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Sample records for axonal velocity distributions

  1. Focal axonal swellings and associated ultrastructural changes attenuate conduction velocity in central nervous system axons: a computer modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaric, Katarina V; Thomson, Gemma; Edgar, Julia M; Brown, Angus M

    2013-08-01

    The constancy of action potential conduction in the central nervous system (CNS) relies on uniform axon diameter coupled with fidelity of the overlying myelin providing high-resistance, low capacitance insulation. Whereas the effects of demyelination on conduction have been extensively studied/modeled, equivalent studies on the repercussions for conduction of axon swelling, a common early pathological feature of (potentially reversible) axonal injury, are lacking. The recent description of experimentally acquired morphological and electrical properties of small CNS axons and oligodendrocytes prompted us to incorporate these data into a computer model, with the aim of simulating the effects of focal axon swelling on action potential conduction. A single swelling on an otherwise intact axon, as occurs in optic nerve axons of Cnp1 null mice caused a small decrease in conduction velocity. The presence of single swellings on multiple contiguous internodal regions (INR), as likely occurs in advanced disease, caused qualitatively similar results, except the dimensions of the swellings required to produce equivalent attenuation of conduction were significantly decreased. Our simulations of the consequences of metabolic insult to axons, namely, the appearance of multiple swollen regions, accompanied by perturbation of overlying myelin and increased axolemmal permeability, contained within a single INR, revealed that conduction block occurred when the dimensions of the simulated swellings were within the limits of those measured experimentally, suggesting that multiple swellings on a single axon could contribute to axonal dysfunction, and that increased axolemmal permeability is the decisive factor that promotes conduction block. PMID:24303138

  2. Axonal velocity distributions in neural field equations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojak, I.; Liley, D.T.

    2010-01-01

    By modelling the average activity of large neuronal populations, continuum mean field models (MFMs) have become an increasingly important theoretical tool for understanding the emergent activity of cortical tissue. In order to be computationally tractable, long-range propagation of activity in MFMs

  3. Changes in the axonal conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in the aged cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, M C; Liu, R H; Engelhardt, J K; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether age-dependent changes in axonal conduction velocity occur in pyramidal tract neurons. A total of 260 and 254 pyramidal tract neurons were recorded extracellularly in the motor cortex of adult control and aged cats, respectively. These cells were activated antidromically by electrical stimulation of the medullary pyramidal tract. Fast- and slow-conducting neurons were identified according to their axonal conduction velocity in both control and aged cats. While 51% of pyramidal tract neurons recorded in the control cats were fast conducting (conduction velocity greater than 20 m/s), only 26% of pyramidal tract neurons in the aged cats were fast conducting. There was a 43% decrease in the median conduction velocity for the entire population of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats when compared with that of pyramidal tract neurons in the control cats (P cats. However, the regression slope was significantly reduced in aged cats. This reduction was due to the appearance of a group of pyramidal tract neurons with relatively shorter spike durations but slower axonal conduction velocities in the aged cat. Sample intracellular data confirmed the above results. These observations form the basis for the following conclusions: (i) there is a decrease in median conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats; (ii) the reduction in the axonal conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats is due, in part, to fibers that previously belonged to the fast-conducting group and now conduct at slower velocity. PMID:10392844

  4. Focal axonal swellings and associated ultrastructural changes attenuate conduction velocity in central nervous system axons: a computer modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Kolaric, Katarina V; Thomson, Gemma; Edgar, Julia M; Brown, Angus M.

    2013-01-01

    The constancy of action potential conduction in the central nervous system (CNS) relies on uniform axon diameter coupled with fidelity of the overlying myelin providing high-resistance, low capacitance insulation. Whereas the effects of demyelination on conduction have been extensively studied/modeled, equivalent studies on the repercussions for conduction of axon swelling, a common early pathological feature of (potentially reversible) axonal injury, are lacking. The recent description of ex...

  5. Ionic mechanisms maintaining action potential conduction velocity at high firing frequencies in an unmyelinated axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Kevin P; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2016-05-01

    The descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD) is a high-performance interneuron in locusts with an axon capable of transmitting action potentials (AP) at more than 500 Hz. We investigated biophysical mechanisms for fidelity of high-frequency transmission in this axon. We measured conduction velocities (CVs) at room temperature during exposure to 10 mmol/L cadmium, a calcium current antagonist, and found significant reduction in CV with reduction at frequencies >200 Hz of ~10%. Higher temperatures induced greater CV reductions during exposure to cadmium across all frequencies of ~20-30%. Intracellular recordings during 15 min of exposure to cadmium or nickel, also a calcium current antagonist, revealed an increase in the magnitude of the afterhyperpolarization potential (AHP) and the time to recover to baseline after the AHP (Medians for Control: -19.8%; Nickel: 167.2%; Cadmium: 387.2%), that could be due to a T-type calcium current. However, the removal of extracellular calcium did not mimic divalent cation exposure suggesting calcium currents are not the cause of the AHP increase. Computational modeling showed that the effects of the divalent cations could be modeled with a persistent sodium current which could be blocked by high concentrations of divalent cations. Persistent sodium current shortened the AHP duration in our models and increased CV for high-frequency APs. We suggest that faithful, high-frequency axonal conduction in the DCMD is enabled by a mechanism that shortens the AHP duration like a persistent or resurgent sodium current. PMID:27225630

  6. Modeling distributed axonal delays in mean-field brain dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2008-11-01

    The range of conduction delays between connected neuronal populations is often modeled as a single discrete delay, assumed to be an effective value averaging over all fiber velocities. This paper shows the effects of distributed delays on signal propagation. A distribution acts as a linear filter, imposing an upper frequency cutoff that is inversely proportional to the delay width. Distributed thalamocortical and corticothalamic delays are incorporated into a physiologically based mean-field model of the cortex and thalamus to illustrate their effects on the electroencephalogram (EEG). The power spectrum is acutely sensitive to the width of the thalamocortical delay distribution, and more so than the corticothalamic distribution, because all input signals must travel along the thalamocortical pathway. This imposes a cutoff frequency above which the spectrum is overly damped. The positions of spectral peaks in the resting EEG depend primarily on the distribution mean, with only weak dependences on distribution width. Increasing distribution width increases the stability of fixed point solutions. A single discrete delay successfully approximates a distribution for frequencies below a cutoff that is inversely proportional to the delay width, provided that other model parameters are moderately adjusted. A pair of discrete delays together having the same mean, variance, and skewness as the distribution approximates the distribution over the same frequency range without needing parameter adjustment. Delay distributions with large fractional widths are well approximated by low-order differential equations.

  7. The Velocity Distribution of Hypervelocity Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Elena M; Sari, Re'em

    2013-01-01

    We consider the process of stellar binaries tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole. For highly eccentric orbits, as one star is ejected from the three-body system, the companion remains bound to the black hole. Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) observed in the Galactic halo and S-stars observed orbiting the central black hole may originate from such mechanism. In this paper, we predict the velocity distribution of the ejected stars of a given mass, after they have travelled out of the Galactic potential. We use both analytical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. We find that each part of the velocity distribution encodes different information. At low velocities < 800 km/s, the Galactic Potential shapes universally the observed distribution, which rises towards a peak, related to the Galactic escape velocity. Beyond the peak, the velocity distribution depends on binary mass and separation distributions. Finally, the finite star life introduces a break related to their mass. A qualitative comparison of our...

  8. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Cordes, J M

    2002-01-01

    (Abridged) We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars by modelling their birth, evolution, and detection in large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys, and by comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. We test models that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as sqrt(Edot) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/s and 500 km/s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (i)...

  9. Comparison of the effects of stimulating groups of static gamma axons with different conduction velocity ranges on cat spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonet-Dénand, F; Laporte, Y; Petit, J

    2001-07-01

    In cat peroneus tertius muscles, static gamma axons were prepared in groups of three to four according to the conduction velocity of their axons (fast, intermediate, or slow). Effects of stimulating these groups (at 20, 30, and 50 Hz) on spindle ensemble discharges during sinusoidal stretch (peak-to-peak amplitude, 0.5 mm; frequency linearly increasing from 0.5 to 8 Hz in 10 s) were compared. Ensemble discharges were obtained by digital treatment of the discharges in afferent fibers from all the spindles in peroneus tertius as recorded from the muscle nerve. Stimulation of each group prevented ensemble discharges from falling to very low levels during shortening phases. However, this effect was clearly larger when the group of fast-conducting axons was stimulated. In view of the known effects of the activation of bag(2) and chain fibers (either separately or together) on single primary ending discharges during comparable sinusoidal stretches, this stronger effect supports the view that static gamma axons with faster conduction velocities are more likely to supply more bag(2) fibers than slower ones. Possibly the proportions of bag(2) and chain fibers activated during motor activity are determined by a recruitment of static gamma motoneurons related to their size.

  10. The Velocity Distribution of Hypervelocity Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elena M.; Kobayashi, Shiho; Sari, Re'em

    2014-11-01

    We consider the process of stellar binaries tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH). For highly eccentric orbits, as one star is ejected from the three-body system, the companion remains bound to the BH. Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) observed in the Galactic halo and S-stars observed orbiting the central BH may originate from such mechanism. In this paper, we predict the velocity distribution of the ejected stars of a given mass, after they have traveled out of the Galactic potential. We use both analytical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. We find that each part of the velocity distribution encodes different information. At low velocities <800 km s-1, the Galactic potential universally shapes the observed distribution, which rises toward a peak, related to the Galactic escape velocity. Beyond the peak, the velocity distribution depends on binary mass and separation distributions. Finally, the finite star life introduces a break related to their mass. A qualitative comparison of our models with current observations shows the great potential of HVSs to constrain bulge and Galactic properties. Standard choices for parameter distributions predict velocities below and above ~800 km s-1 with equal probability, while none are observed beyond ~700 km s-1 and the current detections are more clustered at low velocities 300-400 km s-1. These features may indicate that the separation distribution of binaries that reach the tidal sphere is not flat in logarithmic space, as observed in more local massive binaries, but has more power toward larger separations, enhancing smaller velocities. In addition, the binary formation/evolution process or the injection mechanism might also induce a cut-off a min ~ 10 R ⊙ in the separation distribution.

  11. The velocity distribution of hypervelocity stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the process of stellar binaries tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH). For highly eccentric orbits, as one star is ejected from the three-body system, the companion remains bound to the BH. Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) observed in the Galactic halo and S-stars observed orbiting the central BH may originate from such mechanism. In this paper, we predict the velocity distribution of the ejected stars of a given mass, after they have traveled out of the Galactic potential. We use both analytical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. We find that each part of the velocity distribution encodes different information. At low velocities <800 km s–1, the Galactic potential universally shapes the observed distribution, which rises toward a peak, related to the Galactic escape velocity. Beyond the peak, the velocity distribution depends on binary mass and separation distributions. Finally, the finite star life introduces a break related to their mass. A qualitative comparison of our models with current observations shows the great potential of HVSs to constrain bulge and Galactic properties. Standard choices for parameter distributions predict velocities below and above ∼800 km s–1 with equal probability, while none are observed beyond ∼700 km s–1 and the current detections are more clustered at low velocities 300-400 km s–1. These features may indicate that the separation distribution of binaries that reach the tidal sphere is not flat in logarithmic space, as observed in more local massive binaries, but has more power toward larger separations, enhancing smaller velocities. In addition, the binary formation/evolution process or the injection mechanism might also induce a cut-off a min ∼ 10 R ☉ in the separation distribution.

  12. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Chernoff, D. F.; Cordes, J. M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars based on large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys. We do so by modelling evolution of the locations, velocities, spins, and radio luminosities of pulsars; calculating pulsed flux according to a beaming model and random orientation angles of spin and beam; applying selection effects of pulsar surveys; and comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. The surveys analyzed have well-defined characteristics and cover approx. 95% of the sky. We maximize the likelihood in a 6-dimensional space of observables P, dot-P, DM, absolute value of b, mu, F (period, period derivative, dispersion measure, Galactic latitude, proper motion, and flux density). The models we test are described by 12 parameters that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as E(exp 1/2) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/ s and 500 km/ s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution; this preference is largely immune to variations in other population parameters, such as the luminosity or distance scale, or the assumed spin-down law. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (1) roughly 50% of pulsars in the solar neighborhood will escape the Galaxy, while approx. 15% have velocities greater than 1000 km/ s (2) observational bias against high velocity pulsars is relatively unimportant for surveys that reach high Galactic absolute value of z distances, but is severe for

  13. Altered potassium channel distribution and composition in myelinated axons suppresses hyperexcitability following injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Margarita; Richards, Natalie; Schmid, Annina B; Barroso, Alejandro; Zhu, Lan; Ivulic, Dinka; Zhu, Ning; Anwandter, Philipp; Bhat, Manzoor A; Court, Felipe A; McMahon, Stephen B; Bennett, David L H

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury is associated with hyperexcitability in damaged myelinated sensory axons, which begins to normalise over time. We investigated the composition and distribution of shaker-type-potassium channels (Kv1 channels) within the nodal complex of myelinated axons following injury. At the neuroma that forms after damage, expression of Kv1.1 and 1.2 (normally localised to the juxtaparanode) was markedly decreased. In contrast Kv1.4 and 1.6, which were hardly detectable in the naïve state, showed increased expression within juxtaparanodes and paranodes following injury, both in rats and humans. Within the dorsal root (a site remote from injury) we noted a redistribution of Kv1-channels towards the paranode. Blockade of Kv1 channels with α-DTX after injury reinstated hyperexcitability of A-fibre axons and enhanced mechanosensitivity. Changes in the molecular composition and distribution of axonal Kv1 channels, therefore represents a protective mechanism to suppress the hyperexcitability of myelinated sensory axons that follows nerve injury. PMID:27033551

  14. Anomalous velocity distributions in active Brownian suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Fiege, Andrea; Vollmayr-Lee, Benjamin; Zippelius, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Large scale simulations and analytical theory have been combined to obtain the non-equilibrium velocity distribution, $f(v)$, of randomly accelerated particles in suspension. The simulations are based on an event-driven algorithm, generalised to include friction. They reveal strongly anomalous but largely universal distributions which are independent of volume fraction and collision processes, which suggests a one-particle model should capture all the essential features. We have formulated th...

  15. Electron velocity distributions near collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies of the amount of electron heating and of the shapes of electron velocity distributions across shocks near the earth are reviewed. It is found that electron heating increases with increasing shock strength but is always less than the ion heating. The scale length of electron heating is also less than that for the ions. Electron velocity distributions show characteristic shapes which depend on the strength of the shocks. At the weaker shocks, electron heating is mostly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, bar B, and results in Gaussian-shaped velocity distributions at low-to-moderate energies. At the stronger shocks, parallel heating predominates resulting in flat-topped velocity distributions. A reasonable interpretation of these results indicates that at the weaker shocks electron heating is dominated by a tendency toward conservation of the magnetic moment. At the stronger fast-mode shocks, this heating is thought to be dominated by an acceleration parallel to bar B produced by the macroscopic shock electric field followed by beam driven plasma instabilities. Some contribution to the heating at the stronger shocks from conservation of the magnetic moment and cross-field current-driven instabilities cannot be ruled out. Although the heating at slow-mode shocks is also dominated by instabilities driven by magnetic field-aligned electron beams, their acceleration mechanism is not yet established

  16. Distribution of axon diameters in cortical white matter: an electron-microscopic study on three human brains and a macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liewald, Daniel; Miller, Robert; Logothetis, Nikos; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Schüz, Almut

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information on the axonal diameters of cortico-cortical fibres in the human brain, connecting distant regions of the same hemisphere via the white matter. Samples for electron microscopy were taken from the region of the superior longitudinal fascicle and from the transitional white matter between temporal and frontal lobe where the uncinate and inferior occipitofrontal fascicle merge. We measured the inner diameter of cross sections of myelinated axons. For comparison with data from the literature on the human corpus callosum, we also took samples from that region. For comparison with well-fixed material, we also included samples from corresponding regions of a monkey brain (Macaca mulatta). Fibre diameters in human brains ranged from 0.16 to 9 μm. Distributions of diameters were similar in the three systems of cortico-cortical fibres investigated, both in humans and the monkey, with most of the average values below 1 μm diameter and a small population of much thicker fibres. Within individual human brains, the averages were larger in the superior longitudinal fascicle than in the transitional zone between temporal and frontal lobe. An asymmetry between left and right could be found in one of the human brains, as well as in the monkey brain. A correlation was also found between the thickness of the myelin sheath and the inner axon diameter for axons whose calibre was greater than about 0.6 μm. The results are compared to white matter data in other mammals and are discussed with respect to conduction velocity, brain size, cognition, as well as diffusion weighted imaging studies. PMID:25142940

  17. On the geocentric micrometeor velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, Diego; Nolan, Michael C.; Meisel, David D.; Mathews, John D.; Zhou, Qihou H.; Moser, Danielle E.

    2003-06-01

    We report micrometeor velocity distributions measured with unprecedented velocity and radiant resolution using the dual-beam 430 MHz Arecibo (AO) radar in Puerto Rico. The AO radar detects over 10,000 events daily inside its 300 m radar beam that are produced mainly by particles in the size range 0.5-100 microns. During the observations reported here, the line feed antenna is pointed vertically while the Gregorian feed is pointed at an angle of 15 degrees from zenith. The off-vertical radar beam is initially placed pointing north and every 30 min is rotated 180 degrees, allowing observation of three different regions of the Earth's ionosphere. Results from the observations performed on 21 January and 25 June 2002 are presented and discussed. We observe that the meteoroid population detected by AO is smaller in particle size and faster in velocity and thus entirely different from the one observed by conventional lower-frequency meteor radars that use a different scattering mechanism. We observe qualitative difference in the shape of the meteor velocity distribution for the different pointing directions. Preliminary analysis of these distributions indicates that we detect at least four particle populations characterized by their geocentric velocities: A slow one with a "classical" value (˜15 km/sec), an intermediate velocity population (˜30 km/sec) the presence of which depends on ecliptic latitude and longitude, and two fast and dominant (at sunrise) populations (˜45 km/sec and ˜50 km/sec). Finally, we explore the possibility of observational biases in our technique and find no evidence for large effects.

  18. Single-point velocity distribution in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Falkovich, G; Falkovich, Gregory; Lebedev, Vladimir

    1997-01-01

    We show that the tails of the single-point velocity probability distribution function (PDF) are generally non-Gaussian in developed turbulence. By using instanton formalism for the Navier-Stokes equation, we establish the relation between the PDF tails of the velocity and those of the external forcing. In particular, we show that a Gaussian random force having correlation scale $L$ and correlation time $\\tau$ produces velocity PDF tails $\\ln{\\cal P}(v)\\propto-v^4$ at $v\\gg v_{rms}, L/\\tau$. For a short-correlated forcing when $\\tau\\ll L/v_{rms}$ there is an intermediate asymptotics $\\ln {\\cal P}(v)\\propto-v^3$ at $L/\\tau\\gg v\\gg v_{rms}$.

  19. Anomalous velocity distributions in active Brownian suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, Andrea; Vollmayr-Lee, Benjamin; Zippelius, Annette

    2013-08-01

    Large-scale simulations and analytical theory have been combined to obtain the nonequilibrium velocity distribution, f(v), of randomly accelerated particles in suspension. The simulations are based on an event-driven algorithm, generalized to include friction. They reveal strongly anomalous but largely universal distributions, which are independent of volume fraction and collision processes, which suggests a one-particle model should capture all the essential features. We have formulated this one-particle model and solved it analytically in the limit of strong damping, where we find that f(v) decays as 1/v for multiple decades, eventually crossing over to a Gaussian decay for the largest velocities. Many particle simulations and numerical solution of the one-particle model agree for all values of the damping. PMID:24032806

  20. Velocity and velocity-difference distributions in Burgers turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Boldyrev, S.; Linde, T.; Polyakov, A.

    2003-01-01

    We consider the one-dimensional Burgers equation randomly stirred at large scales by a Gaussian short-time correlated force. Using the method of dissipative anomalies, we obtain velocity and velocity-difference probability density functions and confirm the results with high-resolution numerical simulations.

  1. Velocity Distributions & Density Fluctuations in a 2D Granular Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Olafsen, J. S.; Urbach, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Velocity distributions in a vibrated granular monolayer are investigated experimentally. Non-Gaussian velocity distributions are observed at low vibration amplitudes but cross over smoothly to Gaussian distributions as the amplitude is increased. Cross-correlations between fluctuations in density and temperature are present only when the velocity distributions are strongly non-Gaussian. Confining the expansion of the granular layer results in non-Gaussian velocity distributions that persist t...

  2. Trajectory and terminal distribution of single centrifugal axons from olfactory cortical areas in the rat olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, S

    2010-08-11

    The olfactory bulb receives a large number of centrifugal fibers whose functions remain unclear. To gain insight into the function of the bulbar centrifugal system, the morphology of individual centrifugal axons from olfactory cortical areas was examined in detail. An anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, was injected into rat olfactory cortical areas, including the pars lateralis of the anterior olfactory nucleus (lAON) and the anterior part of the piriform cortex (aPC). Reconstruction from serial sections revealed that the extrabulbar segments of centrifugal axons from the lAON and those from the aPC had distinct trajectories: the former tended to innervate the pars externa of the AON before entering the olfactory bulb, while the latter had extrabulbar collaterals that extended to a variety of targets. In contrast to the extrabulbar segments, no clear differences were found between the intrabulbar segments of axons from the lAON and from the aPC. The intrabulbar segments of centrifugal axons were mainly found in the granule cell layer but a few axons extended into the external plexiform and glomerular layer. Approximately 40% of centrifugal axons innervated both the medial and lateral aspects of the olfactory bulb. The number of boutons found on single intrabulbar segments was typically less than 1000. Boutons tended to aggregate and form complex terminal tufts with short axonal branches. Terminal tufts, no more than 10 in single axons from ipsilateral cortical areas, were localized to the granule cell layer with varying intervals; some tufts formed patchy clusters and others were scattered over areas that extended for a few millimeters. The patchy, widespread distribution of terminals suggests that the centrifugal axons are able to couple the activity of specific subsets of bulbar neurons even when the subsets are spatially separated.

  3. Two dimensional velocity distribution in open channels using Renyi entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhakar, Manotosh; Ghoshal, Koeli

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the entropy concept is employed for describing the two-dimensional velocity distribution in an open channel. Using the principle of maximum entropy, the velocity distribution is derived by maximizing the Renyi entropy by assuming dimensionless velocity as a random variable. The derived velocity equation is capable of describing the variation of velocity along both the vertical and transverse directions with maximum velocity occurring on or below the water surface. The developed model of velocity distribution is tested with field and laboratory observations and is also compared with existing entropy-based velocity distributions. The present model has shown good agreement with the observed data and its prediction accuracy is comparable with the other existing models.

  4. Velocity distribution in recoil-distance Doppler-shift experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Recoil-Distance Doppler-Shift (RDDS) technique is a well established method to measure lifetimes of excited nuclear states in the pico-second range. In standard RDDS experiments at non-relativistc beam-energies, the velocities of the emerging recoils are usually distributed narrowly around a mean velocity v = left angle v right angle v. Under these circumstances, the effect of the velocity distribution is neglectable and the assumption that all nuclei move with the average velocity is justified. In this poster we investigate the influence of broader velocity distributions on lifetimes determined using the standard lifetime analysis-method DDCM. This can be observed, e.g., in experiments with thick targets. In particular, it is shown that the effect of the velocity distribution on the deduced lifetime is minimised at the maximum amplitude of the derivative of the decay function.

  5. Velocity distributions in vertically vibrated granular media

    OpenAIRE

    Delour, J.; Kudrolli, A.; Gollub, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper has been withdrawn by the authors. It has been superceded by an improved investigation: "Velocity statistics in vibrated granular media" W. Losert, D.G.W. Cooper, J. Delour, A. Kudrolli, and J.P. Gollub (submitted to Chaos for a special issue on Granular Materials) cond-mat/9901203

  6. Experimental investigation of particle velocity distributions in windblown sand movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG LiQiang; GUO LieJin; LIU DaYou

    2008-01-01

    With the PDPA (Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer) measurement technology, the probability distributions of particle impact and lift-off velocities on bed surface and the particle velocity distributions at different heights are detected in a wind tunnel. The results show that the probability distribution of impact and lift-off velocities of sand grains can be expressed by a log-normal function, and that of impact and lift-off angles complies with an exponential function. The mean impact angle is between 28° and 39°, and the mean lift-off angle ranges from 30°to 44°. The mean lift-off velocity is 0.81-0.9 times the mean impact velocity. The proportion of backward-impacting particles is 0.05-0.11, and that of backward-entrained parti-cles ranges from 0.04 to 0.13. The probability distribution of particle horizontal ve-locity at 4 mm height is positive skew, the horizontal velocity of particles at 20 mm height varies widely, and the variation of the particle horizontal velocity at 80 mm height is less than that at 20 mm height. The probability distribution of particle ver-tical velocity at different heights can be described as a normal function.

  7. Experimental investigation of particle velocity distributions in windblown sand movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the PDPA(Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer) measurement technology,the probability distributions of particle impact and lift-off velocities on bed surface and the particle velocity distributions at different heights are detected in a wind tunnel. The results show that the probability distribution of impact and lift-off velocities of sand grains can be expressed by a log-normal function,and that of impact and lift-off angles complies with an exponential function. The mean impact angle is between 28° and 39°,and the mean lift-off angle ranges from 30° to 44°. The mean lift-off velocity is 0.81-0.9 times the mean impact velocity. The proportion of backward-impacting particles is 0.05-0.11,and that of backward-entrained particles ranges from 0.04 to 0.13. The probability distribution of particle horizontal velocity at 4 mm height is positive skew,the horizontal velocity of particles at 20 mm height varies widely,and the variation of the particle horizontal velocity at 80 mm height is less than that at 20 mm height. The probability distribution of particle vertical velocity at different heights can be described as a normal function.

  8. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  9. Velocity distribution and pressure loss at three-dimensional roughnesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the pressure drop and the velocity distribution at three-dimensional roughnesses in a rectangular channel of variable channel width were performed with air. The friction factors of the extreme roughness (p/h = 2.5, g/e = 1) were found to be the highest which were measured up to now. The velocity distribution showed great differences to that observed at other roughnesses. The 'law of the wall' is not adequate to describe the velocity profile over these roughnesses, the velocity profiles are much flatter. (orig.)

  10. Universal non-Gaussian velocity distribution in violent gravitational processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Osamu; Sota, Yasuhide; Tatekawa, Takayuki; Nakamichi, Akika; Morikawa, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    We study the velocity distribution in spherical collapses and cluster-pair collisions by use of N -body simulations. Reflecting the violent gravitational processes, the velocity distribution of the resultant quasistationary state generally becomes non-Gaussian. Through the strong mixing of the violent process, there appears a universal non-Gaussian velocity distribution, which is a democratic (equal-weighted) superposition of many Gaussian distributions (DT distribution). This is deeply related with the local virial equilibrium and the linear mass-temperature relation which characterize the system. We show the robustness of this distribution function against various initial conditions which leads to the violent gravitational process. The DT distribution has a positive correlation with the energy fluctuation of the system. On the other hand, the coherent motion such as the radial motion in the spherical collapse and the rotation with the angular momentum suppress the appearance of the DT distribution.

  11. Reconstructing the three-dimensional local dark matter velocity distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Kavanagh, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Directionally sensitive dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments present the only way to observe the full three-dimensional velocity distribution of the Milky Way halo local to Earth. In this work we compare methods for extracting information about the local DM velocity distribution from a set of recoil directions and energies in a range of hypothetical directional and non-directional experiments. We compare a model independent empirical parameterisation of the velocity distribution based on an angular discretisation with a model dependent approach which assumes knowledge of the functional form of the distribution. The methods are tested under three distinct halo models which cover a range of possible phase space structures for the local velocity distribution: a smooth Maxwellian halo, a tidal stream and a debris flow. In each case we use simulated directional data to attempt to reconstruct the shape and parameters describing each model as well as the DM particle properties. We find that the empirical pa...

  12. Behaviour of ion velocity distributions for a simple collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Maurice, J.-P.; Schunk, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the ion velocity distributions for a weakly ionized plasma subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. An exact solution to Boltzmann's equation has been obtained by replacing the Boltzmann collision integral with a simple relaxation model. At altitudes above about 150 km, where the ion collision frequency is much less than the ion cyclotron frequency, the ion distribution takes the shape of a torus in velocity space for electric fields greater than 40 mV/m. This shape persists for one to two hours after application of the electric field. At altitudes where the ion collision and cyclotron frequencies are approximately equal (about 120 km), the ion velocity distribution is shaped like a bean for large electric field strengths. This bean-shaped distribution persists throughout the lifetime of ionospheric electric fields. These highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions may have an appreciable affect on the interpretation of ion temperature measurements.

  13. Distribution of neurofilaments in myelinated axons of the optic nerve of goldfish (Carassius auratus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, D F; Diocee, M S; Roots, B I

    1980-11-01

    Neurofilaments were counted in myelinated axons of the optic nerve of goldfish which were acclimated to 5 degrees and 25 degrees C. The number of neurofilaments increases markedly with increasing axonal size; axons of less than 0.1 micrometer 2 in area contain between 25 and 60 neurofilaments, while in the larger axons of area greater than 1.0 micrometer 2 there are approximately 190. The densities of the neurofilaments in the small axons are noticeably higher than in the larger ones (507 and 160, respectively). A variety of fixation procedures i.e. osmium tetroxide (OsO4) in phosphate buffer, glutaraldehyde (4%) in phosphate buffer or in ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and piperazine-N-N'-bis-(2-ethanesulphonic acid) (PIPES) and post-fixed with OsO4 had no effect on the numbers of neurofilaments relative to the size of axon. The anaesthetic MS-222 (tricaine methanesulphonate) likewise had no effect on the numbers of neurofilaments. It is proposed that temperature acclimation alters the axon diameter concomitant with an alteration in the number of neurofilaments to fit the new diameter of the axons. PMID:6253602

  14. How required reserve ratio affects distribution and velocity of money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-11-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money follows exponential distribution. The expression of monetary wealth distribution and that of the velocity of money in terms of the required reserve ratio are presented in a good agreement with simulation results.

  15. How Required Reserve Ratio Affects Distribution and Velocity of Money

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, N; Wang, Y; Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money follows exponential distribution. The expression of monetary wealth distribution and that of the velocity of money in terms of the required reserve ratio are presented in a good agreement with simulation results.

  16. The $\\Omega$ dependence of the velocity divergence distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardeau, F; Hivon, E; Bouchet, F R

    1996-01-01

    We present a series of results investigating the $\\Omega$ dependence of the distribution function of the large scale local cosmic velocity divergence. Analytical studies using perturbation theory techniques indicate that the shape of this distribution should be strongly dependent on $\\Omega$. This dependence is all the more interesting as it does not involve biases of the galaxy distribution with respect to the underlying density distribution, making it a potentially promising and useful basis for new and alternative methods to obtain bias-independent estimates of $\\Omega$. After a description of the $\\Omega$ dependent characteristics expected in the shape of the velocity divergence PDF, we study this distribution on the basis of a set of $N$-body simulations. To analyze the discretely sampled velocity field yielded by the latter, we apply a set of recently developed numerical tools, the ``Voronoi'' and ``Delaunay'' methods. These two methods were devised specifically for the purpose of investigating statisti...

  17. SPIDER - IX. Classifying galaxy groups according to their velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Trevisan, M.; Capelato, H. V.; La Barbera, F.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Schilling, A. C.

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a new method to study the velocity distribution of galaxy systems, the Hellinger Distance (HD), designed for detecting departures from a Gaussian velocity distribution. Testing different approaches to measure normality of a distribution, we conclude that HD is the least vulnerable method to type I and II statistical errors. We define a relaxed galactic system as the one with unimodal velocity distribution and a normality deviation below a critical value (HD ) and the Gaussianity of the velocity distribution of the groups. Bright galaxies (Mr ≤ -20.7) residing in the inner and outer regions of groups do not show significant differences in the listed quantities regardless if the group has a Gaussian (G) or a Non-Gaussian (NG) velocity distribution. However, the situation is significantly different when we examine the faint galaxies (-20.7 populations, testifying how the environment is affecting the galaxies. Instead, in NG groups there is no segregation between the properties of galaxies in the inner and outer regions, showing that the properties of these galaxies still reflect the physical processes prevailing in the environment where they were found earlier.

  18. Shear Profiles and Velocity Distribution in Dense Shear Granular Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Deng-Ming; ZHOU You-He

    2009-01-01

    We perform DEM simulations to investigate the influence of the packing fraction γ on the,shape of mean tan-gential velocity profile in a 2D annular dense shear granular flow. There is a critical packing fraction γc. For γ < γc, the mean tangential velocity profile shows a roughly exponential decay from the shearing boundary and is almost invariant to the imposed shear rate. However, for γ γc, the tangential velocity profile exhibits a rate-dependence feature and changes from linear to nonlinear gradually with the increasing shear rate. Fhrther-more, the distributions of normalized tangential velocities at different positions along radial direction exhibit the Gaussian or the composite Gaussian distributing features.

  19. Motion of Euglena Gracilis: Active Fluctuations and Velocity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 23, 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a...

  20. Self-consistent size and velocity distributions of collisional cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q=3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi (1969) differential size spectrum to an index as large as q=4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88

  1. Power exponential velocity distributions in disordered porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Matyka, Maciej; Koza, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Velocity distribution functions link the micro- and macro-level theories of fluid flow through porous media. Here we study them for the fluid absolute velocity and its longitudinal and lateral components relative to the macroscopic flow direction in a model of a random porous medium. We claim that all distributions follow the power exponential law controlled by an exponent $\\gamma$ and a shift parameter $u_0$ and examine how these parameters depend on the porosity. We find that $\\gamma$ has a universal value $1/2$ at the percolation threshold and grows with the porosity, but never exceeds 2.

  2. Actin filaments on myosin beds: The velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, L.; Magnasco, M. O.; Winkelmann, D. A.; Libchaber, A.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro studies of actin filaments sliding on a myosin-coated surface are analyzed, filament by filament, at a sampling rate of 30 per second. For each filament, the mean arc length coordinate is computed and histograms of instantaneous velocities, along the arc length, are established. Two types of motion are observed, depending on the experimental conditions. The first one is characterized by a homogeneous flow, with well defined velocities. In this regime, specific defects are a constitutive part of the flow. It is observed at high temperature, at high myosin coverage, and with a particular mode of attachment of myosin to the surface. The second regime shows no clear velocity selection, but a broadband distribution. It is characterized by high friction and is observed at low temperature or low myosin density. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  3. Whistler Waves Driven by Anisotropic Strahl Velocity Distributions: Cluster Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, A.F.; Gurgiolo, C.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Gary, S. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Observed properties of the strahl using high resolution 3D electron velocity distribution data obtained from the Cluster/PEACE experiment are used to investigate its linear stability. An automated method to isolate the strahl is used to allow its moments to be computed independent of the solar wind core+halo. Results show that the strahl can have a high temperature anisotropy (T(perpindicular)/T(parallell) approximately > 2). This anisotropy is shown to be an important free energy source for the excitation of high frequency whistler waves. The analysis suggests that the resultant whistler waves are strong enough to regulate the electron velocity distributions in the solar wind through pitch-angle scattering

  4. Distributed Velocity-Dependent Protocol for Multihop Cellular Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagyasi Bhushan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell phones are embedded with sensors form a Cellular Sensor Network which can be used to localize a moving event. The inherent mobility of the application and of the cell phone users warrants distributed structure-free data aggregation and on-the-fly routing. We propose a Distributed Velocity-Dependent (DVD protocol to localize a moving event using a Multihop Cellular Sensor Network (MCSN. DVD is based on a novel form of connectivity determined by the waiting time of nodes for a Random Waypoint (RWP distribution of cell phone users. This paper analyzes the time-stationary and spatial distribution of the proposed waiting time to explain the superior event localization and delay performances of DVD over the existing Randomized Waiting (RW protocol. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to compare the performance of DVD with RW and the existing Centralized approach.

  5. Distributed Velocity-Dependent Protocol for Multihop Cellular Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthi Chander

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell phones are embedded with sensors form a Cellular Sensor Network which can be used to localize a moving event. The inherent mobility of the application and of the cell phone users warrants distributed structure-free data aggregation and on-the-fly routing. We propose a Distributed Velocity-Dependent (DVD protocol to localize a moving event using a Multihop Cellular Sensor Network (MCSN. DVD is based on a novel form of connectivity determined by the waiting time of nodes for a Random Waypoint (RWP distribution of cell phone users. This paper analyzes the time-stationary and spatial distribution of the proposed waiting time to explain the superior event localization and delay performances of DVD over the existing Randomized Waiting (RW protocol. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to compare the performance of DVD with RW and the existing Centralized approach.

  6. Discretising the velocity distribution for directional dark matter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments which are directionally-sensitive may be the only method of probing the full velocity distribution function (VDF) of the Galactic DM halo. We present an angular basis for the DM VDF which can be used to parametrise the distribution in order to mitigate astrophysical uncertainties in future directional experiments and extract information about the DM halo. This basis consists of discretising the VDF in a series of angular bins, with the VDF being only a function of the DM speed v within each bin. In contrast to other methods, such as spherical harmonic expansions, the use of this basis allows us to guarantee that the resulting VDF is everywhere positive and therefore physical. We present a recipe for calculating the event rates corresponding to the discrete VDF for an arbitrary number of angular bins N and investigate the discretisation error which is introduced in this way. For smooth, Standard Halo Model-like distribution functions, only N=3 angular bins are required to achieve an accuracy of around 10–30% in the number of events in each bin. Shortly after confirmation of the DM origin of the signal with around 50 events, this accuracy should be sufficient to allow the discretised velocity distribution to be employed reliably. For more extreme VDFs (such as streams), the discretisation error is typically much larger, but can be improved with increasing N. This method paves the way towards an astrophysics-independent analysis framework for the directional detection of dark matter

  7. Study on velocity distribution in a pool by submersible mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, F.; Shi, W. D.; Jiang, H.; Lu, X. N.; Chen, B.

    2012-11-01

    To study the distribution of submersible mixers and agitating effect in the sewage treatment pool, Pro/E software was utilized to build the three-dimensional model. Then, the large-scale computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT6.3 was used. ICEM software was used to build unstructured grid of sewage treatment pool. After that, the sewage treatment pool was numerically simulated by dynamic coordinate system technology and RNG k-ε turbulent model and PIOS algorithm. The macro fluid field and each section velocity flow field distribution were analyzed to observe the efficiency of each submersible mixer. The average velocity and mixing area in the sewage pool were studied simultaneously. Results show that: the preferred project B, two submersible mixers speed is 980 r/min, and setting angles are all 30°. Fluid mixing area in the pool has reached more than 95%. Under the action of two mixers, the fluid in the sewage pool form a continuous circulating water flow. The fluid is mixed adequately and average velocity of fluid in the pool is at around 0.241m/s, which agreed with the work requirements. Consequently it can provide a reference basis for practical engineering application of submersible mixers by using this method.

  8. Velocity distribution of Earth-crossing asteroid grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Dermott, Stanley F.

    1994-01-01

    We have systematically studied the evolution of 4- and 9-micrometer-diameter dust particles from three prominent asteroid families, Eos, Koronis, and Themis, until they reach the Earth. We have found that they are quite distinguishable in their (I cos omega, I sin omega) phase space. The different distributions in the inclination space have several important observational consequences, which can be used to identify the origins of these dust particles. We convert the orbital elements of these Earth-crossing dust grains to distinguish them by using any one single velocity component. We conclude that in order to identify the origins of the Earth-crossing dust grains we need all three velocity components to get their orbital elements and find their positions in the inclination space.

  9. Mechanism of proton anisotropic velocity distribution in the solar wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AO; Xianzhi(敖先志); SHEN; Ji(沈迹); TU; Chuanyi(涂传诒)

    2003-01-01

    Although it has been long that spacecraft observed the anisotropy of velocity protons in the solar wind, there is still not a reasonable explanation. In this paper we try to give an explanation from the diffusion plateau of protoncyclotron resonance predicted by the quasi-linear theory for the resonance between the protons and the parallel propagating waves. We consider the effect of dispersion relation on diffusion plateau and notice that the diffusion plateau we have got by using cold plasma dispersion relation accords with the density contours in the velocity phase space detected at 0.3 AU in fast solar wind. For explaining proton distributions obtained in the fast solar wind from 0.7 AU to 1 AU hot plasma dispersion relation should be considered. We also give a theoretical relation of proton thermal anisotropy A and plasma parameter β.

  10. Quantitative analysis of axon bouton distribution of subthalamic nucleus neurons in the rat by single neuron visualization with a viral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Yoshinori; Fujiyama, Fumino; Nakamura, Kouichi C; Furuta, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-06-15

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia plays a key role in motor control, and STN efferents are known to mainly target the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), entopeduncular nucleus (Ep), and substantia nigra (SN) with some axon collaterals to the other regions. However, it remains to be clarified how each STN neuron projects axon fibers and collaterals to those target nuclei of the STN. Here we visualized the whole axonal arborization of single STN neurons in the rat brain by using a viral vector expressing membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein, and examined the distribution of axon boutons in those target nuclei. The vast majority (8-9) of 10 reconstructed STN neurons projected to the GPe, SN, caudate-putamen (CPu), and Ep, which received, on average ± SD, 457 ± 425, 400 ± 347, 126 ± 143, and 106 ± 100 axon boutons per STN neuron, respectively. Furthermore, the density of axon boutons in the GPe was highest among these nuclei. Although these target nuclei were divided into calbindin-rich and -poor portions, STN projection showed no exclusive preference for those portions. Since STN neurons mainly projected not only to the GPe, SN, and Ep but also to the CPu, the subthalamostriatal projection might serve as a positive feedback path for the striato-GPe-subthalamic disinhibitory pathway, or work as another route of cortical inputs to the striatum through the corticosubthalamostriatal disynaptic excitatory pathway.

  11. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuecks, D J; Skiff, F; Kletzing, C A

    2012-08-01

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense (ω(pe) > ω(ce)). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency ω(ce). As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation ω - k([parallel])v([parallel]) = ω(ce). The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  12. Settling-velocity specific SOC distribution on hillslopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yaxian; Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw; Fogel, Marilyn L.;

    The net effect of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric CO2, is determined by the spatial (re-)distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC). The depositional position of eroded SOC is a function of the transport distances of soil fractions where the SOC...... is stored. In theory, the transport distances of soil fractions are related to their settling velocities under given flow conditions. Yet, very few field investigations have been conducted to examine the actual movement of eroded soil fractions along hillslopes, let alone the re-distribution pattern of SOC...... shows a coarsening effect immediately below the eroding slope, followed by a fining trend at the slope tail. The 13C values of soil fractions were more positive at the footslope than on the slope shoulder or at the slope tail, suggesting enhanced decomposition rate of fresh SOC input at the footslope...

  13. Settling-velocity specific SOC distribution on hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaxian; Asefaw Berhe, Asmeret; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Heckrath, Goswin J.; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    The net effect of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric CO2, is determined by the spatial (re-)distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC). The depositional position of eroded SOC is a function of the transport distances of soil fractions where the SOC is stored. In theory, the transport distances of soil fractions are related to their settling velocities under given flow conditions. Yet, very few field investigations have been conducted to examine the actual movement of eroded soil fractions along hillslopes, let alone the re-distribution pattern of SOC fractions. Eroding sandy soils and sediment were sampled after a series of rainfall events along a slope on a freshly seeded cropland in Jutland, Denmark. All the soil samples were fractionated into five settling classes using a settling tube apparatus. The spatial distribution of soil settling classes shows a coarsening effect immediately below the eroding slope, followed by a fining trend at the slope tail. The δ13C values of soil fractions were more positive at the footslope than on the slope shoulder or at the slope tail, suggesting enhanced decomposition rate of fresh SOC input at the footslope during or after erosion-induced transport. Overall, our results illustrate that immediate deposition of fast settling soil fractions and the associated SOC at footslopes must be appropriately accounted for in attempts to quantify the role of soil erosion in terrestrial carbon sequestration. A SOC erodibility parameter based on actual settling velocity distribution of eroded fractions is needed to better calibrate soil erosion models.

  14. Effects of Fractal Size Distributions on Velocity Distributions and Correlations of a Polydisperse Granular Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi-Yuan; ZHANG Duan-Ming

    2008-01-01

    By the Monte Carlo method,the effect of dispersion of disc size distribution on the velocity distributions and correlations of a polydisperse granular gas with fractal size distribution is investigated in the same inelasticity.The dispersion can be described by a fractal dimension D,and the smooth hard discs are engaged in a twodimensional horizontal rectangular box,colliding inelastically with each other and driven by a homogeneous heat bath.In the steady state,the tails of the velocity distribution functions rise more significantly above a Ganssian as D increases,but the non-Ganssian velocity distribution functions do not demonstrate any apparent universal form for any value of D.The spatial velocity correlations are apparently stronger with the increase of D.The perpendicular correlations are about half the parallel correlations,and the two correlations are a power-law decay function of dimensionless distance and are of a long range.Moreover,the parallel velocity correlations of postcollisional state at contact are more than twice as large as the precollisionaJ correlations,and both of them show almost linear behaviour of the fractal dimension D.

  15. Discretising the velocity distribution for directional dark matter experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kavanagh, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments which are directionally-sensitive may be the only method of probing the full velocity distribution function (VDF) of the Galactic DM halo. We present an angular basis for the DM VDF which can be used to parametrise the distribution in order to mitigate astrophysical uncertainties in future directional experiments and extract information about the DM halo. This basis consists of discretising the VDF in a series of angular bins, with the VDF being only a function of the DM speed $v$ within each bin. In contrast to other methods, such as spherical harmonic expansions, the use of this basis allows us to guarantee that the resulting VDF is everywhere positive and therefore physical. We present a recipe for calculating the event rates corresponding to the discrete VDF for an arbitrary number of angular bins $N$ and investigate the discretisation error which is introduced in this way. For smooth, Standard Halo Model-like distribution functions, only $N=3$ angular bins ar...

  16. Electron velocity distribution and lion roars in the magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Masood

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Whistler waves which are termed "lion roars" in the magnetosheath are studied using data obtained by the Spectrum Analyser (SA of the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF experiment aboard Cluster. Kinetic theory is then employed to obtain the theoretical expression for the whistler wave with electron temperature anisotropy which is believed to trigger lion roars in the magnetosheath. This allows us to compare theory and data. This paper for the first time studies the details of the electron velocity distribution function as measured by the Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE in order to investigate the underlying causes for the different types of lion roars found in the data. Our results show that while some instances of lion roars could be locally generated, the source of others must be more remote regions of the magnetosheath.

  17. Submicron Plasticity: Yield Stress, Dislocation Avalanches, and Velocity Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ispánovity, Péter Dusán; Groma, István; Györgyi, Géza; Csikor, Ferenc F.; Weygand, Daniel

    2010-08-01

    The existence of a well-defined yield stress, where a macroscopic crystal begins to plastically flow, has been a basic observation in materials science. In contrast with macroscopic samples, in microcrystals the strain accumulates in random bursts, which makes controlled plastic formation difficult. Here we study by 2D and 3D simulations the plastic deformation of submicron objects under increasing stress. We show that, while the stress-strain relation of individual samples exhibits jumps, its average and mean deviation still specify a well-defined critical stress. The statistical background of this phenomenon is analyzed through the velocity distribution of dislocations, revealing a universal cubic decay and the appearance of a shoulder due to dislocation avalanches.

  18. LASER ULTRASONIC FOR MEASUREMENTS OF VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION IN PIPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Navarrete

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the development of a photoacoustic flowmeter with probe-beam deflection. A pulsedlaser beam produces an acoustic pulse, whose propagation is registered by its deflection effects on two cw probebeams. The acoustic pulse in a flowing fluid is produced by absorption of a laser pulse (30 ns, 1.1 mJ focused overa path flow line. The acoustic propagations, along and against the flow, are monitored by two cw probe beams. Inthe interaction, the probe beam undergoes a transient deflection that is detected by a fast response photodiode.The velocity distribution data profile of a square pipe is obtained by means of the acoustic pulse arrival timemeasured through its cross section applying the cylindrical shockwave model developed by Vlasses. The profilesdetermined with this experimental technique are compared with two turbulent pipe flow models.

  19. On the distribution of sound velocity in a section of Vzag in the Bay of Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Siva Rama Sastry

    1956-04-01

    Full Text Available The vertical sound velocity distribution in a section of Visakhapatnam in the Bay of Bengal has been computed making use of Kuwahara's tables. In an attempt to find out the corrections to the echo-sounder readings the average sound velocity distribution is computed together with the sound velocity profiles taking the spot values only. The physical oceanography of the area in relation to the sound velocity distribution is discussed.

  20. Calculation of a velocity distribution from particle trajectory end-points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lowell A.

    1983-01-01

    The longitudinal component of the velocity of a particle at or near a glacier surface is considered, its position as a function of time being termed its trajectory. Functional relationships are derived for obtaining the trajectory from the spatial distribution of velocity and for obtaining the velocity distribution from the trajectory. It is established that the trajectory end-points impose only an integral condition on the velocity distribution and that no individual point on the velocity distribution can be determined if only the end-points are known.-from Author

  1. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  2. Human intraretinal myelination: Axon diameters and axon/myelin thickness ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGibbon, Thomas; Nestorovski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Human intraretinal myelination of ganglion cell axons occurs in about 1% of the population. We examined myelin thickness and axon diameter in human retinal specimens containing myelinated retinal ganglion cell axons. Materials and Methods: Two eyes containing myelinated patches were prepared for electron microscopy. Two areas were examined in one retina and five in the second retina. Measurements were compared to normal retinal and optic nerve samples and the rabbit retina, which normally contains myelinated axons. Measurements were made using a graphics tablet. Results: Mean axon diameter of myelinated axons at all locations were significantly larger than unmyelinated axons (P ≤ 0.01). Myelinated axons within the patches were significantly larger than axons within the optic nerve (P < 0.01). The relationship between axon diameter/fiber diameter (the G-ratio) seen in the retinal sites differed from that in the nerve. G-ratios were higher and myelin thickness was positively correlated to axon diameter (P < 0.01) in the retina but negatively correlated to axon diameter in the nerve (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Intraretinally myelinated axons are larger than non-myelinated axons from the same population and suggests that glial cells can induce diameter changes in retinal axons that are not normally myelinated. This effect is more dramatic on intraretinal axons compared with the normal transition zone as axons enter the optic nerve and these changes are abnormal. Whether intraretinal myelin alters axonal conduction velocity or blocks axonal conduction remains to be clarified and these issues may have different clinical outcomes. PMID:24212308

  3. Distribution of axon diameters in cortical white matter: an electron-microscopic study on three human brains and a macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Liewald, Daniel; Miller, Robert; Logothetis, Nikos; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Schüz, Almut

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information on the axonal diameters of cortico-cortical fibres in the human brain, connecting distant regions of the same hemisphere via the white matter. Samples for electron microscopy were taken from the region of the superior longitudinal fascicle and from the transitional white matter between temporal and frontal lobe where the uncinate and inferior occipitofrontal fascicle merge. We measured the inner diameter of cross sections of myelinated axons. Fo...

  4. Axon damage and repair in multiple sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, V.H.; Anthony, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that within long-standing multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions there is axonal loss but whether it is an early or late event has been more difficult to establish. The use of immunocytochemical methods that reveal axonal end-bulbs is a valuable approach to investigating acute axonal injury in human pathological material. The application of these techniques to multiple sclerosis tissue reveals evidence of axonal injury in acute lesions; the distribution of the end-bulbs in acute and...

  5. Velocity perturbation distributions in the breakup of artificial satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Tan, Arjun; Reynolds, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the three orthogonal components of the velocity perturbations of satellite fragments, with a view to ascertaining the nature and intensity of the satellite breakup. The method employs three simultaneous equations furnished by changes in fragment specific energy, specific angular momentum, and plane orientation. Velocity perturbations are thereby calculated for fragments from 20 major satellite breakup events; these results, in conjunction with a technique for determining fragment masses, yield a description of the breakup process.

  6. Velocity dependence of angular distributions in gas/solid--surface collisions: Relationship to the interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, J.W. Jr.; Doll, J.D.; Thompson, D.L.

    1978-10-15

    The angular and velocity distributions for gas/solid-surface collisions are examined. It is shown that the envelope of the scattered phase-space distribution is quite sensitive to the gas/surface interaction potential.

  7. Empirical Study of Traffic Velocity Distribution and its Effect on VANETs Connectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Abuelenin, Sherif M

    2015-01-01

    In this article we use real traffic data to confirm that vehicle velocities follow Gaussian distribution in steady state traffic regimes (free-flow, and congestion). We also show that in the transition between free-flow and congestion, the velocity distribution is better modeled by generalized extreme value distribution (GEV). We study the effect of the different models on estimating the probability distribution of connectivity duration between vehicles in vehicular ad-hoc networks.

  8. Velocity distribution measurements in atomic beams generated using laser induced back-ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Denning, A; Lee, S; Ammonson, M; Bergeson, S D

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a sub-thermal atomic beam.

  9. Velocity Distribution of Effective Atoms in a Small Optically Pumped Cesium Beam Frequency Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jingbiao; WANG Fengzhi; YANG Donghai; WANG YiQiu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the velocity distribution of effective atoms in a small optically pumped cesium beam frequency standard has been achieved from the Fourier transforms of the experimentally recorded Ramsey patterns. The result fits well with the theoretical calculation. The second order Doppler shift correction of the small cesium atomic clock is obtained from the velocity distribution of effective atoms.

  10. A possible solution to the solar neutrino problem: Relativistic corrections to the Maxwellian velocity distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jian-Miin

    2001-01-01

    The relativistic corrections to the Maxwellian velocity distribution are needed for standard solar models. Relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution, if adopted in standard solar models, will lower solar neutrino fluxes and change solar neutrino energy spectra but keep solar sound speeds. It is possibly a solution to the solar neutrino problem.

  11. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Olano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available I developed a method to determine theoretical distances to the High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs, based on the idea that the HVCs were ejected from the Magellanic Clouds in a relatively short period of time as a consequence of the collision between the Large (LMC and Small Magellanic Clouds (SMC. The present spatial position of each HVCs was obtained by calculating its orbit with the initial condition that the each HVCs was simultaneously launched from the LMC at the time and position of the LMC-SMC encounter.

  12. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    OpenAIRE

    F. Gao; Liu, H.; P. Xu; Tian, X.; Y Wang; Ren, J; Haibin Wu; Hong Chang

    2014-01-01

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques use...

  13. CFD Simulation of Air Velocity Distribution in Occupied Livestock Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svidt, Kjeld; Zhang, G.; Bjerg, B.

    In modem livestock buildings the design of the ventilation systems is important in order to obtain good air distribution. The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for predicting the air flow and air quality makes it possible to include the effect of room geometry, equipment and occupants in the de...

  14. Numerical Investigation of Developing Velocity Distributions in Open Channel Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Ghani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The velocity profiles in open channel flows start developing after entering into the channel for quite some length. All types of laboratory experiments for open channel flows are carried out in the fully developed flow regions which exist at some length downstream the inlet. In this research work an attempt has been made to investigate the impact of roughness and slope of the channel bed on the length required for establishment of fully developed flow in an open channel. A range of different roughness values along with various slopes were considered for this purpose. It was observed that an increase in roughness results in reduction of development length; and development length reduces drastically when roughness reaches to the range normally encountered in open channel flows with emergent vegetation or natural river flows. However, it was observed that the change of slope did not have any noticeable effect on development length. This work suggests that CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics technique can be used for getting a reliable development length before performing an experimental work

  15. Dark matter searches employing asymmetric velocity distributions obtained via the Eddington approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergados, J. D.; Moustakidis, Ch. C.; Owen, D.

    2016-08-01

    Starting from WIMP density profiles, in the framework of the Eddington approach, we obtain the energy distribution f(E) of dark matter in our vicinity. Assuming a factorizable phase space function, f(E , L) = F(E) FL(L) , we obtain the velocity dispersions and the anisotropy parameter β in terms of the parameters describing the angular momentum dependence. By employing the derived expression f(E) we construct axially symmetric WIMP velocity distributions. The obtained distributions automatically have a velocity upper bound, as a consequence of the fact that they are associated with a gravitationally bound system, and are characterized by an anisotropy parameter β. We then show how such velocity distributions can be used in determining the event rates, including modulation, both in the standard as well directional WIMP searches.

  16. Approximate Kelvin-Voigt Fluid Driven by an External Force Depending on Velocity with Distributed Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yantao Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the approximate 3D Kelvin-Voigt fluid driven by an external force depending on velocity with distributed delay. We investigate the long time behavior of solutions to Navier-Stokes-Voigt equation with a distributed delay external force depending on the velocity of fluid on a bounded domain. By a prior estimate and a contractive function, we give a sufficient condition for the existence of pullback attractor of NSV equation.

  17. The nuclear fusion reaction rate based on relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jian-Miin

    2002-01-01

    The Coulomb barrier is in general much higher than thermal energy. Nuclear fusion reactions occur only among few protons and nuclei with higher relative energies than Coulomb barrier. It is the equilibrium velocity distribution of these high-energy protons and nuclei that participates in determining the rate of nuclear fusion reactions. In the circumstance it is inappropriate to use the Maxwellian velocity distribution for calculating the nuclear fusion reaction rate. We use the relativistic ...

  18. Measurement of pressure distributions and velocity fields of water jet intake flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Eun Ho; Yoon, Sang Youl; Kwon, Seong Hoon; Chun, Ho Hwan; Kim, Mun Chan; Kim, Kyung Chun [Busan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Waterjet propulsion system can avoid cavitation problem which is being arised conventional propeller propulsion system. The main issue of designing waterjet system is the boundary layer separation at ramp and lib of water inlet. The flow characteristics are highly depended on Jet to Velocity Ratio(JVR) as well as the intake geometry. The present study is conducted in a wind tunnel to provide accurate pressure destribution at the inlet wall and velocity field of the inlet and exit planes. Particle image velocimetry technique is used to obtain detail velocity fields. Pressure distributions and velocity field are discussed with accelerating and deaccelerating flow zones and the effect of JVR.

  19. CFD Simulation of Air Velocity Distribution in Occupied Livestock Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Svidt, Kjeld; Zhang, G.; Bjerg, B.

    1998-01-01

    In modem livestock buildings the design of the ventilation systems is important in order to obtain good air distribution. The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for predicting the air flow and air quality makes it possible to include the effect of room geometry, equipment and occupants in the design of ventilation systems. However, it is not appropriate to include the detailed geometry of a large group of lying or standing animals affecting the air flow in the building.It is necessary to hav...

  20. Analyzing angular distributions for two-step dissociation mechanisms in velocity map imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Daniel B; Butler, Lynne M; Alligood, Bridget W; Butler, Laurie J

    2013-08-15

    Increasingly, velocity map imaging is becoming the method of choice to study photoinduced molecular dissociation processes. This paper introduces an algorithm to analyze the measured net speed, P(vnet), and angular, β(vnet), distributions of the products from a two-step dissociation mechanism, where the first step but not the second is induced by absorption of linearly polarized laser light. Typically, this might be the photodissociation of a C-X bond (X = halogen or other atom) to produce an atom and a momentum-matched radical that has enough internal energy to subsequently dissociate (without the absorption of an additional photon). It is this second step, the dissociation of the unstable radicals, that one wishes to study, but the measured net velocity of the final products is the vector sum of the velocity imparted to the radical in the primary photodissociation (which is determined by taking data on the momentum-matched atomic cophotofragment) and the additional velocity vector imparted in the subsequent dissociation of the unstable radical. The algorithm allows one to determine, from the forward-convolution fitting of the net velocity distribution, the distribution of velocity vectors imparted in the second step of the mechanism. One can thus deduce the secondary velocity distribution, characterized by a speed distribution P(v1,2°) and an angular distribution I(θ2°), where θ2° is the angle between the dissociating radical's velocity vector and the additional velocity vector imparted to the product detected from the subsequent dissociation of the radical. PMID:23464815

  1. Breaking through: The effects of a velocity distribution on barriers to dust growth

    CERN Document Server

    Windmark, Fredrik; Ormel, Chris; Dullemond, Cornelis P

    2012-01-01

    It is unknown how far dust growth can proceed by coagulation. Obstacles to collisional growth are the fragmentation and bouncing barriers. However, in all previous simulations of the dust-size evolution in protoplanetary disks, only the mean collision velocity has been considered, neglecting that a small but possibly important fraction of the collisions will occur at both much lower and higher velocities. We study the effect of the probability distribution of impact velocities on the collisional dust growth barriers. Assuming a Maxwellian velocity distribution for colliding particles to determine the fraction of sticking, bouncing, and fragmentation, we implement this in a dust-size evolution code. We also calculate the probability of growing through the barriers and the growth timescale in these regimes. We find that the collisional growth barriers are not as sharp as previously thought. With the existence of low-velocity collisions, a small fraction of the particles manage to grow to masses orders of magnit...

  2. Velocity distribution measurements in a fishway like open channel by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeed-Bin-Asad, S. M.; Lundström, T. S.; Andersson, A. G.; Hellström, J. G. I.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments in an open channel flume with placing a vertical half cylinder barrier have been performed in order to investigate how the upstream velocity profiles are affected by a barrier. An experimental technique using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was adopted to measure these velocity distributions in the channel for four different discharge rates. Velocity profiles were measured very close to wall and at 25, 50 and 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall. For comparing these profiles with well-known logarithmic velocity profiles, velocity profiles were also measured in smooth open channel flow for all same four discharge rates. The results indicate that regaining the logarithmic velocity profiles upstream of the half cylindrical barrier occurs at 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall.

  3. Velocity distribution measurements in a fishway like open channel by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayeed-Bin-Asad S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments in an open channel flume with placing a vertical half cylinder barrier have been performed in order to investigate how the upstream velocity profiles are affected by a barrier. An experimental technique using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV was adopted to measure these velocity distributions in the channel for four different discharge rates. Velocity profiles were measured very close to wall and at 25, 50 and 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall. For comparing these profiles with well-known logarithmic velocity profiles, velocity profiles were also measured in smooth open channel flow for all same four discharge rates. The results indicate that regaining the logarithmic velocity profiles upstream of the half cylindrical barrier occurs at 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall.

  4. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg. PMID:27594833

  5. Asymmetric Velocity Distributions from Halo Density Profiles in the Eddington Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Vergados

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We show how to obtain the energy distribution f(E in our vicinity starting from WIMP density profiles in a self-consistent way by employing the Eddington approach and adding reasonable angular momentum dependent terms in the expression of the energy. We then show how we can obtain the velocity dispersions and the asymmetry parameter β in terms of the parameters describing the angular momentum dependence. From this expression, for f(E, we proceed to construct an axially symmetric WIMP a velocity distribution, which, for a gravitationally bound system, automatically has a velocity upper bound and is characterized by the same asymmetriy β. This approach is tested and clarified by constructing analytic expressions in a simple model, with adequate structure. We then show how such velocity distributions can be used in determining the event rates, including modulation, in both the standard and the directional WIMP searches.

  6. 16-Moment Approximation for Ion Velocity Distribution and its Application in Calculations of Incoherent Scatter Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Kun; GUO Lixin; WV Jian; XU Bin; FANG Chaofeng

    2009-01-01

    A sixteen moment approximation based on a bi-Maxwellian that contains the stress tensor and the heat flow vector is applied to describe the ion velocity distribution which influences the incoherent scatter spectra. A discussion is made about the effects on the incoherent scatter spectra caused by different values of the normalized perpendicular drift velocity D, aspect angle φ between the magnetic field and the line-of-sight direction, and the ratio α of the ion-neutral collision to ion cyclotron frequency. Numerical results show that the shifting and asymmetry of incoherent scatter spectra appear parallel to E × B and E as the normalized perpendicular drift velocity D increases due to the ion drift velocity, the stress tensor and the heat flow vector respectively. However, the spectrum is always typically double-humped Maxwellian parallel to B. The ion velocity distribution is more distorted from the Maxwellian as the aspect angle φ increases from 0° to 90°, and consequently the incoherent scatter spectra is no longer typically double-humped Maxwellian. As α increases, the ion velocity distribution becomes Maxwellian and the incoherent scatter spectra become typically double-humped Maxwellian even with a large value of the normalized perpendicular drift velocity D. It is reasonable to use the sixteen-moment approximation to describe the non-Maxwellian plasma characterized by the large temperature anisotropy.

  7. Impact of the dark matter velocity distribution on capture rates in the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dark matter could be captured in the Sun and self-annihilate, giving rise to an observable neutrino flux. Indirect searches for dark matter looking for this signal with neutrino telescopes have resulted in tight constraints on the interaction cross-section of dark matter with ordinary matter. We investigate how robust limits are against astro-physical uncertainties. We study the effect of the velocity distribution of dark matter in our Galaxy on capture rates in the Sun. We investigate four sources of uncertainties: orbital speed of the Sun, escape velocity of dark matter from the halo, dark matter velocity distribution functions and existence of a dark disc. We find that even extreme cases currently discussed do not decrease the sensitivity of indirect detection significantly because the capture is achieved over a broad range of the velocity distribution by integration over the velocity distribution. The effect of the uncertainty in the high-velocity tail of dark matter halo is very marginal as the capture process is rather inefficient at this region. The difference in capture rate in the Sun for various scenarios is compared to the expected change in event rates for direct detection. The possibility of co-rotating structure with the Sun can largely boost the signal and hence makes the interpretation of indirect detection conservative compared to direct detection

  8. Role of electron-molecule angular scattering in shaping the electron-velocity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunhardt, E.E.; Tzeng, Y.

    1986-09-01

    Five models has been studied to elucidate the role of electron-molecule angular scattering in shaping the velocity distribution for electrons in nitrogen at E/N values of 300 and 1500 Td. The angular dependence of the differential scattering cross sections for elastic and inelastic collisions has been observed to have significant effects on the shape of the velocity distribution, the rate coefficients, and the transport parameters. The velocity distribution is most sensitive to the angular dependence of elastic scattering. Moreover, for a given elastic differential scattering cross section, variations in the angular dependence of inelastic scattering cause significant changes in the distribution. The magnitude of these changes depends on the relative action of the inelastic collisions with respect to the elastic collisions for a given energy interval, i.e., whether the scattering by the inelastic collisions is isotropic, forward, or backward in a given energy interval.

  9. SPIDER IX - Classifying Galaxy Groups SPIDER IX - Classifying Galaxy Groups according to their Velocity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, A L B; de Carvalho, R R; La Barbera, F; Trevisan, M; Lopes, P A; Capelato, H V

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new method to study the velocity distribution of galaxy systems, the Hellinger Distance (HD) - designed for detecting departures from a Gaussian velocity distribution. We define a relaxed galactic system as the one with unimodal velocity distribution and a normality deviation below a critical value (HD= 20) systems are significantly larger than in low multiplicity ones (N) and the gaussianity of the velocity distribution of the groups. Bright galaxies (M_r <=-20.7) residing in the inner and outer regions of groups, do not show significant differences in the listed quantities regardless if the group has a Gaussian (G) or a Non-Gaussian (NG) velocity distribution. However, the situation is significantly different when we examine the faint galaxies (-20.7

  10. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA COLORS AND EJECTA VELOCITIES: HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN REGRESSION WITH NON-GAUSSIAN DISTRIBUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Foley, Ryan J., E-mail: kmandel@cfa.harvard.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We investigate the statistical dependence of the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) on their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II λ6355 spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model, accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust, and implement a Gibbs sampler and deviance information criteria to estimate the correlation. The method is applied to the apparent colors from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SNe Ia. The apparent color distributions of high-velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae exhibit significant discrepancies for B – V and B – R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B – V and B – R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 ± 0.02 and 0.09 ± 0.02 mag, respectively. A linear model finds significant slopes of –0.021 ± 0.006 and –0.030 ± 0.009 mag (10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}){sup –1} for intrinsic B – V and B – R colors versus velocity, respectively. Because the ejecta velocity distribution is skewed toward high velocities, these effects imply non-Gaussian intrinsic color distributions with skewness up to +0.3. Accounting for the intrinsic-color-velocity correlation results in corrections to A{sub V} extinction estimates as large as –0.12 mag for HV SNe Ia and +0.06 mag for NV events. Velocity measurements from SN Ia spectra have the potential to diminish systematic errors from the confounding of intrinsic colors and dust reddening affecting supernova distances.

  11. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA COLORS AND EJECTA VELOCITIES: HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN REGRESSION WITH NON-GAUSSIAN DISTRIBUTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the statistical dependence of the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) on their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II λ6355 spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model, accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust, and implement a Gibbs sampler and deviance information criteria to estimate the correlation. The method is applied to the apparent colors from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SNe Ia. The apparent color distributions of high-velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae exhibit significant discrepancies for B – V and B – R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B – V and B – R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 ± 0.02 and 0.09 ± 0.02 mag, respectively. A linear model finds significant slopes of –0.021 ± 0.006 and –0.030 ± 0.009 mag (103 km s–1)–1 for intrinsic B – V and B – R colors versus velocity, respectively. Because the ejecta velocity distribution is skewed toward high velocities, these effects imply non-Gaussian intrinsic color distributions with skewness up to +0.3. Accounting for the intrinsic-color-velocity correlation results in corrections to AV extinction estimates as large as –0.12 mag for HV SNe Ia and +0.06 mag for NV events. Velocity measurements from SN Ia spectra have the potential to diminish systematic errors from the confounding of intrinsic colors and dust reddening affecting supernova distances

  12. Velocity and pressure distributions in discharge tunnel of rotary-obstruction composite inner energy dissipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of model test and theoretical analysis of velocity and pressure distributions,an hypothesis is presented that the distribution of tangential velocity in radial direction seems to be a combinational distribution of a quasi-free vortex and a quasi-forced vortex for the discharge tunnel of rotary-obstruction composite inner energy dissipation.The variations of corresponding parameters about the hypothesis are obtained under test conditions in this paper.The formula of pressure distribution in radial direction is deduced theoretically,and the theoretical values of pressure distribution computed by the formula are well consistent with the measured ones,showing that the formula is correct and can be applied to the computation and analysis of pressure distribution of this discharge tunnel.

  13. On the nature of bimodal initial velocity distribution of neutron stars

    OpenAIRE

    I. BombaciUniversità di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica;; Popov, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    We propose that the bimodal nature of the kick velocity distribution of radio pulsars is connected with the dichotomy between hadronic stars ({\\it i.e.} neutron stars with no quark matter content) and quark stars. Bimodality can appear due to different mechanisms of explosion which leads to the formation of two types of compact stars or due to two different sets of parameters mastering a particular kick mechanism. The low velocity maximum (at $\\sim 100$ km s$^{-1}$) is connected with hadronic...

  14. Power law in the angular velocity distribution of a granular needle

    OpenAIRE

    Piasecki, J.; Viot, P.

    2005-01-01

    We show how inelastic collisions induce a power law with exponent -3 in the decay of the angular velocity distribution of anisotropic particles with sufficiently small moment of inertia. We investigate this question within the Boltzmann kinetic theory for an elongated granular particle immersed in a bath. The power law persists so long as the collisions are inelastic for a large range of angular velocities provided the mass ratio of the anisotropic particle and the bath particles remains smal...

  15. Galactic Subsystems on the Basis of Cumulative Distribution of Space Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojević, S.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A sample containing $4,614$ stars with available space velocities and high-quality kinematical data from the Arihip Catalogue is formed. For the purpose of distinguishing galactic subsystems the cumulative distribution of space velocities is studied. The fractions of the three subsystems are found to be: thin disc 92\\%, thick disc 6\\% and halo 2\\%. These results are verified by analysing the elements of velocity ellipsoids and the shape and size of the galactocentric orbits of the sample stars, i.e. the planar and vertical eccentricities of the orbits.

  16. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a Strontium atomic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, F; Xu, P; Tian, X; Wang, Y; Ren, J; Wu, Haibin; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    We measure precisely the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam with a velocity selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. By using the ultrastable laser system and narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms, the resolution of the velocity measured can be reached 0.13m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy unit. The experimental results are agreement very well with a theoretical calculation. With the spectroscopic techniques, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of $^{88}$Sr is measured by an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, which is given by 434 829 121 318(10)kHz.

  17. Velocity fluctuations and population distribution in clusters of settling particles at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Boschan, A; Annichini, M; Gauthier, G

    2016-01-01

    A study on the spatial organization and velocity fluctuations of non Brownian spherical particles settling at low Reynolds number in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell is reported. The particle volume fraction ranged from 0.005 to 0.05, while the distance between cell plates ranged from 5 to 15 times the particle radius. Particle tracking revealed that particles were not uniformly distributed in space but assembled in transient settling clusters. The population distribution of these clusters followed an exponential law. The measured velocity fluctuations are in agreement with that predicted theoretically for spherical clusters, from the balance between the apparent weight and the drag force. This result suggests that particle clustering, more than a spatial distribution of particles derived from random and independent events, is at the origin of the velocity fluctuations.

  18. Photoelectric dust levitation around airless bodies revised using realistic photoelectron velocity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senshu, H.; Kimura, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Wada, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Namiki, N.; Matsui, T.

    2015-10-01

    The velocity distribution function of photoelectrons from a surface exposed to solar UV radiation is fundamental to the electrostatic status of the surface. There is one and only one laboratory measurement of photoelectron emission from astronomically relevant material, but the energy distribution function was measured only in the emission angle from the normal to the surface of 0 to about π / 4. Therefore, the measured distribution is not directly usable to estimate the vertical structure of a photoelectric sheath above the surface. In this study, we develop a new analytical method to calculate an angle-resolved velocity distribution function of photoelectrons from the laboratory measurement data. We find that the photoelectric current and yield for lunar surface fines measured in a laboratory have been underestimated by a factor of two. We apply our new energy distribution function of photoelectrons to model the formation of photoelectric sheath above the surface of asteroid 433 Eros. Our model shows that a 0.1 μm-radius dust grain can librate above the surface of asteroid 433 Eros regardless of its launching velocity. In addition, a 0.5 μm grain can hover over the surface if the grain was launched at a velocity slower than 0.4 m/s, which is a more stringent condition for levitation than previous studies. However, a lack of high-energy data on the photoelectron energy distribution above 6 eV prevents us from firmly placing a constraint on the levitation condition.

  19. Search for a Lorentz invariant velocity distribution of a relativistic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, Evaldo M. F.; Germani, Felipe T. L.; Soares, Ivano Damião

    2016-02-01

    We examine the problem of the relativistic velocity distribution in a 1-dim relativistic gas in thermal equilibrium. We use numerical simulations of the relativistic molecular dynamics for a gas with two components, light and heavy particles. However in order to obtain the numerical data our treatment distinguishes two approaches in the construction of the histograms for the same relativistic molecular dynamic simulations. The first, largely considered in the literature, consists in constructing histograms with constant bins in the velocity variable and the second consists in constructing histograms with constant bins in the rapidity variable which yields Lorentz invariant histograms, contrary to the first approach. For histograms with constant bins in the velocity variable the numerical data are fitted accurately by the Jüttner distribution which is also not Lorentz invariant. On the other hand, the numerical data obtained from histograms constructed with constant bins in the rapidity variable, which are Lorentz invariant, are accurately fitted by a Lorentz invariant distribution whose derivation is discussed in this paper. The histograms thus constructed are not fitted by the Jütter distribution (as they should not). Our derivation is based on the special theory of relativity, the central limit theorem and the Lobachevsky structure of the velocity space of the theory, where the rapidity variable plays a crucial role. For v2 /c2 ≪ 1 and 1 / β ≡kB T /m0c2 ≪ 1 the distribution tends to the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution.

  20. Measurements of neutral and ion velocity distribution functions in a Hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarnas, Panagiotis; Romadanov, Iavn; Diallo, Ahmed; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2015-11-01

    Hall thruster is a plasma device for space propulsion. It utilizes a cross-field discharge to generate a partially ionized weakly collisional plasma with magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions. The ions are accelerated by the electric field to produce the thrust. There is a relatively large number of studies devoted to characterization of accelerated ions, including measurements of ion velocity distribution function using laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic. Interactions of these accelerated ions with neutral atoms in the thruster and the thruster plume is a subject of on-going studies, which require combined monitoring of ion and neutral velocity distributions. Herein, laser-induced fluorescence technique has been employed to study neutral and single-charged ion velocity distribution functions in a 200 W cylindrical Hall thruster operating with xenon propellant. An optical system is installed in the vacuum chamber enabling spatially resolved axial velocity measurements. The fluorescence signals are well separated from the plasma background emission by modulating the laser beam and using lock-in detectors. Measured velocity distribution functions of neutral atoms and ions at different operating parameters of the thruster are reported and analyzed. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION IN TRAPEZOID-SECTION OPEN CHANNEL FLOW WITH A NEW REYNOLDS-STRESS EXPRESSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Zheng

    2003-01-01

    By considering that the coherent structure is the main cause of the Reynolds stress, a new Reynolds stress expression was given. On this basis the velocity distribution in the trapezoid-section open channel flow was worked out with the pseudo-spectral method. The results were compared with experimental data and the influence of the ratio of length to width of the cross-section and the lateral inclination on the velocity distribution was analyzed. This model can be used the large flux in rivers and open channes.

  2. Velocity distribution of fusion-like products for medium mass heavy-ion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions between 14N, 16O, 19F, 20Ne, 22Ne, 24Mg projectiles and 24Mg, 26Mg, 27Al, 28Si, 40Ca, 58Ni, 60Ni targets have been studied at 7-20 MeV/nucleon. The velocity distribution of nuclear fragments was measured in order to infer the velocity of the compound nucleus prior to decay. The dependences of the distribution on projectile energy and projectile type were obtained. Obtaining cross sections for reaction processes from the data is discussed

  3. Angular and velocity distributions of NO scattered from the Pt(111) crystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, W.L.; Lin, T.; Ceyer, S.T.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-15

    The angular and velocity distributions of NO scattered from the Pt(111) surface have been measured for a crystal temperature range of 475--1200 K and for an incident beam energy range of 265--1390 K. Both angular and velocity distributions confirm the coexistence of inelastic and trapping-desorption scattering processes. For beams with a kinetic energy of /2k equal to 265 and 615 K, the molecules scattered into angles near the surface normal were found to be equilibrated with the surface for T/sub s/ between 475 and 900 K.

  4. Simulation of quiet start magnetized plasmas, including Maxwellian and velocity-space ring distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longitudinal electrostatic waves are simulated in a magnetized plasma, propagating perpendicular to B0. Groups of particles are arranged in one or more rings and spokes in velocity space. Using various loading schemes to represent different particle velocity-space distributions in the simulations, f(upsilon/sub perpendicular/), these particles are then distributed uniformly in position space along the length of the system. In particular, the evolution of magnetized cold and warm rings is followed (physically unstable), and of a magnetized Maxwellian (unstable due to the particle loading) through to saturation. Rules are deduced for useful loading methods

  5. Cable energy function of cortical axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na(+)-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na(+)-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20-70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship. PMID:27439954

  6. Cable energy function of cortical axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na(+)-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na(+)-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20-70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship.

  7. Cable energy function of cortical axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L.; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na+-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na+-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20–70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship. PMID:27439954

  8. Influence of anisotropy on velocity and age distribution at Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zwinger

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We use a full-Stokes thermo-mechanically coupled ice-flow model to study the dynamics of the glacier inside Scharffenbergbotnen valley, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. The domain encompasses a high accumulation rate region and, downstream a sublimation-dominated bare ice ablation area. The ablation ice area is notable for having old ice at its surface since the vertical velocity is upwards, and horizontal velocities are almost stagnant there. We compare the model simulation with field observations of velocities and the age distribution of the surface ice. A satisfactory match with simulations using an isotropic flow law was not found because of too high horizontal velocities and too slow vertical ones. However, the existence of a pronounced ice fabric may explain the present day surface velocity distribution in the inner Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area. Near absence of data on the temporal evolution of Scharffenbergbotnen since the Late Glacial Maximum necessitates exploration of the impact of anisotropy using prescribed ice fabrics: isotropic, single maximum, and linear variation with depth, in both two-dimensional and three dimensional flow models. The realistic velocity field simulated with a non-collinear orthotropic flow law, however produced surface ages in significant disagreement with the few reliable age measurements and suggests that the age field is not in a steady state and that the present distribution is a result of a flow reorganization at about 15 000 yr BP. In order to fully understand the surface age distribution a transient simulation starting from the Late Glacial Maximum including the correct initial conditions for geometry, age, fabric and temperature distribution would be needed. It is the first time that the importance of anisotropy has been demonstrated in the ice dynamics of a blue ice area. This is useful to understand ice flow in order to better interpret archives of ancient ice for paleoclimate research.

  9. Lateral distributions of streamwise velocity in compound channels with partially vegetated floodplains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KNIGHT; Donald; W

    2009-01-01

    Natural rivers are commonly characterized by a main channel for primary flow conveyance and a floodplain, often partially covered with vegetation such as shrubs or trees, to carry extra flow during floods. The hydraulic resistance due to vegetation on the floodplain typically causes a further reduction of flow velocity and increases the velocity difference between the main channel and the floodplain. As a consequence a strong lateral shear layer leads to the exchange of mass and momentum between the main channel and floodplain, which in turn affects the overall channel conveyance and certain fluvial processes. The prediction of the lateral velocity distribution is important for many flood alleviation schemes, as well as for studies on sediment transport and dispersion in such channels. The present paper proposes a method for predicting the depth-averaged velocity in compound channels with partially vegetated floodplains, based on an analytical solution to the depth-integrated Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with a term included to account for the effects of vegetation. The vegetation is modelled via an additional term in the momentum equation to account for the additional drag force. The method includes the effects of bed friction, drag force, lateral turbulence and secondary flows, via four coefficients f, CD, λ & Γ respectively. The predicted lateral distributions of depth-averaged velocity agree well with the experimental data. The analytical solutions can also be used to predict the distribution of boundary shear stresses, which adds additional weight to the method proposed.

  10. Velocity and electronic state distributions of sputtered Fe atoms by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velocity distributions and relative populations in the fine-structure levels of the a5D/sub J/ ground state of Fe atoms, produced by sputtering with 3 keV argon ions, have been investigated by Doppler shifted laser induced fluorescence. The laser system employs a single-mode, scanning ring dye laser, amplified by a sequence of three excimer-pumped flowing-dye cells. Frequency doubling in a KD*P crystal was used to produce high energy (> .5 mJ) pulses of narrowband tunable UV output near 300 nm. Laser power influence on effective velocity bandwidth was investigated. Favorable light-collection geometry minimized distortion of the velocity spectra from apparatus-averaging effects. In impurity flux diagnostic applications in fusion devices, substantial spatial averaging may occur. In the latter case, the narrow velocity bandwidth (70 m/s, transform limit) of the present laser system is particularly useful

  11. Influence of bank vegetation and gravel bed on velocity and Reynolds stress distributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hossein AFZALIMEHR; Subhasish DEY

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory flume experimental study on the interaction of bank vegetation and gravel bed on the flow velocity (primarily on the location of the maximum velocity, Umax) and the Reynolds stress distributions. The results reveal that the dip of the maximum velocity below the water surface is up to 35% of flow depth and the difference between Umax and the velocity at the water surface is considerable in the presence of vegetation on the walls. The zone of the log-law varies from y/h=2 up to 15 percent of flow depth and it does not depend on distance from the wall. Deviation of the velocity profile in the outer layer over a gravel bed with vegetation cover on the walls is much larger than the case of flow over a gravel bed without vegetation cover on the walls. The presence of vegetation on the walls changes uniform flow to non-uniform flow. This fact can be explained by considering the nonlinear Reynolds stress distribution and location of maximum velocity in each profile at different distances across the flume. The Reynolds stress distributions at the distance 0.02 m from the wall have negative values and away from the wall, they change the sign taking positive values with specific convex form with apex in higher location. Average of von Karman constant κ for this study is equal to 0.16. Based on κ=0.16, the methods of Clauser and the Reynolds stress are compatible for determination of shear velocity.

  12. Distributed tracking for networked Euler-Lagrange systems without velocity measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingkai Yang; Hao Fang; Yutian Mao; Jie Huang

    2014-01-01

    The problem of distributed coordinated tracking control for networked Euler-Lagrange systems without velocity measure-ments is investigated. Under the condition that only a portion of the fol owers have access to the leader, sliding mode estimators are developed to estimate the states of the dynamic leader in fi-nite time. To cope with the absence of velocity measurements, the distributed observers which only use position information are designed. Based on the outputs of the estimators and observers, distributed tracking control laws are proposed such that al the fol-lowers with parameter uncertainties can track the dynamic leader under a directed graph containing a spanning tree. It is shown that the distributed observer-control er guarantees asymptotical stabil-ity of the closed-loop system. Numerical simulations are worked out to il ustrate the effectiveness of the control laws.

  13. Experimental Study on the Distribution of Velocity and Pressure near a Submarine Pipeline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yan; SHI Bing; REN Xingyue; JING Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    As a transport means of oil and gas the submarine pipeline has many merits, such as continuous delivery, large conveying capacity, convenient management, etc. A tube was chosen in our study to simulate the submarine pipeline in the experiments. A high accuracy instrument ADV and high precision point-type pressure sensors were used to measure the parameters of the flow field, including the pressure distribution, velocities at seven cross sections near the submarine pipeline with five different clearance ratios, and twelve dynamic pressure values around the pipeline. The pressure distributions and velocity changes around the pipe under different flow velocities and clearance ratios were analyzed. These results might be useful for further study of submarine pipeline erosion and protection.

  14. Velocity Distribution in the Flow from a Wall-Mounted Diffuser in Rooms with Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The paper describes experiments with wall-mounted air terminal devices. The airflow from an air terminal device will influence the thermal comfort of the occupants and it is therefore important to develop an expression for this flow. The velocity at the floor is influenced by the flow rate to the...... room, by the temperature difference and the type of diffuser. The flow is stratified at large temperature differences. The paper shows the development of an expression for the velocity distribution in the vicinity of the floor. It is shown that openings between obstacles placed directly on the floor...... will generate a flow similar to the air movement in front of a diffuser. An expression for the velocity distribution is given in the paper....

  15. Late Quaternary climate-change velocity: Implications for modern distributions and communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandel, Brody Steven; Dalsgaard, Bo; Arge, Lars Allan;

    conditions are wet, productive and aseasonal. In general, climate-change velocity since the LGM appears to explain a wide variety of phenomena in the modern distributions of species and structure of communities, and we propose that its applications could be quite wide. Understanding the role of historical...... rate required to track changing conditions and explicitly capturing the buffering effect of topography on climate change. Variation in climate stability has long been hypothesized as a possible driver of large-scale ecological patterns including diversity and range size gradients. We calculated...... a global map of climate-change velocity since the Last Glacial Maximum and used this measure of climate instability to address a number of classic hypotheses. Results/Conclusions We show that historical climate-change velocity is related to a wide range of characteristics of modern distributions...

  16. Ion velocity distributions within the LLBL and their possible implication to multiple reconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Vaisberg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze two LLBL crossings made by the Interball-Tail satellite under a southward or variable magnetosheath magnetic field: one crossing on the flank of the magnetosphere, and another one closer to the subsolar point. Three different types of ion velocity distributions within the LLBL are observed: (a D-shaped distributions, (b ion velocity distributions consisting of two counter-streaming components of magnetosheath-type, and (c distributions with three components, one of which has nearly zero parallel velocity and two counter-streaming components. Only the (a type fits to the single magnetic flux tube formed by reconnection between the magnetospheric and magnetosheath magnetic fields. We argue that two counter-streaming magnetosheath-like ion components observed by Interball within the LLBL cannot be explained by the reflection of the ions from the magnetic mirror deeper within the magnetosphere. Types (b and (c ion velocity distributions would form within spiral magnetic flux tubes consisting of a mixture of alternating segments originating from the magnetosheath and from magnetospheric plasma. The shapes of ion velocity distributions and their evolution with decreasing number density in the LLBL indicate that a significant part of the LLBL is located on magnetic field lines of long spiral flux tube islands at the magnetopause, as has been proposed and found to occur in magnetopause simulations. We consider these observations as evidence for multiple reconnection Χ-lines between magnetosheath and magnetospheric flux tubes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  17. Computing along the axon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Haiming; Tseren-Onolt Ishdorj; Gheorghe Pǎun

    2007-01-01

    A special form of spiking neural P systems, called axon P systems, corresponding to the activity of Ranvier nodes of neuron axon, is considered and a class of SN-like P systems where the computation is done along the axon is introduced and their language generative power is investigated.

  18. Gas-kinetic numerical method for solving mesoscopic velocity distribution function equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihui Li; Hanxin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    A gas-kinetic numerical method for directly solving the mesoscopic velocity distribution function equation is presented and applied to the study of three-dimensional complex flows and micro-channel flows covering various flow regimes. The unified velocity distribution function equation describing gas transport phenomena from rarefied transition to continuumflow regimes can be presented on the basis of the kinetic Boltzmann-Shakhov model equation. The gas-kinetic finite-difference schemes for the velocity distribution function are constructed by developing a discrete velocity ordinate method of gas kinetic theory and an unsteady time-splitting technique from computational fluid dynamics. Gas-kinetic boundary conditions and numerical modeling can be established by directly manipulating on the mesoscopic velocity distribution function. A new Gauss-type discrete velocity numerical integration method can be developed and adopted to attack complex flows with different Mach numbers. HPF parallel strategy suitable for the gas-kinetic numerical method is investigated and adopted to solve three-dimensional complex problems. High Mach number flows around three-dimensional bodies are computed preliminarily with massive scale parallel. It is noteworthy and of practical importance that the HPF parallel algorithm for solving three-dimensional complex problems can be effectively developed to cover various flow regimes. On the other hand, the gas-kinetic numerical method is extended and used to study micro-channel gas flows including the classical Couette flow, the Poiseuillechannel flow and pressure-driven gas flows in twodimensional short micro-channels. The numerical experience shows that the gas-kinetic algorithm may be a powerful tool in the numerical simulation of microscale gas flows occuring in the Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS).

  19. Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, Benedikt;

    2013-01-01

    Fast ions play an important role in heating the plasma in a magnetic confinement fusion device. Fast-ion Dα(FIDA) spectroscopy diagnoses fast ions in small measurement volumes. Spectra measured by a FIDA diagnostic can be related to the 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function. A single FIDA vi...

  20. Electron Velocity Distributions Measured with Soft-X-Ray PHA at RTP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Cruz, D. F.; Meijer, J. H.; Donne, A. J. H.

    1992-01-01

    A soft x-ray pulse height analysis (PHA) system is begin used at the Rijhuizen Tokamak Project to study the electron velocity distribution. A liquid nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector is used to view the plasma along a tangential line of sight. A gas cell in combination with Al foils is used for filter

  1. Vertical velocity distribution in open-channel flow with rigid vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changjun; Hao, Wenlong; Chang, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    In order to experimentally investigate the effects of rigid vegetation on the characteristics of flow, the vegetations were modeled by rigid cylindrical rod. Flow field is measured under the conditions of submerged rigid rod in flume with single layer and double layer vegetations. Experiments were performed for various spacings of the rigid rods. The vegetation models were aligned with the approaching flow in a rectangular channel. Vertical distributions of time-averaged velocity at various streamwise distances were evaluated using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). The results indicate that, in submerged conditions, it is difficult to described velocity distribution along the entire depth using unified function. The characteristic of vertical distribution of longitudinal velocity is the presence of inflection. Under the inflection, the line is convex and groove above inflection. The interaction of high and low momentum fluids causes the flow to fold and creates strong vortices within each mixing layer. Understanding the flow phenomena in the area surrounding the tall vegetation, especially in the downstream region, is very important when modeling or studying the riparian environment. ADV measures of rigid vegetation distribution of the flow velocity field can give people a new understanding.

  2. Tomography of fast-ion velocity-space distributions from synthetic CTS and FIDA measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh;

    2012-01-01

    We compute tomographies of 2D fast-ion velocity distribution functions from synthetic collective Thomson scattering (CTS) and fast-ion D (FIDA) 1D measurements using a new reconstruction prescription. Contradicting conventional wisdom we demonstrate that one single 1D CTS or FIDA view suffices to...

  3. Relaxation Time of the Particle Beam with an Anisotropic Velocity Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Vechirka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The computer experiment for study of the relaxation time of the beam particles with an anisotropic velocity distribution is performed by the molecular dynamics. Obtained results agree with the characteristic times of thermal relaxation in plasma for the electronic coolers in modern storage rings.

  4. The spatial distributions of the sources of UV solar Explosive Events at different velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Torres, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze five solar Explosive Events observed in the Si IV emission line at 139.37 nm during SUMER/SoHO raster scans near disk center. The Doppler velocities from -45 km s-1 to +45 km s-1 were sorted into eleven symmetrically organized velocity bins, five equally-sized bins on each side and one bin for the line at rest. The radiance values along the NS oriented slit around the maximum of each EE are used to build one-dimensional distributions. We study these distributions and their development in space and time for different velocity bins to unveil the 3D-structure and evolution of Explosive Events. The spatial radiance distributions for the EE maximum and around it were made. For some Explosive Events the dispersion direction is not oriented orthogonally to the slit direction; consequently, the blueshifted emission is in a linear way offset from the redshifted emission by several pixels. The largest offset (˜5″) is observed between distributions whose velocities differ by ˜36 km s-1. The linear relation agrees with an scenario of flows inside magnetic arcs.

  5. State-selective velocity and angular distributions of NO molecules scattered from a graphite surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, J.; Shen, Y.R.; Walther, H.

    1985-03-01

    Laser ionization was used to measure the state-selective angular and velocity distributions of NO molecules scattered from a graphite surface. The data showed that at sufficiently low surface temperatures, the scattered molecules were generally composed of quasispecular reflected part and a diffusive scattered part with different translational and rotational behavior.

  6. Sodium Atoms in the Lunar Exotail: Observed Velocity and Spatial Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Line, Michael R.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Oliversen, R. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Haffner, L. M.; Roesler, F. L.

    2011-01-01

    The lunar sodium tail extends long distances due to radiation pressure on sodium atoms in the lunar exosphere. Our earlier observations determined the average radial velocity of sodium atoms moving down the lunar tail beyond Earth along the Sun-Moon-Earth line (i.e., the anti-lunar point) to be 12.4 km/s. Here we use the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper to obtain the first kinematically resolved maps of the intensity and velocity distribution of this emission over a 15 x times 15 deg region on the sky near the anti-lunar point. We present both spatially and spectrally resolved observations obtained over four nights around new moon in October 2007. The spatial distribution of the sodium atoms is elongated along the ecliptic with the location of the peak intensity drifting 3 degrees east along the ecliptic per night. Preliminary modeling results suggest that the spatial and velocity distributions in the sodium exotail are sensitive to the near surface lunar sodium velocity distribution and that observations of this sort along with detailed modeling offer new opportunities to describe the time history of lunar surface sputtering over several days.

  7. Electron Velocity Distribution Function in Magnetic Clouds in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchil, Teresa; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the kinetic properties of the electron velocity distribution functions within magnetic clouds, since they are the dominant thermal component. The study is based on high time resolution data from the GSFC WIND/SWE electron spectrometer and the Berkeley 3DP electron plasma instruments. Recent studies on magnetic clouds have shown observational evidence of anti-correlation between the total electron density and electron temperature, which suggest a polytrope law P(sub e) = alpha(Nu(sub e) (sup gamma)) for electrons with the constant gamma approximates 0.5 electron distributions (i.e. non-thermal) within magnetic clouds. These works suggested that the non-thermal electrons can contribute as much as 50% of the total electron pressure within magnetic clouds. We have revisited some of the magnetic cloud events previously studied and attempted to quantify the nature of the non-thermal electrons by modeling the electron velocity distribution function using a kappa distribution function to characterize the kinetic non-thermal effects. If non-thermal tail effects are the source for the anti-correlation between the moment electron temperature and density and if the kappa distribution is a reasonable representative model of non-thermal effects, then the electron velocity distribution within magnetic clouds should show indication for small K-values when gamma < 1.

  8. Planar Velocity Distribution of Viscous Debris Flow at Jiangjia Ravine, Yunnan, China: A Field Measurement Using Two Radar Velocimeters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xudong; WANG Guangqian; KANG Zhicheng; FEI Xiangjun

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics of planar velocity distribution of viscous debris flow were analyzed using the measured data at Jiangjia Ravine, Yunnan, China. The velocity data were measured through using two radar velocimeters. The cross-sectional mean velocities were calculated and used to examine Kang et al's (2004) relationship, which was established for converting the flow velocity at river centerline measured by a radar velocimeter into the mean velocity based on the stop-watch method. The velocity coefficient, K, defined by the ratio of the mean velocity to the maximum velocity, ranges from 0.2 to 0.6. Kang et al's (2004) relationship was found being inapplicable to flows with K smaller than 0.43. This paper contributes to show the complexity of the planar velocity distribution of viscous debris flows and the applicability of Kang et al's relationship.

  9. Liquid concentration distribution and planar interface instability at an abruptly changing pulling velocity in directional solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ShuangMing; FU HengZhi

    2007-01-01

    Liquid concentration distribution is seriously affected by an abruptly changing pulling velocity under directional solidification. Theoretical and numerical investigations indicate that at the pulling velocity jumping from V0 to V, the solidification system does not achieve the pulling velocity V immediately, and it goes through a non-steady-state transition zone. As the pulling velocity abruptly increases (V/V0 > 1), interface liquid concentration firstly increases to the maximum and then decreases to the steady-state value. The magnitude of interface liquid concentration at the beginning increases with V/V0, the initial pulling velocity V0 and the temperature gradient GL in the liquid. At the same time, solute diffusion length reduces with V/V0 and GL. In contrast, the minimum of interface liquid concentration falls with V/V0 at the pulling velocity decreasing abruptly. As the interface liquid concentration enriched at V/V0 > 1 is more than the value required for the planar interface to keep stable, the solid/liquid interface may become unstable. The analytical results are in agreement with the numerical calculation results of Al-2%Cu alloy.

  10. Liquid concentration distribution and planar interface instability at an abruptly changing pulling velocity in directional solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Liquid concentration distribution is seriously affected by an abruptly changing pulling velocity under directional solidification. Theoretical and numerical investi-gations indicate that at the pulling velocity jumping from V0 to V, the solidification system does not achieve the pulling velocity V immediately, and it goes through a non-steady-state transition zone. As the pulling velocity abruptly increases (V/V0 > 1), interface liquid concentration firstly increases to the maximum and then de-creases to the steady-state value. The magnitude of interface liquid concentration at the beginning increases with V/V0, the initial pulling velocity V0 and the tem-perature gradient GL in the liquid. At the same time, solute diffusion length reduces with V/V0 and GL. In contrast, the minimum of interface liquid concentration falls with V/V0 at the pulling velocity decreasing abruptly. As the interface liquid con-centration enriched at V/V0 > 1 is more than the value required for the planar inter-face to keep stable, the solid/liquid interface may become unstable. The analytical results are in agreement with the numerical calculation results of Al-2%Cu alloy.

  11. Velocity Distribution Measurement Using Pixel-Pixel Cross Correlation of Electrical Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGXiang; PENGLihui; YAODanya; ZHANGBaofen

    2004-01-01

    Electrical tomography (ET) provides a novel means of visualizing the internal behavior of twophase flow in industrial process. Using a dual-sensingplane Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) or Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system, the raw data of two different section images can be acquired synchronously and the two images reflecting the inner medium distribution respectively can also be reconstructed by using imaging algorithm. Further, the analysis of pixel-pixel cross correlation is able to be setup and the measurement of velocity distribution of two-phase flow could be achieved. The principle is described in the paper. The FFT algorithm for gray value computation and cross correlation function calculation is also introduced. Some experimental results of velocity distribution measurement using pixelpixel cross correlation in vertical slug flow are presented.

  12. Structure of velocity distributions in shock waves in granular gases with extension to molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilquin, A.; Boudet, J. F.; Kellay, H.

    2016-08-01

    Velocity distributions in normal shock waves obtained in dilute granular flows are studied. These distributions cannot be described by a simple functional shape and are believed to be bimodal. Our results show that these distributions are not strictly bimodal but a trimodal distribution is shown to be sufficient. The usual Mott-Smith bimodal description of these distributions, developed for molecular gases, and based on the coexistence of two subpopulations (a supersonic and a subsonic population) in the shock front, can be modified by adding a third subpopulation. Our experiments show that this additional population results from collisions between the supersonic and subsonic subpopulations. We propose a simple approach incorporating the role of this third intermediate population to model the measured probability distributions and apply it to granular shocks as well as shocks in molecular gases.

  13. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  14. Dynamics of Mitochondrial Transport in Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niescier, Robert F; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Joo, Se Hun; Chang, Karen T; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons. PMID:27242435

  15. A large fraction of neocortical myelin ensheathes axons of local inhibitory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Kristina D; Wolman, Dylan; Mensh, Brett D; Pax, Elizabeth; Buchanan, JoAnn; Smith, Stephen J; Bock, Davi D

    2016-01-01

    Myelin is best known for its role in increasing the conduction velocity and metabolic efficiency of long-range excitatory axons. Accordingly, the myelin observed in neocortical gray matter is thought to mostly ensheath excitatory axons connecting to subcortical regions and distant cortical areas. Using independent analyses of light and electron microscopy data from mouse neocortex, we show that a surprisingly large fraction of cortical myelin (half the myelin in layer 2/3 and a quarter in layer 4) ensheathes axons of inhibitory neurons, specifically of parvalbumin-positive basket cells. This myelin differs significantly from that of excitatory axons in distribution and protein composition. Myelin on inhibitory axons is unlikely to meaningfully hasten the arrival of spikes at their pre-synaptic terminals, due to the patchy distribution and short path-lengths observed. Our results thus highlight the need for exploring alternative roles for myelin in neocortical circuits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15784.001 PMID:27383052

  16. Bayesian Reconstruction of the Velocity Distribution of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles from Direct Dark Matter Detection Data

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, Chung-Lin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we extended our earlier work on the reconstruction of the (time-averaged) one-dimensional velocity distribution of Galactic Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) and introduce the Bayesian fitting procedure to the theoretically predicted velocity distribution functions. In this reconstruction process, the (rough) velocity distribution reconstructed by using raw data from direct Dark Matter detection experiments directly, i.e. measured recoil energies, with one or more different target materials, has been used as "reconstructed-input" information. By assuming a fitting velocity distribution function and scanning the parameter space based on the Bayesian analysis, the astronomical characteristic parameters, e.g. the Solar and Earth's orbital velocities, will be pinned down as the output results. Our Monte-Carlo simulations show that this Bayesian scanning procedure could reconstruct the true (input) WIMP velocity distribution function pretty precisely with negligible systematic deviations ...

  17. Velocity distribution of flow with submerged flexible vegetations based on mixing-length approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-xin HUAI; Jie HAN; Yu-hong ZENG; Xiang AN; Zhong-dong QIAN

    2009-01-01

    By choosing a PVC slice to simulate flexible vegetation, we carried out ex-periments in an open channel with submerged flexible vegetation. A 3D acoustic Doppler velocimeter (micro ADV) was used to measure local flow velocities and Reynolds stress. The results show that hydraulic characteristics in non-vegetation and vegetation layers are totally different. In a region above the vegetation, Reynolds stress distribution is linear, and the measured velocity profile is a classical logarithmic one. Based on the concept of new-riverbed, the river compression parameter representing the impact of vegetation on river is given, and a new assumption of mixing length expression is made. The formula for time-averaged velocity derived from the expression requires less parameters and simple calculation, and is useful in applications.

  18. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of 88Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10 kHz.

  19. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, F.; Liu, H.; Tian, X. [CAS Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Xi' an 710600 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, P.; Wang, Y.; Ren, J. [CAS Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Xi' an 710600 (China); Wu, Haibin, E-mail: hbwu@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Chang, Hong, E-mail: changhong@ntsc.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Xi' an 710600 (China); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2014-02-15

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of {sup 88}Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10) kHz.

  20. Distributed optical fiber-based theoretical and empirical methods monitoring hydraulic engineering subjected to seepage velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huaizhi; Tian, Shiguang; Cui, Shusheng; Yang, Meng; Wen, Zhiping; Xie, Wei

    2016-09-01

    In order to systematically investigate the general principle and method of monitoring seepage velocity in the hydraulic engineering, the theoretical analysis and physical experiment were implemented based on distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing (DTS) technology. During the coupling influence analyses between seepage field and temperature field in the embankment dam or dike engineering, a simplified model was constructed to describe the coupling relationship of two fields. Different arrangement schemes of optical fiber and measuring approaches of temperature were applied on the model. The inversion analysis idea was further used. The theoretical method of monitoring seepage velocity in the hydraulic engineering was finally proposed. A new concept, namely the effective thermal conductivity, was proposed referring to the thermal conductivity coefficient in the transient hot-wire method. The influence of heat conduction and seepage could be well reflected by this new concept, which was proved to be a potential approach to develop an empirical method monitoring seepage velocity in the hydraulic engineering.

  1. Using diffusion anisotropy to characterize neuronal morphology in gray matter: the orientation distribution of axons and dendrites in the NeuroMorpho.org database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel B Hansen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate mathematical modeling is integral to the ability to interpret diffusion magneticresonance (MR imaging data in terms of cellular structure in brain gray matter (GM. Inprevious work, we derived expressions to facilitate the determination of the orientationdistribution of axonal and dendritic processes from diffusion MR data. Here we utilize neuronreconstructions available in the NeuroMorpho database (www.neuromorpho.org to assess thevalidity of the model we proposed by comparing morphological properties of the neurons topredictions based on diffusion MR simulations using the reconstructed neuron models. Initially,the method for directly determining neurite orientation distributions is shown to not depend onthe line length used to quantify cylindrical elements. Further variability in neuron morphology ischaracterized relative to neuron type, species, and laboratory of origin. Subsequently, diffusionMR signals are simulated based on human neocortical neuron reconstructions. This reveals a biasin which diffusion MR data predict neuron orientation distributions to have artificially lowanisotropy. This bias is shown to arise from shortcomings (already at relatively low diffusionweighting in the Gaussian approximation of diffusion, in the presence of restrictive barriers, anddata analysis methods involving higher moments of the cumulant expansion are shown to becapable of reducing the magnitude of the observed bias.

  2. Lateral distributions of streamwise velocity in compound channels with partially vegetated floodplains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG XiaoNan; KNIGHT Donald W

    2009-01-01

    Natural rivers are commonly characterized by a main channel for primary flow conveyance and a floodplain, often partially covered with vegetation such as shrubs or trees, to carry extra flow during floods.The hydraulic resistance due to vegetation on the floodplain typically causes a further reduction of flow velocity and increases the velocity difference between the main channel and the floodplain.As a consequence a strong lateral shear layer leads to the exchange of mass and momentum between the main channel and floodplain, which in turn affects the overall channel conveyance and certain fluvial processes.The prediction of the lateral velocity distribution is important for many flood alleviation schemes, as well as for studies on sediment transport and dispersion in such channels.The present paper proposes a method for predicting the depth-averaged velocity in compound channels with par-tially vegetated floodplains, based on an analytical solution to the depth-integrated Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with a term included to account for the effects of vegetation.The vegetation is modelled via an additional term in the momentum equation to account for the additional drag force.The method includes the effects of bed friction, drag force, lateral turbulence and secondary flows, via four coefficients f, C_D,λ & Г respectively.The predicted lateral distributions of depth-averaged velocity agree well with the experimental data.The analytical solutions can also be used to predict the distribu-tion of boundary shear stresses, which adds additional weight to the method proposed.

  3. Vertical distribution of fluid velocity and suspended sediment in open channel turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Debasish; Ghoshal, Koeli

    2016-06-01

    To predict the vertical distribution of streamwise fluid velocity and suspended sediment concentration profiles in an open channel turbulent flow, we derive a theoretical model here based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equation and the mass conservation equations of solid and fluid phases. The model includes the effects of secondary current in terms of the vertical velocity of fluid, additional vertical velocity of fluid due to the suspended particles, mixing length of sediment-laden flow and settlement of the suspended particles due to gravitational force. We numerically solve our model as coupled differential equations and the obtained solution agrees well with a wide spectrum of experimental data. A detailed error analysis asserts the superior determination accuracy of our model in comparison to the traditional log-law and Rouse equation and other existing theoretical models. The significance of the turbulent features included in the model and the importance of their co-existence to compute velocity and concentration profiles are explained. In sharp contrast to the previous researchers, the present model has significant contribution in unveiling several latent phenomena of particle-turbulence interaction throughout the flow region. The model can also address various crucial phenomena of velocity and concentration profiles that occur during flow in real situation.

  4. Type Ia Supernova Colors and Ejecta Velocities: Hierarchical Bayesian Regression with Non-Gaussian Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Kaisey S; Kirshner, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the correlations between the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) and their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II 6355 A spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model and Gibbs sampler to estimate the dependence of the intrinsic colors of a SN Ia on its ejecta velocity, while accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust. The method is applied to the apparent color data from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SN Ia. Comparison of the apparent color distributions of high velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae reveals significant discrepancies in B-V and B-R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B-band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B-V and B-R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 +/- 0.02 and 0.09 +/- 0.02 mag, respectively. Under a linear m...

  5. An ordinary differential equation for velocity distribution and dip-phenomenon in open channel flows

    CERN Document Server

    Absi, Rafik

    2011-01-01

    An ordinary differential equation for velocity distribution in open channel flows is presented based on an analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and a log-wake modified eddy viscosity distribution. This proposed equation allows to predict the velocity-dip-phenomenon, i.e. the maximum velocity below the free surface. Two different degrees of approximations are presented, a semi-analytical solution of the proposed ordinary differential equation, i.e. the full dip-modified-log-wake law and a simple dip-modified-log-wake law. Velocity profiles of the two laws and the numerical solution of the ordinary differential equation are compared with experimental data. This study shows that the dip correction is not efficient for a small Coles' parameter, accurate predictions require larger values. The simple dip-modified-log-wake law shows reasonable agreement and seems to be an interesting tool of intermediate accuracy. The full dip-modified-log-wake law, with a parameter for dip-correction obtained f...

  6. Velocity and angular distributions of evaporation residues from /sup 32/S-induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinnefeld, J.D.; Kolata, J.J.; Henderson, D.J.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Kovar, D.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Rosner, G.; Stephans, G.S.F.; van den Berg, A.M.; Wilkins, B.D.

    1987-09-01

    Velocity distributions of mass-resolved evaporation residues from reactions of /sup 32/S with /sup 12/C, /sup 24/Mg, /sup 27/Al, /sup 28/Si, and /sup 40/Ca have been measured at bombarding energies of 194, 239, and 278 MeV using time-of-flight techniques. In all cases, the observed shifts in the velocity centroids relative to the values expected for complete fusion are consistent with a previously reported parametrization of a threshold for onset of incomplete fusion. Angular distributions were measured and total cross sections extracted for the /sup 32/S+ /sup 24/Mg system at all three energies. A comparison with existing results for /sup 32/S+ /sup 24/Mg at lower energies, and with other systems leading to the /sup 56/Ni compound nucleus, suggests two different types of compound-nuclear limitations to complete fusion at higher energies.

  7. Study on Droplet Size and Velocity Distributions of a Pressure Swirl Atomizer Based on the Maximum Entropy Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A predictive model for droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer has been proposed based on the maximum entropy formalism (MEF. The constraint conditions of the MEF model include the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy. The effects of liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio on the droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer are investigated. Results show that model based on maximum entropy formalism works well to predict droplet size and velocity distributions under different spray conditions. Liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio have different effects on droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer.

  8. Measurement of Velocity Distribution in Atomic Beam by Diode Laser with Narrow Line width

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jingbiao; WANG Fengzhi; YANG Donghai; WANG YiQiu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, by using the detecting laser beam interacts with the atomic beam at a sharp angle and the Doppler frequency shift effect, the velocity distribution in cesium atomic beam is measured with a diode laser of narrow linewidth of 1 MHz. The effects of the atomic natural line width and cycling transition detecting factor on the measured results have been analyzed. Finally, the measured results have been compared with the theoretical calculation.

  9. Angular velocity distribution of a granular planar rotator in a thermalized bath

    OpenAIRE

    Piasecki, J.; Talbot, J.; Viot, P.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of a granular planar rotator with a fixed center undergoing inelastic collisions with bath particles is analyzed both numerically and analytically by means of the Boltzmann equation. The angular velocity distribution evolves from quasi-gaussian in the Brownian limit to an algebraic decay in the limit of an infinitely light particle. In addition, we compare this model with a planar rotator with a free center. We propose experimental tests that might confirm the predicted behaviors.

  10. Angular velocity distribution of a granular planar rotator in a thermalized bath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, J; Talbot, J; Viot, P

    2007-05-01

    The kinetics of a granular planar rotator with a fixed center undergoing inelastic collisions with bath particles is analyzed both numerically and analytically by means of the Boltzmann equation. The angular velocity distribution evolves from quasi-Gaussian in the Brownian limit to an algebraic decay in the limit of an infinitely light particle. In addition, we compare this model to that of a planar rotator with a free center and discuss the prospects for experimental confirmation of these results. PMID:17677054

  11. Motor Axon Pathfinding

    OpenAIRE

    Bonanomi, Dario; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2010-01-01

    Motor neurons are functionally related, but represent a diverse collection of cells that show strict preferences for specific axon pathways during embryonic development. In this article, we describe the ligands and receptors that guide motor axons as they extend toward their peripheral muscle targets. Motor neurons share similar guidance molecules with many other neuronal types, thus one challenge in the field of axon guidance has been to understand how the vast complexity of brain connection...

  12. Longitudinal electron waves for a plasma with a bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An original method for calculating and representing the excitation coefficients of longitudinal electron waves is applied to the case of a hot, collisionless, homogeneous and isotropic plasma with a bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. Using a Van Kampen treatment a 'wave density' distribution is represented graphically. When hot electrons are added to a plasma of cool electrons the Landau mode is distorted and its damping increases with the hot/cold temperature ratio theta. The Landau mode separates into two modes for theta >= theta0 where theta0 increases as the hot/cold density ratio α decreases. It is shown that no wave seems to be able to propagate at frequencies below the plasma frequency. Using an abrupt cut-off in the hot electron distribution function, we recover the results for a Maxwellian plus water-bag distribution. (author)

  13. Analysis of the Velocity Distribution in Partially-Filled Circular Pipe Employing the Principle of Maximum Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The flow velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe was investigated in this paper. The velocity profile is different from full-filled pipe flow, since the flow is driven by gravity, not by pressure. The research findings show that the position of maximum flow is below the water surface, and varies with the water depth. In the region of near tube wall, the fluid velocity is mainly influenced by the friction of the wall and the pipe bottom slope, and the variation of velocity is similar to full-filled pipe. But near the free water surface, the velocity distribution is mainly affected by the contractive tube wall and the secondary flow, and the variation of the velocity is relatively small. Literature retrieval results show relatively less research has been shown on the practical expression to describe the velocity distribution of partially-filled circular pipe. An expression of two-dimensional (2D) velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe flow was derived based on the principle of maximum entropy (POME). Different entropies were compared according to fluid knowledge, and non-extensive entropy was chosen. A new cumulative distribution function (CDF) of partially-filled circular pipe velocity in terms of flow depth was hypothesized. Combined with the CDF hypothesis, the 2D velocity distribution was derived, and the position of maximum velocity distribution was analyzed. The experimental results show that the estimated velocity values based on the principle of maximum Tsallis wavelet entropy are in good agreement with measured values. PMID:26986064

  14. Protein 4.1B contributes to the organization of peripheral myelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cifuentes-Diaz

    Full Text Available Neurons are characterized by extremely long axons. This exceptional cell shape is likely to depend on multiple factors including interactions between the cytoskeleton and membrane proteins. In many cell types, members of the protein 4.1 family play an important role in tethering the cortical actin-spectrin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. Protein 4.1B is localized in myelinated axons, enriched in paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions, and also all along the internodes, but not at nodes of Ranvier where are localized the voltage-dependent sodium channels responsible for action potential propagation. To shed light on the role of protein 4.1B in the general organization of myelinated peripheral axons, we studied 4.1B knockout mice. These mice displayed a mildly impaired gait and motility. Whereas nodes were unaffected, the distribution of Caspr/paranodin, which anchors 4.1B to the membrane, was disorganized in paranodal regions and its levels were decreased. In juxtaparanodes, the enrichment of Caspr2, which also interacts with 4.1B, and of the associated TAG-1 and Kv1.1, was absent in mutant mice, whereas their levels were unaltered. Ultrastructural abnormalities were observed both at paranodes and juxtaparanodes. Axon calibers were slightly diminished in phrenic nerves and preterminal motor axons were dysmorphic in skeletal muscle. βII spectrin enrichment was decreased along the axolemma. Electrophysiological recordings at 3 post-natal weeks showed the occurrence of spontaneous and evoked repetitive activity indicating neuronal hyperexcitability, without change in conduction velocity. Thus, our results show that in myelinated axons 4.1B contributes to the stabilization of membrane proteins at paranodes, to the clustering of juxtaparanodal proteins, and to the regulation of the internodal axon caliber.

  15. The velocity distribution of pickup He{sup +} measured at 0.3 AU by MESSENGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershman, Daniel J. [Geospace Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Fisk, Lennard A.; Gloeckler, George; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Solomon, Sean C., E-mail: djgersh@umich.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    During its interplanetary trajectory in 2007-2009, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvrionment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft passed through the gravitational focusing cone for interstellar helium multiple times at a heliocentric distance R ≈ 0.3 AU. Observations of He{sup +} interstellar pickup ions made by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer sensor on MESSENGER during these transits provide a glimpse into the structure of newly formed inner heliospheric pickup-ion distributions. This close to the Sun, these ions are picked up in a nearly radial interplanetary magnetic field. Compared with the near-Earth environment, pickup ions observed near 0.3 AU will not have had sufficient time to be energized substantially. Such an environment results in a nearly pristine velocity distribution function that should depend only on pickup-ion injection velocities (related to the interstellar gas), pitch-angle scattering, and cooling processes. From measured energy-per-charge spectra obtained during multiple spacecraft observational geometries, we have deduced the phase-space density of He{sup +} as a function of magnetic pitch angle. Our measurements are most consistent with a distribution that decreases nearly monotonically with increasing pitch angle, rather than the more commonly modeled isotropic or hemispherically symmetric forms. These results imply that pitch-angle scattering of He{sup +} may not be instantaneous, as is often assumed, and instead may reflect the velocity distribution of initially injected particles. In a slow solar wind stream, we find a parallel-scattering mean free path of λ {sub ||} ∼ 0.1 AU and a He{sup +} production rate of ∼0.05 m{sup –3} s{sup –1} within 0.3 AU.

  16. Ionization Fractions of Slow Ions in a Plasma with Kappa Distributions for the Electron Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannawichian, S.; Ruffolo, D.; Kartavykh, Yu. Yu.

    2003-06-01

    The interpretation of a wide variety of astrophysical observations requires an understanding of how ionization fractions depend on plasma parameters. Observations have indicated that electron velocity distributions in space plasmas generally have enhanced high-energy tails. Instead of a Maxwellian distribution, they are better described by a kappa distribution, characterized by the kinetic temperature, T, and a parameter, κ, that quantifies the deviation from a Maxwellian. We calculate and tabulate the equilibrium ionization fractions of N, O, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni, based on a balance of ionization and recombination processes, for 104K<=T<=108K (or up to 109 K for Fe and Ni) and for various Maxwellian and kappa distributions. For a Maxwellian distribution of electrons, the mean charge as a function of temperature is characterized by plateaux corresponding to closed-shell charge states, with transitions over narrow ranges of logT. However, for kappa distributions, which are more realistic models of the observed electron distributions in coronal or space plasmas, those transitions are substantially broader. We find that a lower κ value (more suprathermal electrons) frequently leads to a higher mean charge, especially for low temperatures, but can also lead to a lower mean charge in certain temperature ranges; these effects are associated with the sharp energy thresholds and resonances of ionization and dielectronic recombination cross sections, respectively. The results provide information for various applications in which observed ionization fractions are used as diagnostics of astrophysical plasmas.

  17. Velocity and temperature distributions of coal-slag layers on magnetohydrodynamic generators walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, C. C. P.; Smith, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Approximate analytical expressions are derived for the velocity and temperature distributions in steady state coal slag deposits flowing over MHD generator walls. Effects of slag condensation and Joule heating are included in the analysis. The transport conditions and the slag temperature at the slag-gas interface are taken to be known parameters in the formulation. They are assumed to have been predetermined either experimentally or from the slag properties and the gas dynamic calculations of the free stream flow. The analysis assumes a power law velocity profile for the slag and accounts for the coupling between the energy and momentum conservation equations. Comparisons are made with the more exact numerical solutions to verify the accuracy of the results.

  18. Crossed molecular beam studies of unimolecular reaction dynamics. [Angular and velocity distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.

    1979-04-01

    The study of seven radical-molecule reactions using the crossed molecular beam technique with supersonic nozzle beams is reported. Product angular and velocity distributions were obtained and compared with statistical calculations in order to identify dynamical features of the reactions. In the reaction of chlorine and fluorine atoms with vinyl bromide, the product energy distributions are found to deviate from predictions of the statistical model. A similar effect is observed in the reaction of chlorine atoms with 1, 2 and 3-bromopropene. The reaction of oxygen atoms with ICl and CF/sub 3/I has been used to obtain an improved value of the IO bond energy, 55.0 +- 2.0 kcal mol/sup -1/. In all reactions studied, the product energy and angular distributions are found to be coupled, and this is attributed to a kinematic effect of the conservation of angular momentum.

  19. Axon Membrane Skeleton Structure is Optimized for Coordinated Sodium Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yihao; Li, He; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-01-01

    Axons transmit action potentials with high fidelity and minimal jitter. This unique capability is likely the result of the spatiotemporal arrangement of sodium channels along the axon. Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under entropic tension. Sodium channels also exhibit a periodic distribution pattern, as they bind to ankyrin G, which associates with spectrin. Here, we elucidate the relationship between the axon membrane skeleton structure and the function of the axon. By combining cytoskeletal dynamics and continuum diffusion modeling, we show that spectrin filaments under tension minimize the thermal fluctuations of sodium channels and prevent overlap of neighboring channel trajectories. Importantly, this axon skeletal arrangement allows for a highly reproducible band-like activation of sodium channels leading to coordinated sodium propagation along the axon.

  20. Observations of the He+ pickup ion torus velocity distribution function with SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, Andreas; Berger, Lars; Bochsler, Peter; Drews, Christian; Klecker, Berndt; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2016-03-01

    Interstellar PickUp Ions (PUIs) are created from neutrals coming from the interstellar medium that get ionized inside the heliosphere. Once ionized, the freshly created ions are injected into the magnetized solar wind plasma with a highly anisotropic torus-shaped Velocity Distribution Function (VDF). It has been commonly assumed that wave-particle interactions rapidly destroy this torus by isotropizing the distribution in one hemisphere of velocity space. However, recent observations of a He+ torus distribution using PLASTIC on STEREO showed that the assumption of a rapid isotropization is oversimplified. The aim of this work is to complement these studies. Using He+ data from the Charge Time-Of-Flight (CTOF) sensor of the Charge, ELement, and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on-board the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and magnetic field data from the Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) magnetometer of the WIND spacecraft, we derive the projected 1-D VDF of He+ for different magnetic field configurations. Depending on the magnetic field direction, the initial torus VDF lies inside CTOF's aperture or not. By comparing the VDFs derived under different magnetic field directions with each other we reveal an anisotropic signature of the He+ VDF.

  1. The three-dimensional distributions of tangential velocity and total- temperature in vortex tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderstrøm-Lang, C.U.

    1971-01-01

    turbulent energy equation. The method employed for the solution of this equation stresses the equivalence of the vortex tube to counter-current systems with transverse diffusion such as distillation columns and heat exchangers. An availability function is derived that permits the evaluation of vortex tube......The axial and radial gradients of the tangential velocity distribution are calculated from prescribed secondary flow functions on the basis of a zero-order approximation to the momentum equations developed by Lewellen. It is shown that secondary flow functions may be devised which meet pertinent...

  2. Superstatistical velocity distributions of cold trapped ions in molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rouse, I

    2015-01-01

    We present a realistic molecular-dynamics treatment of laser-cooled ions in radiofrequency ion traps which avoids previously made simplifications such as modeling laser cooling as a friction force and combining individual heating mechanisms into a single effective heating force. Based on this implementation, we show that infrequent energetic collisions of single ions with background gas molecules lead to pronounced heating of the entire ion ensemble and a time-varying secular ensemble temperature which manifests itself in a superstatistical time-averaged velocity distribution of the ions. The effect of this finding on the experimental determination of ion temperatures and rate constants for cold chemical reactions is discussed.

  3. Distribution of velocity gradients and rate of caustic formation in turbulent aerosols at finite Kubo numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavsson, K

    2012-01-01

    In a one-dimensional model for a turbulent aerosol (inertial particles suspended in a random flow) we compute the distributions of particle-velocity gradients and the rate of caustic formation at finite but small Kubo numbers Ku, for arbitrary Stokes numbers St. Our results are consistent with those obtained earlier in the limit of small Ku and and large St, such that Ku^2 St remains constant. We show how finite-time correlations and non-ergodic effects influence the inertial-particle dynamics at finite but small Kubo numbers.

  4. Simulations of Ion Velocity Distribution Functions Taken into Account Both Elastic and Charge Exchange Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huihui; Kaganovich, Igor D; Mustafaev, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Based on accurate representation of the He+-He differential angular scattering cross sections consisting of both elastic and charge exchange collisions, we performed detailed numerical simulations of the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) by Monte Carlo collision method (MCC). The results of simulations are validated by comparison with the experimental data of the mobility and the transverse diffusion. The IVDF simulation study shows that due to significant effect of scattering in elastic collisions IVDF cannot be separated into product of two independent IVDFs in the transverse and parallel to the electric field directions.

  5. Turbulence-Induced Relative Velocity of Dust Particles III: The Probability Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin; Scalo, John

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by its important role in the collisional growth of dust particles in protoplanetary disks, we investigate the probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows. Using the simulation from our previous work, we compute the relative velocity PDF as a function of the friction timescales, tau_p1 and tau_p2, of two particles of arbitrary sizes. The friction time of particles included in the simulation ranges from 0.1 tau_eta to 54T_L, with tau_eta and T_L the Kolmogorov time and the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, respectively. The relative velocity PDF is generically non-Gaussian, exhibiting fat tails. For a fixed value of tau_p1, the PDF is the fattest for equal-size particles (tau_p2~tau_p1), and becomes thinner at both tau_p2tau_p1. Defining f as the friction time ratio of the smaller particle to the larger one, we find that, at a given f in 1/2>T_L). These features are successfully explained by the Pan & Padoan model. Usin...

  6. Reconstructing the Velocity Distribution of WIMPs from Direct Dark Matter Detection Data

    CERN Document Server

    Drees, M; Drees, Manuel; Shan, Chung-Lin

    2007-01-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are one of the leading candidates for dark matter. Currently, the most promising method to detect many different WIMP candidates is the direct detection of the recoil energy deposited in a low--background laboratory detector due to elastic WIMP--nucleus scattering. So far the usual procedure has been to predict the event rate of direct detection of WIMPs based on some model(s) of the galactic halo. The aim of our work is to invert this process. That is, we study what future direct detection experiment can teach us about the WIMP halo. As the first step we consider a time--averaged recoil spectrum, assuming that no directional information exists. We develop a method to construct the (time--averaged) one--dimensional velocity distribution function from this spectrum. Moments of this function, such as the mean velocity and velocity dispersion of WIMPs, can also be obtained directly from the recoil spectrum. The only input needed in addition to a measured recoil spectr...

  7. Distributed leader-follower flocking control for multi-agent dynamical systems with time-varying velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Using tools from algebraic graph theory and nonsmooth analysis in combination with ideas of collective potential functions, velocity consensus and navigation feedback, a distributed leader-follower flocking algorithm for multi-agent dynamical systems with time-varying velocities is developed where e

  8. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from Transit Timing Variations and Radial Velocity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses---Radial Velocities (RVs) and Transit Timing Variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable---as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This ``sensitivity bias'' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in...

  9. The ion velocity distribution of tokamak plasmas: Rutherford scattering at TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammen, H.F.

    1995-01-10

    One of the most promising ways to gererate electricity in the next century on a large scale is nuclear fusion. In this process two light nuclei fuse and create a new nucleus with a smaller mass than the total mass of the original nuclei, the mass deficit is released in the form of kinetic energy. Research into this field has already been carried out for some decades now, and will have to continue for several more decades before a commercially viable fusion reactor can be build. In order to obtain fusion, fuels of extremely high temperatures are needed to overcome the repulsive force of the nuclei involved. Under these circumstances the fuel is fully ionized: it consists of ions and electrons and is in the plasma state. The problem of confining such a hot substance is solved by using strong magnetic fields. One specific magnetic configuration, in common use, is called the tokamak. The plasma in this machine has a toroidal, i.e. doughnut shaped, configuration. For understanding the physical processes which take place in the plasma, a good temporally and spatially resolved knowledge of both the ion and electron velocity distribution is required. The situation concerning the electrons is favourable, but this is not the case for the ions. To improve the existing knowledge of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak plasmas, a Rutherford scattering diagnostic (RUSC), designed and built by the FOM-Institute for Plasmaphysics `Rijnhuizen`, was installed at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich (D). The principle of the diagnostic is as follows. A beam of monoenergetic particles (30 keV, He) is injected vertically into the plasma. A small part of these particles collides elastically with the moving plasma ions. By determining the energy of a scattered beam particle under a certain angle (7 ), the initial velocity of the plasma ion in one direction can be computed. (orig./WL).

  10. Revised Model of the Steady-state Solar Wind Halo Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-08-01

    A recent study discussed the steady-state model for solar wind electrons during quiet time conditions. The electrons emanating from the Sun are treated in a composite three-population model—the low-energy Maxwellian core with an energy range of tens of eV, the intermediate ˜102-103 eV energy-range (“halo”) electrons, and the high ˜103-105 eV energy-range (“super-halo”) electrons. In the model, the intermediate energy halo electrons are assumed to be in resonance with transverse EM fluctuations in the whistler frequency range (˜102 Hz), while the high-energy super-halo electrons are presumed to be in steady-state wave-particle resonance with higher-frequency electrostatic fluctuations in the Langmuir frequency range (˜105 Hz). A comparison with STEREO and WIND spacecraft data was also made. However, ignoring the influence of Langmuir fluctuations on the halo population turns out to be an unjustifiable assumption. The present paper rectifies the previous approach by including both Langmuir and whistler fluctuations in the construction of the steady-state velocity distribution function for the halo population, and demonstrates that the role of whistler-range fluctuation is minimal unless the fluctuation intensity is arbitrarily raised. This implies that the Langmuir-range fluctuations, known as the quasi thermal noise, are important for both halo and super-halo electron velocity distribution.

  11. Simulation of Velocity and Temperature Distributions of Displacement Ventilation System with Single or Double Heat Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenfei Wu; Xuan Wu; Yanhui Feng; Xinxin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of flow characteristics of displacement ventilation, the three-dimensional numerical models are developed using the CFD technology. The numerical simulation results are verified by experiments, based on this, the velocity and temperature distribution of three-dimensional displacement ventilation system with single and double heat sources are studied. Velocity and temperature fields under two different cases of heat source are analyzed and compared. The numerical results show that there are three layers in vertical temperature fields of displacement ventilation system with single or double heat sources, and the vertical temperature distribution of single heat source is different from that of double heat sources. When indoor load is large, the comfort requirement of people indoor can't be satisfied with displacement ventilation system only, thus an additional refrigeration system is necessary. Furthermore, under the condition of two heat sources, the displacement ventilation parameters can't be computed simply according to single heat source inlet parameters, therefore the interaction between heat sources should be considered.

  12. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Huong T.; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F )-dependent velocity [P (v )] and run length [P (n )] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P (n ) and P (v ) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F , P (v ) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v , which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  13. Revised Model of the Steady-state Solar Wind Halo Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-08-01

    A recent study discussed the steady-state model for solar wind electrons during quiet time conditions. The electrons emanating from the Sun are treated in a composite three-population model—the low-energy Maxwellian core with an energy range of tens of eV, the intermediate ˜102–103 eV energy-range (“halo”) electrons, and the high ˜103–105 eV energy-range (“super-halo”) electrons. In the model, the intermediate energy halo electrons are assumed to be in resonance with transverse EM fluctuations in the whistler frequency range (˜102 Hz), while the high-energy super-halo electrons are presumed to be in steady-state wave–particle resonance with higher-frequency electrostatic fluctuations in the Langmuir frequency range (˜105 Hz). A comparison with STEREO and WIND spacecraft data was also made. However, ignoring the influence of Langmuir fluctuations on the halo population turns out to be an unjustifiable assumption. The present paper rectifies the previous approach by including both Langmuir and whistler fluctuations in the construction of the steady-state velocity distribution function for the halo population, and demonstrates that the role of whistler-range fluctuation is minimal unless the fluctuation intensity is arbitrarily raised. This implies that the Langmuir-range fluctuations, known as the quasi thermal noise, are important for both halo and super-halo electron velocity distribution.

  14. The Effects of High-Velocity Supernova Kicks on the Orbital Properties and Sky Distributions of Neutron Star Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, W. N.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.

    1994-01-01

    We systematically investigate the effects of high supernova kick velocities on the orbital parameters of post-supernova neutron-star binaries. Using Monte- Carlo simulations, we determine the post-supernova distributions of orbital parameters for progeneitors of HMXBs and LMXBs. With the recent distribution of pulsar birth velocities by Lyne & Lorimer (1994), only about 27% of massive systems remain bound after the supernova, of which about 26% immediately experience dynamical mass transfer a...

  15. Characteristics of proton velocity distribution functions in the near-lunar wake from Chandrayaan-1/SWIM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanya, M. B.; Bhardwaj, Anil; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Alok, Abhinaw; Wieser, Martin; Holmström, Mats; Wurz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Due to the high absorption of solar wind plasma on the lunar dayside, a large scale wake structure is formed downstream of the Moon. However, recent in-situ observations have revealed the presence of protons in the near-lunar wake (100 km to 200 km from the surface). The solar wind, either directly or after interaction with the lunar surface (including magnetic anomalies), is the source of these protons in the near-wake region. Using the entire data from the SWIM sensor of the SARA experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1, we analyzed the velocity distribution of the protons observed in the near-lunar wake. The average velocity distribution functions, computed in the solar wind rest frame, were further separated based on the angle between the upstream solar wind velocity and the IMF. Although the protons enter the wake parallel as well as perpendicular to the IMF, the velocity distribution were not identical for the different IMF orientations, indicating the control of IMF in the proton entry processes. Several proton populations were identified from the velocity distribution and their possible entry mechanism were inferred based on the characteristics of the velocity distribution. These entry mechanisms include (i) diffusion of solar wind protons into the wake along IMF, (ii) the solar wind protons with finite gyro-radii that are aided by the wake boundary electric field, (iii) solar wind protons with gyro-radii larger than lunar radii from the tail of the solar wind velocity distribution, and (iv) scattering of solar wind protons from the dayside lunar surface or from magnetic anomalies. In order to gain more insight into the entry mechanisms associated with different populations, backtracing is carried out for each of these populations. For most of the populations, the source of the protons obtained from backtracing is found to be in agreement with that inferred from the velocity distribution. There are few populations that could not be explained by the known mechanisms

  16. Wind direction/velocity and current direction/velocity data from current meter casts in a world wide distribution from 1970-12-06 to 1991-10-01 (NODC Accession 9700218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind direction/velocity and current direction/velocity data were collected using current meter casts in a world wide distribution from December 6, 1970 to October...

  17. Determinants of axonal regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Frisén, J

    1997-01-01

    Axons often regrow to their targets and lost functions may be restored after an injury in the peripheral nervous system. In contrast, axonal regeneration is generally very limited after injuries in the central nervous system, and functional impairment is usually permanent. The regenerative capacity depends on intrinsic neuronal factors as weil as the interaction of neurons with other cells. Glial cells may, in different situations, either support or inhibit axo...

  18. Axonal transmission in the retina introduces a small dispersion of relative timing in the ganglion cell population response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Zeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual stimuli elicit action potentials in tens of different retinal ganglion cells. Each ganglion cell type responds with a different latency to a given stimulus, thus transforming the high-dimensional input into a temporal neural code. The timing of the first spikes between different retinal projection neurons cells may further change along axonal transmission. The purpose of this study is to investigate if intraretinal conduction velocity leads to a synchronization or dispersion of the population signal leaving the eye. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We 'imaged' the initiation and transmission of light-evoked action potentials along individual axons in the rabbit retina at micron-scale resolution using a high-density multi-transistor array. We measured unimodal conduction velocity distributions (1.3±0.3 m/sec, mean ± SD for axonal populations at all retinal eccentricities with the exception of the central part that contains myelinated axons. The velocity variance within each piece of retina is caused by ganglion cell types that show narrower and slightly different average velocity tuning. Ganglion cells of the same type respond with similar latency to spatially homogenous stimuli and conduct with similar velocity. For ganglion cells of different type intraretinal conduction velocity and response latency to flashed stimuli are negatively correlated, indicating that differences in first spike timing increase (up to 10 msec. Similarly, the analysis of pair-wise correlated activity in response to white-noise stimuli reveals that conduction velocity and response latency are negatively correlated. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Intraretinal conduction does not change the relative spike timing between ganglion cells of the same type but increases spike timing differences among ganglion cells of different type. The fastest retinal ganglion cells therefore act as indicators of new stimuli for postsynaptic neurons. The intraretinal dispersion

  19. Transport Equations of Three-point Distribution Functions in MHD Turbulent Flow for Velocity, Magnetic Temperature and Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.K. Azad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the statistical theory of certain distribution functions for simultaneous velocity, magnetic temperature and concentration fields in MHD turbulent flow have been studied. The various properties of the constructed joint distribution functions such as, reduction property, separation property, coincidence and symmetric properties have been discussed. We have made an attempt to derive the transport equations for two and three point distribution functions. Lastly, the transport equation for evaluation of three point distribution functions has been derived.

  20. A comparative quantitative assessment of axonal and dendritic mRNA transport in maturing hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunja K Pathak

    Full Text Available Translation of mRNA in axons and dendrites enables a rapid supply of proteins to specific sites of localization within the neuron. Distinct mRNA-containing cargoes, including granules and mitochondrial mRNA, are transported within neuronal projections. The distributions of these cargoes appear to change during neuronal development, but details on the dynamics of mRNA transport during these transitions remain to be elucidated. For this study, we have developed imaging and image processing methods to quantify several transport parameters that can define the dynamics of RNA transport and localization. Using these methods, we characterized the transport of mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial mRNA in differentiated axons and dendrites of cultured hippocampal neurons varying in developmental maturity. Our results suggest differences in the transport profiles of mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial mRNA, and differences in transport parameters at different time points, and between axons and dendrites. Furthermore, within the non-mitochondrial mRNA pool, we observed two distinct populations that differed in their fluorescence intensity and velocity. The net axonal velocity of the brighter pool was highest at day 7 (0.002±0.001 µm/s, mean ± SEM, raising the possibility of a presynaptic requirement for mRNA during early stages of synapse formation. In contrast, the net dendritic velocity of the brighter pool increased steadily as neurons matured, with a significant difference between day 12 (0.0013±0.0006 µm/s and day 4 (-0.003±0.001 µm/s suggesting a postsynaptic role for mRNAs in more mature neurons. The dim population showed similar trends, though velocities were two orders of magnitude higher than of the bright particles. This study provides a baseline for further studies on mRNA transport, and has important implications for the regulation of neuronal plasticity during neuronal development and in response to neuronal injury.

  1. Determination of cosmic bodies size-velocity distribution by observation of current impacts on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchinov, I. V.; Perelomova, A. A.; Shuvalov, V. V.

    1993-01-01

    Collisions of cosmic bodies with terrestrial planets involve many physical processes such as deceleration and ablation during their flight through an atmosphere, the impact at a surface accompanied by cratering, melting and evaporation of surface material, generation of shock waves, etc. If body velocity is high enough then a thermal radiation is very important. All these processes on Mars proceed differently than on the other planets because of the low density of its atmosphere. In particular, this leads to the fact that smaller bodies of sizes of the order of 0.1-10 m strike the planet surface without being decelerated and perform some effects which may be detected by equipment placed on a board of artificial satellites, by a network of stations at the surface of Mars and even from the Earth. These observations can be used to determine size-velocity distribution of such bodies in the Solar System. Numerical simulation of the impacts at the surface of Mars have been carried out using two-dimensional gas dynamic code with detailed consideration of the thermal radiative transfer. This work is an extension of our previous paper. We have expanded a range of projectile sizes up to r sub 0 = 100 m. For such a large-scale body, the initial stage of the impact, involving crate ring and ejection of surface material, is very important. Thus, these effects have been taken into account.

  2. Kr II and Xe II axial velocity distribution functions in a cross-field ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser induced fluorescence measurements were carried out in a cross-field ion source to examine the behaviour of the axial ion velocity distribution functions (VDFs) in the expanding plasma. In the present paper, we focus on the axial VDFs of Kr II and Xe II ions. We examine the contourplots in a 1D-phase space (x,vx) representation in front of the exhaust channel and along the centerline of the ion source. The main ion beam, whose momentum corresponds to the ions that are accelerated through the whole potential drop, is observed. A secondary structure reveals the ions coming from the opposite side of the channel. We show that the formation of the neutralized ion flow is governed by the annular geometry. The assumption of a collisionless shock or a double layer due to supersonic beam interaction is not necessary. A non-negligible fraction of slow ions originates in local ionization or charge-exchange collision events between ions of the expanding plasma and atoms of the background residual gas. Slow ions that are produced near the centerline in the vicinity of the exit plane are accelerated toward the source body with a negative velocity leading to a high sputtering of front face. On the contrary, the ions that are produced in the vicinity of the channel exit plane are partially accelerated by the extended electric field.

  3. Systematic Variability of the He+ Pickup Ion Velocity Distribution Function Observed With SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, Andreas; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Berger, Lars; Drews, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Interstellar pickup ions in the heliosphere exhibit a characteristic suprathermal Velocity Distribution Function (VDF). This is the result of their injection into the solar wind as a highly anisotropic torus distribution which is continuously modulated by pitch-angle scattering and cooling processes. As the impact of these processes on the pickup ion VDF depends on present and past solar wind conditions, the pickup ion VDF is not static but variable in shape and intensity. Using the good counting statistics of the Charge-Time-Of-Flight sensor onboard SOHO we were able to resolve a systematic variability of the He^+ VDF. On the one hand the intensity of freshly created pickup ions near the injection speed increases during magnetic field configurations in which the initial torus distribution lies inside the sensor's aperture. This complements our studies showing a persisting anisotropy of the He^+ VDF and introduces a limit for the efficiency of pitch-angle scattering. On the other hand we observe anomalous shapes of the He^+ VDF in the vicinity of stream interaction regions, where the VDF tends to be shifted towards higher speeds. These observations may be explained by a modified cooling behaviour in these regions. Furthermore we observe an enhancement of ions above the injection speed that were likely accelerated in compression regions. Here, we present our observations and discuss the implications on the processes named above.

  4. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, D.; Gota, H.; Hayashi, R.; Kiyashko, V.; Morehouse, M.; Primavera, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Bolte, N. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Marsili, P. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Roche, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Wessel, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  5. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D; Bolte, N; Gota, H; Hayashi, R; Kiyashko, V; Marsili, P; Morehouse, M; Primavera, S; Roche, T; Wessel, F

    2010-10-01

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  6. Particle Paths of Lagrangian Velocity Distribution Simulating the Spiral Arms of Galaxy M51

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tzu-Fang Chen; Georgios H. Vatistas; Sui Lin

    2008-01-01

    Galaxies are huge families of stars held together by their own gravities. The system M51 is a spiral galaxy. It possesses billions of stars. The range of the spiral arms extends hundred thousand light years. The present study is in an attempt in using the particle paths of the Lagrangian flow field to simulate the spiral arms of Galaxy M51.The Lagrangian flow field is introduced. The initial locations of fluid particles in the space between two concentric cylinders are first specified. Then a linear velocity distribution of the fluid particles is used with different angle rotations of the particles to obtain the particle paths in the Lagrangian diagram. For simulating the spiral arms of Galaxy M51, the Lagrangian M51 diagram is developed. The particle paths of the Lagrangian M51 diagram agree quite well with the spiral arms of Galaxy M51.

  7. Two-dimensional ion velocity distribution functions in inductively coupled argon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, David C [Optical Sciences Company, Anaheim, CA 92806 (United States); McWilliams, Roger [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Edrich, David A [Scientific Applications and Research Associates Inc., Cypress, CA 90630 (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Two-dimensional ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) of argon plasmas have been measured with optical tomography via laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). An inductive radio-frequency (RF) coil created the plasmas, and IVDFs were measured versus RF frequency, gas pressure and location (bulk plasma or presheath of a plate). Typical gas pressure was 0.3-0.4 mTorr, RF power 25 W and magnetic field 130 G. Effective perpendicular ion temperature decreased with increasing RF frequency, and changed little with pressure. Optical tomography reveals features of the presheath IVDF that cannot be deduced from LIF scans parallel and perpendicular to the plate alone. Progress also has been made toward performing optical tomography on a commercial ion beam source (Veeco/Ion Tech 3 cm RF Ion Source, Model no. 201). In particular, it has been discovered that the beam energy fluctuates in a range of about 20 eV over the timescale of a few minutes.

  8. Prediction of Pressure, Temperature, and Velocity Distribution of Two-Phase Flow in Oil Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazarez-Candia, Octavio [Programa de Yacimientos Naturalmente Fracturados, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, CP 07730, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Vasquez-Cruz, Mario A. [Gerencia de Reservas de Hidrocarburos, PEMEX, Av. Marina Nacional No. 329, Col. Huasteca, C.P. 11311, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-03-15

    In this work, a one-dimensional, time-dependent homogeneous mathematical model is presented, which can be used for determining the pressure, temperature, and velocity distributions of two-phase flow with three components (water-oil and gas) in oil wells. The numerical solution of the mathematical model, which consists of mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations, is based on the finite difference technique in the implicit scheme. The thermodynamic and transport properties of the fluids are estimated by black oil PVT correlations. The contribution of the terms of the conservation equations to the prediction of field data is studied. As a result, it was observed that the convective terms do not affect significantly the results of the present model. However, the terms in the energy equation containing the Joule-Thomson coefficient affect sensitively the prediction of temperature, but not the prediction of pressure. Numerical results are in agreement with field data and theoretical results reported in the literature.

  9. Velocity distribution of carbon and oxygen atoms in front of a tokamak limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the Doppler-broadened emission profiles of a CI line (3P2→3P20, λ=909.5 nm) and of an OI line (3P2,1,0→3S10, λ=844.6 nm), the velocity distribution of carbon and oxygen atoms in front of a graphite limiter has been deduced. For the π-component of the CI line, the Zeeman splitting is negligible, but for the π-components of the OI line, the Paschen-Back effect has to be taken into account. The contribution of chemical and physical sputtering to the release of impurities under various experimental conditions has been investigated at the tip of the limiter. For C atoms, chemical sputtering dominates at low boundary temperatures, and physical sputtering at high temperature. For oxygen, chemical sputtering is always indicated to be the more efficient process. (orig.)

  10. Three-dimensional distribution of random velocity inhomogeneities at the Nankai trough seismogenic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T.; Obana, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Nakanishi, A.; Kaiho, Y.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Nankai trough in southwestern Japan is a convergent margin where the Philippine sea plate is subducted beneath the Eurasian plate. There are major faults segments of huge earthquakes that are called Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes. According to the earthquake occurrence history over the past hundreds years, we must expect various rupture patters such as simultaneous or nearly continuous ruptures of plural fault segments. Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) conducted seismic surveys at Nankai trough in order to clarify mutual relations between seismic structures and fault segments, as a part of "Research concerning Interaction Between the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes" funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. This study evaluated the spatial distribution of random velocity inhomogeneities from Hyuga-nada to Kii-channel by using velocity seismograms of small and moderate sized earthquakes. Random velocity inhomogeneities are estimated by the peak delay time analysis of S-wave envelopes (e.g., Takahashi et al. 2009). Peak delay time is defined as the time lag from the S-wave onset to its maximal amplitude arrival. This quantity mainly reflects the accumulated multiple forward scattering effect due to random inhomogeneities, and is quite insensitive to the inelastic attenuation. Peak delay times are measured from the rms envelopes of horizontal components at 4-8Hz, 8-16Hz and 16-32Hz. This study used the velocity seismograms that are recorded by 495 ocean bottom seismographs and 378 onshore seismic stations. Onshore stations are composed of the F-net and Hi-net stations that are maintained by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) of Japan. It is assumed that the random inhomogeneities are represented by the von Karman type PSDF. Preliminary result of inversion analysis shows that spectral gradient of PSDF (i.e., scale dependence of

  11. Turbulence-induced relative velocity of dust particles. III. The probability distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Liubin [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Padoan, Paolo [ICREA and ICC, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Scalo, John, E-mail: lpan@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: parrot@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Motivated by its important role in the collisional growth of dust particles in protoplanetary disks, we investigate the probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows. Using the simulation from our previous work, we compute the relative velocity PDF as a function of the friction timescales, τ{sub p1} and τ{sub p2}, of two particles of arbitrary sizes. The friction time of the particles included in the simulation ranges from 0.1τ{sub η} to 54T {sub L}, where τ{sub η} and T {sub L} are the Kolmogorov time and the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, respectively. The relative velocity PDF is generically non-Gaussian, exhibiting fat tails. For a fixed value of τ{sub p1}, the PDF shape is the fattest for equal-size particles (τ{sub p2} = τ{sub p1}), and becomes thinner at both τ{sub p2} < τ{sub p1} and τ{sub p2} > τ{sub p1}. Defining f as the friction time ratio of the smaller particle to the larger one, we find that, at a given f in (1/2) ≲ f ≲ 1, the PDF fatness first increases with the friction time τ{sub p,h} of the larger particle, peaks at τ{sub p,h} ≅ τ{sub η}, and then decreases as τ{sub p,h} increases further. For 0 ≤ f ≲ (1/4), the PDF becomes continuously thinner with increasing τ{sub p,h}. The PDF is nearly Gaussian only if τ{sub p,h} is sufficiently large (>>T {sub L}). These features are successfully explained by the Pan and Padoan model. Using our simulation data and some simplifying assumptions, we estimated the fractions of collisions resulting in sticking, bouncing, and fragmentation as a function of the dust size in protoplanetary disks, and argued that accounting for non-Gaussianity of the collision velocity may help further alleviate the bouncing barrier problem.

  12. Exploring the velocity distribution of debris flows: An iteration algorithm based approach for complex cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zheng; Chen, Guangqi; Li, Yange; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    The estimation of debris-flow velocity in a cross-section is of primary importance due to its correlation to impact force, run up and superelevation. However, previous methods sometimes neglect the observed asymmetric velocity distribution, and consequently underestimate the debris-flow velocity. This paper presents a new approach for exploring the debris-flow velocity distribution in a cross-section. The presented approach uses an iteration algorithm based on the Riemann integral method to search an approximate solution to the unknown flow surface. The established laws for vertical velocity profile are compared and subsequently integrated to analyze the velocity distribution in the cross-section. The major benefit of the presented approach is that natural channels typically with irregular beds and superelevations can be taken into account, and the resulting approximation by the approach well replicates the direct integral solution. The approach is programmed in MATLAB environment, and the code is open to the public. A well-documented debris-flow event in Sichuan Province, China, is used to demonstrate the presented approach. Results show that the solutions of the flow surface and the mean velocity well reproduce the investigated results. Discussion regarding the model sensitivity and the source of errors concludes the paper.

  13. Dynamics of axon fasciculation in the presence of neuronal turnover

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Debasish; Mohanty, P K; Zapotocky, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We formulate and characterize a model aiming to describe the formation of fascicles of axons mediated by contact axon-axon interactions. The growing axons are represented as interacting directed random walks in two spatial dimensions. To mimic axonal turnover in the mammalian olfactory system, the random walkers are injected and removed at specified rates. In the dynamical steady state, the position-dependent distribution of fascicle sizes obeys a scaling law. We identify several distinct time scales that emerge from the dynamics, are sensitive functions of the microscopic parameters of the model, and can exceed the average axonal lifetime by orders of magnitude. We discuss our findings in terms of an analytically tractable, effective model of fascicle dynamics.

  14. Determination and shaping of the ion-velocity distribution function in a single-ended Q machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Michelsen, Poul;

    1971-01-01

    An electrostatic energy analyzer with a resolution better than 0.03 eV was constructed. This analyzer was used to determine the ion-velocity distribution function at different densities and plate temperatures in a single-ended Q machine. In all regions good agreement with theoretical predictions...... based on simple, physical pictures is obtained. It is shown that within certain limits the velocity distribution function can be shaped; double-humped distribution functions have been obtained. The technique used here is suggested as an accurate method for determination of plasma densities within 10......% in single-ended Q machines...

  15. Optimization and investigation of the effect of velocity distribution of air curtains on the performance of food refrigerated display cabinets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, XueHong; Chang, ZhiJuan; Ma, QiuYang; Lu, YanLi; Yin, XueMei

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on improving the performance of the vertical open refrigerated display cabinets (VORDC) by optimizing the structure of deflector, which is affected by inlet velocity and velocity distribution of air curtains. The results show that the temperature of products located at the front and at the rear reduces as the increases of inlet velocity of air curtains. The increase of the inlet velocity of air curtains can strengthen the disturbance inside the VORDC, and also decrease the temperature of products inside the VORDC; the increase of the outer velocity of air curtain will exacerbate the disturbance outside the VORDC and decrease air curtain's performance. The present study can provide a theoretical foundation for the design of VORDC.

  16. Diagnosis of mildly relativistic electron velocity distributions by electron cyclotron emission in the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mildly relativistic electron velocity distributions are diagnosed from measurements of the first few electron cyclotron emission harmonics in the Alcator C tokamak. The approach employs a vertical viewing chord through the center of the tokamak plasma terminating at a compact, high-performance viewing dump. The cyclotron emission spectra obtained in this way are dominated by frequency downshifts due to the relativistic mass increase, which discriminates the electrons by their total energy. In this way a one-to-one correspondence between the energy and the emission frequency is accomplished in the absence of harmonic superpositions. The distribution, described by f/sub p/, the line-averaged phase space density, and Λ, the anisotropy factor, is determined from the ratio of the optically thin harmonics or polarizations. Diagnosis of spectra in the second and the third harmonic range of frequencies obtained during lower hybrid heating, current drive, and low density ohmic discharges are carried out, using different methods depending on the degree of harmonic superposition present in the spectrum and the availability of more than one ratio measurement. Discussions of transient phenomena, the radiation temperature measurement from the optically thick first harmonic, and the measurements compared to the angular hard x-ray diagnostic results illuminate the capabilities of the vertically viewing electron cyclotron emission diagnostic

  17. Asymmetric Orbital Distribution near Mean Motion Resonance: Application to Planets Observed by Kepler and Radial Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Ji-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many multiple-planet systems have been found by the Kepler transit survey and various radial velocity (RV) surveys. Kepler planets show an asymmetric feature, namely, there are small but significant deficits/excesses of planet pairs with orbital period spacing slightly narrow/wide of the exact resonance, particularly near the first order mean motion resonance (MMR), such as 2:1 and 3:2 MMR. Similarly, if not exactly the same, an asymmetric feature (pileup wide of 2:1 MMR) is also seen in RV planets, but only for massive ones. We analytically and numerically study planets' orbital evolutions near and in the MMR. We find that their orbital period ratios could be asymmetrically distributed around the MMR center regardless of dissipation. In the case of no dissipation, Kepler planets' asymmetric orbital distribution could be partly reproduced for 3:2 MMR but not for 2:1 MMR, implying that dissipation might be more important to the latter. The pileup of massive RV planets just wide of 2:1 MMR is found to be consis...

  18. Fluid Distribution in Synthetic Wet Halite Rocks : Inference from Measured Elastic Wave Velocity and Electrical Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Kitano, M.

    2011-12-01

    Intercrystalline fluid can significantly affect rheological and transport properties of rocks. Its influences are strongly dependent on its distribution. The dihedral angle between solid and liquid phases has been widely accepted as a key parameter that controls solid-liquid textures. The liquid phase is not expected to be interconnected if the dihedral angle is larger than 60 degree. However, observations contradictory to dihedral angle values have been reported. Watanabe (2010) suggested the coexistence of grain boundary fluid with a positive dihedral angle. For good understanding of fluid distribution, it is thus critical to study the nature of grain boundary fluid. We have developed a high pressure and temperature apparatus for study of intercrystalline fluid distribution. It was specially designed for measurements of elastic wave velocities and electrical conductivity. The apparatus mainly consists of a conventional cold-seal vessel with an external heater. The pressure medium is silicon oil of the viscosity of 0.1 Pa s. The pressure and temperature can be controlled from 0 to 200 MPa and from 20 to 200 C, respectively. Dimensions of a sample are 9 mm in diameter, and 15 mm in length. Halite-water system is used as an analog for crustal rocks. The dihedral angle has been studied systematically at various pressure and temperature conditions [Lewis and Holness, 1996]. The dihedral angle is larger than 60 degree at lower pressure and temperature. It decreases to be smaller than 60 degree with increasing pressure and temperature. A sample is prepared by cold-pressing and annealing of wet NaCl powder. Optical examination has shown that synthesized samples are microstructurally homogeneous. Grains are polygonal and equidimensional with a mean diameter of 100 micrometer. Grain boundaries vary from straight to bowed and 120 degree triple junctions are common. Gas and fluid bearing inclusions are visible on the grain boundaries. There are spherical inclusions or

  19. Uptake, distribution, and velocity of organically complexed plutonium in corn (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Shannon W; Molz, Fred J; Fjeld, Robert A; Kaplan, Daniel I

    2012-10-01

    Lysimeter experiments and associated simulations suggested that Pu moved into and through plants that invaded field lysimeters during an 11-year study at the Savannah River Site. However, probable plant uptake and transport mechanisms were not well defined, so more detailed study is needed. Therefore, experiments were performed to examine movement, distribution, and velocity of soluble, complexed Pu in corn. Corn was grown and exposed to Pu using a "long root" system in which the primary root extended through a soil pot and into a hydroponic container. To maintain solubility, Pu was complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB (Desferrioxamine B) or the chelating agent DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid). Corn plants were exposed to nutrient solutions containing Pu for periods of 10 min to 10 d. Analysis of root and shoot tissues permitted concentration measurement and calculation of uptake velocity and Pu retardation in corn. Results showed that depending on exposure time, 98.3-95.9% of Pu entering the plant was retained in the roots external to the xylem, and that 1.7-4.1% of Pu entered the shoots (shoot fraction increased with exposure time). Corn Pu uptake was 2-4 times greater as Pu(DFOB) than as Pu(2)(DTPA)(3). Pu(DFOB) solution entered the root xylem and moved 1.74 m h(-1) or greater upward, which is more than a million times faster than Pu(III/IV) downward movement through soil during the lysimeter study. The Pu(DFOB) xylem retardation factor was estimated to be 3.7-11, allowing for rapid upward Pu transport and potential environmental release. PMID:22717315

  20. Effective velocity distribution in an atom gravimeter: effect of the convolution with the response of the detection

    CERN Document Server

    Farah, Tristan; Cheng, Bing; Landragin, Arnaud; Merlet, Sébastien; Santos, Franck Pereira Dos

    2014-01-01

    We present here a detailed study of the influence of the transverse motion of the atoms in a free-fall gravimeter. By implementing Raman selection in the horizontal directions at the beginning of the atoms free fall, we characterize the effective velocity distribution, ie the velocity distribution of the detected atom, as a function of the laser cooling and trapping parameters. In particular, we show that the response of the detection induces a pronounced asymetry of this effective velocity distribution that depends not only on the imbalance between molasses beams but also on the initial position of the displaced atomic sample. This convolution with the detection has a strong influence on the averaging of the bias due to Coriolis acceleration. The present study allows a fairly good understanding of results previously published in {\\it Louchet-Chauvet et al., NJP 13, 065025 (2011)}, where the mean phase shift due to Coriolis acceleration was found to have a sign different from expected.

  1. Characteristics of proton velocity distribution functions in the near-lunar wake from Chandrayaan-1/SWIM observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dhanya, M B; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Alok, Abhinaw; Wieser, Martin; Holmström, Mats; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high absorption of solar wind plasma on the lunar dayside, a large scale wake structure is formed downstream of the Moon. However, recent in-situ observations have revealed the presence of protons in the near-lunar wake (100 km to 200 km from the surface). The solar wind, either directly or after interaction with the lunar surface (including magnetic anomalies), is the source of these protons in the near-wake region. Using the entire data from the SWIM sensor of the SARA experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1, we analysed the velocity distribution of the protons observed in the near-lunar wake. The average velocity distribution functions, computed in the solar wind rest frame, were further separated based on the angle between the upstream solar wind velocity and the IMF. Several proton populations were identified from the velocity distribution and their possible entry mechanism were inferred based on the characteristics of the velocity distribution. These entry mechanisms include (i) diffusion of solar w...

  2. Corticostriatal combinatorics: the implications of corticostriatal axonal arborizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, T; Wilson, C J

    2002-02-01

    The complete striatal axonal arborizations of 16 juxtacellularly stained cortical pyramidal cells were analyzed. Corticostriatal neurons were located in the medial agranular or anterior cingulate cortex of rats. All axons were of the extended type and formed synaptic contacts in both the striosomal and matrix compartments as determined by counterstaining for the mu-opiate receptor. Six axonal arborizations were from collaterals of brain stem-projecting cells and the other 10 from bilaterally projecting cells with no brain stem projections. The distribution of synaptic boutons along the axons were convolved with the average dendritic tree volume of spiny projection neurons to obtain an axonal innervation volume and innervation density map for each axon. Innervation volumes varied widely, with single axons occupying between 0.4 and 14.2% of the striatum (average = 4%). The total number of boutons formed by individual axons ranged from 25 to 2,900 (average = 879). Within the innervation volume, the density of innervation was extremely sparse but inhomogeneous. The pattern of innervation resembled matrisomes, as defined by bulk labeling and functional mapping experiments, superimposed on a low background innervation. Using this sample as representative of all corticostriatal axons, the total number of corticostriatal neurons was estimated to be 17 million, about 10 times the number of striatal projection neurons.

  3. Angular and Linear Velocity Estimation for a Re-Entry Vehicle Using Six Distributed Accelerometers: Theory, Simulation and Feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G

    2003-04-28

    This report describes a feasibility study. We are interested in calculating the angular and linear velocities of a re-entry vehicle using six acceleration signals from a distributed accelerometer inertial measurement unit (DAIMU). Earlier work showed that angular and linear velocity calculation using classic nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) solvers is not practically feasible, due to mathematical and numerical difficulties. This report demonstrates the theoretical feasibility of using model-based nonlinear state estimation techniques to obtain the angular and linear velocities in this problem. Practical numerical and calibration issues require additional work to resolve. We show that the six accelerometers in the DAIMU are not sufficient to provide observability, so additional measurements of the system states are required (e.g. from a Global Positioning System (GPS) unit). Given the constraint that our system cannot use GPS, we propose using the existing on-board 3-axis magnetometer to measure angular velocity. We further show that the six nonlinear ODE's for the vehicle kinematics can be decoupled into three ODE's in the angular velocity and three ODE's in the linear velocity. This allows us to formulate a three-state Gauss-Markov system model for the angular velocities, using the magnetometer signals in the measurement model. This re-formulated model is observable, allowing us to build an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) for estimating the angular velocities. Given the angular velocity estimates from the EKF, the three ODE's for the linear velocity become algebraic, and the linear velocity can be calculated by numerical integration. Thus, we do not need direct measurements of the linear velocity to provide observability, and the technique is mathematically feasible. Using a simulation example, we show that the estimator adds value over the numerical ODE solver in the presence of measurement noise. Calculating the velocities in the

  4. Unexpected patterns of vegetation distribution response and climate change velocities in cold ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Fauria, M.; Johnson, E. A.; Forbes, B. C.; Willis, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    In cold ecosystems such as sub-alpine forests and forest-tundra, vegetation geographical ranges are expected to expand upward/northward in a warmer world. Such moving fronts have been predicted to 1) decrease the remaining alpine area in mountain systems, increasing fragmentation and extinction risk of many alpine taxa, and 2) fundamentally modify the energy budget of newly afforested areas, enhancing further regional warming due to a reduction in albedo. The latter is particularly significant in the forest-tundra, where changes over large regions can have regional-to-global effects on climate. An integral part of the expected range shifts is their velocity. Whereas range shifts across thermal gradients can theoretically be fast in an elevation gradient relative to climate velocity (i.e. rate of climate change) due to the short distances involved, large lags are expected over the flat forest-tundra. Mountain regions have thus been identified as buffer areas where species can track climate change, in opposition to flat terrain where climate velocity is faster. Thus, much shorter time-to-equilibrium are expected for advancing upslope sub-alpine forest than for advancing northern boreal forest. We contribute to this discussion by showing two mechanisms that might largely alter the above predictions in opposite directions: 1) In mountain regions, terrain heterogeneity not only allows for slower climate velocities, but slope processes largely affect the advance of vegetation. Indeed, such mechanisms can potentially reduce the climatic signal in vegetation distribution limits (e.g. treeline), precluding it from migrating to climatically favourable areas - since these areas occur in geologically unfavourable ones. Such seemingly local control to species range shifts was found to reduce the climate-sensitive treeline areas in the sub-alpine forest of the Canadian Rocky Mountains to ~5% at a landscape scale, fundamentally altering the predictions of vegetation response to

  5. Low-freqency instabilities and the resulting velocity distributions of pickup ions at comet Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimabadi, H.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.; Fuselier, S. A.; Neugebauer, M.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction between the solar wind and newborn cometary ions is studied using a new analytical theory as well as one- and two-dimensional hybrid simulations. Using the observed parameters upstream of the comet Halley, a detailed study of wave excitation and the resulting particle distributions is presentd. Linear theory as well as simulations show that a variety of modes such as the fast magnetosonic mode, high frequency whistlers and obliquely propagating Alfven ion cyclotron waves can be excited. However, parallel propagating waves are found to be dominant in the wave spectrum and to control the scattering of the pickup ions. Several features of the observed distributions of pickup protons are explained. In particular, it is shown that the observed asymmetric pitch distribution for the pickup protons is due to the small saturation amplitude of the waves for the given parameters. Water group associated waves can lead to energy diffusion and further pitch angle scattering of protons. This effect is most likely to be important in the vicinity of the bow shock of comet Halley where the density of water group ions becomes comparable to that of protons. It is shown that the observed increase in the radius of the proton velocity shell just outside the bow shock can be due to water group waves. The nearby isotropic proton pitch angle distribution observed by Neugebauer et al. (1989) just outside the bow shock may, however, be related to the presence of a rotational discontinuity which has been identified in the magnetic field data. Just outside the bow shock, simulations show that parallel propagating water group waves can steepen with attached whistler wave packets. The steepening process at parallel propagation is a transient effect, in an important contrast to the case of steepening at oblique angles. The smaller beam densitites at comet Halley appears to be the main reason not only why waves at comet Halley have smaller amplitudes but also why oblique, steepening

  6. The microscopic state of the solar wind: Links between composition, velocity distributions, waves and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, E.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of the microscopic state of the solar wind with emphasis on recent Ulysses high-latitude observations and previous Helios in-ecliptic observations. The possible links between composition, ionization state. velocity distribution functions of electrons, protons and heavy ions. kinetic plasma waves and MHD-scale turbulence are elaborated. Emphasis is placed on a connection of interplanetary kinetic-scale phenomena with their generating microscopic processes in the corona. The fast streams seem to consist of mesoscale pressure-balanced plasma filaments and magnetic flux tubes, reminiscent of the supergranular-size structures building the open corona, from which copious Alfven waves emanate. The wind from the magnetically structured and active corona shows developed compressive turbulence and considerable abundance and ionization state variations. Some modelling attempts to explain the observed element fractionation are briefly reviewed. The causes of the nonthermal particle features. such as proton-ion differential streaming, ion beams. temperature anisotropies, and skewed distributions associated with collisionless heat conduction, are ultimately to be searched in the fact, that the corona is never quiescent but fundamentally variable in space and time. Consequently, the radial evolution of the internal state of the wind resembles at all latitudes a complicated relaxation process, in the course of which the free (in comparison with LTE conditions) particle kinetic energy is converted into plasma waves and MHD turbulence on a wide range of scales. This leads to intermittent wave-particle interactions and unsteady anomalous transport, mixed with the weak effects of the rare Coulomb collisions. Spherical expansion and large-scale inhomogeneity forces the wind to attain microscopically a complex internal state of dynamic statistical equilibrium.

  7. Angular momentum analysis of rotational transfer of superthermal relative velocity distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteley, T.W.J.; McCaffery, A.J. [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). School of Molecular Sciences

    1996-12-02

    An angular momentum (AM) theory is developed to calculate the relative populations of final rotational states after collision between a diatomic molecule and an atom having a narrow, superthermal velocity distribution as produced by, e.g. photolysis of a precursor species. Probability densities are derived from semiclassical expressions for energy and angular momentum assuming the classically impulsive limit with the repulsive wall modelled by a hard ellipsoid. The treatment given is general and therefore applies to molecules in which the centre-of-mass does not coincide with the centre of the potential coordinates. A transfer function for RT is derived and applied to the H + CO system. Analysis of the data allows the anisotropy to be extracted which is in good agreement with an ab initio potential surface. The method described allows one to rapidly assess the contributions from the elliptical core of the potential and from other features of the potential, and would permit more sophisticated representations of the topology to be incorporated. (Author).

  8. Spatial distribution of random velocity inhomogeneities in the western part of Nankai subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T.; Obana, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Nakanishi, A.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In the Nankai trough, there are three seismogenic zones of megathrust earthquakes (Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes). Lithospheric structures in and around these seismogenic zones are important for the studies on mutual interactions and synchronization of their fault ruptures. Recent studies on seismic wave scattering at high frequencies (>1Hz) make it possible to estimate 3D distributions of random inhomogeneities (or scattering coefficient) in the lithosphere, and clarified that random inhomogeneity is one of the important medium properties related to microseismicity and damaged structure near the fault zone [Asano & Hasegawa, 2004; Takahashi et al. 2009]. This study estimates the spatial distribution of the power spectral density function (PSDF) of random inhomogeneities the western part of Nankai subduction zone, and examines the relations with crustal velocity structure and seismic activity. Seismic waveform data used in this study are those recorded at seismic stations of Hi-net & F-net operated by NIED, and 160 ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) deployed at Hyuga-nada region from Dec. 2008 to Jan. 2009. This OBS observation was conducted by JAMSTEC as a part of "Research concerning Interaction Between the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes" funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. Spatial distribution of random inhomogeneities is estimated by the inversion analysis of the peak delay time of small earthquakes [Takahashi et al. 2009], where the peak delay time is defined as the time lag from the S-wave onset to its maximal amplitude arrival. We assumed the von Karman type functional form for the PSDF. Peak delay times are measured from root mean squared envelopes at 4-8Hz, 8-16Hz and 16-32Hz. Inversion result can be summarized as follows. Random inhomogeneities beneath the Quaternary volcanoes are characterized by strong inhomogeneities at small spatial scale (~ a few hundreds meter) and weak spectral gradient

  9. Velocity and turbulence distributions in wall subchannels of a road bundle in three axial planes downstream of a spacer grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehme, K.

    1987-03-01

    The velocity, turbulence, and temperature distributions in nuclear fuel element bundles of nuclear reactors were investigated. The mean velocity, the wall shear stresses, and the turbulence were measured in two wall subchannels of a rod bundle of four parallel rods, arranged in a rectangular channel, for three axial planes. A spacer grid was inserted in the rod bundle, for ratios between the distance spacer grid/measuring plane and the hydraulic diameter (LIDh) of 40.4, 32.8 and 16.9. The Reynolds number was 145,000. The results show that the distributions of the velocity and the turbulence are affected by the spacer grid, already for LIDh = 40.4. The effects of the spacer grid increase with decreasing distance to the spacer grid.

  10. Angular, velocity, rotational, and electronic distributions of vibrationally elastically scattered NO(v = 1) from LiF(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misewich, J.; Zacharias, H.; Loy, M.M.T.

    1985-09-01

    Infrared laser excitation has been utilized to excite part of a molecular beam of NO to a single well-defined quantum state, NO(v = 1, J = 3/2, ..cap omega.. = 1/2), which is scattered from a cleaved LiF(100) surface. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques then allow the determination of rotational and electronic distributions as well as state-specific angular and velocity distributions for scattering from a single initial vibrational-rotational state.

  11. Integral cross section measurements and product recoil velocity distributions of Xe2+ + N2 hyperthermal charge-transfer collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2016-07-01

    Charge exchange from doubly charged rare gas cations to simple diatomics proceeds with a large cross section and results in populations of many vibrational and electronic product states. The charge exchange between Xe2+ and N2, in particular, is known to create N2 + in both the A and B electronic states. In this work, we present integral charge exchange cross section measurements of the Xe2+ + N2 reaction as well as axial recoil velocity distributions of the Xe+ and N2 + product ions for collision energies between 0.3 and 100 eV in the center-of-mass (COM) frame. Total charge-exchange cross sections decrease from 70 Å2 to about 40 Å2 with increasing collision energy through this range. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions indicates that a Xe2+ - N2 complex exists at low collision energies but is absent by 17.6 eV COM. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions reveals evidence for complexes with lifetimes comparable to the rotational period at low collision energies. The velocity distributions are consistent with quasi-resonant single charge transfer at high collision energies.

  12. Integral cross section measurements and product recoil velocity distributions of Xe(2+) + N2 hyperthermal charge-transfer collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Michael L; Prince, Benjamin D; Bemish, Raymond J

    2016-07-28

    Charge exchange from doubly charged rare gas cations to simple diatomics proceeds with a large cross section and results in populations of many vibrational and electronic product states. The charge exchange between Xe(2+) and N2, in particular, is known to create N2 (+) in both the A and B electronic states. In this work, we present integral charge exchange cross section measurements of the Xe(2+) + N2 reaction as well as axial recoil velocity distributions of the Xe(+) and N2 (+) product ions for collision energies between 0.3 and 100 eV in the center-of-mass (COM) frame. Total charge-exchange cross sections decrease from 70 Å(2) to about 40 Å(2) with increasing collision energy through this range. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions indicates that a Xe(2+) - N2 complex exists at low collision energies but is absent by 17.6 eV COM. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions reveals evidence for complexes with lifetimes comparable to the rotational period at low collision energies. The velocity distributions are consistent with quasi-resonant single charge transfer at high collision energies. PMID:27475363

  13. The Radial Velocity Distribution of Class I and Flat-Spectrum Protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Covey, Kevin R; Doppmann, G W; Lada, C J; Covey, Kevin R.; Greene, Thomas P.; Doppmann, Greg W.; Lada, Charles J.

    2005-01-01

    We analyze radial velocities for a sample of 31 Class I and flat spectrum protostars in Taurus-Auriga, rho Ophiuchi and Serpens for evidence of the global dynamical state of extremely young stellar populations buried within parental molecular clouds. Comparing the radial velocity of each protostar to that of the local CO gas, we are able to constrain the one dimensional radial velocity dispersion of Class I and flat spectrum objects to ~ 2.5 km/sec or below. This upper limit to the protostellar velocity dispersion is consistent with the velocity dispersions of surrounding CO gas which we measure to be ~ 1.4 km/sec, suggesting that the motions of protostars and local CO gas are dynamically linked and dominated by the gravitational potential of the molecular cloud. However, the upper limit on the protostellar velocity dispersion could still allow for slightly inflated motions of protostars relative to the local molecular gas. Four of the protostars analyzed appear to have velocities more than 3 sigma (7.5 km/se...

  14. DETECTION OF THE VELOCITY SHEAR EFFECT ON THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE GALACTIC SATELLITES IN ISOLATED SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jounghun [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun-Young, E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    We report a detection of the effect of the large-scale velocity shear on the spatial distributions of the galactic satellites around the isolated hosts. Identifying the isolated galactic systems, each of which consists of a single host galaxy and its satellites, from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and reconstructing linearly the velocity shear field in the local universe, we measure the alignments between the relative positions of the satellites from their isolated hosts and the principal axes of the local velocity shear tensors projected onto the plane of sky. We find a clear signal that the galactic satellites in isolated systems are located preferentially along the directions of the minor principal axes of the large-scale velocity shear field. Those galactic satellites that are spirals, are brighter, are located at distances larger than the projected virial radii of the hosts, and belong to the spiral hosts yield stronger alignment signals, which implies that the alignment strength depends on the formation and accretion epochs of the galactic satellites. It is also shown that the alignment strength is quite insensitive to the cosmic web environment, as well as the size and luminosity of the isolated hosts. Although this result is consistent with the numerical finding of Libeskind et al. based on an N-body experiment, owing to the very low significance of the observed signals, it remains inconclusive whether or not the velocity shear effect on the satellite distribution is truly universal.

  15. Axons of sacral preganglionic neurons in the cat: II. Axon collaterals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C W

    2001-01-01

    Axon collaterals were identified in 21 of 24 preganglionic neurons in the lateral band of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus of the cat. Following the intracellular injection of HRP or neurobiotin the axons from 20 of these neurons were followed and 53 primary axon collaterals were found to originate from unmyelinated segments and from nodes of Ranvier. Detailed mapping done in the five best labeled cells showed bilateral axon collaterals distributions up to 25,000 microm in length with 950 varicosities and unilateral distributions up to 12,561 microm with 491 varicosities. The axon collaterals appeared to be unmyelinated, which was confirmed at EM, and were small in diameter (average 0.3 microm). Varicosities were located mostly in laminae I, V, VII, VIII and X and in the lateral funiculi. Most varicosities were not in contact with visible structures but some were seen in close apposition to Nissl stained somata and proximal dendrites. Varicosities had average minor diameters of 1.3 microm and major diameters of 2.3 microm. Most were boutons en passant while 10-20% were boutons termineaux. EM revealed axodendritic and axoaxonic synapses formed by varicosities and by the axons between varicosities. It is estimated that the most extensive of these axon collaterals systems may contact over 200 spinal neurons in multiple locations. These data lead to the conclusion that sacral preganglionic neurons have multiple functions within the spinal cord in addition to serving their target organ. As most preganglionic neurons in this location innervate the urinary bladder, it is possible that bladder preganglionic neurons have multiple functions.

  16. ON THE COMPETITION BETWEEN RADIAL EXPANSION AND COULOMB COLLISIONS IN SHAPING THE ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: KINETIC SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present numerical simulations of the solar wind using a fully kinetic model which takes into account the effects of particle's binary collisions in a quasi-neutral plasma in spherical expansion. Starting from an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution function for the electrons, we show that the combined effect of expansion and Coulomb collisions leads to the formation of two populations: a collision-dominated cold and dense population almost isotropic in velocity space and a weakly collisional, tenuous field-aligned and antisunward drifting population generated by mirror force focusing in the radially decreasing magnetic field. The relative weights and drift velocities for the two populations observed in our simulations are in excellent agreement with the relative weights and drift velocities for both core and strahl populations observed in the real solar wind. The radial evolution of the main moments of the electron velocity distribution function is in the range observed in the solar wind. The electron temperature anisotropy with respect to the magnetic field direction is found to be related to the ratio between the collisional time and the solar wind expansion time. Even though collisions are found to shape the electron velocity distributions and regulate the properties of the strahl, it is found that the heat flux is conveniently described by a collisionless model where a fraction of the electron thermal energy is advected at the solar wind speed. This reinforces the currently largely admitted fact that collisions in the solar wind are clearly insufficient to force the electron heat flux obey the classical Spitzer-Härm expression where heat flux and temperature gradient are proportional to each other. The presented results show that the electron dynamics in the solar wind cannot be understood without considering the role of collisions.

  17. Effects of tangential velocity distribution on flow stability in a draft tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Huashu; Niu, Lin; Cao, Shuliang

    2014-10-01

    Numerical simulations of the flow in the draft tube of a Francis turbine are carried out in order to elucidate the effects of tangential velocity on flow stability. Influence of the location of the maximum tangential velocity is explored considering the equality of the total energy at the inlet of the draft tube. It is found that the amplitude of the pressure fluctuation decreases when the location of the maximum of the tangential velocity moves from the centre to the wall on the cross section. Thus, the stability of the flow in the draft tube increases with the moving of the location of the maximum tangential velocity. However, the relative hydraulic loss increases and the recovery coefficient of the draft tube decreases slightly.

  18. Atmospheric velocity spectral width measurements using the statistical distribution of pulsed CO2 lidar return signal intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Grant, William B.

    1989-01-01

    A pulsed CO2 lidar with coherent detection has been used to measure the correlation time of backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles which are illuminated by the pulsed radiation. The correlation time of the backscatter of the return signal, which is directly related to the velocity spectral width, can be used to study the velocity structure constant of atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Various techniques for correlation time measurement are discussed, and several measurement results are presented for the technique using the information contained in the statistical distribution of a set of lidar return signal intensities.

  19. Time-evolution of the ion velocity distribution function in the discharge of a Hall effect thruster

    OpenAIRE

    Mazouffre, S.; Gawron, D.; N. Sadeghi

    2009-01-01

    The temporal characteristics of the Xe$^+$ ion axial Velocity Distribution Function (VDF) were recorded in the course of low-frequency discharge current oscillations ($\\sim$~14 kHz) of the 5 kW-class PPS$\\circledR$X000 Hall thruster. The evolution in time of the ion axial velocity component is monitored by means of a laser induced fluorescence diagnostic tool with a time resolution of 100 ns. As the number of fluorescence photons is very low during such a short time period, a hom-made pulse-c...

  20. Estimation of the Radial Distribution of the Tangential Velocity in a Vortex Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira OGAWA; Tsuyoshi IKARI; Hiroyuki MURAKAMI; Kouhei SATHO

    2009-01-01

    The estimation of maximum tangential velocity becomes a very important factor for the estimation of performances of the vortex chamber. In this paper, a proposed flow model of how to estimate the maximum tangential velocity in the special form of the vortex chamber is described in detail. The pressure drop basing upon the rapid expansion by flowing from the inlet pipe into the cyclone body is estimated as half of the dynamic pressure in the inlet pipe.

  1. Effect of the Temperature of the Moderator on the Velocity Distribution of Neutrons with Numerical Calculations for H as Moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E. P.; Wilkins, J. E. Jr.

    1944-09-14

    In this paper we set up an integral equation governing the energy distribution of neutrons that are being slowed down uniformly throughout the entire space by a uniformly distributed moderator whose atoms are in motion with a Maxwellian distribution of velocities. The effects of chemical binding and crystal reflection are ignored. When the moderator is hydrogen, the integral equation is reduced to a differential equation and solved by numerical methods. In this manner we obtain a refinement of the dv/v{sup 2} law. (auth)

  2. Irregular geometries in normal unmyelinated axons: a 3D serial EM analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, M M; Leitao, C; Trogadis, J; Stevens, J K

    1990-12-01

    Axons have generally been represented as straight cylinders. It is not at all uncommon for anatomists to take single cross-sections of an axonal bundle, and from the axonal diameter compute expected conduction velocities. This assumes that each cross-section represents a slice through a perfect cylinder. We have examined the three-dimensional geometry of 98 central and peripheral unmyelinated axons, using computer-assisted serial electron microscopy. These reconstructions reveal that virtually all unmyelinated axons have highly irregular axial shapes consisting of periodic varicosities. The varicosities were, without exception, filled with membranous organelles frequently including mitochondria, and have obligatory volumes similar to that described in other neurites. The mitochondria make contact with microtubules, while the other membraneous organelles were frequently found free floating in the cytoplasm. We conclude that unmyelinated axons are fundamentally varicose structures created by the presence of organelles, and that an axon's calibre is dynamic in both space and time. These irregular axonal geometries raise serious doubts about standard two dimensional morphometric analysis and suggest that electrical properties may be more heterogeneous than expected from single section data. These results also suggest that the total number of microtubules contained in an axon, rather than its single section diameter, may prove to be a more accurate predictor of properties such as conduction velocity. Finally, these results offer an explanation for a number of pathological changes that have been described in unmyelinated axons. PMID:2292722

  3. A probabilistic description of the bed load sediment flux: 3. The particle velocity distribution and the diffusive flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, David Jon; Roseberry, John C.; Schmeeckle, Mark W.

    2012-09-01

    Particles transported as bed load within a specified streambed area possess at any instant a distribution of velocities. This distribution figures prominently in describing the rates of transport and dispersal of particles. High-speed imaging of sand particles transported as bed load over a planar bed reveals that the probability density functions of the streamwise and cross-stream particle velocities are exponential-like. For quasi-steady conditions the exponential-like density of streamwise velocities reflects a balance among three fluxes in momentum space: (1) an advection of streamwise momentum whose magnitude and sign vary with the momentum state; (2) a diffusion of momentum from higher to lower values of momentum density; and (3) a drift of momentum from regions in momentum space having high average rates of generation of kinetic energy toward regions having low rates of generation of kinetic energy. The probability density of cross-stream velocities similarly reflects a balance of fluxes of cross-stream momentum. Whereas the average net force acting on particles is zero under steady conditions, the mean, variance and asymmetry of the distribution of forces acting on particles vary with the momentum state of the particles. Numerical simulations of particle motions that are faithful to these statistical properties reproduce key empirical results, namely, the exponential-like velocity distribution and the nonlinear relation between hop distances and travel times. The simulations also illustrate how steady gradients in particle activity, the solid volume of particles in motion per unit streambed area, induce a diffusive flux as described in companion papers.

  4. Mass, velocity, angular and charge-state distributions from the fusion of /sup 32/S and /sup 112/Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, C.; Schier, W.A.; Tsoupas, N.; Enge, H.; Salomaa, M.; Sperduto, A.; Graue, A.

    1978-07-01

    Evaporation residues from the fusion of /sup 32/S and /sup 112/Sn at E/sub /sup 32/S/ = 160 meV were studied using an energy-mass spectrometer. The velocity selector of the energy-mass spectrometer was first utilized to measure summed fusion products as a function of velocity setting and reaction angle. In-flight mass separtion of the fusion products with the energy-mass spectrometer identified masses 141, 140, and 139 from the evaporation of three to five nucleons from the /sup 144/Dy compound nucleus. Absolute cross-section measurements are compared to theoretical predictions of the statistical evaporation model. Velocity, angular and charge state distributions of evaporation residues are also compared to calculated values.

  5. Brain gangliosides in axon-myelin stability and axon regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides, sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids, are expressed at high abundance and complexity in the brain. Altered ganglioside expression results in neural disorders, including seizures and axon degeneration. Brain gangliosides function, in part, by interacting with a ganglioside-binding lectin, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). MAG, on the innermost wrap of the myelin sheath, binds to gangliosides GD1a and GT1b on axons. MAG-ganglioside binding ensures optimal axon-myelin cell-ce...

  6. Velocity distribution of the flow field in the cyclonic zone of cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Xiao-wei; Liu Jiong-tian; Wang Yong-tian; Cao Yi-jun

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been conducted to study the flow field in a cyclone static micro-bubble flotation column.The method of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used.The flow field velocity distribution in both cross section and longitudinal section within cyclonic zone was studied for different circulating volumes.The cross sectional vortex was also analyzed.The results show that in cross section as the circulating volume increases from 0.187 to 0.350 m3/h,the flow velocity ranges from 0 to 0.68 m/s.The flow field is mainly a non-vortex potential flow that forms a free vortex without outside energy input.In the cyclonic region the vortex deviates from the center of the flotation column because a single tangential opening introduces circulating fluid into the column.The tangential component of the velocity plays a defining role in the cross section.In the longitudinal section the velocity ranges from 0 to 0.08 m/s.The flow velocity increases as does the circulating volume.Advantageous mineral separation conditions arise from the combined effects of cyclonic flow in cross and longitudinal section.

  7. The distribution of spectral index of magnetic field and ion velocity in Pi2 frequency band in BBFs: THEMIS statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Du, A. M.; Volwerk, M.; Wang, G. Q.

    2016-09-01

    A statistical study of the THEMIS FGM and ESA data is performed on turbulence of magnetic field and velocity for 218 selected 12 min intervals in BBFs. The spectral index α in the frequency range of 0.005-0.06 Hz are Gaussian distributions. The peaks indexes of total ion velocity Vi and parallel velocity V‖ are 1.95 and 2.07 nearly the spectral index of intermittent low frequency turbulence with large amplitude. However, most probable α of perpendicular velocity V⊥ is about 1.75. It is a little bigger than 5/3 of Kolmogorov (1941). The peak indexes of total magnetic field BT is 1.70 similar to V⊥. Compression magnetic field B‖ are 1.85 which is smaller than 2 and bigger than 5/3 of Kolmogorov (1941). The most probable spectral index of shear B⊥ is about 1.44 which is close to 3/2 of Kraichnan (1965). Max V⊥ have little effect on the power magnitude of VT and V‖ but is positively correlated to spectral index of V⊥. The spectral power of BT, B‖ and B⊥ increase with max perpendicular velocity but spectral indexes of them are negatively correlated to V⊥. The spectral index and the spectral power of magnetic field over the frequency interval 0.005-0.06 Hz is very different from that over 0.08-1 Hz.

  8. Determination of the Ion Velocity Distribution in a Rotating Plasma from Measurements of Doppler Broadening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    -particle orbit picture is valid for the discharge period under investigation, except for the first few microseconds during breakdown when a strong interaction between plasma and remaining neutral gas takes place by Alfvens critical velocity mechanism. A simple relation is given between the measured half......The Doppler-broadened profile of the He II 4685.75 AA line was measured along a chord in a rotating plasma, transverse to the magnetic field. Using a single-particle orbit picture, the corresponding velocity spectrum of ions confirm the measurements, so it can be concluded that the single......-width and shift of the Doppler profile and the macroscopic quantities of ion velocity and energy. Several Doppler-broadened profiles are shown for different plasma parameters....

  9. Transfer of vesicles from Schwann cell to axon: a novel mechanism of communication in the peripheral nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alejandra eLopez-Verrilli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells (SCs are the glial component of the peripheral nervous system, with essential roles during development and maintenance of axons, as well as during regenerative processes after nerve injury. SCs increase conduction velocities by myelinating axons, regulate synaptic activity at presynaptic nerve terminals and are a source of trophic factors to neurons. Thus, development and maintenance of peripheral nerves are crucially dependent on local signalling between SCs and axons. In addition to the classic mechanisms of intercellular signalling, the possibility of communication through secreted vesicles has been poorly explored to date. Interesting recent findings suggest the occurrence of lateral transfer mediated by vesicles from glial cells to axons that could have important roles in axonal growth and axonal regeneration. Here, we review the role of vesicular transfer from SCs to axons and propose the benefits of this means in supporting neuronal and axonal maintenance and regeneration after nerve damage.

  10. Experimental study on upward bubble velocity and pierce length distributions in a water model of copper converter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Du; Jiayun Zhang; Tuping Zhou; Qifeng Shu

    2003-01-01

    The upward bubble velocity and the pierce length distributions in a sectional water model of the copper convener in Guixi Smelter in Jiangxi, China, were measured using a two-contact electro-resistivity probe. In the case of using a single tuyere, the bubble velocity distribution along longitudinal direction was similar to that derived from Guassian function. Beyond the center of the longitudinal range, the bubble pierce length exhibited a sudden increase. The upward bubble velocity at a specified location could go up to meters per second. Its probability at a fixed location obeys a lognormal function; the bubble pierce length there varies bellow a few centimeters. In the case of using multi-tuyeres, the upward bubble velocity was roughly uniform right above the tuyeres and showed a slow decrease beyond this region. The bubble pierce length within both of these two regions was roughly uniform. Its average value in the former region, however, was found to be somewhat lower than that in the later.

  11. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey X: Evidence for a bimodal distribution of rotational velocities for the single early B-type stars

    OpenAIRE

    Dufton, P. L.; Langer, N.; Dunstall, P. R.; Evans, C J; Brott, I; Mink, S.E. de; Howarth, I. D.; Kennedy, M; McEvoy, C.; Potter, A. T.; Ramirez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, Hugues; Simon-Diaz, S.; Taylor, W.; Vink, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Projected rotational velocities (\\vsini) have been estimated for 334 targets in the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey that do not manifest significant radial velocity variations and are not supergiants. They have spectral types from approximately O9.5 to B3. The estimates have been analysed to infer the underlying rotational velocity distribution, which is critical for understanding the evolution of massive stars. Methods: Projected rotational velocities were deduced from the Fourier transfor...

  12. Online computing of non-stationary distributions velocity fields by an accuracy controlled growing neural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frezza-Buet, Hervé

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a vector quantization process that can be applied online to a stream of inputs. It enables to set up and maintain a dynamical representation of the current information in the stream as a topology preserving graph of prototypical values, as well as a velocity field. The algorithm relies on the formulation of the accuracy of the quantization process, that allows for both the updating of the number of prototypes according to the stream evolution and the stabilization of the representation from which velocities can be extracted. A video processing application is presented. PMID:25248032

  13. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution as a result of electron-attachment collisions in ionized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of electron-attachment collisions on the velocity distribution of electrons is studied on the basis of Boltzmann kinetic equations governing the energetic balance of electrons (e), atoms of a carrier gas (c), and SF6-molecules (m) capturing electrons. Under the assumption that 1) the densities of the particles fulfill the conditions nsub(e) << nsub(c), nsub(m), nsub(m) << nsub(c), and that 2) only the electron-attachment process is in competition with the elastic collision process between electrons and the atoms of the carrier gas, the time behaviour of the energetic balance of the electrons is investigated. The calculations lead to non-Maxwellian forms of the electron velocity distribution changing the mean electron energy. (author)

  14. Ion velocity distribution functions in argon and helium discharges: detailed comparison of numerical simulation results and experimental data

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huihui; Kaganovich, Igor D; Mustafaev, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo Collisions (MCC) method, we have performed simulations of ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) taking into account both elastic collisions and charge exchange collisions of ions with atoms in uniform electric fields for argon and helium background gases. The simulation results are verified by comparison with the experiment data of the ion drift velocities and the ion transverse diffusion coefficients in argon and helium. The recently published experimental data for the first seven coefficients of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the ion energy and angular distribution functions are used to validate simulation results for IVDF. Good agreements between measured and simulated IVDFs show that the developed simulation model can be used for accurate calculations of IVDFs.

  15. Velocity spectra and angular distributions of evaporation residues from sup 32 S + sup 12 C at 145 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, N.; Cavallaro, S.; Femino' , S.; Figuera, P.; Pirrone, S.; Porto, F.; Sambataro, S. (Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Universita di Messina, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania and Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud I-95129 Catania (Italy))

    1991-11-01

    Velocity spectra and angular and mass distributions for the evaporation residues of the {sup 32}S+{sup 12}C system at {ital E}{sup 32}S=145 MeV in the angular range 3{degree}{le}{var theta}{sub {ital L}}{le}12{degree} have been measured. In order to separate compound nucleus evaporation residues from other heavy reaction products, a kinematic analysis based on simple statistical assumptions relative to the velocity spectra was performed. The structures in the mass distribution are compared with the LILITA code predictions. The fusion excitation function of the existing results is compared with theoretical models. The total reaction cross section has been extracted by means of the modified sum of differences method.

  16. Comparisons of the galaxy age, stellar velocity dispersion and K-band luminosity distributions between grouped galaxies and isolated ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Xin-Fa

    2016-02-01

    In two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10), we compare the age, stellar velocity dispersion and K-band luminosity distributions of grouped galaxies with those of isolated galaxies, to explore the environmental dependence of these properties of galaxies. It is found that grouped galaxies have preferentially larger stellar velocity dispersions and are preferentially older than isolated galaxies. We also note apparent difference of K-band luminosity distribution at both extremes of density in the luminous volume-limited Main galaxy sample: grouped galaxies are preferentially more luminous than isolated galaxies, while this difference in the faint volume-limited Main galaxy sample is very small.

  17. Differential Axonal Projection of Mitral and Tufted Cells in the Mouse Main Olfactory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Nagayama

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, much has been elucidated regarding the functional organization of the axonal connection of olfactory sensory neurons to olfactory bulb (OB glomeruli. However, the manner in which projection neurons of the OB process odorant input and send this information to higher brain centers remains unclear. Here, we report long-range, large-scale tracing of the axonal projection patterns of OB neurons using two-photon microscopy. Tracer injection into a single glomerulus demonstrated widely distributed mitral/tufted cell axonal projections on the lateroventral surface of the mouse brain, including the anterior/posterior piriform cortex (PC and olfactory tubercle (OT. We noted two distinct groups of labeled axons: PC-orienting axons and OT-orienting axons. Each group occupied distinct parts of the lateral olfactory tract. PC-orienting axons projected axon collaterals to a wide area of the PC but only a few collaterals to the OT. OT-orienting axons densely projected axon collaterals primarily to the anterolateral OT (alOT. Different colored dye injections into the superficial and deep portions of the OB external plexiform layer revealed that the PC-orienting axon populations originated in presumed mitral cells and the OT-orienting axons in presumed tufted cells. These data suggest that although mitral and tufted cells receive similar odor signals from a shared glomerulus, they process the odor information in different ways and send their output to different higher brain centers via the PC and alOT.

  18. Angular distribution of the total cyclotron radiation of a relativistic particle with parallel velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A closed form formula is given for the mean power radiated per solid angle in a given direction by a relativistic particle in cyclotronic motion with a non zero parallel velocity. The difference between emitted and received mean power for a non closed periodic motion is illustrated in this case

  19. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .3. CLOUDS, COMPLEXES AND POPULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; VANWOERDEN, H

    1991-01-01

    We present the first complete catalogue of high-velocity clouds (HVCs), followed by a classification of these clouds into complexes and populations. The catalogue will form the basis for comparisons with theoretical models. The study described here yields the following conclusions: (1) Differential

  20. Velocity Distributions of Runaway Stars Produced by Supernovae in the Galaxy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abudusaimaitijiang Yisikandeer; Chunhua Zhu; Zhaojun Wang; Guoliang Lu

    2016-09-01

    Using a method of population synthesis, we investigate the runaway stars produced by disrupted binaries via asymmetric core collapse supernova explosions (CC-RASs) and thermonuclear supernova explosions (TN-RASs). We find the velocities of CC-RASs in the range of about 30--100 km s$^{−1}$. The runaway stars observed in the galaxy are possibly CC-RASs. Due to differences in stellar chemical components and structures, TN-RASs are divided into hydrogen-rich TN-RASs and helium-rich TN-RASs. The velocities of the former are about 100–500 km s$^{−1}$, while the velocities of the latter are mainly between 600 and 1100 km s$^{−1}$. The hypervelocity stars observed in the galaxy may originate from thermonuclear supernova explosions. Our results possibly cover the US 708 which is a compact helium star and travels with a velocity of 1157$\\pm$53 km s$^{−1}$ in our galaxy.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE TRANSITION REGION OF PIPES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-hui; DU Guang-sheng; LIU Li-ping; SHAO Zhu-feng; ZHAI Cheng-yuan

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of an ultrasonic flowmeter meaurement depends on the profile-linear average velocity.But this velocity in the transition region is not available at the present.In this article,the velocity in the transition region in pipes is studied by experimental methods.The Particle Image Velocimetry ( PIV ) is used to measure the flow field in the transition region in pipes,and the measured results from PIV are in good agreement with the Westerwell's experimental data.Based on the experimental data of PIV,the curves of the profile-linear average velocity in the transition region against the Reynolds number in the range from 2 000 to 20 000 are obtained,and it is shown that the coefficient k is constant when the Reynolds number is in the range of 2 000-2 400 and 6 000-20 000,and the coefficient k is increasing when the Reynolds number is in the range of 2 400-6 000.The results of this article can be used to improve the measurement accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeters and as a theoretical basis for the research on the transition flow.

  2. Nonlinear Landau damping and formation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal structures for plasmas with q-nonextensive velocity distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, M. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune 411021 (India); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-03-15

    In the past, long-time evolution of an initial perturbation in collisionless Maxwellian plasma (q = 1) has been simulated numerically. The controversy over the nonlinear fate of such electrostatic perturbations was resolved by Manfredi [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2815-2818 (1997)] using long-time simulations up to t=1600{omega}{sub p}{sup -1}. The oscillations were found to continue indefinitely leading to Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK)-like phase-space vortices (from here on referred as 'BGK structures'). Using a newly developed, high resolution 1D Vlasov-Poisson solver based on piecewise-parabolic method (PPM) advection scheme, we investigate the nonlinear Landau damping in 1D plasma described by toy q-distributions for long times, up to t=3000{omega}{sub p}{sup -1}. We show that BGK structures are found only for a certain range of q-values around q = 1. Beyond this window, for the generic parameters, no BGK structures were observed. We observe that for values of q<1 where velocity distributions have long tails, strong Landau damping inhibits the formation of BGK structures. On the other hand, for q>1 where distribution has a sharp fall in velocity, the formation of BGK structures is rendered difficult due to high wave number damping imposed by the steep velocity profile, which had not been previously reported. Wherever relevant, we compare our results with past work.

  3. Angular and velocity distributions of desorbing product carbon dioxide from two reaction sites on platinum(110)(1×2)

    OpenAIRE

    Ohno, Yuichi; Matsushima, Tatsuo; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    The angular and velocity distributions of desorbing product CO2 were studied on a platinum(110)(1×2) surface over a wide range of CO coverages by means of angle-resolved thermal desorption combined with a cross-correlation time-of-flight (TOF) technique. Heating the coadsorption layer of CO and oxygen yields four CO2 formation peaks P1–CO2 (~400 K), P2–CO2 (300 K), P3–CO2 (250 K), and P4–CO2 (170 K)]. The angular distribution of each CO2 produced at high CO coverages consists of three desorpt...

  4. Velocity distribution of free particles in the modified special relativity theory

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jian-Miin

    1998-01-01

    Keeping the two fundamental postulates of the special theory of relativity, the principle of relativity and the constancy of the one-way velocity of light in all inertial frames of reference, and assuming two generalized Finslerian structures of gravity-free space and time in the usual inertial coordinate system, we can modify the special theory of relativity. The modified theory is still characterized by the localized Lorentz transformation between any two usual inertial coordinate systems. ...

  5. The Three-Dimensional Velocity Distribution of Wide Gap Taylor-Couette Flow Modelled by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shina Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is conducted for the flow between two concentric cylinders with a wide gap, relevant to bearing chamber applications. This wide gap configuration has received comparatively less attention than narrow gap journal bearing type geometries. The flow in the gap between an inner rotating cylinder and an outer stationary cylinder has been modelled as an incompressible flow using an implicit finite volume RANS scheme with the realisable k-ε model. The model flow is above the critical Taylor number at which axisymmetric counterrotating Taylor vortices are formed. The tangential velocity profiles at all axial locations are different from typical journal bearing applications, where the velocity profiles are quasilinear. The predicted results led to two significant findings of impact in rotating machinery operations. Firstly, the axial variation of the tangential velocity gradient induces an axially varying shear stress, resulting in local bands of enhanced work input to the working fluid. This is likely to cause unwanted heat transfer on the surface in high torque turbomachinery applications. Secondly, the radial inflow at the axial end-wall boundaries is likely to promote the transport of debris to the junction between the end-collar and the rotating cylinder, causing the build-up of fouling in the seal.

  6. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin eWhite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialised glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarisation followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasising the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during CNS myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of PLP (proteolipid protein transport by SNARE proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases.

  7. Highly transverse velocity distribution of convoy electrons emitted by highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, M.; Tőkési, K.; Reinhold, C. O.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2003-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of convoy electron emission resulting from highly charged ion (HCI) transport through carbon foils. Employing a classical transport theory we analyze the angular and energy distribution formed by multiple scattering of electrons in the solid. We find that the convoy electron distribution becomes highly transverse at intermediate foil thicknesses representing an oblate spheroidal distribution due to the stepwise excitation of the HCI. The calculated convoy electron spectra are found to be in good agreement with recent measurements.

  8. Impact of velocity space distribution on hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the (1,1) mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numeric studies of the impact of the velocity space distribution on the stabilization of (1,1) internal kink mode and excitation of the fishbone mode are performed with a hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic model. These simulations demonstrate an extension of the physics capabilities of NIMROD[C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)], a three-dimensional extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, to include the kinetic effects of an energetic minority ion species. Kinetic effects are captured by a modification of the usual MHD momentum equation to include a pressure tensor calculated from the δf particle-in-cell method [S. E. Parker and W. W. Lee, Phys. Fluids B 5, 77 (1993)]. The particles are advanced in the self-consistent NIMROD fields. We outline the implementation and present simulation results of energetic minority ion stabilization of the (1,1) internal kink mode and excitation of the fishbone mode. A benchmark of the linear growth rate and real frequency is shown to agree well with another code. The impact of the details of the velocity space distribution is examined; particularly extending the velocity space cutoff of the simulation particles. Modestly increasing the cutoff strongly impacts the (1,1) mode. Numeric experiments are performed to study the impact of passing versus trapped particles. Observations of these numeric experiments suggest that assumptions of energetic particle effects should be re-examined.

  9. Risk methodology for geologic disposal of radioactive waste: The distributed velocity method of solving the convective-dispersion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method is proposed for treating convective-dispersive transport. The motivation for developing this technique arises from the demands of performing a risk assessment for a nuclear waste repository. These demands include computational efficiency over a relatively large range of Peclet numbers and the ability to handle chains of decaying radionuclides with rather extreme contrasts in both solution velocities and half lives. To the extent it has been tested to date, the Distributed Velocity Method (DVM) appears to satisfy these demands. Included in this paper are the mathematical theory, numerical implementation, an error analysis employing statistical sampling and regression analysis techniques, and comparisons of DVM with other methods for convective-dispersive transport. (author)

  10. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.

    Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  11. Shells, holes, worms, high-velocity gas and the z-distribution of gas in galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, R. J.

    The author gives an overview of the current observational understanding of vertically extended gas components in spiral galaxies and the various phenomena which come under such names as shells, holes, worms, and high-velocity gas. For the most part, the focus is on recent high-resolution interferometric studies. The author concentrates on cold gas, and briefly on warm ionized gas, in the Milky Way and a few nearby spirals. Along the way, it is seen how phenomena such as worms and shells may be related to the formation and maintenance of the vertically extended components.

  12. Starspot distributions on fully convective M dwarfs: implications for radial velocity planet searches

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, J R; Jones, H R A; Pavlenko, Ya V; Jenkins, J S; Haswell, C A; Lohr, M E

    2015-01-01

    Since M4.5 - M9 dwarfs exhibit equatorial rotation velocities of order 10 km/s on average, radial velocity surveys targeting this stellar population will likely need to find methods to effectively remove starspot jitter. We present the first high resolution Doppler images of the M4.5 dwarf, GJ 791.2A, and the M9 dwarf, LP 944-20. The time series spectra of both objects reveal numerous line profile distortions over the rotation period of each star which we interpret as starspots. The transient distortions are modelled with spot/photosphere contrast ratios that correspond to model atmosphere temperature differences of Tphot-Tspot = 200 and 300 K. GJ 791.2A is a fully convective star with vsini = 35.1 km/s. Although we find more starspot structure at high latitudes, we reconstruct spots at a range of phases and latitudes with a mean spot filling of ~3%. LP 944-20 is one of the brightest known late-M dwarfs, with spectral type M9V and vsini = 30.8 km/s. Its spectral time series exhibits two dominant transient lin...

  13. Electron momentum distribution, velocity space instability, and angular momentum in relativistic large aspect ratio diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazak, G.; Zarmi, Y.; Zinamon, Z.

    1981-06-01

    The detailed structure of electron momentum distribution in relativistic diodes is studied. It is proven that in most of the diode region the momentum distribution is isotropic in fluid rest frame, with azimuthal temperature which, in general, is much larger than the cathode temperature. A diode model based on these conclusions is presented. The model allows for a continuum of electron trajectories at each point. In various limits the results are reduced to well-known cold fluid model results.

  14. The genetics of axonal transport and axonal transport disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E Duncan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are specialized cells with a complex architecture that includes elaborate dendritic branches and a long, narrow axon that extends from the cell body to the synaptic terminal. The organized transport of essential biological materials throughout the neuron is required to support its growth, function, and viability. In this review, we focus on insights that have emerged from the genetic analysis of long-distance axonal transport between the cell body and the synaptic terminal. We also discuss recent genetic evidence that supports the hypothesis that disruptions in axonal transport may cause or dramatically contribute to neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. RGM is a repulsive guidance molecule for retinal axons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnier, Philippe P; Sierra, Ana; Macchi, Paolo;

    2002-01-01

    Axons rely on guidance cues to reach remote targets during nervous system development. A well-studied model system for axon guidance is the retinotectal projection. The retina can be divided into halves; the nasal half, next to the nose, and the temporal half. A subset of retinal axons, those from...... the temporal half, is guided by repulsive cues expressed in a graded fashion in the optic tectum, part of the midbrain. Here we report the cloning and functional characterization of a membrane-associated glycoprotein, which we call RGM (repulsive guidance molecule). This molecule shares no sequence homology...... with known guidance cues, and its messenger RNA is distributed in a gradient with increasing concentration from the anterior to posterior pole of the embryonic tectum. Recombinant RGM at low nanomolar concentration induces collapse of temporal but not of nasal growth cones and guides temporal retinal axons...

  16. Velocity Distribution of Slurry in Horizontal Pipe When Solid Particles Sliding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangShilin; XuZhenliang; Shaolongtan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the laws of momentum conservation and impulse in accelerating process, the distribution on speed of ununiform slurry flow in a horizontal pipe was studied. According to the momentum change of solid particles and conveying liquid of slurry flow during accelerating, and some effect factors, the relationship between the speed of solid particles and the speed of conveying liquid was obtained.When dealing with the friction between sliding solid particles and pipe, it is pivotal to reasonably distribute component of friction to each solid particle. The friction coefficient between solid particles was obtained by forces analysis and theoretic calculation, and can be used to calculate the friction force on every solid particle. The effect of friction on speed of ever), solid particle was investigated through the impulse law. The result is more accurate than that by using uniform friction on solid particles. It is completely new method to use above theory to get solid particles speed distribution, conveying liquid speed distribution and slurry speed distribution.

  17. On the Anisotropy of the He+, C+, O+, and Ne+ Pickup Ion Velocity Distribution Function: STEREO PLASTIC Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, A.; Drews, C.; Berger, L.; Peleikis, T.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    PickUp Ions (PUIs) are typically characterized by (1) their almost exclusively single charge state, (2) a highly non-thermal and anisotropic Velocity Distribution Function (VDF) [Drews et al., 2015], and (3) an extended source population of neutral atoms somewhere between the observer and the Sun. The origin of pickup ions ranges from sources only several solar radii away from the Sun, the so-called inner-source of pickup ions, up to a distance of several hundreds of astronomical units, the local interstellar medium. Their continuous production inside the heliosphere and complex interactions with the magnetized solar wind plasma leads to the development of non-thermal, anisotropic features of both the solar wind and pickup ion velocity distribution functions. In this study, we present observations of the VDF of He+, C+, N+, O+ and Ne+ pickup ions with PLASTIC on STEREO A. We have found a PUI flux increase during perpendicular configurations of the local magnetic field that is generally linked to the existence of a so-called torus-distribution [Drews et al., 2015] which is attributed to the production of PUIs close to the observer. A comparison of the PUI VDF between radial and perpendicular configurations of the local magnetic field vector is used to quantify the anisotropy of the PUI VDF and thereby enables us to estimate the mean free path for pitch-angle scattering of He, C, N, O and Ne pickup ions without the necessity of an over-simplified heliospheric model to describe the PUI phase space transport. Our results show a clear signature of a C+ torus signature at 1 AU as well as significant differences between the anisotropies of the He+ and O+ VDF. We will discuss our results in the light of recent studies about the nature of the inner-source of PUIs [Berger et al., 2015] and observations of the 2D VDF of He+[Drews et al., 2015]. Figure Caption: Velocity space diagrams of a pickup ion torus distribution as a (vx-vy)-projection (top left panel) and in the vz = 0

  18. Near-field angular distributions of high velocity ions for low-power hall thrusters

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Regina M.; Yost, Allison; Johnson, Lee K.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental angular distributions of high-energy primary ions in the near-field region of a small Hall thruster between 50-200 mm downstream of the thruster exit plane at a range of centerline angles have been determined using a highly-collimated, energy-selective diagnostic probe. The measurements reveal a wide angular distribution of ions exiting the thruster channel and the formation of a strong, axially-directed jet of ions along the thruster centerline. Comparisons are made to other exp...

  19. Design of a molecular beam surface scattering apparatus for velocity and angular distribution measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceyer, S.T.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1981-09-01

    A molecular beam surface scattering apparatus designed for the study of corrosion and catalytic surface reactions is described. The apparatus incorporates two molecular or atomic beams aimed at a surface characterized by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), a rotatable, differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer, and a versatile manipulator. Angular distributions and energy distributions as a function of angle and independent of the surface residence time can be measured. Typical data for the oxidation of deuterium to D/sub 2/O on a Pt(111) crystal surface are presented.

  20. DESIGN OF A MOLECULAR BEAM SURFACE SCATTERING APPARATUS FOR VELOCITY AND ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceyer, S. T.; Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1980-11-01

    A molecular beam surface scattering apparatus designed for the study of corrosion and catalyticsurfacereactions is described. The apparatus incorporates two molecular or atomic beams aimed at a surface characterized by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), a rotatable, differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer, and a versatile manipulator. Angular distributions and energy distributions as a funcion of angle and independent of the surface residence time can be measured. Typical data for the oxidation of deuterium to D{sub 2}O on a Pt(lll) crystal surface are presented.

  1. Reactive scattering of halogen molecules. [Angular and velocity distributions, stabilities 6. 8 to 17. 7 kcal/mole, FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, J.J.

    1976-11-01

    A study of the endoergic, bimolecular reactions of F/sub 2/ with I/sub 2/, ICl, and HI in a crossed molecular beam experiment is described. The trihalogens IIF, ClIF, and HIF were directly observed as the products of these reactions. At high collision energies a second reactive channel producing IF becomes important. Product angular and velocity distributions show that this IF does not result from a four-center exchange reaction. Measured threshold energies for the formation of IIF, ClIF, and HIF yield lower bounds to the stabilities of these molecules, with respect to the separated atoms, of 69, 81, and 96 kcal/mole, respectively. Analysis of product center-of-mass angular distributions indicates that a slightly nonlinear approach is most effective in bringing about reaction to form the stable triatomic radical. Also described is a crossed molecular beam study of the Cl + Br/sub 2/ ..-->.. BrCl + Br reaction at collision energies from 6.8 to 17.7 kcal/mole. The results indicate that this reaction has the characteristics of an exoergic reaction on an attractive potential energy surface with early energy release. Reagent translational energy is very efficiently channeled into product internal energy. At high collision energy the reaction appears to approach the spectator stripping limit. Finally, a series of computer programs which can be used to carry out the requisite data analysis for crossed molecular beam reactive scattering experiments are described. These programs recover the reactive scattering center-of-mass flux distribution from the measured angular and velocity distributions of the products.

  2. Displaced logarithmic profile of the velocity distribution in the boundary layer of a turbulent flow over an unbounded flat surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpos, Simona; Apostol, Marian

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that the Reynolds equations for a turbulent flow over an unbounded flat surface in the presence of a constant pressure-gradient lead to a displaced logarithmic profile of the velocity distribution; the displaced logarithmic profile is obtained by assuming a constant production rate of turbulence energy. The displacement height measured on the (vertical) axis perpendicular to the surface is either positive or negative. For a positive displacement height the boundary layer exhibits an inversion, while for a negative displacement height the boundary layer is a direct one. In an inversion boundary layer the logarithmic velocity profile is disrupted into two distinct branches separated by a logarithmic singularity. The viscosity transforms this logarithmic singularity into a sharp edge, governed by a generalized Reynolds number. The associated temperature distribution is calculated, and the results are discussed in relation to meteorological boundary-layer jets and stratified layers. The effects of gravitation and atmospheric thermal or fluid-mixture concentration gradients ("external forcings") are also considered; it is shown that such circumstances may lead to various modifications of the boundary layers. A brief presentation of a similar situation is described for a circular pipe.

  3. Patterns of growth, axonal extension and axonal arborization of neuronal lineages in the developing Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Camilla; Shy, Diana; Spindler, Shana R; Fung, Siaumin; Pereanu, Wayne; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-11-15

    The Drosophila central brain is composed of approximately 100 paired lineages, with most lineages comprising 100-150 neurons. Most lineages have a number of important characteristics in common. Typically, neurons of a lineage stay together as a coherent cluster and project their axons into a coherent bundle visible from late embryo to adult. Neurons born during the embryonic period form the primary axon tracts (PATs) that follow stereotyped pathways in the neuropile. Apoptotic cell death removes an average of 30-40% of primary neurons around the time of hatching. Secondary neurons generated during the larval period form secondary axon tracts (SATs) that typically fasciculate with their corresponding primary axon tract. SATs develop into the long fascicles that interconnect the different compartments of the adult brain. Structurally, we distinguish between three types of lineages: PD lineages, characterized by distinct, spatially separate proximal and distal arborizations; C lineages with arborizations distributed continuously along the entire length of their tract; D lineages that lack proximal arborizations. Arborizations of many lineages, in particular those of the PD type, are restricted to distinct neuropile compartments. We propose that compartments are "scaffolded" by individual lineages, or small groups thereof. Thereby, the relatively small number of primary neurons of each primary lineage set up the compartment map in the late embryo. Compartments grow during the larval period simply by an increase in arbor volume of primary neurons. Arbors of secondary neurons form within or adjacent to the larval compartments, resulting in smaller compartment subdivisions and additional, adult specific compartments. PMID:19538956

  4. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  5. Molecular beam studies of unimolecular reactions: Cl, F + C/sub 2/H/sub 3/Br. [Angular and velocity distributions, mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.; Coggiola, M.J.; Lee, Y.T.

    1978-12-01

    Several methods currently used to study unimolecular decomposition in molecular beams are discussed. Experimental product angular and velocity distributions obtained for the reaction of F, Cl with C/sub 2/H/sub 3/Br are presented. The mechanism by which conservation of angular momemtum can cause coupling of the product angular and velocity distributions in dissociation of long-lived complexes is introduced. 14 references.

  6. Rapidly changing distribution of velocity and suspended materials under the drifting Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ho Kyung; Im, Jungho; Kim, Yong Hoon; Yae Son, Eun; Lee, Sanggyun

    2015-04-01

    In two summer seasons of 2011 and 2014, the short-term (1-4 days) ice-camp study has been conducted on the drifting Arctic sea ice. In particular, in 2014, the international collaboration with the Marginal Ice Zone program (sponsored by Office of Naval Research) has been integrated. The mooring package comprises the acoustic Doppler velocity profiler, holographic imaging camera, and conductivity-temperature-depth profiler, which are used to understand the dynamic behavior of sea ice and spatial-temporal variation of mixing layer (ML) and suspended particulate matters under the sea ice. Mooring data clearly shows the mixing and entrainment pattern in the upper ML in the marginal ice zone. When ice floes drift toward the pack ice, the upward entrainment from the seasonal pycnocline to sea ice-water boundary was induced by shear across ML and seasonal pycnocline. The entrainment speed was in the range of 0.25-2 m/hr, which matches well with thickening and thinning rate of ML during the near-inertial period (~12 hr). When ice floes drift toward the open ocean, the turbulent wakes at the advancing edge of ice were combined with the entrainment caused by near-inertial motion, which results in a complex mixing pattern of both upward and downward fluxes in the ML. Also, the acoustic backscatter observed by the acoustic Doppler current profiler and beam attenuation from transmissometer revealed the increased concentration of suspended particulate materials in the ML, which can be direct evidence visualizing the mixing pattern. Results suggest that the mixing and entrainment found in our study sustain particulate matters in suspension within the upper ML for a few months.

  7. Molecular beam scattering investigation of the oxidation of CO on Rh(111). II. Angular and velocity distributions of the CO/sub 2/ product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.S.; Sibener, S.J.

    1989-03-01

    Molecular beam and time of flight methods have been used to examine the angular distributions and velocity distributions of the CO/sub 2/ product molecules formed in the catalytic oxidation of CO on a Rh(111) single crystal in the surface temperature range 700--1000 K. The angular distribution was sharply peaked about the surface normal, and cannot be described by a simple cos/sup n/ theta expression. No temperature dependence was observed in the angular distribution over the range of temperatures studied here. Observed velocity distributions were clearly non-Maxwellian and had average translational energies in excess of those expected at the surface temperatures. Furthermore, the average velocity depended strongly on the desorption angle. Molecules desorbing along the surface normal had an average translational energy of approx.8 kcal/mol. The average energy decreased with increasing angle, reaching a value of approx.4 kcal/mol at an angle of 60/sup 0/. All of the observed velocity distributions were narrower than Maxwellian distributions with the same average energies. Product velocity distributions did not appear to vary with surface temperature. The observed excess energies are believed to arise from the crossing of the activation barrier to reaction, with a fraction of the reaction energy being carried away from the surface by the product molecules.

  8. Bulk properties and velocity distributions of water group ions at Comet Halley - Giotto measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, A. J.; Johnstone, A. D.; Wilken, B.; Jockers, K.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    1990-01-01

    In the region upstream of Comet Halley, pickup heavy ions of cometary origin were directly observed by the implanted ion spectrometer on Giotto. Diffusion of this population in pitch angle and in energy, during the approach to the comet and on the outbound leg is discussed. The two data sets are compared and qualitative ideas on scattering timescales are inferred. In addition the bulk parameters of these distributions have been computed and a comparison of the observed speed in the solar wind frame and the observed density with expectations is presented. Pitch angle scattering occurs more slowly than expected with filled shells appearing at 2,500,000 km, and significant energy diffusion does not occur until the bow shock region. Also the shell distributions downstream of the shock flow at the bispherical bulk speed (related to the Alfven speed) along the magnetic field with respect to the solar wind in accordance with conservation of energy between the pickup ions and the wave turbulence.

  9. Ejecta velocity distribution of impact craters formed on quartz sand: Effect of projectile density on crater scaling law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujido, Sayaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Suzuki, Ayako I.; Yasui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify the effects of projectile density on ejecta velocity distributions for a granular target, impact cratering experiments on a quartz sand target were conducted by using eight types of projectiles with different densities ranging from 11 g cm-3 to 1.1 g cm-3, which were launched at about 200 m s-1 from a vertical gas gun at Kobe University. The scaling law of crater size, the ejection angle of ejecta grains, and the angle of the ejecta curtain were also investigated. The ejecta velocity distribution obtained from each projectile was well described by the π-scaling theory of v0/√{gR} =k2(x0/R)-1/μ, where v0, g, R and x0 are the ejection velocity, gravitational acceleration, crater radius and ejection position, respectively, and k2 and μ are constants mostly depending on target material properties (Housen, K.R., Holsapple, K.A. [2011]. Icarus 211, 856-875). The value of k2 was found to be almost constant at 0.7 for all projectiles except for the nylon projectile, while μ increased with the projectile density, from 0.43 for the low-density projectile to 0.6-0.7 for the high-density projectile. On the other hand, the π-scaling theory for crater size gave a μ value of 0.57, which was close to the average of the μ values obtained from ejecta velocity distributions. The ejection angle, θ, of each grain decreased slightly with distance, from higher than 45° near the impact point to 30-40° at 0.6 R. The ejecta curtain angle is controlled by the two elementary processes of ejecta velocity distribution and ejection angle; it gradually increased from 52° to 63° with the increase of the projectile density. The comparison of our experimental results with the theoretical model of the crater excavation flow known as the Z-model revealed that the relationship between μ and θ obtained by our experiments could not be described by the Z-model (Maxwell, D.E. [1977]. In: Roddy, D.J., Pepin, R.O., Merrill, R.B. (Eds.), Impact and Explosion Cratering

  10. Local translation and directional steering in axons

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Andrew C; Holt, Christine E.

    2007-01-01

    The assembly of functional neural circuits in the developing brain requires neurons to extend axons to the correct targets. This in turn requires the navigating tips of axons to respond appropriately to guidance cues present along the axonal pathway, despite being cellular ‘outposts' far from the soma. Work over the past few years has demonstrated a critical role for local translation within the axon in this process in vitro, making axon guidance another process that requires spatially locali...

  11. NIHAO project II: halo shape, phase-space density and velocity distribution of dark matter in galaxy formation simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsky, Iryna; Macciò, Andrea V.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Wang, Liang; Obreja, Aura; Stinson, Greg S.; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W.; Wadsley, James

    2016-10-01

    We use the NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of Hundred Astrophysical Objects) cosmological simulations to study the effects of galaxy formation on key properties of dark matter (DM) haloes. NIHAO consists of ≈90 high-resolution smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that include (metal-line) cooling, star formation, and feedback from massive stars and supernovae, and cover a wide stellar and halo mass range: 106 ≲ M*/M⊙ ≲ 1011(109.5 ≲ Mhalo/M⊙ ≲ 1012.5). When compared to DM-only simulations, the NIHAO haloes have similar shapes at the virial radius, Rvir, but are substantially rounder inside ≈0.1Rvir. In NIHAO simulations, c/a increases with halo mass and integrated star formation efficiency, reaching ˜0.8 at the Milky Way mass (compared to 0.5 in DM-only), providing a plausible solution to the long-standing conflict between observations and DM-only simulations. The radial profile of the phase-space Q parameter (ρ/σ3) is best fit with a single power law in DM-only simulations, but shows a flattening within ≈0.1Rvir for NIHAO for total masses M > 1011 M⊙. Finally, the global velocity distribution of DM is similar in both DM-only and NIHAO simulations, but in the solar neighbourhood, NIHAO galaxies deviate substantially from Maxwellian. The distribution is more symmetric, roughly Gaussian, with a peak that shifts to higher velocities for Milky Way mass haloes. We provide the distribution parameters which can be used for predictions for direct DM detection experiments. Our results underline the ability of the galaxy formation processes to modify the properties of DM haloes.

  12. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey X: Evidence for a bimodal distribution of rotational velocities for the single early B-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Dufton, P L; Dunstall, P R; Evans, C J; Brott, I; de Mink, S E; Howarth, I D; Kennedy, M; McEvoy, C; Potter, A T; Ramírez-Agudelo, O H; Sana, H; Simón-Díaz, S; Taylor, W; Vink, J S

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Projected rotational velocities (\\vsini) have been estimated for 334 targets in the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey that do not manifest significant radial velocity variations and are not supergiants. They have spectral types from approximately O9.5 to B3. The estimates have been analysed to infer the underlying rotational velocity distribution, which is critical for understanding the evolution of massive stars. Methods: Projected rotational velocities were deduced from the Fourier transforms of spectral lines, with upper limits also being obtained from profile fitting. For the narrower lined stars, metal and non-diffuse helium lines were adopted, and for the broader lined stars, both non-diffuse and diffuse helium lines; the estimates obtained using the different sets of lines are in good agreement. The uncertainty in the mean estimates is typically 4% for most targets. The iterative deconvolution procedure of Lucy has been used to deduce the probability density distribution of the rotational velocities. R...

  13. Regulation of action potential waveforms by axonal GABAA receptors in cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xia

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb of the main axon trunk of layer -5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors.

  14. Measurements of the Diameter and Velocity Distributions of Atomized Tablet-Coating Solutions for Pharmaceutical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Aliseda, Alberto; Lasheras, Juan

    2009-11-01

    The atomization of colloidal suspensions is of particular interest to the manufacturing of tablets and pills used as drug delivery systems by the pharmaceutical industry. At various stages in the manufacturing process, the tablets are coated with a spray of droplets produced by co-axial atomizers. The mechanisms of droplet size and spray formation in these types of atomizers are dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz and Raleigh-Taylor instabilities for both low[1] and high[2] Ohnesorge numbers. We present detailed phase Doppler measurements of the Sauter Mean Diameter of the droplets produced by co-axial spray atomizers using water-based colloidal suspensions with solid concentrations ranging from fifteen to twenty percent and acetone-based colloidal suspensions with solid concentrations ranging from five to ten percent. Our results compare favorably with predictions by Aliseda's model. This suggests that the final size distribution is mainly determined by the instabilities caused by the sudden acceleration of the liquid interface. [1]Varga, C. M., et al. (2003) J. Fluid Mech. 497:405-434 [2]Aliseda, A. et al. (2008). J. Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 34(2), 161-175.

  15. Time-evolution of the ion velocity distribution function in the discharge of a Hall effect thruster

    CERN Document Server

    Mazouffre, S; Sadeghi, N

    2009-01-01

    The temporal characteristics of the Xe$^+$ ion axial Velocity Distribution Function (VDF) were recorded in the course of low-frequency discharge current oscillations ($\\sim$~14 kHz) of the 5 kW-class PPS$\\circledR$X000 Hall thruster. The evolution in time of the ion axial velocity component is monitored by means of a laser induced fluorescence diagnostic tool with a time resolution of 100 ns. As the number of fluorescence photons is very low during such a short time period, a hom-made pulse-counting lock-in system was used to perform real-time discrimination between background photons and fluorescence photons. The evolution in time of the ion VDF was observed at three locations along the thruster channel axis after a fast shut down of the thruster power. The anode discharge current is switched off at 2 kHz during 5 $\\mu$s without any synchronization with the current oscillation cycle. This approach allows to examine the temporal behavior of the ion VDF during decay and ignition of the discharge as well as dur...

  16. Multi-channel laser Doppler velocimetry using a two-dimensional optical fiber array for obtaining instantaneous velocity distribution characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Yasue, Youichi; Ishida, Hiroki; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Takada, Yogo; Teranishi, Tsunenobu; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) has been developed that is capable of performing two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional measurements. It employs two horizontal laser light sheets that intersect at an angle of 13.3°. Since the intersection region is thin, it can be used to approximately determine the 2D flow field. An 8 × 8 array of optical fibers is used to simultaneously measure Doppler frequencies at 64 points. Experiments were conducted to assess the performance of the LDV, and it was found to be capable of obtaining spatial and temporal velocity information at multiple points in a flow field. The technique is fast, noninvasive, and accurate over long sampling periods. Furthermore, its applicability to an actual flow field was confirmed by measuring the temporal velocity distribution of a pulsatile flow in a rectangular flow channel with an obstruction. The proposed device is thus a useful, compact optical instrument for conducting simultaneous 2D cross-sectional multipoint measurements.

  17. Kinetic transverse dispersion relation for relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, DC 20064 (United States); Muñoz, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, J. Alejandro [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-09-15

    We use a kinetic treatment to study the linear transverse dispersion relation for a magnetized isotropic relativistic electron-positron plasma with finite relativistic temperature. The explicit linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating along a constant background magnetic field is presented, including an analytical continuation to the whole complex frequency plane for the case of Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions. This dispersion relation is studied numerically for various temperatures. For left-handed solutions, the system presents two branches, the electromagnetic ordinary mode and the Alfvén mode. In the low frequency regime, the Alfvén branch has two dispersive zones, the normal zone (where ∂ω/∂k > 0) and an anomalous zone (where ∂ω/∂k < 0). We find that in the anomalous zone of the Alfvén branch, the electromagnetic waves are damped, and there is a maximum wave number for which the Alfvén branch is suppressed. We also study the dependence of the Alfvén velocity and effective plasma frequency with the temperature. We complemented the analytical and numerical approaches with relativistic full particle simulations, which consistently agree with the analytical results.

  18. 3D velocity distribution functions of heavy ions and kinetic properties of fast solar wind O6+ at 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetic properties of the solar wind are a result of complex interactions in the solar corona and interplanetary space. So far, observations of Velocity Distribution Functions (VDFs) of solar wind heavy ions have been solely 1D. They are known to exhibit non-thermal features, but because they are 1D projections of the 3D velocity phase space it is difficult to interpret them properly. We have modeled heavy-ion VDFs based on 3D observations of protons and alpha particles from Helios. In the model, the magnetic field vector plays a crucial role by defining the symmetry axis of the VDFs. A thermal anisotropy T parallel /T perpendicularto ≠1 and a beam drifting along the magnetic field vector at a relative speed of approximately the Alfven speed are included. The modeled VDFs are analysed using a virtual detector and then compared with data from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). Our observations give evidence for the existence of heavy-ion beams. The projection of these beams can explain observed differential streaming. Especially the rare periods of negative differential streaming correspond to periods in which the magnetic field lines are strongly bend no longer pointing towards Earth but towards the Sun. We present in-situ measurements and derived kinetic properties of fast solar wind O6+ at 1 AU.

  19. NIHAO project II: Halo shape, phase-space density and velocity distribution of dark matter in galaxy formation simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Butsky, Iryna; Dutton, Aaron A; Wang, Liang; Stinson, Greg S; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W; Wadsley, James

    2015-01-01

    We show the effect of galaxy formation on the dark matter (DM) distribution across a wide range of halo masses. We focus on how baryon physics changes the dark matter halo shape, the so called "pseudo phase-space density distribution" and the velocity distribution within the virial radius, Rvir and in the solar neighborhood. This study is based on the NIHAO galaxy formation simulations, a large suite of cosmological zoom-in simulations. The galaxies reproduce key properties of observed galaxies, and hence offer unique insight into how baryons change the dark matter morphology and kinematics. When compared to dark matter only simulations, the NIHAO haloes have similar shapes at Rvir, but are substantially rounder inside ~0.1 Rvir. In DM-only simulations the inner halo has a minor-to-major axis ratio of c/a~0.5. In hydro simulations c/a increases with halo mass and integrated star formation efficiency, reaching ~0.8 at the Milky Way mass, reconciling a long-standing conflict between observations and DM only sim...

  20. 4-Velocity distribution function using Maxwell-Boltzmann's original approach and a new form of the relativistic equation of state

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Following the original approach of Maxwell-Boltzmann(MB), we derive a 4-velocity distribution function for the relativistic ideal gas. This distribution function perfectly reduces to original MB distribution in the non-relativistic limit. We express the relativistic equation of state(EOS), $\\rho-\\rho_0=(\\gamma-1)^{-1}p$,\\ in the two equations: $\\rho=\\rho_0 f(\\lambda)$,\\ and $p=\\rho_0 g(\\lambda)$, where $\\lambda$\\ is a parameter related to the kinetic energy, hence the temperature, of the gas. In the both extreme limits, they give correct EOS:\\ $\\rho=3p$\\ in the ultra-relativistic, and\\ $\\rho-\\rho_0=3/2p$ in the non-relativistic regime. Using these equations the adiabatic index $\\gamma$ (=$\\frac{c_p}{c_v}$) and the sound speed $a_s$ are calculated as a function of $\\lambda$. They also satisfy the inequalities: $4/3 \\le \\gamma \\le 5/3$ and $a_s \\le \\frac{1}{\\sqrt{3}}$ perfectly.

  1. Distribution of velocity and turbulent characteristics in coarse-sediment laden flows above erodible plane bed in open channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrostlík, Štěpán; Bareš, Vojtěch; Krupička, Jan; Picek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Václav

    2016-03-01

    Extreme conditions as flash floods in steep mobile-bed streams induce flows which carry a huge amount of sediment. Typically, the flow with the intense transport of sediment is stratified with a layered structure above an erodible plane bed. The paper deals with local flow characteristics in the layered structure of the two-phase flow composed of water and sediment. We present experimental data and results for two different fractions of plastic particles obtained using two acoustic Doppler methods and a Prandtl probe. The results contain vertical profiles of longitudinal velocity component and local turbulent characteristics of the flow as the Reynolds stress and turbulent intensity. The effect of the layered character of the flow on the flow characteristics is discussed. Special attention is paid to the distribution of Reynolds stress in the sediment-rich transport layer above the bed and to the evaluation of ability of carrier turbulent eddies to support sediment grains in and above the transport layer.

  2. Ultra-low kinetic energy photoelectron angular distribution measurements in He and Ne using a Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, A. M.; Redt, E.; Hoenert, M.; Hoyos-Campo, L. M.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Aguilar, A.

    2009-11-01

    We present photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in Helium and Neon for electrons with excess energies between 5 and 100 meV. These ultra-low kinetic energy PAD measurements were obtained with a modified Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer (VMI) and VUV light from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron radiation source. The efficiency and reliability of the spectrometer at this ultra-low kinetic energy range has been tested by determining the variation with energy of the asymmetry, β, parameter of photoelectrons from the s-shell direct ionization in Helium. For Neon, we determined the energy dependent asymmetry parameters across the "s" and "d" autoionizing resonances between the P3/2 and P1/2 ionic states. Furthermore, we measured the asymmetry parameter for photoelectrons produced from the n = 2 to n = 6 satellite states of He. These measurements were performed at values of excess kinetic energy previously unexplored.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of heated wall temperature and velocity distribution in CFD simulations of the upward flow of supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work was to investigate sensitivities of the heated wall temperature and radial velocity distribution predictions on selected model parameters, in water flow under supercritical conditions. The study was focused on cases in which deterioration of heat transfer occurs. Numerical simulations of the turbulent, upward flow in a circular tube were performed using the commercial CFD code ANSYS CFX 12.1. Implementation of water properties was according to IAPWS IF97. The model sensitivities were examined on the mesh discretization, boundary conditions and numerical parameters. Results of simulations were compared with the available experimental data. A significant sensitivity was recognized especially for changes of heat flux and mass flux. It was found out that the model is much less sensitive to changes of boundary conditions for high values of mass flux and heat flux than for low mass and heat fluxes. (author)

  4. Ultra-low kinetic energy photoelectron angular distribution measurements in He and Ne using a Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, A M; Hoyos-Campo, L M [Institute de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Mor. 62210 (Mexico); Redt, E; Hoenert, M; Aguilar, A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA-94720 (United States); Rolles, D [Max Planck Advanced Study Group, CFEL, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Berrah, N, E-mail: aaguilar@lbl.go [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo MI-49008 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We present photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in Helium and Neon for electrons with excess energies between 5 and 100 meV. These ultra-low kinetic energy PAD measurements were obtained with a modified Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer (VMI) and VUV light from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron radiation source. The efficiency and reliability of the spectrometer at this ultra-low kinetic energy range has been tested by determining the variation with energy of the asymmetry, {beta}, parameter of photoelectrons from the s-shell direct ionization in Helium. For Neon, we determined the energy dependent asymmetry parameters across the 's' and 'd' autoionizing resonances between the P{sub 3/2} and P{sub 1/2} ionic states. Furthermore, we measured the asymmetry parameter for photoelectrons produced from the n = 2 to n = 6 satellite states of He. These measurements were performed at values of excess kinetic energy previously unexplored.

  5. The Effects of Sub-Regional Climate Velocity on the Distribution and Spatial Extent of Marine Species Assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Kleisner

    Full Text Available Many studies illustrate variable patterns in individual species distribution shifts in response to changing temperature. However, an assemblage, a group of species that shares a common environmental niche, will likely exhibit similar responses to climate changes, and these community-level responses may have significant implications for ecosystem function. Therefore, we examine the relationship between observed shifts of species in assemblages and regional climate velocity (i.e., the rate and direction of change of temperature isotherms. The assemblages are defined in two sub-regions of the U.S. Northeast Shelf that have heterogeneous oceanography and bathymetry using four decades of bottom trawl survey data and we explore temporal changes in distribution, spatial range extent, thermal habitat area, and biomass, within assemblages. These sub-regional analyses allow the dissection of the relative roles of regional climate velocity and local physiography in shaping observed distribution shifts. We find that assemblages of species associated with shallower, warmer waters tend to shift west-southwest and to shallower waters over time, possibly towards cooler temperatures in the semi-enclosed Gulf of Maine, while species assemblages associated with relatively cooler and deeper waters shift deeper, but with little latitudinal change. Conversely, species assemblages associated with warmer and shallower water on the broad, shallow continental shelf from the Mid-Atlantic Bight to Georges Bank shift strongly northeast along latitudinal gradients with little change in depth. Shifts in depth among the southern species associated with deeper and cooler waters are more variable, although predominantly shifts are toward deeper waters. In addition, spatial expansion and contraction of species assemblages in each region corresponds to the area of suitable thermal habitat, but is inversely related to assemblage biomass. This suggests that assemblage distribution

  6. The Effects of Sub-Regional Climate Velocity on the Distribution and Spatial Extent of Marine Species Assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleisner, Kristin M; Fogarty, Michael J; McGee, Sally; Barnett, Analie; Fratantoni, Paula; Greene, Jennifer; Hare, Jonathan A; Lucey, Sean M; McGuire, Christopher; Odell, Jay; Saba, Vincent S; Smith, Laurel; Weaver, Katherine J; Pinsky, Malin L

    2016-01-01

    Many studies illustrate variable patterns in individual species distribution shifts in response to changing temperature. However, an assemblage, a group of species that shares a common environmental niche, will likely exhibit similar responses to climate changes, and these community-level responses may have significant implications for ecosystem function. Therefore, we examine the relationship between observed shifts of species in assemblages and regional climate velocity (i.e., the rate and direction of change of temperature isotherms). The assemblages are defined in two sub-regions of the U.S. Northeast Shelf that have heterogeneous oceanography and bathymetry using four decades of bottom trawl survey data and we explore temporal changes in distribution, spatial range extent, thermal habitat area, and biomass, within assemblages. These sub-regional analyses allow the dissection of the relative roles of regional climate velocity and local physiography in shaping observed distribution shifts. We find that assemblages of species associated with shallower, warmer waters tend to shift west-southwest and to shallower waters over time, possibly towards cooler temperatures in the semi-enclosed Gulf of Maine, while species assemblages associated with relatively cooler and deeper waters shift deeper, but with little latitudinal change. Conversely, species assemblages associated with warmer and shallower water on the broad, shallow continental shelf from the Mid-Atlantic Bight to Georges Bank shift strongly northeast along latitudinal gradients with little change in depth. Shifts in depth among the southern species associated with deeper and cooler waters are more variable, although predominantly shifts are toward deeper waters. In addition, spatial expansion and contraction of species assemblages in each region corresponds to the area of suitable thermal habitat, but is inversely related to assemblage biomass. This suggests that assemblage distribution shifts in

  7. 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves in a biotite gneiss, measured in oil as the pressure medium: Comparison with velocity measurements in a multi-anvil pressure apparatus and with texture-based calculated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokajíček, T.; Kern, H.; Svitek, T.; Ivankina, T.

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic measurements of the 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves were performed on a spherical sample of a biotite gneiss from the Outokumpu scientific drill hole. Measurements were done at room temperature and pressures up to 400 and 70 MPa, respectively, in a pressure vessel with oil as a pressure medium. A modified transducer/sample assembly and the installation of a new mechanical system allowed simultaneous measurements of P- and S-wave velocities in 132 independent directions of the sphere on a net in steps of 15°. Proper signals for P- and S-waves could be recorded by coating the sample surface with a high-viscosity shear wave gel and by temporal point contacting of the transmitter and receiver transducers with the sample surface during the measurements. The 3D seismic measurements revealed a strong foliation-related directional dependence (anisotropy) of P- and S-wave velocities, which is confirmed by measurements in a multi-anvil apparatus on a cube-shaped specimen of the same rock. Both experimental approaches show a marked pressure sensitivity of P- and S-wave velocities and velocity anisotropies. With increasing pressure, P- and S-wave velocities increase non-linearly due to progressive closure of micro-cracks. The reverse is true for velocity anisotropy. 3D velocity calculations based on neutron diffraction measurements of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of major minerals show that the intrinsic bulk anisotropy is basically caused by the CPO of biotite constituting about 23 vol.% of the rock. Including the shape of biotite grains and oriented low-aspect ratio microcracks into the modelling increases bulk anisotropy. An important finding from this study is that the measurements on the sample sphere and on the sample cube displayed distinct differences, particularly in shear wave velocities. It is assumed that the differences are due to the different geometries of the samples and the configuration of the transducer-sample assembly

  8. Phase mixing due to the Galactic potential: steps in the position and velocity distributions of popped star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Candlish, G N; Fellhauer, M; Gibson, B K; Kroupa, P; Assmann, P

    2013-01-01

    As star clusters are expected to form with low star formation efficiencies, the gas in the cluster is expelled quickly and early in their development: the star cluster "pops." This leads to an unbound stellar system, evolving in the Galactic potential. Previous N-body simulations have demonstrated the existence of a stepped number density distribution of cluster stars after popping, both in vertical position and vertical velocity, with a passing resemblance to a Christmas tree. Using numerical and analytical methods, we investigate the source of this structure, which arises due to the phase mixing of the out-of-equilibrium stellar system, determined entirely by the background analytic potential. Considering only the vertical motions, we construct a theoretical model to describe the time evolution of the phase space distribution of stars in a Miyamoto-Nagai disk potential and a full Milky-Way type potential comprising bulge, halo and disk components, which is then compared with N-body simulations. Using our th...

  9. Structure of the velocity distribution of sheath-accelerated secondary electrons in an asymmetric RF-dc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrabrov, Alexander V.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Ranjan, Alok; Chen, Lee

    2015-10-01

    Low-pressure capacitively-coupled discharges with additional dc bias applied to a separate electrode are utilized in plasma-assisted etching for semiconductor device manufacturing. Measurements of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) of the flux impinging on the wafer, as well as in the plasma bulk, show a thermal population and additional peaks within a broad range of energies. That range extends from the thermal level up to the value for the ‘ballistic’ peak, corresponding to the bias potential. The non-thermal electron flux has been correlated to alleviating the electron shading effect and providing etch-resistance properties to masking photoresist layers. ‘Middle-energy peak electrons’ at energies of several hundred eV may provide an additional sustaining mechanism for the discharge. These features in the electron velocity (or energy) distribution functions are possibly caused by secondary electrons emitted from the electrodes and interacting with two high-voltage sheaths: a stationary sheath at the dc electrode and an oscillating self-biased sheath at the powered electrode. Since at those energies the mean free path for large-angle scattering (momentum relaxation length) is comparable to, or exceeds the size of the discharge gap, these ‘ballistic’ electrons will not be fully scattered by the background gas as they traverse the inter-electrode space. We have performed test-particle simulations in which the features in the EVDF of electrons impacting the RF electrode are fully resolved at all energies. An analytical model has been developed to predict existence of peaked and step-like structures in the EVDF. Those features can be explained by analyzing the kinematics of electron trajectories in the discharge gap. Step-like structures in the EVDF near the powered electrode appear due to accumulation of electrons emitted from the dc electrode within a portion of the RF cycle, and their subsequent release. Trapping occurs when the RF

  10. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. X. Evidence for a bimodal distribution of rotational velocities for the single early B-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufton, P. L.; Langer, N.; Dunstall, P. R.; Evans, C. J.; Brott, I.; de Mink, S. E.; Howarth, I. D.; Kennedy, M.; McEvoy, C.; Potter, A. T.; Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Taylor, W.; Vink, J. S.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: Projected rotational velocities (vesini) have been estimated for 334 targets in the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey that do not manifest significant radial velocity variations and are not supergiants. They have spectral types from approximately O9.5 to B3. The estimates have been analysed to infer the underlying rotational velocity distribution, which is critical for understanding the evolution of massive stars. Methods: Projected rotational velocities were deduced from the Fourier transforms of spectral lines, with upper limits also being obtained from profile fitting. For the narrower lined stars, metal and non-diffuse helium lines were adopted, and for the broader lined stars, both non-diffuse and diffuse helium lines; the estimates obtained using the different sets of lines are in good agreement. The uncertainty in the mean estimates is typically 4% for most targets. The iterative deconvolution procedure of Lucy has been used to deduce the probability density distribution of the rotational velocities. Results: Projected rotational velocities range up to approximately 450 km s-1 and show a bi-modal structure. This is also present in the inferred rotational velocity distribution with 25% of the sample having 0 ≤ ve ≤ 100 km s-1 and the high velocity component having ve ~ 250 km s-1. There is no evidence from the spatial and radial velocity distributions of the two components that they represent either field and cluster populations or different episodes of star formation. Be-type stars have also been identified. Conclusions: The bi-modal rotational velocity distribution in our sample resembles that found for late-B and early-A type stars. While magnetic braking appears to be a possible mechanism for producing the low-velocity component, we can not rule out alternative explanations. Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/550/A109

  11. Axon density and axon orientation dispersion in children born preterm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, Claire E.; Thompson, Deanne K.; Chen, Jian; Leemans, Alexander; Adamson, Christopher L.; Inder, Terrie E.; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Doyle, Lex W.; Anderson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Very preterm birth (VPT, <32 weeks' gestation) is associated with altered white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), the biological basis of which is uncertain but may relate to changes in axon density and/or dispersion, which can be measured using Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density

  12. Outsourcing CREB translation to axons to survive

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Andrew C; Holt, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    Nerve growth factor induces sensory neuron survival via retrograde signalling from the axon to the cell body. Local translation of the transcription factor CREB in the axon, followed by its transport to the nucleus, is involved in this process.

  13. Involvement of SARA in Axon and Dendrite Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Cristina Isabel; Siri, Sebastián Omar; Conde, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    SARA (Smad Anchor for Receptor Activation) plays a crucial role in Rab5-mediated endocytosis in cell lines localizing to early endosomes where it regulates morphology and function. Here, we analyzed the role of SARA during neuronal development and tested whether it functions as a regulator of endocytic trafficking of selected axonal and membrane proteins. Suppression of SARA perturbs the appearance of juxtanuclear endocytic recycling compartments and the neurons show long axons with large growth cones. Furthermore, surface distribution of the cell adhesion molecule L1 in axons and the fusion of vesicles containing transferring receptor (TfR) in dendrites were increased in neurons where SARA was silenced. Conversely, SARA overexpression generated large early endosomes and reduced neurite outgrowth. Taken together, our findings suggest a significant contribution of SARA to key aspects of neuronal development, including neurite formation. PMID:26405814

  14. Axonal change in minor head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povlishock, J T; Becker, D P; Cheng, C L; Vaughan, G W

    1983-05-01

    Anterograde axonal transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in selected cerebral and cerebellar efferents was studied in cats subjected to minor head injury. After trauma, the animals were allowed to survive from one to 24 hours, when they were perfused with aldehydes and processed for the light and electron microscopic visualization of the peroxidase reaction product. By light microscopy, the brain injury elicited an initial intra-axonal peroxidase pooling. With longer post-traumatic survival, HRP pooling increased in size, demonstrated frequent lobulation, and ultimately formed large ball- or club-like swellings which suggested frank axonal separation from the distal axonal segment. Ultrastructural examination revealed that the initial intra-axonal peroxidase pooling was associated with organelle accumulation which occurred without any other form of axonal change or related parenchymal or vascular damage. This accumulation of organelles increased with time and was associated with conspicuous axonal swelling. Ultimately these organelle-laden swellings lost continuity with the distal axonal segment and the axonal swelling was either completely invested by a thin myelin sheath or protruded without myelin investment into the brain parenchyma. This study suggests that axonal change is a consistent feature of minor head injury. Since these axonal changes occurred without any evidence of focal parenchymal or vascular damage, minor brain injury may ultimately disrupt axons without physically shearing or tearing them. PMID:6188807

  15. TEGENA: Detailed experimental investigations of temperature and velocity distributions in rod bundle geometries with turbulent sodium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise knowlege of the velocity and temperature distributions is necessary in fuel element design (rod bundles with longitudinal flow). The detail codes required in the fine analysis of non-uniformly cooled bundle zones are presently at the stage of development. In order to verify these computer codes, the mean fluid temperatures and the related RMS values of the temperature fluctuations were measured in a heated bundle, TEGENA, containing four rods arranged in one row (P/D = W/D = 1.147) with sodium cooling (Pr≅0.005). The temperature distribution in the structures was determined as the necessary boundary condition for the temperature profiles in the fluid. The experiments were carried out with different types of heating (uniform load and flux tilting) and the flow conditions were varied in the ranges 4000≤Re≤76,000; 20≤Pe≤400. The essential processes of thermal development took place under uniform load within a heated bundle length of about 100 hydraulic diameters. In the main measuring plane at the end of the heated zone, after 200 hydraulic diameters, the flow can be termed largely developed thermally. There, the temperature profiles measured in the fluid exhibit pronounced maxima in the narrowest gaps of the subchannels as well as pronounced minima in the centers of the subchannels at the unheated wall. In the zones of maximum temperature gradients the temperature fluctuations attain maximum and minimum values, respectively, at the points of disappearance of the temperature gradients. In all cases of flux tilting investigated the flow at the end of the heated zone had not yet developed thermally. (orig.)

  16. Distribution of velocity and turbulent characteristics in coarse-sediment laden flows above erodible plane bed in open channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrostlík Štěpán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme conditions as flash floods in steep mobile-bed streams induce flows which carry a huge amount of sediment. Typically, the flow with the intense transport of sediment is stratified with a layered structure above an erodible plane bed. The paper deals with local flow characteristics in the layered structure of the two-phase flow composed of water and sediment. We present experimental data and results for two different fractions of plastic particles obtained using two acoustic Doppler methods and a Prandtl probe. The results contain vertical profiles of longitudinal velocity component and local turbulent characteristics of the flow as the Reynolds stress and turbulent intensity. The effect of the layered character of the flow on the flow characteristics is discussed. Special attention is paid to the distribution of Reynolds stress in the sediment-rich transport layer above the bed and to the evaluation of ability of carrier turbulent eddies to support sediment grains in and above the transport layer.

  17. The Origin of Non-Maxwellian Solar Wind Electron Velocity Distribution Function: Connection to Nanoflares in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Che, H

    2014-01-01

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this letter based on the current knowledge of nanoflares we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfv\\'en wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This rel...

  18. Gogo receptor contributes to retinotopic map formation and prevents R1-6 photoreceptor axon bundling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Hein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topographic maps form the basis of neural processing in sensory systems of both vertebrate and invertebrate species. In the Drosophila visual system, neighboring R1-R6 photoreceptor axons innervate adjacent positions in the first optic ganglion, the lamina, and thereby represent visual space as a continuous map in the brain. The mechanisms responsible for the establishment of retinotopic maps remain incompletely understood. RESULTS: Here, we show that the receptor Golden goal (Gogo is required for R axon lamina targeting and cartridge elongation in a partially redundant fashion with local guidance cues provided by neighboring axons. Loss of function of Gogo in large clones of R axons results in aberrant R1-R6 fascicle spacing. Gogo affects target cartridge selection only indirectly as a consequence of the disordered lamina map. Interestingly, small clones of gogo deficient R axons perfectly integrate into a proper retinotopic map suggesting that surrounding R axons of the same or neighboring fascicles provide complementary spatial guidance. Using single photoreceptor type rescue, we show that Gogo expression exclusively in R8 cells is sufficient to mediate targeting of all photoreceptor types in the lamina. Upon lamina targeting and cartridge selection, R axons elongate within their individual cartridges. Interestingly, here Gogo prevents bundling of extending R1-6 axons. CONCLUSION: Taken together, we propose that Gogo contributes to retinotopic map formation in the Drosophila lamina by controlling the distribution of R1-R6 axon fascicles. In a later developmental step, the regular position of R1-R6 axons along the lamina plexus is crucial for target cartridge selection. During cartridge elongation, Gogo allows R1-R6 axons to extend centrally in the lamina cartridge.

  19. Comparison of 1D PDA sampling methods to obtain drop size and velocity distributions inside a spray cone of agricultural nozzles

    OpenAIRE

    Holterman, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    In agriculture, spray drift research is carried out in field experiments and by computer simulation. Regarding the latter approach, accurate knowledge of the initial spray is required. Not only is the overall drop size distribution of the spray an important factor in the spraying process, but also its local variation within the spray cone below a nozzle. Furthermore, the velocity distribution of drops in the spray cone has to be considered, which is a function of drop size and location in the...

  20. Angular and velocity distributions of secondary particles emitted in interaction of 3. 6-GeV/nucleon. cap alpha. particles and lead nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonenko, V.G.; Vinogradov, A.A.; Galitskii, V.M.; Grigor' yan, Y.I.; Ippolitov, M.S.; Karadzhev, K.V.; Kuz' min, E.A.; Man' ko, V.I.; Ogloblin, A.A.; Paramonov, V.V.; Tsvetkov, A.A.

    1980-04-01

    The technique is described and results presented of measurements of the velocity and angular distributions of pions, protons, and deuterons, and tritons emitted in bombardment of lead nuclei by ..cap alpha.. particles with energy 3.6 GeV/nucleon.

  1. Crossed laser and molecular beam study of multiphoton dissociation of C/sub 2/F/sub 5/Cl. [Rate constants, angular and velocity distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajnovich, D.J.; Giardini-Guidoni, A.; Sudboe, A.S.; Schulz, P.A.; Shen, Y.R.; Lee, Y.T.

    1978-09-01

    Rate constants for the photodissociation of C/sub 2/F/sub 5/Cl as well as the yield of C/sub 2/F/sub 4//sup +/ were measured. The dynamics of the two dissociation channels was studied by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of the products. 2 references. (JFP)

  2. Angular and velocity distributions of small cluster fragments in neutral (NH{sub 3}){sub n} scattering off LiF(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, C.; Zacharias, H. [Physikalisches Institut, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Baumfalk, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Stroemungsforschung, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany)

    1998-12-15

    The scattering of neutral ammonia clusters off a LiF(100) surface is studied. A supersonic expansion of ammonia and ammonia seeded in Kr and He produces clusters of various sizes but uniform kinetic energies of 176, 57 and 285 meV per monomer molecule, respectively. The mass distribution of scattered particles is measured in a reflecting time-of-flight mass spectrometer using single-photon photoionization with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser radiation at {lambda}=118 nm (h{nu}=10.49 eV). While in the incident beam (NH{sub 3}){sub n} clusters up to n=65 can be detected, the mass spectrum of the scattered particles is dominated by NH{sub 3}{sup +}, and only a few small clusters are found. Angular distributions of these fragments show that the maximum of the scattered intensity shifts to greater detection angles for increasing fragment mass. Velocity distributions of released monomers are measured for all three cluster beams and found to be independent of the impact velocity of the clusters. The velocity distributions of scattered fragments larger than NH{sub 3}{sup +} show a decreasing width with increasing fragment size and a most probable velocity slightly higher than that of the monomer molecules. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this Letter, based on the current knowledge of nanoflares, we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfvén wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This relation can be extended to the more general core-halo-strahl feature in the solar wind. The temperature ratio between the core and hot components is nearly independent of the heliospheric distance to the Sun. We show that the core-halo relative drift previously reported is a relic of the fully saturated two-stream instability. Our theoretical results are consistent with the observations while new tests for this model are provided.

  4. A model of fasciculation and sorting in mixed populations of axons

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Debasish; Zapotocky, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We extend a recently proposed model (Chaudhuri et al., EPL 87, 20003 (2009)), aiming to describe the formation of fascicles of axons during neural development. The growing axons are represented as paths of interacting directed random walkers in two spatial dimensions. To mimic turnover of axons, whole paths are removed and new walkers are injected with specified rates. In the simplest version of the model, we use strongly adhesive inter-axon interactions that are identical for all pairs of axons. We generalize the model to interactions of finite strengths and to multiple types of axons with type-specific interactions. The dynamic steady state is characterized by the position-dependent distribution of fascicle sizes. With distance in the direction of axon growth, the mean fascicle size and emergent time scales grow monotonically, while the degree of sorting of fascicles by axon type has a maximum at a finite distance. To understand the emergence of slow time scales, we develop an analytical framework to analyz...

  5. Characteristics of velocity distribution functions and entry mechanisms of protons in the near-lunar wake from SWIM/SARA on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanya, M. B.; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Holmström, Mats; Bhardwaj, Anil; Wurz, Peter; Alok, Abhinaw; Futaana, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Moon is an airless body with no global magnetic field, although regions of crustal magnetic fields known as magnetic anomalies exist on Moon. Solar wind, the magnetized plasma flow from the Sun, continuously impinges on Moon. Due to the high absorption of solar wind plasma on the lunar dayside, a large scale wake structure is formed downstream of the Moon. However, recent in-situ observations have revealed the presence of protons in the near-lunar wake (100 km to 200 km from the surface). The source of these protons have been found to be the solar wind that enter the wake either directly or after interaction with the lunar surface or with the magnetic anomalies. Using the entire data from the SWIM sensor, which was an ion-mass analyzer, of the SARA experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1, the characteristics of velocity distribution of these protons were investigated to understand the entry mechanisms to near lunar wake. The velocity distribution functions were computed in the two dimensional velocity space, namely in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the IMF (v_allel and v_perp) in the solar wind rest frame. Several proton populations were identified from the velocity distribution and their possible entry mechanism were inferred based on the characteristics of the velocity distribution. These entry mechanisms include (i) diffusion of solar wind protons into the wake along IMF, (ii) the solar wind protons with finite gyro-radii that are aided by the wake boundary electric field, (iii) solar wind protons with gyro-radii larger than lunar radii from the tail of the solar wind velocity distribution, and (iv) scattering of solar wind protons from the dayside lunar surface or from magnetic anomalies. In order to gain more insight into the entry mechanisms associated with different populations, the trajectories of the protons were computed backward in time (backtracing) for each of these populations. For most of the populations, the source mechanism obtained from

  6. Measurement of oil volume fraction and velocity distributions in vertical oil-in-water flows using ERT and a local probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua; WANG Mi; WU Ying-xiang; MA Yi-xin; WILLIAMS Richard

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the use of a high performance dual-plane electrical resistance tomography (ERT) system and a local dual-sensor conductance probe to measure the vertical upward oil-in-water pipe flows in which the mean oil volume fraction is up to 23.1%.A sensitivity coefficient back-projection (SBP) algorithm was adopted to reconstruct the flow distributions and a cross correlation method was applied to obtain the oil velocity distributions. The oil volume fraction and velocity distributions obtained from both measurement techniques were compared and good agreement was found, which indicates that the ERT technique can be used to measure the low fraction oil-water flows. Finally, the factors affecting measurement precision were discussed.

  7. Injury predictors for traumatic axonal injury in a rodent head impact acceleration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M

    2011-11-01

    A modified Marmarou impact acceleration injury model was developed to study the kinematics of the rat head to quantify traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in the corpus callosum (CC) and brainstem pyramidal tract (Py), to determine injury predictors and to establish injury thresholds for severe TAI. Thirty-one anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 grams) were impacted using a modified impact acceleration injury device from 2.25 m and 1.25 m heights. Beta-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry was used to assess and quantify axonal changes in CC and Py. Over 600 injury maps in CC and Py were constructed in the 31 impacted rats. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction in CC and Py was determined. Linear and angular responses of the rat head were monitored and measured in vivo with an attached accelerometer and angular rate sensor, and were correlated to TAI data. Logistic regression analysis suggested that the occurrence of severe TAI in CC was best predicted by average linear acceleration, followed by power and time to surface righting. The combination of average linear acceleration and time to surface righting showed an improved predictive result. In Py, severe TAI was best predicted by time to surface righting, followed by peak and average angular velocity. When both CC and Py were combined, power was the best predictor, and the combined average linear acceleration and average angular velocity was also found to have good injury predictive ability. Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to assess the predictive power of individual and paired injury predictors. TAI tolerance curves were also proposed in this study. PMID:22869303

  8. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  9. Measurements of water distributions in in-plane direction of a PEFC by using neutron radiography and analysis of gas-velocity distributions in the channel and the GDL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visualization and measurement of water distributions in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) were carried out by means of neutron radiography for clarifying water effects on the performances. The two-dimensional water distributions were applied for a network model. It analyzes the gas-velocity distributions depending on the local pressure drop which is affected by the gas-flow rate and the water accumulation. Formation of the accumulated water in the channel was assumed based on measurement results of water distributions in through-plane direction. Furthermore, it was estimated that maximum water accumulation in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and mechanism of water discharge from the GDL to the channel. From the analysis results, change of gas-velocity distributions depending on the water accumulation in the PEFC could be obtained. (author)

  10. On the Pressure Drop and the Velocity Distribution in the Cylindrical Vortex Chamber with Two Inlet Pipes for the Control of Vortex Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira OGAWA; Tutomu OONO; Hayato OKABE; Noriaki AKIBA; Taketo OOYAGI

    2005-01-01

    @@ Vortex flow is applied to a cyclone dust collector, a vortex combustion chamber, and a vortex diode for vortex control. In order to apply the vortex flow to the industries, it is necessary to keep the stable flow condition and to estimate the response time of the transient flow process and also the intensity of the vortex flow. For control vortex flow, two types of vortex chamber with two inlet pipes were designed. One of them is to promote the vortex flow named as Co-Rotating Flow System and another one is to hinder the vortex flow named as Counter-Rotating Flow System. The pressure drops and the velocity distributions were measured for these vortex chambers. The estimation of the tangential velocity by the application of the angular momentum flux is compared with the measured velocity by a cylindrical Pitot-tube. The characteristics of the total pressure drop could be explained by introducing the circulation.

  11. Variation of the neurofilament medium KSP repeat sub-domain across mammalian species: implications for altering axonal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, D M; Carpenter, C; Yager, C; Golik, B; Barry, K J; Shen, H; Mikse, O; Eggert, L S; Schulz, D J; Garcia, M L

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of larger mammals resulted in a corresponding increase in peripheral nerve length. To ensure optimal nervous system functionality and survival, nerve conduction velocities were likely to have increased to maintain the rate of signal propagation. Increases of conduction velocities may have required alterations in one of the two predominant properties that affect the speed of neuronal transmission: myelination or axonal diameter. A plausible mechanism to explain faster conduction velocities was a concomitant increase in axonal diameter with evolving axonal length. The carboxy terminal tail domain of the neurofilament medium subunit is a determinant of axonal diameter in large caliber myelinated axons. Sequence analysis of mammalian orthologs indicates that the neurofilament medium carboxy terminal tail contains a variable lysine-serine-proline (KSP) repeat sub-domain flanked by two highly conserved sub-domains. The number of KSP repeats within this region of neurofilament medium varies among species. Interestingly, the number of repeats does not change within a species, suggesting that selective pressure conserved the number of repeats within a species. Mapping KSP repeat numbers onto consensus phylogenetic trees reveals independent KSP expansion events across several mammalian clades. Linear regression analyses identified three subsets of mammals, one of which shows a positive correlation in the number of repeats with head-body length. For this subset of mammals, we hypothesize that variations in the number of KSP repeats within neurofilament medium carboxy terminal tail may have contributed to an increase in axonal caliber, increasing nerve conduction velocity as larger mammals evolved. PMID:20008369

  12. Traction Force and Tension Fluctuations During Axon Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamison ePolackwich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Actively generated mechanical forces play a central role in axon growthand guidance, but the mechanisms that underly force generation andregulation in growing axons remain poorly understood. We reportmeasurements of the dynamics of traction stresses from growth cones ofactively advancing axons from postnatal rat DRG neurons. By tracking themovement of the growth cone and analyzing the traction stress field froma reference frame that moves with it, we are able to show that there isa clear and consistent average stress field that underlies the complexspatial stresses present at any one time. The average stress field hasstrong maxima on the sides of the growth cone, directed inward towardthe growth cone neck. This pattern represents a contractile stresscontained within the growth cone, and a net force that is balanced bythe axon tension. Using high time-resolution measurements of the growthcone traction stresses, we show that the stress field is composed offluctuating local stress peaks, with a large number peaks that live fora short time, a population of peaks whose lifetime distribution followsan exponential decay, and a small number of very long-lived peaks. Weshow that the high time-resolution data also reveal that the tensionappears to vary randomly over short time scales, roughly consistent withthe lifetime of the stress peaks, suggesting that the tensionfluctuations originate from stochastic adhesion dynamics.

  13. Quantitative measurements and modeling of cargo–motor interactions during fast transport in the living axon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinesins have long been known to drive microtubule-based transport of sub-cellular components, yet the mechanisms of their attachment to cargo remain a mystery. Several different cargo-receptors have been proposed based on their in vitro binding affinities to kinesin-1. Only two of these—phosphatidyl inositol, a negatively charged lipid, and the carboxyl terminus of the amyloid precursor protein (APP-C), a trans-membrane protein—have been reported to mediate motility in living systems. A major question is how these many different cargo, receptors and motors interact to produce the complex choreography of vesicular transport within living cells. Here we describe an experimental assay that identifies cargo–motor receptors by their ability to recruit active motors and drive transport of exogenous cargo towards the synapse in living axons. Cargo is engineered by derivatizing the surface of polystyrene fluorescent nanospheres (100 nm diameter) with charged residues or with synthetic peptides derived from candidate motor receptor proteins, all designed to display a terminal COOH group. After injection into the squid giant axon, particle movements are imaged by laser-scanning confocal time-lapse microscopy. In this report we compare the motility of negatively charged beads with APP-C beads in the presence of glycine-conjugated non-motile beads using new strategies to measure bead movements. The ensuing quantitative analysis of time-lapse digital sequences reveals detailed information about bead movements: instantaneous and maximum velocities, run lengths, pause frequencies and pause durations. These measurements provide parameters for a mathematical model that predicts the spatiotemporal evolution of distribution of the two different types of bead cargo in the axon. The results reveal that negatively charged beads differ from APP-C beads in velocity and dispersion, and predict that at long time points APP-C will achieve greater progress towards the presynaptic

  14. The Statistical Distribution of Turbulence Driven Velocity Extremes in the Atmosperic Boundary Layer cartwright/Longuet-Higgins Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2007-01-01

    " distribution, Cartwright and Longuet-Higgens [1] derived an asymptotic expression for the distribution of the largest excursion from the mean level during an arbitrary recurrence period. From its inception, this celebrated expression has been widely used in wind engineering (as well as in off-shore engineering...... on the expence of an acceptable distribution fit in the data population regime of small to medium excursions which, however, for an extreme investigation is unimportant. Further, the derived asymptotic distribution is shown to equal a Gumbel EV1 distribution, and the two distribution parameters are expressed...

  15. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .2. STATISTICAL-ANALYSIS OF THE WHOLE-SKY SURVEY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP

    1991-01-01

    A sensitive, almost complete, whole-sky survey of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) has been made available by Bajaja et al. (1985) and Hulsbosch & Wakker (1988, Paper I). This paper (Paper II in a series on HVCs) is dedicated to the analysis of the statistical properties of these surveys. The main conclu

  16. Role of unsteady mechanisms in maintaining a nonuniform angular-velocity distribution through the depth of the solar convection zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zherbina, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    Unsteady rotation of a viscous convective layer with friction at its lower boundary is analyzed. Such friction is shown to be capable of maintaining a radial dependence of angular velocity for a long time. It is found, however, that this mechanism cannot be the cause of the sun's equatorial acceleration.

  17. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  18. a Study of Liquid - of Atomization Droplet Size Velocity and Temperature Distribution via Information Theory Spray Interaction with Ambient Air Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianguo

    Linear temporal instability analysis of a moving thin viscous liquid sheet of uniform thickness in an inviscid gas medium shows that surface tension always opposes, while surrounding gas and relative velocity between the sheet and gas favour the onset and development of instability. For gas Weber number smaller than the density ratio of gas to liquid, liquid viscosity enhances instability; If gas Weber number is slightly larger, aerodynamic and viscosity -induced instabilities interact with each other, displaying complicated effects of viscosity via Ohnesorge number; For much larger values of gas Weber numbers, aerodynamic instability dominates, liquid viscosity reduces disturbance growth rate and increases the dominant wavelength. Droplet probability distribution function (PDF) in sprays is formulated through information theory without resorting to the details of atomization processes. The derived analytical droplet size PDF is Nukiyama-Tanasawa type if conservation of mass is considered alone. If conservation of mass, momentum and energy is all taken into account, the joint droplet size and velocity PDF depends on Weber number, and compares favourably with measurements. Droplet velocity PDF is truncated Gaussian for any specific droplet size. Mean velocity approaches a constant value and velocity variance decreases as droplet size increases. Mean droplet diameters calculated agree well with observations. The computation indicates that atomization efficiency is very low, usually less than 1%. Droplet size, velocity and temperature PDF in sprays under combusting environment has also been derived. Effects of combustion on PDF occur mainly through the heat transferred into liquid sheet prior to its breakup. Experimental studies identify three modes of spray behaviours due to its interaction with various annular air flows, and show that bluff-body type of combustor has ability and easement to control aerodynamically spray angle, shape and droplet trajectories. It is

  19. Neurofilament spacing, phosphorylation, and axon diameter in regenerating and uninjured lamprey axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijak, D S; Hall, G F; Tenicki, P J; Boulos, A S; Lurie, D I; Selzer, M E

    1996-05-13

    It has been postulated that phosphorylation of the carboxy terminus sidearms of neurofilaments (NFs) increases axon diameter through repulsive electrostatic forces that increase sidearm extension and interfilament spacing. To evaluate this hypothesis, the relationships among NF phosphorylation, NF spacing, and axon diameter were examined in uninjured and spinal cord-transected larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus). In untransected animals, axon diameters in the spinal cord varied from 0.5 to 50 microns. Antibodies specific for highly phosphorylated NFs labeled only large axons (> 10 microns), whereas antibodies for lightly phosphorylated NFs labeled medium-sized and small axons more darkly than large axons. For most axons in untransected animals, diameter was inversely related to NF packing density, but the interfilament distances of the largest axons were only 1.5 times those of the smallest axons. In addition, the lightly phosphorylated NFs of the small axons in the dorsal columns were widely spaced, suggesting that phosphorylation of NFs does not rigidly determine their spacing and that NF spacing does not rigidly determine axon diameter. Regenerating neurites of giant reticulospinal axons (GRAs) have diameters only 5-10% of those of their parent axons. If axon caliber is controlled by NF phosphorylation via mutual electrostatic repulsion, then NFs in the slender regenerating neurites should be lightly phosphorylated and densely packed (similar to NFs in uninjured small caliber axons), whereas NFs in the parent GRAs should be highly phosphorylated and loosely packed. However, although linear density of NFs (the number of NFs per micrometer) in these slender regenerating neurites was twice that in their parent axons, they were highly phosphorylated. Following sectioning of these same axons close to the cell body, axon-like neurites regenerated ectopically from dendritic tips. These ectopically regenerating neurites had NF linear densities 2.5 times those of

  20. Bergmann glia and the recognition molecule CHL1 organize GABAergic axons and direct innervation of Purkinje cell dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Ango

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The geometric and subcellular organization of axon arbors distributes and regulates electrical signaling in neurons and networks, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In rodent cerebellar cortex, stellate interneurons elaborate characteristic axon arbors that selectively innervate Purkinje cell dendrites and likely regulate dendritic integration. We used GFP BAC transgenic reporter mice to examine the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of stellate cell axons and their innervation pattern. We show that stellate axons are organized and guided towards Purkinje cell dendrites by an intermediate scaffold of Bergmann glial (BG fibers. The L1 family immunoglobulin protein Close Homologue of L1 (CHL1 is localized to apical BG fibers and stellate cells during the development of stellate axon arbors. In the absence of CHL1, stellate axons deviate from BG fibers and show aberrant branching and orientation. Furthermore, synapse formation between aberrant stellate axons and Purkinje dendrites is reduced and cannot be maintained, leading to progressive atrophy of axon terminals. These results establish BG fibers as a guiding scaffold and CHL1 a molecular signal in the organization of stellate axon arbors and in directing their dendritic innervation.

  1. Neuronal Development: SAD Kinases Make Happy Axons

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Lei; Newbern, Jason M.; Snider, William D

    2013-01-01

    The polarity proteins LKB1 and SAD-A/B are key regulators of axon specification in the developing cerebral cortex. Recent studies now show that this mechanism cannot be generalized to other classes of neurons: instead, SAD-A/B functions downstream of neurotrophin signaling in sensory neurons to mediate a later stage of axon development — arborization in the target field.

  2. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in wat

  3. Wnt Signalling Promotes Actin Dynamics during Axon Remodelling through the Actin-Binding Protein Eps8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanna Stamatakou

    Full Text Available Upon arrival at their synaptic targets, axons slow down their growth and extensively remodel before the assembly of presynaptic boutons. Wnt proteins are target-derived secreted factors that promote axonal remodelling and synaptic assembly. In the developing spinal cord, Wnts secreted by motor neurons promote axonal remodelling of NT-3 responsive dorsal root ganglia neurons. Axon remodelling induced by Wnts is characterised by growth cone pausing and enlargement, processes that depend on the re-organisation of microtubules. However, the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that Wnt3a regulates the actin cytoskeleton by rapidly inducing F-actin accumulation in growth cones from rodent DRG neurons through the scaffold protein Dishevelled-1 (Dvl1 and the serine-threonine kinase Gsk3β. Importantly, these changes in actin cytoskeleton occurs before enlargement of the growth cones is evident. Time-lapse imaging shows that Wnt3a increases lamellar protrusion and filopodia velocity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of actin assembly demonstrates that Wnt3a increases actin dynamics. Through a yeast-two hybrid screen, we identified the actin-binding protein Eps8 as a direct interactor of Dvl1, a scaffold protein crucial for the Wnt signalling pathway. Gain of function of Eps8 mimics Wnt-mediated axon remodelling, whereas Eps8 silencing blocks the axon remodelling activity of Wnt3a. Importantly, blockade of the Dvl1-Eps8 interaction completely abolishes Wnt3a-mediated axonal remodelling. These findings demonstrate a novel role for Wnt-Dvl1 signalling through Eps8 in the regulation of axonal remodeling.

  4. The challenges of axon survival: introduction to the special issue on axonal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Michael P

    2013-08-01

    Early axon loss is a common feature of many neurodegenerative disorders. It renders neurons functionally inactive, or less active if axon branches are lost, in a manner that is often irreversible. In the CNS, there is no long-range axon regeneration and even peripheral nerve axons are unlikely to reinnervate their targets while the cause of the problem persists. In most disorders, axon degeneration precedes cell death so it is not simply a consequence of it, and it is now clear that axons have at least one degeneration mechanism that differs from that of the soma. It is important to understand these degeneration mechanisms and their contribution to axon loss in neurodegenerative disorders. In this way, it should become possible to prevent axon loss as well as cell death. This special edition considers the roles and mechanisms of axon degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia, ischemic injury, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, glaucoma, Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. Using examples from these and other disorders, this introduction considers some of the reasons for axon vulnerability. It also illustrates how molecular genetics and studies of Wallerian degeneration have contributed to our understanding of axon degeneration mechanisms. PMID:23769907

  5. Estimating neuronal connectivity from axonal and dendritic density fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap evan Pelt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurons innervate space by extending axonal and dendritic arborizations. When axons and dendrites come in close proximity of each other, synapses between neurons can be formed. Neurons vary greatly in their morphologies and synaptic connections with other neurons. The size and shape of the arborizations determine the way neurons innervate space. A neuron may therefore be characterized by the spatial distribution of its axonal and dendritic 'mass'. A population mean 'mass' density field of a particular neuron type can be obtained by averaging over the individual variations in neuron geometries. Connectivity in terms of candidate synaptic contacts between neurons can be determined directly on the basis of their arborizations but also indirectly on the basis of their density fields. To decide when a candidate synapse can be formed, we previously developed a criterion defining that axonal and dendritic line pieces should cross in 3D and have an orthogonal distance less than a threshold value. In this paper, we developed new methodology for applying this criterion to density fields. We show that estimates of the number of contacts between neuron pairs calculated from their density fields are fully consistent with the number of contacts calculated from the actual arborizations. However, the estimation of the connection probability and the expected number of contacts per connection cannot be calculated directly from density fields, because density fields do not carry anymore the correlative structure in the spatial distribution of synaptic contacts. Alternatively, these two connectivity measures can be estimated from the expected number of contacts by using empirical mapping functions. The neurons used for the validation studies were generated by our neuron simulator NETMORPH. An example is given of the estimation of average connectivity and Euclidean pre- and postsynaptic distance distributions in a network of neurons represented by their population

  6. Reduced axonal transport in Parkinson's disease cybrid neurites is restored by light therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Taboada Luis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been hypothesized that reduced axonal transport contributes to the degeneration of neuronal processes in Parkinson's disease (PD. Mitochondria supply the adenosine triphosphate (ATP needed to support axonal transport and contribute to many other cellular functions essential for the survival of neuronal cells. Furthermore, mitochondria in PD tissues are metabolically and functionally compromised. To address this hypothesis, we measured the velocity of mitochondrial movement in human transmitochondrial cybrid "cytoplasmic hybrid" neuronal cells bearing mitochondrial DNA from patients with sporadic PD and disease-free age-matched volunteer controls (CNT. The absorption of low level, near-infrared laser light by components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mtETC enhances mitochondrial metabolism, stimulates oxidative phosphorylation and improves redox capacity. PD and CNT cybrid neuronal cells were exposed to near-infrared laser light to determine if the velocity of mitochondrial movement can be restored by low level light therapy (LLLT. Axonal transport of labeled mitochondria was documented by time lapse microscopy in dopaminergic PD and CNT cybrid neuronal cells before and after illumination with an 810 nm diode laser (50 mW/cm2 for 40 seconds. Oxygen utilization and assembly of mtETC complexes were also determined. Results The velocity of mitochondrial movement in PD cybrid neuronal cells (0.175 +/- 0.005 SEM was significantly reduced (p Conclusion The results from this study support our proposal that axonal transport is reduced in sporadic PD and that a single, brief treatment with near-infrared light can restore axonal transport to control levels. These results are the first demonstration that LLLT can increase axonal transport in model human dopaminergic neuronal cells and they suggest that LLLT could be developed as a novel treatment to improve neuronal function in patients with PD.

  7. Evolution of The Proton Velocity Distribution due to Stochastic Heating in the Near-Sun Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Kristopher G

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how the proton distribution function evolves when the protons undergo stochastic heating by strong, low-frequency, Alfv\\'en-wave turbulence under the assumption that $\\beta$ is small. We apply our analysis to protons undergoing stochastic heating in the supersonic fast solar wind and obtain proton distributions at heliocentric distances ranging from 4 to 30 solar radii. We find that the proton distribution develops non-Gaussian structure with a flat core and steep tail. For $r >5 \\ R_{\\rm S}$, the proton distribution is well approximated by a modified Moyal distribution. Comparisons with future measurements from \\emph{Solar Probe Plus} could be used to test whether stochastic heating is occurring in the solar-wind acceleration region.

  8. Contrast and stability of the axon diameter index from microstructure imaging with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim B; Søgaard, Lise V; Hall, Matt G;

    2013-01-01

    (max) ) on a scanner influence the sensitivity to a range of axon diameters. Multishell high-angular-diffusion-imaging (HARDI) protocols for G(max) of 60, 140, 200, and 300 mT/m were optimized for the pulsed-gradient-spin-echo (PGSE) sequence. Data were acquired on a fixed monkey brain and Monte-Carlo simulations...... supported the results. Increasing G(max) reduces within-voxel variation of the axon diameter index and improves contrast beyond what is achievable with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations reveal an upper bound on the axon diameter (∼10 μm) that pulsed-gradient-spin-echo measurements are sensitive to......(max) for enhancing contrast between axon diameter distributions and are, therefore, relevant in general for microstructure imaging methods and highlight the need for increased G(max) on future commercial systems. Magn Reson Med, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  9. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. I - The origin of typical 1 AU velocity distribution functions - Steady state theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    A kinetic theory for the velocity distribution of solar wind electrons which illustrates the global and local properties of the solar wind expansion is proposed. By means of the Boltzmann equation with the Krook collision operator accounting for Coulomb collisions, it is found that Coulomb collisions determine the population and shape of the electron distribution function in both the thermal and suprathermal energy regimes. For suprathermal electrons, the cumulative effects of Coulomb interactions are shown to take place on the scale of the heliosphere itself, whereas the Coulomb interactions of thermal electrons occur on a local scale near the point of observation (1 AU). The bifurcation of the electron distribution between thermal and suprathermal electrons is localized to the deep solar corona (1 to 10 solar radii).

  10. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. 1: The origin of typical 1 AU velocity distribution functions: Steady state theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed first principle kinetic theory for electrons which is neither a classical fluid treatment nor an exospheric calculation is presented. This theory illustrates the global and local properties of the solar wind expansion that shape the observed features of the electron distribution function, such as its bifurcation, its skewness and the differential temperatures of the thermal and suprathermal subpopulations. Coulomb collisions are substantial mediators of the interplanetary electron velocity distribution function and they place a zone for a bifurcation of the electron distribution function deep in the corona. The local cause and effect precept which permeates the physics of denser media is modified for electrons in the solar wind. The local form of transport laws and equations of state which apply to collision dominated plasmas are replaced with global relations that explicitly depend on the relative position of the observer to the boundaries of the system.

  11. Energy velocity and group velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇

    1995-01-01

    A new Lagrangian method for studying the relationship between the energy velocity and the group velocity is described. It is proved that under the usual quasistatic electric field, the energy velocity is identical to the group velocity for acoustic waves in anisotropic piezoelectric (or non-piezoelectric) media.

  12. Luminosity dependence of the spatial and velocity distributions of galaxies: Semi-analytic models versus the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cheng; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Boerner, Gerhard; Kang, Xi; Wang, Lan; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2007.11518.x

    2008-01-01

    By comparing semi-analytic galaxy catalogues with data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we show that current galaxy formation models reproduce qualitatively the dependence of galaxy clustering and pairwise peculiar velocities on luminosity, but some subtle discrepancies with the data still remain. The comparisons are carried out by constructing a large set of mock galaxy redshift surveys that have the same selection function as the SDSS Data Release Four (DR4). The mock surveys are based on two sets of semi-analytic catalogues presented by Croton et al. and Kang et al. From the mock catalogues, we measure the redshift-space projected two-point correlation function, the power spectrum, and the pairwise velocity dispersion (PVD) in Fourier space and in configuration space, for galaxies in different luminosity intervals. We then compare these theoretical predictions with the measurements derived from the SDSS DR4. On large scales and for galaxies brighter than L*, both sets of mock catalogues agree well...

  13. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Salewski, Mirko; Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Garcıa-Munoz, Manuel; Heidbrink, Bill; Korsholm, Soren Bang; Leipold, Frank; Madsen, Jens; Moseev, Dmitry; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Rasmussen, Jesper; Stejner, Morten; Tardini, Giovanni; Weiland, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$. To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) light from the plasma center in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra agree very well with synthetic spectra calculated from a TRANSP/NUBEAM simulation. Based on the measured FIDA spectra alone, we infer $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ by tomographic inversion. Salient features of our measurement of $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ agree reasonably well with the simulation: the measured as well as the simulated $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ are lopsided towards negative velocities parallel to the magnetic field, and they have similar shapes. Further, the peaks in the simulation of $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ at full and half injection energies of the neutral beam also appear in the measurement at similar velocity-space locations. We expect that we can measure spectra in up to seven vi...

  14. Escape Velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Nikola Vlacic

    2010-01-01

    In this project, we investigated if it is feasible for a single staged rocket with constant thrust to attain escape velocity. We derived an equation for the velocity and position of a single staged rocket that launches vertically. From this equation, we determined if an ideal model of a rocket is able to reach escape velocity.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: giant axonal neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in giant axonal neuropathy: new insights into disease mechanisms. Muscle Nerve. 2012 Aug;46(2):246-56. ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  16. Angular and velocity distributions of HD molecules produced by the H/sub 2/--D/sub 2/ exchange reaction on the stepped Pt(557) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, T.H.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1984-07-15

    The H/sub 2/--D/sub 2/ exchange reaction on Pt(557) crystal surface was investigated using a molecular beam surface scattering technique. The angular and velocity distributions of the HD product were measured at various crystal temperatures (500--1170 K). It was found that the exchange reaction occurred via interactions of adsorbed H and D atoms (Langmuir--Hinshelwood mechanism). Although the HD that is produced desorbs with a cos/sup 2/ theta angular distribution, its translational energy corresponds to a temperature slightly colder than that of the substrate with the mean energy of the desorbing molecules depending on the desorption angle. As the desorbing angle increases away from the surface normal, the mean translational energy decreases. The exchange reactivity was found to be incident azimuthal angle dependent while the translational energy of the product HD is independent of the azimuthal angle of detection.

  17. Velocity and angular distributions of cations produced upon laser desorption of C{sub 60} and C{sub 60}O{sub x} (x = 2-4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, R.D.; Weis, P.; Rockenberger, J.; Kappes, M.M. [Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-03-23

    The mechanism of UV laser desorption/ionization of C{sub 60} and C{sub 60}O{sub x} (x = 2-4) has been studied by measuring the angle and arrival time distribution for positive ions generated upon laser irradiation of microcrystalline targets. Observations include evidence for desorption `jet` formation as well as for on-beam axis enrichment of coalescence products. These measurements imply that internal and kinetic energy of promptly desorbing material are correlated and suggest that coalescence products such as C{sub 118}{sup +} are generated within the material ablated by one laser pulse rather than from previous photopolymerization. The data are contrasted to laser desorption measurements of NaI/CsI mixed targets for which near effusive ion velocity distributions are observed. 30 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Effect of the borax mass and pre-spray medium temperature on droplet size and velocity vector distributions of intermittently sprayed starchy solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang

    2015-02-01

    Spray coating technology has demonstrated great potential in the slow release fertilizers industry. The better understanding of the key spray parameters benefits both the environment and low cost coating processes. The use of starch based materials to coat the slow release fertilizers is a new development. However, the hydraulic spray jet breakup of the non-Newtonian starchy solutions is a complex phenomenon and very little known. The aim of this research was to study the axial and radial distributions of the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) and velocity vectors in pulsing spray patterns of native and modified tapioca starch solutions. To meet the objective, high speed imaging and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) techniques were employed to characterize the four compositions of the starch-urea-borax complex namely S0, S1, S2 and S3. The unheated solutions exhibited very high viscosities ranging from 2035 to 3030 cP. No jet breakup was seen at any stage of the nozzle operation at an injection pressure of 1-5 bar. However, at 80 °C temperature and 5 bar pressure, the viscosity was reduced to 455 to 638 cP and dense spray patterns emerged from the nozzle obscuring the PDA signals. The axial size distribution revealed a significant decrease in SMD along the spray centreline. The smallest axial SMD (51 to 79 μm) was noticed in S0 spray followed by S1, S2 and S3. Unlikely, the radial SMD in S0 spray did not vary significantly at any stage of the spray injection. This trend was attributed to the continuous growth of the surface wave instabilities on the native starch sheet. However, SMD obtained with S1, S2 and S3 varied appreciably along the radial direction. The mean velocity vector profiles followed the non-Gaussian distribution. The constant vector distributions were seen in the near nozzle regions, where the spray was in the phase of development. In far regions, the velocity vectors were poly-dispersed and a series of ups and downs were seen in the respective radial

  19. About measuring velocity dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellhauer, M.

    A lot of our knowledge about the dynamics and total masses of pressure dominated stellar systems relies on measuring the internal velocity disper- sion of the system. We assume virial equilibrium and that we are able to measure only the bound stars of the system without any contamination. This article shows how likely it is to measure the correct velocity dispersion in reality. It will show that as long as we have small samples of velocity mea- surements the distribution of possible outcomes can be very large and as soon as we have a source of error the velocity dispersion can wrong by several standard deviations especially in large samples.

  20. Rotation Curve and Mass Distribution in the Galaxy from the Velocities of Objects at Distances up to 200 kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Bajkova, A T

    2016-01-01

    Three three-component (bulge, disk, halo) model Galactic gravitational potentials differing by the expression for the dark matter halo are considered. The central (bulge) and disk components are described by the Miyamoto-Nagai expressions. The Allen-Santill'an (I), Wilkinson-Evans (II), and Navarro-Frenk-White (III) models are used to describe the halo. A set of present-day observational data in the range of Galactocentric distances R from 0 to 200 kpc is used to refine the parameters of these models. The model rotation curves have been fitted to the observed velocities by taking into account the constraints on the local matter density \\rho_\\odotand the force K_{z=1.1} acting perpendicularly to the Galactic plane. The Galactic mass within a sphere of radius 50 kpc, M_G (R<=50 kpc)=(0.41+/-0.12)x10^12 M_\\odot, is shown to satisfy all three models. The differences between the models become increasingly significant with increasing radius R. In model I, the Galactic mass within a sphere of radius 200 kpc turns...

  1. A Simple Method for 3D Analysis of Immunolabeled Axonal Tracts in a Transparent Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Belle

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clearing techniques have been developed to transparentize mouse brains, thereby preserving 3D structure, but their complexity has limited their use. Here, we show that immunolabeling of axonal tracts followed by optical clearing with solvents (3DISCO and light-sheet microscopy reveals brain connectivity in mouse embryos and postnatal brains. We show that the Robo3 receptor is selectively expressed by medial habenula axons forming the fasciculus retroflexus (FR and analyzed the development of this commissural tract in mutants of the Slit/Robo and DCC/Netrin pathways. Netrin-1 and DCC are required to attract FR axons to the midline, but the two mutants exhibit specific and heterogeneous axon guidance defects. Moreover, floor-plate-specific deletion of Slit ligands with a conditional Slit2 allele perturbs not only midline crossing by FR axons but also their anteroposterior distribution. In conclusion, this method represents a unique and powerful imaging tool to study axonal connectivity in mutant mice.

  2. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist

  3. Determination of concentration distribution and velocity of a catalyst in a model of a fluidized bed reactor using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified model of a cracking unit was construct. The gaseous phase consisted of air, the solid phase (zeolite catalyst cracking) and both the phases circulate at the ambiente temperature in the steady state with 500 g of catalyst and air flow of 1600 1/h. Measurements for the circulation time of the solid phase (catalyst), concentration and radial distribution of catalyst have been carried out. The reduced experimental model of the cracking reactor (FCC) was used and radioctive tracer and attenuation of γ-radiation techniques were employed. (E.G.)

  4. 横向双极电除尘器的速度分布特征%Characteristics of the Velocity Distribution in Bipolar Transverse Plate ESP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向晓东; 聂衍韬; 丁娣

    2015-01-01

    为了提高现有电除尘器的除尘效果,提出一种横向双极电除尘器。用计算流体动力学(CFD )软件的模拟结果表明,当横向双极电除尘器入口风速为1 m/s时,在距横向双极电除尘器极板迎风面40 mm范围内,平均速度小于0.7m/s,在距极板背风面40mm范围内,平均速度小于0.3m/s。不同的异极距的流速模拟对比发现,异极距在150~250 mm之间时,横向双极电除尘器极板附近的平均流速较小,远远小于普通电除尘器极板附近的风速,这将非常有利于横向双极电除尘器获得更高的除尘效率。理论、模拟与实验的结果证明,极板附近的速度分布规律呈凹形。%In order to improve the particle collection efficiency of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) ,a bipolar transverse-plate ESP is proposed .The results obtained by the CFD software show that ,when the inlet velocity of the bipolar trans-verse plate ESP is 1 m/s ,the average velocities of windward side and leeward side are less than 0 .7 m/s and 0 .3 m/s re-spectively in the range of 40 mm from the collection electrode plate .It is also found that the average velocities are lower when the electrode distance changes between 150~250 mm .The velocity near the collection electrode plate of the bipolar transverse plate ESP is far lower than that of the ordinary ESP .Therefore ,the bipolar charged transverse-plate ESP can get higher efficiency for fine particulate collection .The theories ,simulations and experiments indicate that the velocity distribu-tion near the plates shows concave .

  5. An analysis of conductance changes in squid axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MULLINS, L J

    1959-05-20

    The membrane of the squid axon is considered on the basis of a pore model in which the distribution of the pore sizes strongly favors K(+) transfer when there is no potential. Electrical asymmetry causes non-penetrating ions on the membrane capacitor to exert a mechanical force on both membrane surfaces and this force results in a deformation of the membrane pore system such that it assumes a distribution of sizes favoring the ions exerting mechanical force. The ions involved appear to be Ca(++) on the outside of the membrane and isethionate(-), (i(-)) on the inside; as Ca(++) is equivalent in size to Na(+), the charged membrane is potentially able to transfer Na(+), when the ions deforming the membrane pore distribution are removed. A depolarization of the membrane leads to an opening of pores that will allow Na(+) penetration and a release of the membrane from deformation. The pores revert to the zero-potential pore size distribution hence the Na permeability change is a transient. Calculation shows that the potassium conductance vs. displacement of membrane potential curve for the squid axon and the "inactivation" function, h, can be obtained directly from the assumed membrane distortion without the introduction of arbitrary parameters. The sodium conductance, because it is a transient, requires assumptions about the time constants with which ions unblock pores at the outside and the inside of the membrane.

  6. Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Regulates Axon Guidance by Stabilizing CRMP2A Selectively in Distal Axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Balastik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Axon guidance relies on precise translation of extracellular signal gradients into local changes in cytoskeletal dynamics, but the molecular mechanisms regulating dose-dependent responses of growth cones are still poorly understood. Here, we show that during embryonic development in growing axons, a low level of Semaphorin3A stimulation is buffered by the prolyl isomerase Pin1. We demonstrate that Pin1 stabilizes CDK5-phosphorylated CRMP2A, the major isoform of CRMP2 in distal axons. Consequently, Pin1 knockdown or knockout reduces CRMP2A levels specifically in distal axons and inhibits axon growth, which can be fully rescued by Pin1 or CRMP2A expression. Moreover, Pin1 knockdown or knockout increases sensitivity to Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse in vitro and in vivo, leading to developmental abnormalities in axon guidance. These results identify an important isoform-specific function and regulation of CRMP2A in controlling axon growth and uncover Pin1-catalyzed prolyl isomerization as a regulatory mechanism in axon guidance.

  7. Network structure implied by initial axon outgrowth in rodent cortex: empirical measurement and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalane, Diarmuid J; Clancy, Barbara; Kingsbury, Marcy A; Graf, Ethan; Sporns, Olaf; Finlay, Barbara L

    2011-01-11

    The developmental mechanisms by which the network organization of the adult cortex is established are incompletely understood. Here we report on empirical data on the development of connections in hamster isocortex and use these data to parameterize a network model of early cortical connectivity. Using anterograde tracers at a series of postnatal ages, we investigate the growth of connections in the early cortical sheet and systematically map initial axon extension from sites in anterior (motor), middle (somatosensory) and posterior (visual) cortex. As a general rule, developing axons extend from all sites to cover relatively large portions of the cortical field that include multiple cortical areas. From all sites, outgrowth is anisotropic, covering a greater distance along the medial/lateral axis than along the anterior/posterior axis. These observations are summarized as 2-dimensional probability distributions of axon terminal sites over the cortical sheet. Our network model consists of nodes, representing parcels of cortex, embedded in 2-dimensional space. Network nodes are connected via directed edges, representing axons, drawn according to the empirically derived anisotropic probability distribution. The networks generated are described by a number of graph theoretic measurements including graph efficiency, node betweenness centrality and average shortest path length. To determine if connectional anisotropy helps reduce the total volume occupied by axons, we define and measure a simple metric for the extra volume required by axons crossing. We investigate the impact of different levels of anisotropy on network structure and volume. The empirically observed level of anisotropy suggests a good trade-off between volume reduction and maintenance of both network efficiency and robustness. Future work will test the model's predictions for connectivity in larger cortices to gain insight into how the regulation of axonal outgrowth may have evolved to achieve efficient

  8. Determination of the electron velocity distribution from the soft and hard x-ray emission during lower-hybrid current drive on PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During lower-hybrid heating in low-density-tokamak discharges, a nonMaxwellian tail of high-energy electrons is formed. This tail carries the plasma current. Utilizing the fact that relativistic electrons emit bremsstrahlung predominantly in the forward direction, we investigate the shape of the electron distribution by measuring the dependence of the x-ray emission on the angle between the magnetic field and the line of sight. The experimental data indicate that the distribution function is predominantly peaked in the forward direction, although a small fraction of the electrons is in the backward cone. The energy dependence of the x-ray spectra is consistent with that of a velocity distribution which has a plateau extending out to several hundred kiloelectron volts. Radial profiles show that the hot electrons are located in the central plasma region and form a high-conductivity plasma with the current profile frozen in. The slope of the spectrum depends on the rf power and on the phasing of the waveguide grill, but not on the externally applied plasma voltage. Relaxation oscillations occur shortly after switching the rf off. They also appear during the rf for low rf power and at the high-density limit of the lower-hybrid current drive. The x-ray spectra confirm that parallel energy is transferred to perpendicular energy during the instability, suggesting an instability due to the anomalous Doppler effect

  9. Ndel1-derived peptides modulate bidirectional transport of injected beads in the squid giant axon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Segal

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectional transport is a key issue in cellular biology. It requires coordination between microtubule-associated molecular motors that work in opposing directions. The major retrograde and anterograde motors involved in bidirectional transport are cytoplasmic dynein and conventional kinesin, respectively. It is clear that failures in molecular motor activity bear severe consequences, especially in the nervous system. Neuronal migration may be impaired during brain development, and impaired molecular motor activity in the adult is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases leading to neuronal cell death. The mechanisms that regulate or coordinate kinesin and dynein activity to generate bidirectional transport of the same cargo are of utmost importance. We examined how Ndel1, a cytoplasmic dynein binding protein, may regulate non-vesicular bidirectional transport. Soluble Ndel1 protein, Ndel1-derived peptides or control proteins were mixed with fluorescent beads, injected into the squid giant axon, and the bead movements were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Automated tracking allowed for extraction and unbiased analysis of a large data set. Beads moved in both directions with a clear bias to the anterograde direction. Velocities were distributed over a broad range and were typically slower than those associated with fast vesicle transport. Ironically, the main effect of Ndel1 and its derived peptides was an enhancement of anterograde motion. We propose that they may function primarily by inhibition of dynein-dependent resistance, which suggests that both dynein and kinesin motors may remain engaged with microtubules during bidirectional transport.

  10. Axonal degeneration of the ulnar nerve secondary to carpal tunnel syndrome: fact or fiction?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Radwa Mahmoud Azmy; Amira Ahmed Labib; Saly Hassan Elkholy

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of sensory symptoms in carpal tunnel syndrome is strongly dependent on the degree of electrophysiological dysfunction of the median nerve. The association between carpal tunnel syndrome and ulnar nerve entrapment is still unclear. In this study, we measured ulnar nerve function in 82 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The patients were divided into group I with minimal carpal tunnel syndrome (n = 35) and group II with mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome (n = 47) according to electrophysiological data. Sixty-one age- and sex-matched subjects without carpal tunnel syndrome were used as a control group. There were no significant differences in ulnar sensory nerve peak latencies or conduction velocities from the 4th and 5th fingers between patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and the control group. The ulnar sensory nerve action potential amplitudes from the 4th and 5th fingers were lower in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome than in the control group. The ratios of the ulnar sensory nerve action potential amplitudes from the 4th and 5th fingers were almost the same in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome as in the control group. These findings indicate that in patients with minimal to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, there is some electrophysiological evidence of traction on the adjacent ulnar nerve fibers. The findings do not indicate axonal degeneration of the ulnar nerve.

  11. Microfluidic device for unidirectional axon growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malishev, E.; Pimashkin, A.; Gladkov, A.; Pigareva, Y.; Bukatin, A.; Kazantsev, V.; Mukhina, I.; Dubina, M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the communication and connectivity development of neuron networks, we designed microfluidic devices with several chambers for growing dissociated neuronal cultures from mice fetal hippocampus (E18). The chambers were connected with microchannels providing unidirectional axonal growth between “Source” and “Target” neural sub-networks. Experiments were performed in a hippocampal cultures plated in a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip, aligned with a 60 microelectrode array (MEA). Axonal growth through microchannels was observed with brightfield, phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, and after 7 days in vitro electrical activity was recorded. Visual inspection and spike propagation analysis showed the predominant axonal growth in microchannels in a direction from “Source” to “Target”.

  12. Peripheral Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Assessment of Axon and Myelin Sheath Integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Heckel

    Full Text Available To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI parameters as in-vivo biomarkers of axon and myelin sheath integrity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel as validated by correlation with electrophysiology.MRI examinations at 3T including DTI were conducted on wrists in 30 healthy subjects. After manual segmentation of the median nerve quantitative analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA as well as axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, and MD was carried out. Pairwise Pearson correlations with electrophysiological parameters comprising sensory nerve action potential (SNAP and compound muscle action potential (CMAP as markers of axon integrity, and distal motor latency (dml and sensory nerve conduction velocity (sNCV as markers of myelin sheath integrity were computed. The significance criterion was set at P=0.05, Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons.DTI parameters showed a distinct proximal-to-distal profile with FA, MD, and RD extrema coinciding in the center of the carpal tunnel. AD correlated with CMAP (r=0.50, p=0.04, Bonf. corr. but not with markers of myelin sheath integrity. RD correlated with sNCV (r=-0.53, p=0.02, Bonf. corr. but not with markers of axon integrity. FA correlated with dml (r=-0.63, p=0.002, Bonf. corr. and sNCV (r=0.68, p=0.001, Bonf. corr. but not with markers of axon integrity.AD reflects axon integrity, while RD (and FA reflect myelin sheath integrity as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. DTI parameters consistently indicate a slight decrease of structural integrity in the carpal tunnel as a physiological site of median nerve entrapment. DTI is particularly sensitive, since these findings are observed in healthy participants. Our results encourage future studies to evaluate the potential of DTI in differentiating axon from myelin sheath injury in patients with manifest peripheral neuropathies.

  13. Diverse modes of axon elaboration in the developing neocortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of axonal arbors is a critical step in the establishment of precise neural circuits, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms of axonal elaboration in the neocortex. We used in vivo two-photon time-lapse microscopy to image axons in the neocortex of green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice over the first 3 wk of postnatal development. This period spans the elaboration of thalamocortical (TC and Cajal-Retzius (CR axons and cortical synaptogenesis. Layer 1 collaterals of TC and CR axons were imaged repeatedly over time scales ranging from minutes up to days, and their growth and pruning were analyzed. The structure and dynamics of TC and CR axons differed profoundly. Branches of TC axons terminated in small, bulbous growth cones, while CR axon branch tips had large growth cones with numerous long filopodia. TC axons grew rapidly in straight paths, with frequent interstitial branch additions, while CR axons grew more slowly along tortuous paths. For both types of axon, new branches appeared at interstitial sites along the axon shaft and did not involve growth cone splitting. Pruning occurred via retraction of small axon branches (tens of microns, at both CR and TC axons or degeneration of large portions of the arbor (hundreds of microns, for TC axons only. The balance between growth and retraction favored overall growth, but only by a slight margin. Given the identical layer 1 territory upon which CR and TC axons grow, the differences in their structure and dynamics likely reflect distinct intrinsic growth programs for axons of long projection neurons versus local interneurons.

  14. Automated Axon Counting in Rodent Optic Nerve Sections with AxonJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Kasra; Scheetz, Todd E.; Christopher, Mark; Miller, Kathy; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Tandon, Anamika; Anderson, Michael G.; Fingert, John H.; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a publicly available tool, AxonJ, which quantifies the axons in optic nerve sections of rodents stained with paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In this study, we compare AxonJ’s performance to human experts on 100x and 40x images of optic nerve sections obtained from multiple strains of mice, including mice with defects relevant to glaucoma. AxonJ produced reliable axon counts with high sensitivity of 0.959 and high precision of 0.907, high repeatability of 0.95 when compared to a gold-standard of manual assessments and high correlation of 0.882 to the glaucoma damage staging of a previously published dataset. AxonJ allows analyses that are quantitative, consistent, fully-automated, parameter-free, and rapid on whole optic nerve sections at 40x. As a freely available ImageJ plugin that requires no highly specialized equipment to utilize, AxonJ represents a powerful new community resource augmenting studies of the optic nerve using mice.

  15. Radial Glial Cell-Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-10-28

    How extracellular cues direct axon-dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)-cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC-neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho-Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia-neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases.

  16. Quantitative relationship between axonal injury and mechanical response in a rodent head impact acceleration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M

    2011-09-01

    A modified Marmarou impact acceleration model was developed to study the mechanical responses induced by this model and their correlation to traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was induced in 31 anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 g) by a custom-made 450-g impactor from heights of 1.25 m or 2.25 m. An accelerometer and angular rate sensor measured the linear and angular responses of the head, while the impact event was captured by a high-speed video camera. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction, as well as across the left and right hemispheres, was determined using β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry, and detailed TAI injury maps were constructed for the entire corpus callosum. Peak linear acceleration 1.25 m and 2.25 m impacts were 666±165 g and 907±501 g, respectively. Peak angular velocities were 95±24 rad/sec and 124±48 rad/sec, respectively. Compared to the 2.25-m group, the observed TAI counts in the 1.25-m impact group were significantly lower. Average linear acceleration, peak angular velocity, average angular acceleration, and surface righting time were also significantly different between the two groups. A positive correlation was observed between normalized total TAI counts and average linear acceleration (R(2)=0.612, plinear and angular acceleration response of the rat head during impact, not necessarily the drop height.

  17. Functions of axon guidance molecules in synapse formation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shih-Yu; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2009-01-01

    Axon guidance and synapse formation are important developmental events for establishing a functional neuronal circuitry. These two related cellular processes occur in a coordinated fashion but previous studies from multiple model organisms seemed to suggest that axon guidance and synapse formation are mediated by distinct molecular cues. Thus, axon guidance molecules are responsible for guiding the navigating axon toward its target area, while other adhesion or ligand-receptor molecules speci...

  18. Three-dimensional X-ray visualization of axonal tracts in mouse brain hemisphere

    CERN Document Server

    Mizutani, Ryuta; Ohtsuka, Masato; Miura, Hiromi; Hoshino, Masato; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons transmit active potentials through axons, which are essential for the brain to function. In this study, the axonal networks of the murine brain were visualized with X-ray tomographic microscopy, also known as X-ray microtomography or micro-CT. Murine brain samples were freeze-dried to reconstitute the intrinsic contrast of tissue constituents and subjected to X-ray visualization. A whole brain hemisphere visualized by absorption contrast illustrated three-dimensional structures including those of the striatum, corpus callosum, and anterior commissure. Axonal tracts observed in the striatum start from the basal surface of the cerebral cortex and end at various positions in the basal ganglia. The distribution of X-ray attenuation coefficients indicated that differences in water and phospholipid content between the myelin sheath and surrounding tissue constituents account for the observed contrast. A rod-shaped cutout of brain tissue was also analyzed with a phase retrieval method, wherein tissue microst...

  19. Electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth for dynamically configurable neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honegger, Thibault; Scott, Mark A; Yanik, Mehmet F; Voldman, Joel

    2013-02-21

    Axons in the developing nervous system are directed via guidance cues, whose expression varies both spatially and temporally, to create functional neural circuits. Existing methods to create patterns of neural connectivity in vitro use only static geometries, and are unable to dynamically alter the guidance cues imparted on the cells. We introduce the use of AC electrokinetics to dynamically control axonal growth in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We find that the application of modest voltages at frequencies on the order of 10(5) Hz can cause developing axons to be stopped adjacent to the electrodes while axons away from the electric fields exhibit uninhibited growth. By switching electrodes on or off, we can reversibly inhibit or permit axon passage across the electrodes. Our models suggest that dielectrophoresis is the causative AC electrokinetic effect. We make use of our dynamic control over axon elongation to create an axon-diode via an axon-lock system that consists of a pair of electrode 'gates' that either permit or prevent axons from passing through. Finally, we developed a neural circuit consisting of three populations of neurons, separated by three axon-locks to demonstrate the assembly of a functional, engineered neural network. Action potential recordings demonstrate that the AC electrokinetic effect does not harm axons, and Ca(2+) imaging demonstrated the unidirectional nature of the synaptic connections. AC electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth has potential for creating configurable, directional neural networks. PMID:23314575

  20. Mechanisms of axon degeneration: from development to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Smita; Caroni, Pico

    2007-10-01

    Axon degeneration is an active, tightly controlled and versatile process of axon segment self-destruction. Although not involving cell death, it resembles apoptosis in its logics. It involves three distinct steps: induction of competence in specific neurons, triggering of degeneration at defined axon segments of competent neurons, and rapid fragmentation and removal of the segments. The mechanisms that initiate degeneration are specific to individual settings, but the final pathway of pruning is shared; it involves microtubule disassembly, axon swellings, axon fragmentation, and removal of the remnants by locally recruited phagocytes. The tight regulatory properties of axon degeneration distinguish it from passive loss phenomena, and confer significance to processes that involve it. Axon degeneration has prominent roles in development, upon lesions and in disease. In development, it couples the progressive specification of neurons and circuits to the removal of defined axon branches. Competence might involve transcriptional switches, and local triggering can involve axon guidance molecules and synaptic activity patterns. Lesion-induced Wallerian degeneration is inhibited in the presence of Wld(S) fusion protein in neurons; it involves early local, and later, distal degeneration. It has recently become clear that like in other settings, axon degeneration in disease is a rapid and specific process, which should not be confused with a variety of disease-related pathologies. Elucidating the specific mechanisms that initiate axon degeneration should open up new avenues to investigate principles of circuit assembly and plasticity, to uncover mechanisms of disease progression, and to identify ways of protecting synapses and axons in disease.

  1. Morphometry of Axons in Optic Nerves of Siamese's Twins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinzu Gu; Zhenping Zhang; Qi Lin; Jiongji Liang; Wenyu Lu; Xiulan Ye; A A Sadun

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the development of optic nerve, we examined four optic nerves from Siameses Twins by absolute counts of axons.Methods: Mean axon diameter, mean axon density, totally axonal population and optic nerve area were noted for each optic nerve. The mean axon diameter and the mean axon density were compared between paraxial (inner sectors)and cortical (outer sectors)areas of the nerves.Results: More myelinated axons were seen in the inner sectors as compared to the outer sectors(average 11 axons/1 000 μm2 in inner sectors and 34 axons/l 000 μm2 in outer sectors( P=0. 036) . The myelinated fibers were also smaller(63 microns) in the outer sectors as compared to the inner sectors(72 microns) ( P = 0. 001 ). The average cross sectors area for the four 40 week stage optical nerves of Siamese Twins was 3.32 × 103 as compared to 1 million axons for 32-week-old normals.Conclusion: Our finding of fewer axonal number and small myelinated fibers in the Siamese Twins suggests hypoplasia. Myelination was more abnormal in the paraxial optic nerve than that in the peripheral sectors, suggesting anomalous development of optic nerve peripherally and delayed developnent centrally. Axonal density is higher in inner sectors than that in outer sectors, suggesting delayed development of the outer nerve sector.

  2. Spatial temperature gradients guide axonal outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bryan; Vishwakarma, Vivek; Dhakal, Kamal; Bhattarai, Samik; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Jain, Ankur; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2016-07-01

    Formation of neural networks during development and regeneration after injury depends on accuracy of axonal pathfinding, which is primarily believed to be influenced by chemical cues. Recently, there is growing evidence that physical cues can play crucial role in axonal guidance. However, detailed mechanism involved in such guidance cues is lacking. By using weakly-focused near-infrared continuous wave (CW) laser microbeam in the path of an advancing axon, we discovered that the beam acts as a repulsive guidance cue. Here, we report that this highly-effective at-a-distance guidance is the result of a temperature field produced by the near-infrared laser light absorption. Since light absorption by extracellular medium increases when the laser wavelength was red shifted, the threshold laser power for reliable guidance was significantly lower in the near-infrared as compared to the visible spectrum. The spatial temperature gradient caused by the near-infrared laser beam at-a-distance was found to activate temperature-sensitive membrane receptors, resulting in an influx of calcium. The repulsive guidance effect was significantly reduced when extracellular calcium was depleted or in the presence of TRPV1-antagonist. Further, direct heating using micro-heater confirmed that the axonal guidance is caused by shallow temperature-gradient, eliminating the role of any non-photothermal effects.

  3. Axonal PPARγ promotes neuronal regeneration after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezana, Juan Pablo; Dagan, Shachar Y; Robinson, Ari; Goldstein, Ronald S; Fainzilber, Mike; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bronfman, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    PPARγ is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor best known for its involvement in adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. PPARγ activity has also been associated with neuroprotection in different neurological disorders, but the mechanisms involved in PPARγ effects in the nervous system are still unknown. Here we describe a new functional role for PPARγ in neuronal responses to injury. We found both PPAR transcripts and protein within sensory axons and observed an increase in PPARγ protein levels after sciatic nerve crush. This was correlated with increased retrograde transport of PPARγ after injury, increased association of PPARγ with the molecular motor dynein, and increased nuclear accumulation of PPARγ in cell bodies of sensory neurons. Furthermore, PPARγ antagonists attenuated the response of sensory neurons to sciatic nerve injury, and inhibited axonal growth of both sensory and cortical neurons in culture. Thus, axonal PPARγ is involved in neuronal injury responses required for axonal regeneration. Since PPARγ is a major molecular target of the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of drugs used in the treatment of type II diabetes, several pharmaceutical agents with acceptable safety profiles in humans are available. Our findings provide motivation and rationale for the evaluation of such agents for efficacy in central and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26446277

  4. Patterns of growth, axonal extension and axonal arborization of neuronal lineages in the developing Drosophila brain

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Camilla; Shy, Diana; Spindler, Shana R; Fung, Siaumin; Pereanu, Wayne; Younossi -Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila central brain is composed of approximately 100 paired lineages, with most lineages comprising 100–150 neurons. Most lineages have a number of important characteristics in common. Typically, neurons of a lineage stay together as a coherent cluster and project their axons into a coherent bundle visible from late embryo to adult. Neurons born during the embryonic period form the primary axon tracts (PATs) that follow stereotyped pathways in the neuropile. Apoptotic cell death remo...

  5. AxonQuant: A Microfluidic Chamber Culture-Coupled Algorithm That Allows High-Throughput Quantification of Axonal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Published methods for imaging and quantitatively analyzing morphological changes in neuronal axons have serious limitations because of their small sample sizes, and their time-consuming and nonobjective nature. Here we present an improved microfluidic chamber design suitable for fast and high-throughput imaging of neuronal axons. We developed the AxonQuant algorithm, which is suitable for automatic processing of axonal imaging data. This microfluidic chamber-coupled algorithm allows calculation of an ‘axonal continuity index' that quantitatively measures axonal health status in a manner independent of neuronal or axonal density. This method allows quantitative analysis of axonal morphology in an automatic and nonbiased manner. Our method will facilitate large-scale high-throughput screening for genes or therapeutic compounds for neurodegenerative diseases involving axonal damage. When combined with imaging technologies utilizing different gene markers, this method will provide new insights into the mechanistic basis for axon degeneration. Our microfluidic chamber culture-coupled AxonQuant algorithm will be widely useful for studying axonal biology and neurodegenerative disorders. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Mislocalization of neuronal mitochondria reveals regulation of Wallerian degeneration and NMNAT/WLDS-mediated axon protection independent of axonal mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Kitay, Brandon M.; McCormack, Ryan; Wang, Yunfang; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Zhai, R. Grace

    2013-01-01

    Axon degeneration is a common and often early feature of neurodegeneration that correlates with the clinical manifestations and progression of neurological disease. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylytransferase (NMNAT) is a neuroprotective factor that delays axon degeneration following injury and in models of neurodegenerative diseases suggesting a converging molecular pathway of axon self-destruction. The underlying mechanisms have been under intense investigation and recent reports suggest...

  7. Preliminary study on preparation, release velocity and intracorporeal physical distribution of 32P-chromic phosphate-poly (L-lactide) delayed release panicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to prepare the 32P-chromic phosphate-poly(L-lac-tide) (32P-CP-PLLA) particles with different ratio of the materials and further examine their performance in-dex in vivo and in vitro and their intracorporeal distribution. Methods: The erosion, degrading rates, delayed release velocity and radioactivity self-absorption coefficient (RSAC) of 32P-CP-PLLA particles made from different materials were investigated and compared. After the implantation of 32P-CP-PLLA particles and the injection of 32P-CP colloids in the muscular tissues, the weight loss rate and the radioactivity release rate (RRR) of the particles were calculated. The intracorporeal distribution, radioactive half-life and bio-logical effect of 32P in the targeting sites were further studied. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 12.0, and one-way analysis of variance and t-test were used. Results: 32P-CP-PLLA particles were of green cylinder, with regular shape and radionuclide distribution. The RSAC of the particles was of little relation with molecular weight of PLLA and proportional to the ratio of PLLA to CP. The extracorporeal release rate increased with the reduction of molecular weight of PLLA and with the increase of the ratio of PLLA to CP. The RRR reached peak when PLLA was 3 times of CP. The 32P-CP, released with the degradation and corrosion of the particle distributed mainly in the surrounding muscles of the particle. And the peak of percentage activity of injection dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g) in liver, spleen and bone were 1. 7887, 1. 6401 and 1. 9470 respectively, much lower than that in the 32P-CP group (4.7523, 3.9712 and 4.3174 ; all t > 2.7, all P 32P-CP-PLLA, which can increase the targeting radioactive dosage and effective half-life in the implanting sites, can be served as an potential implanting agent for onco-therapy with a better perspective. (authors)

  8. Constraints on the Velocity and Spatial Distribution of Helium-like Ions in the Wind of SMC X-1 from Observations with XMM-Newton/RGS

    CERN Document Server

    Wojdowski, Patrick S; Kallman, Timothy R

    2007-01-01

    We present here X-ray spectra of the HMXB SMC X-1 obtained in an observation with the XMM observatory beginning before eclipse and ending near the end of eclipse. With the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on board XMM, we observe emission lines from hydrogen-like and helium-like ions of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and silicon. Though the resolution of the RGS is sufficient to resolve the helium-like n=2->1 emission into three line components, only one of these components, the intercombination line, is detected in our data. The lack of flux in the forbidden lines of the helium-like triplets is explained by pumping by ultraviolet photons from the B0 star and, from this, we set an upper limit on the distance of the emitting ions from the star. The lack of observable flux in the resonance lines of the helium-like triplets indicate a lack of enhancement due to resonance line scattering and, from this, we derive a new observational constraint on the distribution of the wind in SMC X-1 in velocity and c...

  9. Characterization of sub-cloud vertical velocity distributions and precipitation-driven outflow dynamics using a ship-based, scanning Doppler lidar during VOCALS-Rex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, A.; Feingold, G.; Tucker, S. C.; Covert, D. S.; Hardesty, R.

    2010-12-01

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment NOAA's High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) operated from the RV Ronald H. Brown and made continuous measurements of sub-cloud horizontal and vertical wind speed and aerosol backscatter signal strength. We will present averaged profiles of vertical velocity distributions and turbulence parameters, stratified by a range of conditions including diurnal variation, precipitation, and distance from shore. The results point to a strong diurnal dependence in the strength of turbulence with nighttime conditions exhibiting stronger subcloud variance. Skewness shows less diurnal sensitivity with a trend towards more negative skewness near cloud base. Combining HRDL’s scanning horizontal wind speed measurements with other ship based in-situ and remote sensing measurements, we investigate the dynamics of precipitation-driven outflows and their impact on surface thermodynamic and aerosol properties. Using a sample of over 150 airmass transitions over the course of the 5 week deployment, we observed that warmer outflow air is typically drier, has less aerosol scattering and tends to have higher ozone concentrations (indicating the transport of air from above the boundary layer top). Transitions to cooler air are generally moister, have more aerosol scattering and show no significant change in ozone concentration. We will present animations of combined lidar/radar/GOES imagery that were used to facilitate visualization and interpretation of the dynamics of the outflows.

  10. Study of velocity and shear stress distributions in the impeller passages and the volute of a bio-centrifugal ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Leok Poh; Ong, Kang Shiu; Song, Guoliang

    2008-05-01

    The velocity fields within the impeller passages of three different impellers of the Kyoto-NTN bio-centrifugal ventricular assist device are measured using laser Doppler velocimetry in this study. The 16 forward-swept-blade impeller has better performance than the 16 straight-blade and 8 backward-swept-blade impellers in terms of smooth flow pattern, and has less high-shear-stress regions in the passages. The flow distributions are found to be similar with those measured by Yu et al. Through-flow characteristics are found in the impeller when the passages open to the biggest volute space. The flow fields in the blade channels of the impeller were found to be axis symmetrical due to the double volute design with the objective of minimizing the imbalance of the radial thrust when the impeller is magnetically suspended. In addition, the high-intensity vortex which was detected by Yu et al. at the discharge channel of the pump is effectively reduced when the end of the splitter plate is modified by increasing the taper ratio from 4 to 20. The new design would reduce the hemolysis of blood due to the high shear rate of the vortex. PMID:18471167

  11. Ring-shaped velocity distribution functions in energy-dispersed structures formed at the boundaries of a proton stream injected into a transverse magnetic field: Test-kinetic results

    CERN Document Server

    Voitcu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the formation of ring-shaped and gyro-phase restricted velocity distribution functions (VDFs) at the edges of a cloud of protons injected into non-uniform distributions of the electromagnetic field. The velocity distribution function is reconstructed using the forward test-kinetic method. We consider two profiles of the electric field: (1) a non-uniform E-field obtained by solving the Laplace equation consistent with the conservation of the electric drift and (2) a constant and uniform E-field. In both cases, the magnetic field is similar to the solutions obtained for tangential discontinuities. The initial velocity distribution function is Liouville mapped along numerically integrated trajectories. The numerical results show the formation of an energy-dispersed structure due to the energy-dependent displacement of protons towards the edges of the cloud by the gradient-B drift. Another direct effect of the gradient-B drift is the formation of ring-shaped velocity distribution functio...

  12. Dynamic Axonal Translation in Developing and Mature Visual Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeoka, Toshiaki; Jung, Hosung; Jung, Jane; Turner-Bridger, Benita; Ohk, Jiyeon; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Amieux, Paul S; Holt, Christine E

    2016-06-30

    Local mRNA translation mediates the adaptive responses of axons to extrinsic signals, but direct evidence that it occurs in mammalian CNS axons in vivo is scant. We developed an axon-TRAP-RiboTag approach in mouse that allows deep-sequencing analysis of ribosome-bound mRNAs in the retinal ganglion cell axons of the developing and adult retinotectal projection in vivo. The embryonic-to-postnatal axonal translatome comprises an evolving subset of enriched genes with axon-specific roles, suggesting distinct steps in axon wiring, such as elongation, pruning, and synaptogenesis. Adult axons, remarkably, have a complex translatome with strong links to axon survival, neurotransmission, and neurodegenerative disease. Translationally co-regulated mRNA subsets share common upstream regulators, and sequence elements generated by alternative splicing promote axonal mRNA translation. Our results indicate that intricate regulation of compartment-specific mRNA translation in mammalian CNS axons supports the formation and maintenance of neural circuits in vivo. PMID:27321671

  13. Motor and dorsal root ganglion axons serve as choice points for the ipsilateral turning of dI3 axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Oshri; Hadas, Yoav; Vald, Lilach; Hong, Seulgi; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Klar, Avihu

    2010-11-17

    The axons of the spinal intersegmental interneurons are projected longitudinally along various funiculi arrayed along the dorsal-ventral axis of the spinal cord. The roof plate and the floor plate have a profound role in patterning their initial axonal trajectory. However, other positional cues may guide the final architecture of interneuron tracks in the spinal cord. To gain more insight into the organization of specific axonal tracks in the spinal cord, we focused on the trajectory pattern of a genetically defined neuronal population, dI3 neurons, in the chick spinal cord. Exploitation of newly characterized enhancer elements allowed specific labeling of dI3 neurons and axons. dI3 axons are projected ipsilaterally along two longitudinal fascicules at the ventral lateral funiculus (VLF) and the dorsal funiculus (DF). dI3 axons change their trajectory plane from the transverse to the longitudinal axis at two novel checkpoints. The axons that elongate at the DF turn at the dorsal root entry zone, along the axons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and the axons that elongate at the VLF turn along the axons of motor neurons. Loss and gain of function of the Lim-HD protein Isl1 demonstrate that Isl1 is not required for dI3 cell fate. However, Isl1 is sufficient to impose ipsilateral turning along the motor axons when expressed ectopically in the commissural dI1 neurons. The axonal patterning of dI3 neurons, revealed in this study, highlights the role of established axonal cues-the DRG and motor axons-as intermediate guidepost cues for dI3 axons.

  14. Minimal information in velocity space

    CERN Document Server

    Evrard, Guillaume

    1995-01-01

    Jaynes' transformation group principle is used to derive the objective prior for the velocity of a non-zero rest-mass particle. In the case of classical mechanics, invariance under the classical law of addition of velocities, leads to an improper constant prior over the unbounded velocity space of classical mechanics. The application of the relativistic law of addition of velocities leads to a less simple prior. It can however be rewritten as a uniform volumetric distribution if the relativistic velocity space is given a non-trivial metric.

  15. Development of microarray device for functional evaluation of PC12D cell axonal extension ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Yanagimoto, Junpei; Murakami, Shinya; Morita, Yusuke

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we developed a microarray bio-MEMS device that could trap PC12D (rat pheochromocytoma cells) cells to examine the intercellular interaction effect on the cell activation and the axonal extension ability. This is needed to assign particular patterns of PC12D cells to establish a cell functional evaluation technique. This experimental observation-based technique can be used for design of the cell sheet and scaffold for peripheral and central nerve regeneration. We have fabricated a micropillar-array bio-MEMS device, whose diameter was approximately 10 μm, by using thick photoresist SU-8 on the glass slide substrate. A maximum trapped PC12D cell ratio, 48.5%, was achieved. Through experimental observation of patterned PC12D "bi-cells" activation, we obtained the following results. Most of the PC12D "bi-cells" which had distances between 40 and 100 μm were connected after 24 h with a high probability. On the other hand, "bi-cells" which had distances between 110 and 200 μm were not connected. In addition, we measured axonal extension velocities in cases where the intercellular distance was between 40 and 100 μm. A maximum axonal extension velocity, 86.4 μm/h, was obtained at the intercellular distance of 40 μm.

  16. Speciifc effects of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-interacting protein 1 in neuronal axons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Tang; Qiang Wen; Xiao-jian Zhang; Quan-cheng Kan

    2016-01-01

    c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting protein 3 plays an important role in brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) anterograde axonal transport. It remains unclear whether JNK-interacting protein 1 mediates similar effects, or whether JNK-interacting protein 1 affects the regulation of TrkB anterograde axonal transport. In this study, we isolated rat embryonic hippocampus and cultured hippocampal neuronsin vitro. Coimmunoprecipitation results demonstrated that JNK-interacting protein 1 formed TrkB com-plexesin vitro andin vivo. Immunocytochemistry results showed that when JNK-interacting protein 1 was highly expressed, the distribution of TrkB gradually increased in axon terminals. However, the distribution of TrkB reduced in axon terminals after knocking out JNK-interact-ing protein 1. In addition, there were differences in distribution of TrkB after JNK-interacting protein 1 was knocked out compared with not. However, knockout of JNK-interacting protein 1 did not affect the distribution of TrkB in dendrites. These ifndings conifrm that JNK-inter-acting protein 1 can interact with TrkB in neuronal cells, and can regulate the transport of TrkB in axons, but not in dendrites.

  17. Axon regeneration impediment:the role of paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Liu; Yan Wang; Wei Fu

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative capacity is weak after central nervous system injury because of the absence of an enhancing microenvironment and presence of an inhibitory microenvironment for neuronal and axonal repair. In addition to the Nogo receptor (NgR), the paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB) is a recently discovered coreceptor of Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. Concurrent blocking of NgR and PirB almost completely elim-inates the inhibitory effect of myelin-associated inhibitory molecules on axonal regeneration. PirB participates in a key pathological process of the nervous system, speciifcally axonal regener-ation inhibition. PirB is an inhibitory receptor similar to NgR, but their effects are not identical. This study summarizes the structure, distribution, relationship with common nervous system diseases, and known mechanisms of PirB, and concludes that PirB is also distributed in cells of the immune and hematopoietic systems. Further investigations are needed to determine if im-munomodulation and blood cell migration involve inhibition of axonal regeneration.

  18. Rapid activity-dependent delivery of the neurotrophic protein CPG15 to the axon surface of neurons in intact Xenopus tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantallops, Isabel; Cline, Hollis T

    2008-05-01

    CPG15 (aka neuritin) is an activity-induced GPI-anchored axonal protein that promotes dendritic and axonal growth, and accelerates synaptic maturation in vivo. Here we show that CPG15 is distributed inside axons and on the axon surface. CPG15 is trafficked to and from the axonal surface by membrane depolarization. To assess CPG15 trafficking in vivo, we expressed an ecliptic pHluorin (EP)-CPG15 fusion protein in optic tectal explants and in retinal ganglion cells of intact Xenopus tadpoles. Depolarization by KCl increased EP-CPG15 fluorescence on axons. Intraocular kainic acid (KA) injection rapidly increased cell-surface EP-CPG15 in retinotectal axons, but coinjection of TTX and KA did not. Consistent with this, we find that intracellular CPG15 is localized to vesicles and endosomes in presynaptic terminals and colocalizes with synaptic vesicle proteins. The results indicate that the delivery of the neurotrophic protein CPG15 to the axon surface can be regulated on a rapid time scale by activity-dependent mechanisms in vivo. PMID:18383547

  19. Regulation of myelin genes implicated in psychiatric disorders by functional activity in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip R Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelination is a highly dynamic process that continues well into adulthood in humans. Several recent gene expression studies have found abnormal expression of genes involved in myelination in the prefrontal cortex of brains from patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Defects in myelination could contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness by impairing information processing as a consequence of altered impulse conduction velocity and synchrony between cortical regions carrying out higher level cognitive functions. Myelination can be altered by impulse activity in axons and by environmental experience. Psychiatric illness is treated by psychotherapy, behavioral modification, and drugs affecting neurotransmission, raising the possibility that myelinating glia may not only contribute to such disorders, but that activity-dependent effects on myelinating glia could provide one of the cellular mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effects of these treatments. This review examines evidence showing that genes and gene networks important for myelination can be regulated by functional activity in axons.

  20. Axonal loss and neuroprotection in optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Leonard A

    2007-06-01

    Most optic neuropathies do not have effective treatments. Examples are ischemic optic neuropathy, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, optic neuritis, and traumatic optic neuropathy. In some cases, the pathophysiology of the optic nerve injury is not fully understood. For example, while the demyelinative aspects of optic neuritis have been studied, the mechanism by which the axonal loss occurs is less apparent. In other cases, although the pathophysiology of the optic neuropathy may be understood, there is difficulty treating the disease, for example, with traumatic optic neuropathy. In response to this therapeutic dearth, the concept of neuroprotection has arisen. Neuroprotection is a therapeutic paradigm for preventing death of neurons from injury and maintaining function. In optic neuropathies, the corresponding neuron is the retinal ganglion cell. These cells are unable to divide, and optic neuropathies irrevocably result in their death; therefore, the primary target of neuroprotection are retinal ganglion cells and their axons. This review emphasizes that most optic neuropathies are axonal and thus good targets for neuroprotection. PMID:17508035

  1. Shh goes multidirectional in axon guidance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola Bovolenta; Luisa Sanchez-Arrones

    2012-01-01

    Shh and Wnts,secreted by the floor and roof plate of the spinal cord,direct longitudinal growth of the axons from the adjacent ventral funiculus and cortico-spinal tract.Whether these midline cues influencethe directionality of axons elongating in more lateral positions of the spinal cord is unexplored.Song and colleagues investigate this possibility and demonstrate that the location of descending raphe-spinal tract in the ventrolateral spinal cord is dictated by the simultaneous repellent activity of Shh gradients in both the anteriorto-posterior (A-P) and medial-tolateral (M-L) axis. The spinal cord is the main pathway for exchange of information between the brain and the rest of the body.Sensory information collected in the body periphery is conveyed to the brain by axonal tracts that ascend along the spinal cord whereas motor information travels from the brain to the periphery in descending tracts.Precise spatial organization of these fiber tracts is thus essential for animal behavior and survival.

  2. MRI of the diffuse axonal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Yang Gu; Woo, Young Hoon; Suh, Soo Jhi [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-01-15

    CT has facilitated early recognition and treatment of focal brain injuries in patients with head trauma. However, CT shows relatively low sensitivity in identifying non hemorrhage contusion and injuries of white matter. MR is known to be superior to CT in detection of white matter injuries, such as diffuse axonal injury. MR imaging in 14 cases of diffuse axonal injury on 2.0T was studied. The corpus callosum, especially the body portion, was the most commonly involved site. The lesions ranged from 5 to 20mm in size with ovoid to elliptical shape. T2WI was the most sensitive pulse sequence in detecting lesions such as white matter degeneration, hemorrhagic and non hemorrhagic contusion. The lesions were nonspecific as high and low signal intensities on T2WI and T1WI respectively. CT showed white matter abnormality in only 1 case of 14 cases. We propose MR imaging as the primary imaging procedure for the detection of diffuse axonal injury because of its multiplanar capabilities and higher sensitivity.

  3. Distributions of age, thickness and gas velocity in the cake of jet pulsed filters - Application and validation of a generations filter model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavouras, A.; Krammer, G. [Graz Technical University, Graz (Austria)

    2003-01-01

    Different imperfections are observed with jet pulsed filters. They manifest themselves most obviously in the curve of the pressure drop versus time. A convex pressure drop curve indicates cake compaction. But jet pulsed filters frequently show a concave rise of the pressure drop curve. This phenomenon is due to a strongly nonuniform cake area load on the filter and it is generally attributed to incomplete cake removal. Incomplete cake removal takes place when only a fraction of the total filter area is cleaned at the end of a filter cycle or when patchy cleaning prevails. In this paper a filter model is proposed in which the different classes of cake thickness are understood to result from different cake generations. A cake becomes one generation older when it survives the jet pulse cleaning at the end of a filtration cycle, although the area that is occupied by the cake on the filter medium is diminished by the jet pulse. This generations filter model can be used to find the distributions of age, thickness and gas velocities in the cake from steady-state operational data. The steady-state, periodic model provides a complete basis for the simulation of heterogeneous gas/solid reactions in the cake of jet pulsed filters. In the model intermediate cake build up during the cleaning procedure is considered. There redeposition of removed filter cake also takes place, and its extent is estimated. Experiments from a pilot plant for dry flue gas cleaning are presented and the generations filter model is validated with the experimental data.

  4. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H Le

    Full Text Available Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1. Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr and chronic (2hr CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  5. Acceleration of conduction velocity linked to clustering of nodal components precedes myelination

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Sean A.; Desmazières, Anne; Simonnet, Jean; Gatta, Marie; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Aigrot, Marie Stéphane; Rappeneau, Quentin; Guerreiro, Serge; Michel, Patrick Pierre; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Barbin, Gilles; Brophy, Peter. J.; Fricker, Desdemona; Lubetzki, Catherine; Sol-Foulon, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of nodes of Ranvier of myelinated axons in the CNS are still only partly understood. Our study shows the influence of intrinsic cues and glial extrinsic factors for nodal protein clustering before myelination on specific hippocampal neuronal subpopulations and extends to electrophysiological understandings and in vivo relevance. Although conduction velocity along axons has long been thought to mostly rely on the insulating properties o...

  6. Early ultrastructural defects of axons and axon-glia junctions in mice lacking expression of Cnp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Julia M; McLaughlin, Mark; Werner, Hauke B; McCulloch, Mailis C; Barrie, Jennifer A; Brown, Angus; Faichney, Andrew Blyth; Snaidero, Nicolas; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Griffiths, Ian R

    2009-12-01

    Most axons in the central nervous system (CNS) are surrounded by a multilayered myelin sheath that promotes fast, saltatory conduction of electrical impulses. By insulating the axon, myelin also shields the axoplasm from the extracellular milieu. In the CNS, oligodendrocytes provide support for the long-term maintenance of myelinated axons, independent of the myelin sheath. Here, we use electron microscopy and morphometric analyses to examine the evolution of axonal and oligodendroglial changes in mice deficient in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) and in mice deficient in both CNP and proteolipid protein (PLP/DM20). We show that CNP is necessary for the formation of a normal inner tongue process of oligodendrocytes that myelinate small diameter axons. We also show that axonal degeneration in Cnp1 null mice is present very early in postnatal life. Importantly, compact myelin formed by transplanted Cnp1 null oligodendrocytes induces the same degenerative changes in shiverer axons that normally are dysmyelinated but structurally intact. Mice deficient in both CNP and PLP develop a more severe axonal phenotype than either single mutant, indicating that the two oligodendroglial proteins serve distinct functions in supporting the myelinated axon. These observations support a model in which the trophic functions of oligodendrocytes serve to offset the physical shielding of axons by myelin membranes. PMID:19459211

  7. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou;

    2014-01-01

    (v‖, v⊥) are lopsided towards negative velocities parallel to the magnetic field, and they have similar shapes. Further, the peaks in the simulation of f(v‖, v⊥) at full and half injection energies of the neutral beam also appear in the measurement at similar velocity-space locations. We expect that we...... can measure spectra in up to seven views simultaneously in the next ASDEX Upgrade campaign which would further improve measurements of f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion....

  8. Action potentials reliably invade axonal arbors of rat neocortical neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Charles L.; Denk, Winfried; Tank, David W.; Svoboda, Karel

    2000-01-01

    Neocortical pyramidal neurons have extensive axonal arborizations that make thousands of synapses. Action potentials can invade these arbors and cause calcium influx that is required for neurotransmitter release and excitation of postsynaptic targets. Thus, the regulation of action potential invasion in axonal branches might shape the spread of excitation in cortical neural networks. To measure the reliability and extent of action potential invasion into axonal arbors, we have used two-photon...

  9. Myelin sheath survival after guanethidine-induced axonal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Membrane-membrane interactions between axons and Schwann cells are required for initial myelin formation in the peripheral nervous system. However, recent studies of double myelination in sympathetic nerve have indicated that myelin sheaths continue to exist after complete loss of axonal contact (Kidd, G. J., and J. W. Heath. 1988. J. Neurocytol. 17:245-261). This suggests that myelin maintenance may be regulated either by diffusible axonal factors or by nonaxonal mechanisms. To test these hy...

  10. Axon Regeneration in the Peripheral and Central Nervous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Huebner, Eric A.; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2009-01-01

    Axon regeneration in the mature mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is extremely limited after injury. Consequently, functional deficits persist after spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury, stroke, and related conditions that involve axonal disconnection. This situation differs from that in the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS), where long- distance axon regeneration and substantial functional recovery can occur in the adult. Both extracellular molecules and the intrinsi...

  11. Axonal autophagy during regeneration of the rat sciatic nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kangrong Lu; Zhongxian Piao; Zhenxi Liu; Weiwang Gu; Wanshan Wang; Nngjie Piao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The removal of degenerated axonal debris during Wallerian degeneration is very important for nerve regeneration. However, the mechanism by which debris is removed is not been completely understood. Considerable controversy remains as to the clearance pathway and cells that are involved. OBJECTIVE: To investigate axonal autophagy during removal of degenerated axonal debris by transecting the sciatic nerve in a rat Wallerian degeneration model.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Experimental neuropathological analysis. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory Animal Service Center of the Southern Medical University between January and June 2005. MATERIALS: Fifty-four adult, Wistar rats of either sex, weighing 180-250 g, were obtained from the Laboratory Animal Service Center of the Southern Medical University. Animals were randomly divided into nine groups of six rats. METHODS: Wallerian degeneration was induced by transecting the rat sciatic nerve, and tissue samples from the distal stump were obtained 0.2, 0.4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, and 15 days post-transection. Ultrathin sections were prepared for electron microscopy to study ultrastructure and enzyme cytochemistry staining. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ultrastructure (axon body, autophagic body, and cystoskeleton) of axons and myelin sheaths observed with electron microscopy; acidic phosphatase activity detected by Gomori staining using electron microscopy. RESULTS: The major changes of degenerating axons after transection were axoplasm swelling and separation of axons from their myelin sheath between five hours and two days post-transection. At four days post-transection, the axoplasm condensed and axons were completely separated from the myelin sheath, forming dissociative axon bodies. Vacuoles of different sizes formed in axons during the early phase after lesion. Larger dissociative axon bodies were formed when the axons were completely separated from the myelin sheath during a late phase. The axolemma

  12. Differences in excitability properties of FDI and ADM motor axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong Seok; Sawai, Setsu; Misawa, Sonoko; Kanai, Kazuaki; Isose, Sagiri; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2009-03-01

    The first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles are innervated by the same ulnar nerve, but studies have shown that the former is much more severely affected in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, threshold tracking was used to investigate whether membrane properties differ between FDI and ADM motor axons. In 12 normal subjects, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from FDI and ADM after ulnar nerve stimulation at the wrist. The strength-duration time constant was significantly longer in the FDI axons than in the ADM axons, and latent addition studies showed greater threshold changes at the conditioning-test stimulus of 0.2 ms in FDI than in ADM axons. These findings suggest that nodal persistent sodium conductances are more prominent in FDI axons than in ADM axons, and therefore excitability is physiologically higher in FDI axons. Even in the same nerve at the same sites, membrane properties of FDI and ADM motor axons differ significantly, and thus their axonal/neuronal responses to disease may also differ.

  13. Present status of studies on diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Ma; Chonggong Zhang; Yi Li

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explain the present status of study on diffuse axonal injury,investigate its pathogenesis and pathophysiological changes ,and suggest principles for the diagnosis and treatment.DATA SOURCES: Articles about diffuse axonal injury published in English from January 1994 to October 2006 were searched in Pubmed database using the keywords of "diffuse axonal injury,pathogenesis,therapy".STUDY SELECTION: The collected articles were primarily screened to select those associated with diffuse axonal injury,the obviously irrelated articles were excluded,and the rest ones were retrieved manually,and the full-texes were searched.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 98 articles were collected,41 of them were involved.and the other 57 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: Diffuse axonal injury is mainly caused by acceleratory or deceleratory injury,and its pathophysiological change is a progressive duration,local axonal injury finally develops to axonal breakage,mainly includes inactivation of natrium channel,intracellular Ca2+ overloading,activation of calcium protease,caspase etc.,and mitochondrial injury.At present,there is still lack of effective therapeutic methods for diffuse axonal injury,so we should actively explore more effective methods to relieve the pain of patients and improve their prognosis.CONCLUSION: At present,diffuse axonal injury has not attracted enough attentions in China,the mechanisms for its diagnosis and attack are still unclear,and the treatments are mainly aiming at the symptoms.

  14. Dopaminergic axon guidance: which makes what?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia ePrestoz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesotelencephalic pathways in the adult central nervous system have been studied in great detail because of their implication in major physiological functions as well as in psychiatric, neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the ontogeny of these pathways and the molecular mechanisms that guide dopaminergic axons during embryogenesis have been only recently studied. This line of research is of crucial interest for the repair of lesioned circuits in adulthood following neurodegenerative diseases or common traumatic injuries. For instance, in the adult, the anatomic and functional repair of the nigrostriatal pathway following dopaminergic embryonic neuron transplantation suggests that specific guidance cues exist which govern embryonic fibers outgrowth, and suggests that axons from transplanted embryonic cells are able to respond to theses cues, which then guide them to their final targets. In this review, we first synthesize the work that has been performed in the last few years on developing mesotelencephalic pathways, and summarize the current knowledge on the identity of cellular and molecular signals thought to be involved in establishing mesotelencephalic dopaminergic neuronal connectivity during embryogenesis in the central nervous system of rodents. Then, we review the modulation of expression of these molecular signals in the lesioned adult brain and discuss their potential role in remodeling the mesotelencephalic dopaminergic circuitry, with a particular focus on Parkinson’s disease. Identifying guidance molecules involved in the connection of grafted cells may be useful for cellular therapy in Parkinsonian patients, as these molecules may help direct axons from grafted cells along the long distance they have to travel from the substantia nigra to the striatum.

  15. Subtle paranodal injury slows impulse conduction in a mathematical model of myelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Babbs

    Full Text Available This study explores in detail the functional consequences of subtle retraction and detachment of myelin around the nodes of Ranvier following mild-to-moderate crush or stretch mediated injury. An equivalent electrical circuit model for a series of equally spaced nodes of Ranvier was created incorporating extracellular and axonal resistances, paranodal resistances, nodal capacitances, time varying sodium and potassium currents, and realistic resting and threshold membrane potentials in a myelinated axon segment of 21 successive nodes. Differential equations describing membrane potentials at each nodal region were solved numerically. Subtle injury was simulated by increasing the width of exposed nodal membrane in nodes 8 through 20 of the model. Such injury diminishes action potential amplitude and slows conduction velocity from 19.1 m/sec in the normal region to 7.8 m/sec in the crushed region. Detachment of paranodal myelin, exposing juxtaparanodal potassium channels, decreases conduction velocity further to 6.6 m/sec, an effect that is partially reversible with potassium ion channel blockade. Conduction velocity decreases as node width increases or as paranodal resistance falls. The calculated changes in conduction velocity with subtle paranodal injury agree with experimental observations. Nodes of Ranvier are highly effective but somewhat fragile devices for increasing nerve conduction velocity and decreasing reaction time in vertebrate animals. Their fundamental design limitation is that even small mechanical retractions of myelin from very narrow nodes or slight loosening of paranodal myelin, which are difficult to notice at the light microscopic level of observation, can cause large changes in myelinated nerve conduction velocity.

  16. Standard logarithmic mean velocity distribution in a band-limited restricted nonlinear model of turbulent flow in a half-channel

    CERN Document Server

    Bretheim, Joel U; Gayme, Dennice F

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of wall-turbulence using the restricted nonlinear (RNL) model generate realistic mean velocity profiles in plane Couette and channel flow at low Reynolds numbers. The results are less accurate at higher Re, and while a logarithmic region is observed, its von-K\\'arm\\'an constant is not consistent with the standard logarithmic law. In half-channel flow we show that limiting the streamwise-varying wavenumber support of RNL turbulence to one or few empirically determined modes improves its predictions considerably. In particular, the mean velocity profiles obtained with the band-limited RNL model follow standard logarithmic behavior for the higher Reynolds numbers in this study.

  17. Differential calcium signaling mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels in rat retinal ganglion cells and their unmyelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Sargoy

    Full Text Available Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury.

  18. Effect of transition in cross-sectional shape on the development of the velocity and pressure distribution of turbulent flow in pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Edwin

    1939-01-01

    With regard to the change in shape of the cross section while the area remains constant, no investigation results are as yet available. Such an investigation will be the subject of the present paper. For this purpose it is necessary to consider the velocity and pressure relations over each entire cross section so that we are confronted with a three-dimensional problem.

  19. Distinct interneuron types express m2 muscarinic receptor immunoreactivity on their dendrites or axon terminals in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájos, N; Papp, E C; Acsády, L; Levey, A I; Freund, T F

    1998-01-01

    In previous studies m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-immunoreactive interneurons and various types of m2-positive axon terminals have been described in the hippocampal formation. The aim of the present study was to identify the types of interneurons expressing m2 receptor and to examine whether the somadendritic and axonal m2 immunostaining labels the same or distinct cell populations. In the CA1 subfield, neurons immunoreactive for m2 have horizontal dendrites, they are located at the stratum oriens/alveus border and have an axon that project to the dendritic region of pyramidal cells. In the CA3 subfield and the hilus, m2-positive neurons are multipolar and are scattered in all layers except stratum lacunosum-moleculare. In stratum pyramidale of the CA1 and CA3 regions, striking axon terminal staining for m2 was observed, surrounding the somata and axon initial segments of pyramidal cells in a basket-like manner. The co-localization of m2 with neurochemical markers and GABA was studied using the "mirror" technique and fluorescent double-immunostaining at the light microscopic level and with double-labelling using colloidal gold-conjugated antisera and immunoperoxidase reaction (diaminobenzidine) at the electron microscopic level. GABA was shown to be present in the somata of most m2-immunoreactive interneurons, as well as in the majority of m2-positive terminals in all layers. The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin was absent from practically all m2-immunoreactive cell bodies and dendrites. In contrast, many of the terminals synapsing on pyramidal cell somata and axon initial segments co-localized parvalbumin and m2, suggesting a differential distribution of m2 receptor immunoreactivity on the axonal and somadendritic membrane of parvalbumin-containing basket and axo-axonic cells. The co-existence of m2 receptors with the calcium-binding protein calbindin and the neuropeptides cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide was rare throughout the

  20. Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribosylation) improves axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Alexandra B; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Sekine, Yuichi; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Miller, David M; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a neuron to regenerate its axon after injury depends in part on its intrinsic regenerative potential. Here, we identify novel intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration: poly(ADP-ribose) glycohodrolases (PARGs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARGs, which remove poly(ADP-ribose) from proteins, act in injured C. elegans GABA motor neurons to enhance axon regeneration. PARG expression is regulated by DLK signaling, and PARGs mediate DLK function in enhancing axon regeneration. Conversely, PARPs, which add poly(ADP-ribose) to proteins, inhibit axon regeneration of both C. elegans GABA neurons and mammalian cortical neurons. Furthermore, chemical PARP inhibitors improve axon regeneration when administered after injury. Our results indicate that regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) levels is a critical function of the DLK regeneration pathway, that poly-(ADP ribosylation) inhibits axon regeneration across species, and that chemical inhibition of PARPs can elicit axon regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12734.001

  1. New insights into mRNA trafficking in axons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gumy, Laura; Katrukha, Eugene; Kapitein, Lukas; Hoogenraad, Casper

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has been demonstrated that mRNAs localize to axons of young and mature central and peripheral nervous system neurons in culture and in vivo. Increasing evidence is supporting a fundamental role for the local translation of these mRNAs in neuronal function by regulating axon growt

  2. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard;

    2002-01-01

    Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total l...

  3. Angular and velocity distributions of the HD sup + and D sub 2 sup + fragments from HD sub 2 sup + colliding with He at energies of 1 to 5 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, I.; Martriaanez, H.; Cisneros, C.; de Urquijo, J. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 139-B, 62191 Cuernavaca Morelos (Mexico))

    1992-01-01

    The angular and velocity distributions of the HD{sup +} and D{sub 2}{sup +} fragments resulting from collision-induced dissociation of the HD{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ion incident on He have been measured in the energy range 1--5 keV. These distributions were used to determine the binding energy of HD{sub 2}{sup +}, some of the main transitions involved in the dissociation process, and the total cross sections for the production of both fragments.

  4. The 4.1B cytoskeletal protein regulates the domain organization and sheath thickness of myelinated axons

    OpenAIRE

    Einheber, Steven; Maurel, Patrice; Meng, Xiaosong; Rubin, Marina; Lam, Isabel; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Shrager, Peter; Kissil, Joseph; Salzer, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Myelinated axons are organized into specialized domains critical to their function in saltatory conduction, i.e. nodes, paranodes, juxtaparanodes, and internodes. Here, we describe the distribution and role of the 4.1B protein in this organization. 4.1B is expressed by neurons, and at lower levels by Schwann cells, which also robustly express 4.1G. Immunofluorescence and immuno-EM demonstrates 4.1B is expressed subjacent to the axon membrane in all domains except the nodes. Mice deficient in ...

  5. SnoN facilitates axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun L Do

    Full Text Available Adult CNS neurons exhibit a reduced capacity for growth compared to developing neurons, due in part to downregulation of growth-associated genes as development is completed. We tested the hypothesis that SnoN, an embryonically regulated transcription factor that specifies growth of the axonal compartment, can enhance growth in injured adult neurons. In vitro, SnoN overexpression in dissociated adult DRG neuronal cultures significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, TGF-β1, a negative regulator of SnoN, inhibited neurite outgrowth, and SnoN over-expression overcame this inhibition. We then examined whether SnoN influenced axonal regeneration in vivo: indeed, expression of a mutant form of SnoN resistant to degradation significantly enhanced axonal regeneration following cervical spinal cord injury, despite peri-lesional upregulation of TGF-β1. Thus, a developmental mechanism that specifies extension of the axonal compartment also promotes axonal regeneration after adult CNS injury.

  6. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Molecular Switches Regulating CNS Axon Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthy Vigneswara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The poor or lack of injured adult central nervous system (CNS axon regeneration results in devastating consequences and poor functional recovery. The interplay between the intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributes to robust inhibition of axon regeneration of injured CNS neurons. The insufficient or lack of trophic support for injured neurons is considered as one of the major obstacles contributing to their failure to survive and regrow their axons after injury. In the CNS, many of the signalling pathways associated with neuronal survival and axon regeneration are regulated by several classes of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK that respond to a variety of ligands. This paper highlights and summarises the most relevant recent findings pertinent to different classes of the RTK family of molecules, with a particular focus on elucidating their role in CNS axon regeneration.

  7. Signaling mechanisms in cortical axon growth, guidance and branching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eKalil

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise wiring of cortical circuits during development depends upon axon extension, guidance and branching to appropriate targets. Motile growth cones at axon tips navigate through the nervous system by responding to molecular cues, which modulate signaling pathways within axonal growth cones. Intracellular calcium signaling has emerged as a major transducer of guidance cues but exactly how calcium signaling pathways modify the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton to evoke growth cone behaviors and axon branching is still mysterious. Axons must often pause in their outgrowth while their branches extend into targets. Some evidence suggests a competition between growth of axons and branches but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Since it is difficult to study growing axons deep within the mammalian brain, much of what we know about signaling pathways and cytoskeletal dynamics has come from studies of axonal growth cones, in many cases from non-mammalian species, growing in tissue culture. Consequently it is not well understood how guidance cues relevant to mammalian neural development in vivo signal to the growth cone cytoskeleton during axon outgrowth and guidance. In this review we describe our recent work in dissociated cultures of developing rodent sensorimotor cortex in the context of the current literature on molecular guidance cues, calcium signaling pathways and cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate growth cone behaviors. A major challenge is to relate findings in tissue culture to mechanisms of cortical development in vivo. Toward this goal, we describe our recent work in cortical slices, which preserve the complex cellular and molecular environment of the mammalian brain but allow direct visualization of growth cone behaviors and calcium signaling. Findings from this work suggest that mechanisms regulating axon growth and guidance in dissociated culture neurons also underlie development of cortical connectivity in vivo.

  8. Brain injury tolerance limit based on computation of axonal strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and permanent impairment over the last decades. In both the severe and mild TBIs, diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is the most common pathology and leads to axonal degeneration. Computation of axonal strain by using finite element head model in numerical simulation can enlighten the DAI mechanism and help to establish advanced head injury criteria. The main objective of this study is to develop a brain injury criterion based on computation of axonal strain. To achieve the objective a state-of-the-art finite element head model with enhanced brain and skull material laws, was used for numerical computation of real world head trauma. The implementation of new medical imaging data such as, fractional anisotropy and axonal fiber orientation from Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) of 12 healthy patients into the finite element brain model was performed to improve the brain constitutive material law with more efficient heterogeneous anisotropic visco hyper-elastic material law. The brain behavior has been validated in terms of brain deformation against Hardy et al. (2001), Hardy et al. (2007), and in terms of brain pressure against Nahum et al. (1977) and Trosseille et al. (1992) experiments. Verification of model stability has been conducted as well. Further, 109 well-documented TBI cases were simulated and axonal strain computed to derive brain injury tolerance curve. Based on an in-depth statistical analysis of different intra-cerebral parameters (brain axonal strain rate, axonal strain, first principal strain, Von Mises strain, first principal stress, Von Mises stress, CSDM (0.10), CSDM (0.15) and CSDM (0.25)), it was shown that axonal strain was the most appropriate candidate parameter to predict DAI. The proposed brain injury tolerance limit for a 50% risk of DAI has been established at 14.65% of axonal strain. This study provides a key step for a realistic novel injury metric for DAI. PMID:27038501

  9. Clinical features of diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the mechanism of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) and study the relationship between DAI and brain concussion, brain contusion, and primary brain stem injury.Methods: The clinical data and iconographic characteristics of 56 patients with DAI were analyzed retrospectively.Results: Traffic accidents were the main cause of DAI. Among the 56 cases, 34 were injured for at least twice, and 71.43% of the patients were complicated with contusion.Conclusions: It is considered that DAI is a common pattern of primary brain injury, which is often underestimated. And DAI includes cerebral concussion and primary brain injury, and is often complicated by cerebral cortex contusion. Therefore, it is very simple and practical to divide primary brain injuries into local and diffuse injuries.

  10. Axonal damage in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in a C57BL/6 mouse model may be not secondary to inflammatory demyelination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boting Gao; Juan Chen; Qiong Wang; Wei Wang; Zhouping Tang

    2011-01-01

    The present study established a chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model in C57BL/6 mice induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptides and complete Freund's adjuvant. Onset latency was 12 days, with an incidence rate of 100%. Neuropathological characteristics included perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration, demyelination, neuronal degeneration, and axonal damage within cerebral and myelic white matter. Electron microscopy revealed swollen mitochondria, complete organ disappearance, and fused or broken myelin sheath structure, which were accompanied by myelin sheath reconstruction. Moreover, axonal damage was not consistent with demyelination distribution, and severity of axonal damage did not correlate with demyelination. Results suggested that axonal damage in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model is not secondary to inflammatory demyelination.

  11. Preliminary study on diffuse axonal injury by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy histopathology imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiantong; He, Guanglong; Zhang, Xiang; Chang, Lin; Zhang, Haidong; Ripple, Mary G; Fowler, David R; Li, Ling

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for detecting diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in a mouse model. Brain tissues from DAI mouse model were prepared with H&E, silver, and β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunohistochemistry stains and were also studied with FTIR. The infrared spectrum images showed high absorption of amide II in the subcortical white matter of the experimental mouse brain, while there was no obvious expression of amide II in the control mouse brain. The areas with high absorption of amide II were in the same distribution as the DAI region confirmed by the silver and β-APP studies. The result suggests that high absorption of amide II correlates with axonal injury. The use of FTIR imaging allows the biochemical changes associated with DAI pathologies to be detected in the tissues, thus providing an important adjunct method to the current conventional pathological diagnostic techniques.

  12. Miro, MCU, and calcium: bridging our understanding of mitochondrial movement in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eNiescier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are extremely polarized structures with long axons and dendrites, which require proper distribution of mitochondria and maintenance of mitochondrial dynamics for neuronal functions and survival. Indeed, recent studies show that various neurological disorders are linked to mitochondrial transport in neurons. Mitochondrial anterograde transport is believed to deliver metabolic energy to synaptic terminals where energy demands are high, while mitochondrial retrograde transport is required to repair or remove damaged mitochondria in axons. It has been suggested that Ca2+ plays a key role in regulating mitochondrial transport by altering the configuration of mitochondrial protein, miro. However, molecular mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial transport in neurons still are not well characterized. In this review, we will discuss the roles of miro in mitochondrial transport and how the recently identified components of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter add to our current model of mitochondrial mobility regulation.

  13. Miro, MCU, and calcium: bridging our understanding of mitochondrial movement in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niescier, Robert F; Chang, Karen T; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2013-09-10

    Neurons are extremely polarized structures with long axons and dendrites, which require proper distribution of mitochondria and maintenance of mitochondrial dynamics for neuronal functions and survival. Indeed, recent studies show that various neurological disorders are linked to mitochondrial transport in neurons. Mitochondrial anterograde transport is believed to deliver metabolic energy to synaptic terminals where energy demands are high, while mitochondrial retrograde transport is required to repair or remove damaged mitochondria in axons. It has been suggested that Ca(2) (+) plays a key role in regulating mitochondrial transport by altering the configuration of mitochondrial protein, miro. However, molecular mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial transport in neurons still are not well characterized. In this review, we will discuss the roles of miro in mitochondrial transport and how the recently identified components of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter add to our current model of mitochondrial mobility regulation.

  14. Electrical Potential, Mass Transport and Velocity Distribution of Electro-osmotic Flow in a Nanochannel by Incorporating the Variation of Dielectric Constant of Aqueous Electrolyte Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Padidhapu, Rajendra; Brahmajirao, V

    2016-01-01

    We consider a coupled system of Navier Stokes, Maxwell Stefan and Poisson Boltzmann equations by incorporating the variation of dielectric constant, which governs the electro osmotic flow in nano channel, describing the evolution of the velocity, concentration and potential fields of dissolved constituents in an aqueous electrolyte solution. We apply the finite difference technique to solve one and two dimensional systems of these equations. The solutions give an extremely accurate prediction of the dielectric constant for a variety of salts and a wide range of concentrations.

  15. Dogs with hearth diseases causing turbulent high-velocity blood flow have changes in patelet function and von Willebrand factor multimer distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier;

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate platelet function using in vitro tests based on both high and low shear rates and von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimeric composition in dogs with cardiac disease and turbulent high-velocity blood flow. Client-owned asymptomatic, untreated...... dogs were divided into 4 groups: 14 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (Cavaliers) with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and no or minimal mitral regurgitation (MR), 17 Cavaliers with MVP and moderate to severe MR, 14 control dogs, and 10 dogs with subaortic stenosis (SAS). Clinical examinations...

  16. Intra-axonal myosin and actin in nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Irvine G; Lund, Linda M

    2009-10-01

    A focused review of sciatic nerve regeneration in the rat model, based on research conducted by the authors, is presented. We examine structural proteins carried distally in the axon by energy-requiring motor enzymes, using protein chemistry and molecular biology techniques in combination with immunohistochemistry. Relevant findings from other laboratories are cited and discussed. The general conclusion is that relatively large amounts of actin and tubulin are required to construct a regenerating axon and that these materials mainly originate in the parent axon. The motor enzymes that carry these proteins forward as macromolecules include kinesin and dynein but probably also include myosin. PMID:19927086

  17. Axon guidance and neuronal migration research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Proper migration of neuronal somas and axonal growth cones to designated locations in the developing brain is essential for the assembly of functional neuronal circuits.Rapid progress in research of axon guidance and neuronal migration has been made in the last twenty years.Chinese researchers began their exploration in this field ten years ago and have made significant contributions in clarifying the signal transduction of axon guidance and neuronal migration.Several unique experimental approaches,including the migration assay of single isolated neurons in response to locally delivered guidance cues,have been developed by Chinese neuroscientists to investigate the molecular machinery underlying these guidance events.

  18. 多级鼓泡塔内液体速度分布的实验研究%Experimental study on liquid velocity distribution in multi-stage bubble column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊亚超; 靳海波; 秦岭; 杨索和; 何广湘

    2011-01-01

    液体循环流动是多级鼓泡塔重要流体力学特征之一,文中在内径为282 mm,高2000 mm的鼓泡塔内,采用不同类型的筛板将普通鼓泡塔分割成双级气液鼓泡塔.采用Pavlov管测液速的方法考察了不同筛板、不同表观气速下该鼓泡塔中上下二侧的液体速度分布.根据实验结果得出了液体速度在塔中心处最大,且与表观气速有关,随着表观气速的增大而增大;气液鼓泡塔内液速分布呈半抛物线状,在量纲一径向位置0.7左右处,液体速度方向发生改变;加入筛板后,径向速度区发生改变,转折点的位置与筛板的类型有关;同时筛板的加入对鼓泡塔的湍流会有一定程度的抑制,筛板对鼓泡塔上侧液速径向分布的影响明显大于对鼓泡塔下侧液速径向分布的影响.%The characteristic of liquid circulation flow is an important feature of hydrodynamics in multi-stage bubble columns. A bubble column of 282 mm in diameter and 2000 mm in height was selected, and various kinds of sieve plates were introduced to divide a conventional gas-liquid column into a two-stage gas-liquid bubble column. The effects of sieve plate and superficial gas velocity on the liquid velocity distribution in the upper and the lower of the multi-stage gas-liquid bubble column were studied by the method of Pavlov tube. The experimental results show that the maximum liquid velocity appears in the center of the bubble column, and increases with an increase of superficial gas velocity. The curves of liquid velocity distribution are half-parabolic in a gas-liquid bubble column, and liquid velocity direction is changed at around 0. 7 of dimensional-one radial direction. Meanwhile, the introduction of sieve plate suppresses the liquid turbulent flow, and affects the inversion point of liquid velocity. Moreover, the value of inversion point changes with the difference of sieve plate structure. The radial distribution of liquid velocity on the

  19. Unc-51/ATG1 controls axonal and dendritic development via kinesin-mediated vesicle transport in the Drosophila brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Mochizuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Members of the evolutionary conserved Ser/Thr kinase Unc-51 family are key regulatory proteins that control neural development in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Previous studies have suggested diverse functions for the Unc-51 protein, including axonal elongation, growth cone guidance, and synaptic vesicle transport. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we have investigated the functional significance of Unc-51-mediated vesicle transport in the development of complex brain structures in Drosophila. We show that Unc-51 preferentially accumulates in newly elongating axons of the mushroom body, a center of olfactory learning in flies. Mutations in unc-51 cause disintegration of the core of the developing mushroom body, with mislocalization of Fasciclin II (Fas II, an IgG-family cell adhesion molecule important for axonal guidance and fasciculation. In unc-51 mutants, Fas II accumulates in the cell bodies, calyx, and the proximal peduncle. Furthermore, we show that mutations in unc-51 cause aberrant overshooting of dendrites in the mushroom body and the antennal lobe. Loss of unc-51 function leads to marked accumulation of Rab5 and Golgi components, whereas the localization of dendrite-specific proteins, such as Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM and No distributive disjunction (Nod, remains unaltered. Genetic analyses of kinesin light chain (Klc and unc-51 double heterozygotes suggest the importance of kinesin-mediated membrane transport for axonal and dendritic development. Moreover, our data demonstrate that loss of Klc activity causes similar axonal and dendritic defects in mushroom body neurons, recapitulating the salient feature of the developmental abnormalities caused by unc-51 mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Unc-51 plays pivotal roles in the axonal and dendritic development of the Drosophila brain. Unc-51-mediated membrane vesicle transport is important in targeted localization of guidance molecules

  20. Inhibitory effects of draxin on axonal outgrowth and migration of precerebellar neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyadh, M Asrafuzzaman; Shinmyo, Yohei; Ohta, Kunimasa; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2014-06-20

    The rhombic lip, a dorsal stripe of the neuroepithelium lining the edge of the fourth ventricle, is the site of origin of precerebellar neurons (PCN), which migrate tangentially towards the floor plate. After reaching the floor plate, they project their axons to the cerebellum. Although previous studies have shown that the guidance molecules Netrin/DCC and Slit/Robo have critical roles in PCN migration, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain poorly understood. Here, we report that draxin, a repulsive axon guidance protein, is involved in PCN development. We found that draxin is expressed in the rhombic lip and migratory stream of some PCN in the developing hindbrain of mice. In addition, draxin inhibited neurite outgrowth and nuclei migration from rhombic lip explants. These results suggest that draxin functions as a repulsive guidance cue for PCN migration. However, we observed no significant differences in PCN distribution between draxin(-/-) and wild type embryos. Thus, draxin and other axon guidance cues may have redundant roles in PCN migration.

  1. Regulation of Intracellular Structural Tension by Talin in the Axon Growth and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingyu, Wang; Fanjie, Meng; Zhengzheng, Ding; Baosheng, Huang; Chao, Yang; Yi, Pan; Huiwen, Wu; Jun, Guo; Gang, Hu

    2016-09-01

    Intracellular tension is the most important characteristic of neuron polarization as well as the growth and regeneration of axons, which can be generated by motor proteins and conducted along the cytoskeleton. To better understand this process, we created Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tension probes that can be incorporated into microfilaments to provide a real-time measurement of forces in neuron cytoskeletons. We found that our probe could be used to assess the structural tension of neuron polarity. Nerve growth factor (NGF) upregulated structural forces, whereas the glial-scar inhibitors chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and aggrecan weakened such forces. Notably, the tension across axons was distributed uniformly and remarkably stronger than that in the cell body in NGF-stimulated neurons. The mechanosensors talin/vinculin could antagonize the effect of glial-scar inhibitors via structural forces. However, E-cadherin was closely associated with glial-scar inhibitor-induced downregulation of structural forces. Talin/vinculin was involved in the negative regulation of E-cadherin transcription through the nuclear factor-kappa B pathway. Collectively, this study clarified the mechanism underlying intracellular tension in the growth and regeneration of axons which, conversely, can be regulated by talin and E-cadherin. PMID:26298665

  2. Axon diameter mapping in crossing fibers with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hui; Dyrby, Tim B; Alexander, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    tissue than measures derived from diffusion tensor imaging. Most existing techniques for axon diameter mapping assume a single axon orientation in the tissue model, which limits their application to only the most coherently oriented brain white matter, such as the corpus callosum, where the single...... orientation assumption is a reasonable one. However, fiber crossings and other complex configurations are widespread in the brain. In such areas, the existing techniques will fail to provide useful axon diameter indices for any of the individual fiber populations. We propose a novel crossing fiber tissue...... of the technique by establishing reasonable axon diameter indices in the crossing region at the interface of the cingulum and the corpus callosum....

  3. Internodal function in normal and regenerated mammalian axons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, M; Krarup, C

    2007-01-01

    human nerves. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that persistently shorter regenerated internodes lead to increased Na+/K+-pump activity in response to increased Na+ entry during conduction. This may impair axonal function during prolonged repetitive activity and drain the energy reserves of the axons.......AIM: Following Wallerian degeneration, peripheral myelinated axons have the ability to regenerate and, given a proper pathway, establish functional connections with targets. In spite of this capacity, the clinical outcome of nerve regeneration remains unsatisfactory. Early studies have found...... that regenerated internodes remain persistently short though this abnormality did not seem to influence recovery in conduction. It remains unclear to which extent abnormalities in axonal function itself may contribute to the poor outcome of nerve regeneration. METHODS: We review experimental evidence indicating...

  4. Structural plasticity of axon terminals in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolla, Nadine; Galimberti, Ivan; Caroni, Pico

    2007-10-01

    There is now conclusive evidence for widespread ongoing structural plasticity of presynaptic boutons and axon side-branches in the adult brain. The plasticity complements that of postsynaptic spines, but axonal plasticity samples larger volumes of neuropil, and has a larger impact on circuit remodeling. Axons from distinct neurons exhibit unique ratios of stable (t1/2>9 months) and dynamic (t1/2 5-20 days) boutons, which persist as spatially intermingled subgroups along terminal arbors. In addition, phases of side-branch dynamics mediate larger scale remodeling guided by synaptogenesis. The plasticity is most pronounced during critical periods; its patterns and outcome are controlled by Hebbian mechanisms and intrinsic neuronal factors. Novel experience, skill learning, life-style, and age can persistently modify local circuit structure through axonal structural plasticity.

  5. Saltatory conduction in unmyelinated axons: Clustering of Na+ channels on lipid rafts allows micro-saltatory conduction in C-fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali eNeishabouri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The action potential (AP, the fundamental signal of the nervous system, is carried by two types of axons: unmyelinated and myelinated fibers. In the former the action potential propagates continuously along the axon as established in large-diameter fibers. In the latter axons the AP jumps along the Nodes of Ranvier – discrete, anatomically specialized regions which contain very high densities of sodium ion (Na + channels. Therefore saltatory conduction is thought as the hallmark of myelinated axons, which enables faster and more reliable propagation of signals than in unmyelinated axons of same outer diameter.Recent molecular anatomy showed that in C-fibers, the very thin (0.1 μm diameter axons of the peripheral nervous system, Nav1.8 channels are clustered together on lipid rafts that float in the cell membrane. This localized concentration of Na+ channels resembles in structure the ion channel organization at the Nodes of Ranvier, yet it is currently unknown whether this translates into equivalent phenomenon of saltatory conduction or related-functional benefits and efficiencies. Therefore, we modeled biophysically realistic unmyelinated axons with both conventional and lipid-raft based organization of Na+ channels. We find that action potentials are reliably conducted in a micro-saltatory fashion along lipid rafts.Comparing APs in unmyelinated fibers with and without lipid rafts did not reveal any significant difference in either the metabolic cost or AP propagation velocity. By investigating the efficiency of AP propagation over Nav1.8 channels, we find however that the specific inactivation properties of these channels significantly increase the metabolic cost of signaling in C-fibers.

  6. Changes in prefrontal axons may disrupt the network in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Zikopoulos, Basilis; Barbas, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Neural communication is disrupted in autism by unknown mechanisms. Here we examined whether in autism there are changes in axons, which are the conduit for neural communication. We investigated single axons and their ultrastructure in the white matter of post-mortem human brain tissue below the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), orbitofrontal (OFC), and lateral (LPFC) prefrontal cortices, which are associated with attention, social interactions, and emotions and have been consistently implicate...

  7. Fcγ receptor-mediated inflammation inhibits axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Anti-glycan/ganglioside antibodies are the most common immune effectors found in patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which is a peripheral autoimmune neuropathy. We previously reported that disease-relevant anti-glycan autoantibodies inhibited axon regeneration, which echo the clinical association of these antibodies and poor recovery in Guillain-Barré Syndrome. However, the specific molecular and cellular elements involved in this antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration are not previously defined. This study examined the role of Fcγ receptors and macrophages in the antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration. A well characterized antibody passive transfer sciatic nerve crush and transplant models were used to study the anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration in wild type and various mutant and transgenic mice with altered expression of specific Fcγ receptors and macrophage/microglia populations. Outcome measures included behavior, electrophysiology, morphometry, immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting. We demonstrate that the presence of autoantibodies, directed against neuronal/axonal cell surface gangliosides, in the injured mammalian peripheral nerves switch the proregenerative inflammatory environment to growth inhibitory milieu by engaging specific activating Fcγ receptors on recruited monocyte-derived macrophages to cause severe inhibition of axon regeneration. Our data demonstrate that the antibody orchestrated Fcγ receptor-mediated switch in inflammation is one mechanism underlying inhibition of axon regeneration. These findings have clinical implications for nerve repair and recovery in antibody-mediated immune neuropathies. Our results add to the complexity of axon regeneration in injured peripheral and central nervous systems as adverse effects of B cells and autoantibodies on neural injury and repair are increasingly recognized.

  8. Axonal neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    GORSON, K.; Ropper, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is typically a predominantly demyelinating process that may have additional features of axonal degeneration. Sixteen patients with MGUS and a pure or predominantly axonal neuropathy are reported and compared with 20 consecutive patients with demyelinating neuropathy and MGUS who were seen during the same period.
METHODS—Retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients w...

  9. 6-Sulphated chondroitins have a positive influence on axonal regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Lin

    Full Text Available Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs upregulated in the glial scar inhibit axon regeneration via their sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. Chondroitin 6-sulphotransferase-1 (C6ST-1 is upregulated after injury leading to an increase in 6-sulphated GAG. In this study, we ask if this increase in 6-sulphated GAG is responsible for the increased inhibition within the glial scar, or whether it represents a partial reversion to the permissive embryonic state dominated by 6-sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. Using C6ST-1 knockout mice (KO, we studied post-injury changes in chondroitin sulphotransferase (CSST expression and the effect of chondroitin 6-sulphates on both central and peripheral axon regeneration. After CNS injury, wild-type animals (WT showed an increase in mRNA for C6ST-1, C6ST-2 and C4ST-1, but KO did not upregulate any CSSTs. After PNS injury, while WT upregulated C6ST-1, KO showed an upregulation of C6ST-2. We examined regeneration of nigrostriatal axons, which demonstrate mild spontaneous axon regeneration in the WT. KO showed many fewer regenerating axons and more axonal retraction than WT. However, in the PNS, repair of the median and ulnar nerves led to similar and normal levels of axon regeneration in both WT and KO. Functional tests on plasticity after the repair also showed no evidence of enhanced plasticity in the KO. Our results suggest that the upregulation of 6-sulphated GAG after injury makes the extracellular matrix more permissive for axon regeneration, and that the balance of different CSs in the microenvironment around the lesion site is an important factor in determining the outcome of nervous system injury.

  10. Axonal maintenance, glia, exosomes, and heat shock proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Tytell; Lasek, Raymond J.; Harold Gainer

    2016-01-01

    Of all cellular specializations, the axon is especially distinctive because it is a narrow cylinder of specialized cytoplasm called axoplasm with a length that may be orders of magnitude greater than the diameter of the cell body from which it originates. Thus, the volume of axoplasm can be much greater than the cytoplasm in the cell body. This fact raises a logistical problem with regard to axonal maintenance. Many of the components of axoplasm, such as soluble proteins and cytoskeleton, are...

  11. Comparison of 1D PDA sampling methods to obtain drop size and velocity distributions inside a spray cone of agricultural nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holterman, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    In agriculture, spray drift research is carried out in field experiments and by computer simulation. Regarding the latter approach, accurate knowledge of the initial spray is required. Not only is the overall drop size distribution of the spray an important factor in the spraying process, but also i

  12. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  13. Experimental Measurements for the Velocity Distribution of Turbulent Open-channel Flow over a Permeable Rough Bed%粗糙透水床面明渠水流垂线流速分布的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兴伟; 林木生; 林炳青

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experimental research is reported, which considered effects of bed permeabili- ty on the velocity distribution of turbulent open-channel flow. The experiment was conducted in a glass-sided flume that was 20 m long, 0.8 m wide and 0. 6 m deep, and its bed was glued a layer of uniform marbles with a diameter of 1 cm. Located at a distance of 10 m from the upstream end of the flume was a rectangular recess that was 1.65 m long and 0. 7 m wide. The permeable bed is simulated in the recess where is well packed with eleven layers of the same marble. The velocity measurements were carried out using a laser Doppler velocimeter ( LDV, DANTEC) and the probe of the LDV was installed by a high resolution traversing system. The measurements were conducted under three flow conditions. Velocity distribution at 2 locations for impermeable bed and 3 for permeable bed were measured. The results show that the velocity distribution for impermeable bed follows the law of the wall when the reference level is lowered to 0. 25-diameter of the marble top. For permeable bed, its distribution is similar to that over impermeable bed, but with larger shear velocity and smaller integra- tion constant. Still, how the shear velocity and integration constant vary need further investigation.%冲积河流的粗颗粒河床,具有较大的渗透性,河床渗透对明渠水流运动特性的影响不可忽视.通过水槽试验,研究了河床渗透对垂线流速分布的影响.距试验玻璃水槽进口10m处,设计一个长1.65m、宽0.7m的收缩段,由12层直径1cm的玻璃珠紧密有规则铺成,以模拟粗糙透水床面.其上下游铺上1层相同玻璃珠,形成粗糙度相同但不透水的床面.垂线流速分布通过激光多普勒测速仪及配套的高精度坐标架系统测量.试验施放了3种流量,分别在不透水和透水床面进行垂线流速分布测量.试验结果表明:1)不透水床面的垂线流速分布符合

  14. Ultrastructural observation of effect of moderate hypothermia on axonal damage in an animal model of diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓川; 唐文渊; 郑履平

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of moderate hypothermia on responses of axonal cytoskeleton to axonal injury in the acute stage of injury. Methods: Of fifteen adult guinea pigs, twelve animals were subjected to stretch injury to the right optic nerves and divided into the normothermic group (n=6) in which the animal's core temperature was maintained at 36.0-37.5℃ and the hypothermia group (n=6) in which the core temperature was reduced to 32.0-32.5℃ after stretch injury. Remaining three animals sustained no injury to the right optic nerves and served as control group. Half of injured animals (n=3) of either normothermic group or hypothermic group were killed at either 2 hours or 4 hours after injury. The ultrastructural changes of axonal cytoskeleton of the right optic nerve fibers from the animals were examined under a transmission electron microscope and analyzed by quantitative analysis with a computer image analysis system. Results: At 2 hours after stretch injury, there was a significant reduction in the mean number of microtubules (P<0.001), and a significant increase in the mean intermicrotubule spacing (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in axons of all sizes in normothermic animals. The mean number of neurofilaments also decreased statistically (P<0.01) in large and medium subgroups of axons in the same experimental group at 2 hours. By 4 hours, the large subgroup of axons in normothermic animals still demonstrated a significant decline in the mean number of microtubules (P<0.01) and an increase in the mean intermicrotubule spacing (P<0.05), while the medium and small subgroups of axons displayed a significant increase in the mean number of neurofilaments (P<0.05) and reduction in the mean interneurofilament spacing (P<0.05). On the contrary, either the mean number of microtubules and the mean intermicrotubule spacing, or the mean number of neurofilaments and interneurofilament spacing in axons of all sizes in hypothermic stretch-injured animals was not

  15. Portable Conduction Velocity Experiments Using Earthworms for the College and High School Neuroscience Teaching Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Kyle M.; Gage, Gregory J.; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Wilson, W. Jeffrey; Marzullo, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The earthworm is ideal for studying action potential conduction velocity in a classroom setting, as its simple linear anatomy allows easy axon length measurements and the worm's sparse coding allows single action potentials to be easily identified. The earthworm has two giant fiber systems (lateral and medial) with different conduction…

  16. 3D high resolution mineral phase distribution and seismic velocity structure of the transition zone: predicted by a full spherical-shell compressible mantle convection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, T.; Heister, T.; Van Den Berg, A. P.; Jacobs, M.; Bangerth, W.

    2011-12-01

    We present high resolution 3D results of the complex mineral phase distribution in the transition zone obtained by numerical modelling of mantle convection. We extend the work by [Jacobs and van den Berg, 2011] to 3D and illustrate the efficiency of adaptive mesh refinement for capturing the complex spatial distribution and sharp phase transitions as predicted by their model. The underlying thermodynamical model is based on lattice dynamics which allows to predict thermophysical properties and seismic wave speeds for the applied magnesium-endmember olivine-pyroxene mineralogical model. The use of 3D geometry allows more realistic prediction of phase distribution and seismic wave speeds resulting from 3D flow processes involving the Earth's transition zone and more significant comparisons with interpretations from seismic tomography and seismic reflectivity studies aimed at the transition zone. Model results are generated with a recently developed geodynamics modeling application based on dealII (www.dealii.org). We extended this model to incorporate both a general thermodynamic model, represented by P,T space tabulated thermophysical properties, and a solution strategy that allows for compressible flow. When modeling compressible flow in the so called truncated anelastic approximation framework we have to adapt the solver strategy that has been proven by several authors to be highly efficient for incompressible flow to incorporate an extra term in the continuity equation. We present several possible solution strategies and discuss their implication in terms of robustness and computational efficiency.

  17. Rabies Virus Hijacks and accelerates the p75NTR retrograde axonal transport machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluska, Shani; Zahavi, Eitan Erez; Chein, Michael; Gradus, Tal; Bauer, Anja; Finke, Stefan; Perlson, Eran

    2014-08-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) is a neurotropic virus that depends on long distance axonal transport in order to reach the central nervous system (CNS). The strategy RABV uses to hijack the cellular transport machinery is still not clear. It is thought that RABV interacts with membrane receptors in order to internalize and exploit the endosomal trafficking pathway, yet this has never been demonstrated directly. The p75 Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) receptor (p75NTR) binds RABV Glycoprotein (RABV-G) with high affinity. However, as p75NTR is not essential for RABV infection, the specific role of this interaction remains in question. Here we used live cell imaging to track RABV entry at nerve terminals and studied its retrograde transport along the axon with and without the p75NTR receptor. First, we found that NGF, an endogenous p75NTR ligand, and RABV, are localized in corresponding domains along nerve tips. RABV and NGF were internalized at similar time frames, suggesting comparable entry machineries. Next, we demonstrated that RABV could internalize together with p75NTR. Characterizing RABV retrograde movement along the axon, we showed the virus is transported in acidic compartments, mostly with p75NTR. Interestingly, RABV is transported faster than NGF, suggesting that RABV not only hijacks the transport machinery but can also manipulate it. Co-transport of RABV and NGF identified two modes of transport, slow and fast, that may represent a differential control of the trafficking machinery by RABV. Finally, we determined that p75NTR-dependent transport of RABV is faster and more directed than p75NTR-independent RABV transport. This fast route to the neuronal cell body is characterized by both an increase in instantaneous velocities and fewer, shorter stops en route. Hence, RABV may employ p75NTR-dependent transport as a fast mechanism to facilitate movement to the CNS.

  18. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  19. Wnt5a regulates midbrain dopaminergic axon growth and guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brette D Blakely

    Full Text Available During development, precise temporal and spatial gradients are responsible for guiding axons to their appropriate targets. Within the developing ventral midbrain (VM the cues that guide dopaminergic (DA axons to their forebrain targets remain to be fully elucidated. Wnts are morphogens that have been identified as axon guidance molecules. Several Wnts are expressed in the VM where they regulate the birth of DA neurons. Here, we describe that a precise temporo-spatial expression of Wnt5a accompanies the development of nigrostriatal projections by VM DA neurons. In mice at E11.5, Wnt5a is expressed in the VM where it was found to promote DA neurite and axonal growth in VM primary cultures. By E14.5, when DA axons are approaching their striatal target, Wnt5a causes DA neurite retraction in primary cultures. Co-culture of VM explants with Wnt5a-overexpressing cell aggregates revealed that Wnt5a is capable of repelling DA neurites. Antagonism experiments revealed that the effects of Wnt5a are mediated by the Frizzled receptors and by the small GTPase, Rac1 (a component of the non-canonical Wnt planar cell polarity pathway. Moreover, the effects were specific as they could be blocked by Wnt5a antibody, sFRPs and RYK-Fc. The importance of Wnt5a in DA axon morphogenesis was further verified in Wnt5a-/- mice, where fasciculation of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB as well as the density of DA neurites in the MFB and striatal terminals were disrupted. Thus, our results identify a novel role of Wnt5a in DA axon growth and guidance.

  20. Regulation of Microtubule Dynamics in Axon Regeneration: Insights from C. elegans [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngang Heok Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of an axon to regenerate is regulated by its external environment and by cell-intrinsic factors. Studies in a variety of organisms suggest that alterations in axonal microtubule (MT dynamics have potent effects on axon regeneration. We review recent findings on the regulation of MT dynamics during axon regeneration, focusing on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In C. elegans the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK promotes axon regeneration, whereas the exchange factor for Arf6 (EFA-6 inhibits axon regeneration. Both DLK and EFA-6 respond to injury and control axon regeneration in part via MT dynamics. How the DLK and EFA-6 pathways are related is a topic of active investigation, as is the mechanism by which EFA-6 responds to axonal injury. We evaluate potential candidates, such as the MT affinity-regulating kinase PAR-1/MARK, in regulation of EFA-6 and axonal MT dynamics in regeneration.

  1. Coordinated motor neuron axon growth and neuromuscular synaptogenesis are promoted by CPG15 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Cline, Hollis T

    2005-02-17

    We have used in vivo time-lapse two-photon imaging of single motor neuron axons labeled with GFP combined with labeling of presynaptic vesicle clusters and postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors in Xenopus laevis tadpoles to determine the dynamic rearrangement of individual axon branches and synaptogenesis during motor axon arbor development. Control GFP-labeled axons are highly dynamic during the period when axon arbors are elaborating. Axon branches emerge from sites of synaptic vesicle clusters. These data indicate that motor neuron axon elaboration and synaptogenesis are concurrent and iterative. We tested the role of Candidate Plasticity Gene 15 (CPG15, also known as Neuritin), an activity-regulated gene that is expressed in the developing motor neurons in this process. CPG15 expression enhances the development of motor neuron axon arbors by promoting neuromuscular synaptogenesis and by increasing the addition of new axon branches. PMID:15721237

  2. Pore Velocity Estimation Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devary, J. L.; Doctor, P. G.

    1982-08-01

    Geostatistical data analysis techniques were used to stochastically model the spatial variability of groundwater pore velocity in a potential waste repository site. Kriging algorithms were applied to Hanford Reservation data to estimate hydraulic conductivities, hydraulic head gradients, and pore velocities. A first-order Taylor series expansion for pore velocity was used to statistically combine hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic head gradient, and effective porosity surfaces and uncertainties to characterize the pore velocity uncertainty. Use of these techniques permits the estimation of pore velocity uncertainties when pore velocity measurements do not exist. Large pore velocity estimation uncertainties were found to be located in the region where the hydraulic head gradient relative uncertainty was maximal.

  3. Difference in trafficking of brain-derived neurotrophic factor between axons and dendrites of cortical neurons, revealed by live-cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohara Keigo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is sorted into a regulated secretory pathway of neurons, is supposed to act retrogradely through dendrites on presynaptic neurons or anterogradely through axons on postsynaptic neurons. Depending on which is the case, the pattern and direction of trafficking of BDNF in dendrites and axons are expected to be different. To address this issue, we analyzed movements of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged BDNF in axons and dendrites of living cortical neurons by time-lapse imaging. In part of the experiments, the expression of BDNF tagged with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was compared with that of nerve growth factor (NGF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, to see whether fluorescent protein-tagged BDNF is expressed in a manner specific to this neurotrophin. Results We found that BDNF tagged with GFP or CFP was expressed in a punctated manner in dendrites and axons in about two-thirds of neurons into which plasmid cDNAs had been injected, while NGF tagged with GFP or YFP was diffusely expressed even in dendrites in about 70% of the plasmid-injected neurons. In neurons in which BDNF-GFP was expressed as vesicular puncta in axons, 59 and 23% of the puncta were moving rapidly in the anterograde and retrograde directions, respectively. On the other hand, 64% of BDNF-GFP puncta in dendrites did not move at all or fluttered back and forth within a short distance. The rest of the puncta in dendrites were moving relatively smoothly in either direction, but their mean velocity of transport, 0.47 ± 0.23 (SD μm/s, was slower than that of the moving puncta in axons (0.73 ± 0.26 μm/s. Conclusion The present results show that the pattern and velocity of the trafficking of fluorescence protein-tagged BDNF are different between axons and dendrites, and suggest that the anterograde transport in axons may be the dominant stream of BDNF to release sites.

  4. A novel technique using hydrophilic polymers to promote axonal fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravinder Bamba; D Colton Riley; Nathaniel D Kelm; Mark D Does; Richard D Dortch; Wesley P hTayer

    2016-01-01

    The management of traumatic peripheral nerve injury remains a considerable concern for clinicians. With minimal innovations in surgical technique and a limited number of specialists trained to treat peripheral nerve injury, outcomes of surgical intervention have been unpredictable. The inability to manipulate the pathophysiology of nerve injury (i.e., Wallerian degeneration) has left scientists and clinicians depending on the slow and lengthy process of axonal regeneration (~1 mm/day). When axons are severed, the endings undergo calcium-mediated plasmalemmal sealing, which limits the ability of the axon to be primarily re-paired. Polythethylene glycol (PEG) in combination with a bioengineered process overcomes the inability to fuse axons. The mechanism for PEG axonal fusion is not clearly understood, but multiple studies have shown that a providing a calcium-free environment is essential to the process known as PEG fusion. The proposed mechanism is PEG-induced lipid bilayer fusion by removing the hydration barrier surrounding the axolemma and reducing the activation energy required for membrane fusion to occur. This review highlights PEG fusion, its past and current studies, and future directions in PEG fusion.

  5. Highly effective photonic cue for repulsive axonal guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan J Black

    Full Text Available In vivo nerve repair requires not only the ability to regenerate damaged axons, but most importantly, the ability to guide developing or regenerating axons along paths that will result in functional connections. Furthermore, basic studies in neuroscience and neuro-electronic interface design require the ability to construct in vitro neural circuitry. Both these applications require the development of a noninvasive, highly effective tool for axonal growth-cone guidance. To date, a myriad of technologies have been introduced based on chemical, electrical, mechanical, and hybrid approaches (such as electro-chemical, optofluidic flow and photo-chemical methods. These methods are either lacking in desired spatial and temporal selectivity or require the introduction of invasive external factors. Within the last fifteen years however, several attractive guidance cues have been developed using purely light based cues to achieve axonal guidance. Here, we report a novel, purely optical repulsive guidance technique that uses low power, near infrared light, and demonstrates the guidance of primary goldfish retinal ganglion cell axons through turns of up to 120 degrees and over distances of ∼90 µm.

  6. Subtypes of GABAergic neurons project axons in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyoshi Higo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons in the neocortex have been regarded as interneurons and speculated to modulate the activity of neurons locally. Recently, however, several experiments revealed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons project cortico-cortically with long axons. In this study, we illustrate Golgi-like images of the nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons using a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d reaction and follow the emanating axon branches in cat brain sections. These axon branches projected cortico-cortically with other non-labeled arcuate fibers, contra-laterally via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure. The labeled fibers were not limited to the neocortex but found also in the fimbria of the hippocampus. In order to have additional information on these GABAergic neuron projections, we investigated green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled GABAergic neurons in GAD67-Cre knock-in / GFP Cre-reporter mice. GFP-labeled axons emanate densely, especially in the fimbria, a small number in the anterior commissure, and very sparsely in the corpus callosum. These two different approaches confirm that not only nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons but also other subtypes of GABAergic neurons project long axons in the cerebral cortex and are in a position to be involved in information processing.

  7. Functional complexity of the axonal growth cone: a proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estrada-Bernal

    Full Text Available The growth cone, the tip of the emerging neurite, plays a crucial role in establishing the wiring of the developing nervous system. We performed an extensive proteomic analysis of axonal growth cones isolated from the brains of fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. Approximately 2000 proteins were identified at ≥ 99% confidence level. Using informatics, including functional annotation cluster and KEGG pathway analysis, we found great diversity of proteins involved in axonal pathfinding, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular traffic and carbohydrate metabolism, as expected. We also found a large and complex array of proteins involved in translation, protein folding, posttranslational processing, and proteasome/ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Immunofluorescence studies performed on hippocampal neurons in culture confirmed the presence in the axonal growth cone of proteins representative of these processes. These analyses also provide evidence for rough endoplasmic reticulum and reveal a reticular structure equipped with Golgi-like functions in the axonal growth cone. Furthermore, Western blot revealed the growth cone enrichment, relative to fetal brain homogenate, of some of the proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and catabolism. Our study provides a resource for further research and amplifies the relatively recently developed concept that the axonal growth cone is equipped with proteins capable of performing a highly diverse range of functions.

  8. Number and topography of cones, rods and optic nerve axons in New and Old World primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Barbara L; Franco, Edna Cristina S; Yamada, Elizabeth S; Crowley, Justin C; Parsons, Michael; Muniz, José Augusto P C; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L

    2008-01-01

    To better understand the evolution of spatial and color vision, the number and spatial distributions of cones, rods, and optic nerve axon numbers were assessed in seven New World primates (Cebus apella, Saimiri ustius, Saguinus midas niger, Alouatta caraya, Aotus azarae, Calllithrix jacchus, and Callicebus moloch). The spatial distribution and number of rods and cones was determined from counts of retinal whole mounts. Optic axon number was determined from optic nerve sections by electron microscopy. These data were amassed with existing data on retinal cell number and distribution in Old World primates, and the scaling of relative densities and numbers with respect to retinal area, eye and brain sizes, and foveal specializations were evaluated. Regular scaling of all cell types was observed, with the exceptionally large, rod-enriched retina of the nocturnal owl monkey Aotus azarae, and the unusually high cone density of the fovea of the trichromatic howler monkey Alouatta caraya presenting interesting variations on this basic plan. Over all species, the lawful scaling of rods, cones, and retinal ganglion cell number is hypothesized to result from a conserved sequence of cell generation that defends retinal acuity and sensitivity over a large range of eye sizes. PMID:18598400

  9. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Victor ePetersen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The axon initial segment (AIS is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS in live tissue can be difficult because its identification is not always reliable. Here we provide a new technique allowing a fast and reliable identification of the AIS in live brain slice preparations. By simultaneous recoding of extracellular local field potentials and whole-cell patch-clamp recording of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from the brain.

  10. Transport coefficients and orientational distributions of dilute colloidal dispersions composed of hematite particles (for an external magnetic field parallel to the angular velocity vector of simple shear flow)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Akira [Department of Machine Intelligence and System Engineering, Faculty of System Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, 84-4, Ebinokuchi, Tsuchiya-aza, Yuri-Honjo 015-0055 (Japan)], E-mail: asatoh@akita-pu.ac.jp; Hayasaka, Ryo [Department of Machine Intelligence and System Engineering, Faculty of System Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, 84-4, Ebinokuchi, Tsuchiya-aza, Yuri-Honjo 015-0055 (Japan); Majima, Tamotsu [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, 1-33, Yayoicho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    We have treated a dilute dispersion composed of ferromagnetic rodlike particles with a magnetic moment normal to the particle axis, such as hematites, to investigate the influences of the magnetic field strength, shear rate, and random forces on the orientational distribution of rodlike particles and also on transport coefficients, such as viscosity and diffusion coefficient. In the present analysis, these rodlike particles are assumed to conduct the rotational Brownian motion in a simple shear flow as well as an external magnetic field. The results obtained here are summarized as follows. In the case of a strong magnetic field and a smaller shear rate, the rodlike particle can freely rotate in the xy-plane with the magnetic moment continuing to point the magnetic field direction. On the other hand, for a strong shear flow, the particle has a tendency to incline in the flow direction with the magnetic moment pointing to the magnetic field direction. In the case of the magnetic field applied normal to the direction of the sedimentation, the diffusion coefficient gives rise to smaller values than expected, since the rodlike particle sediments with the particle axis inclining toward directions normal to the movement direction and, of course, toward the direction along that direction.

  11. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    CERN Document Server

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J; Martinez, Jose L Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramer-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  12. Recent advances in the genetics of hereditary axonal sensory-motor neuropathies type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Teepu

    2011-06-01

    Hereditary axonal motor and sensory neuropathies or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2) are characterized clinically by distal muscle weakness and atrophy, sensory loss, and foot deformities. Conduction velocities are usually in the normal range or mildly slowed. The majority of CMT2 are autosomal-dominant but autosomal-recessive forms have been described. The number of genes associated with CMT2 have significantly increased in the past decade, with the gene causing CMT2C/SPSMA being the last one discovered. More than 10 genes are now associated with different subtypes of CMT2, which are classified from CMT2A to CMT2N. These genes have distinct functions, but some appear to be involved in common biological pathways, therefore, providing important clues for understanding the pathogenic mechanism of these heterogeneous disorders.

  13. Neurofilament proteins in axonal regeneration and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao Wang; Minfei Wu; Chuanjun Zhan; Enyuan Ma; Maoguang Yang; Xiaoyu Yang; Yingpu Li

    2012-01-01

    Neurofilament protein is a component of the mature neuronal cytoskeleton, and it interacts with the zygosome, which is mediated by neurofilament-related proteins. Neurofilament protein regulates enzyme function and the structure of linker proteins. In addition, neurofilament gene expression plays an important role in nervous system development. Previous studies have shown that neurofilament gene transcriptional regulation is crucial for neurofilament protein expression, especially in axonal regeneration and degenerative diseases. Post-transcriptional regulation increased neurofilament protein gene transcription during axonal regeneration, ultimately resulting in a pattern of neurofilament protein expression. An expression imbalance of post-transcriptional regulatory proteins and other disorders could lead to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or other neurodegenerative diseases. These findings indicated that after transcription, neurofilament protein regulated expression of related proteins and promoted regeneration of damaged axons, suggesting that regulation disorders could lead to neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Turbulent Velocity Structure in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Ossenkopf, Volker; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2002-01-01

    We compare velocity structure observed in the Polaris Flare molecular cloud at scales ranging from 0.015 pc to 20 pc to the velocity structure of a suite of simulations of supersonic hydrodynamic and MHD turbulence computed with the ZEUS MHD code. We examine different methods of characterising the structure, including a scanning-beam size-linewidth relation, structure functions, velocity and velocity difference probability distribution functions (PDFs), and the Delta-variance wavelet transform, and use them to compare models and observations. The Delta-variance is most sensitive in detecting characteristic scales and varying scaling laws, but is limited in the observational application by its lack of intensity weighting. We compare the true velocity PDF in our models to simulated observations of velocity centroids and average line profiles in optically thin lines, and find that the line profiles reflect the true PDF better. The observed velocity structure is consistent with supersonic turbulence showing a com...

  15. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T. [Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Perera, Surangi N. [Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53205 (United States); Svoboda, Kurt R., E-mail: svobodak@uwm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53205 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  16. Axonal transport of cadmium in the olfactory nerve of the pike

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    109Cd2+ was applied in the olfactory chambers of pikes (Esox lucius) and the dynamics of the axoplasmic flow of the metal was determined in the olfactory nerves by gamma spectrometry and autoradiography. The results showed that the 109Cd2+ is transported at a constant rate along the olfactory nerves. The profile of the 109Cd2+ in the nerves showed a wave front of transported metal followed by a saddle region. When the nasal chambers were washed 2 hr after application of the 109Cd2+ well-defined transport peaks for the metal were seen in the olfactory axons. The maximal velocity for the transport of 109Cd2+, which corresponds to the movement of the wave front, was 2.38±0.10 mm/hr (mean±S.E.) at the experimental temperature (10 deg. C). The average velocity for the transport of the 109Cd2+, which corresponds to the peak apex movement of the wave, was 2.18±0.05 mm/hr (mean ±S.E.) at 10 deg. C. The tranported 109Cd2+ was strongly accumulated in the anterior parts of the olfactory bulbs, whereas in other brain areas the levels of the metal remained low. Autoradiography of a pike exposed to 109Cd2+ via the water showed a strong labelling in the receptor-cell-containing olfactory rosettes, whereas other structures in the olfactory chambers were only weakly labelled. The accumulation and axonal transport in the olfactory neurons may be noxious and constitute an important component in the toxicology of cadmium in fish, and this may apply also to some other heavy metals. (author)

  17. Axon-glial interactions in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Butt, Arthur; Bay, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Axon-glial interactions are critical for brain information transmission and processing. In the CNS, this is a function of the major types of glia – astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and novel NG2-glia. This special issue of the Journal of Anatomy comprises contributions arising from a symposium entitled ‘Axon-glial interactions in the CNS’, held at the University of Portsmouth, UK in July 2010. The aim of the special issue is to bring together an international group of experts to demonstrate the c...

  18. Giant Axonal Neuropathy Among Two Siblings - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jhon. K

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant axonal neuropathy is a rate disorder with an autosomal recessive inheritance. It should be differentiated from toxic neuropathies, and hereditary degenerative disorders of nervous system like Friedreich′s ataxia and HMSN. Thick curly hair, though may not be present always is a useful clinical clue to identify cases. Prognosis is generally poor though course of the illness is variable. We report here a clinically and hisopathologically characteristic familial case of giant axonal neuropathy, which occurred in a 17-year-old boy, and his 21-year-old sister.

  19. Vertical distribution of Kuroshio velocity at PN section and its formation mechanism%PN断面黑潮流速垂直分布特征及机制分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓丽静; 魏皓; 汪嘉宁

    2014-01-01

    基于全球海洋再分析模拟GLORYS2(Global Ocean Reanalysis Simulation 2)结果,分析了PN断面(126.0ºE-128.2ºE,1000 m以浅)黑潮流速垂直结构的季节和年际变化,探讨了黑潮流速垂直结构形成的动力学机制。结果表明:1) PN断面黑潮夏季流量最大,春季次之,秋、冬季节最小;气候态平均的冬、夏季流速最大值都位于次表层,春、秋季节流速最大值位于表层;夏季相对流速较大、最大值深度较浅;等密线在黑潮主轴区下凹,冬季更为明显。流速最大值深度和密度水平梯度为零的深度均表现出了较大的年际差异,该年际变化甚至超过季节差异;2)流速与密度符合热成风关系。黑潮通量由太平洋大尺度风场及中尺度运动两者共同决定,但局地的热通量和环流对温盐的输运共同影响密度场,调节黑潮流速的垂直分布,影响水通量的分配及营养盐输运;3)有些年份夏季流速最大值出现在表层,可能是夏季西南季风诱导陆架水离岸输运进入黑潮上层导致的结果。非线性、非地转物理过程的影响没有考虑在本研究中,热成风关系能够解释黑潮流速垂直分布形成的部分原因。%The seasonal and inter-annual variations of vertical distribution of Kuroshio velocity and its formation mechanism are studied by analyzing the GLORYS2 ( Global Ocean Reanalysis Simulation 2) dataset at the PN section (126.0oE-128.2oE, depth less than 1000 m) . The results indicate that 1) The maximum transport at PN section is in summer, followed by spring, and the minimum is in autumn and winter; the maximum velocities are located in the subsurface in both winter and summer with relatively larger velocity and shallower depth in summer; the velocity core is located in the surface in spring and autumn. The isopycnic line has a clear depression around the Kuroshio axis in winter. The depths of maximum velocity and

  20. Algorithms for estimating blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used intensively for the last 15 years for studying the hemodynamics of the human body. Systems for determining both the velocity distribution at one point of interest (spectral systems) and for displaying a map of velocity in real time have been constructed. A number of schem...

  1. Networks of Polarized Actin Filaments in the Axon Initial Segment Provide a Mechanism for Sorting Axonal and Dendritic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Watanabe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking of proteins specifically to the axonal or somatodendritic membrane allows neurons to establish and maintain polarized compartments with distinct morphology and function. Diverse evidence suggests that an actin-dependent vesicle filter within the axon initial segment (AIS plays a critical role in polarized trafficking; however, no distinctive actin-based structures capable of comprising such a filter have been found within the AIS. Here, using correlative light and scanning electron microscopy, we visualized networks of actin filaments several microns wide within the AIS of cortical neurons in culture. Individual filaments within these patches are predominantly oriented with their plus ends facing toward the cell body, consistent with models of filter selectivity. Vesicles carrying dendritic proteins are much more likely to stop in regions occupied by the actin patches than in other regions, indicating that the patches likely prevent movement of dendritic proteins to the axon and thereby act as a vesicle filter.

  2. Trophic and tropic effects of striatal astrocytes on cografted mesencephalic dopamine neurons and their axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, P; Quenneville, N; Vandaele, S; Abbaszadeh, R; Lanctôt, C; Crine, P; Doucet, G

    1998-01-01

    Astrocytes from the ventral mesencephalon and from the striatum respectively promote the dendritic and axonal arborization of dopamine (DA) neurons in vitro. To test this response in vivo, astrocytes in primary cultures from the neonatal cerebral cortex, ventral mesencephalon, or striatum were coimplanted with fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue into the intact or DA-denervated striatum of adult rats and these cografts examined after 3-6 months by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry (intact recipients) or after 5-6 months by in vitro [3H]DA-uptake autoradiography (DA-denervated recipients). In contrast with single ventral mesencephalic grafts, all types of cograft displayed a rather uniform distribution of TH-immunoreactive perikarya. The average size of TH-immunoreactive cell bodies was not significantly different in cografts containing cortical or mesencephalic astrocytes and in single ventral mesencephalic grafts, but it was significantly larger in cografts containing striatal astrocytes. Nevertheless, the number of [3H]DA-labeled terminals in the DA-lesioned host striatum was clearly smaller with cografts of striatal astrocytes than with single mesencephalic grafts or with cografts containing cortical astrocytes. On the other hand, cografts of striatal astrocytes contained much higher numbers of [3H]DA-labeled terminals than the other types of graft or cograft. Thus, while cografted astrocytes in general influence the distribution of DA neurons within the graft, astrocytes from the neonatal striatum have a trophic effect on DA perikarya and a tropic effect on DA axons, keeping the latter within the graft.

  3. Membrane potential dynamics of axons in cultured hippocampal neurons probed by second-harmonic-generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuriya, Mutsuo; Yasui, Masato

    2010-03-01

    The electrical properties of axons critically influence the nature of communication between neurons. However, due to their small size, direct measurement of membrane potential dynamics in intact and complex mammalian axons has been a challenge. Furthermore, quantitative optical measurements of axonal membrane potential dynamics have not been available. To characterize the basic principles of somatic voltage signal propagation in intact axonal arbors, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging is applied to cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. When FM4-64 is applied extracellularly to dissociated neurons, whole axonal arbors are visualized by SHG imaging. Upon action potential generation by somatic current injection, nonattenuating action potentials are recorded in intact axonal arbors. Interestingly, however, both current- and voltage-clamp recordings suggest that nonregenerative subthreshold somatic voltage changes at the soma are poorly conveyed to these axonal sites. These results reveal the nature of membrane potential dynamics of cultured hippocampal neurons, and further show the possibility of SHG imaging in physiological investigations of axons.

  4. Axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the corticospinal tract in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus measured by q-space imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouhei Kamiya

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Previous studies suggest that compression and stretching of the corticospinal tract (CST potentially cause treatable gait disturbance in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH. Measurement of axon diameter with diffusion MRI has recently been used to investigate microstructural alterations in neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated alterations in the axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction of the CST in iNPH by q-space imaging (QSI analysis. METHODS: Nineteen patients with iNPH and 10 age-matched controls were recruited. QSI data were obtained with a 3-T system by using a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence with the diffusion gradient applied parallel to the antero-posterior axis. By using a two-component low-q fit model, the root mean square displacements of intra-axonal space ( =  axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the CST were calculated at the levels of the internal capsule and body of the lateral ventricle, respectively. RESULTS: Wilcoxon's rank-sum test revealed a significant increase in CST intra-axonal volume fraction at the paraventricular level in patients (p<0.001, whereas no significant difference was observed in the axon diameter. At the level of the internal capsule, neither axon diameter nor intra-axonal volume fraction differed significantly between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that in patients with iNPH, the CST does not undergo irreversible axonal damage but is rather compressed and/or stretched owing to pressure from the enlarged ventricle. These analyses of axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction yield insights into microstructural alterations of the CST in iNPH.

  5. Three-dimensional structure of axonal mitochondria reflects the age of drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Honglian Zhu; Xiaojiang Sun

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of axonal mitochondria using Fiji and Neurolucida software, and to observe directly the morphology and distribution of mitochondria in axons of motor neurons in dorsal longitudinal flight muscles of drosophila aged 5 days and 20 days, using electron microscopy. Results indicated that there was no difference in the total area and volume of mitochondria between 5-day-old drosophila and 20-day-old drosophila in all sections, but the ratio of mitochondrial total areas to axon total areas, as well as mitochondrial density of 20-day-old drosophila, was lower than that of 5-day-old drosophila. The number of mitochondria, whose volume was less than 1 000 000 μm3, and between 1 000 000 μm3 and 10 000 000 μm3, was higher in 20-day-old drosophila than that in 5-day-old drosophila. The number of mitochondria with a volume between 1 000 000 μm3 and 100 000 000 μm3 was apparently higher than those with a volume less than 1 000 000 μm3 or larger than 100 000 000 μm3. In addition, the number of mitochondria with a volume more than 100 000 000 μm3 was small; however, the volume was nearly 70% of the total volume in both 5-day-old and 20-day-old drosophila. In contrast, the number of mitochondria with a volume between 1 000 000 μm3 and 10 000 000 μm3 was large, but the volume was less than 30% of the total volume. These experimental findings suggest that changes in mitochondrial morphology and number in motor neurons from the dorsal longitudinal muscle of drosophila are present during different ages.

  6. Wnt-induced calcium signaling mediates axon growth and guidance in the developing corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, B Ian; Li, Li; Kalil, Katherine

    2012-01-10

    Wnt5a gradients guide callosal axons by repulsion through Ryk receptors in vivo. We recently found that Wnt5a repels cortical axons and promotes axon outgrowth through calcium signaling in vitro. Here, using cortical slices, we show that Wnt5a signals through Ryk to guide and promote outgrowth of callosal axons after they cross the midline. Calcium transient frequencies in callosal growth cones positively correlate with axon outgrowth rates in vitro. In cortical slices, calcium release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptors and calcium entry through transient receptor potential channels modulate axon growth and guidance. Knocking down Ryk inhibits calcium signaling in cortical axons, reduces rates of axon outgrowth subsequent to midline crossing, and causes axon guidance defects. Calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is required downstream of Wnt-induced calcium signaling for postcrossing callosal axon growth and guidance. Taken together, these results suggest that growth and guidance of postcrossing callosal axons by Wnt-Ryk-calcium signaling involves axon repulsion through CaMKII.

  7. Chronic excitotoxin-induced axon degeneration in a compartmented neuronal culture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Hosie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate excitotoxicity is a major pathogenic process implicated in many neurodegenerative conditions, including AD (Alzheimer's disease and following traumatic brain injury. Occurring predominantly from over-stimulation of ionotropic glutamate receptors located along dendrites, excitotoxic axonal degeneration may also occur in white matter tracts. Recent identification of axonal glutamate receptor subunits within axonal nanocomplexes raises the possibility of direct excitotoxic effects on axons. Individual neuronal responses to excitotoxicity are highly dependent on the complement of glutamate receptors expressed by the cell, and the localization of the functional receptors. To enable isolation of distal axons and targeted excitotoxicity, murine cortical neuron cultures were prepared in compartmented microfluidic devices, such that distal axons were isolated from neuronal cell bodies. Within the compartmented culture system, cortical neurons developed to relative maturity at 11 DIV (days in vitro as demonstrated by the formation of dendritic spines and clustering of the presynaptic protein synaptophysin. The isolated distal axons retained growth cone structures in the absence of synaptic targets, and expressed glutamate receptor subunits. Glutamate treatment (100 μM to the cell body chamber resulted in widespread degeneration within this chamber and degeneration of distal axons in the other chamber. Glutamate application to the distal axon chamber triggered a lesser degree of axonal degeneration without degenerative changes in the untreated somal chamber. These data indicate that in addition to current mechanisms of indirect axonal excitotoxicity, the distal axon may be a primary target for excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative conditions.

  8. Spectrins in axonal cytoskeletons: Dynamics revealed by extensions and fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lipeng; Cao, Jianshu

    2014-07-01

    The macroscopic properties, the properties of individual components, and how those components interact with each other are three important aspects of a composited structure. An understanding of the interplay between them is essential in the study of complex systems. Using axonal cytoskeleton as an example system, here we perform a theoretical study of slender structures that can be coarse-grained as a simple smooth three-dimensional curve. We first present a generic model for such systems based on the fundamental theorem of curves. We use this generic model to demonstrate the applicability of the well-known worm-like chain (WLC) model to the network level and investigate the situation when the system is stretched by strong forces (weakly bending limit). We specifically studied recent experimental observations that revealed the hitherto unknown periodic cytoskeleton structure of axons and measured the longitudinal fluctuations. Instead of focusing on single molecules, we apply analytical results from the WLC model to both single molecule and network levels and focus on the relations between extensions and fluctuations. We show how this approach introduces constraints to possible local dynamics of the spectrin tetramers in the axonal cytoskeleton and finally suggests simple but self-consistent dynamics of spectrins in which the spectrins in one spatial period of axons fluctuate in-sync.

  9. Drosophila Ryks and their roles in axon and muscle guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahaye, Liza Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade it has become clear that a number of the molecular mechanisms that are required for proper navigation of axons in complex nervous systems are also employed to guide muscles to their appropriate attachment sites. Among the gene families that mediate these diverse processes is the R

  10. Life-or-death decisions upon axonal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Francesco; Caroni, Pico

    2012-02-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Hu et al. (2012) report that upon axonal damage, CHOP and XBP1 unfolded protein response pathways are not recruited equally and have opposite effects on neuronal survival. XBP1 pathway boosting may represent a valuable neuroprotective strategy.

  11. IFNgamma enhances microglial reactions to hippocampal axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Hegelund, I V; Lomholt, N D;

    2000-01-01

    periods. Message for the immune cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) was undetectable, and glial reactivity to axonal lesions occurred as normal in IFNgamma-deficient mice. Microglial responses to lesion-induced neuronal injury were markedly enhanced in myelin basic protein promoter-driven transgenic mice...

  12. PTEN inhibition and axon regeneration and neural repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yosuke Ohtake; Umar Hayat; Shuxin Li

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic growth ability of all the neurons declines during development although some may grow better than others. Numerous intracellular signaling proteins and transcription factors have been shown to regulate the intrinsic growth capacity in mature neurons. Among them, PI3 kinase/Akt pathway is important for controlling axon elongation. As a negative regulator of this pathway, the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) appears critical to con-trol the regenerative ability of young and adult neurons. This review will focus on recent research progress in axon regeneration and neural repair by PTEN inhibition and therapeutic potential of blocking this phosphatase for neurological disorders. Inhibition of PTEN by deletion in con-ditional knockout mice, knockdown by short-hairpin RNA, or blockade by pharmacological approaches, including administration of selective PTEN antagonist peptides, stimulates various degrees of axon regrowth in juvenile or adult rodents with central nervous system injuries. Im-portantly, post-injury PTEN suppression could enhance axonal growth and functional recovery in adult central nervous system after injury.

  13. Quantifying mechanical force in axonal growth and guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ibrahim Mahmoud Athamneh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical force plays a fundamental role in neuronal development, physiology, and regeneration. In particular, research has shown that force is involved in growth cone-mediated axonal growth and guidance as well as stretch-induced elongation when an organism increases in size after forming initial synaptic connections. However, much of the details about the exact role of force in these fundamental processes remain unknown. In this review, we highlight (1 standing questions concerning the role of mechanical force in axonal growth and guidance and (2 different experimental techniques used to quantify forces in axons and growth cones. We believe that satisfying answers to these questions will require quantitative information about the relationship between elongation, forces, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal transport, signaling, substrate adhesion, and stiffness contributing to directional growth advance. Furthermore, we address why a wide range of force values have been reported in the literature, and what these values mean in the context of neuronal mechanics. We hope that this review will provide a guide for those interested in studying the role of force in development and regeneration of neuronal networks.

  14. Aeolian processes on Mars - Erosive velocities, settling velocities, and yellow clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Extremely high atmospheric wind velocities are needed to erode particulate matter on Mars. Settling velocities are roughly equivalent to terrestrial settling velocities for clay to fine sand-size particles; suspension transport may be dominant for fine particles on Mars. Yellow clouds suggest that required threshold erosion velocities are reached and that a great deal of fine-grained material is carried in suspension. Yellow cloud origins are concentrated over the southern latitudes and areas of major topographic relief. The cloud distribution pattern suggests that high threshold velocities are attained by transient atmospheric disturbances such as slope winds and dust devils.-

  15. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...... estimator automatically compensates for the axial velocity, when determining the transverse velocity by using fourth order moments rather than second order moments. The estimation is optimized by using a lag different from one in the estimation process, and noise artifacts are reduced by using averaging...... of RF samples. Further, compensation for the axial velocity can be introduced, and the velocity estimation is done at a fixed depth in tissue to reduce spatial velocity dispersion....

  16. Analysis on Velocity Characteristics of Cavitation Flow Around Hydrofoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang-bin; LIU Shu-yan; WANG Guo-yu; ZHANG Bo; ZHANG Min-di

    2010-01-01

    The time-averaged velocity distributions in flows around a hydronautics hydrofoil were measured by using a digit-al particle image velocimeter (DPIV) system. The results show that the velocity distribution in the whole flow field depends on the development of cavitation structures with the decreasing of cavitation number. The high-fluctuation region with lower velocity relates to the cavitation area. The lowest velocity distribution in the cavity core becomes more uniform, and its in-fluence becomes smaller gradually as moving to downstream. The main-stream velocity distribution is even, then fluctuate and even at last. In the supercavitation stage, the fluid velocity in the cavitation region, corresponding to the front of the hydrofoil's suction surface, has a distribution close to the main stream, while the fluid velocity in other cavitation area is lower.

  17. Refinement of turbulent flow velocity characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.V. Bryanskaya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic laws of Prandtl semi-empirical turbulence theory were analyzed in the article. It was shown, that the Prandtl – Nikuradse logarithmic distribution of velocities are not strictly universal. The change of the first and second turbulence constants was analyzed on the basis of experimental data of I. Nikuradse. The logarithmic velocity profiles for smooth and rough pipes have been transformed. A united velocity logarithmic profile for flows in pipes, appropriate for any rate of hydraulic resistance was received. A more precise, consistent with the resistance laws, description of the kinematic structure of the flow with varying parameters of the velocity profiles was set. It was shown that the position of the average velocity point for the flow in pipe remained constant when the parameters of the velocity profile changed.

  18. VELOCITY PROFILES OF TURBULENT OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dianchang; WANG Xingkui; YU Mingzhong; LI Danxun

    2001-01-01

    The log-law and the wake law of velocity profile for open channel flows are discussed and compared in this paper. Experimental data from eight sources are used to verify the velocity distribution models.The effect of bed level on the velocity profile is analyzed. A formula to calculate the maximum velocity is proposed. In the region of y <δm , the velocity profile approximately follows the log-law. For the region of y >δm , the effect of the aspect ratio is considered. A new velocity profile model on the basis of log-law that can unify all of the hydraulic bed roughness is presented.

  19. Axonal regeneration and development of de novo axons from distal dendrites of adult feline commissural interneurons after a proximal axotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenrich, Keith K; Skelton, Nicole; MacDermid, Victoria E;

    2007-01-01

    the soma or a very proximal dendrite. L-ALPs were devoid of MAP2a/b immunoreactivity. Some of these L-ALPs projected through the lesion and formed bouton-like swellings. These results suggest that proximally axotomized spinal interneurons have the potential to form new connections via de novo axons...

  20. White matter involvement after TBI: Clues to axon and myelin repair capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Regina C; Mierzwa, Amanda J; Marion, Christina M; Sullivan, Genevieve M

    2016-01-01

    Impact-acceleration forces to the head cause traumatic brain injury (TBI) with damage in white matter tracts comprised of long axons traversing the brain. White matter injury after TBI involves both traumatic axonal injury (TAI) and myelin pathology that evolves throughout the post-injury time course. The axon response to initial mechanical forces and secondary insults follows the process of Wallerian degeneration, which initiates as a potentially reversible phase of intra-axonal damage and proceeds to an irreversible phase of axon fragmentation. Distal to sites of axon disconnection, myelin sheaths remain for prolonged periods, which may activate neuroinflammation and inhibit axon regeneration. In addition to TAI, TBI can cause demyelination of intact axons. These evolving features of axon and myelin pathology also represent opportunities for repair. In experimental TBI, demyelinated axons exhibit remyelination, which can serve to both protect axons and facilitate recovery of function. Myelin remodeling may also contribute to neuroplasticity. Efficient clearance of myelin debris is a potential target to attenuate the progression of chronic pathology. During the early phase of Wallerian degeneration, interventions that prevent the transition from reversible damage to axon disconnection warrant the highest priority, based on the poor regenerative capacity of axons in the CNS. Clinical evaluation of TBI will need to address the challenge of accurately detecting the extent and stage of axon damage. Distinguishing the complex white matter changes associated with axons and myelin is necessary for interpreting advanced neuroimaging approaches and for identifying a broader range of therapeutic opportunities to improve outcome after TBI. PMID:25697845

  1. IH activity is increased in populations of slow versus fast motor axons of the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad eLorenz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Much is known about the electrophysiological variation in motoneuron somata across different motor units. However comparatively less is known about electrophysiological variation in motor axons and how this could impact function or electrodiagnosis in healthy or diseased states. We performed nerve excitability testing on two groups of motor axons in Sprague-Dawley rats that are known to differ significantly in their chronic daily activity patterns and in the relative proportion of motor unit types: one group innervating the soleus (slow motor axons and the other group innervating the tibialis anterior (fast motor axons muscles. We found that slow motor axons have significantly larger accommodation compared to fast motor axons upon application of a 100 ms hyperpolarizing conditioning stimulus that is 40% of axon threshold (Z = 3.24, p = 0.001 or 20% of axon threshold (Z = 2.67, p = 0.008. Slow motor axons had larger accommodation to hyperpolarizing currents in the current-threshold measurement (-80% Z = 3.07, p = 0.002; -90% Z = 2.98, p = 0.003. In addition, we found that slow motor axons have a significantly smaller rheobase than fast motor axons (Z = -1.99, p = 0.047 accompanied by a lower threshold in stimulus-response curves. The results provide evidence that slow motor axons have greater activity of the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying cation conductance (IH than fast motor axons. It is possible that this difference between fast and slow axons is caused by an adaptation to their chronic differences in daily activity patterns, and that this adaptation might have a functional effect on the motor unit. Moreover, these findings indicate that slow and fast motor axons may react differently to pathological conditions.

  2. Activity-dependent development of cortical axon terminations in the spinal cord and brain stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J H; Kably, B; Hacking, A

    1999-03-01

    Corticospinal (CS) axon terminations in several species are widespread early in development but are subsequently refined into a spatially more restricted distribution. We studied the role of neural activity in sensorimotor cortex in shaping postnatal development of CS terminations in cats. We continuously infused muscimol unilaterally into sensorimotor cortex to silence neurons during the postnatal CS refinement period (weeks 3-7). Using anterograde transport of WGA-HRP, we examined the laterality of terminations from the muscimol-infused (i.e., silenced) and active sides in the spinal cord, as well as in the cuneate nucleus and red nucleus. We found that CS terminations from the muscimol-infused cortex were very sparse and limited to the contralateral side, while those from the active cortex maintained an immature bilateral topography. Controls (saline infusion, noninfusion) had dense, predominantly contralateral, CS terminations. There was a substantial decrease in the spinal gray matter area occupied by terminations from the side receiving the blockade and a concomitant increase in the area occupied by ipsilateral terminations from the active cortex. Optical density measurements of HRP reaction product from the active cortex in muscimol-infused animals showed substantial increases over controls in the ratio of ipsilateral to contralateral CS terminations for all laminae examined (IV-V, VI, VII). Our findings suggest that ipsilateral dorsal horn terminations reflect new axon growth during the refinement period because they are not present there earlier in development. Those in the ventral horn are present earlier in development and thus could reflect maintenance of transient terminations. Increased ipsilateral terminations from active cortex were due to recrossing of CS axons in lamina X and not to an increase in labeled CS axons in the ipsilateral white matter. Examination of brain stem terminations suggested that, between postnatal weeks 3 and 7, development of

  3. FMRP-Mediated Axonal Delivery of miR-181d Regulates Axon Elongation by Locally Targeting Map1b and Calm1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Subcellular targeting and local translation of mRNAs are critical for axon development. However, the precise local control of mRNA translation requires investigation. We report that the Fmr1-encoded protein, FMRP-mediated axonal delivery of miR-181d negatively regulates axon elongation by locally targeting the transcripts of MAP1B (Map1b and calmodulin (Calm1 in primary sensory neurons. miR-181d affected the local synthesis of MAP1B and calmodulin in axons. FMRP was associated with miR-181d, Map1b, and Calm1. Both FMRP deficiency in Fmr1I304N mice and Fmr1 knockdown impeded the axonal delivery of miR-181d, Map1b, and Calm1 and reduced the protein levels of MAP1B and calmodulin in axons. Furthermore, nerve growth factor (NGF induced Map1b and Calm1 release from FMRP and miR-181d-repressing granules, thereby promoting axon elongation. Both miR-181d overexpression and FMRP knockdown impaired NGF-induced axon elongation. Our study reveals a mechanism for the local regulation of translation by miR-181d and FMRP during axon development.

  4. Spastin-interacting protein NA14/SSNA1 functions in cytokinesis and axon development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Goyal

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs are a genetically diverse group of inherited neurological disorders (SPG1-72 with the cardinal feature of prominent lower-extremity spasticity due to a length-dependent axonopathy of corticospinal motor neurons. The most frequent form of autosomal dominant HSP results from mutations of the SPG4 gene product spastin. This is an ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA protein that binds to and severs microtubules. While spastin participates in crucial cellular processes such as cytokinesis, endosomal tubulation, and axon development, its role in HSP pathogenesis remains unclear. Spastin interacts in cells with the NA14 protein, a major target for auto-antibodies in Sjögren's syndrome (nuclear autoantigen 1; SSNA1. Our analysis of endogenous spastin and NA14 proteins in HeLa cells and rat cortical neurons in primary culture revealed a clear distribution of both proteins to centrosomes, with NA14 localizing specifically to centrioles. Stable NA14 knockdown in cell lines dramatically affected cell division, in particular cytokinesis. Furthermore, overexpression of NA14 in neurons significantly increased axon outgrowth and branching, while also enhancing neuronal differentiation. We postulate that NA14 may act as an adaptor protein regulating spastin localization to centrosomes, temporally and spatially regulating the microtubule-severing activity of spastin that is particularly critical during the cell cycle and neuronal development.

  5. Angular velocity discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  6. Alterations of mitochondrial dynamics allow retrograde propagation of locally initiated axonal insults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassus, Benjamin; Magifico, Sebastien; Pignon, Sandra; Belenguer, Pascale; Miquel, Marie-Christine; Peyrin, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In chronic neurodegenerative syndromes, neurons progressively die through a generalized retraction pattern triggering retrograde axonal degeneration toward the cell bodies, which molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Recent observations suggest that direct activation of pro-apoptotic signaling in axons triggers local degenerative events associated with early alteration of axonal mitochondrial dynamics. This raises the question of the role of mitochondrial dynamics on both axonal vulnerability stress and their implication in the spreading of damages toward unchallenged parts of the neuron. Here, using microfluidic chambers, we assessed the consequences of interfering with OPA1 and DRP1 proteins on axonal degeneration induced by local application of rotenone. We found that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial fission prevented axonal damage induced by rotenone, in low glucose conditions. While alteration of mitochondrial dynamics per se did not lead to spontaneous axonal degeneration, it dramatically enhanced axonal vulnerability to rotenone, which had no effect in normal glucose conditions, and promoted retrograde spreading of axonal degeneration toward the cell body. Altogether, our results suggest a mitochondrial priming effect in axons as a key process of axonal degeneration. In the context of neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, mitochondria fragmentation could hasten neuronal death and initiate spatial dispersion of locally induced degenerative events. PMID:27604820

  7. Changes in microtubule stability and density in myelin-deficient shiverer mouse CNS axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, L. L.; Witt, A. S.; Payne, H. R.; Shine, H. D.; Brady, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    Altered axon-Schwann cell interactions in PNS myelin-deficient Trembler mice result in changed axonal transport rates, neurofilament and microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation, neurofilament density, and microtubule stability. To determine whether PNS and CNS myelination have equivalent effects on axons, neurofilaments, and microtubules in CNS, myelin-deficient shiverer axons were examined. The genetic defect in shiverer is a deletion in the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene, an essential component of CNS myelin. As a result, shiverer mice have little or no compact CNS myelin. Slow axonal transport rates in shiverer CNS axons were significantly increased, in contrast to the slowing in demyelinated PNS nerves. Even more striking were substantial changes in the composition and properties of microtubules in shiverer CNS axons. The density of axonal microtubules is increased, reflecting increased expression of tubulin in shiverer, and the stability of microtubules is drastically reduced in shiverer axons. Shiverer transgenic mice with two copies of a wild-type myelin basic protein transgene have an intermediate level of compact myelin, making it possible to determine whether the actual level of compact myelin is an important regulator of axonal microtubules. Both increased microtubule density and reduced microtubule stability were still observed in transgenic mouse nerves, indicating that signals beyond synaptogenesis and the mere presence of compact myelin are required for normal regulation of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton.

  8. Regulation of neuronal axon specification by glia-neuron gap junctions in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingfeng; Zhang, Albert; Jin, Yishi; Yan, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Axon specification is a critical step in neuronal development, and the function of glial cells in this process is not fully understood. Here, we show that C. elegans GLR glial cells regulate axon specification of their nearby GABAergic RME neurons through GLR-RME gap junctions. Disruption of GLR-RME gap junctions causes misaccumulation of axonal markers in non-axonal neurites of RME neurons and converts microtubules in those neurites to form an axon-like assembly. We further uncover that GLR-RME gap junctions regulate RME axon specification through activation of the CDK-5 pathway in a calcium-dependent manner, involving a calpain clp-4. Therefore, our study reveals the function of glia-neuron gap junctions in neuronal axon specification and shows that calcium originated from glial cells can regulate neuronal intracellular pathways through gap junctions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19510.001 PMID:27767956

  9. Interplay between kinesin-1 and cortical dynein during axonal outgrowth and microtubule organization in Drosophila neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo, Urko; Winding, Michael; Lu, Wen; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2015-12-28

    In this study, we investigated how microtubule motors organize microtubules in Drosophila neurons. We showed that, during the initial stages of axon outgrowth, microtubules display mixed polarity and minus-end-out microtubules push the tip of the axon, consistent with kinesin-1 driving outgrowth by sliding antiparallel microtubules. At later stages, the microtubule orientation in the axon switches from mixed to uniform polarity with plus-end-out. Dynein knockdown prevents this rearrangement and results in microtubules of mixed orientation in axons and accumulation of microtubule minus-ends at axon tips. Microtubule reorganization requires recruitment of dynein to the actin cortex, as actin depolymerization phenocopies dynein depletion, and direct recruitment of dynein to the membrane bypasses the actin requirement. Our results show that cortical dynein slides 'minus-end-out' microtubules from the axon, generating uniform microtubule arrays. We speculate that differences in microtubule orientation between axons and dendrites could be dictated by differential activity of cortical dynein.

  10. Axonal loss and blood flow disturbances in the natural course of indirect traumatic optic neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wei; WANG Huai-zhou; SONG Wei-xian; YANG Wen-li; LI Wei-ye; WANG Ning-li

    2013-01-01

    Background Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) is an acute injury of the optic nerve associated with severe visual dysfunction,which may be a result of secondary mechanical injury and vascular disorder of the optic nerve due to trauma.We analyzed the natural course of axonal loss and blood flow disturbances in patients with indirect TON to find a possible therapeutic window.Methods A cohort of 54 patients with indirect TON recruited between October 2008 and October 2010 at Beijing Tongren Hospital was retrospectively analyzed.The patients were divided into no light perception group (NLP) and better than NLP (btNLP) group.Specifically,the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT),and hemodynamic parameters of the ophthalmic artery (OA),central retinal artery (CRA) and posterior ciliary artery (PCA) were determined.Results Two weeks after injury,there was a statistically significant decrease in the thickness of RNFL in the btNLP group as compared with the fellow control eyes (P <0.05).In contrast,in the NLP group,RNFL thickness slightly increased for 2 weeks following injury,then overtly reduced after 4 weeks (P <0.05).Peak systolic velocity (PSV) of CRA was significantly decreased 4 weeks after injury (P <0.05) in both the NLP group and btNLP group (P <0.05).The thickness of RNFL in the NLP group was negatively correlated with PSV of CRA after 1 week of injury (P <0.05,r=-0.962).Conclusions SD-OCT is a useful supplement in detecting the axonal loss in TON.The dynamic change of the thickness of RNFL appears to correlate with the hemodynamic disturbances in the natural course of TON.The first 2 weeks following an injury is critical and should be considered as the therapeutic window for TON patients.

  11. Antiretroviral Therapy-Associated Acute Motor and Sensory Axonal Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly N. Capers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS has been reported in HIV-infected patients in association with the immune reconstitution syndrome whose symptoms can be mimicked by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. We report a case of a 17-year-old, HIV-infected patient on HAART with a normal CD4 count and undetectable viral load, presenting with acute lower extremity weakness associated with lactatemia. Electromyography/nerve conduction studies revealed absent sensory potentials and decreased compound muscle action potentials, consistent with a diagnosis of acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy. Lactatemia resolved following cessation of HAART; however, neurological deficits minimally improved over several months in spite of immune modulatory therapy. This case highlights the potential association between HAART, mitochondrial toxicity and acute axonal neuropathies in HIV-infected patients, distinct from the immune reconstitution syndrome.

  12. Missed connections: photoreceptor axon seeks target neuron for synaptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astigarraga, Sergio; Hofmeyer, Kerstin; Treisman, Jessica E

    2010-08-01

    Extending axons must choose the appropriate synaptic target cells in order to assemble functional neural circuitry. The axons of the Drosophila color-sensitive photoreceptors R7 and R8 project as a single fascicle from each ommatidium, but their terminals are segregated into distinct layers within their target region. Recent studies have begun to reveal the molecular mechanisms that establish this projection pattern. Both homophilic adhesion molecules and specific ligand-receptor interactions make important contributions to stabilizing R7 and R8 terminals in the appropriate target layers. These cell recognition molecules are regulated by the same transcription factors that control R7 and R8 cell fates. Autocrine and repulsive signaling mechanisms prevent photoreceptor terminals from encroaching on their neighbors, preserving the spatial resolution of visual information. PMID:20434326

  13. High-Velocity Clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, Bart P.; Woerden, Hugo van; Oswalt, Terry D.; Gilmore, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The high-velocity clouds (HVCs) are gaseous objects that do not partake in differential galactic rotation, but instead have anomalous velocities. They trace energetic processes on the interface between the interstellar material in the Galactic disk and intergalactic space. Three different processes

  14. Bazooka mediates secondary axon morphology in Drosophila brain lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein Volker; Spindler Shana R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the Drosophila brain, neural lineages project bundled axon tracts into a central neuropile. Each lineage exhibits a stereotypical branching pattern and trajectory, which distinguish it from other lineages. In this study, we used a multilineage approach to explore the neural function of the Par-complex member Par3/Bazooka in vivo. Drosophila bazooka is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of the larval brain and localizes within neurons in a lineage-dependent manner. The fact that mul...

  15. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of ...

  16. Adult motor axons preferentially reinnervate predegenerated muscle nerve

    OpenAIRE

    M. Abdullah; O'Daly, A.; A Vyas; Rohde, C.; Brushart, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Preferential motor reinnervation (PMR) is the tendency for motor axons regenerating after repair of mixed nerve to reinnervate muscle nerve and/or muscle rather than cutaneous nerve or skin. PMR may occur in response to the peripheral nerve pathway alone in juvenile rats (Brushart, 1993; Redett et al., 2005), yet the ability to identify and respond to specific pathway markers is reportedly lost in adults (Uschold et al., 2007). The experiments reported here evaluate the relative roles of path...

  17. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    A transverse oscillation (TO)-based method for calculating the velocity spectrum for fully transverse flow is described. Current methods yield the mean velocity at one position, whereas the new method reveals the transverse velocity spectrum as a function of time at one spatial location. A convex...... array probe is used along with two different estimators based on the correlation of the received signal. They can estimate the velocity spectrum as a function of time as for ordinary spectrograms, but they also work at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The approach is validated using simulations of pulsatile...... flow using the Womersly–Evans flow model. The relative bias of the mean estimated frequency is 13.6% and the mean relative standard deviation is 14.3% at 90°, where a traditional estimator yields zero velocity. Measurements have been conducted with an experimental scanner and a convex array transducer...

  18. Axonal Transport Impairment in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Nicolini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN is a dose-limiting side effect of several antineoplastic drugs which significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Although different molecular mechanisms have been investigated, CIPN pathobiology has not been clarified yet. It has largely been recognized that Dorsal Root Ganglia are the main targets of chemotherapy and that the longest nerves are the most damaged, together with fast axonal transport. Indeed, this bidirectional cargo-specific transport has a pivotal role in neuronal function and its impairment is involved in several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases. Literature data demonstrate that, despite different mechanisms of action, all antineoplastic agents impair the axonal trafficking to some extent and the severity of the neuropathy correlates with the degree of damage on this bidirectional transport. In this paper, we will examine the effect of the main old and new chemotherapeutic drug categories on axonal transport, with the aim of clarifying their potential mechanisms of action, and, if possible, of identifying neuroprotective strategies, based on the knowledge of the alterations induced by each drugs.

  19. EEG functional connectivity, axon delays and white matter disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Paul L.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Fields, R. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Both structural and functional brain connectivities are closely linked to white matter disease. We discuss several such links of potential interest to neurologists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, and non-clinical neuroscientists. Methods Treatment of brains as genuine complex systems suggests major emphasis on the multi-scale nature of brain connectivity and dynamic behavior. Cross-scale interactions of local, regional, and global networks are apparently responsible for much of EEG's oscillatory behaviors. Finite axon propagation speed, often assumed to be infinite in local network models, is central to our conceptual framework. Results Myelin controls axon speed, and the synchrony of impulse traffic between distant cortical regions appears to be critical for optimal mental performance and learning. Results Several experiments suggest that axon conduction speed is plastic, thereby altering the regional and global white matter connections that facilitate binding of remote local networks. Conclusions Combined EEG and high resolution EEG can provide distinct multi-scale estimates of functional connectivity in both healthy and diseased brains with measures like frequency and phase spectra, covariance, and coherence. Significance White matter disease may profoundly disrupt normal EEG coherence patterns, but currently these kinds of studies are rare in scientific labs and essentially missing from clinical environments. PMID:24815984

  20. Dysregulated axonal RNA translation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kyota; Mili, Stavroula

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset motor neuron disease that has been associated with a diverse array of genetic changes. Prominent among these are mutations in RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) or repeat expansions that give rise to toxic RNA species. RBPs are additionally central components of pathologic aggregates that constitute a disease hallmark, suggesting that dysregulation of RNA metabolism underlies disease progression. In the context of neuronal physiology, transport of RNAs and localized RNA translation in axons are fundamental to neuronal survival and function. Several lines of evidence suggest that axonal RNA translation is a central process perturbed by various pathogenic events associated with ALS. Dysregulated translation of specific RNA groups could underlie feedback effects that connect and reinforce disease manifestations. Among such candidates are RNAs encoding proteins involved in the regulation of microtubule dynamics. Further understanding of axonally dysregulated RNA targets and of the feedback mechanisms they induce could provide useful therapeutic insights. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:589-603. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1352 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27038103