational gas wave machine, the wave rotor refrigerator (WRR) is an unsteady flow device used for refrigeration, in whose passages pressured streams directly contact and exchange energy due to the movement of pressure waves. In this paper, the working mechanism and refrigeration principle are inves-tigated based on the one-dimensional unsteady flow theory.A basic limitation on main structural parameters and operating parameters is deduced and the wave diagram of WRR to guide designing is sketched. The main influential factors are studied through an experiment. In the DUT Gas Wave Refrigeration Studying and Development Center (GWRSDC) lab, the isentropic efficiency can now reach about 65%. The results show that the WRR is a feasible and promising technology in pressured gas refrigeration cases.

  8. Measurement uncertainty in pulmonary vascular input impedance and characteristic impedance estimated from pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound and pressure: clinical studies on 57 pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lian; Hunter, Kendall S; Kirby, K Scott; Ivy, D Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary vascular input impedance better characterizes right ventricular (RV) afterload and disease outcomes in pulmonary hypertension compared to the standard clinical diagnostic, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Early efforts to measure impedance were not routine, involving open-chest measurement. Recently, the use of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured velocity to non-invasively estimate instantaneous flow has made impedance measurement more practical. One critical concern remains with clinical use: the measurement uncertainty, especially since previous studies only incorporated random error. This study utilized data from a large pediatric patient population to comprehensively examine the systematic and random error contributions to the total impedance uncertainty and determined the least error prone methodology to compute impedance from among four different methods. We found that the systematic error contributes greatly to the total uncertainty and that one of the four methods had significantly smaller propagated uncertainty; however, even when this best method is used, the uncertainty can be large for input impedance at high harmonics and for the characteristic impedance modulus. Finally, we found that uncertainty in impedance between normotensive and hypertensive patient groups displays no significant difference. It is concluded that clinical impedance measurement would be most improved by advancements in instrumentation, and the best computation method is proposed for future clinical use of the input impedance.

  9. Two-phase flow model for energetic proton beam induced pressure waves in mercury target systems in the planned European Spallation Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-phase flow calculations are presented to investigate the thermo-hydraulic effects of the interaction between 2 ms long 1.3 GeV proton pulses with a closed mercury loop which can be considered as a model system of the target of the planned European Spallation Source (ESS) facility. The two-fluid model consists of six first-order partial differential equations that present one dimensional mass, momentum and energy balances for mercury vapor and liquid phases are capable to describe quick transients like cavitation effects or shock waves. The absorption of the proton beam is represented as instantaneous heat source in the energy balance equations. Densities and internal energies of the mercury liquid-vapor system is calculated from the van der Waals equation, but general method how to obtain such properties using arbitrary equation of state is also presented. A second order accurate high-resolution shock-capturing numerical scheme is applied with different kind of limiters in the numerical calculations. Our analysis shows that even 75 degree temperature heat shocks cannot cause considerable cavitation effects in mercury. (authors)

  10. Measurement uncertainty in pulmonary vascular input impedance and characteristic impedance estimated from pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound and pressure: clinical studies on 57 pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary vascular input impedance better characterizes right ventricular (RV) afterload and disease outcomes in pulmonary hypertension compared to the standard clinical diagnostic, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Early efforts to measure impedance were not routine, involving open-chest measurement. Recently, the use of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured velocity to non-invasively estimate instantaneous flow has made impedance measurement more practical. One critical concern remains with clinical use: the measurement uncertainty, especially since previous studies only incorporated random error. This study utilized data from a large pediatric patient population to comprehensively examine the systematic and random error contributions to the total impedance uncertainty and determined the least error prone methodology to compute impedance from among four different methods. We found that the systematic error contributes greatly to the total uncertainty and that one of the four methods had significantly smaller propagated uncertainty; however, even when this best method is used, the uncertainty can be large for input impedance at high harmonics and for the characteristic impedance modulus. Finally, we found that uncertainty in impedance between normotensive and hypertensive patient groups displays no significant difference. It is concluded that clinical impedance measurement would be most improved by advancements in instrumentation, and the best computation method is proposed for future clinical use of the input impedance

  11. A MATLAB toolbox and Excel workbook for calculating the densities, seismic wave speeds, and major element composition of minerals and rocks at pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abers, Geoffrey A.; Hacker, Bradley R.

    2016-02-01

    To interpret seismic images, rock seismic velocities need to be calculated at elevated pressure and temperature for arbitrary compositions. This technical report describes an algorithm, software, and data to make such calculations from the physical properties of minerals. It updates a previous compilation and Excel® spreadsheet and includes new MATLAB® tools for the calculations. The database of 60 mineral end-members includes all parameters needed to estimate density and elastic moduli for many crustal and mantle rocks at conditions relevant to the upper few hundreds of kilometers of Earth. The behavior of α and β quartz is treated as a special case, owing to its unusual Poisson's ratio and thermal expansion that vary rapidly near the α-β transition. The MATLAB tools allow integration of these calculations into a variety of modeling and data analysis projects.

  12. 波浪荷载作用下非均等固结饱和粉土孔压特性研究%Characteristics of Pore Water Pressure of Anisotropic Consolidation Saturated Silt under Wave Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健; 翟剑峰; 王仙美; 陈景雅

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic triaxial-torsional coupling shear tests were performed by hollow cylinder apparatus under anisotropic consolidation to study the development of pore water pressure in the saturated silt under wave loading.It was found that the relationship between pore water pressure ratio and generalized shear strain of saturated silts under anisotropic consolidation well fits the hyperbolic curve,while pore pressure ratio and vibration cycle ratio can be fitted by the use of power function.According to the Mohr-Coulomb law under ultimate state,the method to calculate limit pore water pressure of less viscous silt was proposed; Comparison between the calculation results and the test results showed that there is a linear relationship between pore pressure ratio and consolidation ratio for both of the calculation results and the test values.In addition,the smaller the Kc is,the less difference exists between calculation results and test values.%选用近海地区分布广泛的粉土作为研究对象,利用空心圆柱仪进行了模拟波浪荷载作用下的循环三轴-扭剪耦合试验,探寻非均等固结条件下饱和粉土孔隙水压力的发展特性.试验结果表明:非均等固结条件下,饱和粉土孔压比与广义剪应变之间的关系符合双曲线发展形式,孔压比与振次比之间的关系可以用幂函数来较好地拟合.根据极限状态的摩尔—库仑定律,推导了少粘性粉土孔隙水压力极限值计算方法,并将计算值与试验值进行了比较.孔压比和固结比的计算值与试验值之间均符合直线型关系,且固结比越小,计算值与试验值之间的差异越小.

  13. 基于HHT去噪和互相关原理的ABS制动液压力波波速的研究%Research of Pressure Wave Velocity of Brake Fluid of ABS Based on HHT and Principle of Cross-correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚雪珍; 李孝禄; 王文越

    2016-01-01

    汽车防抱死系统( ABS)依靠制动液压力波传递制动压力,对汽车制动效能影响很大。文中利用压力传感器采集ABS制动液压力,对采集的数据进行希尔伯特-黄变换( HHT)去噪,再利用互相关原理对不同刹车盘转速和制动管路长度下的制动液压力波波速进行计算。研究表明,制动液压力波波速可达1181.8 m/s。%Pressure wave velocity of brake fluid of Anti-lock braking system( ABS) have an obvious effect on brake ability of automobile, which transfers braking pressure for braking disc. The brake fluid pressure was acquired by the pressure transmitters in an ABS, and with Hilbert-huang transform ( HHT) de-noised. The pressure wave velocities of brake fluid were calculated by the cross-correlation principle under different rotating speeds and braking pipe lengths. The results show that the pressure wave velocity of brake fluid is up to 1 181.8m/s.

  14. Imploding Detonation Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Verma

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of imploding detonation waves propagating through a gas with initial density, is studied. It is shown that the consideration of varying initial density affects the problem considerably incomparison to a uniform gas at rest. An analytical expression for the pressure distribution in the neighbourhood of the centre of symmetry has been found.

  15. Imploding Detonation Waves

    OpenAIRE

    B. G. Verma; Singh, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of imploding detonation waves propagating through a gas with initial density, is studied. It is shown that the consideration of varying initial density affects the problem considerably incomparison to a uniform gas at rest. An analytical expression for the pressure distribution in the neighbourhood of the centre of symmetry has been found.

  16. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart contracts, which ... as it relaxes, which is called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure ...

  17. Residual Liquefaction under Standing Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study which deals with the residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves. It is shown that the seabed liquefaction under standing waves, although qualitatively similar, exhibits features different from that caused by progressive waves....... The experimental results show that the buildup of pore-water pressure and the resulting liquefaction first starts at the nodal section and spreads towards the antinodal section. The number of waves to cause liquefaction at the nodal section appears to be equal to that experienced in progressive waves for the same...... wave height. Recommendations are made as to how to assess liquefaction potential in standing waves. Copyright © 2012 by the International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers (ISOPE)....

  18. WAVE EQUATION MODEL FOR SHIP WAVES IN BOUNDED SHALLOW WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ships were modelled as moving pressure disturbances on the free surface of a shallow water basin in the present paper.The moving-pressure generating waves were subjected to the reflection of land boundaries and the radiation of open boundaries.This paper proposed and examined a wave equation model (WEM) to solve the shallow water equations with moving surface pressures simulating ship waves in a bounded shallow water region.The Galerkin finite element method was used to solve a second order wave equation for the free surface elevations and the hydrodynamic pressure of the ship bottom simultaneously.Horizontal velocities were obtained from the momentum equations.Numerical solutions of Series 60 CB=0.6 ships moving with the depth Froude number of Fh=0.6, 1.0, 1.3 in a rectangular shallow water harbor were investigated.Three dimensional surface elevation profiles and the depth-averaged horizontal velocities were analysed.The numerical results characterised very well the ship waves in shallow water.Strong boundary reflection waves were found in the case of high depth Froude number (Fh=1.3).Waves generated by the interactions of two ships moving in the same directions and in the opposite directions were also numerically investigated in the present study.

  19. Wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  20. BREAKING WAVE FORCES ON VERTICAL CYLINDERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The breaking wave forces on vertical cylinders in shallow waters were studied by means of experimental methods. The results indicate that the breaking wave pressure is distributed exponentially with respect to water depth. An experimental formula was given using the test data. Compared with test data, the calculated breaking wave forces are in good agreement with the test data.

  1. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  2. Study on Variation Rules of Intake and Exhaust Pressure Waves for Turbocharged Diesel Engine -Based on One-dimension Simulation%增压柴油机进排气压力波变化规律研究--基于一维仿真模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁澄清; 文华; 姜水生; 林宇星

    2013-01-01

    使用 Boost 软件建立起一款增压柴油机工作过程的一维计算模型,并利用发动机台架实验数据对该模型进行了标定和验证,进而在确保模型满足误差要求的情况下,通过该模型计算得到了实验难以获取的气门位置的进排气压力波信息;结合柴油机实际特点,对这些不同工况下的进排气压力波的变化规律进行了归纳比较及合理性分析,并与相应工况下缸内压力进行了比较;最后,基于理想进排气压力波的关键要素要求,指出了进一步优化进排气压力波的必要性,并提出了优化的初步方向及具体措施。研究工作表明了一维仿真研究进排气压力波的可行性、实用性和准确性。%Using the boost software , computational simulation model of one-dimension for the work process of a turbo-charged diesel engine was created , and for the accuracy of the simulation , the model was calibrated and verified by using the base engine experiment data .With the model , we got the intake and exhaust pressure wave information which were not easily got by these base experiments at positions of valves .With the actual characteristics of the diesel engine , the pressure waves of different cases was inductive compared and analysed , and comparison between pressure waves and cy linder was made .At last , base on the requirement of ideal of intake and exhaust pressure wave , we not only point out the necessity of improving intake and exhaust pressure wave , and also give suggestions of improving the intake and ex-haust wave .The research shows the feasibility , practicability and accuracy of studying on pressure wave by one-dimen-sion model .

  3. Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H2–O2–Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Deiterding

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniques in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.

  4. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  5. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  6. The explanation and verification of the best pressure to acquire pulse waves based on hemodynamics%基于桡动脉血液流动模型对中医最佳取脉压力的解释与验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉满; 王学民; 宋鹏; 王欣; 陆小左; 周鹏

    2015-01-01

    Pulse manifestation in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) was formed by pulse wave which is affected by body’s physiological parameters. The best pressure to acquire pulse wave was an important part of objective study of TCM pulse diagnosis, which was assumed and analyzed according to the rule of thumb before and there was no theoretical basis for it. Therefore, studying the best pressure to acquire pulse wave in the light of radial artery blood flow model has an important significance for the improvement of electropulsograph and the objective research of TCM pulse diagnosis. According to the theories and methods from hemodynamics and the existing equivalent model of radial artery blood vessel, blood flow model of different pressure from the outside was built. Meanwhile, the relationship between pulse pressure and the pressure to acquire pulse wave was derived, which explains the best pressure to acquire pulse waves in theory. And the mathematical model of the best pressure to acquire pulse wave was verified by normal pulse, floating pulse, deep pulse--three clinical cases which collected by electropulsograph. The clinical results were as follows: The best pressure to acquire pulse wave varies with pulse manifestation. The peak value of normal pulse first rises and then decreases, the best pressure to acquire pulse wave is in the moderate pressure. The peak value of floating pulse increases continuously, the best pressure to acquire pulse wave is in the light pressure. And the peak value of deep pulse has been reduced, the best pressure to acquire pulse wave is in the heavy pressure. Clinical results are in reasonable agreement with theoretical proof, it testified that pulse pressure and the pressure to acquire pulse wave are closely related, and the maximum value of pulse pressure is the best position to acquire pulse wave.%中医的脉象是脉搏波受人体的生理参数影响而形成,由桡动脉血液流动模型研究中医的最佳取脉压力,对

  7. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Sørensen, H. C.;

    1998-01-01

    This paper concerns with the development of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon. This WEC is based on the overtopping principle. An overview of the performed research done concerning the Wave Dragon over the past years is given, and the results of one of the more comprehensive studies......, concerning a hydraulic evaluation and optimisation of the geometry of the Wave Dragon, is presented. Furthermore, the plans for the future development projects are sketched....

  8. Electromagnetic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is dedicated to various aspects of electromagnetic wave theory and its applications in science and technology. The covered topics include the fundamental physics of electromagnetic waves, theory of electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering, methods of computational analysis......, material characterization, electromagnetic properties of plasma, analysis and applications of periodic structures and waveguide components, etc....

  9. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Knapp, W.;

    2006-01-01

    Wave Dragon is a floating wave energy converter working by extracting energy principally by means of overtopping of waves into a reservoir. A 1:4.5 scale prototype has been sea tested for 20 months. This paper presents results from testing, experiences gained and developments made during...

  10. Wave phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Towne, Dudley H

    1988-01-01

    This excellent undergraduate-level text emphasizes optics and acoustics, covering inductive derivation of the equation for transverse waves on a string, acoustic plane waves, boundary-value problems, polarization, three-dimensional waves and more. With numerous problems (solutions for about half). ""The material is superbly chosen and brilliantly written"" - Physics Today. Problems. Appendices.

  11. Wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarenko, Sergey [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Mathematics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Wave Turbulence refers to the statistical theory of weakly nonlinear dispersive waves. There is a wide and growing spectrum of physical applications, ranging from sea waves, to plasma waves, to superfluid turbulence, to nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Beyond the fundamentals the book thus also covers new developments such as the interaction of random waves with coherent structures (vortices, solitons, wave breaks), inverse cascades leading to condensation and the transitions between weak and strong turbulence, turbulence intermittency as well as finite system size effects, such as ''frozen'' turbulence, discrete wave resonances and avalanche-type energy cascades. This book is an outgrow of several lectures courses held by the author and, as a result, written and structured rather as a graduate text than a monograph, with many exercises and solutions offered along the way. The present compact description primarily addresses students and non-specialist researchers wishing to enter and work in this field. (orig.)

  12. Wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, wave energy spectra, significant wave height, dominant wave period and direction, peak wave period and direction, currents, temperature, conductivity, pressure, sigma-theta, river level, sonar readings, and backscatter data collected at Myrtle Beach in the North Atlantic Ocean from instruments deployed on MOORINGS using platforms RV NANCY FOSTER and RV DAN MOORE from October 1, 2003 to May 1, 2004 (NODC Accession 0066109)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These bottom current, wave and associated observations were collected as part of a larger study to understand the physical processes that control the transport of...

  13. Theoretical Analysis and Derivation of Combustion Wave Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jun

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical relations of pressure, density, velocity, temperature and Mach number of combustion waves are built. The parameters' curves with different combustion energy are illustrated in which four zones are pointed out to represent different combustion states. The expressions and curves of parameters are important to analyze the trends of combustion waves, and to determine conditions on which detonation waves or deflagration waves occur.

  14. Refrigeration system having standing wave compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1992-01-01

    A compression-evaporation refrigeration system, wherein gaseous compression of the refrigerant is provided by a standing wave compressor. The standing wave compressor is modified so as to provide a separate subcooling system for the refrigerant, so that efficiency losses due to flashing are reduced. Subcooling occurs when heat exchange is provided between the refrigerant and a heat pumping surface, which is exposed to the standing acoustic wave within the standing wave compressor. A variable capacity and variable discharge pressure for the standing wave compressor is provided. A control circuit simultaneously varies the capacity and discharge pressure in response to changing operating conditions, thereby maintaining the minimum discharge pressure needed for condensation to occur at any time. Thus, the power consumption of the standing wave compressor is reduced and system efficiency is improved.

  15. Study on Technology of Oil Pipeline Leakage Detection Based on Negative Pressure Wave%负压波输油管道泄漏检测技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏; 王兰兰; 张冬生; 林义刚

    2011-01-01

    Pipeline transportation plays an important role in the national economy for its unique advantages.However, due to various reasons, the leakage accidents in pipelines transportation occur frequently not only cause great loss of resoursel, but also pollute the environment, what' s more, it may lead to serious casualties. In order to guarantee the pipelines work safely and minimize the losses caused by leakage accidents, it' s necessary to study leakage detecting technology to raise the sensitivity of detection and accuracy of localization. To solve this issue,the negative pressure wave leak detecting technology is introduced, analyzed the principles of detection and localization and the key factors that effect accurate localization. At last, the design and structure of pipeline leak detecting system are given.%管道输送以自己独特的优点在国民经济中占有重要的地位.然而由于各种原因,管道泄漏事故频频发生,不仅造成资源损失和环境污染,而且会带来巨大的财产损失和人员伤亡.为保障管道安全运行和将泄漏事故造成的危害减少到最小,需要研究泄漏检测技术以获得更高的泄漏检测灵敏度和更准确的泄漏点定位精度.针对这个问题,主要介绍了负压波泄漏检测技术.分析了其检测定位原理以及影响准确定位的关键因素.最后说明了管道泄漏检测系统的设计与构成.

  16. 发射筒口燃气压力波数值模拟及实验验证%Numerical Simulation and Experimental Verification of Gas Pressure Wave at the Exit of Launching Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程栋; 何国强; 胡仁海; 魏祥庚; 李江

    2011-01-01

    文章利用气泡脉动理论对筒口燃气脉动规律进行了分析,采用VOF多相流模型和k-ε湍流模型,对导弹水下发射时筒口燃气脉动压力波进行了数值模拟,并利用实验数据进行了验证.结果表明,数值模型与实验数据比较接近,在一定程度上反映了筒口压力波的变化规律,为水下发射环境研究探索了一种新的方法.%The introduction of the full paper outlines our research, which is explained in sections 1, and 2. Section 1 is entitled calculation method ; subsection 1.1 is entitled geometrical configuration and its mesh; subsection 1.2 is entitled boundary conditions and initial conditions; subsection 1.3 is entitled numerical simulation model; subsection 1.3.1 is entitled gas-liquid two-phase flow model; subsection 1.3.2 is entitled k-ε turbulence model. Section 2 is entitled verification of calculation method; its core consists of: (1) we did pool experiments on the under-water launching of a model missile, during which we photographed the pulsant of a bubble with a high-speed camera and monitored the pressure wave at the exit of launching tube; (2) we compare our simulation results with experimental results; the comparison results indicate preliminarily that the formation, expansion and contraction of the bubble simulated with our method agree qualitatively with those obtained through experiments.

  17. Violent breaking wave impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Peregrine, D.H.; Bullock, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    When an ocean wave breaks against a steep-fronted breakwater, sea wall or a similar marine structure, its impact on the structure can be very violent. This paper describes the theoretical studies that, together with field and laboratory investigations, have been carried out in order to gain...... a better understanding of the processes involved. The wave's approach towards a structure is modelled with classical irrotational flow to obtain the different types of impact profiles that may or may not lead to air entrapment. The subsequent impact is modelled with a novel compressible-flow model...... for a homogeneous mixture of incompressible liquid and ideal gas. This enables a numerical description of both trapped air pockets and the propagation of pressure shock waves through the aerated water. An exact Riemann solver is developed to permit a finite-volume solution to the flow model with smallest possible...

  18. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  19. Plane waves as tractor beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that in a large class of systems, plane waves act as tractor beams: i.e., an incident plane wave can exert a pulling force on the scatterer. The underlying physical mechanism for the pulling force is due to the sufficiently strong scattering of the incoming wave into another mode carrying more momentum, in which case excess momentum is created behind the scatterer. This tractor beam or negative radiation pressure (NRP) effect, is found to be generic in systems with multiple scattering channels. In a birefringent medium, electromagnetic plane waves incident on a thin plate exert NRP of the same order of magnitude as optical radiation pressure, while in artificial dielectrics (metamaterials), the magnitude of NRP can even be macroscopic. In two dimensions, we study various scattering situations on vortices, and NRP is shown to occur by the scattering of heavy baryons into light leptons off cosmic strings, and by neutron scattering off vortices in the XY model.

  20. 不同收缩压水平对臂踝脉搏波传导速度影响的研究%Effect of different levels of systolic blood pressure on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王义; 陶杰; 董岩; 陈朔华; 高新颖; 季春鹏; 杨光; 郑瑶; 吴寿岭

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of different levels of systolic blood pressure on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity(baPWV). Methods A total of 5 852 participants was selected with stratified random sampling from the 101 510 workers of Tangshan Kaiuan Company who had undergone a physical check-up program. 5 222 of them with integral data were recruited into this survey. According to SBP collected during the 2010-2011 health examination program,the population under observation was divided into four groups:optimal SBP(SBP<120 mmHg),high-normal blood pressure Ⅰ period(120 mmHg≤SBP<130 mmHg),high-normal blood pressure Ⅱ period (130 mmHg≤SBP<140 mmHg)and hypertension(SBP≥140 mmHg or SBP<140 mmHg but antihypertensive drug user). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the influence of different levels of systolic blood pressure on baPWV. Results 1)There were 3 132 males and 2 090 females in all the 5 222 participants with an average age of 55.1 years old. Their mean of baPWV was(1 587.57±400.71)cm/s,with the detection rates as 62%(baPWV≥1 400 cm/s). 2)The means of baPWV for the above groups of SBP were 1 322.19,1 456.27,1 544.78 and 1 827.77 cm/s, respectively,with detection rates of baPWV≥1 400 cm/s as 26.4%,49.3%,64.2% and 88.3%, respectively. 3)Results from the Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that β of SBP was 0.40,only ranking second,on age(0.48). 4)Data from the Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that after adjusting for age,gender and other risk factors,when compared to optimal SBP,factors as high-normal blood pressure Ⅰ period、high-normal blood pressure Ⅱ period and hypertension were risk factors for increasing baPWV,with OR values as 2.70(95%CI:2.20-3.32),4.56(95%CI:3.67-5.67)and 13.51(95%CI:10.87-16.78),respectively. Conclusion Higher SBP seemed an independent risk factor for the increase of baPWV.%目的:探讨不同收缩压(SBP)水平对臂踝脉搏波传导速度

  1. High pressure Hugoniot of sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D.

    1993-07-01

    The Hugoniot of sapphire was measured from 80 GPa to 340 GPa in shock-wave experiments using projectiles accelerated by a two stage gas gun. Transit times of the shock waves were measured either optically with a streak camera or through electrical pin contacts. The Hugoniot in this pressure range fits U{sub s}=8.74+0.96 U{sub p}in km/s.

  2. Prototype testing of the wave energy converter wave dragon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter [Hydraulics and Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, Aalborg 9000 (Denmark); Friis-Madsen, Erik [Loewenmark F.R.I., Copenhagen (Denmark); Soerensen, Hans Chr. [SPOK, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2006-02-01

    The Wave Dragon is an offshore wave energy converter of the overtopping type. It consists of two wave reflectors focusing the incoming waves towards a ramp, a reservoir for collecting the overtopping water and a number of hydro turbines for converting the pressure head into power. In the period from 1998 to 2001 extensive wave tank testing on a scale model was carried at Aalborg University. Then, a 57x27m wide and 237tonnes heavy (incl. ballast) prototype of the Wave Dragon, placed in Nissum Bredning, Denmark, was grid connected in May 2003 as the world's first offshore wave energy converter. The prototype is fully equipped with hydro turbines and automatic control systems, and is instrumented in order to monitor power production, wave climate, forces in mooring lines, stresses in the structure and movements of the Wave Dragon. In the period May 2003 to January 2005 an extensive measuring program has been carried out, establishing the background for optimal design of the structure and regulation of the power take off system. Planning for deployment of a 4MW power production unit in the Atlantic by 2007 is in progress. (author)

  3. Superconducting traveling wave accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note considers the applicability of superconductivity to traveling wave accelerators. Unlike CW operation of a superconducting standing wave or circulating wave accelerator section, which requires improvement factors (superconductor conductivity divided by copper conductivity) of about 106 in order to be of practical use, a SUperconducting TRaveling wave Accelerator, SUTRA, operating in the pulsed mode requires improvement factors as low as about 103, which are attainable with niobium or lead at 4.2K, the temperature of liquid helium at atmospheric pressure. Changing from a copper traveling wave accelerator to SUTRA achieves the following. (1) For a given gradient SUTRA reduces the peak and average power requirements typically by a factor of 2. (2) SUTRA reduces the peak power still further because it enables us to increase the filling time and thus trade pulse width for gradient. (3) SUTRA makes possible a reasonably long section at higher frequencies. (4) SUTRA makes possible recirculation without additional rf average power. 8 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  4. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik;

    2008-01-01

    Since March 2003 a prototype of Wave Dragon has been tested in an inland sea in Denmark. This has been a great success with all subsystems tested and improved through working in an offshore environment. The project has proved the Wave Dragon device and has enabled the next stage, a production sized...

  5. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  6. Wave Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Christov, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    In classical continuum physics, a wave is a mechanical disturbance. Whether the disturbance is stationary or traveling and whether it is caused by the motion of atoms and molecules or the vibration of a lattice structure, a wave can be understood as a specific type of solution of an appropriate mathematical equation modeling the underlying physics. Typical models consist of partial differential equations that exhibit certain general properties, e.g., hyperbolicity. This, in turn, leads to the possibility of wave solutions. Various analytical techniques (integral transforms, complex variables, reduction to ordinary differential equations, etc.) are available to find wave solutions of linear partial differential equations. Furthermore, linear hyperbolic equations with higher-order derivatives provide the mathematical underpinning of the phenomenon of dispersion, i.e., the dependence of a wave's phase speed on its wavenumber. For systems of nonlinear first-order hyperbolic equations, there also exists a general ...

  7. Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Teens > Peer Pressure Print A A A Text Size What's in ... She'd just had a big dose of peer pressure. Who Are Your Peers? When you were a ...

  8. Method of Calculation of Crown Wall Stability in Oblique Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    2007-01-01

    The wave loading along a structure exposed to oblique waves varies in time and space. Despite of this, the wave generated pressures are usually recorded by gauges only in one position of the wall (more gauges densily spaced is regarded as one position).......The wave loading along a structure exposed to oblique waves varies in time and space. Despite of this, the wave generated pressures are usually recorded by gauges only in one position of the wall (more gauges densily spaced is regarded as one position)....

  9. Infragravity waves across the oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Arshad; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Aucan, Jerome

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of transoceanic Infragravity (IG) wave was investigated using a global spectral wave model together with deep-ocean pressure recorders. IG waves are generated mostly at the shorelines due to non-linear hydrodynamic effects that transfer energy from the main windsea and swell band, with periods of 1 to 25 s, to periods up to 500 s. IG waves are important for the study of near-shore processes and harbor agitation, and can also be a potential source of errors in satellite altimetry measurements. Setting up a global IG model was motivated by the investigation of these errors for the future planned SWOT mission. Despite the fact that the infragravity waves exhibit much smaller vertical amplitudes than the usual high frequency wind-driven waves, of the order of 1 cm in the deep oceans, their propagation throughout the oceans and signature in the wave spectrum can be clearly observed. Using a simplified empirical parameterization of the nearshore source of free IG waves as a function of the incoming wave parameters we extended to WAVEWATCH III model, used so far for windseas and swell, to the IG band, up to periods of 300 s. The spatial and temporal variability of the modeled IG energy was well correlated to the DART station records, making it useful to interpret the records of IG waves. Open ocean IG wave records appear dominated by trans-oceanic events with well defined sources concentrated on a few days, usually on West coasts, and affecting the entire ocean basin, with amplitude patterns very similar to those of tsunamis. Three particular IG bursts during 2008 are studied, 2 in the Pacific Ocean and 1 in the North Atlantic. It was observed that the liberated IG waves can travel long distances often crossing whole oceans with negligible dissipation. The IG signatures are clearly observed at sensors along their propagation paths.

  10. Cavitation pressure in liquid helium

    OpenAIRE

    Caupin, Frederic; Balibar, Sebastien

    2001-01-01

    Recent experiments have suggested that, at low enough temperature, the homogeneous nucleation of bubbles occurs in liquid helium near the calculated spinodal limit. This was done in pure superfluid helium 4 and in pure normal liquid helium 3. However, in such experiments, where the negative pressure is produced by focusing an acoustic wave in the bulk liquid, the local amplitude of the instantaneous pressure or density is not directly measurable. In this article, we present a series of measur...

  11. High Accuracy, Miniature Pressure Sensor for Very High Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SiWave proposes to develop a compact, low-cost MEMS-based pressure sensor for very high temperatures and low pressures in hypersonic wind tunnels. Most currently...

  12. Shock response of porous metals: characterization of pressure field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shock wave reaction on porous metals is numerically simulated. When the pressure threshold is low, the increasing rate of high-pressure area gives roughly the propagation velocity of the compressive waves in the porous material. and the wave front in the condensed pressure map is nearly a plane: with the increasing of pressure threshold. more low-pressure-spots appear in the high-pressure background, and neighboring spots may coalesce, consequently, the topology of the pressure Turing pattern may change. The deviation from linearity of the increasing rate of high-pressure area is a pronounced effect of porous material under shock. The stronger the initial shock, the more pronounced the porosity effects. When the initial yield of material becomes higher, the material shows more elastic behaviors and the less porous effects, compressive and tension waves propagate more quickly, and the porous material becomes less compressible. (authors)

  13. Abnormal storm waves in the winter East/Japan Sea: generation process and hindcasting using an atmosphere-wind wave modelling system

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, H.S.; Kim, K. O.; Yamashita, T.; Komaguchi, T.; Mishima, T.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal storm waves cause coastal disasters along the coasts of Korean Peninsula and Japan in the East/Japan Sea (EJS) in winter, arising due to developed low pressures during the East Asia winter monsoon. The generation of these abnormal storm waves during rough sea states were studied and hindcast using an atmosphere-wave coupled modelling system. Wind waves and swell due to developed low pressures were found to be the main components of abnormal storm waves. The meteorological conditions ...

  14. Efficient Wave Energy Amplification with Wave Reflectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten Mejlhede; Frigaard, Peter Bak

    2002-01-01

    Wave Energy Converters (WEC's) extract wave energy from a limited area, often a single point or line even though the wave energy is generally spread out along the wave crest. By the use of wave reflectors (reflecting walls) the wave energy is effectively focused and increased to approximately 130...... for different geometries of the wave reflectors and optimal geometrical design parameters are specified. On this basis inventors of WEC's can evaluate whether a specific WEC possible could benefit from wave reflectors....

  15. Janus Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Papazoglou, Dimitris G; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2016-01-01

    We show the existence of a family of waves that share a common interesting property affecting the way they propagate and focus. These waves are a superposition of twin waves, which are conjugate to each other under inversion of the propagation direction. In analogy to holography, these twin "real" and "virtual" waves are related respectively to the converging and the diverging part of the beam and can be clearly visualized in real space at two distinct foci under the action of a focusing lens. Analytic formulas for the intensity distribution after focusing are derived, while numerical and experimental demonstrations are given for some of the most interesting members of this family, the accelerating Airy and ring-Airy beams.

  16. Alfven wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven chapters are included. Chapters 1 and 2 introduce the Alfven wave and describe its linear properties in a homogeneous medium. Chapters 3 and 4 cover the effects of inhomogeneities on these linear properties. Particular emphasis is placed on the appearance of a continuum spectrum and the associated absorption of the Alfven wave which arise due to the inhomogeneity. The explanation of the physical origin of absorption is given using kinetic theory. Chapter 5 is devoted to the associated plasma instabilities. Nonlinear effects discussed in Chapter 6 include quasilinear diffusion, decay, a solitary wave, and a modulational instability. The principles of Alfven wave heating, a design example and present-day experimental results are described in Chapter 7

  17. Wave Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Bazzi, Tomaso; Di Memmo, Alberico; Palini, Massimo; Sellini, Massimiliano; Fabbri, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the present report is the summary of the experimental campaign performed at INSEAN facilities. This campaign has been oriented to analyze the classical wave measurement systems and, furthermore, to validate the results of the numerical models. A devoted paragraph describes the main features of a new innovative and non intrusive methodology for the wave measurements aimed to perform both model and ship scale trials.

  18. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  19. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  20. Attenuation Analysis and Acoustic Pressure Levels for Combined Absorptive Mufflers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Vasile

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the pressure-wave propagation in a muffler for an internal combustion engine in case of two combined mufflers geometry. The approach is generally applicable to analyzing the damping of propagation of harmonic pressure waves. The paper purpose is to show finite elements analysis of both inductive and resistive damping in pressure acoustics. The main output is the attenuation and acoustic pressure levels for the frequency range 50 Hz–3000 Hz.

  1. Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Needham, Charles E

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this text is to document many of the lessons that have been learned during the author’s more than forty years in the field of blast and shock. The writing therefore takes on an historical perspective, in some sense, because it follows the author’s experience. The book deals with blast waves propagating in fluids or materials that can be treated as fluids. It begins by distinguishing between blast waves and the more general category of shock waves. It then examines several ways of generating blast waves, considering the propagation of blast waves in one, two and three dimensions as well as through the real atmosphere. One section treats the propagation of shocks in layered gases in a more detailed manner. The book also details the interaction of shock waves with structures in particular reflections, progressing from simple to complex geometries, including planar structures, two-dimensional structures such as ramps or wedges, reflections from heights of burst, and three-dimensional st...

  2. Pressure Hull Analysis under Shock Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-Jung Lee; Chia-Hao Hsu; Chien-Hua Huang

    2008-01-01

    The hull of high performance submarines must resist underwater shock loading due to exploding torpedoes or depth bombs. An underwater shock involving an initial shock wave and successive bubble pulsating waves is so complex that a theoretical technique for deriving shock pressure distribution is required for improving simulation efficiency. Complete shock loading is obtained theoretically in this work, and responses of a submarine pressure hull are calculated using ABAQUS USA (Underwater Shoc...

  3. Three-Dimensional Propagation of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in the Solar Chromosphere and Corona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波; 郑惠南; 王水

    2002-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in the solar atmosphere consisting of the chromosphere and corona. Pressure enhancement and velocity shear are implemented simultaneously at the bottom of the chromosphere. The global propagation of the incurred MHD waves, including fast-mode and slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves as well as Alfvén wave, can be identified. Wave front positions obtained numerically with respect to specific waves fit well with those calculated with local MHD wave speeds.

  4. Simplified Analysis Of Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Wilmer E.

    1988-01-01

    Semiempirical expressions and conventional analyses agree within about 3 percent. Set of semiempirical formulas enables direct calculation of supersonic and hypersonic shock-wave parameters without use of iterative procedures. Formulas provided for calculating shock deflection angle and downstream static pressure and enthalpy over mach number range of 2 to 25. Relationship describing thermodynamic behavior of partially dissociated air also developed.

  5. 节律性压力波对家犬气道黏蛋白分泌平衡的影响及其机制%Effect of rhythmic pressure waves on balancing airway basic mucus secretion in dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘诗兰; 尤列·皮尔曼; 维克多·科罗索夫; 周向东

    2013-01-01

    group C:the tension-sensitive cation channel (TRPV) 4 blocker Ruthenium Red (RR) was injected in advance, and ventilated as in group A. In group D:TRPV4 blocker RR was injected ifrstly, and then ventilated as in group B. Atfer 12 h ventilation, we collected bronchoalveolar lavage lfuid (BALF), tested MUC (2, 5AC, 5B) protein content by ELISA, and detected the transcription of MUC (2, 5AC, 5B) mRNA of bronchial lung tissue by RT-PCR . Results:Compared with the normal ventilation (A2) group, the protein level of MUC of excessive ventilation (B2) group was significantly higher, mainly MUC5AC (P<0.05);compared with the normal ventilation (A1) group, the protein level of MUC of no ventilation (B1) group was signiifcantly decreased (P<0.05). Atfer pretreatment with RR, the MUC protein level of group C1, C2 were signiifcantly lower than that of group A1, A2 (P<0.05);the MUC protein level of group B2were significantly lower than that of group D2 (P<0.05). The MUC (2, 5AC and 5B) mRNA level was higher in excessive ventilation group (B2) than in normal ventilation group (A2). Atfer pretreatment with RR, in comparison with group A1, A2, the MUC (2, 5AC and 5B) mRNA level of group C1, C2 declined;in comparison with group B2, the MUC (2, 5AC and 5B) mRNA level of group D2 declined. Conclusion:Rhythmic pressure waves may regulate and balance basic airway mucin secretion through activating the TRPV4 channel in dogs.

  6. Nonlinear wave-wave interactions and wedge waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ray Q.Lin; Will Perrie

    2005-01-01

    A tetrad mechanism for exciting long waves,for example edge waves,is described based on nonlinear resonant wave-wave interactions.In this mechanism,resonant interactions pass energy to an edge wave,from the three participating gravity waves.The estimated action flux into the edge wave can be orders of magnitude greater than the transfer fluxes derived from other competing mechanisms,such as triad interactions.Moreover,the numerical results show that the actual transfer rates into the edge wave from the three participating gravity waves are two-to three- orders of magnitude greater than bottom friction.

  7. Shock waves data for minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  8. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  9. Wave Generation Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Høgedal, Michael; Christensen, Morten

    The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered.......The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered....

  10. Magnetoacoustic Waves in the Solar Stratified Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑惠南; 王水; 吴式灿; 李波

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of magnetoacoustic waves in the solar atmosphere consisting of the photosphere, chromosphere and corona has been studied numerically by time-dependent multi-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation. Pressure disturbances are introduced at the bottom of the chromosphere and at the bottom of the corona, respectively. The computational results show that incurred fast and slow MHD waves propagate away from the source of the disturbances. The fast MHD wave propagates as an expansive wave in the radial direction, while the slow one steepens and it may evolve into a slow shock. We suggest that the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope wave observed by the SOHO and Moreton wave are a fast MHD wave propagating in the corona and in the chromosphere, respectively.

  11. Plane waves as tractor beams

    CERN Document Server

    Forgács, Péter; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that in a large class of systems plane waves can act as tractor beams: i.e., an incident plane wave can exert a pulling force on the scatterer. The underlying physical mechanism for the pulling force is due to the sufficiently strong scattering of the incoming wave into another mode having a larger wave number, in which case excess momentum is created behind the scatterer. Such a tractor beam or negative radiation pressure effect arises naturally in systems where the coupling between the scattering channels is due to Aharonov-Bohm (AB) gauge potentials. It is demonstrated that this effect is also present if the AB potential is an induced, ("artificial") gauge potential such as the one found in J. March-Russell, J. Preskill, F. Wilczek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 58 2567 (1992).

  12. Modal Wave Number Spectrum for Mesoscale Eddies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Ying; PENG Linhui

    2003-01-01

    The variations of ocean environmental parameters invariably result in variations of local modal wave numbers of a sound pressure field. The asymptotic Hankel transform with a short sliding window is applied to the complex sound pressure field in the water containing a mesoscale eddy to examine the variation of local modal wave numbers in such a range-dependent environment. The numerical simulation results show that modal wave number spectra obtained by this method can reflect the location and strength of a mesoscale eddy, therefore it can be used to monitor the strength and spatial scale of ocean mesoscale eddies.

  13. Pressure difference receiving ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Axel; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2007-01-01

    of such pressure difference receiving ears have been hampered by lack of suitable experimental methods. In this review, we review the methods for collecting reliable data on the binaural directional cues at the eardrums, on how the eardrum vibrations depend on the direction of sound incidence, and on how sound...... waves behave in the air spaces leading to the interior surfaces of eardrums. A linear mathematical model with well-defined inputs is used for exploring how the directionality varies with the binaural directional cues and the amplitude and phase gain of the sound pathway to the inner surface...

  14. Pressure transient in liquid lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressure surge that results from a step change of flow in liquid pipelines, commonly known as water hammer, was analyzed by an eigenfunction method. A differential-integral Pressure wave equation and a linearized velocity equation were derived from the equations of mass and momentum conservation. Waveform distortion due to viscous dissipation and pipe-wall elastic expansion is characterized by a dimensionless transmission number K. The pressure surge condition, which is mathematically singular, was used in the solution procedure. The exact solutions from numerical calculation of the differential-integral equation provide a complete Pressure transient in the pipe. The problems are also calculated With the general-purpose computer code COMMIX, which solves the exact mass conservation equation and Navier-Stokes equations. These solutions were compared with published experimental results, and agreement was good. The effect of turbulence on the pressure transient is discussed in the light of COMMIX calculational results

  15. On periodic water waves with Coriolis effects and isobaric streamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Matioc, Anca-Voichita

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove that solutions of the f-plane approximation for equatorial geophysical deep water waves, which have the property that the pressure is constant along the streamlines and do not possess stagnation points,are Gerstner-type waves. Furthermore, for waves traveling over a flat bed, we prove that there are only laminar flow solutions with these properties.

  16. Standing Sound Waves in Air with DataStudio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments related to standing sound waves in air are adapted for using the ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with the DataStudio software from PASCO scientific. First, the standing waves are created by reflection from a plane reflector. The distribution of the sound pressure along the standing wave is measured. Second, the resonance…

  17. Incident Wave Climate at the OWC Pico Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Crom, I.; Cabrera Bermejo, H.; Pecher, Arthur;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study is to retrieve the incident wave information that coincides with former Pico plant operation periods. The recent implementation of a directional pressure sensor for wave measurement as well as the recovery of the data gathered by a directional wave rider buoy allowed embarking...

  18. Design of a 1.5MW Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, H. C.; Friis-Madsen, E.; Parmeggiani, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses results of regular wave tests conducted at the University of Naples “Federico II” with the purpose of investigating the qualitative features and the magnitude of the wave pressures acting onto the front face of a Seawave Slot-Cone Generator (SSG). Various wave conditions have...

  19. Springing Response Due to Directional Wave Field Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2004-01-01

    in multidirectional sea. The incident pressure field from the second order bidirectional wave field is derived, including the non-linear cross-coupling terms between the two wave systems (e.g. wind driven waves and swell). The resulting effect of the super-harmonic cross-coupling interaction terms on the springing...

  20. Cooldown Measurements in a Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Refrigerator

    CERN Document Server

    Dhuley, R C

    2016-01-01

    Thermoacoustic Refrigerators (TARs) use acoustic power to generate cold temperatures. Apart from the operating frequency and the mean temperature of the working medium, the charging pressure and the dynamic pressure in the TAR govern its attainable cold temperature. The effect of charging pressure on the dynamic pressure in a loudspeaker driven gas filled standing wave column has been well understood. The present work aims to investigate the effect of charging pressure on the cold end temperature of a standing wave TAR. The cold end temperature lift and the cooldown for several changing pressures are reported. The effect of vacuum around the cold end on the TAR performance is also presented.

  1. Effects of Low Frequency Sound Waves of Different Timbres on Weizhong Microcirculation and Transcutaneous Oxygen Partial Pressure of Healthy People%不同音色低频声波对健康人委中微循环及经皮氧分压的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王普艳; 陈雪; 许继宗; 汤心钰; 张波; 李玉华; 司英奎; 李洁; 杨戈; 李新艳; 刘亚峰

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察频率相同的情况下不同音色的低频声波对健康人委中微循环及经皮氧分压的影响,探讨体感音乐疗法的作用机理。方法在30例健康人的委中附近,播放频率相同(98.00 Hz)、音色不同(分别模拟古琴、箫、埙、钟、鼓的音色)的低频声波,各音色分别播放至60、120、180、240、300 s时,以激光多普勒血流仪分析委中微循环及经皮氧分压的变化。结果钟、鼓、箫的音色声波使委中微循环量、经皮氧分压逐渐升高,且鼓>钟>箫;埙、古琴的音色声波使委中微循环量、经皮氧分压逐渐降低,且埙递减大于古琴。同一时点组间比较,鼓音色组高于其他组(P<0.01)。结论不同音色的低频声波五行属性不同,频谱成分不同,可对穴位产生不同影响。%Objective To discuss different effects of low frequency sound waves of different timbres on microcirculation and transcutaneous oxygen partial pressure of Weizhong (BL40) of healthy people;To study the mechanism of somatosensory music therapy. Methods The same frequency (98.00 Hz), different timbres (sounds of guqin, flute, ocarina, bell, and drum were simulated) low frequency sound waves were played near Weizhong acupoint of 30 healthy persons. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to analyze microcirculation and the changes of transcutaneous oxygen pressure of meridian acupoints, when each timbre was played for 60, 120, 180, 240 and 300 s. Results Sound waves of bell, drum, and flute made point microcirculation and transcutaneous oxygen pressure gradually increase, and the influence of drum>bell>flute;timbre waves of ocarina and guqin made the point microcirculation and transcutaneous oxygen pressure decrease gradually decrease, and the decrease of ocarina was more significant than that of guqin. In the same time point, sound waves of bell made point microcirculation and transcutaneous oxygen pressure increase more than the other

  2. Noise Evaluation Technique Based on Surface Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter the relevant theory for the understanding of TE noise modeling is collected. It contains the acoustic formulations of [31] and [57]. Both give a relation for the far field sound pressure in dependence of the frequency wave number spectral density of the pressure on the airfoil...

  3. Pore Pressure Measurements Inside Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgason, Einar; Burcharth, H. F.; Grüne, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The present paper presents pore pressure measurements from large scale model tests performed at the Large Wave Channel, Hannover, Germany and small scale model test performed at the Hydraulic & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University, Denmark. Information on pore pressure attenuation a...

  4. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hereman, Willy

    2013-01-01

    Encyclopedic article covering shallow water wave models used in oceanography and atmospheric science. Sections: Definition of the Subject; Introduction and Historical Perspective; Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations; Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions; Numerical Methods; Water Wave Experiments and Observations; Future Directions, and Bibliography.

  5. Hydraulic behaviour of the floating wave energy converter Wave Dragon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the project is to establish a scale 1:4.5 test model of the floating offshore wave energy converter - Wave Dragon - for testing at 5 m water depth in the Inlet Nissum Bredning. The test model will be equipped with an existing diameter 340 mm model turbine plus additional outlet tubes simulating the resistance from 1 - 16 turbines. The model will be designed to stay afloat even with a total loss of air pressure in the open bottom buoyancy chambers. The test series will primarily focus on measurements of hydraulic response, forces in the mooring system and overtopping quantities. Also data such as head, rotational speed and power production from the turbine will be monitored during the whole test period. The project will verify the effect of the pressured air buoyancy system, which cannot be scaled correctly in laboratory scale models. The test results will allow for an evaluation of the Wave Dragon power production as a function of sea state and freeboard height, in order to calibrate the existing WD-power simulation software. The model can be utilized for further testing of turbine regulation and stress and strain in the structure, establishing the necessary knowledge base for deploying a full-scale demonstration plant. This CD-ROM contains various videos, reports, notes, conference papers and Power Point presentations on the making of the wave energy converter Wave Dragon. (BA)

  6. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    På foranledning af Löwenmark F.R.I, er der udført numeriske beregninger af Wave Dragons (herefter WD) armes effektivitet for forskellige geometriske udformninger. 5 geometriske modeller, hvor WD's arme er forkortet/forlænget er undersøgt for 3 forskellige drejninger af armene. I alt er 15...

  7. Model testing of Wave Dragon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Previous to this project a scale model 1:50 of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon was built by the Danish Maritime Institute and tested in a wave tank at Aalborg University (AAU). The test programs investigated the movements of the floating structure, mooring forces and forces in the reflectors. The first test was followed by test establishing the efficiency in different sea states. The scale model has also been extensively tested in the EU Joule Craft project JOR-CT98-7027 (Low-Pressure Turbine and Control Equipment for Wave Energy Converters /Wave Dragon) at University College Cork, Hydraulics and Maritime Research Centre, Ireland. The results of the previous model tests have formed the basis for a redesign of the WEC. In this project a reconstruction of the scale 1:50 model and sequential tests of changes to the model geometry and mass distribution parameters will be performed. AAU will make the modifications to the model based on the revised Loewenmark design and perform the tests in their wave tank. Grid connection requirements have been established. A hydro turbine with no movable parts besides the rotor has been developed and a scale model 1:3.5 tested, with a high efficiency over the whole head range. The turbine itself has possibilities for being used in river systems with low head and variable flow, an area of interest for many countries around the world. Finally, a regulation strategy for the turbines has been developed, which is essential for the future deployment of Wave Dragon.The video includes the following: 1. Title, 2. Introduction of the Wave Dragon, 3. Model test series H, Hs = 3 m, Rc = 3 m, 4. Model test series H, Hs = 5 m, Rc = 4 m, 5. Model test series I, Hs = 7 m, Rc = 1.25 m, 6. Model test series I, Hs = 7 m, Rc = 4 m, 7. Rolling title. On this VCD additional versions of the video can be found in the directory 'addvideo' for playing the video on PC's. These versions are: Model testing of Wave Dragon, DVD version

  8. Pressure sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  9. Pressure Hull Analysis under Shock Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Jung Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The hull of high performance submarines must resist underwater shock loading due to exploding torpedoes or depth bombs. An underwater shock involving an initial shock wave and successive bubble pulsating waves is so complex that a theoretical technique for deriving shock pressure distribution is required for improving simulation efficiency. Complete shock loading is obtained theoretically in this work, and responses of a submarine pressure hull are calculated using ABAQUS USA (Underwater Shock Analysis codes. In the long run, this deflection and stress data will assist in examining the structural arrangement of the submarine pressure hull.

  10. Relationship between Blood Pressure Variability and Brachial-ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Hypertensive Patients%高血压患者血压变异性与肱踝脉搏波传导速度的关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 余振球

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨高血压患者血压变异性与肱踝脉搏波传导速度(brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity,baPWV)的关系.方法 选择原发性高血压患者313例,根据baPWV值,将其分为两组:baPWV正常组(baPWV<1 400 cm/s)87例,baPWV升高组(baPWV≥1 400 cm/s)226例.比较两组患者年龄、性别构成比、血糖、血脂、血肌酐、血尿酸、血压及血压变异性.结果 单因素分析显示,baPWV升高组患者的年龄、胆固醇、低密度脂蛋白、高密度脂蛋白、24 h平均收缩压、24 h收缩压变异性及24 h舒张压变异性均高于baPWV正常组(P<0.05),代入Logistic回归分析显示年龄、胆固醇、高密度脂蛋白、24 h平均收缩压、24 h收缩压变异性及24 h舒张压变异性与baPWV呈相关性(P<0.05).结论 高血压患者24 h收缩压变异性和舒张压变异性是影响baPWV的独立因素.%Objective To explore the relationship between blood pressure variability and brachial - ankle pulse wave velocity ( baPWV ) in hypertensive patients. Methods Totally 313 patients with essential hypertension were enrolled in this study and divided into normal baPWV group ( baPWV < 1 400cm/s, n =87 ) and high baPWV group ( baPWV≥1 400cm/s, n= 226 ) based on their baPWV values. Age, gender ratio, fasting blood glucose ( FBG ), blood lipids including cholesterol ( CHO ), low - density lipoprotein cholesterol ( LDL ), and high - density lipoprotein cholesterol ( HDL ), serum creatinine ( Cr ), blood uric acid ( UA ), blood pressure, and blood pressure variability were measured. Results Univariate analysis revealed that age, CHO, LDL, HDL, 24 - hour systolic blood pressure, 24 - hour systolic blood pressure variability, and 24 -hour diastolic blood pressure variability were significantly higher in high baPWV group than in normal baPWV group ( P <0. 05 ). Multivariate Logistic regression analysis indicated that age, CHO, HDL, 24 -hour systolic blood pressure, 24 -hour systolic blood pressure variability

  11. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Maksimchuk, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-02-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses that diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we study theoretically and numerically relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking.

  12. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004.......Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004....

  13. Gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, I; Moschella, U; Fre, P

    2001-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are a hot topic and promise to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology, and theoretical physics. Technological developments have led us to the brink of their direct observation, which could become a reality in the coming years. The direct observation of GWs will open an entirely new field: GW astronomy. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of previously unseen phenomena, such as the coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes), the fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big-bang relics, and the new and unexpected.With a wide range of contributions by leading scientists in the field, Gravitational Waves covers topics such as the basics of GWs, various advanced topics, GW detectors, astrophysics of GW sources, numerical applications, and several recent theoretical developments. The material is written at a level suitable for postgraduate students entering the field.

  14. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  15. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  16. Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves along a dense plasma filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowakowska, H.; Zakrzewski, Z. [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Gdansk (Poland); Moisan, M. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2001-05-21

    The characteristics of electromagnetic waves propagating along dense plasma filaments, as encountered in atmospheric pressure discharges, are examined in the microwave frequency range; they turn out to be surface waves. Results of numerical calculations of the dependence of the phase and attenuation coefficients on the plasma parameters are presented. In the limit of large electron densities, this guided wave is akin to a Sommerfeld wave and the propagation can be described in an analytical form. (author)

  17. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  18. Cooldown Measurements in a Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Refrigerator

    OpenAIRE

    Dhuley, R. C.; Atrey, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoacoustic Refrigerators (TARs) use acoustic power to generate cold temperatures. Apart from the operating frequency and the mean temperature of the working medium, the charging pressure and the dynamic pressure in the TAR govern its attainable cold temperature. The effect of charging pressure on the dynamic pressure in a loudspeaker driven gas filled standing wave column has been well understood. The present work aims to investigate the effect of charging pressure on the cold end tempera...

  19. Magnetospheric ULF waves driven by external sources

    CERN Document Server

    Agapitov, Oleksiy

    2015-01-01

    The multi-spacecraft missions (Cluster and THEMIS) observations allowed to collect large data base for Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves properties, their localization, and sources. Mainly here we focused on these recent results. Studying of the source and characteristics of ULF waves can help in the understanding of the interaction and energy transport from solar wind to the magnetosphere. Here we present peculiarities of ULF waves generated by different solar wind phenomenon: surface magnetopause instability, magnetosphere cavity modes and solar wind dynamic pressure sudden impulses (SI) penetration into the magnetosphere. Permanent observations of ULF waves involve existence of the permanent source and, as the previous studies showed, the contributions to Pc4-Pc5 ULF wave power from the external sources are larger than the contribution from internal magnetosphere sources. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) can generate on the magnetosphere flanks classical ULF resonant waves with spatially localized ampl...

  20. Compaction Waves in Granular HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Kober; R. Menikoff

    1999-01-01

    Piston driven compaction waves in granular HMX are simulated with a two-dimensional continuum mechanics code in which individual grains are resolved. The constitutive properties of the grains are modeled with a hydrostatic pressure and a simple elastic-plastic model for the shear stress. Parameters are chosen to correspond to inert HMX. For a tightly packed random grain distribution (with initial porosity of 19%) we varied the piston velocity to obtain weak partly compacted waves and stronger fully compacted waves. The average stress and wave speed are compatible with the porous Hugoniot locus for uni- axial strain. However, the heterogeneities give rise to stress concentrations, which lead to localized plastic flow. For weak waves, plastic deformation is the dominant dissipative mechanism and leads to dispersed waves that spread out in time. In addition to dispersion, the granular heterogeneities give rise to subgrain spatial variation in the thermodynamic variables. The peaks in the temperature fluctuations, known as hot spots, are in the range such that they are the critical factor for initiation sensitivity.

  1. Saturation process of nonlinear standing waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马大猷; 刘克

    1996-01-01

    The sound pressure of the nonlinear standing waves is distorted as expected, but also tends to saturate as being found in standing-wave tube experiments with increasing sinusoidal excitation. Saturation conditions were not actually reached, owing to limited excitation power, but the evidence of tendency to saturation is without question. It is the purpose of this investigation to find the law of saturation from the existing experimental data. The results of curve fitting indicate that negative feedback limits the growth of sound pressure with increasing excitation, the growth of the fundamental and the second harmonic by the negative feedback of their sound pressures, and the growth of the third and higher harmonics, however, by their energies (sound pressures squared). The growth functions of all the harmonics are derived, which are confirmed by the experiments. The saturation pressures and their properties are found.

  2. Impact of Wave Dragon on Wave Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Tedd, James; Kramer, Morten; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2006-01-01

    This report is an advisory paper for use in determining the wave dragon effects on hydrography, by considering the effect on the wave climate in the region of a wave dragon. This is to be used in the impact assessment for the Wave Dragon pre-commercial demonstrator.

  3. Impact of Wave Dragon on Wave Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Tedd, James; Kramer, Morten;

    This report is an advisory paper for use in determining the wave dragon effects on hydrography, by considering the effect on the wave climate in the region of a wave dragon. This is to be used in the impact assessment for the Wave Dragon pre-commercial demonstrator....

  4. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  5. Chemical pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Andreas; Amstutz, Nahid; Delahaye, Sandra; Sadki, Asmaâ; Schenker, Sabine; Sieber, Regula; Zerara, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    The physical and photophysical properties of three classic transition metal complexes, namely [Fe(bpy)3]2+, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, and [Co(bpy)3]2+, can be tuned by doping them into a variety of inert crystalline host lattices. The underlying guest-host interactions are discussed in terms of a chemical pressure.

  6. Vertical variations of wave-induced radiation stress tensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jinhai; Yan Yixin

    2001-01-01

    The distributions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor over depth are studied by using the linear wave theory, which are divided into three regions, i.e., above the mean water level, below the wave trough level, and between these two levels. The computational expressions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor at the arbitrary wave angle are established by means of the Eulerian coordinate transformation, and the asymptotic forms for deep and shallow water are also presented. The vertical variations of a 30° incident wave-induced radiation stress tensor in deep water, intermediate water and shallow water are calculated respectively. The following conclusions are obtained from computations.The wave-induced radiation stress tensor below the wave trough level is induced by the water wave particle velocities only, whereas both the water wave particle velocities and the wave pressure contribute to the tensor above the wave trough level. The vertical variations of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor are influenced substantially by the velocity component in the direction of wave propagation. The distributions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor over depth are nonuniform and the proportion of the tensor below the wave trough level becomes considerable in the shallow water. From the water surface to the seabed, the reversed variations occur for the predominant tensor components.

  7. 3-D Effects Force Reduction of Short-Crested Non-Breaking Waves on Caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of wave short-crestedness on the horizontal wave force on a caisson is twofold. The one is the force reduction due to the reduction of point pressure on the caisson, named point-pressure reduction. The other is the force reduction due to the fact that the peak pressures do not occur...

  8. Effects of Ambient Pressure on Bubble Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢新培; 刘明海; 江中和; 潘垣

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the ambient pressure Pambient on the bubble characteristics of pulsed discharge in water are investigated. The simulation results show that, when Pambient increases from 1 atm to 100 atm, the bubble radius R decreases from 4cma to 7mm, and its pulsation period decreases frown 8ms to 0.2ms. The results also show that the peak pressure of the first shock wave is independent of Pambient, but the peak pressure of the second shock wave caused by the bubble re-expansion decreases when Pambient increases. On the other hand, the larger the ambient pressure, the larger the peak pressure of the plasma in the bubble, while the plasma temperature is independent of Pambient.

  9. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Angélil, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics, rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches, we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic...

  10. 爆炸冲击波在钢管混凝土柱表面压力分布试验研究及数值模拟%Research on Pressure Distribution of Blast Wave on the Surface of CFST Column Based on Explosion Test and Numerical Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔莹; 赵均海; 张常光; 孙珊珊

    2014-01-01

    为了解决爆炸荷载下钢管混凝土柱表面冲击波压力实际分布和数值模拟存在偏差的问题,通过开展钢管混凝土柱爆炸试验,研究冲击波在钢管混凝土柱表面的压力分布,并结合试验建立爆炸荷载下钢管混凝土柱有限元模型,分析不同空气和炸药网格尺寸对冲击波传播及数值分析结果的影响.结果表明:在折合距离为1.1 m/ kg1/3试验条件的爆炸荷载作用下,柱顶与柱底的约束条件良好,柱产生的变形属于弹性变形;考察冲击波对构件的损伤程度,应综合考量峰值压力与正压冲量两者的作用效应;不同空气和炸药网格尺寸对爆炸冲击波的压力峰值及压力时程曲线均有较大影响;数值模拟值与试验实测值的误差随着网格尺寸的减小而降低.综合考察数值分析结果与实测值吻合程度,最终确定:空气和炸药网格尺寸为20 mm,符合折合距离不小于1.1 m/ kg1/3试验条件下的爆炸数值模拟要求.%In order to eliminate the deviation between explosion test and numerical simulation, the pressure distribution of blast wave on the surface of concrete filled steel ( CFST) column had been analyzed by executing the explosion test. And by using FEM procedure and considering the condition of explosion test, a FEM model of CFST column had been established. In order to investigate the influence of the different mesh size of air and explosive on the blast wave propagation and pressure value of blast wave, the numerical simulation with the different mesh size of air and explosive had been executed based on explosion test results. Analysis of research results shows that the constraints of column are in good condition and deformation of column belongs to elastic stage when the scale distance is 1. 1 m/ kg1 / 3 in explosion test. Both peak pressure value and positive impulse value should be considered together in evaluation of damage on column. The different mesh sizes of air and

  11. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere.

  12. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere. PMID:24606251

  13. Theoretical analysis of one dimensional gas dynamics of total pressure losses for combustion-driven continuous wave DF/HF chemical lasers%燃烧驱动CWDF/HF化学激光器总压损失的一维气体动力学理论分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐力铁; 李艳娜; 赵乐至

    2016-01-01

    The pressure recovery system is one of the key techniques for the high energy chemical lasers. Total pressure losses affect the key specification of lasers, such as the output ability, the size and weight of laser systems. The total pressure losses for combustion-driven continuous wave DF/HF chemical lasers were proposed according to the theory analysis of one dimensional gas exhausting. The analysis of the main factors of total pressure losses in the gain generator of the laser is the foundation of the research of recovering the gain generator with high pressure. Two major factors of total pressure losses caused by viscous friction and the temperature rise caused by chemical reaction in optical cavity were discussed in this paper. The result shows that temperature rise caused by burning has obvious influence on system's performance of pressure recovery.%压力恢复系统是目前高能化学激光器的关键部件,它的总压损失会影响到整个激光器系统的出光能力和全系统的体积重量等关键技术指标。为了研究燃烧驱动CW DF/HF化学激光器总压损失,从一维气体动力学进行了理论分析。分析在激光器增益发生器内引起总压损失的主要因素,是研究高压力恢复激光器增益发生器的基础。主要讨论了引起总压损失的两个主要原因:第一,由于粘性摩擦引起的总压损失;第二,由于光学谐振腔中化学反应放热升温引起的总压损失。计算结果表明,燃烧升温对系统的压力恢复能力有较大的影响。

  14. Wave Motion of Smoke in Subway Fire Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wenzhong; YOU Shijun

    2009-01-01

    Wave motion in subway or tunnel fire is an intrinsic property of smoke.As the pressure of smoke changes with mass of certain power,a kind of linear wave equation for smoke can be derived from the conservation equations of its mass and momentum,under nearly homogeneous zone assumption.The smoke movement of 4 subway fires was simulated with Airpak.By fitting the pressure-mass functions to the simulated data,wave equations of the smoke were derived,and wave motions of smoke were thus validated.It can be seen that smoke wave is a kind of mass wave,whose velocity is inversely proportional to smoke mass,and wave of a bigger fire propagates slower.

  15. Breakdown of Acceleration Waves in Radiative Magneto-fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisudan Rai

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of propagation of acceleration waves in an optically thick medium of electrically conducting fluid has been dealt with. During propagation of the waves, the effects of radiation pressure, radiation energy density, and heat transfer through thermal radiation and thermal conduction have been taken into account. The growth equation for the variation of amplitude of the wave has been derived and solved. It has been concluded that all the compressive waves with initial amplitudes greater than a critical value will grow and terminate into a shock wave due to nonlinear steepening, while all expansion waves will decay out. Acritical stage, when the compressive wave will either grow or decay, has also been discussed. The effects of radiation pressure and radiative heat transfer on the shock formation have been discussed and analysed.

  16. Depth-dependent expression of obliquely incident wave induced radiation stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The vertically dependent expressions of obliquely incident waves induced radiation stress are derived by use of the second order Stokes wave theory within three regions of the water column, that is, above the mean water level, below the wave trough level, and between these two levels. Computations indicate that the wave-induced radiation stress below the wave trough level is from the water wave particle velocity only, whereas both the water wave particle velocity and the wave pressure contribute to the tensor above the wave trough level; the vertical variations of the wave-induced radiation stress are influenced substantially by the velocity component in the direction of wave propagation; the distributions of the wave-induced radiation stress tensor over depth are non-uniform and the proportion of the tensor below the wave trough level becomes considerable in the shallow water; from water surface to seabed, the reversed variations occur for the predominant tensor components.

  17. Pressurized hopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Secure Automated Fuel Fabrication Line is being developed to reduce personnel exposure and to improve safeguards. Fertile and fissile fuel powders are blended in the line for making fuel pellets. A pressurized hopper was developed for use not only as a blender, but also as a storage and feeding device. It works with or without injection tubes to produce a well-blended powder with reduced agglomerate population. Results of blending experiments using dry Kaolin clay and Tempra pigment are given

  18. Environmental data collection using autonomous Wave Gliders

    OpenAIRE

    Hermsdorfer, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Sensor Hosting Autonomous Remote Craft (SHARC), also known as Wave Glider, is an autonomous ocean vehicle powered by wave motion. This slow-moving platform makes long-term deployments and environmental data collection feasible, especially in data sparse regions or hazardous environments. The standard SHARC hosts a meteorological station (Airmar PB200) that samples air pressure, temperature, wind speed and wind direction at 1.12 m. ...

  19. Violent wave impacts on vertical and inclined walls: Large scale model tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obhrai, C.; Bullock, G.; Wolters, G.;

    2005-01-01

    New data is presented from large scale model tests where combined measurements of wave pressure and aeration have been made on the front of a vertical and an inclined wall. The shape of the breaking wave was found to have a significant effect on the distribution of the wave impact pressures...... on the wall. The characteristics of violent wave impacts are discussed and related to the impulse on the structure....

  20. Numerical Simulation of Seabed Response and Liquefaction due to Non-linear Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-feng; ZHANG Qing-he; HAN Tao; QIN Chong-ren

    2005-01-01

    Based on Biot's consolidation theory, a two-dimensional model for computation of the seabed response to waves is presented with the finite element method. Numerical results for different wave conditions are obtained, and the effects of wave non-linearity on the wave-induced seabed response are examined. Moreover, the wave-induced momentary liquefaction in uniform and inhomogeneous seabeds is investigated. It is shown that the wave non-linearity affects the distribution of the wave-induced pore pressure and effective stresses, while the influence of wave non-linearity on the seabed liquefaction potential is not so significant.

  1. Blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The ...

  2. Blood Pressure Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents ... About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Blood Pressure Quiz Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number ...

  3. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... right away. continue How Do Doctors Measure Blood Pressure? Blood pressure readings are fast and painless. Blood pressure ... same age, height, and gender have lower blood pressure. Blood pressure between 90% and 95% of the normal ...

  4. Noninvasive blood pressure measurement in large vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse pressure in the aorta was evaluated by the measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and blood flow velocity (BFV). PWV reflects the elasticity of the vessel and was determined by a time-of-flight method. BFV was measured by analyzing the change of magnetization decay due to flow in multiecho experiments. If one neglects pulse wave reflections at vascular branch points and flow resistance due to blood viscosity, pulse pressure is proportional to PWV and BFV. Noninvasive MR imaging measurements were obtained in 12 patients, all of whom underwent correlative arterial catheterization. Values varied between 35 and 100 mm Hg. The results demonstrated a high correlation between the two methods

  5. Pulse Wave Propagation in the Arterial Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vosse, Frans N.; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The beating heart creates blood pressure and flow pulsations that propagate as waves through the arterial tree that are reflected at transitions in arterial geometry and elasticity. Waves carry information about the matter in which they propagate. Therefore, modeling of arterial wave propagation extends our knowledge about the functioning of the cardiovascular system and provides a means to diagnose disorders and predict the outcome of medical interventions. In this review we focus on the physical and mathematical modeling of pulse wave propagation, based on general fluid dynamical principles. In addition we present potential applications in cardiovascular research and clinical practice. Models of short- and long-term adaptation of the arterial system and methods that deal with uncertainties in personalized model parameters and boundary conditions are briefly discussed, as they are believed to be major topics for further study and will boost the significance of arterial pulse wave modeling even more.

  6. Multiscale Simulation of Breaking Wave Impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Ole

    errors in the fluid volume. The dam break test case shows that the incompressible and inviscid ALE-WLS model can calculate nonlinear fluid motion, fluid structure impacts and overturning waves. The propagation speed of the wetting front and impact pressures are compared to experiments and the results......The purpose of this project is to make an accurate, robust, geometric flexible and efficient model for calculation of forces on structures from nonlinear ocean waves and breaking wave impacts. Accurate prediction of the extreme forces on wind turbine foundations, breakwaters and tidal or wave power......-distance based adaptivity method and redistributed via a point position filtering method. The incompressible and inviscid ALE-WLS model is applied to the following standard validation test cases: deforming elliptical drop, small amplitude standing waves and the dam break problem. The deforming elliptical drop...

  7. Pressure transfer functions for interfacial fluid problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Robin Ming; Walsh, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    We make a consistent derivation, from the governing equations, of the pressure transfer function in the small-amplitude Stokes wave regime and the hydrostatic approximation in the small-amplitude solitary water wave regime, in the presence of a background shear flow. The results agree with the well-known formulae in the zero vorticity case,but they incorporate the effects of vorticity through solutions to the Rayleigh equation. We extend the results to permit continuous density stratification and to internal waves between two constant-density fluids. Several examples are discussed.

  8. Watching Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    In the vicinity of merging neutron strar binaries or supernova remnants, gravitational waves can interact with the prevailing strong magnetic fields. The resulting partial conversion of gravitational waves into electromagnetic (radio) waves might prove to be an indirect way of detecting gravitational waves from such sources. Another interesting interaction considered in this article is the excitation of magnetosonic plasma waves by a gravitational wave passing through the surrounding plasma. ...

  9. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Nakariakov Valery M.; Verwichte Erwin

    2005-01-01

    Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves), theoretical modelling of interactio...

  10. Fiber Bragg Grating Pressure Sensor Based on Corrugated Diaphragm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hai-wei; FU Jun-mei; QIAO Xue-guang

    2004-01-01

    A kind of fiber Bragg grating pressure sensor based on corrugated diaphragm is proposed. The relationship between the central wavelength of reflective wave of FBG and pressure is given, and the expression of the pressure sensitivity coefficient is also given. Within the range from results agree with the theoretical analysis. It is indicated that the expected pressure sensitivity of the sensor can be obtained by optimizing the size and mechanical parameters of the corrugated diaphragm.

  11. Characteristics of Spherical Shock Wave and Circular Pulse Jet Generated by Discharge of Propagating Shock Wave at Open End of Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsukasa Irie; Tsuyoshi Yasunobu; Hideo Kashimura; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Kazuyasu Matsuo

    2003-01-01

    When the shock wave propagating in the straight circular tube reaches at the open end, the impulsive wave is generated by the emission of a shock wave from an open end, and unsteady pulse jet is formed near the open end behind the impulsive wave under the specific condition. The pulse jet transits to spherical shock wave with the increase in the strength of shock wave. The strength is dependent on the Mach number of shock wave, which attenuates by propagation distance from the open end. In this study, the mechanism of generating the unsteady pulse jet, the characteristics of the pressure distribution in the flow field and the emission of shock wave from straight circular tube which has the infinite flange at open end are analyzed numerically by the TVD method. Strength of spherical shock wave, relation of shock wave Mach number, distance decay of spherical shock wave and directional characteristics are clarified.

  12. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid. PMID:27566141

  13. Shock wave compression of condensed matter a primer

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Jerry W

    2012-01-01

    This book introduces the core concepts of the shock wave physics of condensed matter, taking a continuum mechanics approach to examine liquids and isotropic solids. The text primarily focuses on one-dimensional uniaxial compression in order to show the key features of condensed matter’s response to shock wave loading. The first four chapters are specifically designed to quickly familiarize physical scientists and engineers with how shock waves interact with other shock waves or material boundaries, as well as to allow readers to better understand shock wave literature, use basic data analysis techniques, and design simple 1-D shock wave experiments. This is achieved by first presenting the steady one-dimensional strain conservation laws using shock wave impedance matching, which insures conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Here, the initial emphasis is on the meaning of shock wave and mass velocities in a laboratory coordinate system. An overview of basic experimental techniques for measuring pressure...

  14. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Pors, A.; Gravesen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Waveguide phenomena play a major role in basic sciences and engineering. The Helmholtz equation is the governing equation for the electric field in electromagnetic wave propagation and the acoustic pressure in the study of pressure dynamics. The Schro¨dinger equation simplifies to the Helmholtz e......-dimensional finite element method results. Good agreement is found between the present analytical method using a combination of differential geometry with perturbation theory and finite element results for a large range of curvature ratios....

  15. Exploratory experimental investigation of a wave propeller

    OpenAIRE

    Dane, Carl W.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A low-speed wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine if a small secondary airfoil or wave propeller, oscillating in a rotary plunging motion, could significantly affect the airflow over a lifting airfoil surface to delay the onset of stall. The lifting airfoil shape was a NACA 66(215)-216, chosen for its chordwise pressure port instrumentation. Testing consisted of measuring the pressure distribution of the NACA 66(215)-2...

  16. Analysis of Recognition of Guided Waves in Vibration and Noise in High-pressure Air Compressor in Ships and Warships%高压空压机冲击噪声与振动故障的导波识别分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍俊瑶; 鲍柏至

    2014-01-01

    冲击振动和冲击噪声是舰船高压空压机的主要振动源和噪声源,识别出冲击振动的产生原因对于降低高压空压机整机的振动与噪声具有十分重要的意义。采用导波传播定位测试技术对4级高压星型空压机冲击振动的产生机理进行了分析,发现第一级排气冲击是引起空压机整机振动与噪声的最主要原因,其次是第二级排气冲击,为采取改进气阀结构来降低高压空压机整机的振动与噪声提供了依据。%Shock vibration and shock noise are main source of vibration and noise of high-pressure air com-pressor in ships and warships.The recognition of the cause of shock vibration is significantly crucial to low-er the impact and noise of complete high-pressure air compressor.By analyzing mechanism of production of vibration shock in 4-level high-pressure star air compressor with the help of guided waves transmission tes-ting technology,the first level of emission impact is the main reason for complete vibration and noise in air compressor while the second level of emission shock ranks the next place.All these findings provide gist for using improved structure of air valve to lower complete vibration and noise in air compressor.

  17. 波浪导致黄河口海床沉积物超孔压响应现场试验研究%In situ experiment of wave-induced excess pore pressure in the seabed sediment in Yellow River estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓磊; 贾永刚; 郑杰文

    2015-01-01

    Both the special engineering geological properties and the complex engineering dynamic stability problems are closely related to the wave-induced dynamic response of pore pressure in seabed sediment in the Yellow River estuary. Four typical sites on the intertidal flats of the Yellow River delta are selected to simulate the wave action on the intact seabed sediments. Various testing methods, such as pore water piezometer test, field sediment strength test and sampling/laboratory geotechnical experiments, are employed to determine the variations in pore pressure and strength of the undisturbed seabed sediments at different stages under the cyclic loading. It is shown that during the cyclic loading process, the excess pore pressure response of undisturbed seabed sediment can be separated into 5 stages including gradual accumulation, partial dissipation, rapid accumulation, accumulated liquefaction and complete dissipation, which correspond to five processes of sediment strength variation including attenuation, increase, attenuation, loss and recovery, respectively. The grain size composition and structural strength dominate the excess pore pressure response. The wave-induced liquefied depth of intact seabed sediment is significantly affected by the initial physical properties such as dry density, void ratio, saturation degree, etc. To a large extent, the relative amount of fine grained components also controls the liquefaction characteristics of sediment in the Yellow River estuary.%黄河口海床特殊的工程地质性质与复杂的工程动力稳定性问题,均与海床沉积物在波浪荷载作用下的孔压动力响应密切相关。在现代黄河水下三角洲潮间带岸滩选择4个典型研究点,现场模拟波浪作用对原状海床沉积物实施循环加载,利用孔隙水压力观测、沉积物强度测试、样品采集与实验室土工测试等方法手段,测定黄河口原状海床沉积物在循环荷载作用

  18. Cardioaccelerometery: the assessment of pulse wave velocity using accelerometers

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Helena Catarina de Bastos Marques

    2007-01-01

    In the past recent years, great emphasis has been placed on the role of arterial stiffness in the development of cardiovascular diseases, recognized as the leading cause of death in the world. This hemodynamic parameter, generally associated to age and blood pressure increase, can be assessed by the measurement of the pulse wave velocity (PWV), i.e., the velocity at which the pressure wave propagates along an artery. Although PWV measurement is accepted as the most simple, non-...

  19. Blood pressure modifies retinal susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng He

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma affects more than 67 million people. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is a risk factor for glaucoma and may reduce nutrient availability by decreasing ocular perfusion pressure (OPP. An interaction between arterial blood pressure and IOP determines OPP; but the exact contribution that these factors have for retinal function is not fully understood. Here we sought to determine how acute modifications of arterial pressure will affect the susceptibility of neuronal function and blood flow to IOP challenge. Anaesthetized (ketamine:xylazine Long-Evan rats with low (∼60 mmHg, sodium nitroprusside infusion, moderate (∼100 mmHg, saline, or high levels (∼160 mmHg, angiotensin II of mean arterial pressure (MAP, n = 5-10 per group were subjected to IOP challenge (10-120 mmHg, 5 mmHg steps every 3 minutes. Electroretinograms were measured at each IOP step to assess bipolar cell (b-wave and inner retinal function (scotopic threshold response or STR. Ocular blood flow was measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry in groups with similar MAP level and the same IOP challenge protocol. Both b-wave and STR amplitudes decreased with IOP elevation. Retinal function was less susceptible to IOP challenge when MAP was high, whereas the converse was true for low MAP. Consistent with the effects on retinal function, higher IOP was needed to attenuated ocular blood flow in animals with higher MAP. The susceptibility of retinal function to IOP challenge can be ameliorated by acute high BP, and exacerbated by low BP. This is partially mediated by modifications in ocular blood flow.

  20. Chapter 4: Pulsating Wave Loads Section 4.3: 3D Effects Force Reduction of Short-Crested Non-Breaking Waves on Caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Liu, Zhou

    1999-01-01

    The effect of wave short-crestedness on the horizontal wave force on a caisson is twofold. The one is the force reduction due to the reduction of point pressure on the caisson, named point-pressure reduction. The other is the force reduction due to the fact that the peak pressures do not occur...... simultaneously along the caisson, named peak-delay reduction. Model test results indicate that the point-pressure reduction can be predicted by the Goda formula. Based on linear wave theory, Battjes (1982) presented a formula for the peak-delay force reduction of short-crested waves with only one frequency...... ion of peakdelay force reduction factor for oblique long-crested and short-crested non-breaking waves are derived analytically. Theoretical formula for the maximum non-dimensional horizontally turning moment around the center of the caisson by oblique regular waves is also presented. Finally the paper...

  1. Spinning swimming of Volvox by tangential helical wave

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2016-01-01

    The swimming of a sphere by means of tangential helical waves running along its surface is studied on the basis of the Stokes equations. Two types of tangential waves are found. The first of these is associated with a pressure disturbance and leads to a higher rate of net rotation than the second one for the same power. It is suggested that the helical waves are relevant for the rotational swimming of Volvox.

  2. Self-similar solutions of laser produced blast waves

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, KPJ

    1996-01-01

    The aerodynamics of the blast wave produced by laser ablation is studied using the piston analogy. The unsteady one-dimensional gasdynamic equations governing the flow an solved under assumption of self-similarity. The solutions are utilized to obtain analytical expressions for the velocity, density, pressure and temperature distributions. The results predict. all the experimentally observed features of the laser produced blast waves.

  3. Review of methods to attenuate shock/blast waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igra, O.; Falcovitz, J.; Houas, L.; Jourdan, G.

    2013-04-01

    Quick and reliable shock wave attenuation is the goal of every protection facility and therefore it is not surprising that achieving this has drawn much attention during the past hundred years. Different options have been suggested; their usefulness varying from a reasonable protection to the opposite, a shock enhancement. An example for a suggestion for shock mitigation that turned out to be an enhancement of the impinging shock wave was the idea to cover a protected object with a foam layer. While the pressure behind the reflected shock wave from the foam frontal surface was smaller than that recorded in a similar reflection from a rigid wall [25], the pressure on the “protected” surface, attached to the foam's rear-surface, was significantly higher than that recorded in a similar reflection from a bare, rigid wall [11]. In protecting humans and installations from destructive shock and/or blast waves the prime goal is to reduce the wave amplitude and the rate of pressure increase across the wave front. Both measures result in reducing the wave harmful effects. During the past six decades several approaches for achieving the desired protection have been offered in the open literature. We point out in this review that while some of the suggestions offered are practical, others are impractical. In our discussion we focus on recent schemes for shock/blast wave attenuation, characterized by the availability of reliable measurements (notably pressure and optical diagnostics) as well as high-resolution numerical simulations.

  4. Single point methods for determining blast wave injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teland, J.A.; Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van; Horst, M.J. van der; Svinsas, E.

    2011-01-01

    Models for calculating human injury from a blast wave are examined. The Axelsson BTD model is able to give injury estimates also for complex shock waves, but is difficult to use in practise since it requires input from four pressure sensors on a BTD (Blast Test Device) in the specific location. To f

  5. Travelling wave solution of the Buckley-Leverett equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tychkov, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional Buckley-Leverett system governing motion of two-phase flow is considered. Travelling-wave solutions for these equations are found. Wavefronts of these solutions may be circles, lines and parabolae. Values of pressure and saturation on the wave fronts are found.

  6. Waves in the seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Not all sea waves look alike in form. Scientists, in fact, classify all waves into definite groups, which can be simulated on a computer using specific models. Thus there are many types of wave forms on the sea surface like regular sinusoidal waves...

  7. Financial Rogue Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analytically give the financial rogue waves in the nonlinear option pricing model due to Ivancevic, which is nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes model. These rogue wave solutions may he used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for rogue wave phenomenon in financial markets and related fields.

  8. Financial Rogue Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen-Ya

    2010-11-01

    We analytically give the financial rogue waves in the nonlinear option pricing model due to Ivancevic, which is nonlinear wave alternative of the Black—Scholes model. These rogue wave solutions may he used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for rogue wave phenomenon in financial markets and related fields.

  9. Waves in inhomogeneous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we study wave propagation in inhomogeneous media. Examples of the classical (massless) waves we consider are acoustic waves (sound) and electromagnetic waves (light, for example). Interaction with inhomogeneities embedded in a reference medium alter the propagation direction, velocity

  10. Practical and highly sensitive elemental analysis for aqueous samples containing metal impurities employing electrodeposition on indium-tin oxide film samples and laser-induced shock wave plasma in low-pressure helium gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lahna, Kurnia; Idris, Nasrullah; Jobiliong, Eric; Suyanto, Hery; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Tjia, May On; Lie, Tjung Jie; Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Davy Putra; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-09-01

    We have conducted an experimental study exploring the possible application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for practical and highly sensitive detection of metal impurities in water. The spectrochemical measurements were carried out by means of a 355 nm Nd-YAG laser within N2 and He gas at atmospheric pressures as high as 2 kPa. The aqueous samples were prepared as thin films deposited on indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass by an electrolysis process. The resulting emission spectra suggest that concentrations at parts per billion levels may be achieved for a variety of metal impurities, and it is hence potentially feasible for rapid inspection of water quality in the semiconductor and pharmaceutical industries, as well as for cooling water inspection for possible leakage of radioactivity in nuclear power plants. In view of its relative simplicity, this LIBS equipment offers a practical and less costly alternative to the standard use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for water samples, and its further potential for in situ and mobile applications. PMID:26368882

  11. Residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the seabed liquefaction beneath standing waves. Silt (with d50 =0.070mm) was used in the experiments. Two kinds of measurements were carried out: pore water pressure measurements and water surface elevation measurements. These measuremen...

  12. Studies on seismic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海明; 陈晓非

    2003-01-01

    The development of seismic wave study in China in the past four years is reviewed. The discussion is divided into several aspects, including seismic wave propagation in laterally homogeneous media, laterally heterogeneous media, anisotropic and porous media, surface wave and seismic wave inversion, and seismic wave study in prospecting and logging problems. Important projects in the current studies on seismic wave is suggested as the development of high efficient numerical methods, and applying them to the studies of excitation and propagation of seismic waves in complex media and strong ground motion, which will form a foundation for refined earthquake hazard analysis and prediction.

  13. Wave Data Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alikhani, Amir; Frigaard, Peter; Burcharth, Hans F.

    1998-01-01

    The data collected over the course of the experiment must be analysed and converted into a form suitable for its intended use. Type of analyses range from simple to sophisticated. Depending on the particular experiment and the needs of the researcher. In this study three main part of irregular wave...... data analyses are presented e.g. Time Domain (Statistical) Analyses, Frequency Domain (Spectral) Analyses and Wave Reflection Analyses. Random wave profile and definitions of representative waves, distributions of individual wave height and wave periods and spectra of sea waves are presented....

  14. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor prescribes it, medicine. What Is Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is the force of blood flow inside ... Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you won't ...

  15. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is the AHA recommendation for healthy blood pressure? This blood pressure chart reflects categories defined by the American ... unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare providers will want to get ...

  16. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure and should be taken seriously. Over time, consistently high blood pressure weakens and damages ... of landmark NIH blood pressure study confirm that lower blood pressure target can reduce ...

  17. Seasonal prediction of ocean surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrynin, Mikhail; Brune, Sebastian; Fröhlich, Kristina; Bunzel, Felix; Pohlmann, Holger; Müller, Wolfgang A.; Baehr, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    Due to the short-term nature of wind, storms and surface ocean waves dynamics, the seasonal prediction of ocean wave requires a robust prediction system which can realistically represent the variably of sea level pressure and wind on a seasonal scale. The seasonal prediction system based on the mixed resolution CMIP5 version of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model (MPI-ESM MR) provides a skilful seasonal prediction of sea level pressure and wind. The system is initialised every six months by reanalysis and observations in the atmospheric, ocean and sea ice components of the model. The seasonal prediction system was extended by the wave model WAM, which is running offline, using the wind re-forecast provided by the MPI-ESM MR. Our 10-member wave re-forecast over the period from 1982 to 2012 demonstrates a skilful prediction of the wave height up to 2-4 months in the Pacific, Equatorial Atlantic and Indian Ocean depending on the season. We evaluate our re-forecast by statistical metrics such as the anomaly correlation, spread-error ratio, and root-mean-square-error using the ERA-Interim forced wave reanalysis and buoys measurements as a reference.

  18. Planar shock wave sliding over a water layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, V.; Jourdan, G.; Marty, A.; Allou, A.; Parisse, J.-D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we conduct experiments to study the interaction between a horizontal free water layer and a planar shock wave that is sliding over it. Experiments are performed at atmospheric pressure in a shock tube with a square cross section (200× 200 mm^2) for depths of 10, 20, and 30 mm; a 1500-mm-long water layer; and two incident planar shock waves having Mach numbers of 1.11 and 1.43. We record the pressure histories and high-speed visualizations to study the flow patterns, surface waves, and spray layers behind the shock wave. We observe two different flow patterns with ripples formed at the air-water interface for the weaker shock wave and the dispersion of a droplet mist for the stronger shock wave. From the pressure signals, we extract the delay time between the arrival of the compression wave into water and the shock wave in air at the same location. We show that the delay time evolves with the distance traveled over the water layer, the depth of the water layer, and the Mach number of the shock wave.

  19. Blast wave mitigation by liquid foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monloubou, Martin; Dollet, Benjamin; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Cantat, Isabelle; Soft Matter Team

    2014-11-01

    Due to their high apparent viscosity, liquid foams are good systems to absorb energy. This property is for instance used in the military domain to mitigate blast waves or explosions [Britan, 2009; Del Prete, 2013]. However, the underlying dissipation mechanisms are still not well understood. We address this issue by resolving in space and time a shock wave impacting a foam sample. We use a shock tube to send a shock wave on a foam with controlled liquid fraction, bubble size and physico-chemistry. The impacting shock creates an expanding cavity in the foam and propagates through the whole sample. The dynamics is recorded with a high speed camera and pressure signals are simultaneously measured. We show the influence of the bubble size and of the shock amplitude on the velocity and on the attenuation of the pressure signal, and on the foam destruction rate. This work is supported by the DGA.

  20. Shock wave science and technology reference library

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This book is the second of several volumes on solids in the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library. These volumes are primarily concerned with high-pressure shock waves in solid media, including detonation and high-velocity impact and penetration events. Of the four extensive chapters in this volume, the first two describe the reactive behavior of condensed phase explosives, - Condensed-Phase Explosives: Shock Initiation and Detonation Phenomena (SA Sheffield and R Engelke) - First Principles Molecular Simulations of Energetic Materials at High-Pressures (F Zhang, S Alavi, and TK Woo), and the remaining two discuss the inert, mechanical response of solid materials. - Combined Compression and Shear Plane Waves (ZP Tang and JB Aidun), and - Dynamic Fragmentation of Solids (D Grady). All chapters are each self-contained, and can be read independently of each other. They offer a timely reference, for beginners as well as professional scientists and engineers, on the foundations of detonation phenomen...

  1. Intrinsic Frequency and the Single Wave Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasek, Danny; Pahlevan, Niema M.; Tavallali, Peyman; Rinderknecht, Derek G.; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the hallmark of classical type II diabetes. In addition, insulin resistance plays a central role in metabolic syndrome, which astonishingly affects 1 out of 3 adults in North America. The insulin resistance state can precede the manifestation of diabetes and hypertension by years. Insulin resistance is correlated with a low-grade inflammatory condition, thought to be induced by obesity as well as other conditions. Currently, the methods to measure and monitor insulin resistance, such as the homeostatic model assessment and the euglycemic insulin clamp, can be impractical, expensive, and invasive. Abundant evidence exists that relates increased pulse pressure, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and vascular dysfunction with insulin resistance. We introduce a potential method of assessing insulin resistance that relies on a novel signal-processing algorithm, the intrinsic frequency method (IFM). The method requires a single pulse pressure wave, thus the term “ wave biopsy.” PMID:26183600

  2. A Comparison of Nature Waves and Model Waves with Special Reference to Wave Grouping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    This paper represents a comparative analyses of the occurrence of wave grouping in field storm waves and laboratory waves with similar power spectra and wave height distribution.......This paper represents a comparative analyses of the occurrence of wave grouping in field storm waves and laboratory waves with similar power spectra and wave height distribution....

  3. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Schroeder, C B; Zhidkov, A G; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2011-01-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses as they diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we report on theoretical study of relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking. These waves may be suitable as particle injectors or as flying mirrors that both reflect and focus radiation, enabling unique X-ray sources and nonlinear QED phenomena.

  4. Wave-Ice interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈奚海莉

    2001-01-01

    The growth and movement of sea ice cover are influenced by the presence of wave field. Inturn, the wave field is influenced by the presence of ice cover. Their interaction is not fully understood.In this paper, we discuss some current understanding on wave attenuation when it propagates through frag-mented ice cover, ice drift due to the wave motion, and the growth characteristics of ice cover in wave field.

  5. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  6. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Lamwers, Stephanie; Tepel, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is linked to increased cardiovascular risk. This risk can be reduced by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment. As OSA is associated with an increase of several vasoconstrictive factors, we investigated whether nCPAP influences the digital volume...... pulse wave. We performed digital photoplethysmography during sleep at night in 94 consecutive patients who underwent polysomnography and 29 patients treated with nCPAP. Digital volume pulse waves were obtained independently of an investigator and were quantified using an algorithm for continuous.......01; n = 94) and the arousal index (Spearman correlation, r = 0.21; p CPAP treatment, the AHI was significantly reduced from 27 ± 3 events · h(-1) to 4 ± 2 events · h(-1) (each n = 29; p

  7. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion. PMID:26509428

  8. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion.

  9. 以年龄和血压分类的健康人群臂-踝脉搏波速度参考值的临床意义%Clinical significance of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in healthy people classified by blood pressure and age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大伟; 张婧; 姜树强; 刘超; 郑海芳; 靳英; 韩春雷; 王建昌

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨以年龄和血压分类的一般健康人群的臂-踝脉搏波传导速度(baPWV)参考值的临床意义。方法选取30岁以上无心脑血管疾病的1750名健康体检者,收集 baPWV、血压、血糖、血脂、体质量指数、吸烟、饮酒及服药史等资料。结果校正年龄和血压后,糖尿病、降压和降脂药物与 baPWV 相关,排除这些因素的1237人作为参考值人群。baPWV 参考值随年龄和血压增加而增加。结论一般健康人群按年龄和血压分类的 baPWV 参考值,可为不同年龄段和血压状态下的健康体检人群判定 baPWV 检测结果和积极防治动脉硬化提供依据。%Objective To investigate the clinical significance of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity(baP-WV)in healthy people who were classified by blood pressure and age.Methods A total of 1750 healthy subjects without cerebral-cardiovascular diseases in the physical examination were recruited.The data of baPWV,blood pres-sure,glucose,lipid,body mass index,smoking,alcohol drinking and drugs were collected.Results After adjusting for age and blood pressure,the diabetes,drugs for anti-hypertensive drugs and lipid-lowering drugs were related with baP-WV,and the rest 1237 persons without these factors were selected as control group.Conclusion The study provides the reference value of baPWV in healthy people classified by blood pressure and age,which may be valuable for the selection of baPWV test for people in different states of ages and blood pressure in health examination,and the preven-tion of arterial stiffness.

  10. Instability of Wave Trains and Wave Probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanin, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia, ababanin@swin.edu.au Design criteria in ocean engineering, whether this is one in 50 years or one in 5000 years event, are hardly ever based on measurements, and rather on statistical distributions of relevant metocean properties. Of utmost interest is the tail of distribution, that is rare events such as the highest waves with low probability. Engineers have long since realised that the superposition of linear waves with narrow-banded spectrum as depicted by the Rayleigh distribution underestimates the probability of extreme wave heights and crests, which is a critical shortcoming as far as the engineering design is concerned. Ongoing theoretical and experimental efforts have been under way for decades to address this issue. Typical approach is the treating all possible waves in the ocean or at a particular location as a single ensemble for which some comprehensive solution can be obtained. The oceanographic knowledge, however, now indicates that no single and united comprehensive solution is available. We would expect the probability distributions of wave height to depend on a) whether the waves are at the spectral peak or at the tail; b) on wave spectrum and mean steepness in the wave field; c) on the directional distribution of the peak waves; d) on whether the waves are in deep water, in intermediate depth or in shallow water; e) on wave breaking; f) on the wind, particularly if it is very strong, and on the currents if they have suitable horizontal gradients. Probability distributions in the different circumstances according to these groups of conditions should be different, and by combining them together the inevitable scatter is introduced. The scatter and the accuracy will not improve by increasing the bulk data quality and quantity, and it hides the actual distribution of extremes. The groups have to be separated and their probability

  11. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    In this work, the dynamics of laser-generated single cavitation bubbles exposed to lithotripter shock waves has been investigated experimentally. The energy of the impinging shock wave is varied in several steps. High-speed photography and pressure field measurements simultaneously with image acquisition provide the possibility of capturing the fast bubble dynamics under the effect of the shock wave impact. The pressure measurement is performed using a fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) which operates based on optical diagnostics of the shock wave propagating medium. After a short introduction in chapter 1 an overview of the previous studies in chapter 2 is presented. The reported literatures include theoretical and experimental investigations of several configurations of physical problems in the field of bubble dynamics. In chapter 3 a theoretical description of propagation of a shock wave in a liquid like water has been discussed. Different kinds of reflection of a shock wave at an interface are taken into account. Undisturbed bubble dynamics as well as interaction between a planar shock wave and an initially spherical bubble are explored theoretically. Some physical parameters which are important in this issue such as the velocity of the shock-induced liquid jet, Kelvin impulse and kinetic energy are explained. The shock waves are generated in a water filled container by a focusing piezoelectric generator. The shock wave profile has a positive part with pulse duration of ∼1 μs followed by a longer tension tail (i.e. ∼3 μs). In chapter 4 high-speed images depict the propagation of a shock wave in the water filled tank. The maximum pressure is also derived for different intensity levels of the shock wave generator. The measurement is performed in the free field (i.e. in the absence of laser-generated single bubbles). In chapter 5 the interaction between lithotripter shock waves and laserinduced single cavitation bubbles is investigated experimentally. An

  12. Linear surface capillary-gravity short-crested waves on a current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hu

    2008-01-01

    One of the forward situations in the study of water waves is the basic three-dimensional surface wave motion of short-crested waves. Capillary waves result in rich effects concerned closely with remote sensing in the open ocean. Ocean currents experience a complete process in surface wave motion. Based on the above ideas, a linear dynamical system of surface capillary-gravity short-crested waves is developed by considering the current effects, thus leading to the following analytical expressions of the kinematic and dynamic variables: the wave height, the wave steepness, the phase velocity, the wave-particle velocities, accelerations and trajectories and the wave pressure. A number of the classi-cal, typical and latest special wave cases can arise from these expressions.

  13. Long Waves Associated with Bichromatic Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Guohai(董国海); YE Wenya(叶文亚); Nicholas Dodd

    2001-01-01

    A numerical model of low frequency waves is presented. The model is based on that of Roelvink (1993), but the numerical techniques used in the solution are based on the so-called Weighted-Average Flux (WAF) method withTime-Operator-Splitting (TOS) used for the treatment of the source terms. This method allows a small number ofcomputational points to be used, and is particularly efficient in modeling wave setup. The short wave (or primary wave)energy equation is solved with a traditional Lax-Wendroff technique. A nonlinear wave theory is introduced. The modeldescribed in this paper is found to be satisfactory in modeling low frequency waves associated with incident bichromaticwaves.

  14. Characteristics of a compression wave propagating over porous plate wall in a high-speed railway tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A pressure wave is generated ahead of a high-speed train, while entering a tunnel. This pressure wave propagates to the tunnel exit and spouts as a micro-pressure wave, which causes an exploding sound. From the fact that the ballast track tunnel has smaller noise than the slab track tunnel, we have suggested a new inner tunnel model to decrease the noise of the micro-pressure wave, using the ballast effect. Experimental and numerical investigations are carried out to clarify the attenuation and distortion of propagating compression wave over porous plate wall in a model tunnel. Data shows that the strength of the compression wave and a maximum pressure gradient of the compression wave was weakened. These data shows the possibility of the present a11eviative method using the porous plate wall in a tunnel

  15. Properties of Longitudinal Flux Tube Waves. III; Wave Propagation in Solar and Stellar Wind FLows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the analytic properties of longitudinal tube waves taking into account ambient wind flows. This is an extension of the studies of Papers I and II, which assumed a mean flow speed of zero and also dealt with a simplified horizontal pressure balance. Applications include the study of longitudinal flux tube waves in stars with significant mass loss and the heating and dynamics of plumes in the solar wind. Slow magnetosonic waves, also called longitudinal waves, have been observed in solar plumes and are likely an important source of heating. We show that the inclusion of ambient wind flows considerably alters the limiting shock strength as well as the energy damping length of the waves.

  16. Measurements of Overtopping Flow Time Series on the Wave Dragon, Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2009-01-01

    A study of overtopping flow series on the Wave Dragon prototype, a low crested device designed to maximise flow, in a real sea, is presented. This study aims to fill the gap in the literature on time series of flow overtopping low crested structures. By comparing to a simulated flow...... the characteristics of the overtopping flow are discussed and the simulation algorithm is tested. Measured data is shown from a storm build up in October 2006, from theWave Dragon prototype situated in an inland sea in Northern Denmark. This wave energy converter extracts energy from the waves, by funnelling them...... to run-up a ramp and overtop into a reservoir. This water is stored at a higher level than the average sea surface, before being discharged through hydro turbines. The waves, device sea handling and  overtopping flow are measured by pressure transducers ahead of, beneath and in the device. Comparisons...

  17. Properties of Longitudinal Flux Tube Waves. III; Wave Propagation in Solar and Stellar Wind Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the analytic properties of longitudinal tube waves taking into account ambient wind flows. This is an extension of the studies of Papers I and II, which assumed a mean flow speed of zero and also dealt with a simplified horizontal pressure balance. Applications include the study of longitudinal flux tube waves in stars with significant mass loss and heating and dynamics of plumes in the solar wind. Slow magnetosonic waves, also called longitudinal waves, have been observed in solar plumes and are likely an important source of heating. We show that the inclusion of ambient wind flows considerably alters the limiting shock strength as well as the energy damping length of waves.

  18. Light detonation wave in a cylindrical Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupaliev, U.; Sysoev, N. N.; Shuteev, S. A.; Elenskii, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    A secondary compression wave previously observed by other researchers in a cylindrical Z-pinch has been identified in this work as a light detonation wave. It appears on the inner surface of a discharge chamber under the action of the intense ultraviolet radiation from a plasma pinch at the stage of its maximum compression. The condition of the light detonation wave has been determined experimentally. The dependence of its Mach number on a generalized dimensionless variable has been determined taking into account the conservation laws for the light detonation wave including the pressure of the gas, expenses on the formation of the surface plasma, and the energy of ionization of the gas involved in the wave. An analogy with the laser-supported detonation wave created by intense laser radiation has been revealed. The indicated dependence is within the error of measurement in agreement with the experimental data for light detonation waves created by both methods.

  19. Nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in thermoviscous fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter

    Traditional ultrasound theory is based on linear theory, however, for strongly focused sound beams, the pressure levels are sufficiently high to generate nonlinear waves. In thermoviscous fluids nonlinearity arises as a result of a nonlinear equation of state together with nonlinear advection....... Furthermore, dissipation and dispersion is included in a combined third order term in the velocity potential. We shall report on solitary pulse propagation with generation of higher harmonics of the emitted carrier wave frequency. The envelopes of the carrier wave and its first higher harmonics satisfy two...... is interpreted as a shock wave formation, similar in nature to those of the simple Burgers equation. The results are relevant for medical ultrasound imaging....

  20. Shock wave control using liquid curtains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvert, Brendan; Tao, Xingtian; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a planar wall of liquid as a blast mitigation device is examined using a shock tube and a custom-designed and -built shock test chamber. Experimental data collection methods being used include high-speed schlieren photography and high-frequency pressure sensors. During the relevant shock interaction time periods, the liquid-gas interface is examined to determine its effect on shock waves. The characteristic quantities that reflect these effects include reflected-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted and reflected impulse, and peak pressure reduction. These parameters are examined for correlations to incident wave speed, liquid mass, liquid density, and liquid viscosity. Initial results have been obtained that show a correlation between fluid mass and peak pressure reduction. More experiments are being performed to further explore this relationship as well as examine the effects of altering the other parameters such as liquid-gas interface geometry and using dilatant fluids.

  1. Theoretical Investigation of Peak-Delay Force Reduction for Caissons Exposed to Non-breaking Short-Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    In nature coastal structures are exposed to oblique short-crested waves. The effect of wave incident angle on total wave force on a long caisson are twofold. The one is the force reduction due to the reduction of instantaneous point pressure on the caisson, named point-pressure force reduction....... The other is the force reduction due to the fact that the peak pressures do not occur simultaneously along the caisson, named peak-delay force reduction. These two reduction effects can also be expected with short-crested waves, as the short-crestedness of waves means the spreading of wave energy over...... on the peak-delay force reduction of caissons exposed to non-breaking short-crested waves. Battjes (1982) has investigated theoretically the peak-delay force reduction of shortcrested waves with only one frequency component. Such a force reduction factor cannot be applied because in nature waves are composed...

  2. Elastohydrodynamic wake and wave resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Arutkin, Maxence; Salez, Thomas; Raphaël, Elie

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a thin elastic sheet lubricated by a narrow layer of liquid is relevant to various situations and length scales. In the continuity of our previous work on viscous wakes, we study theoretically the effects of an external pressure disturbance moving at constant speed along the surface of a thin lubricated elastic sheet. In the comoving frame, the imposed pressure field creates a stationary deformation of the free interface that spatially vanishes in the far-field region. The shape of the wake and the way it decays depend on the speed and size of the external disturbance, as well as the rheological properties of both the elastic and liquid layers. The wave resistance, namely the force that has to be externally furnished in order to maintain the wake, is analyzed in detail.

  3. Separate P‐ and SV‐wave equations for VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Reynam C.

    2011-01-01

    In isotropic media we use the scalar acoustic wave equation to perform reverse time migration RTM of the recorded pressure wavefleld data. In anisotropic media P- and SV-waves are coupled and the elastic wave equation should be used for RTM. However, an acoustic anisotropic wave equation is often used instead. This results in significant shear wave energy in both modeling and RTM. To avoid this undesired SV-wave energy, we propose a different approach to separate P- and SV-wave components for vertical transversely isotropic VTI media. We derive independent pseudo-differential wave equations for each mode. The derived equations for P- and SV-waves are stable and reduce to the isotropic case. The equations presented here can be effectively used to model and migrate seismic data in VTI media where ε - δ is small. The SV-wave equation we develop is now well-posed and triplications in the SV wavefront are removed resulting in stable wave propagation. We show modeling and RTM results using the derived pure P-wave mode in complex VTI media and use the rapid expansion method REM to propagate the waveflelds in time. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. Characteristics of high waves observed at multiple stations along the east coast of Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-H. Oh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent several years, extremely high waves occasionally visited the Korean coast of the East Sea and caused severe coastal disasters almost every winter season. In this paper, characteristics of such high waves are reported by analyzing wave records collected at multiple stations along the Korean east coast. Meteorological data obtained at relevant weather stations were also used in the analysis. The reason for appearance of the high waves was identified as the strong northeasters due to extra-tropical low pressure systems that had been rapidly developing in the East Sea. The general mechanism concerning the formation and spatial evolution of such strong low pressure systems was more clearly understood through the synthetic analysis of the wave and meteorological data. In particular, the influence of spatio-temporal features of the low pressure system on the resulting characteristics of the high waves was described in more detail in this study. Since the overall wave direction was northeast also, the first wave arrival time on the coastline became later for a wave station whose latitude is lower. At present, however, the arrival time of such high waves on the coast as well as their intrinsic characteristics such as wave height and period are not satisfactorily predicted by the daily weather forecast. Hence, it is necessary to enhance predictability of the high waves by investigating developmental mechanisms of the strong low pressure system in winter season more thoroughly.

  5. Analysis of a bubble deformation process in a microcapsule by shock waves for developing DDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagawa, Masaaki; Morimoto, Kenshi

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes development of DDS (drug delivery systems) microcapsule using underwater shock waves, especially (1) making polymer microcapsules including a bubble and analysis of a bubble deformation process in a polymer capsule by pressure wave, (2) making liposome microcapsules with different elastic membrane and disintegration tests by ultrasonic waves.

  6. Spectral power density of the random excitation for the photoacoustic wave equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Erkol

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The superposition of the Green's function and its time reversal can be extracted from the photoacoustic point sources applying the representation theorems of the convolution and correlation type. It is shown that photoacoustic pressure waves at locations of random point sources can be calculated with the solution of the photoacoustic wave equation and utilization of the continuity and the discontinuity conditions of the pressure waves in the frequency domain although the pressure waves cannot be measured at these locations directly. Therefore, with the calculated pressure waves at the positions of the sources, the spectral power density can be obtained for any system consisting of two random point sources. The methodology presented here can also be generalized to any finite number of point like sources. The physical application of this study includes the utilization of the cross-correlation of photoacoustic waves to extract functional information associated with the flow dynamics inside the tissue.

  7. NEW WIND WAVE GROWTH RELATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shu-ping; HOU Yi-jun; YIN Bao-shu

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper combining the relationship between wave steepness and wave age with the significant wave energy balance equation for wind wave,a new wind wave growth relation is presented.Comparisons with the other existing wind wave growth relations show that the results in present paper accord better with the wind wave growth process.

  8. A Sensitive and Biodegradable Pressure Sensor Array for Cardiovascular Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutry, Clementine M; Nguyen, Amanda; Lawal, Qudus Omotayo; Chortos, Alex; Rondeau-Gagné, Simon; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-11-18

    An array of highly sensitive pressure sensors entirely made of biodegradable materials is presented, designed as a single-use flexible patch for application in cardiovascular monitoring. The high sensitivity in combination with fast response time is unprecedented when compared to recent reports on biodegradable pressure sensors (sensitivity three orders of magnitude higher), as illustrated by pulse wave velocity measurements, toward hypertension detection.

  9. Magnetoacoustic resonance and gyrorelaxation electronic absorption of fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous plasma cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast magnetoacoustic wave excitation by external currents in an inhomogeneous plasma cylinder is investigated. It is assumed that the wave frequency is much greater than the frequency of Coulomb electron collisions and much less than the ion cyclotron frequency. The plasma pressure is of the order of magnetic pressure. On the base of perturbation theory, the solution of Maxwell's equations is obtained taking into account the electron gyrorelaxation effect. Small-scale magnetoacoustic wave absorption is considered (the transverse wave length is much less than the plasma radius). The natural frequencies and damping rate are calculated. The case of magnetic pumping is discovered (long-wave oscillations when resonance excitation is impossible)

  10. Ray-theoretical modeling of secondary microseism P-waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, V.; Stutzmann, E.; Gualtieri, L.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.

    2016-06-01

    Secondary microseism sources are pressure fluctuations close to the ocean surface. They generate acoustic P-waves that propagate in water down to the ocean bottom where they are partly reflected, and partly transmitted into the crust to continue their propagation through the Earth. We present the theory for computing the displacement power spectral density of secondary microseism P-waves recorded by receivers in the far field. In the frequency domain, the P-wave displacement can be modeled as the product of (1) the pressure source, (2) the source site effect that accounts for the constructive interference of multiply reflected P-waves in the ocean, (3) the propagation from the ocean bottom to the stations, (4) the receiver site effect. Secondary microseism P-waves have weak amplitudes, but they can be investigated by beamforming analysis. We validate our approach by analyzing the seismic signals generated by Typhoon Ioke (2006) and recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network. Back projecting the beam onto the ocean surface enables to follow the source motion. The observed beam centroid is in the vicinity of the pressure source derived from the ocean wave model WAVEWATCH IIIR. The pressure source is then used for modeling the beam and a good agreement is obtained between measured and modeled beam amplitude variation over time. This modeling approach can be used to invert P-wave noise data and retrieve the source intensity and lateral extent.

  11. Ray-theoretical modeling of secondary microseism P waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, V.; Stutzmann, E.; Gualtieri, L.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.

    2016-09-01

    Secondary microseism sources are pressure fluctuations close to the ocean surface. They generate acoustic P waves that propagate in water down to the ocean bottom where they are partly reflected and partly transmitted into the crust to continue their propagation through the Earth. We present the theory for computing the displacement power spectral density of secondary microseism P waves recorded by receivers in the far field. In the frequency domain, the P-wave displacement can be modeled as the product of (1) the pressure source, (2) the source site effect that accounts for the constructive interference of multiply reflected P waves in the ocean, (3) the propagation from the ocean bottom to the stations and (4) the receiver site effect. Secondary microseism P waves have weak amplitudes, but they can be investigated by beamforming analysis. We validate our approach by analysing the seismic signals generated by typhoon Ioke (2006) and recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network. Backprojecting the beam onto the ocean surface enables to follow the source motion. The observed beam centroid is in the vicinity of the pressure source derived from the ocean wave model WAVEWATCH IIIR. The pressure source is then used for modeling the beam and a good agreement is obtained between measured and modeled beam amplitude variation over time. This modeling approach can be used to invert P-wave noise data and retrieve the source intensity and lateral extent.

  12. Flow and sediment transport induced by a plunging solitary wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Sen, M.Berke; Karagali, Ioanna;

    2011-01-01

    Two parallel experiments involving the evolution and runup of plunging solitary waves on a sloping bed were conducted: (1) a rigid-bed experiment, allowing direct (hot film) measurements of bed shear stresses, and (2) a sediment-bed experiment, allowing for the measurement of pore-water pressures......, and for observation of the morphological changes. The two experimental conditions were maintained as similar as possible. The experiments showed that the complete sequence of the plunging solitary wave involves the following processes: Shoaling and wave breaking; Runup; Rundown and hydraulic jump; and Trailing wave...... affected, by as much as a factor of 2, in the runup and hydraulic jump stages. The pore-water pressure measurements showed that the sediment at (or near) the surface of the bed experiences upward-directed pressure gradient forces during the downrush phase. The magnitude of this force can reach values...

  13. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, to obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented. 10 references, 11 figures.

  14. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-09-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, and obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular, the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented.

  15. Modelling of Performance of Caisson Type Breakwaters under Extreme Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güney Doǧan, Gözde; Özyurt Tarakcıoǧlu, Gülizar; Baykal, Cüneyt

    2016-04-01

    Many coastal structures are designed without considering loads of tsunami-like waves or long waves although they are constructed in areas prone to encounter these waves. Performance of caisson type breakwaters under extreme swells is tested in Middle East Technical University (METU) Coastal and Ocean Engineering Laboratory. This paper presents the comparison of pressure measurements taken along the surface of caisson type breakwaters and obtained from numerical modelling of them using IH2VOF as well as damage behavior of the breakwater under the same extreme swells tested in a wave flume at METU. Experiments are conducted in the 1.5 m wide wave flume, which is divided into two parallel sections (0.74 m wide each). A piston type of wave maker is used to generate the long wave conditions located at one end of the wave basin. Water depth is determined as 0.4m and kept constant during the experiments. A caisson type breakwater is constructed to one side of the divided flume. The model scale, based on the Froude similitude law, is chosen as 1:50. 7 different wave conditions are applied in the tests as the wave period ranging from 14.6 s to 34.7 s, wave heights from 3.5 m to 7.5 m and steepness from 0.002 to 0.015 in prototype scale. The design wave parameters for the breakwater were 5m wave height and 9.5s wave period in prototype. To determine the damage of the breakwater which were designed according to this wave but tested under swell waves, video and photo analysis as well as breakwater profile measurements before and after each test are performed. Further investigations are carried out about the acting wave forces on the concrete blocks of the caisson structures via pressure measurements on the surfaces of these structures where the structures are fixed to the channel bottom minimizing. Finally, these pressure measurements will be compared with the results obtained from the numerical study using IH2VOF which is one of the RANS models that can be applied to simulate

  16. Controls on flood and sediment wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Maarten; Lane, Stuart N.; Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of flood wave propagation - celerity and transformation - through a fluvial system is of generic importance for flood forecasting/mitigation. In association with flood wave propagation, sediment wave propagation may induce local erosion and sedimentation, which will affect infrastructure and riparian natural habitats. Through analysing flood and sediment wave propagation, we gain insight in temporal changes in transport capacity (the flood wave) and sediment availability and transport (the sediment wave) along the river channel. Heidel (1956) was amongst the first to discuss the progressive lag of sediment concentration behind the corresponding flood wave based on field measurements. Since then this type of hysteresis has been characterized in a number of studies, but these were often based on limited amount of floods and measurement sites, giving insufficient insight into associated forcing mechanisms. Here, as part of a project concerned with the hydrological and geomorphic forcing of sediment transfer processes in alpine environments, we model the downstream propagation of short duration, high frequency releases of water and sediment (purges) from a flow intake in the Borgne d'Arolla River in south-west Switzerland. A total of >50 events were measured at 1 minute time intervals using pressure transducers and turbidity probes at a number of sites along the river. We show that flood and sediment wave propagation can be well represented through simple convection diffusion models. The models are calibrated/validated to describe the set of measured waves and used to explain the observed variation in wave celerity and diffusion. In addition we explore the effects of controlling factors including initial flow depth, flood height, flood duration, bed roughness, bed slope and initial sediment concentration, on the wave propagation processes. We show that the effects of forcing mechanisms on flood and sediment wave propagation will lead to different

  17. Research on Energy Conversion System of Floating Wave Energy Converter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚群; 盛松伟; 游亚戈; 吴必军; 刘洋

    2014-01-01

    A wave power device includes an energy harvesting system and a power take-off system. The power take-off system of a floating wave energy device is the key that converts wave energy into other forms. A set of hydraulic power take-off system, which suits for the floating wave energy devices, includes hydraulic system and power generation system. The hydraulic control system uses a special“self-hydraulic control system”to control hydraulic system to release or save energy under the maximum and the minimum pressures. The maximum pressure is enhanced to 23 MPa, the minimum to 9 MPa. Quite a few experiments show that the recent hydraulic system is evidently improved in efficiency and reliability than our previous one, that is expected to be great significant in the research and development of our prototype about wave energy conversion.

  18. The sequence of sediment behaviour during wave-induced liquefaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Hatipoglu, Figen; Fredsøe, Jørgen;

    2006-01-01

    of liquefaction and compaction fronts in the sediment and (iii) the characteristics of the orbital motion of the liquefied sediment including the motion of the interface between the water body and the sediment. The ranges of the various quantities in the tests were: wave height, H = 9-17 cm, wave period, T = 1......This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the complete sequence of sediment behaviour beneath progressive waves. The sediment was silty with d(50) = 0.060 mm. Two kinds of measurements were carried out: pore-water pressure measurements (across the sediment depth.......6 sec, water depth = 42 cm, and the Shields parameter = 0.34-0.59. The experiments reveal that, with the introduction of waves, excess pore pressure builds up, which is followed by liquefaction during which internal waves are experienced at the interface of the water body and the liquefied sediment...

  19. Research on energy conversion system of floating wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-qun; Sheng, Song-wei; You, Ya-ge; Wu, Bi-jun; Liu, Yang

    2014-03-01

    A wave power device includes an energy harvesting system and a power take-off system. The power take-off system of a floating wave energy device is the key that converts wave energy into other forms. A set of hydraulic power take-off system, which suits for the floating wave energy devices, includes hydraulic system and power generation system. The hydraulic control system uses a special "self-hydraulic control system" to control hydraulic system to release or save energy under the maximum and the minimum pressures. The maximum pressure is enhanced to 23 MPa, the minimum to 9 MPa. Quite a few experiments show that the recent hydraulic system is evidently improved in efficiency and reliability than our previous one, that is expected to be great significant in the research and development of our prototype about wave energy conversion.

  20. Electrohydraulic shock wave generation as a means to increase intrinsic permeability of mortar

    OpenAIRE

    MAUREL, O.; REESS, T.; MATALLAH, M.; FERRON, A.; Chen, W.; C. La Borderie; G. Pijaudier-Cabot; JACQUESE, A.; REY-BETHBEDER, F.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the influence of compressive shock waves on the permeability of cementitious materials. Shock waves are generated in water by Pulsed Arc Electrohydraulic Discharges (PAED). The practical aim is to increase the intrinsic permeability of the specimens. The maximum pressure amplitude of the shock wave is 250 MPa. It generates damage in the specimens and the evolution of damage is correlated with the intrinsic permeability of the mortar. A threshold of pressure is observed....