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Sample records for axonal velocity distributions

  1. Inner membrane fusion mediates spatial distribution of axonal mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yiyi; Lee, Hao-Chih; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Suhan, Joseph; Qiu, Minhua; Ba, Qinle; Yang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria form a dynamic interconnected network to respond to changing needs at different subcellular locations. A fundamental yet unanswered question regarding this network is whether, and if so how, local fusion and fission of individual mitochondria affect their global distribution. To address this question, we developed high-resolution computational image analysis techniques to examine the relations between mitochondrial fusion/fission and spatial distribution within the axon of Drosophila larval neurons. We found that stationary and moving mitochondria underwent fusion and fission regularly but followed different spatial distribution patterns and exhibited different morphology. Disruption of inner membrane fusion by knockdown of dOpa1, Drosophila Optic Atrophy 1, not only increased the spatial density of stationary and moving mitochondria but also changed their spatial distributions and morphology differentially. Knockdown of dOpa1 also impaired axonal transport of mitochondria. But the changed spatial distributions of mitochondria resulted primarily from disruption of inner membrane fusion because knockdown of Milton, a mitochondrial kinesin-1 adapter, caused similar transport velocity impairment but different spatial distributions. Together, our data reveals that stationary mitochondria within the axon interconnect with moving mitochondria through fusion and fission and that local inner membrane fusion between individual mitochondria mediates their global distribution. PMID:26742817

  2. Parametric Probability Distribution Functions for Axon Diameters of Corpus Callosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid eSepehrband

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Axon diameter is an important neuroanatomical characteristic of the nervous system that alters in the course of neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Axon diameters vary, even within a fiber bundle, and are not normally distributed. An accurate distribution function is therefore beneficial, either to describe axon diameters that are obtained from a direct measurement technique (e.g., microscopy, or to infer them indirectly (e.g., using diffusion-weighted MRI. The gamma distribution is a common choice for this purpose (particularly for the inferential approach because it resembles the distribution profile of measured axon diameters which has been consistently shown to be non-negative and right-skewed. In this study we compared a wide range of parametric probability distribution functions against empirical data obtained from electron microscopy images. We observed that the gamma distribution fails to accurately describe the main characteristics of the axon diameter distribution, such as location and scale of the mode and the profile of distribution tails. We also found that the generalized extreme value distribution consistently fitted the measured distribution better than other distribution functions. This suggests that there may be distinct subpopulations of axons in the corpus callosum, each with their own distribution profiles. In addition, we observed that several other distributions outperformed the gamma distribution, yet had the same number of unknown parameters; these were the inverse Gaussian, log normal, log logistic and Birnbaum-Saunders distributions.

  3. Cargo distributions differentiate pathological axonal transport impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cassie S; Lee, Robert H

    2012-05-07

    Axonal transport is an essential process in neurons, analogous to shipping goods, by which energetic and cellular building supplies are carried downstream (anterogradely) and wastes are carried upstream (retrogradely) by molecular motors, which act as cargo porters. Impairments in axonal transport have been linked to devastating and often lethal neurodegenerative diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Huntington's, and Alzheimer's. Axonal transport impairment types include a decrease in available motors for cargo transport (motor depletion), the presence of defective or non-functional motors (motor dilution), and the presence of increased or larger cargos (protein aggregation). An impediment to potential treatment identification has been the inability to determine what type(s) of axonal transport impairment candidates that could be present in a given disease. In this study, we utilize a computational model and common axonal transport experimental metrics to reveal the axonal transport impairment general characteristics or "signatures" that result from three general defect types of motor depletion, motor dilution, and protein aggregation. Our results not only provide a means to discern these general impairments types, they also reveal key dynamic and emergent features of axonal transport, which potentially underlie multiple impairment types. The identified characteristics, as well as the analytical method, can be used to help elucidate the axonal transport impairments observed in experimental and clinical data. For example, using the model-predicted defect signatures, we identify the defect candidates, which are most likely to be responsible for the axonal transport impairments in the G93A SOD1 mouse model of ALS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Velocity distribution in snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K.; Ito, Y.

    1997-12-01

    In order to investigate the detailed structure of snow avalanches, we have made snow flow experiments at the Miyanomori ski jump in Sapporo and systematic observations in the Shiai-dani, Kurobe Canyon. In the winter of 1995-1996, a new device to measure static pressures was used to estimate velocities in the snow cloud that develops above the flowing layer of avalanches. Measurements during a large avalanche in the Shiai-dani which damaged and destroyed some instruments indicate velocities increased rapidly to more than 50 m/s soon after the front. Velocities decreased gradually in the following 10 s. Velocities of the lower flowing layer were also calculated by differencing measurement of impact pressure. Both recordings in the snow cloud and in the flowing layer changed with a similar trend and suggest a close interaction between the two layers. In addition, the velocity showed a periodic change. Power spectrum analysis of the impact pressure and the static pressure depression showed a strong peak at a frequency between 4 and 6 Hz, which might imply the existence of either ordered structure or a series of surges in the flow.

  5. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Chernoff, D. F.; Cordes, J. M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars based on large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys. We do so by modelling evolution of the locations, velocities, spins, and radio luminosities of pulsars; calculating pulsed flux according to a beaming model and random orientation angles of spin and beam; applying selection effects of pulsar surveys; and comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. The surveys analyzed have well-defined characteristics and cover approx. 95% of the sky. We maximize the likelihood in a 6-dimensional space of observables P, dot-P, DM, absolute value of b, mu, F (period, period derivative, dispersion measure, Galactic latitude, proper motion, and flux density). The models we test are described by 12 parameters that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as E(exp 1/2) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/ s and 500 km/ s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution; this preference is largely immune to variations in other population parameters, such as the luminosity or distance scale, or the assumed spin-down law. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (1) roughly 50% of pulsars in the solar neighborhood will escape the Galaxy, while approx. 15% have velocities greater than 1000 km/ s (2) observational bias against high velocity pulsars is relatively unimportant for surveys that reach high Galactic absolute value of z distances, but is severe for

  6. High resolution global phase velocity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampert, J.; Woodhouse, J. H.

    We present global phase velocity distributions for fundamental mode Love and Rayleigh waves in the period range 40 to 150 seconds. The models, expressed in terms of spherical harmonic expansions up to degree and order 40, have beed derived from 28,479 Love wave and 33,662 Rayleigh wave measurements. The measurements were made using an automatic procedure based on non-linear waveform inversion. We show that the results are characterized by lateral resolving radii between 500 and 850 km, a significant reduction from previous work. The improved global resolution is largely due to the inclusion of many more major arc measurements. The power spectra of the models are much whiter than has previously been found. The results show great similarity to the phase velocity distributions derived from the recent a priori model 3-SMAC, in which the primary relevant features are the crustal thickness and crustal velocity distributions, the cooling oceanic lithosphere and the thick (300km) lithosphere of the continental cratons. The results thus confirm these features. Differences, for example, in the strengths of the crust, ridge and craton signatures should lead to refinement in the thermal and constitutive parameters upon which the a priori model depends.

  7. Neurofilament distribution and organization in the myelinated axons of the peripheral nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, S T; Crawford, T O; Griffin, J W

    1994-04-11

    The nature of neurofilament organization within the axonal cytoskeleton has been the subject of controversy for many years. Previous reports have suggested that neurofilaments are randomly distributed in the radial dimension of the myelinated axon. Randomness of distribution implies that there is no interaction between neurofilaments, while order in distribution suggest the presence of forces between neurofilaments. To address the issue of randomness vs. order, we evaluated neurofilament distribution by two different statistical approaches--nearest-neighbor distance and the Poisson tile-counting method. Neurofilament nearest-neighbor distances in a myelinated axon differ from nearest-neighbor distances of a set of random points with similar density (40.6 +/- 7.0 nm vs. 30.7 +/- 12.9 nm, P masking of other organelles. To further characterize the distribution of neurofilaments, we compared the relationship between nearest-neighbor distance and density for three sets of data: evenly spaced points, randomly distributed points and measured neurofilament coordinates. Neurofilaments do not conform to either evenly spaced or random distribution models. Instead, neurofilament distribution falls into an intermediate position between evenly spaced and random distributions. This study also demonstrates that the nearest-neighbor distance method of assessing neurofilament distribution offers several technical and theoretical advantages to the Poisson tile-counting method.

  8. Axonal sodium channel distribution shapes the depolarized action potential threshold of dentate granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Geraldine J; Dowling, Margaret J; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Mennerick, Steven

    2010-04-01

    Intrinsic excitability is a key feature dictating neuronal response to synaptic input. Here we investigate the recent observation that dentate granule neurons exhibit a more depolarized voltage threshold for action potential initiation than CA3 pyramidal neurons. We find no evidence that tonic GABA currents, leak or voltage-gated potassium conductances, or the expression of sodium channel isoform differences can explain this depolarized threshold. Axonal initial segment voltage-gated sodium channels, which are dominated by the Na(V)1.6 isoform in both cell types, distribute more proximally and exhibit lower overall density in granule neurons than in CA3 neurons. To test possible contributions of sodium channel distributions to voltage threshold and to test whether morphological differences participate, we performed simulations of dentate granule neurons and of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These simulations revealed that cell morphology and sodium channel distribution combine to yield the characteristic granule neuron action potential upswing and voltage threshold. Proximal axon sodium channel distribution strongly contributes to the higher voltage threshold of dentate granule neurons for two reasons. First, action potential initiation closer to the somatodendritic current sink causes the threshold of the initiating axon compartment to rise. Second, the proximity of the action potential initiation site to the recording site causes somatic recordings to more faithfully reflect the depolarized threshold of the axon than in cells like CA3 neurons, with distally initiating action potentials. Our results suggest that the proximal location of axon sodium channels in dentate granule neurons contributes to the intrinsic excitability differences between DG and CA3 neurons and may participate in the low-pass filtering function of dentate granule neurons. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Stationary velocity distributions in traffic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    We introduce a traffic flow model that incorporates clustering and passing. We obtain analytically the steady state characteristics of the flow from a Boltzmann-like equation. A single dimensionless parameter, R=c 0 v 0 t 0 with c 0 the concentration, v 0 the velocity range, and t 0 -1 the passing rate, determines the nature of the steady state. When R 1, large clusters with average mass left-angle m right-angle ∼R α form, and the flux is J∼R -γ . The initial distribution of slow cars governs the statistics. When P 0 (v)∼v μ as v→0, the scaling exponents are γ=1/(μ+2), α=1/2 when μ>0, and α=(μ+1)/(μ+2) when μ<0. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  10. Morphology and distribution of chandelier cell axon terminals in the mouse cerebral cortex and claustroamygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, M C; DeFelipe, J; Muñoz, A

    2009-01-01

    Chandelier cells represent a unique type of cortical gamma-aminobutityric acidergic interneuron whose axon terminals (Ch-terminals) only form synapses with the axon initial segments of some pyramidal cells. Here, we have used immunocytochemistry for the high-affinity plasma membrane transporter GAT-1 and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin to analyze the morphology and distribution of Ch-terminals in the mouse cerebral cortex and claustroamygdaloid complex. In general, 2 types of Ch-terminals were distinguished on the basis of their size and the density of the axonal boutons that made up the terminal. Simple Ch-terminals were made up of 1 or 2 rows of labeled boutons, each row consisting of only 3-5 boutons. In contrast, complex Ch-terminals were tight cylinder-like structures made up of multiple rows of boutons. Simple Ch-terminals were detected throughout the cerebral cortex and claustroamygdaloid complex, the complex type was only occasionally found in certain regions, whereas in others they were very abundant. These results indicate that there are substantial differences in the morphology and distribution of Ch-terminals between different areas and layers of the mouse cerebral cortex. Furthermore, we suggest that the distribution of complex Ch-terminals may be related to the developmental origin of the different brain regions analyzed.

  11. Turbulent flow velocity distribution at rough walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, W.

    1978-08-01

    Following extensive measurements of the velocity profile in a plate channel with artificial roughness geometries specific investigations were carried out to verify the results obtained. The wall geometry used was formed by high transverse square ribs having a large pitch. The measuring position relative to the ribs was varied as a parameter thus providing a statement on the local influence of roughness ribs on the values measured. As a fundamental result it was found that the gradient of the logarithmic rough wall velocity profiles, which differs widely from the value 2.5, depends but slightly on the measuring position relative to the ribs. The gradients of the smooth wall velocity profiles deviate from 2.5 near the ribs, only. This fact can be explained by the smooth wall shear stress varying with the pitch of the ribs. (orig.) 891 GL [de

  12. Behaviour of ion velocity distributions for a simple collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Maurice, J.-P.; Schunk, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the ion velocity distributions for a weakly ionized plasma subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. An exact solution to Boltzmann's equation has been obtained by replacing the Boltzmann collision integral with a simple relaxation model. At altitudes above about 150 km, where the ion collision frequency is much less than the ion cyclotron frequency, the ion distribution takes the shape of a torus in velocity space for electric fields greater than 40 mV/m. This shape persists for one to two hours after application of the electric field. At altitudes where the ion collision and cyclotron frequencies are approximately equal (about 120 km), the ion velocity distribution is shaped like a bean for large electric field strengths. This bean-shaped distribution persists throughout the lifetime of ionospheric electric fields. These highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions may have an appreciable affect on the interpretation of ion temperature measurements.

  13. Empirical analysis on the runners' velocity distribution in city marathons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhenquan; Meng, Fan

    2018-01-01

    In recent decades, much researches have been performed on human temporal activity and mobility patterns, while few investigations have been made to examine the features of the velocity distributions of human mobility patterns. In this paper, we investigated empirically the velocity distributions of finishers in New York City marathon, American Chicago marathon, Berlin marathon and London marathon. By statistical analyses on the datasets of the finish time records, we captured some statistical features of human behaviors in marathons: (1) The velocity distributions of all finishers and of partial finishers in the fastest age group both follow log-normal distribution; (2) In the New York City marathon, the velocity distribution of all male runners in eight 5-kilometer internal timing courses undergoes two transitions: from log-normal distribution at the initial stage (several initial courses) to the Gaussian distribution at the middle stage (several middle courses), and to log-normal distribution at the last stage (several last courses); (3) The intensity of the competition, which is described by the root-mean-square value of the rank changes of all runners, goes weaker from initial stage to the middle stage corresponding to the transition of the velocity distribution from log-normal distribution to Gaussian distribution, and when the competition gets stronger in the last course of the middle stage, there will come a transition from Gaussian distribution to log-normal one at last stage. This study may enrich the researches on human mobility patterns and attract attentions on the velocity features of human mobility.

  14. How required reserve ratio affects distribution and velocity of money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-11-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money follows exponential distribution. The expression of monetary wealth distribution and that of the velocity of money in terms of the required reserve ratio are presented in a good agreement with simulation results.

  15. The SCEC Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) Software Framework for Distributing and Querying Seismic Velocity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maechling, P. J.; Taborda, R.; Callaghan, S.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Olsen, K. B.; Jordan, T. H.; Goulet, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal seismic velocity models and datasets play a key role in regional three-dimensional numerical earthquake ground-motion simulation, full waveform tomography, modern physics-based probabilistic earthquake hazard analysis, as well as in other related fields including geophysics, seismology, and earthquake engineering. The standard material properties provided by a seismic velocity model are P- and S-wave velocities and density for any arbitrary point within the geographic volume for which the model is defined. Many seismic velocity models and datasets are constructed by synthesizing information from multiple sources and the resulting models are delivered to users in multiple file formats, such as text files, binary files, HDF-5 files, structured and unstructured grids, and through computer applications that allow for interactive querying of material properties. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) software framework to facilitate the registration and distribution of existing and future seismic velocity models to the SCEC community. The UCVM software framework is designed to provide a standard query interface to multiple, alternative velocity models, even if the underlying velocity models are defined in different formats or use different geographic projections. The UCVM framework provides a comprehensive set of open-source tools for querying seismic velocity model properties, combining regional 3D models and 1D background models, visualizing 3D models, and generating computational models in the form of regular grids or unstructured meshes that can be used as inputs for ground-motion simulations. The UCVM framework helps researchers compare seismic velocity models and build equivalent simulation meshes from alternative velocity models. These capabilities enable researchers to evaluate the impact of alternative velocity models in ground-motion simulations and seismic hazard analysis applications

  16. SPIDER - IX. Classifying galaxy groups according to their velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Trevisan, M.; Capelato, H. V.; La Barbera, F.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Schilling, A. C.

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a new method to study the velocity distribution of galaxy systems, the Hellinger Distance (HD), designed for detecting departures from a Gaussian velocity distribution. Testing different approaches to measure normality of a distribution, we conclude that HD is the least vulnerable method to type I and II statistical errors. We define a relaxed galactic system as the one with unimodal velocity distribution and a normality deviation below a critical value (HD ) and the Gaussianity of the velocity distribution of the groups. Bright galaxies (Mr ≤ -20.7) residing in the inner and outer regions of groups do not show significant differences in the listed quantities regardless if the group has a Gaussian (G) or a Non-Gaussian (NG) velocity distribution. However, the situation is significantly different when we examine the faint galaxies (-20.7 < Mr ≤ -17.9). In G groups, there is a remarkable difference between the galaxy properties of the inner and outer galaxy populations, testifying how the environment is affecting the galaxies. Instead, in NG groups there is no segregation between the properties of galaxies in the inner and outer regions, showing that the properties of these galaxies still reflect the physical processes prevailing in the environment where they were found earlier.

  17. Shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of antihydrogen in GBAR

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, G.; Lambrecht, A.; Nesvizhevsky, V.V.; Reynaud, S.; Voronin, A.Yu.

    2014-01-30

    GBAR is a project aiming at measuring the free fall acceleration of gravity for antimatter, namely antihydrogen atoms ($\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$). Precision of this timing experiment depends crucially on the dispersion of initial vertical velocities of the atoms as well as on the reliable control of their distribution. We propose to use a new method for shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$, which improves these factors simultaneously. The method is based on quantum reflection of elastically and specularly bouncing $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$ with small initial vertical velocity on a bottom mirror disk, and absorption of atoms with large initial vertical velocities on a top rough disk. We estimate statistical and systematic uncertainties, and show that the accuracy for measuring the free fall acceleration $\\overline{g}$ of $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$ could be pushed below $10^{-3}$ under realistic experimental conditions.

  18. Motion of Euglena gracilis: Active fluctuations and velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanczuk, P.; Romensky, M.; Scholz, D.; Lobaskin, V.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and active Brownian particle theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80(23), 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a constant propulsion with multiplicative noise.

  19. Eccentricity samples: Implications on the potential and the velocity distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubarsi R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Planar and vertical epicycle frequencies and local angular velocity are related to the derivatives up to the second order of the local potential and can be used to test the shape of the potential from stellar disc samples. These samples show a more complex velocity distribution than halo stars and should provide a more realistic test. We assume an axisymmetric potential allowing a mixture of independent ellipsoidal velocity distributions, of separable or Staeckel form in cylindrical or spherical coordinates. We prove that values of local constants are not consistent with a potential separable in addition in cylindrical coordinates and with a spherically symmetric potential. The simplest potential that fits the local constants is used to show that the harmonical and non-harmonical terms of the potential are equally important. The same analysis is used to estimate the local constants. Two families of nested subsamples selected for decreasing planar and vertical eccentricities are used to borne out the relation between the mean squared planar and vertical eccentricities and the velocity dispersions of the subsamples. According to the first-order epicycle model, the radial and vertical velocity components provide accurate information on the planar and vertical epicycle frequencies. However, it is impossible to account for the asymmetric drift which introduces a systematic bias in estimation of the third constant. Under a more general model, when the asymmetric drift is taken into account, the rotation velocity dispersions together with their asymmetric drift provide the correct fit for the local angular velocity. The consistency of the results shows that this new method based on the distribution of eccentricities is worth using for kinematic stellar samples. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. No 176011: Dynamics and Kinematics of Celestial Bodies and Systems

  20. The auroral O+ non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hubert

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available New characteristics of O+ ion velocity distribution functions in a background of atomic oxygen neutrals subjected to intense external electromagnetic forces are presented. The one dimensional (1-D distribution function along the magnetic field displays a core-halo shape which can be accurately fitted by a two Maxwellian model. The Maxwellian shape of the 1-D distribution function around a polar angle of 21 ± 1° from the magnetic field direction is confirmed, taking into account the accuracy of the Monte Carlo simulations. For the first time, the transition of the O+ 1-D distribution function from a core halo shape along the magnetic field direction to the well-known toroidal shape at large polar angles, through the Maxwellian shape at polar angle of 21 ± 1° is properly explained from a generic functional of the velocity moments at order 2 and 4.

  1. How Required Reserve Ratio Affects Distribution and Velocity of Money

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money fo...

  2. A finite element analysis of the distribution velocity in viscous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work we use the finite element method to analyze the distribution of velocity in a viscous incompressible fluid flow using Lagrange interpolation function. The results obtained are highly accurate and converge fast to the exact solution as the number of elements increase.

  3. Investigation of the Velocity Distribution in Sediment-Laden Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khodadoust Siuki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For a velocity profile in turbulent flows, the flow conditions in the vicinity of the wall are described by logarithmic law of the wall. However, it has been extensively verified that the log-law does not apply in the outer region of the boundary layer. For example, in free surface flows, the law of the wall holds only for 20 percent of the flow depth from the wall. Coles (1956 conducted an important advancement and argued that away from the wall, the deviations of the profiles of measured velocity from those obtained from the law of the wall could be explained by another universal law, called the wake-law. Combining both laws (wall and wake, a complete approximation to the time-averaged velocity profile in turbulent flows is then feasible (White, 1991. On the other hand, the fundamental problem of characterizing the mean velocity profile in sediment-laden flows remains unresolved. While existence models have been developed to estimate velocity profile, but there is a lack of generalization in the sediment-laden flows. For several decades, it has been controversial about the effects of suspended sediment on hydraulic characteristics of the flow, including flow resistance and velocity distribution. Fig. 1 shows the variations of velocity distribution due to introduction of the suspended sediment. As it is seen in this Figure, the suspended sediment moves faster than the water in the inner layer; on the other hands, there is a velocity-lag due to the introduction of sediment into the outer layer. Accurate estimate of the rate of sediment loads is important in sediment-laden flow. Because velocity distribution is one of the required parameters to estimate the sediment discharge. Until now, many equations have been introduced by many researchers for estimating the velocity distribution in open channels. Generally, there are two different views about the velocity distribution in sediment-laden flows. The first view suggests that the log

  4. Generalized reorientation cross section for cylindrically symmetric velocity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generalized reorientation cross sections are derived for the case of atom--molecule collisions where the molecules initially have a velocity distribution cylindrically symmetric about an axis in the laboratory reference frame. This spatial ordering of the velocity can come about, for instance, by exciting molecular electronic states with a light source whose linewidth is much narrower than the Doppler-broadened absorption line. A simple kinetic theory can be set up in terms of state multipoles that are not completely irreducible; the resulting reorientation cross sections are only slightly more complex than the cross sections occurring in a spherically symmetric velocity field. Two approximations are investigated: a McGuire--Kouri m/sub j/-conserving model and a semiclassical model where the orientation of the rotation plane is conserved. The import of the generalized cross sections for several types of experiment and the applicability of the approximate models are discussed

  5. Distributed Velocity-Dependent Protocol for Multihop Cellular Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagyasi Bhushan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell phones are embedded with sensors form a Cellular Sensor Network which can be used to localize a moving event. The inherent mobility of the application and of the cell phone users warrants distributed structure-free data aggregation and on-the-fly routing. We propose a Distributed Velocity-Dependent (DVD protocol to localize a moving event using a Multihop Cellular Sensor Network (MCSN. DVD is based on a novel form of connectivity determined by the waiting time of nodes for a Random Waypoint (RWP distribution of cell phone users. This paper analyzes the time-stationary and spatial distribution of the proposed waiting time to explain the superior event localization and delay performances of DVD over the existing Randomized Waiting (RW protocol. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to compare the performance of DVD with RW and the existing Centralized approach.

  6. Distributed Velocity-Dependent Protocol for Multihop Cellular Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthi Chander

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell phones are embedded with sensors form a Cellular Sensor Network which can be used to localize a moving event. The inherent mobility of the application and of the cell phone users warrants distributed structure-free data aggregation and on-the-fly routing. We propose a Distributed Velocity-Dependent (DVD protocol to localize a moving event using a Multihop Cellular Sensor Network (MCSN. DVD is based on a novel form of connectivity determined by the waiting time of nodes for a Random Waypoint (RWP distribution of cell phone users. This paper analyzes the time-stationary and spatial distribution of the proposed waiting time to explain the superior event localization and delay performances of DVD over the existing Randomized Waiting (RW protocol. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to compare the performance of DVD with RW and the existing Centralized approach.

  7. Velocity distribution in a turbulent flow near a rough wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsun, A. S.; Pisarevsky, M. I.; Fedoseev, V. N.; Kreps, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    Velocity distribution in the zone of developed wall turbulence, regardless of the conditions on the wall, is described by the well-known Prandtl logarithmic profile. In this distribution, the constant, that determines the value of the velocity, is determined by the nature of the interaction of the flow with the wall and depends on the viscosity of the fluid, the dynamic velocity, and the parameters of the wall roughness.In extreme cases depending on the ratio between the thickness of the viscous sublayer and the size of the roughness the constant takes on a value that does not depend on viscosity, or leads to a ratio for a smooth wall.It is essential that this logarithmic profile is the result not only of the Prandtl theory, but can be derived from general considerations of the theory of dimensions, and also follows from the condition of local equilibrium of generation and dissipation of turbulent energy in the wall area. This allows us to consider the profile as a universal law of velocity distribution in the wall area of a turbulent flow.The profile approximation up to the maximum speed line with subsequent integration makes possible to obtain the resistance law for channels of simple shape. For channels of complex shape with rough walls, the universal profile can be used to formulate the boundary condition when applied to the calculation of turbulence models.This paper presents an empirical model for determining the constant of the universal logarithmic profile. The zone of roughness is described by a set of parameters and is considered as a porous structure with variable porosity.

  8. Creating unstable velocity-space distributions with barium injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    Large Debye lengths relative to detector dimensions and the absence of confining walls makes space an attractive laboratory for studying fundamental theories of plasma instabilities. However, natural space plasmas are rarely found displaced from equilibrium enough to permit isolation and diagnosis of the controlling parameters and driving conditions. Furthermore, any plasma or field response to the departure from equilibrium can be masked by noise in the natural system. Active experiments provide a technique for addressing the chicken or egg dilemma. Early thermite barium releases were generally conducted at low altitudes from sounding rockets to trace electric fields passively or to study configuration-space instabilities. One can also study velocity-space instabilities with barium releases. Neutral barium vapor releases wherein a typical speed greatly exceeds the thermal speed can be used to produce barium ion velocity-space distributions that should be subject to a number of microinstabilities. We examine the ion velocity-space distributions resulting from barium injections from orbiting spacecraft and shaped-charges

  9. Study on velocity distribution in a pool by submersible mixers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, F; Shi, W D; Lu, X N; Chen, B; Jiang, H

    2012-01-01

    To study the distribution of submersible mixers and agitating effect in the sewage treatment pool, Pro/E software was utilized to build the three-dimensional model. Then, the large-scale computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT6.3 was used. ICEM software was used to build unstructured grid of sewage treatment pool. After that, the sewage treatment pool was numerically simulated by dynamic coordinate system technology and RNG k-ε turbulent model and PIOS algorithm. The macro fluid field and each section velocity flow field distribution were analyzed to observe the efficiency of each submersible mixer. The average velocity and mixing area in the sewage pool were studied simultaneously. Results show that: the preferred project B, two submersible mixers speed is 980 r/min, and setting angles are all 30°. Fluid mixing area in the pool has reached more than 95%. Under the action of two mixers, the fluid in the sewage pool form a continuous circulating water flow. The fluid is mixed adequately and average velocity of fluid in the pool is at around 0.241m/s, which agreed with the work requirements. Consequently it can provide a reference basis for practical engineering application of submersible mixers by using this method.

  10. Predicted and measured velocity distribution in a model heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.B.; Carlucci, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between numerical predictions, using the porous media concept, and measurements of the two-dimensional isothermal shell-side velocity distributions in a model heat exchanger. Computations and measurements were done with and without tubes present in the model. The effect of tube-to-baffle leakage was also investigated. The comparison was made to validate certain porous media concepts used in a computer code being developed to predict the detailed shell-side flow in a wide range of shell-and-tube heat exchanger geometries

  11. Quantitative analysis of axon bouton distribution of subthalamic nucleus neurons in the rat by single neuron visualization with a viral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Yoshinori; Fujiyama, Fumino; Nakamura, Kouichi C; Furuta, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-06-15

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia plays a key role in motor control, and STN efferents are known to mainly target the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), entopeduncular nucleus (Ep), and substantia nigra (SN) with some axon collaterals to the other regions. However, it remains to be clarified how each STN neuron projects axon fibers and collaterals to those target nuclei of the STN. Here we visualized the whole axonal arborization of single STN neurons in the rat brain by using a viral vector expressing membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein, and examined the distribution of axon boutons in those target nuclei. The vast majority (8-9) of 10 reconstructed STN neurons projected to the GPe, SN, caudate-putamen (CPu), and Ep, which received, on average ± SD, 457 ± 425, 400 ± 347, 126 ± 143, and 106 ± 100 axon boutons per STN neuron, respectively. Furthermore, the density of axon boutons in the GPe was highest among these nuclei. Although these target nuclei were divided into calbindin-rich and -poor portions, STN projection showed no exclusive preference for those portions. Since STN neurons mainly projected not only to the GPe, SN, and Ep but also to the CPu, the subthalamostriatal projection might serve as a positive feedback path for the striato-GPe-subthalamic disinhibitory pathway, or work as another route of cortical inputs to the striatum through the corticosubthalamostriatal disynaptic excitatory pathway. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A novel MRI framework for the quantification of any moment of arbitrary velocity distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Knutsson, Hans; Ebbers, Tino

    2011-01-01

    MRI can measure several important hemodynamic parameters but might not yet have reached its full potential. The most common MRI method for the assessment of flow is phase-contrast MRI velocity mapping that estimates the mean velocity of a voxel. This estimation is precise only when the intravoxel velocity distribution is symmetric. The mean velocity corresponds to the first raw moment of the intravoxel velocity distribution. Here, a generalized MRI framework for the quantification of any mome...

  13. The distribution of chandelier cell axon terminals that express the GABA plasma membrane transporter GAT-1 in the human neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, M C; Defelipe, J; Muñoz, A

    2007-09-01

    Chandelier cells represent a unique type of cortical GABAergic interneuron whose axon terminals (Ch-terminals) form synapses exclusively with the axon initial segments of pyramidal cells. In this study, we have used immunocytochemistry for the high-affinity plasma membrane transporter-1 (GAT-1) to analyze the distribution and density of Ch-terminals in various cytoarchitectonic and functional areas of the human neocortex. The lowest density of GAT-1-immuoreactive (-ir) Ch-terminals was detected in the primary and secondary visual (areas 17 and 18) and in the somatosensory areas (areas 3b and 1). In contrast, an intermediate density was observed in the motor area 4 and the associative frontolateral areas 45 and 46, whereas the associative frontolateral areas 9 and 10, frontal orbitary areas 11, 12, 13, 14, and 47, associative temporal areas 20, 21, 22, and 38, and cingulate areas 24 and 32 displayed the highest density of GAT-1-ir Ch-terminals. Despite these differences, the laminar distribution of GAT-1-ir Ch-terminals was similar in most cortical areas. Hence, the highest density of this transporter was observed in layer II, followed by layers III, V, VI, and IV. In most cortical areas, the density of GAT-1-ir Ch-terminals was positively correlated with the neuronal density, although a negative correlation was detected in layer III across all cortical areas. These results indicate that there are substantial differences in the distribution and density of GAT-1-ir Ch-terminals between areas and layers of the human neocortex. These differences might be related to the different functional attributes of the cortical regions examined.

  14. GRS defective axonal distribution as a potential contributor to distal spinal muscular atrophy type V pathogenesis in a new model of GRS-associated neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ah Jung; Park, Byung Sun; Jung, Junyang

    2014-11-01

    Distal spinal muscular atrophy type V (dSMA-V), a hereditary axonal neuropathy, is a glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GRS)-associated neuropathy caused by a mutation in GRS. In this study, using an adenovirus vector system equipped with a neuron-specific promoter, we constructed a new GRS-associated neuropathy mouse model. We found that wild-type GRS (WT) is distributed in peripheral axons, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cell bodies, central axon terminals and motor neuron cell bodies in the mouse model. In contrast, the L129P mutant GRS was localized in DRG and motor neuron cell bodies. Thus, we propose that the disease-causing L129P mutant is linked to a distribution defect in peripheral nerves in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of squid enolase mRNA: sequence analysis, tissue distribution, and axonal localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, J T; Gioio, A E; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1995-08-01

    Enolase is a glycolytic enzyme whose amino acid sequence is highly conserved across a wide range of animal species. In mammals, enolase is known to be a dimeric protein composed of distinct but closely related subunits: alpha (non-neuronal), beta (muscle-specific), and gamma (neuron-specific). However, little information is available on the primary sequence of enolase in invertebrates. Here we report the isolation of two overlapping cDNA clones and the putative primary structure of the enzyme from the squid (Loligo pealii) nervous system. The composite sequence of those cDNA clones is 1575 bp and contains the entire coding region (1302 bp), as well as 66 and 207 bp of 5' and 3' untranslated sequence, respectively. Cross-species comparison of enolase primary structure reveals that squid enolase shares over 70% sequence identity to vertebrate forms of the enzyme. The greatest degree of sequence similarity was manifest to the alpha isoform of the human homologue. Results of Northern analysis revealed a single 1.6 kb mRNA species, the relative abundance of which differs approximately 10-fold between various tissues. Interestingly, evidence derived from in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction experiments indicate that the mRNA encoding enolase is present in the squid giant axon.

  16. Velocity distribution of a driven inelastic one-component Maxwell gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, V V; Das, Dibyendu; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Rajesh, R

    2017-03-01

    The nature of the velocity distribution of a driven granular gas, though well studied, is unknown as to whether it is universal or not, and, if universal, what it is. We determine the tails of the steady state velocity distribution of a driven inelastic Maxwell gas, which is a simple model of a granular gas where the rate of collision between particles is independent of the separation as well as the relative velocity. We show that the steady state velocity distribution is nonuniversal and depends strongly on the nature of driving. The asymptotic behavior of the velocity distribution is shown to be identical to that of a noninteracting model where the collisions between particles are ignored. For diffusive driving, where collisions with the wall are modeled by an additive noise, the tails of the velocity distribution is universal only if the noise distribution decays faster than exponential.

  17. Channel flow analysis. [velocity distribution throughout blade flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanis, T.

    1973-01-01

    The design of a proper blade profile requires calculation of the blade row flow field in order to determine the velocities on the blade surfaces. An analysis theory is presented for several methods used for this calculation and associated computer programs that were developed are discussed.

  18. Velocity Distributions of Runaway Stars Produced by Supernovae in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using a method of population synthesis, we investigate the runaway stars produced by disrupted binaries via asymmetric core collapse supernova explosions (CC-RASs) and thermonuclear supernova explosions (TN-RASs). We find the velocities of CC-RASs in the range of about 30--100 km s − 1 . The runaway stars ...

  19. Evaluation of the extent and distribution of diffuse axonal injury from real world motor vehicle crashes - biomed 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Elizabeth M; Urban, Jillian E; Lynch, Sarah K; Whitlow, Christopher T; Stitzel, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a common traumatic brain injury (TBI) often seen as a result of motor vehicle crashes (MVC). Twelve (12) cases of DAI were selected from the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) to determine the extent and distribution of injury with respect to the head contact location. Head computed tomography (CT) scans were collected for each subject and segmented using semi-automated methods to establish the volumes of DAI. The impacted area on the subject's head was approximated from evidence of a soft tissue scalp contusion on the CT scan. This was used in conjunction with subject images and identified internal vehicle contact locations to ascertain a label map of the contact location. A point cloud was developed from the contact location label map and the centroid of the point cloud was calculated as the subject's head impact location. The injury and contact location were evaluated in spherical coordinates and grouped into 0.2 by 0.2 radial increments of azimuth and elevation. The radial increments containing DAI were projected onto a meshed sphere to evaluate the radial distance from the impact location to primary location of DAI and approximate anatomical location. Of the 170 injuries observed, 123 were identified in the frontal lobe and 36 in the parietal lobe. The distribution of the DAI in relation to the change in azimuth from the contact loca y correlated with contact to the head superficial to this lobe. Results from this study provide further insight into the biomechanics of traumatic brain injury and can be used in future work as an aid to validate finite element models of the head.

  20. Impact of velocity correlation and distribution on transport in fractured media: Field evidence and theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Bour, Olivier; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-02-01

    Flow and transport through fractured geologic media often leads to anomalous (non-Fickian) transport behavior, the origin of which remains a matter of debate: whether it arises from variability in fracture permeability (velocity distribution), connectedness in the flow paths through fractures (velocity correlation), or interaction between fractures and matrix. Here we show that this uncertainty of distribution- versus correlation-controlled transport can be resolved by combining convergent and push-pull tracer tests because flow reversibility is strongly dependent on velocity correlation, whereas late-time scaling of breakthrough curves is mainly controlled by velocity distribution. We build on this insight, and propose a Lagrangian statistical model that takes the form of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) with correlated particle velocities. In this framework, velocity distribution and velocity correlation are quantified by a Markov process of particle transition times that is characterized by a distribution function and a transition probability. Our transport model accurately captures the anomalous behavior in the breakthrough curves for both push-pull and convergent flow geometries, with the same set of parameters. Thus, the proposed correlated CTRW modeling approach provides a simple yet powerful framework for characterizing the impact of velocity distribution and correlation on transport in fractured media.

  1. Determination of Anisotropic Ion Velocity Distribution Function in Intrinsic Gas Plasma. Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaev, A.; Grabovskiy, A.; Murillo, O.; Soukhomlinov, V.

    2018-02-01

    The first seven coefficients of the expansion of the energy and angular distribution functions in Legendre polynomials for Hg+ ions in Hg vapor plasma with the parameter E/P ≈ 400 V/(cm Torr) are measured for the first time using a planar one-sided probe. The analytic solution to the Boltzmann kinetic equation for ions in the plasma of their parent gas is obtained in the conditions when the resonant charge exchange is the predominant process, and ions acquire on their mean free path a velocity much higher than the characteristic velocity of thermal motion of atoms. The presence of an ambipolar field of an arbitrary strength is taken into account. It is shown that the ion velocity distribution function is determined by two parameters and differs substantially from the Maxwellian distribution. Comparison of the results of calculation of the drift velocity of He+ ions in He, Ar+ in Ar, and Hg+ in Hg with the available experimental data shows their conformity. The results of the calculation of the ion distribution function correctly describe the experimental data obtained from its measurement. Analysis of the result shows that in spite of the presence of the strong field, the ion velocity distribution functions are isotropic for ion velocities lower than the average thermal velocity of atoms. With increasing ion velocity, the distribution becomes more and more extended in the direction of the electric field.

  2. Mass and velocity distributions of low energy cluster beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compagnini, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche Universita di Catania and MATIS-INFM, Viale A. Doria 6 Catania 95125 (Italy)]. E-mail: gcompagnini@unict.it; D' Urso, Luisa [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche Universita di Catania and MATIS-INFM, Viale A. Doria 6 Catania 95125 (Italy); Puglisi, Orazio [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche Universita di Catania and MATIS-INFM, Viale A. Doria 6 Catania 95125 (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    We have recently generated several low energy cluster beams by using a laser vaporization source and a pulsed He stream. This has been done both for covalent (silicon and carbon) and metallic (gold) materials. In this work we present a simple procedure to carefully measure the speed and speed distribution of the obtained clusters with the help of an orthogonal time of flight mass spectrometer. Results show average speed values in the range 700-1000 m/s with a mild variation by changing the gas backing pressure and the cluster mass inside each cluster train. Detailed speed distributions for each cluster's mass will be given.

  3. Late Quaternary climate-change velocity: Implications for modern distributions and communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandel, Brody Steven; Dalsgaard, Bo; Arge, Lars Allan

    conditions are wet, productive and aseasonal. In general, climate-change velocity since the LGM appears to explain a wide variety of phenomena in the modern distributions of species and structure of communities, and we propose that its applications could be quite wide. Understanding the role of historical...... a global map of climate-change velocity since the Last Glacial Maximum and used this measure of climate instability to address a number of classic hypotheses. Results/Conclusions We show that historical climate-change velocity is related to a wide range of characteristics of modern distributions...

  4. The three-dimensional distributions of tangential velocity and total- temperature in vortex tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderstrøm-Lang, C.U.

    1971-01-01

    The axial and radial gradients of the tangential velocity distribution are calculated from prescribed secondary flow functions on the basis of a zero-order approximation to the momentum equations developed by Lewellen. It is shown that secondary flow functions may be devised which meet pertinent...... physical requirements and which at the same time lead to realistic tangential velocity gradients. The total-temperature distribution in both the axial and radial directions is calculated from such secondary flow functions and corresponding tangential velocity results on the basis of an approximate...

  5. Action Potential Dynamics in Fine Axons Probed with an Axonally Targeted Optical Voltage Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yihe; Bayguinov, Peter O; Jackson, Meyer B

    2017-01-01

    The complex and malleable conduction properties of axons determine how action potentials propagate through extensive axonal arbors to reach synaptic terminals. The excitability of axonal membranes plays a major role in neural circuit function, but because most axons are too thin for conventional electrical recording, their properties remain largely unexplored. To overcome this obstacle, we used a genetically encoded hybrid voltage sensor (hVOS) harboring an axonal targeting motif. Expressing this probe in transgenic mice enabled us to monitor voltage changes optically in two populations of axons in hippocampal slices, the large axons of dentate granule cells (mossy fibers) in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region and the much finer axons of hilar mossy cells in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Action potentials propagated with distinct velocities in each type of axon. Repetitive firing broadened action potentials in both populations, but at an intermediate frequency the degree of broadening differed. Repetitive firing also attenuated action potential amplitudes in both mossy cell and granule cell axons. These results indicate that the features of use-dependent action potential broadening, and possible failure, observed previously in large nerve terminals also appear in much finer unmyelinated axons. Subtle differences in the frequency dependences could influence the propagation of activity through different pathways to excite different populations of neurons. The axonally targeted hVOS probe used here opens up the diverse repertoire of neuronal processes to detailed biophysical study.

  6. Settling-velocity specific SOC distribution on hillslopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yaxian; Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    shows a coarsening effect immediately below the eroding slope, followed by a fining trend at the slope tail. The 13C values of soil fractions were more positive at the footslope than on the slope shoulder or at the slope tail, suggesting enhanced decomposition rate of fresh SOC input at the footslope......The net effect of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric CO2, is determined by the spatial (re-)distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC). The depositional position of eroded SOC is a function of the transport distances of soil fractions where the SOC...

  7. CFD Simulation of Air Velocity Distribution in Occupied Livestock Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svidt, Kjeld; Zhang, G.; Bjerg, B.

    In modem livestock buildings the design of the ventilation systems is important in order to obtain good air distribution. The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for predicting the air flow and air quality makes it possible to include the effect of room geometry, equipment and occupants...... in the design of ventilation systems. However, it is not appropriate to include the detailed geometry of a large group of lying or standing animals affecting the air flow in the building. It is necessary to have relatively simple models of the animals, which are easier to implement in the computer models...

  8. On the theoretical velocity distribution and flow resistance in natural channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moramarco, Tommaso; Dingman, S. Lawrence

    2017-12-01

    The velocity distribution in natural channels is of considerable interest for streamflow measurements to obtain information on discharge and flow resistance. This study focuses on the comparison of theoretical velocity distributions based on 1) entropy theory, and 2) the two-parameter power law. The analysis identifies the correlation between the parameters of the distributions and defines their dependence on the geometric and hydraulic characteristics of the channel. Specifically, we investigate how the parameters are related to the flow resistance in terms of Manning roughness, shear velocity and water surface slope, and several formulae showing their relationships are proposed. Velocity measurements carried out in the past 20 years at Ponte Nuovo gauged section along the Tiber River, central Italy, are the basis for the analysis.

  9. Activity-dependent myelination of parvalbumin interneurons mediated by axonal morphological plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedehouder, J; Brizee, D; Shpak, G; Kushner, S A

    2018-03-05

    Axonal myelination of neocortical pyramidal neurons is dynamically modulated by neuronal activity. Recent studies have shown that a substantial proportion of neocortical myelin content is contributed by fast-spiking, parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons. However, it remains unknown whether the myelination of PV + interneurons is also modulated by intrinsic activity. Here, we utilized cell-type specific Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) in adult male and female mice to activate a sparse population of medial prefrontal cortex PV + interneurons. Using single-cell axonal reconstructions, we find that DREADD-stimulated PV + interneurons exhibit a nearly two-fold increase in total length of myelination, predominantly mediated by a parallel increase of axonal arborization and number of internodes. In contrast, the distribution of axonal inter-branch segment distance and myelin internode length were not significantly altered. Topographical analysis revealed that myelination of DREADD-stimulated cells extended to higher axonal branch orders, while retaining a similar inter-branch distance threshold for myelination. Together, our results demonstrate that chemogenetically-induced neuronal activity increases the myelination of neocortical PV + interneurons mediated at least in part by an elaboration of their axonal morphology. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelination is the wrapping of an axon in order to optimize conduction velocity in an energy-efficient manner. Previous studies have shown that myelination of neocortical pyramidal neurons is experience and activity-dependent. We now show that activity-dependent myelin plasticity in the adult neocortex extends to parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking interneurons. Specifically, chemogenetic stimulation of parvalbumin interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex significantly enhanced axonal myelination, which was paralleled by an increase in axonal arborization. This suggests that activity

  10. Determining cardiac velocity fields and intraventricular pressure distribution from a sequence of ultrafast CT cardiac images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S M; Leahy, R M; Boyd, D P; Brundage, B H; Napel, S

    1994-01-01

    A method of computing the velocity field and pressure distribution from a sequence of ultrafast CT (UFCT) cardiac images is demonstrated. UFCT multi-slice cine imaging gives a series of tomographic slices covering the volume of the heart at a rate of 17 frames per second. The complete volume data set can be modeled using equations of continuum theory and through regularization, velocity vectors of both blood and tissue can be determined at each voxel in the volume. The authors present a technique to determine the pressure distribution throughout the volume of the left ventricle using the computed velocity field. A numerical algorithm is developed by discretizing the pressure Poisson equation (PPE), which Is based on the Navier-Stokes equation. The algorithm is evaluated using a mathematical phantom of known velocity and pressure-Couette flow. It is shown that the algorithm based on the PPE can reconstruct the pressure distribution using only the velocity data. Furthermore, the PPE is shown to be robust in the presence of noise. The velocity field and pressure distribution derived from a UFCT study of a patient are also presented.

  11. Measurement of functional microcirculatory geometry and velocity distributions using automated image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobbe, J. G. G.; Streekstra, G. J.; Atasever, B.; van Zijderveld, R.; Ince, C.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes a new method for analyzing microcirculatory videos. It introduces algorithms for quantitative assessment of vessel length, diameter, the functional microcirculatory density distribution and red blood-cell (RBC) velocity in individual vessels as well as its distribution. The

  12. Investigation on velocity distribution of TFM and DEM phase in hybrid model of CBFB in mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyu; Feng, Ying; Zhao, Zhening

    2017-05-01

    As a novel model for gas solid flow simulation, the investigation of TFM-DEM hybrid model is far from completely, including mutual interaction of TFM and DEM phase, selection of DEM portion and coherence of the predicted results from both phases. Therefore, in present study, the consistency of velocity distribution between TFM and DEM phase is investigated. The correlation of instantaneous and time-averaged velocity distribution of TFM and DEM phase in specific area in CBFB for mining is studied. And the differences of the axial and radial velocity between the particles of different sizes are discussed. The influence of particle diameter and the ratio of DEM and TFM phase on the correlation of velocity, both instantaneous and time-averaged, are taken into consideration.

  13. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA COLORS AND EJECTA VELOCITIES: HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN REGRESSION WITH NON-GAUSSIAN DISTRIBUTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Foley, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the statistical dependence of the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) on their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II λ6355 spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model, accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust, and implement a Gibbs sampler and deviance information criteria to estimate the correlation. The method is applied to the apparent colors from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SNe Ia. The apparent color distributions of high-velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae exhibit significant discrepancies for B – V and B – R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B – V and B – R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 ± 0.02 and 0.09 ± 0.02 mag, respectively. A linear model finds significant slopes of –0.021 ± 0.006 and –0.030 ± 0.009 mag (10 3 km s –1 ) –1 for intrinsic B – V and B – R colors versus velocity, respectively. Because the ejecta velocity distribution is skewed toward high velocities, these effects imply non-Gaussian intrinsic color distributions with skewness up to +0.3. Accounting for the intrinsic-color-velocity correlation results in corrections to A V extinction estimates as large as –0.12 mag for HV SNe Ia and +0.06 mag for NV events. Velocity measurements from SN Ia spectra have the potential to diminish systematic errors from the confounding of intrinsic colors and dust reddening affecting supernova distances

  14. Estimation of two-dimensional velocity distribution profile using General Index Entropy in open channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeezadeh, Shahab Aldin; Amiri, Seyyed Mehrab

    2018-02-01

    Estimation of velocity distribution profile is a challenging subject of open channel hydraulics. In this study, an entropy-based method is used to derive two-dimensional velocity distribution profile. The General Index Entropy (GIE) can be considered as the generalized form of Shannon entropy which is suitable to combine with the different form of Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF). Using the principle of maximum entropy (POME), the velocity distribution is defined by maximizing the GIE by treating the velocity as a random variable. The combination of GIE and a CDF proposed by Marini et al. (2011) was utilized to introduce an efficient entropy model whose results are comparable with several well-known experimental and field data. Consequently, in spite of less sensitivity of the related parameters of the model to flow conditions and less complexity in application of the model compared with other entropy-based methods, more accuracy is obtained in estimating velocity distribution profile either near the boundaries or the free surface of the flow.

  15. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION AND DIP-PHENOMENON IN NARROW OPEN-CHANNEL FLOWS

    OpenAIRE

    Absi, Rafik

    2009-01-01

    International audience; In this study, we present analytical tools for velocity distribution in steady uniform open-channel flows. Simple dip-modified laws are presented. An ordinary differential equation based on an analysis of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations is proposed. Comparisons of predicted velocity profiles with experimental data show good agreement. It is well known that dip-phenomenon depends on aspect ratio Ar (ratio of the channel width b to the water depth h)...

  16. Validation of MCDS by comparison of predicted with experimental velocity distribution functions in rarefied normal shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham-Van-diep, Gerald C.; Erwin, Daniel A.

    1989-01-01

    Velocity distribution functions in normal shock waves in argon and helium are calculated using Monte Carlo direct simulation. These are compared with experimental results for argon at M = 7.18 and for helium at M = 1.59 and 20. For both argon and helium, the variable-hard-sphere (VHS) model is used for the elastic scattering cross section, with the velocity dependence derived from a viscosity-temperature power-law relationship in the way normally used by Bird (1976).

  17. Non-Gaussian center-of-pressure velocity distribution during quiet stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E. S. D.; Picoli, S.; Deprá, P. P.; Mendes, R. S.

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we investigate patterns in the postural sway that characterize the static balance in human beings. To measure the postural sway, sixteen healthy young subjects performed quiet stance tasks providing the center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories. From these trajectories, we obtained the COP velocities. We verified that the velocity distributions exhibit non-normal behavior and can be approximated by generalized Gaussians with fat tails. We also discuss possible implications of modeling COP velocity by using generalized Fokker-Planck equations related to Tsallis statistics and Richardson anomalous diffusion.

  18. Galactic Subsystems on the Basis of Cumulative Distribution of Space Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojević, S.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A sample containing $4,614$ stars with available space velocities and high-quality kinematical data from the Arihip Catalogue is formed. For the purpose of distinguishing galactic subsystems the cumulative distribution of space velocities is studied. The fractions of the three subsystems are found to be: thin disc 92\\%, thick disc 6\\% and halo 2\\%. These results are verified by analysing the elements of velocity ellipsoids and the shape and size of the galactocentric orbits of the sample stars, i.e. the planar and vertical eccentricities of the orbits.

  19. Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, Benedikt

    2013-01-01

    Fast ions play an important role in heating the plasma in a magnetic confinement fusion device. Fast-ion Dα(FIDA) spectroscopy diagnoses fast ions in small measurement volumes. Spectra measured by a FIDA diagnostic can be related to the 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function. A single FIDA view...... probes certain regions in velocity-space, determined by the geometry of the set-up. Exploiting this, the fast-ion distribution function can be inferred using a velocity-space tomography method. This poster contains a tomography calculated from measured spectra from three different FIDA views at ASDEX...... Upgrade. The quality of the tomography improves with the number of FIDA views simultaneously measuring the same volume. To investigate the potential benefits of including additional views (up to 18), tomographies are inferred from synthetic spectra calculated from a simulated distribution function...

  20. Spherical Harmonic Analysis of Particle Velocity Distribution Function: Comparison of Moments and Anisotropies using Cluster Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgiolo, Chris; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a spherical harmonic analysis of the plasma velocity distribution function using high-angular, energy, and time resolution Cluster data obtained from the PEACE spectrometer instrument to demonstrate how this analysis models the particle distribution function and its moments and anisotropies. The results show that spherical harmonic analysis produced a robust physical representation model of the velocity distribution function, resolving the main features of the measured distributions. From the spherical harmonic analysis, a minimum set of nine spectral coefficients was obtained from which the moment (up to the heat flux), anisotropy, and asymmetry calculations of the velocity distribution function were obtained. The spherical harmonic method provides a potentially effective "compression" technique that can be easily carried out onboard a spacecraft to determine the moments and anisotropies of the particle velocity distribution function for any species. These calculations were implemented using three different approaches, namely, the standard traditional integration, the spherical harmonic (SPH) spectral coefficients integration, and the singular value decomposition (SVD) on the spherical harmonic methods. A comparison among the various methods shows that both SPH and SVD approaches provide remarkable agreement with the standard moment integration method.

  1. Note: Reflection-type micro multipoint laser Doppler velocimeter for measuring velocity distributions in blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, H; Kobayashi, D; Shirakawa, H; Andoh, T; Akiguchi, S; Wakisaka, T; Ishizuka, M; Hachiga, T

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) for measuring velocity distributions in blood vessels. We converted a transmission-based LDV into a reflection-based LDV to make it suitable for clinical applications. The velocity distribution image of a serpentine flow channel obtained could be qualitatively explained by the numerical results. Finally, we evaluated the system by using it to measure injection of blood into a glass tube by a syringe pump. The results obtained demonstrate that erythrocytes can be used as seeding particles for the reflection-type micro multipoint LDV. The results obtained are useful as basic data for clinical applications.

  2. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg.

  3. Ring-averaged ion velocity distribution function probe for laboratory magnetized plasma experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Chen, Jinting; Lin, Chiahsuan; Lee, Zongmau

    2017-10-01

    Ring-averaged velocity distribution function of ions at a fixed guiding center position is a fundamental quantity in the gyrokinetic plasma physics. We have developed a diagnostic tool for the ring averaged velocity distribution function of ions for laboratory plasma experiments, which is named as the ring-averaged ion distribution function probe (RIDFP). The RIDFP is a set of ion collectors for different velocities. It is designed to be immersed in magnetized plasmas and achieves momentum selection of incoming ions by the selection of the ion Larmor radii. To nullify the influence of the sheath potential surrounding the RIDFP on the orbits of the incoming ions, the electrostatic potential of the RIDFP body is automatically adjusted to coincide with the space potential of the target plasma with the use of an emissive probe and a voltage follower. The developed RIDFP successfully measured the equilibrium ring-averaged velocity distribution function of a laboratory magnetized plasma, which was in accordance with the Maxwellian distribution having an ion temperature of 0.2 eV.

  4. Ring-averaged ion velocity distribution function probe for laboratory magnetized plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Chen, Jinting; Lin, Chiahsuan; Lee, Zongmau

    2017-10-01

    Ring-averaged velocity distribution function of ions at a fixed guiding center position is a fundamental quantity in the gyrokinetic plasma physics. We have developed a diagnostic tool for the ring averaged velocity distribution function of ions for laboratory plasma experiments, which is named as the ring-averaged ion distribution function probe (RIDFP). The RIDFP is a set of ion collectors for different velocities. It is designed to be immersed in magnetized plasmas and achieves momentum selection of incoming ions by the selection of the ion Larmor radii. To nullify the influence of the sheath potential surrounding the RIDFP on the orbits of the incoming ions, the electrostatic potential of the RIDFP body is automatically adjusted to coincide with the space potential of the target plasma with the use of an emissive probe and a voltage follower. The developed RIDFP successfully measured the equilibrium ring-averaged velocity distribution function of a laboratory magnetized plasma, which was in accordance with the Maxwellian distribution having an ion temperature of 0.2 eV.

  5. Maximum Likelihood-Based Methods for Target Velocity Estimation with Distributed MIMO Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxin Cao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The estimation problem for target velocity is addressed in this in the scenario with a distributed multi-input multi-out (MIMO radar system. A maximum likelihood (ML-based estimation method is derived with the knowledge of target position. Then, in the scenario without the knowledge of target position, an iterative method is proposed to estimate the target velocity by updating the position information iteratively. Moreover, the Carmér-Rao Lower Bounds (CRLBs for both scenarios are derived, and the performance degradation of velocity estimation without the position information is also expressed. Simulation results show that the proposed estimation methods can approach the CRLBs, and the velocity estimation performance can be further improved by increasing either the number of radar antennas or the information accuracy of the target position. Furthermore, compared with the existing methods, a better estimation performance can be achieved.

  6. Detection of bump-on-tail reduced electron velocity distributions at the electron foreshock boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Klimas, A. J.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Reduced velocity distributions are derived from three-dimensional measurements of the velocity distribution of electrons in the 7 to 500 eV range in the electron foreshock. Bump-on-tail reduced distributions are presented for the first time at the foreshock boundary consistent with Filbert and Kellogg's proposed time-of-flight mechanism for generating the electron beams. In a significant number of boundary crossings, bump-on-tail reduced distributions were found in consecutive 3 sec measurements made 9 sec apart. It is concluded that, although the beams are linearly unstable to plasma waves according to the Penrose criterion, they persist on a time scale of 3 to 15 sec. Previously announced in STAR as N84-22518

  7. Ion velocity distributions within the LLBL and their possible implication to multiple reconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Vaisberg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze two LLBL crossings made by the Interball-Tail satellite under a southward or variable magnetosheath magnetic field: one crossing on the flank of the magnetosphere, and another one closer to the subsolar point. Three different types of ion velocity distributions within the LLBL are observed: (a D-shaped distributions, (b ion velocity distributions consisting of two counter-streaming components of magnetosheath-type, and (c distributions with three components, one of which has nearly zero parallel velocity and two counter-streaming components. Only the (a type fits to the single magnetic flux tube formed by reconnection between the magnetospheric and magnetosheath magnetic fields. We argue that two counter-streaming magnetosheath-like ion components observed by Interball within the LLBL cannot be explained by the reflection of the ions from the magnetic mirror deeper within the magnetosphere. Types (b and (c ion velocity distributions would form within spiral magnetic flux tubes consisting of a mixture of alternating segments originating from the magnetosheath and from magnetospheric plasma. The shapes of ion velocity distributions and their evolution with decreasing number density in the LLBL indicate that a significant part of the LLBL is located on magnetic field lines of long spiral flux tube islands at the magnetopause, as has been proposed and found to occur in magnetopause simulations. We consider these observations as evidence for multiple reconnection Χ-lines between magnetosheath and magnetospheric flux tubes. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  8. Assessment of altered three-dimensional blood characteristics in aortic disease by velocity distribution analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, Julio; Barker, Alex J.; van Ooij, Pim; Schnell, Susanne; Puthumana, Jyothy; Bonow, Robert O.; Collins, Jeremy D.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo test the feasibility of velocity distribution analysis for identifying altered three-dimensional (3D) flow characteristics in patients with aortic disease based on 4D flow MRI volumetric analysis. MethodsForty patients with aortic (Ao) dilation (mid ascending aortic diameter MAA=407 mm,

  9. Sodium Atoms in the Lunar Exotail: Observed Velocity and Spatial Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Line, Michael R.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Oliversen, R. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Haffner, L. M.; Roesler, F. L.

    2011-01-01

    The lunar sodium tail extends long distances due to radiation pressure on sodium atoms in the lunar exosphere. Our earlier observations determined the average radial velocity of sodium atoms moving down the lunar tail beyond Earth along the Sun-Moon-Earth line (i.e., the anti-lunar point) to be 12.4 km/s. Here we use the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper to obtain the first kinematically resolved maps of the intensity and velocity distribution of this emission over a 15 x times 15 deg region on the sky near the anti-lunar point. We present both spatially and spectrally resolved observations obtained over four nights around new moon in October 2007. The spatial distribution of the sodium atoms is elongated along the ecliptic with the location of the peak intensity drifting 3 degrees east along the ecliptic per night. Preliminary modeling results suggest that the spatial and velocity distributions in the sodium exotail are sensitive to the near surface lunar sodium velocity distribution and that observations of this sort along with detailed modeling offer new opportunities to describe the time history of lunar surface sputtering over several days.

  10. Analytical models for predicting the ion velocity distributions in JET in the presence of ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Lisak, M.

    1986-01-01

    The present report summarizes the work performed within the contract JT4/9008, the aim of which is to derive analytical models for ion velocity distributions resulting from ICRF heating on JET. The work has been performed over a two-year-period ending in August 1986 and has involved a total effort of 2.4 man years. (author)

  11. Meteoroid velocity distribution derived from head echo data collected at Arecibo during regular world day observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Sulzer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the observation and analysis of ionization flashes associated with the decay of meteoroids (so-called head echos detected by the Arecibo 430 MHz radar during regular ionospheric observations in the spring and autumn equinoxes. These two periods allow pointing well-above and nearly-into the ecliptic plane at dawn when the event rate maximizes. The observation of many thousands of events allows a statistical interpretation of the results, which show that there is a strong tendency for the observed meteoroids to come from the apex as has been previously reported (Chau and Woodman, 2004. The velocity distributions agree with Janches et al. (2003a when they are directly comparable, but the azimuth scan used in these observations allows a new perspective. We have constructed a simple statistical model which takes meteor velocities as input and gives radar line of sight velocities as output. The intent is to explain the fastest part of the velocity distribution. Since the speeds interpreted from the measurements are distributed fairly narrowly about nearly 60 km s-1, double the speed of the earth in its orbit, is consistent with the interpretation that many of the meteoroids seen by the Arecibo radar are moving in orbits about the sun with similar parameters as the earth, but in the retrograde direction. However, it is the directional information obtained from the beam-swinging radar experiment and the speed that together provide the evidence for this interpretation. Some aspects of the measured velocity distributions suggest that this is not a complete description even for the fast part of the distribution, and it certainly says nothing about the slow part first described in Janches et al. (2003a. Furthermore, we cannot conclude anything about the entire dust population since there are probably selection effects that restrict the observations to a subset of the population.

  12. Peripheral nerve changes assessed by conduction velocity distribution in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszewicz, M; Gosk-Bierska, I; Jerzy, G; Bilińska, M; Podemski, R; Budrewicz, S; Adamiec, R

    2011-08-01

    Different mechanisms (neural and intravascular) are thought to be important in the pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP). In a previous study we confirmed autonomic nervous system impairment in patients with primary RP, but the pathogenic role of peripheral nerves remained unclear. The aim of the current study was an electrophysiological analysis of peripheral nerves using both standard conduction velocity and the conduction velocity distribution (CVD) in patients with primary RP in order to investigate the causes of dysautonomia. We examined 34 patients with primary RP and dysautonomia and 31 sex- and age-matched controls. Standard motor and sensory conduction tests in ulnar and peroneal (sural) nerves and a CVD test in the same nerves were performed. Clinically, none of the patients had motor symptoms, while 35.3% of them presented sensory neuropathy. Standard neurographic tests were within the normal limits except for the significant prolongation of mean sensory latency in both examined nerves. CVD revealed significant slowing of motor conduction velocity in all the conduction values, e.g. in the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles of velocity. There were no differences in the width of the velocity distribution in the patient group and controls. The results of CVD indicated the presence of generalized subclinical peripheral motor nerve impairment (subclinical polyneuropathy) in patients with primary RP and dysautonomia. Based on the present and previous studies, we conclude that the mechanism of autonomic dysfunction in primary RP is mixed, resulting from both central and peripheral neural abnormalities.

  13. Visualization of velocity field and phase distribution in gas-liquid two-phase flow by NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, G.; Monji, H.; Obata, J.

    2004-01-01

    NMR imaging has been applied in the field of fluid mechanics, mainly single phase flow, to visualize the instantaneous flow velocity field. In the present study, NMR imaging was used to visualize simultaneously both the instantaneous phase structure and velocity field of gas-liquid two-phase flow. Two methods of NMR imaging were applied. One is useful to visualize both the one component of liquid velocity and the phase distribution. This method was applied to horizontal two-phase flow and a bubble rising in stagnant oil. It was successful in obtaining some pictures of velocity field and phase distribution on the cross section of the pipe. The other is used to visualize a two-dimensional velocity field. This method was applied to a bubble rising in a stagnant water. The velocity field was visualized after and before the passage of a bubble at the measuring cross section. Furthermore, the distribution of liquid velocity was obtained. (author)

  14. Anomalous diffusion and q-Weibull velocity distributions in epithelial cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Souza Vilela Podestá

    Full Text Available In multicellular organisms, cell motility is central in all morphogenetic processes, tissue maintenance, wound healing and immune surveillance. Hence, the control of cell motion is a major demand in the creation of artificial tissues and organs. Here, cell migration assays on plastic 2D surfaces involving normal (MDCK and tumoral (B16F10 epithelial cell lines were performed varying the initial density of plated cells. Through time-lapse microscopy quantities such as speed distributions, velocity autocorrelations and spatial correlations, as well as the scaling of mean-squared displacements were determined. We find that these cells exhibit anomalous diffusion with q-Weibull speed distributions that evolves non-monotonically to a Maxwellian distribution as the initial density of plated cells increases. Although short-ranged spatial velocity correlations mark the formation of small cell clusters, the emergence of collective motion was not observed. Finally, simulational results from a correlated random walk and the Vicsek model of collective dynamics evidence that fluctuations in cell velocity orientations are sufficient to produce q-Weibull speed distributions seen in our migration assays.

  15. An Undersea Mining Microseism Source Location Algorithm Considering Wave Velocity Probability Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furui Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional mine microseism locating methods are mainly based on the assumption that the wave velocity is uniform through the space, which leads to some errors for the assumption goes against the laws of nature. In this paper, the wave velocity is regarded as a random variable, and the probability distribution information of the wave velocity is fused into the traditional locating method. This paper puts forwards the microseism source location method for the undersea mining on condition of the probability distribution of the wave velocity and comes up with the solving process of Monte Carlo. In addition, based on the simulated results of the Monte Carlo method, the space is divided into three areas: the most possible area (area I, the possible area (area II, and the small probability area (area III. Attached to corresponding mathematical formulations, spherical models and cylindrical models in different areas are, respectively, built according to whether the source is in the sensor arrays. Both the examples and the actual applications show that (1 the method of microseism source location in this paper can highly improve the accuracy of the microseism monitoring, especially for the source beyond the sensor arrays, and (2 the space-dividing method based on occurrence possibilities of the source can recognize and sweep the hidden dangers for it predicts the probable location range of the source efficiently, while the traditional method cannot.

  16. Study on Droplet Size and Velocity Distributions of a Pressure Swirl Atomizer Based on the Maximum Entropy Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A predictive model for droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer has been proposed based on the maximum entropy formalism (MEF. The constraint conditions of the MEF model include the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy. The effects of liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio on the droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer are investigated. Results show that model based on maximum entropy formalism works well to predict droplet size and velocity distributions under different spray conditions. Liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio have different effects on droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer.

  17. Wartime Distribution Operations: Roles of Focused Logistics, Velocity Management, Strategic Distribution Policy and Air Clearance Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Mark

    2004-01-01

    ...) and service policies on materiel consolidation and air clearance authority. The paper argues that developing common DoD and services policies for materiel consolidation and air clearance will result in a more effective joint distribution system...

  18. A macroscopic model of traffic jams in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V; Avramenko, A A

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a minimal macroscopic model capable of explaining the formation of traffic jams in fast axonal transport. The model accounts for the decrease of the number density of positively (and negatively) oriented microtubules near the location of the traffic jam due to formation of microtubule swirls; the model also accounts for the reduction of the effective velocity of organelle transport in the traffic jam region due to organelles falling off microtubule tracks more often in the swirl region. The model is based on molecular-motor-assisted transport equations and the hydrodynamic model of traffic jams in highway traffic. Parametric analyses of the model's predictions for various values of viscosity of the traffic flow, variance of the velocity distribution, diffusivity of microtubule-bound and free organelles, rate constants for binding to and detachment from microtubules, relaxation time, and average motor velocities of the retrograde and anterograde transport, are carried out.

  19. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 μm and a geometric standard deviation, σ g of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and σ g decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 μm and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented

  20. Nonlinear Wave-Particle Interaction: Implications for Newborn Planetary and Backstreaming Proton Velocity Distribution Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, N.; Mazelle, C.; Meziane, K.

    2018-02-01

    Seen from the solar wind (SW) reference frame, the presence of newborn planetary protons upstream from the Martian and Venusian bow shocks and SW protons reflected from each of them constitutes two sources of nonthermal proton populations. In both cases, the resulting proton velocity distribution function is highly unstable and capable of giving rise to ultralow frequency quasi-monochromatic electromagnetic plasma waves. When these instabilities take place, the resulting nonlinear waves are convected by the SW and interact with nonthermal protons located downstream from the wave generation region (upstream from the bow shock), playing a predominant role in their dynamics. To improve our understanding of these phenomena, we study the interaction between a charged particle and a large-amplitude monochromatic circularly polarized electromagnetic wave propagating parallel to a background magnetic field, from first principles. We determine the number of fix points in velocity space, their stability, and their dependence on different wave-particle parameters. Particularly, we determine the temporal evolution of a charged particle in the pitch angle-gyrophase velocity plane under nominal conditions expected for backstreaming protons in planetary foreshocks and for newborn planetary protons in the upstream regions of Venus and Mars. In addition, the inclusion of wave ellipticity effects provides an explanation for pitch angle distributions of suprathermal protons observed at the Earth's foreshock, reported in previous studies. These analyses constitute a mean to evaluate if nonthermal proton velocity distribution functions observed at these plasma environments present signatures that can be understood in terms of nonlinear wave-particle processes.

  1. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    OpenAIRE

    White, Robin; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialized glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarization followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is...

  2. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  3. Velocity and size distribution measurement of suspension droplets using PDPA technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Shahin; Akbarnozari, Ali; Moreau, Christian; Dolatabadi, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The creation of fine and uniform droplets from a bulk of liquid is a vital process in a variety of engineering applications, such as atomization in suspension plasma spray (SPS) in which the submicron coating materials are injected to the plasma gas through the suspension droplets. The size and velocity of these droplets has a great impact on the interaction of the suspension with the gas flow emanating from a plasma torch and can consequently affect the mechanical and chemical properties of the resultant coatings. In the current study, an aqueous suspension of small glass particles (2-8 μm) was atomized by utilizing an effervescent atomizer of 1 mm orifice diameter which involves bubbling gas (air) directly into the liquid stream. The gas to liquid ratio (GLR) was kept constant at 6% throughout this study. The mass concentration of glass particles varied in the range between 0.5 to 5% in order to investigate the effect of suspension viscosity and surface tension on the droplet characteristics, such as velocity and size distributions. These characteristics were simultaneously measured by using a non-intrusive optical technique, Phase Doppler Particle Anemometry (PDPA), which is based on the light signal scattered from the droplets moving in a measurement volume. The velocity and size distribution of suspension droplets were finally compared to those of distilled water under identical conditions. The results showed a different atomization behaviors due to the reduction in surface tension of the suspension spray.

  4. Bayesian reconstruction of the velocity distribution of weakly interacting massive particles from direct dark matter detection data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Chung-Lin, E-mail: clshan@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences No. 101, section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu City, 30013 Taiwan, R.O.C. (China)

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we extended our earlier work on the reconstruction of the (time-averaged) one-dimensional velocity distribution of Galactic Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) and introduce the Bayesian fitting procedure to the theoretically predicted velocity distribution functions. In this reconstruction process, the (rough) velocity distribution reconstructed by using raw data from direct Dark Matter detection experiments directly, i.e. measured recoil energies, with one or more different target materials, has been used as ''reconstructed-input'' information. By assuming a fitting velocity distribution function and scanning the parameter space based on the Bayesian analysis, the astronomical characteristic parameters, e.g. the Solar and Earth's Galactic velocities, will be pinned down as the output results.

  5. The frequency and distribution of high-velocity gas in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joy S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency and distribution of high-velocity gas in the Galaxy using UV absorption line measurements from archival high-dispersion IUE spectra and to identify particularly interesting regions for future study. Approximately 500 spectra have been examined. The study began with the creation of a database of all 0 and B stars with b less than or = to 30 deg observed with IUE at high dispersion over its 18-year lifetime. The original database of 2500 unique objects was reduced to 1200 objects which had optimal exposures available. The next task was to determine the distances of these stars so the high-velocity structures could be mapped in the Galaxy. Spectroscopic distances were calculated for each star for which photometry was available. The photometry was acquired for each star using the SIMBAD database. Preference was given to the ubvy system where available; otherwise the UBV system was used.

  6. Hydrogen distribution in a containment with a high-velocity hydrogen-steam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, G.R.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Postma, A.K.; Claybrook, S.W.

    1982-09-01

    Hydrogen mixing and distribution tests are reported for a modeled high velocity hydrogen-steam release from a postulated small pipe break or release from a pressurizer relief tank rupture disk into the lower compartment of an Ice Condenser Plant. The tests, which in most cases used helium as a simulant for hydrogen, demonstrated that the lower compartment gas was well mixed for both hydrogen release conditions used. The gas concentration differences between any spatial locations were less than 3 volume percent during the hydrogen/steam release period and were reduced to less than 0.5 volume percent within 20 minutes after termination of the hydrogen source. The high velocity hydrogen/steam jet provided the dominant mixing mechanism; however, natural convection and forced air recirculation played important roles in providing a well mixed atmosphere following termination of the hydrogen source. 5 figures, 4 tables

  7. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of pressure and velocity distribution inside Meniere’s diseased vestibular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuddin, N. F. H.; Isa, N. M.; Taib, I.; Mohammed, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Meniere’s disease or known as endolymphatic hydrops is an incurable vestibular disorder of the inner ear. This is due to the excessive fluid build-up in the endolymphatic sac which causing the vestibular endolymphatic membrane to start stretching. Although this mechanism has been widely accepted as the likely mechanism of Meniere’s syndrome, the reason for its occurrence remains unclear. Thus, the aims of this study to investigate the critical parameters of fluid flow in membranous labyrinth that is influencing instability of vestibular system. In addition, to visualise the flow behaviour between a normal membranous labyrinth and dilated membranous labyrinth in Meniere’s disease in predicting instability of vestibular system. Three dimensional geometry of endolymphatic sac is obtained from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) and reconstructed using commercial software. As basis of comparison the two different model of endolymphatic sac is considered in this study which are normal membranous labyrinth for model I and dilated membranous labyrinth for model II. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is used to analyse the behaviour of pressure and velocity flow in the endolymphatic sac. The comparison was made in terms of pressure distribution and velocity profile. The results show that the pressure for dilated membranous labyrinth is greater than normal membranous labyrinth. Due to abnormally pressure in the vestibular system, it leads to the increasing value of the velocity at dilated membranous labyrinth while at the normal membranous labyrinth the velocity values decreasing. As a conclusion by changing the parameters which is pressure and velocity can significantly affect to the instability of vestibular system for Meniere’s disease.

  8. The velocity distribution of interstellar gas observed in strong UV absorption lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, L. L.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of three strong interstellar UV absorption lines of N I (1199 A), N II (1083 A), and Si III (1206 A) in 47 stars of widely varying distance and a variety of spectral types are analyzed to obtain a velocity distribution function for the interstellar gas. A technique based on the maximum and minimum velocities observed along a line of sight is adopted because of heavy line blending, and results are discussed for both power-law and exponential distribution functions. The expected distribution of radiative-phase supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium is calculated as a function of SNR birthrate and of the interstellar density in which they evolve. The results are combined with observed distance estimates, and it is shown that an interstellar density in excess of 0.1 per cu cm would be required to keep the SNRs sufficiently confined so that their cross sections are consistent with the observed number of components. The alternative possibility is considered that SNRs do not enter the radiative phase before escaping from the Galaxy or colliding with neighboring remnants.

  9. Investigation of the velocity distribution in the flow of a journal bearing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobis, Matthias; Reinke, Peter; Schmidt, Marcus; Riedel, Marco; Redlich, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    In many previous studies the main focus was put on the pressure distribution in the lubricating gap. Due to the limited space in the gap an investigation of the velocity distribution is very difficult or rather impossible. Based on the geometrical shapes of a real journal bearing, a bearing model test rig with an increased relative gap width has been developed. Thus, it is possible to detect the distribution of the flow speed within the gap by using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). The comparability of the flow to the flow in a real journal bearing is ensured by observing the Reynolds similarity. Due to a targeted eccentricity in the system and the circumferential groove over 180°, there is in connection with the outlet hole in the rotating shaft a permanent change in the outflow conditions. The consequence is a periodically varying system pressure with effects to the pressure and volumetric flow rate at the inlet and outlet. The velocity measurements with a triggered LDV are done by considering these transient boundary conditions at the system boundaries. In this paper the experimental setup, the expiration of the investigations and some exemplary results are presented. Attendant to the experiment, numerical simulations are carried out and the results are compared with the experimental data.

  10. Investigation of the velocity distribution in the flow of a journal bearing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobis Matthias

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In many previous studies the main focus was put on the pressure distribution in the lubricating gap. Due to the limited space in the gap an investigation of the velocity distribution is very difficult or rather impossible. Based on the geometrical shapes of a real journal bearing, a bearing model test rig with an increased relative gap width has been developed. Thus, it is possible to detect the distribution of the flow speed within the gap by using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV. The comparability of the flow to the flow in a real journal bearing is ensured by observing the Reynolds similarity. Due to a targeted eccentricity in the system and the circumferential groove over 180°, there is in connection with the outlet hole in the rotating shaft a permanent change in the outflow conditions. The consequence is a periodically varying system pressure with effects to the pressure and volumetric flow rate at the inlet and outlet. The velocity measurements with a triggered LDV are done by considering these transient boundary conditions at the system boundaries. In this paper the experimental setup, the expiration of the investigations and some exemplary results are presented. Attendant to the experiment, numerical simulations are carried out and the results are compared with the experimental data.

  11. Distributed leader-follower flocking control for multi-agent dynamical systems with time-varying velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming

    Using tools from algebraic graph theory and nonsmooth analysis in combination with ideas of collective potential functions, velocity consensus and navigation feedback, a distributed leader-follower flocking algorithm for multi-agent dynamical systems with time-varying velocities is developed where

  12. 3D ion velocity distribution function measurement in an electric thruster using laser induced fluorescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, P. Q.; Jarrige, J.; Cucchetti, E.; Cannat, F.; Packan, D.

    2017-09-01

    Measuring the full ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) by non-intrusive techniques can improve our understanding of the ionization processes and beam dynamics at work in electric thrusters. In this paper, a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) tomographic reconstruction technique is applied to the measurement of the IVDF in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster. A setup is developed to move the laser axis along two rotation axes around the measurement volume. The fluorescence spectra taken from different viewing angles are combined using a tomographic reconstruction algorithm to build the complete 3D (in phase space) time-averaged distribution function. For the first time, this technique is used in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster to measure the full distribution function of the xenon ions. Two examples of reconstructions are provided, in front of the thruster nose-cone and in front of the anode channel. The reconstruction reveals the features of the ion beam, in particular on the thruster axis where a toroidal distribution function is observed. These findings are consistent with the thruster shape and operation. This technique, which can be used with other LIF schemes, could be helpful in revealing the details of the ion production regions and the beam dynamics. Using a more powerful laser source, the current implementation of the technique could be improved to reduce the measurement time and also to reconstruct the temporal evolution of the distribution function.

  13. The ion velocity distribution of tokamak plasmas: Rutherford scattering at TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammen, H.F.

    1995-01-01

    One of the most promising ways to gererate electricity in the next century on a large scale is nuclear fusion. In this process two light nuclei fuse and create a new nucleus with a smaller mass than the total mass of the original nuclei, the mass deficit is released in the form of kinetic energy. Research into this field has already been carried out for some decades now, and will have to continue for several more decades before a commercially viable fusion reactor can be build. In order to obtain fusion, fuels of extremely high temperatures are needed to overcome the repulsive force of the nuclei involved. Under these circumstances the fuel is fully ionized: it consists of ions and electrons and is in the plasma state. The problem of confining such a hot substance is solved by using strong magnetic fields. One specific magnetic configuration, in common use, is called the tokamak. The plasma in this machine has a toroidal, i.e. doughnut shaped, configuration. For understanding the physical processes which take place in the plasma, a good temporally and spatially resolved knowledge of both the ion and electron velocity distribution is required. The situation concerning the electrons is favourable, but this is not the case for the ions. To improve the existing knowledge of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak plasmas, a Rutherford scattering diagnostic (RUSC), designed and built by the FOM-Institute for Plasmaphysics 'Rijnhuizen', was installed at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich (D). The principle of the diagnostic is as follows. A beam of monoenergetic particles (30 keV, He) is injected vertically into the plasma. A small part of these particles collides elastically with the moving plasma ions. By determining the energy of a scattered beam particle under a certain angle (7 ), the initial velocity of the plasma ion in one direction can be computed. (orig./WL)

  14. The ion velocity distribution of tokamak plasmas: Rutherford scattering at TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammen, H.F.

    1995-01-10

    One of the most promising ways to gererate electricity in the next century on a large scale is nuclear fusion. In this process two light nuclei fuse and create a new nucleus with a smaller mass than the total mass of the original nuclei, the mass deficit is released in the form of kinetic energy. Research into this field has already been carried out for some decades now, and will have to continue for several more decades before a commercially viable fusion reactor can be build. In order to obtain fusion, fuels of extremely high temperatures are needed to overcome the repulsive force of the nuclei involved. Under these circumstances the fuel is fully ionized: it consists of ions and electrons and is in the plasma state. The problem of confining such a hot substance is solved by using strong magnetic fields. One specific magnetic configuration, in common use, is called the tokamak. The plasma in this machine has a toroidal, i.e. doughnut shaped, configuration. For understanding the physical processes which take place in the plasma, a good temporally and spatially resolved knowledge of both the ion and electron velocity distribution is required. The situation concerning the electrons is favourable, but this is not the case for the ions. To improve the existing knowledge of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak plasmas, a Rutherford scattering diagnostic (RUSC), designed and built by the FOM-Institute for Plasmaphysics `Rijnhuizen`, was installed at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich (D). The principle of the diagnostic is as follows. A beam of monoenergetic particles (30 keV, He) is injected vertically into the plasma. A small part of these particles collides elastically with the moving plasma ions. By determining the energy of a scattered beam particle under a certain angle (7 ), the initial velocity of the plasma ion in one direction can be computed. (orig./WL).

  15. Measurements on multichannel arrays. The angular dependence of the absolute intensity and the velocity distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Verster, N.F.

    1974-01-01

    Three multichannel arrays with channel-diameters of 16, 50 and 140μm have been investigated using O 2 with flow rates of 4 10 -5 through 8 10 -3 torr l s -1 mm -2 . All experimental values of the peaking factor K are described by one experimental curve if the peaking factor is reduced by K*=KT, where T is the Clausing factor, and then is plotted vs. the reduced entrance density eta*=L/lambda, where lambda is the mean free path corresponding to the entrance density and L is the length of the channel. At eta*=1 the experimental curve lies 40% below Giordmaine and Wang theory, and this deviation increases slightly with increasing eta*. In the plot of the reduced half-width-half-maximum THETAsub(1/2)sup(*)=THETAsub(1/2)T -1 vs. eta* all data are also well represented by a single experimental curve. The center-line velocity distribution is described in terms of a deformation function GAMMA(v), to be applied to the Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution from an ideal orifice

  16. Interpreting dark matter direct detection independently of the local velocity and density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate precisely what particle physics information can be extracted from a single direct detection observation of dark matter while making absolutely no assumptions about the local velocity distribution and local density of dark matter. Our central conclusions follow from a very simple observation: the velocity distribution of dark matter is positive definite, f(v)≥0. We demonstrate the utility of this result in several ways. First, we show a falling deconvoluted recoil spectrum (deconvoluted of the nuclear form factor), such as from ordinary elastic scattering, can be 'mocked up' by any mass of dark matter above a kinematic minimum. As an example, we show that dark matter much heavier than previously considered can explain the CoGeNT excess. Specifically, m χ Ge can be in just as good agreement as light dark matter, while m χ >m Ge depends on understanding the sensitivity of xenon to dark matter at very low recoil energies, E R < or approx. 6 keVnr. Second, we show that any rise in the deconvoluted recoil spectrum represents distinct particle physics information that cannot be faked by an arbitrary f(v). As examples of resulting nontrivial particle physics, we show that inelastic dark matter and dark matter with a form factor can both yield such a rise.

  17. Production of a double-humped ion velocity distribution function in a single-ended Q-machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Michelsen, Poul

    1970-01-01

    An experimental method of producing a double-humped velocity distribution function for the ions in a Q-machine is described. The method is based on charge exchange processes between neutral ceasium and the ions in a ceasium plasma.......An experimental method of producing a double-humped velocity distribution function for the ions in a Q-machine is described. The method is based on charge exchange processes between neutral ceasium and the ions in a ceasium plasma....

  18. Internal velocity and mass distributions in simulated clusters of galaxies for a variety of cosmogonic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Renyue

    1994-01-01

    The mass and velocity distributions in the outskirts (0.5-3.0/h Mpc) of simulated clusters of galaxies are examined for a suite of cosmogonic models (two Omega(sub 0) = 1 and two Omega(sub 0) = 0.2 models) utilizing large-scale particle-mesh (PM) simulations. Through a series of model computations, designed to isolate the different effects, we find that both Omega(sub 0) and P(sub k) (lambda less than or = 16/h Mpc) are important to the mass distributions in clusters of galaxies. There is a correlation between power, P(sub k), and density profiles of massive clusters; more power tends to point to the direction of a stronger correlation between alpha and M(r less than 1.5/h Mpc); i.e., massive clusters being relatively extended and small mass clusters being relatively concentrated. A lower Omega(sub 0) universe tends to produce relatively concentrated massive clusters and relatively extended small mass clusters compared to their counterparts in a higher Omega(sub 0) model with the same power. Models with little (initial) small-scale power, such as the hot dark matter (HDM) model, produce more extended mass distributions than the isothermal distribution for most of the mass clusters. But the cold dark matter (CDM) models show mass distributions of most of the clusters more concentrated than the isothermal distribution. X-ray and gravitational lensing observations are beginning providing useful information on the mass distribution in and around clusters; some interesting constraints on Omega(sub 0) and/or the (initial) power of the density fluctuations on scales lambda less than or = 16/h Mpc (where linear extrapolation is invalid) can be obtained when larger observational data sets, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, become available.

  19. Wind direction/velocity and current direction/velocity data from current meter casts in a world wide distribution from 1970-12-06 to 1991-10-01 (NODC Accession 9700218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind direction/velocity and current direction/velocity data were collected using current meter casts in a world wide distribution from December 6, 1970 to October 1,...

  20. A Gordeyev integral for electrostatic waves in a magnetized plasma with a kappa velocity distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mace, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    A Gordeyev-type integral for the investigation of electrostatic waves in magnetized plasma having a kappa or generalized Lorentzian velocity distribution is derived. The integral readily reduces, in the unmagnetized and parallel propagation limits, to simple expressions involving the Z κ function. For propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field, it is shown that the Gordeyev integral can be written in closed form as a sum of two generalized hypergeometric functions, which permits easy analysis of the dispersion relation for electrostatic waves. Employing the same analytical techniques used for the kappa distribution, it is further shown that the well-known Gordeyev integral for a Maxwellian distribution can be written very concisely as a generalized hypergeometric function in the limit of perpendicular propagation. This expression, in addition to its mathematical conciseness, has other advantages over the traditional sum over modified Bessel functions form. Examples of the utility of these generalized hypergeometric series, especially how they simplify analyses of electrostatic waves propagating perpendicular to the magnetic field, are given. The new expression for the Gordeyev integral for perpendicular propagation is solved numerically to obtain the dispersion relations for the electrostatic Bernstein modes in a plasma with a kappa distribution

  1. Mitochondria Localize to Injured Axons to Support Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung Min; Baig, Huma S; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-12-21

    Axon regeneration is essential to restore the nervous system after axon injury. However, the neuronal cell biology that underlies axon regeneration is incompletely understood. Here we use in vivo, single-neuron analysis to investigate the relationship between nerve injury, mitochondrial localization, and axon regeneration. Mitochondria translocate into injured axons so that average mitochondria density increases after injury. Moreover, single-neuron analysis reveals that axons that fail to increase mitochondria have poor regeneration. Experimental alterations to axonal mitochondrial distribution or mitochondrial respiratory chain function result in corresponding changes to regeneration outcomes. Axonal mitochondria are specifically required for growth-cone migration, identifying a key energy challenge for injured neurons. Finally, mitochondrial localization to the axon after injury is regulated in part by dual-leucine zipper kinase 1 (DLK-1), a conserved regulator of axon regeneration. These data identify regulation of axonal mitochondria as a new cell-biological mechanism that helps determine the regenerative response of injured neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Extracting kinetic freeze-out temperature and radial flow velocity from an improved Tsallis distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, Hai-Ling; Liu, Fu-Hu [Shanxi University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi (China); Lacey, Roy A. [Stony Brook University, Departments of Chemistry and Physics, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2017-03-15

    We analyze the transverse-momentum (p{sub T}) spectra of identified particles (π{sup ±}, K{sup ±}, p, and anti p) produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions over a √(s{sub NN}) (center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair) range from 14.5 GeV (one of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies) to 2.76 TeV (one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies). For the spectra with a narrow p{sub T} range, an improved Tsallis distribution which is in fact the Tsallis distribution with radial flow is used. For the spectra with a wide p{sub T} range, a superposition of the improved Tsallis distribution and an inverse power law is used. Both the extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature (T{sub 0}) and radial flow velocity (β{sub T}) increase with the increase of √(s{sub NN}), which indicates a higher excitation and larger expansion of the interesting system at the LHC. Both the values of T{sub 0} and β{sub T} in central collisions are slightly larger than those in peripheral collisions, and they are independent of isospin and slightly dependent on mass. (orig.)

  3. Transient velocity distributions for the supercritical carbon dioxide forced convection heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Ota, Jun; Sakurai, Katsumi; Madarame, Haruki

    2003-01-01

    The authors successfully visualize the density variation of supercritical carbon dioxide under forced convective heat transfer using schlieren and shadowgraph techniques as research toward the precise characterization of supercritical fluid behavior. Using a new experimental setup with short-pulse infrared laser and high-speed camera and by employing frame straddling, sequential images are obtained at an interval of only 0.48 ms. A noise-reduction step is also added to the cross-correlation algorithm to produce clear and accurate velocity distribution maps. The proposed technique is demonstrated to be a highly effective and accurate analysis tool for the behavior of supercritical fluids, and is expected to be useful in research on precision applications such as nuclear reactors. (author)

  4. Investigation of Velocity Distribution in Open Channel Flows Based on Conditional Average of Turbulent Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of a new analytical model similar to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations to determine the distribution of streamwise velocity by considering the bursting phenomenon. It is found that, in two-dimensional (2D flows, the underlying mechanism of the wake law in 2D uniform flow is actually a result of up/down events. A special experiment was conducted to examine the newly derived analytical model, and good agreement is achieved between the experimental data in the inner region and the model’s prediction. The obtained experimental data were also used to examine the DML-Law (dip-modified-log-law, MLW-Law (modified-log-wake law, and CML-Law (Cole’s wake law, and the agreement is not very satisfactory in the outer region.

  5. Exploring the velocity distribution of debris flows: An iteration algorithm based approach for complex cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zheng; Chen, Guangqi; Li, Yange; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    The estimation of debris-flow velocity in a cross-section is of primary importance due to its correlation to impact force, run up and superelevation. However, previous methods sometimes neglect the observed asymmetric velocity distribution, and consequently underestimate the debris-flow velocity. This paper presents a new approach for exploring the debris-flow velocity distribution in a cross-section. The presented approach uses an iteration algorithm based on the Riemann integral method to search an approximate solution to the unknown flow surface. The established laws for vertical velocity profile are compared and subsequently integrated to analyze the velocity distribution in the cross-section. The major benefit of the presented approach is that natural channels typically with irregular beds and superelevations can be taken into account, and the resulting approximation by the approach well replicates the direct integral solution. The approach is programmed in MATLAB environment, and the code is open to the public. A well-documented debris-flow event in Sichuan Province, China, is used to demonstrate the presented approach. Results show that the solutions of the flow surface and the mean velocity well reproduce the investigated results. Discussion regarding the model sensitivity and the source of errors concludes the paper.

  6. Three-dimensional distribution of random velocity inhomogeneities at the Nankai trough seismogenic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T.; Obana, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Nakanishi, A.; Kaiho, Y.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Nankai trough in southwestern Japan is a convergent margin where the Philippine sea plate is subducted beneath the Eurasian plate. There are major faults segments of huge earthquakes that are called Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes. According to the earthquake occurrence history over the past hundreds years, we must expect various rupture patters such as simultaneous or nearly continuous ruptures of plural fault segments. Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) conducted seismic surveys at Nankai trough in order to clarify mutual relations between seismic structures and fault segments, as a part of "Research concerning Interaction Between the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes" funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. This study evaluated the spatial distribution of random velocity inhomogeneities from Hyuga-nada to Kii-channel by using velocity seismograms of small and moderate sized earthquakes. Random velocity inhomogeneities are estimated by the peak delay time analysis of S-wave envelopes (e.g., Takahashi et al. 2009). Peak delay time is defined as the time lag from the S-wave onset to its maximal amplitude arrival. This quantity mainly reflects the accumulated multiple forward scattering effect due to random inhomogeneities, and is quite insensitive to the inelastic attenuation. Peak delay times are measured from the rms envelopes of horizontal components at 4-8Hz, 8-16Hz and 16-32Hz. This study used the velocity seismograms that are recorded by 495 ocean bottom seismographs and 378 onshore seismic stations. Onshore stations are composed of the F-net and Hi-net stations that are maintained by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) of Japan. It is assumed that the random inhomogeneities are represented by the von Karman type PSDF. Preliminary result of inversion analysis shows that spectral gradient of PSDF (i.e., scale dependence of

  7. Determination and shaping of the ion-velocity distribution function in a single-ended Q machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Michelsen, Poul

    1971-01-01

    An electrostatic energy analyzer with a resolution better than 0.03 eV was constructed. This analyzer was used to determine the ion-velocity distribution function at different densities and plate temperatures in a single-ended Q machine. In all regions good agreement with theoretical predictions...... based on simple, physical pictures is obtained. It is shown that within certain limits the velocity distribution function can be shaped; double-humped distribution functions have been obtained. The technique used here is suggested as an accurate method for determination of plasma densities within 10......% in single-ended Q machines...

  8. Axonal transmission in the retina introduces a small dispersion of relative timing in the ganglion cell population response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Zeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual stimuli elicit action potentials in tens of different retinal ganglion cells. Each ganglion cell type responds with a different latency to a given stimulus, thus transforming the high-dimensional input into a temporal neural code. The timing of the first spikes between different retinal projection neurons cells may further change along axonal transmission. The purpose of this study is to investigate if intraretinal conduction velocity leads to a synchronization or dispersion of the population signal leaving the eye. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We 'imaged' the initiation and transmission of light-evoked action potentials along individual axons in the rabbit retina at micron-scale resolution using a high-density multi-transistor array. We measured unimodal conduction velocity distributions (1.3±0.3 m/sec, mean ± SD for axonal populations at all retinal eccentricities with the exception of the central part that contains myelinated axons. The velocity variance within each piece of retina is caused by ganglion cell types that show narrower and slightly different average velocity tuning. Ganglion cells of the same type respond with similar latency to spatially homogenous stimuli and conduct with similar velocity. For ganglion cells of different type intraretinal conduction velocity and response latency to flashed stimuli are negatively correlated, indicating that differences in first spike timing increase (up to 10 msec. Similarly, the analysis of pair-wise correlated activity in response to white-noise stimuli reveals that conduction velocity and response latency are negatively correlated. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Intraretinal conduction does not change the relative spike timing between ganglion cells of the same type but increases spike timing differences among ganglion cells of different type. The fastest retinal ganglion cells therefore act as indicators of new stimuli for postsynaptic neurons. The intraretinal dispersion

  9. Investigating the Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilaments: A Precursor for Optimal Neuronal Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M.

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are the most abundant structure of the neuronal cytoskeleton. Once synthesized within the cell body they are then transported throughout the axon along microtubule tracks, driven by the molecular motors kinesin and dynein. This movement is characterized by long pauses with no movement interrupted by infrequent bouts of rapid movement, resulting in an aggregate dense cytoskeletal structure, which serves to regulate an axon's shape and size. Curiously, the modulated kinetics of these polymers produces a very regular, yet non-uniform, morphology in myelinated axons which are composed of discretely spaced myelin-ensheathed segments that are separated by short constricted regions called "nodes of Ranvier". This unique design optimizes the conduction velocity of myelinated axons at minimal fiber size. Hence, neurofilaments regulate the axon caliber to optimize neuron function. The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the motile mechanism of neurofilament transport as well as the resulting electrophysiological effects that follow. We start by examining highly time-resolved kymograph images generated from recorded neurofilament movement via epifluorescence microscopy. Using kymograph analysis, edge detection algorithms, and pixel smoothing tactics, neurofilament trajectories are extracted and used to obtain statistical distributions for the characteristics of how these filaments move within cells. The results suggest that the observed intermittent and bidirectional motions of these filaments might be explained by a model in which dynein and kinesin motors attach to a single neurofilament cargo and interact through mechanical forces only (i.e. a "tug-of-war" model). We test this hypothesis by developing two discrete-state stochastic models for the kinetic cycles of kinesin and dynein, which are then incorporated into a separate stochastic model that represents the posed tug-of-war scenario. We then

  10. Diagnosis of mildly relativistic electron velocity distributions by electron cyclotron emission in the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.

    1986-09-01

    Mildly relativistic electron velocity distributions are diagnosed from measurements of the first few electron cyclotron emission harmonics in the Alcator C tokamak. The approach employs a vertical viewing chord through the center of the tokamak plasma terminating at a compact, high-performance viewing dump. The cyclotron emission spectra obtained in this way are dominated by frequency downshifts due to the relativistic mass increase, which discriminates the electrons by their total energy. In this way a one-to-one correspondence between the energy and the emission frequency is accomplished in the absence of harmonic superpositions. The distribution, described by f/sub p/, the line-averaged phase space density, and Λ, the anisotropy factor, is determined from the ratio of the optically thin harmonics or polarizations. Diagnosis of spectra in the second and the third harmonic range of frequencies obtained during lower hybrid heating, current drive, and low density ohmic discharges are carried out, using different methods depending on the degree of harmonic superposition present in the spectrum and the availability of more than one ratio measurement. Discussions of transient phenomena, the radiation temperature measurement from the optically thick first harmonic, and the measurements compared to the angular hard x-ray diagnostic results illuminate the capabilities of the vertically viewing electron cyclotron emission diagnostic

  11. Spectroscopic Measurements of the Ion Velocity Distribution at the Base of the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel W.; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2018-03-01

    In situ measurements of the fast solar wind reveal non-thermal distributions of electrons, protons, and minor ions extending from 0.3 au to the heliopause. The physical mechanisms responsible for these non-thermal properties and the location where these properties originate remain open questions. Here, we present spectroscopic evidence, from extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy, that the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of minor ions are already non-Gaussian at the base of the fast solar wind in a coronal hole, at altitudes of thermal equilibrium, (b) fluid motions such as non-Gaussian turbulent fluctuations or non-uniform wave motions, or (c) some combination of both. These observations provide important empirical constraints for the source region of the fast solar wind and for the theoretical models of the different acceleration, heating, and energy deposition processes therein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the ion VDF in the fast solar wind has been probed so close to its source region. The findings are also a timely precursor to the upcoming 2018 launch of the Parker Solar Probe, which will provide the closest in situ measurements of the solar wind at approximately 0.04 au (8.5 solar radii).

  12. Uptake, distribution, and velocity of organically complexed plutonium in corn (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Shannon W; Molz, Fred J; Fjeld, Robert A; Kaplan, Daniel I

    2012-10-01

    Lysimeter experiments and associated simulations suggested that Pu moved into and through plants that invaded field lysimeters during an 11-year study at the Savannah River Site. However, probable plant uptake and transport mechanisms were not well defined, so more detailed study is needed. Therefore, experiments were performed to examine movement, distribution, and velocity of soluble, complexed Pu in corn. Corn was grown and exposed to Pu using a "long root" system in which the primary root extended through a soil pot and into a hydroponic container. To maintain solubility, Pu was complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB (Desferrioxamine B) or the chelating agent DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid). Corn plants were exposed to nutrient solutions containing Pu for periods of 10 min to 10 d. Analysis of root and shoot tissues permitted concentration measurement and calculation of uptake velocity and Pu retardation in corn. Results showed that depending on exposure time, 98.3-95.9% of Pu entering the plant was retained in the roots external to the xylem, and that 1.7-4.1% of Pu entered the shoots (shoot fraction increased with exposure time). Corn Pu uptake was 2-4 times greater as Pu(DFOB) than as Pu(2)(DTPA)(3). Pu(DFOB) solution entered the root xylem and moved 1.74 m h(-1) or greater upward, which is more than a million times faster than Pu(III/IV) downward movement through soil during the lysimeter study. The Pu(DFOB) xylem retardation factor was estimated to be 3.7-11, allowing for rapid upward Pu transport and potential environmental release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute nutritional axonal neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Johanna; Logigian, Eric L

    2018-01-01

    This study describes clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features of a severe acute axonal polyneuropathy common to patients with acute nutritional deficiency in the setting of alcoholism, bariatric surgery (BS), or anorexia. Retrospective analysis of clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory data of patients with acute axonal neuropathy. Thirteen patients were identified with a severe, painful, sensory or sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy that developed over 2-12 weeks with sensory ataxia, areflexia, variable muscle weakness, poor nutritional status, and weight loss, often with prolonged vomiting and normal cerebrospinal fluid protein. Vitamin B6 was low in half and thiamine was low in all patients when obtained before supplementation. Patients improved with weight gain and vitamin supplementation, with motor greater than sensory recovery. We suggest that acute or subacute axonal neuropathy in patients with weight loss or vomiting associated with alcohol abuse, BS, or dietary deficiency is one syndrome, caused by micronutrient deficiencies. Muscle Nerve 57: 33-39, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A new technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescent (PILIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-07-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (Author) 8 refs.

  15. A new technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescent (PILIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (Author) 8 refs

  16. A new Technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescence (PILIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (author)

  17. Direct estimation of the global distribution of vertical velocity within cirrus clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Donifan; Molod, Andrea; Kalesse, Heike

    2017-07-28

    Cirrus clouds determine the radiative balance of the upper troposphere and the transport of water vapor across the tropopause. The representation of vertical wind velocity, W, in atmospheric models constitutes the largest source of uncertainty in the calculation of the cirrus formation rate. Using global atmospheric simulations with a spatial resolution of 7 km we obtain for the first time a direct estimate of the distribution of W at the scale relevant for cirrus formation, validated against long-term observations at two different ground sites. The standard deviation in W, σ w , varies widely over the globe with the highest values resulting from orographic uplift and convection, and the lowest occurring in the Arctic. Globally about 90% of the simulated σ w values are below 0.1 m s -1 and about one in 10 4 cloud formation events occur in environments with σ w  > 0.8 m s -1 . Combining our estimate with reanalysis products and an advanced cloud formation scheme results in lower homogeneous ice nucleation frequency than previously reported, and a decreasing average ice crystal concentration with decreasing temperature. These features are in agreement with observations and suggest that the correct parameterization of σ w is critical to simulate realistic cirrus properties.

  18. Velocity distribution around a sphere descending in a salt-stratified water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi; Akiyama, Shinsaku; Okino, Shinya

    2017-11-01

    When a sphere descends at constant speed in a salt-stratified water, a thin and high-speed jet is often generated above the sphere. The phenomenon has first been observed by shadowgraph and then has been investigated numerically. In this study, a systematic measurement by particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been performed for a wide range of Froude number Fr and Reynolds number Re , to actually observe the numerically simulated velocity distributions and confirm the accuracy of the numerical simulations for a very high Schmidt (Prandtl) number of Sc =(Pr =) 700 . The results show that the radius of the jet is proportional to both Fr 1 / 2 and Re - 1 / 2 , meaning that it is proportional to √{ Fr / Re } (when F < 1). The boundary layer on the sphere surface has a thickness comparable to the jet radius, and it is also proportional to √{ Fr / Re }. These results are in agreement with the recent numerical simulations and a simple dimensional analysis. Typical diverging internal-wave patterns, whose vertical wavelength has been predicted to be proportional to Fr , could also be observed.

  19. Uptake, distribution, and velocity of organically complexed plutonium in corn (Zea mays)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Shannon W.; Molz, Fred J.; Fjeld, Robert A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2012-01-01

    Lysimeter experiments and associated simulations suggested that Pu moved into and through plants that invaded field lysimeters during an 11-year study at the Savannah River Site. However, probable plant uptake and transport mechanisms were not well defined, so more detailed study is needed. Therefore, experiments were performed to examine movement, distribution, and velocity of soluble, complexed Pu in corn. Corn was grown and exposed to Pu using a “long root” system in which the primary root extended through a soil pot and into a hydroponic container. To maintain solubility, Pu was complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB (Desferrioxamine B) or the chelating agent DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid). Corn plants were exposed to nutrient solutions containing Pu for periods of 10 min to 10 d. Analysis of root and shoot tissues permitted concentration measurement and calculation of uptake velocity and Pu retardation in corn. Results showed that depending on exposure time, 98.3–95.9% of Pu entering the plant was retained in the roots external to the xylem, and that 1.7–4.1% of Pu entered the shoots (shoot fraction increased with exposure time). Corn Pu uptake was 2–4 times greater as Pu(DFOB) than as Pu 2 (DTPA) 3 . Pu(DFOB) solution entered the root xylem and moved 1.74 m h −1 or greater upward, which is more than a million times faster than Pu(III/IV) downward movement through soil during the lysimeter study. The Pu(DFOB) xylem retardation factor was estimated to be 3.7–11, allowing for rapid upward Pu transport and potential environmental release. - Highlights: ► By measuring radioactivity, we recorded the uptake of plutonium (Pu) by corn roots. ► Unlike Pu behavior in soil, Pu complexes moved rapidly through plant tissues. ► Pu accumulated in the root tissue external to the xylem and in the corn leaves. ► The 58 cm travel time from roots to leaves was between 10 and 20 min.

  20. Downward velocity distribution of free surface vortex in a cylindrical vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohguri, Youhei; Monji, Hideaki; Kamide, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the basic flow characteristics, especially downward velocity, of the free surface vortex. The flow field at the vertical cross section in a cylindrical vessel was measured by using PIV. The measurement results showed the inclined vortex center due to the un-axisymmetric structure of the vessel. Therefore, the maximum downward velocity on the cross section was discussed with the depth. The relation between the maximum downward velocity and the depth showed the tendency where the downward velocity increased with the depth non-linearly. By using dye, the downward velocity was also measured but its results showed a little difference from that by PIV. (author)

  1. The effect of vertical velocity probability distribution shape on cloud activation of aerosols: off-line calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonttila, J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Räisänen, P.; Kokkola, H.; Järvinen, H.

    2012-04-01

    Off-line calculations of cloud activation of aerosols using a probability density function (PDF) for vertical velocity (w) are performed. The focus is on the variation of the shape of the PDF using two functional formulations: the Normal distribution PDF and the Pearson type IV PDF. The Normal distribution provides a familiar example, as it has been widely used to approximate vertical velocity distributions in numerous applications, including climate models. Pearson type IV distribution provides an alternative that, to our knowledge, has not been employed before to describe the vertical velocity PDF. The advantage of the Pearson distribution is its versatility in representing skewed and more peaked distribution shapes compared to the Normal distribution, though this is obtained at the expense of increased mathematical complexity. The experiments are performed using a box model, in which the environmental conditions, including the aerosol size distribution (bi-modal) and chemical composition (ammonium-sulphate particles) are prescribed as constants. Measured size distributions comprising clean and polluted cases are used. Cloud activation of aerosols is calculated by integrating over the positive side of the PDF of w, which yields the mean number of activated particles (Nact). The mean, variance, and skewness of the PDFs along with the type of the PDF itself are altered in order to explore the effect of the PDF shape on the activation process. All experiments are repeated for three well-documented activation parameterizations: Lin & Leaitch, Abdul-Razzak & Ghan and Fountoukis & Nenes. The results show that for symmetric distributions of w (skewness = 0) there is a maximum difference of 10-15 % in Nact between the cases with w given by the Normal distribution, and the more peaked Pearson distribution. The largest differences are seen for the most polluted cases. Nact in clean cases will saturate rather quickly with respect to the maximum supersaturation and, hence

  2. Probability distributions of bed load particle velocities, accelerations, hop distances, and travel times informed by Jaynes's principle of maximum entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, David; Schmeeckle, Mark; Schumer, Rina; Fathel, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    We describe the most likely forms of the probability distributions of bed load particle velocities, accelerations, hop distances, and travel times, in a manner that formally appeals to inferential statistics while honoring mechanical and kinematic constraints imposed by equilibrium transport conditions. The analysis is based on E. Jaynes's elaboration of the implications of the similarity between the Gibbs entropy in statistical mechanics and the Shannon entropy in information theory. By maximizing the information entropy of a distribution subject to known constraints on its moments, our choice of the form of the distribution is unbiased. The analysis suggests that particle velocities and travel times are exponentially distributed and that particle accelerations follow a Laplace distribution with zero mean. Particle hop distances, viewed alone, ought to be distributed exponentially. However, the covariance between hop distances and travel times precludes this result. Instead, the covariance structure suggests that hop distances follow a Weibull distribution. These distributions are consistent with high-resolution measurements obtained from high-speed imaging of bed load particle motions. The analysis brings us closer to choosing distributions based on our mechanical insight.

  3. Generation of lower hybrid and whistler waves by an ion velocity ring distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winske, D.; Daughton, W.

    2012-01-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations in two and three spatial dimensions, we consider the generation and nonlinear evolution of lower hybrid waves produced by a cold ion ring velocity distribution in a low beta plasma. We show that the initial development of the instability is very similar in two and three dimensions and not significantly modified by electromagnetic effects, consistent with linear theory. At saturation, the level of electric field fluctuations is a small fraction of the background thermal energy; the electric field and corresponding density fluctuations consist of long, field-aligned striations. Energy extracted from the ring goes primarily into heating the background ions and the electrons at comparable rates. The initial growth and saturation of the magnetic components of the lower hybrid waves are related to the electric field components, consistent with linear theory. As the growing electric field fluctuations saturate, parallel propagating whistler waves develop by the interaction of two lower hybrid waves. At later times, these whistlers are replaced by longer wavelength, parallel propagating whistlers that grow through the decay of the lower hybrid fluctuations. Wave matching conditions demonstrate these conversion processes of lower hybrid waves to whistler waves. The conversion efficiency (=ratio of the whistler wave energy to the energy in the saturated lower hybrid waves) is computed and found to be significant (∼15%) for the parameters of the three-dimensional simulation (and even larger in the two-dimensional simulation), although when normalized in terms of the initial kinetic energy in the ring ions the overall efficiency is very small ( −4 ). The results are compared with relevant linear and nonlinear theory.

  4. DETECTION OF THE VELOCITY SHEAR EFFECT ON THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE GALACTIC SATELLITES IN ISOLATED SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jounghun; Choi, Yun-Young

    2015-01-01

    We report a detection of the effect of the large-scale velocity shear on the spatial distributions of the galactic satellites around the isolated hosts. Identifying the isolated galactic systems, each of which consists of a single host galaxy and its satellites, from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and reconstructing linearly the velocity shear field in the local universe, we measure the alignments between the relative positions of the satellites from their isolated hosts and the principal axes of the local velocity shear tensors projected onto the plane of sky. We find a clear signal that the galactic satellites in isolated systems are located preferentially along the directions of the minor principal axes of the large-scale velocity shear field. Those galactic satellites that are spirals, are brighter, are located at distances larger than the projected virial radii of the hosts, and belong to the spiral hosts yield stronger alignment signals, which implies that the alignment strength depends on the formation and accretion epochs of the galactic satellites. It is also shown that the alignment strength is quite insensitive to the cosmic web environment, as well as the size and luminosity of the isolated hosts. Although this result is consistent with the numerical finding of Libeskind et al. based on an N-body experiment, owing to the very low significance of the observed signals, it remains inconclusive whether or not the velocity shear effect on the satellite distribution is truly universal

  5. ON THE COMPETITION BETWEEN RADIAL EXPANSION AND COULOMB COLLISIONS IN SHAPING THE ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: KINETIC SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, S.; Matteini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Pantellini, F. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris 5, Place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2012-12-01

    We present numerical simulations of the solar wind using a fully kinetic model which takes into account the effects of particle's binary collisions in a quasi-neutral plasma in spherical expansion. Starting from an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution function for the electrons, we show that the combined effect of expansion and Coulomb collisions leads to the formation of two populations: a collision-dominated cold and dense population almost isotropic in velocity space and a weakly collisional, tenuous field-aligned and antisunward drifting population generated by mirror force focusing in the radially decreasing magnetic field. The relative weights and drift velocities for the two populations observed in our simulations are in excellent agreement with the relative weights and drift velocities for both core and strahl populations observed in the real solar wind. The radial evolution of the main moments of the electron velocity distribution function is in the range observed in the solar wind. The electron temperature anisotropy with respect to the magnetic field direction is found to be related to the ratio between the collisional time and the solar wind expansion time. Even though collisions are found to shape the electron velocity distributions and regulate the properties of the strahl, it is found that the heat flux is conveniently described by a collisionless model where a fraction of the electron thermal energy is advected at the solar wind speed. This reinforces the currently largely admitted fact that collisions in the solar wind are clearly insufficient to force the electron heat flux obey the classical Spitzer-Haerm expression where heat flux and temperature gradient are proportional to each other. The presented results show that the electron dynamics in the solar wind cannot be understood without considering the role of collisions.

  6. The GALAH Survey: Stellar streams and how stellar velocity distributions vary with Galactic longitude, hemisphere and metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillen, Alice C.; De Silva, Gayandhi; Sharma, Sanjib; Hayden, Michael; Freeman, Ken; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Žerjal, Maruša; Asplund, Martin; Buder, Sven; D'Orazi, Valentina; Duong, Ly; Kos, Janez; Lin, Jane; Lind, Karin; Martell, Sarah; Schlesinger, Katharine; Simpson, Jeffrey D.; Zucker, Daniel B.; Zwitter, Tomaz; Anguiano, Borja; Carollo, Daniela; Casagrande, Luca; Cotar, Klemen; Cottrell, Peter L.; Ireland, Michael; Kafle, Prajwal R.; Horner, Jonathan; Lewis, Geraint F.; Nataf, David M.; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Watson, Fred; Wittenmyer, Rob; Wyse, Rosemary

    2018-04-01

    Using GALAH survey data of nearby stars, we look at how structure in the planar (u, v) velocity distribution depends on metallicity and on viewing direction within the Galaxy. In nearby stars with distance d ≲ 1 kpc, the Hercules stream is most strongly seen in higher metallicity stars [Fe/H]>0.2. The Hercules stream peak v value depends on viewed galactic longitude, which we interpret as due to the gap between the stellar stream and more circular orbits being associated with a specific angular momentum value of about 1640 km s-1 kpc. The association of the gap with a particular angular momentum value supports a bar resonant model for the Hercules stream. Moving groups previously identified in Hipparcos observations are easiest to see in stars nearer than 250 pc, and their visibility and peak velocities in the velocity distributions depends on both viewing direction (galactic longitude and hemisphere) and metallicity. We infer that there is fine structure in local velocity distributions that varies over distances of a few hundred pc in the Galaxy.

  7. Velocity and Temperature Distribution in Flow from an Inlet Device in Rooms with Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T.V.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Measurements are performed in a full-scale test room with displacement ventilation with focus on the velocity and temperature field in the region close to the inlet device. Investigations based on these detailed measurements have been made in order to see if it is possible to describe the velocit...... decay and the shape of velocity and temperature profiles in front of the inlet device by traditional jet theory, by stratified flow theory or by a combination of the two theories.......Measurements are performed in a full-scale test room with displacement ventilation with focus on the velocity and temperature field in the region close to the inlet device. Investigations based on these detailed measurements have been made in order to see if it is possible to describe the velocity...

  8. The anatomy of a pipe bomb explosion: measuring the mass and velocity distributions of container fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bors, Dana; Cummins, Josh; Goodpaster, John

    2014-01-01

    Improvised explosive devices such as pipe bombs are prevalent due to the availability of materials and ease of construction. However, little is known about how these devices actually explode, as few attempts to characterize fragmentation patterns have been attempted. In this study, seven devices composed of various pipe materials (PVC, black steel, and galvanized steel) and two energetic fillers (Pyrodex and Alliant Red Dot) were initiated and the explosions captured using high-speed videography. The video footage was used to calculate fragment velocities, which were represented as particle velocity vector maps. In addition, the fragments were weighed. The results demonstrate a correlation between the type of energetic filler and both the size and velocity of the fragments. Larger fragments were produced by Pyrodex filler indicating a less complete fragmentation, compared with smaller fragments produced by double-base smokeless powder. Additionally, higher fragment velocities were seen with Alliant Red Dot filler. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. The effect of reported high-velocity small raindrops on inferred drop size distributions and derived power laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Leijnse

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that at high rainfall intensities, small raindrops may fall with much larger velocities than would be expected from their diameters. These were argued to be fragments of recently broken-up larger drops. In this paper we quantify the effect of this phenomenon on raindrop size distribution measurements from a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer, a 2-D Video Distrometer, and a vertically-pointing Doppler radar. Probability distributions of fall velocities have been parameterized, where the parameters are functions of both rainfall intensity and drop size. These parameterizations have been used to correct Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer measurements for this phenomenon. The effect of these corrections on fitted scaled drop size distributions are apparent but not major. Fitted gamma distributions for three different types of rainfall have been used to simulate drop size measurements. The effect of the high-velocity small drops is shown to be minor. Especially for the purpose of remote sensing of rainfall using radar, microwave links, or optical links, the errors caused by using the slightly different retrieval relations will be masked completely by other error sources.

  10. Distribution Of Seismic Velocity Change Associated With The May 12, 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Froment, B.; Liu, Q.; Campillo, M.

    2009-12-01

    the co-seismic deformation by GPS measurement. The velocity change, as the deformation, is concentrated in 100km width range and spread single-directional northeastward along the aftershock zone. These observations indicate that the velocity change distribution is more correlated with the deformation/stress map than with the surface geology map. The comparison with the results obtained at longer period is described in a companion paper (Campillo et al. 2009).

  11. Molecular beam diagnostics with internal state selection: velocity distribution and dimer formation in a supersonic Na/Na2 beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, K.; Hefter, U.; Hering, P.

    1978-01-01

    The velocity distribution parallel and perpendicular to the molecular beam axis bas been determined for molecules in well defined quantum states using TOF - via optical pumping and the Doppler-shift method. It has been found that the flow velocity as well as the speed ratio changes with the internal energy of the molecule. The flow velocity increases with increasing internal energy at low pd values (p is the pressure in the oven, d is the nozzle diameter) while the opposite is true at high pd values. The parallel speed ratio is smaller for molecules in vibrationally excited states and the perpendicular velocity distribution shows excessive tails that are more pronounced for molecules in higher lying levels. The population of individual levels has been monitored via laser induced fluorescence. It does not change monotonically with pd. The population distribution is not in thermal equilibrium and can only be approximately described by a temperature of Tsub(γ) approximately 150 K. On the basis of these results a simple model for the influence of the recombination of atoms on the expansion is derived: Molecules are initially neither formed in the γ = 0 vibrational level nor with high internal excitation but probably with > = 1000 cm -1 of internal energy. Thus recombination leads to fast atoms and molecules. It is the incomplete deceleration of these fast particles together with an efficient quenching process for internal energy that determines the flow velocity of molecules in individual quantum states at low pd values. At high pd values the acceleraiton of molecules with much internal energy is incomplete because those molecules have necessarily made only few collisions. (Auth.)

  12. The problem of runaway stars and the distribution function of peculiar radial velocities in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isserstedt, J.; Hart, R.

    1985-11-01

    Distribution functions of peculiar radial velocities in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) are studied. The velocity dispersion obtained after correcting for observing errors is 7 km/s for the interstellar hydrogen and 14 km/s for the supergiants. This suggests that the process of (secondary?) star formation in the LMC leads to an increase of the velocity dispersion of approximately 12 km/s. The distribution function of the peculiar radial velocities of supergiants is purely Gaussian. There is no significant evidence for runaway stars in the LMC. The consequences of this finding with regard to the three current hypotheses for the formation of runaway stars are discussed. It is shown that the runaways certainly do not escape from protoclusters nor do they belong to the old disk population as 'subluminous O-stars'. Only the origin in close binary systems after mass transfer and supernova explosion of the primary appears to be a viable solution to the runaway star problem, but in this case the orientation of the orbital planes of massive close binary systems should be strongly concentrated to that of the galactic plane.

  13. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution as a result of electron-attachment collisions in ionized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Stiller, W.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of electron-attachment collisions on the velocity distribution of electrons is studied on the basis of Boltzmann kinetic equations governing the energetic balance of electrons (e), atoms of a carrier gas (c), and SF 6 -molecules (m) capturing electrons. Under the assumption that 1) the densities of the particles fulfill the conditions nsub(e) << nsub(c), nsub(m), nsub(m) << nsub(c), and that 2) only the electron-attachment process is in competition with the elastic collision process between electrons and the atoms of the carrier gas, the time behaviour of the energetic balance of the electrons is investigated. The calculations lead to non-Maxwellian forms of the electron velocity distribution changing the mean electron energy. (author)

  14. Effect of truncation of electron velocity distribution on release of dust particle from plasma-facing wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Y.; Smirnov, R.; Nakamura, H.; Zhu, S.; Takizuka, T.; Tskhakaya, D.

    2007-01-01

    In modeling of release of a dust particle from a plasma-facing wall it is usually assumed that electron velocity distribution is Maxwellian. However, the absorption of fast electrons by the conducting wall can lead to truncation of fast component of reflecting electrons from the wall. In this work we study the effect of truncation of electron velocity distribution on the release condition of a conducting spherical dust particle from the plasma-facing wall. The truncation increases the electric field at the wall surface compared to that calculated in absence of the truncation. The stronger electric field makes the dust particle hard released when the gravitational force is directed from the wall and applied wall potential is shallower than the floating one

  15. Distribution of motor unit potential velocities in the biceps brachii muscle of sprinters and endurance athletes during short static contractions at low force level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver-Krol, Ewa G.; Henriquez, Nizare R.; Oosterloo, Sebe J.; Klaver, Peter; Kuipers, Harm; Zwarts, Machiel J.

    2010-01-01

    In surface electromyography (sEMG), the distribution of motor unit potential (MUP) velocities has been shown to reflect the proportion of faster and slower propagating MUPs. This study investigated whether the distribution of MUP velocities could distinguish between sprinters and endurance athletes

  16. Distribution of motor unit potential velocities in the biceps brachii muscle of sprinters and endurance athletes during prolonged dynamic exercises at low force levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver-Krol, Ewa G.; Henriquez, Nizare R.; Oosterloo, Sebe J.; Klaver, Peter; Kuipers, Harm; Zwarts, Machiel J.

    2010-01-01

    In surface electromyography (sEMG), the distribution of motor unit potential (MUP) velocities has been shown to reflect the proportion of faster and slower propagating MUPs. This study investigated whether the distribution of MUP velocities could distinguish between sprinters (n = 11) and endurance

  17. Distribution of motor unit potential velocities in the biceps brachii muscle of sprinters and endurance athletes during prolonged dynamic exercises at low force levels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver-Krol, E.G.; Henriquez, N.R.; Oosterloo, S.J.; Klaver, P.; Kuipers, H.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    In surface electromyography (sEMG), the distribution of motor unit potential (MUP) velocities has been shown to reflect the proportion of faster and slower propagating MUPs. This study investigated whether the distribution of MUP velocities could distinguish between sprinters (n=11) and endurance

  18. Axial velocity distribution of a two-component plasma in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we investigate the combined effects of channel indentation and presence of neutral gas (impurities) on the flow of a two-component plasma gas through a magnetized cylinder with indentation. For small indentation, expressed in e, analytic solutions are obtained for the axial velocities, induced magnetic fields, ...

  19. The Spanwise Distribution of Losses in Prismatic Turbine Cascade with Non-Uniform Inlet Velocity Profile

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fürst, J.; Luxa, Martin; Šimurda, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2014), s. 135-141 ISSN 1802-1484 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/10/1329 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : prismatic turbine cascade * losses * velocity profile Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://www.engineeringmechanics.cz/obsahy.html?R=21&C=2

  20. Investigating the Relation between Galaxy Properties and the Gaussianity of the Velocity Distribution of Groups and Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, R. R.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Stalder, D. H.; Rosa, R. R.; Costa, A. P.; Moura, T. C.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the dependence of stellar population properties of galaxies on group dynamical stage for a subsample of the Yang catalog. We classify groups according to their galaxy velocity distribution into Gaussian (G) and Non-Gaussian (NG). Using two totally independent approaches, we have shown that our measurement of Gaussianity is robust and reliable. Our sample covers Yang’s groups in the redshift range 0.03 ≤slant z ≤slant 0.1, with mass ≥slant {10}14{M}⊙ . The new method, called Hellinger Distance, to determine whether a group has a velocity distribution Gaussian or NG is very effective in distinguishing between the two families. NG groups present halo masses higher than the G ones, confirming previous findings. Examining the skewness and kurtosis of the velocity distribution of G and NG groups, we find that faint galaxies in NG groups are mainly infalling, for the first time, into the groups. We show that considering only faint galaxies in the outskirts; those in NG groups are older and more metal-rich than those in G groups. Also, examining the Projected Phase Space of cluster galaxies, we see that bright and faint galactic systems in G groups are in dynamical equilibrium—which does not seem to be the case in NG groups. These findings suggest that NG systems have a higher infall rate, assembling more galaxies that have experienced preprocessing before entering the group.

  1. Effects of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution function on two-stream instability in low-pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydorenko, D.; Smolyakov, A.; Kaganovich, I.; Raitses, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Electron emission from discharge chamber walls is important for plasma maintenance in many low-pressure discharges. The electrons emitted from the walls are accelerated by the sheath electric field and are injected into the plasma as an electron beam. Penetration of this beam through the plasma is subject to the two-stream instability, which tends to slow down the beam electrons and heat the plasma electrons. In the present paper, a one-dimensional particle-in-cell code is used to simulate these effects both in a collisionless plasma slab with immobile ions and in a cross-field discharge of a Hall thruster. The two-stream instability occurs if the total electron velocity distribution function of the plasma-beam system is a nonmonotonic function of electron speed. Low-pressure plasmas can be depleted of electrons with energy above the plasma potential. This study reveals that under such conditions the two-stream instability depends crucially on the velocity distribution function of electron emission. It is shown that propagation of the secondary electron beams in Hall thrusters may be free of the two-stream instability if the velocity distribution of secondary electron emission is a monotonically decaying function of speed. In this case, the beams propagate between the walls with minimal loss of the beam current and the secondary electron emission does not affect the thruster plasma properties

  2. Propagation of action potentials in inhomogeneous axon regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón, F; Joyner, R W; Moore, J W

    1975-04-01

    Described are studies of propagation of action potentials through inhomogenous axon regions through experiments performed on squid giant axons and by computer simulations. The initial speed of propagation of the action potential is dependent upon the stimulus waveform. For a rectangular pulse of current, the action potential travel initally at a high speed that declines over the distance, reaching a constant speed of propagation at about 1-5 resting length constants; this distance depends on the stimulus strength. additional experiments studied the effects of changing the axon diameter and of introducing a temperature step. It was found that the propagated action potential suffers profound modification in shape and velocity as it reaches the region of transition. In both cases, it was possible to obtain reflected action potentials. A region of increased effective diameter was produced experimentally in the squid giant axon by insertion of an axial wire as usually employed in voltage clamps. It was found that the action potential, at the axial wire tip region, undergoes shape changes similar to those obtained tn simulations of a region of increased diameter as in a junction with the axon and soma in motor neurons. It is conducluded that the gaint axon can be used to reproduce simple electrical behaviors in other structures.-Ramón, F., R. W. Joyner and J.W. Moore. Propagation of action potentials in inhomogeneous axon regions.

  3. Protein-synthesizing machinery in the axon compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, E; Giuditta, A

    1999-03-01

    Contrary to the prevailing view that the axon lacks the capacity to synthesize proteins, a substantial body of evidence points to the existence of a metabolically active endogenous translational machinery. The machinery appears to be largely localized in the cortical zone of the axon, where, in vertebrate axons, it is distributed longitudinally as intermittent, discrete domains, called periaxoplasmic plaques. Studies, based on translation assays and probes of RNA transcripts in axon models such as the squid giant axon and selected vertebrate axons, provide evidence of locally synthesized proteins, most of which appear to be constituents of the slow axoplasmic transport rate groups. Metabolic and molecular biological findings are consistent with the view that the synthesis of proteins undergoing local turnover in the axonal compartment of macroneurons depends on the activity of an endogenous translational machinery. The documented presence of a metabolically active machinery in presynaptic terminals of squid photoreceptor neurons is also described. Finally, potential sources of axoplasmic RNAs comprising the machinery, which may include the ensheathing cell of the axon, as well as the cognate cell body, are also discussed.

  4. Design of two-dimensional channels with prescribed velocity distributions along the channel walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanitz, John D

    1953-01-01

    A general method of design is developed for two-dimensional unbranched channels with prescribed velocities as a function of arc length along the channel walls. The method is developed for both compressible and incompressible, irrotational, nonviscous flow and applies to the design of elbows, diffusers, nozzles, and so forth. In part I solutions are obtained by relaxation methods; in part II solutions are obtained by a Green's function. Five numerical examples are given in part I including three elbow designs with the same prescribed velocity as a function of arc length along the channel walls but with incompressible, linearized compressible, and compressible flow. One numerical example is presented in part II for an accelerating elbow with linearized compressible flow, and the time required for the solution by a Green's function in part II was considerably less than the time required for the same solution by relaxation methods in part I.

  5. The Three-Dimensional Velocity Distribution of Wide Gap Taylor-Couette Flow Modelled by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shina Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is conducted for the flow between two concentric cylinders with a wide gap, relevant to bearing chamber applications. This wide gap configuration has received comparatively less attention than narrow gap journal bearing type geometries. The flow in the gap between an inner rotating cylinder and an outer stationary cylinder has been modelled as an incompressible flow using an implicit finite volume RANS scheme with the realisable k-ε model. The model flow is above the critical Taylor number at which axisymmetric counterrotating Taylor vortices are formed. The tangential velocity profiles at all axial locations are different from typical journal bearing applications, where the velocity profiles are quasilinear. The predicted results led to two significant findings of impact in rotating machinery operations. Firstly, the axial variation of the tangential velocity gradient induces an axially varying shear stress, resulting in local bands of enhanced work input to the working fluid. This is likely to cause unwanted heat transfer on the surface in high torque turbomachinery applications. Secondly, the radial inflow at the axial end-wall boundaries is likely to promote the transport of debris to the junction between the end-collar and the rotating cylinder, causing the build-up of fouling in the seal.

  6. Carbon isotope evidence for the latitudinal distribution and wind speed dependence of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    2006-01-01

    The air-sea gas transfer velocity is an important determinant of the exchange of gases, including CO 2 , between the atmosphere and ocean, but the magnitude of the transfer velocity and what factors control it remains poorly known. Here, we use oceanic and atmospheric observations of 14 C and 13 C to constrain the global mean gas transfer velocity as well as the exponent of its wind speed dependence, utilizing the distinct signatures left by the air-sea exchange of 14 CO 2 and 13 CO 2 . While the atmosphere and ocean inventories of 14 CO 2 and 13 CO 2 constrain the mean gas transfer velocity, the latitudinal pattern in the atmospheric and oceanic 14 C and 13 C distributions contain information about the wind speed dependence. We computed the uptake of bomb 14 C by the ocean for different transfer velocity patterns using pulse response functions from an ocean general circulation model, and evaluated the match between the predicted bomb 14 C concentrations and observationally based estimates for the 1970s-1990s. Using a wind speed climatology based on satellite measurements, we solved either for the best-fit global relationship between gas exchange and mean wind speed or for the mean gas transfer velocity over each of 11 ocean regions. We also compared the predicted consequences of different gas exchange relationships on the rate of change and interhemisphere gradient of 14 C in atmospheric CO 2 with tree-ring and atmospheric measurements. Our results suggest that globally, the dependence of the air-sea gas transfer velocity on wind speed is close to linear, with an exponent of 0.5 ± 0.4, and that the global mean gas transfer velocity at a Schmidt number of 660 is 20 ± 3 cm/hr, similar to the results of previous analyses. We find that the air-sea flux of 13 C estimated from atmosphere and ocean observations also suggests a lower than quadratic dependence of gas exchange on wind speed

  7. Unified solution of the Boltzmann equation for electron and ion velocity distribution functions and transport coefficients in weakly ionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Dmitry A.; Cocks, Daniel G.; White, Ronald D.

    2017-10-01

    The velocity distribution function and transport coefficients for charged particles in weakly ionized plasmas are calculated via a multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation and benchmarked using a Monte-Carlo simulation. A unified framework for the solution of the original full Boltzmann's equation is presented which is valid for ions and electrons, avoiding any recourse to approximate forms of the collision operator in various limiting mass ratio cases. This direct method using Lebedev quadratures over the velocity and scattering angles avoids the need to represent the ion mass dependence in the collision operator through an expansion in terms of the charged particle to neutral mass ratio. For the two-temperature Burnett function method considered in this study, this amounts to avoiding the need for the complex Talmi-transformation methods and associated mass-ratio expansions. More generally, we highlight the deficiencies in the two-temperature Burnett function method for heavy ions at high electric fields to calculate the ion velocity distribution function, even though the transport coefficients have converged. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  8. Nonlinear inversion of borehole-radar tomography data to reconstruct velocity and attenuation distribution in earth materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C.; Liu, L.; Lane, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear tomographic inversion method that uses first-arrival travel-time and amplitude-spectra information from cross-hole radar measurements was developed to simultaneously reconstruct electromagnetic velocity and attenuation distribution in earth materials. Inversion methods were developed to analyze single cross-hole tomography surveys and differential tomography surveys. Assuming the earth behaves as a linear system, the inversion methods do not require estimation of source radiation pattern, receiver coupling, or geometrical spreading. The data analysis and tomographic inversion algorithm were applied to synthetic test data and to cross-hole radar field data provided by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The cross-hole radar field data were acquired at the USGS fractured-rock field research site at Mirror Lake near Thornton, New Hampshire, before and after injection of a saline tracer, to monitor the transport of electrically conductive fluids in the image plane. Results from the synthetic data test demonstrate the algorithm computational efficiency and indicate that the method robustly can reconstruct electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity and attenuation distribution in earth materials. The field test results outline zones of velocity and attenuation anomalies consistent with the finding of previous investigators; however, the tomograms appear to be quite smooth. Further work is needed to effectively find the optimal smoothness criterion in applying the Tikhonov regularization in the nonlinear inversion algorithms for cross-hole radar tomography. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  10. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.

    Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  11. Prediction of velocity distributions in rod bundle axial flow, with a statistical model (K-epsilon) of turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, H.C. da.

    1978-12-01

    Reactor fuel elements generally consist of rod bundles with the coolant flowing axially through the region between the rods. The confiability of the thermohydraulic design of such elements is related to a detailed description of the velocity field. A two-equation statistical model (K-epsilon) of turbulence is applied to compute main and secondary flow fields, wall shear stress distributions and friction factors of steady, fully developed turbulent flows, with incompressible, temperature independent fluid flowing axially through triangular or square arrays of rod bundles. The numerical procedure uses the vorticity and the stream function to describe the velocity field. Comparison with experimental and analytical data of several investigators is presented. Results are in good agreement. (Author) [pt

  12. Stereoscopy of dust density waves under microgravity: Velocity distributions and phase-resolved single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpel, Michael, E-mail: himpel@physik.uni-greifswald.de; Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institute of Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bockwoldt, Tim; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Ole Menzel, Kristoffer [ABB Switzerland Ltd, Corporate Research Center, 5405 Dättwil (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on dust-density waves have been performed in dusty plasmas under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. Three-dimensional measurements of a dust density wave on a single particle level are presented. The dust particles have been tracked for many oscillation periods. A Hilbert analysis is applied to obtain trajectory parameters such as oscillation amplitude and three-dimensional velocity amplitude. While the transverse motion is found to be thermal, the velocity distribution in wave propagation direction can be explained by harmonic oscillations with added Gaussian (thermal) noise. Additionally, it is shown that the wave properties can be reconstructed by means of a pseudo-stroboscopic approach. Finally, the energy dissipation mechanism from the kinetic oscillation energy to thermal motion is discussed and presented using phase-resolved analysis.

  13. Shells, holes, worms, high-velocity gas and the z-distribution of gas in galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, R. J.

    The author gives an overview of the current observational understanding of vertically extended gas components in spiral galaxies and the various phenomena which come under such names as shells, holes, worms, and high-velocity gas. For the most part, the focus is on recent high-resolution interferometric studies. The author concentrates on cold gas, and briefly on warm ionized gas, in the Milky Way and a few nearby spirals. Along the way, it is seen how phenomena such as worms and shells may be related to the formation and maintenance of the vertically extended components.

  14. Nonlinear development of stimulated Raman scattering from electrostatic modes excited by self-consistent non-Maxwellian velocity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B.J.; Bezzerides, B.; DuBois, D.F.; Kindel, J.M.; Daughton, W.; Vu, H.X.

    2006-01-01

    The parametric coupling involving backward stimulated scattering of a laser and electron beam acoustic modes (BAM) is described as observed in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The BAM modes evolve from Langmuir waves (LW) as the electron velocity distribution is nonlinearly modified to be non-Maxwellian by backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS). With a marginal damping rate, BAM can be easily excited and allow an extended chirping in frequency to occur as later SRS pulses encounter modified distributions. Coincident with the emergence of this non-Maxwellian distribution is a rapid increase in BSRS reflectivities with laser intensities. Both the reflectivity scaling with laser intensity and the observed spectral features from PIC simulations are consistent with recent Trident experiments

  15. Signal propagation along the axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Debanne, Dominique

    2018-03-08

    Axons link distant brain regions and are usually considered as simple transmission cables in which reliable propagation occurs once an action potential has been generated. Safe propagation of action potentials relies on specific ion channel expression at strategic points of the axon such as nodes of Ranvier or axonal branch points. However, while action potentials are generally considered as the quantum of neuronal information, their signaling is not entirely digital. In fact, both their shape and their conduction speed have been shown to be modulated by activity, leading to regulations of synaptic latency and synaptic strength. We report here newly identified mechanisms of (1) safe spike propagation along the axon, (2) compartmentalization of action potential shape in the axon, (3) analog modulation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission and (4) alteration in conduction time after persistent regulation of axon morphology in central neurons. We discuss the contribution of these regulations in information processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential Axonal Projection of Mitral and Tufted Cells in the Mouse Main Olfactory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Nagayama

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, much has been elucidated regarding the functional organization of the axonal connection of olfactory sensory neurons to olfactory bulb (OB glomeruli. However, the manner in which projection neurons of the OB process odorant input and send this information to higher brain centers remains unclear. Here, we report long-range, large-scale tracing of the axonal projection patterns of OB neurons using two-photon microscopy. Tracer injection into a single glomerulus demonstrated widely distributed mitral/tufted cell axonal projections on the lateroventral surface of the mouse brain, including the anterior/posterior piriform cortex (PC and olfactory tubercle (OT. We noted two distinct groups of labeled axons: PC-orienting axons and OT-orienting axons. Each group occupied distinct parts of the lateral olfactory tract. PC-orienting axons projected axon collaterals to a wide area of the PC but only a few collaterals to the OT. OT-orienting axons densely projected axon collaterals primarily to the anterolateral OT (alOT. Different colored dye injections into the superficial and deep portions of the OB external plexiform layer revealed that the PC-orienting axon populations originated in presumed mitral cells and the OT-orienting axons in presumed tufted cells. These data suggest that although mitral and tufted cells receive similar odor signals from a shared glomerulus, they process the odor information in different ways and send their output to different higher brain centers via the PC and alOT.

  17. Secondary Craters and the Size-Velocity Distribution of Ejected Fragments around Lunar Craters Measured Using LROC Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, K. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; McKinnon, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    Title: Secondary Craters and the Size-Velocity Distribution of Ejected Fragments around Lunar Craters Measured Using LROC Images Authors: Kelsi N. Singer1, Bradley L. Jolliff1, and William B. McKinnon1 Affiliations: 1. Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States. We report results from analyzing the size-velocity distribution (SVD) of secondary crater forming fragments from the 93 km diameter Copernicus impact. We measured the diameters of secondary craters and their distances from Copernicus using LROC Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) image data. We then estimated the velocity and size of the ejecta fragment that formed each secondary crater from the range equation for a ballistic trajectory on a sphere and Schmidt-Holsapple scaling relations. Size scaling was carried out in the gravity regime for both non-porous and porous target material properties. We focus on the largest ejecta fragments (dfmax) at a given ejection velocity (υej) and fit the upper envelope of the SVD using quantile regression to an equation of the form dfmax = A*υej ^- β. The velocity exponent, β, describes how quickly fragment sizes fall off with increasing ejection velocity during crater excavation. For Copernicus, we measured 5800 secondary craters, at distances of up to 700 km (15 crater radii), corresponding to an ejecta fragment velocity of approximately 950 m/s. This mapping only includes secondary craters that are part of a radial chain or cluster. The two largest craters in chains near Copernicus that are likely to be secondaries are 6.4 and 5.2 km in diameter. We obtained a velocity exponent, β, of 2.2 × 0.1 for a non-porous surface. This result is similar to Vickery's [1987, GRL 14] determination of β = 1.9 × 0.2 for Copernicus using Lunar Orbiter IV data. The availability of WAC 100 m/pix global mosaics with illumination geometry optimized for morphology allows us to update and extend the work of Vickery

  18. Extracellular Tau Oligomers Induce Invasion of Endogenous Tau into the Somatodendritic Compartment and Axonal Transport Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Eric; Breckenridge, Leigham; McMahon, Lloyd; Som, Sreemoyee; McConnell, Ian; Bloom, George S.

    2017-01-01

    Aggregates composed of the microtubule associated protein, tau, are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and non-Alzheimer’s tauopathies. Extracellular tau can induce the accumulation and aggregation of intracellular tau, and tau pathology can be transmitted along neural networks over time. There are six splice variants of central nervous system tau, and various oligomeric and fibrillar forms are associated with neurodegeneration in vivo. The particular extracellular forms of tau capable of transferring tau pathology from neuron to neuron remain ill defined, however, as do the consequences of intracellular tau aggregation on neuronal physiology. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of extracellular tau monomers, oligomers, and filaments comprising various tau isoforms on the behavior of cultured neurons. We found that 2N4R or 2N3R tau oligomers provoked aggregation of endogenous intracellular tau much more effectively than monomers or fibrils, or of oligomers made from other tau isoforms, and that a mixture of all six isoforms most potently provoked intracellular tau accumulation. These effects were associated with invasion of tau into the somatodendritic compartment. Finally, we observed that 2N4R oligomers perturbed fast axonal transport of membranous organelles along microtubules. Intracellular tau accumulation was often accompanied by increases in the run length, run time and instantaneous velocity of membranous cargo. This work indicates that extracellular tau oligomers can disrupt normal neuronal homeostasis by triggering axonal tau accumulation and loss of the polarized distribution of tau, and by impairing fast axonal transport. PMID:28482642

  19. Rotational velocity distribution of A stars: Searching for intrinsic slowly rotating normal A0-A1 stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, F.; Gebran, M.; Monier, R.; Caraty, Y.; Kiliçoğlu, T.; Pintado, O.; Adelman, S.; Smalley, B.; Reiners, A.; Hill, G.; Gulliver, A.

    2012-12-01

    Royer et al. (2007) showed that the distribution of rotational velocities for A0-A1 stars is bimodal although all known peculiar and/or binary stars had been excluded from their sample. We present here the preliminary results of the abundance analysis for 47 A0-A1 ``normal'' main sequence stars selected with v sin i slower than 65 kms. These high signal-to-noise spectra collected with ÉLODIE and SOPHIE (OHP) will allow us to obtain a clean sample of low v sin i normal A0-A1 stars and search for intrinsic slow rotators.

  20. Comment on ‘Information hidden in the velocity distribution of ions and the exact kinetic Bohm criterion’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaev, A. S.; Sukhomlinov, V. S.; Timofeev, N. A.

    2018-03-01

    This Comment is devoted to some mathematical inaccuracies made by the authors of the paper ‘Information hidden in the velocity distribution of ions and the exact kinetic Bohm criterion’ (Plasma Sources Science and Technology 26 055003). In the Comment, we show that the diapason of plasma parameters for the validity of the theoretical results obtained by the authors was defined incorrectly; we made a more accurate definition of this diapason. As a result, we show that it is impossible to confirm or refute the feasibility of the Bohm kinetic criterion on the basis of the data of the cited paper.

  1. Improving the modelling of redshift-space distortions - I. A bivariate Gaussian description for the galaxy pairwise velocity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Davide; Chiesa, Matteo; Guzzo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    As a step towards a more accurate modelling of redshift-space distortions (RSD) in galaxy surveys, we develop a general description of the probability distribution function of galaxy pairwise velocities within the framework of the so-called streaming model. For a given galaxy separation r, such function can be described as a superposition of virtually infinite local distributions. We characterize these in terms of their moments and then consider the specific case in which they are Gaussian functions, each with its own mean μ and dispersion σ. Based on physical considerations, we make the further crucial assumption that these two parameters are in turn distributed according to a bivariate Gaussian, with its own mean and covariance matrix. Tests using numerical simulations explicitly show that with this compact description one can correctly model redshift-space distortions on all scales, fully capturing the overall linear and non-linear dynamics of the galaxy flow at different separations. In particular, we naturally obtain Gaussian/exponential, skewed/unskewed distribution functions, depending on separation as observed in simulations and data. Also, the recently proposed single-Gaussian description of RSD is included in this model as a limiting case, when the bivariate Gaussian is collapsed to a two-dimensional Dirac delta function. We also show how this description naturally allows for the Taylor expansion of 1 + ξS(s) around 1 + ξR(r), which leads to the Kaiser linear formula when truncated to second order, explicating its connection with the moments of the velocity distribution functions. More work is needed, but these results indicate a very promising path to make definitive progress in our programme to improve RSD estimators.

  2. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin eWhite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialised glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarisation followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasising the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during CNS myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of PLP (proteolipid protein transport by SNARE proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases.

  3. Nonlinear Landau damping and formation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal structures for plasmas with q-nonextensive velocity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2013-03-01

    In the past, long-time evolution of an initial perturbation in collisionless Maxwellian plasma (q = 1) has been simulated numerically. The controversy over the nonlinear fate of such electrostatic perturbations was resolved by Manfredi [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2815-2818 (1997)] using long-time simulations up to t = 1600 ωp - 1 . The oscillations were found to continue indefinitely leading to Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK)-like phase-space vortices (from here on referred as "BGK structures"). Using a newly developed, high resolution 1D Vlasov-Poisson solver based on piecewise-parabolic method (PPM) advection scheme, we investigate the nonlinear Landau damping in 1D plasma described by toy q-distributions for long times, up to t = 3000 ωp - 1 . We show that BGK structures are found only for a certain range of q-values around q = 1. Beyond this window, for the generic parameters, no BGK structures were observed. We observe that for values of q 1 where distribution has a sharp fall in velocity, the formation of BGK structures is rendered difficult due to high wave number damping imposed by the steep velocity profile, which had not been previously reported. Wherever relevant, we compare our results with past work.

  4. Design and analysis of flow velocity distribution inside a raceway pond using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ramakant; Premalatha, M

    2017-03-01

    Open raceway ponds are widely adopted for cultivating microalgae on a large scale. Working depth of the raceway pond is the major component to be analysed for increasing the volume to surface area ratio. The working depth is limited up to 5-15 cm in conventional ponds but in this analysis working depth of raceway pond is considered as 25 cm. In this work, positioning of the paddle wheel is analysed and corresponding Vertical Mixing Index are calculated using CFD. Flow pattern along the length of the raceway pond, at three different paddle wheel speeds are analysed for L/W ratio of 6, 8 and 10, respectively. Effect of clearance (C) between rotor blade tip and bottom surface is also analysed by taking four clearance conditions i.e. C = 2, 5, 10 and 15. Moving reference frame method of Fluent is used for the modeling of six blade paddle wheel and realizable k-ε model is used for capturing turbulence characteristics. Overall objective of this work is to analyse the required geometry for maintaining a minimum flow velocity to avoid settling of algae corresponding to 25 cm working depth. Geometry given in [13] is designed using ANSYS Design modular and CFD results are generated using ANSYS FLUENT for the purpose of validation. Good agreement of results is observed between CFD and experimental Particle image velocimetry results with the deviation of 7.23%.

  5. The Numerical Investigation of Temperature and Velocity Distribution in the High-Bay Depot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehong Wu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High-bay depot plays an important role in the storage industry. Due to large and high space of high-bay depot, it is difficult to make temperature distribution uniform, which will influence the storage time of raw materials. In this paper, the aim is to find the reasonable air supply and energy-saving method; a supply-air method of high-bay depot is investigated as an example. The results show the radius and spacing of the supply-air inlet have great influence on temperature distribution. The temperature nonuniformity coefficient of summer is smaller than that of winter. The investigated results can provide a theoretical reference for the high-bay depot design and economic operation.

  6. Attenuation, phase velocity and current density distribution in high critical temperature superconducting planar transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabon, B.; Vu Dinh, T.; Chilo, J. [URA CNRS 833, Grenoble (France). Lab. d`Electromagnetisme

    1995-05-01

    Electromagnetic calculation of propagation parameters for high {Tc} superconductive coplanar and microstrip transmission lines is presented. Calculations are performed by a nodal circuit simulator (SPICE), with possibility of direct interfacing with CAE standards. The results are in good agreement with data obtained with a full-wave analysis and CPU time is much smaller than in standard MW applications. Then, current density distributions are shown.

  7. The analysis of coolant-velocity distribution in plat-typed fuel element using CFD method for RSG-GAS research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Subekti; Darwis Isnaini; Endiah Puji Hastuti

    2013-01-01

    The measurement experiment for coolant-velocity distribution in the subchannel of fuel element of RSG-GAS research reactor is difficult to be carried out due to too narrow channel and subchannel placed inside the fuel element. Hence, the calculation is required to predict the coolant-velocity distribution inside subchannel to confirm that the handle presence does not ruin the velocity distribution into every subchannel. This calculation utilizes CFD method, which respect to 3-dimension interior. Moreover, the calculation of coolant-velocity distribution inside subchannel was not ever carried out. The research object is to investigate the distribution of coolant-velocity in plat-typed fuel element using 3-dimension CFD method for RSG-GAS research reactor. This research is required as a part of the development of thermalhydraulic design of fuel element for innovative research reactor as well. The modeling uses ½ model in Gambit software and calculation uses turbulence equation in FLUENT 6.3 software. Calculation result of 3D coolant-velocity in subchannel using CFD method is lower about 4.06 % than 1D calculation result due to 1D calculation obeys handle availability. (author)

  8. Kinetic transverse dispersion relation for relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Moya, Pablo S.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, J. Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We use a kinetic treatment to study the linear transverse dispersion relation for a magnetized isotropic relativistic electron-positron plasma with finite relativistic temperature. The explicit linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating along a constant background magnetic field is presented, including an analytical continuation to the whole complex frequency plane for the case of Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions. This dispersion relation is studied numerically for various temperatures. For left-handed solutions, the system presents two branches, the electromagnetic ordinary mode and the Alfvén mode. In the low frequency regime, the Alfvén branch has two dispersive zones, the normal zone (where ∂ω/∂k > 0) and an anomalous zone (where ∂ω/∂k < 0). We find that in the anomalous zone of the Alfvén branch, the electromagnetic waves are damped, and there is a maximum wave number for which the Alfvén branch is suppressed. We also study the dependence of the Alfvén velocity and effective plasma frequency with the temperature. We complemented the analytical and numerical approaches with relativistic full particle simulations, which consistently agree with the analytical results

  9. Viscous flux flow velocity and stress distribution in the Kim model of a long rectangular slab superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Chai, Xueguang

    2018-05-01

    When a bulk superconductor endures the magnetization process, enormous mechanical stresses are imposed on the bulk, which often leads to cracking. In the present work, we aim to resolve the viscous flux flow velocity υ 0/w, i.e. υ 0 (because w is a constant) and the stress distribution in a long rectangular slab superconductor for the decreasing external magnetic field (B a ) after zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) using the Kim model and viscous flux flow equation simultaneously. The viscous flux flow velocity υ 0/w and the magnetic field B* at which the body forces point away in all of the slab volumes during B a reduction, are determined by both B a and the decreasing rate (db a /dt) of the external magnetic field normalized by the full penetration field B p . In previous studies, υ 0/w obtained by the Bean model with viscous flux flow is only determined by db a /dt, and the field B* that is derived only from the Kim model is a positive constant when the maximum external magnetic field is chosen. This means that the findings in this paper have more physical contents than the previous results. The field B* stress changing with decreasing field B a after ZFC if B* ≤ 0. The effect of db a /dt on the stress is significant in the cases of both ZFC and FC.

  10. Determination of plasma ion velocity distribution via charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonck, R.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Jaehnig, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    Spectroscopy of line radiation from plasma impurity ions excited by charge-exchange recombination reactions with energetic neutral beam atoms is rapidly becoming recognized as a powerful technique for measuring ion temperature, bulk plasma motion, impurity transport, and more exotic phenomena such as fast alpha particle distributions. In particular, this diagnostic offers the capability of obtaining space- and time-resolved ion temperature and toroidal plasma rotation profiles with relatively simple optical systems. Cascade-corrected excitation rate coefficients for use in both fully stripped impurity density studies and ion temperature measurements have been calculated to the principal ..delta..n = 1 transitions of He+, C/sup 5 +/, and O/sup 7 +/ with neutral beam energies of 5 to 100 keV/amu. A fiber optically coupled spectrometer system has been used on PDX to measure visible He/sup +/ radiation excited by charge exchange. Central ion temperatures up to 2.4 keV and toroidal rotation speeds up to 1.5 x 10/sup 7/ cm/s were observed in diverted discharges with P/sub INJ/ less than or equal to 3.0 MW.

  11. Study of microinstabilities due to an anisotropic velocity distribution function of the particles of a homogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennion, F.

    1966-06-01

    A study is made of instabilities in a plasma with an ion velocity distribution function of the form: f oi = 1 / (2*π*α p e i *α p a i ) * λ(ν p e - α p e i ) * e -(v p a 2 /α p a i 2 ) . The plasma is assumed to have finite dimensions limited by infinitely conductive boundary surfaces. A theoretical and numerical analysis of marginal stability locates the regions of stability as a function of several parameters; i.e. plasma length, ion anisotropy (τ) and electron temperature (T e ). A limiting plasma length is found, below which the plasma is stable regardless of its density. For the parameters of the injection experiment M.M.I.I. at Fontenay-aux-roses it is found that the type of instabilities studied here should not occur. (author) [fr

  12. On limitations of laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics for xenon ion velocity distribution function measurements in Hall thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romadanov, I.; Raitses, Y.; Diallo, A.; Hara, K.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Smolyakov, A.

    2018-03-01

    Hall thruster operation is characterized by strong breathing oscillations of the discharge current, the plasma density, the temperature, and the electric field. Probe- and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics were used to measure temporal variations of plasma parameters and the xenon ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) in the near-field plasma plume in regimes with moderate (reducing the production of metastable ions. Because the residence time of ions in the channel is generally shorter than the time scale of breathing oscillations, the density of the excited ions outside the thruster is low and they cannot be detected. In the range of temperature of oscillations, the ionization cross-section of xenon atoms remains sufficiently large to sustain the discharge. This finding suggests that the commonly used LIF diagnostic of xenon IVDF can be subject to large uncertainties in the regimes with significant oscillations of the electron temperature, or other plasma parameters.

  13. The Effects of Sub-Regional Climate Velocity on the Distribution and Spatial Extent of Marine Species Assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleisner, Kristin M; Fogarty, Michael J; McGee, Sally; Barnett, Analie; Fratantoni, Paula; Greene, Jennifer; Hare, Jonathan A; Lucey, Sean M; McGuire, Christopher; Odell, Jay; Saba, Vincent S; Smith, Laurel; Weaver, Katherine J; Pinsky, Malin L

    2016-01-01

    Many studies illustrate variable patterns in individual species distribution shifts in response to changing temperature. However, an assemblage, a group of species that shares a common environmental niche, will likely exhibit similar responses to climate changes, and these community-level responses may have significant implications for ecosystem function. Therefore, we examine the relationship between observed shifts of species in assemblages and regional climate velocity (i.e., the rate and direction of change of temperature isotherms). The assemblages are defined in two sub-regions of the U.S. Northeast Shelf that have heterogeneous oceanography and bathymetry using four decades of bottom trawl survey data and we explore temporal changes in distribution, spatial range extent, thermal habitat area, and biomass, within assemblages. These sub-regional analyses allow the dissection of the relative roles of regional climate velocity and local physiography in shaping observed distribution shifts. We find that assemblages of species associated with shallower, warmer waters tend to shift west-southwest and to shallower waters over time, possibly towards cooler temperatures in the semi-enclosed Gulf of Maine, while species assemblages associated with relatively cooler and deeper waters shift deeper, but with little latitudinal change. Conversely, species assemblages associated with warmer and shallower water on the broad, shallow continental shelf from the Mid-Atlantic Bight to Georges Bank shift strongly northeast along latitudinal gradients with little change in depth. Shifts in depth among the southern species associated with deeper and cooler waters are more variable, although predominantly shifts are toward deeper waters. In addition, spatial expansion and contraction of species assemblages in each region corresponds to the area of suitable thermal habitat, but is inversely related to assemblage biomass. This suggests that assemblage distribution shifts in

  14. The Effects of Sub-Regional Climate Velocity on the Distribution and Spatial Extent of Marine Species Assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Kleisner

    Full Text Available Many studies illustrate variable patterns in individual species distribution shifts in response to changing temperature. However, an assemblage, a group of species that shares a common environmental niche, will likely exhibit similar responses to climate changes, and these community-level responses may have significant implications for ecosystem function. Therefore, we examine the relationship between observed shifts of species in assemblages and regional climate velocity (i.e., the rate and direction of change of temperature isotherms. The assemblages are defined in two sub-regions of the U.S. Northeast Shelf that have heterogeneous oceanography and bathymetry using four decades of bottom trawl survey data and we explore temporal changes in distribution, spatial range extent, thermal habitat area, and biomass, within assemblages. These sub-regional analyses allow the dissection of the relative roles of regional climate velocity and local physiography in shaping observed distribution shifts. We find that assemblages of species associated with shallower, warmer waters tend to shift west-southwest and to shallower waters over time, possibly towards cooler temperatures in the semi-enclosed Gulf of Maine, while species assemblages associated with relatively cooler and deeper waters shift deeper, but with little latitudinal change. Conversely, species assemblages associated with warmer and shallower water on the broad, shallow continental shelf from the Mid-Atlantic Bight to Georges Bank shift strongly northeast along latitudinal gradients with little change in depth. Shifts in depth among the southern species associated with deeper and cooler waters are more variable, although predominantly shifts are toward deeper waters. In addition, spatial expansion and contraction of species assemblages in each region corresponds to the area of suitable thermal habitat, but is inversely related to assemblage biomass. This suggests that assemblage distribution

  15. Modelling in vivo action potential propagation along a giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stuart; Foster, Jamie M; Richardson, Giles

    2015-01-01

    A partial differential equation model for the three-dimensional current flow in an excitable, unmyelinated axon is considered. Where the axon radius is significantly below a critical value R(crit) (that depends upon intra- and extra-cellular conductivity and ion channel conductance) the resistance of the intracellular space is significantly higher than that of the extracellular space, such that the potential outside the axon is uniformly small whilst the intracellular potential is approximated by the transmembrane potential. In turn, since the current flow is predominantly axial, it can be shown that the transmembrane potential is approximated by a solution to the one-dimensional cable equation. It is noted that the radius of the squid giant axon, investigated by (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e), lies close to R(crit). This motivates us to apply the three-dimensional model to the squid giant axon and compare the results thus found to those obtained using the cable equation. In the context of the in vitro experiments conducted in (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e) we find only a small difference between the wave profiles determined using these two different approaches and little difference between the speeds of action potential propagation predicted. This suggests that the cable equation approximation is accurate in this scenario. However when applied to the it in vivo setting, in which the conductivity of the surrounding tissue is considerably lower than that of the axoplasm, there are marked differences in both wave profile and speed of action potential propagation calculated using the two approaches. In particular, the cable equation significantly over predicts the increase in the velocity of propagation as axon radius increases. The consequences of these results are discussed in terms of the evolutionary costs associated with increasing the speed of action potential propagation by increasing axon radius.

  16. Visualization tool for three-dimensional plasma velocity distributions (ISEE_3D) as a plug-in for SPEDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keika, Kunihiro; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Machida, Shinobu; Ieda, Akimasa; Seki, Kanako; Hori, Tomoaki; Miyashita, Yukinaga; Shoji, Masafumi; Shinohara, Iku; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Lewis, Jim W.; Flores, Aaron

    2017-12-01

    This paper introduces ISEE_3D, an interactive visualization tool for three-dimensional plasma velocity distribution functions, developed by the Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Japan. The tool provides a variety of methods to visualize the distribution function of space plasma: scatter, volume, and isosurface modes. The tool also has a wide range of functions, such as displaying magnetic field vectors and two-dimensional slices of distributions to facilitate extensive analysis. The coordinate transformation to the magnetic field coordinates is also implemented in the tool. The source codes of the tool are written as scripts of a widely used data analysis software language, Interactive Data Language, which has been widespread in the field of space physics and solar physics. The current version of the tool can be used for data files of the plasma distribution function from the Geotail satellite mission, which are publicly accessible through the Data Archives and Transmission System of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS)/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The tool is also available in the Space Physics Environment Data Analysis Software to visualize plasma data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale and the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms missions. The tool is planned to be applied to data from other missions, such as Arase (ERG) and Van Allen Probes after replacing or adding data loading plug-ins. This visualization tool helps scientists understand the dynamics of space plasma better, particularly in the regions where the magnetohydrodynamic approximation is not valid, for example, the Earth's inner magnetosphere, magnetopause, bow shock, and plasma sheet.

  17. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  18. Differential compartmentalization of mRNAs in squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, J T; Gioio, A E; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1996-11-01

    Previously, we reported that the squid giant axon contains a heterogeneous population of mRNAs that includes beta-actin, beta-tubulin, kinesin, neurofilament proteins, and enolase. To define the absolute levels and relative distribution of these mRNAs, we have used competitive reverse transcription-PCR to quantify the levels of five mRNAs present in the giant axon and giant fiber lobe (GFL), the location of the parental cell soma. In the GFL, the number of transcripts for these mRNAs varied over a fourfold range, with beta-tubulin being the most abundant mRNA species (1.25 x 10(9) molecules per GFL). Based on transcript number, the rank order of mRNA levels in the GFL was beta-tubulin > beta-actin > kinesin > enolase > microtubule-associated protein (MAP) H1. In contrast, kinesin mRNA was most abundant in the axon (4.1 x 10(7) molecules per axon) with individual mRNA levels varying 15-fold. The rank order of mRNA levels in the axon was kinesin > beta-tubulin > MAP H1 > beta-actin > enolase. The relative abundance of the mRNA species in the axon did not correlate with the size of the transcript, nor was it directly related to their corresponding levels in the GFL. Taken together, these findings confirm that significant amounts of mRNA are present in the giant axon and suggest that specific mRNAs are differentially transported into the axonal domain.

  19. Sublimation pit distribution indicates convection cell surface velocities of ∼10 cm per year in Sputnik Planitia, Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Peter B.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2018-01-01

    The ∼106 km2 Sputnik Planitia, Pluto is the upper surface of a vast basin of nitrogen ice. Cellular landforms in Sputnik Planitia with areas in the range of a few × 102-103 km2 are likely the surface manifestation of convective overturn in the nitrogen ice. The cells have sublimation pits on them, with smaller pits near their centers and larger pits near their edges. We map pits on seven cells and find that the pit radii increase by between 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10-3 and 5.9 ± 0.8 × 10-3 m m-1 away from the cell center, depending on the cell. This is a lower bound on the size increase because of the finite resolution of the data. Accounting for resolution yields upper bounds on the size vs. distance distribution of between 4.2 ± 0.2 × 10-3 and 23.4 ± 1.5 × 10-3 m m-1. We then use an analytic model to calculate that pit radii grow via sublimation at a rate of 3.6-0.6+2.1 ×10-4 m yr-1, which allows us to convert the pit size vs. distance distribution into a pit age vs. distance distribution. This yields surface velocities between 1.5-0.2+1.0 and 6.2-1.4+3.4 cm yr-1 for the slowest cell and surface velocities between 8.1-1.0+5.5 and 17.9-5.1+8.9 cm yr-1 for the fastest cell. These convection rates imply that the surface ages at the edge of cells reach ∼4.2-8.9 × 105 yr. The rates are comparable to rates of ∼6 cm yr-1 that were previously obtained from modeling of the convective overturn in Sputnik Planitia (McKinnon et al., 2016). Finally, we investigate the surface rheology of the convection cells and estimate that the minimum ice viscosity necessary to support the geometry of the observed pits is of order 1016-1017 Pa s, based on the argument that pits would relax away before growing to their observed radii of several hundred meters if the viscosity were lower than this value.

  20. Secondary craters from large impacts on Europa and Ganymede: Ejecta size-velocity distributions on icy worlds, and the scaling of ejected blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Kelsi N.; McKinnon, William B.; Nowicki, L. T.

    2013-09-01

    We have mapped fields of secondary craters around three large primary craters on Europa and Ganymede and estimated the size and velocity of the fragments that formed the secondaries using updated scaling equations for ice impacts. We characterize the upper envelope of the fragment size-velocity distribution to obtain a function for the largest fragments at a given ejection velocity. Power-law velocity exponents found in our study of icy satellite secondary fields are compared to the exponents found for similar studies of mercurian, lunar, and martian craters; for all but basin-scale impacts, fragment size decreases more slowly with increasing ejection velocity than on rocky bodies. Spallation theory provides estimates of the size of ejected spall plates at a given velocity, but this theory predicts fragments considerably smaller than are necessary to form most of our observed secondaries. In general, ejecta fragment sizes scale with primary crater diameter and decrease with increasing ejection velocity, υej, by 1/υej or greater, and point-source scaling implies a relation between the two. The largest crater represented in any of these studies, Gilgamesh on Ganymede, exhibits a relatively steep velocity dependence. Extrapolating the results to the escape speed for each icy moon yields the size of the largest fragment that could later re-impact to form a so-called sesquinary crater, either on the parent moon or a neighboring satellite. We find that craters above 2 km in diameter on Europa and Ganymede are unlikely to be sesquinaries.

  1. Reversible Axonal Dystrophy by Calcium Modulation in Frataxin-Deficient Sensory Neurons of YG8R Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Mollá

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA is a peripheral neuropathy involving a loss of proprioceptive sensory neurons. Studies of biopsies from patients suggest that axonal dysfunction precedes the death of proprioceptive neurons in a dying-back process. We observed that the deficiency of frataxin in sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG of the YG8R mouse model causes the formation of axonal spheroids which retain dysfunctional mitochondria, shows alterations in the cytoskeleton and it produces impairment of axonal transport and autophagic flux. The homogenous distribution of axonal spheroids along the neurites supports the existence of continues focal damages. This lead us to propose for FRDA a model of distal axonopathy based on axonal focal damages. In addition, we observed the involvement of oxidative stress and dyshomeostasis of calcium in axonal spheroid formation generating axonal injury as a primary cause of pathophysiology. Axonal spheroids may be a consequence of calcium imbalance, thus we propose the quenching or removal extracellular Ca2+ to prevent spheroids formation. In our neuronal model, treatments with BAPTA and o-phenanthroline reverted the axonal dystrophy and the mitochondrial dysmorphic parameters. These results support the hypothesis that axonal pathology is reversible in FRDA by pharmacological manipulation of intracellular Ca2+ with Ca2+ chelators or metalloprotease inhibitors, preventing Ca2+-mediated axonal injury. Thus, the modulation of Ca2+ levels may be a relevant therapeutic target to develop early axonal protection and prevent dying-back neurodegeneration.

  2. Axonal and Transynaptic Spread of Prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearin, Harold

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural transmission of prion diseases depends upon the spread of prions from the nervous system to excretory or secretory tissues, but the mechanism of prion transport in axons and into peripheral tissue is unresolved. Here, we examined the temporal and spatial movement of prions from the brain stem along cranial nerves into skeletal muscle as a model of axonal transport and transynaptic spread. The disease-specific isoform of the prion protein, PrPSc, was observed in nerve fibers of the tongue approximately 2 weeks prior to PrPSc deposition in skeletal muscle. Initially, PrPSc deposits had a small punctate pattern on the edge of muscle cells that colocalized with synaptophysin, a marker for the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), in >50% of the cells. At later time points PrPSc was widely distributed in muscle cells, but PrPSc deposition at the NMJ, suggesting additional prion replication and dissemination within muscle cells. In contrast to the NMJ, PrPSc was not associated with synaptophysin in nerve fibers but was found to colocalize with LAMP-1 and cathepsin D during early stages of axonal spread. We propose that PrPSc-bound endosomes can lead to membrane recycling in which PrPSc is directed to the synapse, where it either moves across the NMJ into the postsynaptic muscle cell or induces PrPSc formation on muscle cells across the NMJ. IMPORTANCE Prion diseases are transmissible and fatal neurodegenerative diseases in which prion dissemination to excretory or secretory tissues is necessary for natural disease transmission. Despite the importance of this pathway, the cellular mechanism of prion transport in axons and into peripheral tissue is unresolved. This study demonstrates anterograde spread of prions within nerve fibers prior to infection of peripheral synapses (i.e., neuromuscular junction) and infection of peripheral tissues (i.e., muscle cells). Within nerve fibers prions were associated with the endosomal-lysosomal pathway prior to entry into

  3. TEGENA: Detailed experimental investigations of temperature and velocity distributions in rod bundle geometries with turbulent sodium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.

    1989-02-01

    Precise knowledge of the velocity and temperature distributions is necessary in fuel element design (rod bundles with longitudinal flow). The detail codes required in the fine analysis of non-uniformly cooled bundle zones are presently at the stage of development. In order to verify these computer codes, the mean fluid temperatures and the related RMS values of the temperature fluctuations were measured in a heated bundle TEGENA, containing 4 rods arranged in one row (P/D = W/D = 1.147) with sodium cooling (Pr ≅ 0.005). The temperature distribution in the structures was determined as the necessary boundary condition for the temperature profiles in the fluid. The experiments were carried out with different types of heating (uniform load and load tilting) and the flow conditions were varied in the range from 4000 ≤ Re ≤ 76.000, 20 ≤ Pe ≤ 400. The essential process of thermal development took place under uniform load within a heated bundle length of about 100 hydraulic diameters. In the main measuring plane at the end of the heated zone, after 200 hydraulic diameters, the flow can be termed largely developed thermally. There, the temperature profiles measured in the fluid exhibit pronounced maxima in the narrowest gaps of the subchannels as well as pronounced minima in the centers of the subchannels at the unheated wall. In the zones of maximum temperature gradients the temperature fluctuations attain maximum and minimum values, respectively, at the points of disappearance of the temperature gradients. In all cases of load tilting investigated the flow at the end of the heated zone had not yet developed thermally. By inspection of all thermocouples in isothermal experiments performed at regular intervals, by redundant arrangement of the mobile probe thermocouples and by demonstration of the reproducibility of results of measurement the experiments have been validated satisfactorily. (orig./GL) [de

  4. TEGENA: Detailed experimental investigations of temperature and velocity distributions in rod bundle geometries with turbulent sodium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.

    1989-12-01

    Precise knowlege of the velocity and temperature distributions is necessary in fuel element design (rod bundles with longitudinal flow). The detail codes required in the fine analysis of non-uniformly cooled bundle zones are presently at the stage of development. In order to verify these computer codes, the mean fluid temperatures and the related RMS values of the temperature fluctuations were measured in a heated bundle, TEGENA, containing four rods arranged in one row (P/D = W/D = 1.147) with sodium cooling (Pr≅0.005). The temperature distribution in the structures was determined as the necessary boundary condition for the temperature profiles in the fluid. The experiments were carried out with different types of heating (uniform load and flux tilting) and the flow conditions were varied in the ranges 4000≤Re≤76,000; 20≤Pe≤400. The essential processes of thermal development took place under uniform load within a heated bundle length of about 100 hydraulic diameters. In the main measuring plane at the end of the heated zone, after 200 hydraulic diameters, the flow can be termed largely developed thermally. There, the temperature profiles measured in the fluid exhibit pronounced maxima in the narrowest gaps of the subchannels as well as pronounced minima in the centers of the subchannels at the unheated wall. In the zones of maximum temperature gradients the temperature fluctuations attain maximum and minimum values, respectively, at the points of disappearance of the temperature gradients. In all cases of flux tilting investigated the flow at the end of the heated zone had not yet developed thermally. (orig.) [de

  5. Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Array near a Highway for Traffic Monitoring and Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Lancelle, C.; Ak, E. Ms; Lord, N. E.

    2017-12-01

    Monitoring traffic is important for many technical reasons. It allows for better design of future roads and assessment of the state of current roads. The number, size, weight, and speed of vehicles control deterioration rate. Also, real-time information supplies data to intelligent information systems to help control traffic. Recently there have been studies looking at monitoring traffic seismically as vibrations from traffic are not sensitive to weather and poor visibility. Furthermore, traffic noise can be used to image S-wave velocity distribution in the near surface by capturing and interpreting Rayleigh and Love waves (Nakata, 2016; Zeng et al. 2016). The capability of DAS for high spatial sampling (1 m), temporal sampling (up to 10 kHz), and distributed nature (tens of kilometers) allows for a closer look at the traffic as it passes and how the speed of the vehicle may change over the length of the array. The potential and difficulties of using DAS for these objectives were studied using two DAS arrays. One at Garner Valley in Southern California (a 700-meter array adjacent to CA Highway 74) and another in Brady Hot Springs, Nevada (an 8700-meter array adjacent to Interstate 80). These studies experimentally evaluated the use of DAS data for monitoring traffic and assessing the use of traffic vibration as non-localized sources for seismic imaging. DAS arrays should also be resilient to issues with lighting conditions that are problematic for video monitoring and it may be sensitive to the weight of a vehicle. This study along a major interstate provides a basis for examining DAS' potential and limitations as a key component of intelligent highway systems.

  6. Influence of Particle Size Distribution on the Morphology and Cavitation Resistance of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, L. L.; Sucharski, G. B.; Pukasiewicz, A. G. M.; Paredes, R. S. C.

    2018-02-01

    The cavitation wear process is one of the major wear mechanisms in turbines and rotors of hydroelectric power plants in Brazil. An effective way to increase the cavitation resistance is the use of coatings, applied by thermal spraying. The high-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF) is one of the most used thermal spraying processes, and it is widely adopted for applying coatings for protection against wear and in maintenance components. A FeCrMnSiB experimental alloy was deposited onto SAE 1020 substrate by HVOF process, in order to evaluate the influence of the powder particle size range on the morphology and cavitation resistance of the coatings. The morphology of the coatings showed an increase in oxide content with powder size reduction. The increase in the powder particle size reduced the wettability of the particles, observed by the increase in the quantity of non-melted particles. Higher particle size distribution led to an increase in erosion rate, due to higher presence of non-melted particles in the coatings and consequently reduction of splats adhesion. The cavitation damage was perceived mainly by the mechanism of lamellae detachment; however, part of the damage was also absorbed by strain hardening due to the γ-ɛ martensitic transformation.

  7. Theory of pixel lensing towards M31 II, The velocity anisotropy and flattening of the MACHO distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Kerins, E; Evans, N W; Baillon, Paul; Carr, B J; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gould, A; Hewett, P C; Kaplan, J; Paulin-Henriksson, S; Smartt, S J; Tsapras, Y; Valls-Gabaud, D

    2003-01-01

    The POINT-AGAPE collaboration is currently searching for massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) towards the Andromeda galaxy (M31). The survey aims to exploit the high inclination of the M31 disk, which causes an asymmetry in the spatial distribution of M31 MACHOs. Here, we investigate the effects of halo velocity anisotropy and flattening on the asymmetry signal using simple halo models. For a spherically symmetric and isotropic halo, we find that the underlying pixel-lensing rate in far-disk M31 MACHOs is more than 5 times the rate of near-disk events. We find that the asymmetry is increased further by about 30% if the MACHOs occupy radial orbits rather than tangential orbits, but is substantially reduced if the MACHOs lie in a flattened halo. However, even for haloes with a minor-to-major axis ratio q = 0.3, the numbers of M31 MACHOs in the far-side outnumber those in the near-side by a factor of ~2. We show that, if positional information is exploited in addition to number counts, then the number of candid...

  8. An asymptotic inversion method of inferring the sound velocity distribution in the sun from the spectrum of p-mode oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekii, Takashi; Shibahashi, Hiromoto

    1989-01-01

    We present an inversion method of inferring the sound velocity distribution in the Sun from its oscillation data of p-modes. The equation governing the p-mode oscillations is reduced to a form similar to the Schroedinger equation in quantum mechanics. By using a quantization rule based on the KWBJ asymptotic method, we derive an integral equation of which solution provides the 'acoustic potential' of the wave equation. The acoustic potential consists of two parts: One of them is related with the squared sound velocity and is dependent on the degree of the mode l, while the other term is independent of l and dominates in the outer part of the Sun. By examining the l-dependence of the acoustic potential obtained as the solution of the integral equation, we separate these two components of the potential and eventually obtain the sound velocity distribution from a set of eigenfrequencies of p-modes. In order to evaluate prospects of this inversion method, we perform numerical simulations in which eigenfrequencies of a theoretical solar model are used to reproduce the sound velocity distribution of the model. The error of thus inferred sound velocity relative to the true values is estimated to be less than a few percent. (author)

  9. CSPGs inhibit axon branching by impairing mitochondria-dependent regulation of actin dynamics and axonal translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainath, Rajiv; Ketschek, Andrea; Grandi, Leah; Gallo, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) inhibit the formation of axon collateral branches. The regulation of the axonal cytoskeleton and mitochondria are important components of the mechanism of branching. Actin-dependent axonal plasticity, reflected in the dynamics of axonal actin patches and filopodia, is greatest along segments of the axon populated by mitochondria. It is reported that CSPGs partially depolarize the membrane potential of axonal mitochondria, which impairs the dynamics of the axonal actin cytoskeleton and decreases the formation and duration of axonal filopodia, the first steps in the mechanism of branching. The effects of CSPGs on actin cytoskeletal dynamics are specific to axon segments populated by mitochondria. In contrast, CSPGs do not affect the microtubule content of axons, or the localization of microtubules into axonal filopodia, a required step in the mechanism of branch formation. It is also reported that CSPGs decrease the mitochondria-dependent axonal translation of cortactin, an actin associated protein involved in branching. Finally, the inhibitory effects of CSPGs on axon branching, actin cytoskeletal dynamics and the axonal translation of cortactin are reversed by culturing neurons with acetyl-l-carnitine, which promotes mitochondrial respiration. Collectively these data indicate that CSPGs impair mitochondrial function in axons, an effect which contributes to the inhibition of axon branching. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 419-437, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The axonal cytoskeleton : from organization to function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kevenaar, Josta T|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338771042; Hoogenraad, Casper C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/227263502

    The axon is the single long fiber that extends from the neuron and transmits electrical signals away from the cell body. The neuronal cytoskeleton, composed of microtubules (MTs), actin filaments and neurofilaments, is not only required for axon formation and axonal transport but also provides the

  11. Velocity distribution of electrons in time-varying low-temperature plasmas: progress in theoretical procedures over the past 70 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makabe, Toshiaki

    2018-03-01

    A time-varying low-temperature plasma sustained by electrical powers with various kinds of fRequencies has played a key role in the historical development of new technologies, such as gas lasers, ozonizers, micro display panels, dry processing of materials, medical care, and so on, since World War II. Electrons in a time-modulated low-temperature plasma have a proper velocity spectrum, i.e. velocity distribution dependent on the microscopic quantum characteristics of the feed gas molecule and on the external field strength and the frequency. In order to solve and evaluate the time-varying velocity distribution, we have mostly two types of theoretical methods based on the classical and linear Boltzmann equations, namely, the expansion method using the orthogonal function and the procedure of non-expansional temporal evolution. Both methods have been developed discontinuously and progressively in synchronization with those technological developments. In this review, we will explore the historical development of the theoretical procedure to evaluate the electron velocity distribution in a time-varying low-temperature plasma over the past 70 years.

  12. Slowing of axonal regeneration is correlated with increased axonal viscosity during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidemann Steven R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As we age, the speed of axonal regeneration declines. At the biophysical level, why this occurs is not well understood. Results To investigate we first measured the rate of axonal elongation of sensory neurons cultured from neonatal and adult rats. We found that neonatal axons grew 40% faster than adult axons (11.5 µm/hour vs. 8.2 µm/hour. To determine how the mechanical properties of axons change during maturation, we used force calibrated towing needles to measure the viscosity (stiffness and strength of substrate adhesion of neonatal and adult sensory axons. We found no significant difference in the strength of adhesions, but did find that adult axons were 3 times intrinsically stiffer than neonatal axons. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest decreasing axonal stiffness may be part of an effective strategy to accelerate the regeneration of axons in the adult peripheral nervous system.

  13. Testing the limits of the Maxwell distribution of velocities for atoms flying nearly parallel to the walls of a thin cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Petko; Bloch, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    For a gas at thermal equilibrium, it is usually assumed that the velocity distribution follows an isotropic 3-dimensional Maxwell-Boltzmann (M-B) law. This assumption classically implies the assumption of a "cos θ" law for the flux of atoms leaving the surface. Actually, such a law has no grounds in surface physics, and experimental tests of this assumption have remained very few. In a variety of recently developed sub-Doppler laser spectroscopy techniques for gases one-dimensionally confined in a thin cell, the specific contribution of atoms moving nearly parallel to the boundary of the vapor container becomes essential. We report here on the implementation of an experiment to probe effectively the distribution of atomic velocities parallel to the windows for a thin (60 μm) Cs vapor cell. The principle of the setup relies on a spatially separated pump-probe experiment, where the variations of the signal amplitude with the pump-probe separation provide the information on the velocity distribution. The experiment is performed in a sapphire cell on the Cs resonance line, which benefits from a long-lived hyperfine optical pumping. Presently, we can analyze specifically the density of atoms with slow normal velocities ˜5-20 m/s, already corresponding to unusual grazing flight—at ˜85°-88.5° from the normal to the surface—and no deviation from the M-B law is found within the limits of our elementary setup. Finally we suggest tracks to explore more parallel velocities, when surface details—roughness or structure—and the atom-surface interaction should play a key role to restrict the applicability of an M-B-type distribution.

  14. Simulating Pre-Asymptotic, Non-Fickian Transport Although Doing Simple Random Walks - Supported By Empirical Pore-Scale Velocity Distributions and Memory Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, S.; Jia, N.; Bijeljic, B.; Nowak, W.

    2016-12-01

    Pre-asymptotic characteristics are almost ubiquitous when analyzing solute transport processes in porous media. These pre-asymptotic aspects are caused by spatial coherence in the velocity field and by its heterogeneity. For the Lagrangian perspective of particle displacements, the causes of pre-asymptotic, non-Fickian transport are skewed velocity distribution, statistical dependencies between subsequent increments of particle positions (memory) and dependence between the x, y and z-components of particle increments. Valid simulation frameworks should account for these factors. We propose a particle tracking random walk (PTRW) simulation technique that can use empirical pore-space velocity distributions as input, enforces memory between subsequent random walk steps, and considers cross dependence. Thus, it is able to simulate pre-asymptotic non-Fickian transport phenomena. Our PTRW framework contains an advection/dispersion term plus a diffusion term. The advection/dispersion term produces time-series of particle increments from the velocity CDFs. These time series are equipped with memory by enforcing that the CDF values of subsequent velocities change only slightly. The latter is achieved through a random walk on the axis of CDF values between 0 and 1. The virtual diffusion coefficient for that random walk is our only fitting parameter. Cross-dependence can be enforced by constraining the random walk to certain combinations of CDF values between the three velocity components in x, y and z. We will show that this modelling framework is capable of simulating non-Fickian transport by comparison with a pore-scale transport simulation and we analyze the approach to asymptotic behavior.

  15. Shell-like configuration in O+ ion velocity distribution at high altitudes in the dayside magnetosphere observed by Cluster/CIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Joko

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We report shell-like configurations seen in O+ ion velocity distributions. One case was observed above 8RE in radial distance in the dayside magnetosphere, presumably in the mantle region, during the observation period of 09:30-10:00 UT on 12 April 2001 by the CIS instrument on board the Cluster satellite. This shell-like configuration was different from so-called "conics" or "beams": the lower energy (cold population and the higher energy partial shell part were seen together, but there was no obvious signature of heating process. With respect to H+ ion velocity distributions observed simultaneously, transverse heating (so-called in "pan-cake" shape or field-aligned energisation configurations were seen as the result of heating/energisation processes and the upward-going part of the distribution also formed a half spherical thick shell configuration. Concerning O+ ion heating in the case of 12 April 2001, it was obviously observed when the spacecraft passed through the mantle region close to the poleward cusp. As the spacecraft moved toward the dayside cusp shell-like (or dome shape velocity distributions appeared apparently and continued to be observed until the spacecraft reached the magnetopause according to two other different cases (13 February 2001 and 14 April 2001. Two other cases were observed in the Southern Hemisphere and the spacecraft was supposed to pass through the dayside cusp toward the mantle region at higher altitudes (9-11RE. O+ ion velocity distributions in these cases show pre-/post-structured shell-like configurations, depending on the observation sites (mantle or dayside cusp.

  16. Gogo receptor contributes to retinotopic map formation and prevents R1-6 photoreceptor axon bundling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Hein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topographic maps form the basis of neural processing in sensory systems of both vertebrate and invertebrate species. In the Drosophila visual system, neighboring R1-R6 photoreceptor axons innervate adjacent positions in the first optic ganglion, the lamina, and thereby represent visual space as a continuous map in the brain. The mechanisms responsible for the establishment of retinotopic maps remain incompletely understood. RESULTS: Here, we show that the receptor Golden goal (Gogo is required for R axon lamina targeting and cartridge elongation in a partially redundant fashion with local guidance cues provided by neighboring axons. Loss of function of Gogo in large clones of R axons results in aberrant R1-R6 fascicle spacing. Gogo affects target cartridge selection only indirectly as a consequence of the disordered lamina map. Interestingly, small clones of gogo deficient R axons perfectly integrate into a proper retinotopic map suggesting that surrounding R axons of the same or neighboring fascicles provide complementary spatial guidance. Using single photoreceptor type rescue, we show that Gogo expression exclusively in R8 cells is sufficient to mediate targeting of all photoreceptor types in the lamina. Upon lamina targeting and cartridge selection, R axons elongate within their individual cartridges. Interestingly, here Gogo prevents bundling of extending R1-6 axons. CONCLUSION: Taken together, we propose that Gogo contributes to retinotopic map formation in the Drosophila lamina by controlling the distribution of R1-R6 axon fascicles. In a later developmental step, the regular position of R1-R6 axons along the lamina plexus is crucial for target cartridge selection. During cartridge elongation, Gogo allows R1-R6 axons to extend centrally in the lamina cartridge.

  17. Relationship between the focal mechanism of magnitude ML 3.3 seismic event induced by mining and distribution of peak ground velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubiński Józef

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between seismic radiation pattern generated by a strong mining induced seismic event and the distribution of peak ground velocity in the epicenter area has been presented. It was a seismic event with the local magnitude ML = 3.3 occurred on June 21, 2016 in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB in Marcel Mine. Calculated values of the peak ground velocity, taking into account the amplification coefficient, were the basis for the development of the PGVHamp map. The resulting distribution of PGVHamp isolines and the measured velocity amplitudes point to significant differences. That fact indicates that some additional factors can impact on the seismic effect observed on the surface. One of them could be a focal mechanism of seismic event. Focal mechanism of the M=3.3 induced seismic tremor, were calculated by the moment tensor inversion method. The tremor was characterized by a normal slip mechanism with 87% shear component. Comparison of seismic pattern for S-wave at individual stations allowed confirms a relation between directionality of the seismic radiation pattern for S-wave and the recorded peak ground velocities and explain the observed anomaly.

  18. Measurement of the parallel velocity distribution function of the electron beam in a quasi-optical gyrotron by electron cyclotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soumagne, G.; Alberti, S.; Hogge, J.P.; Pedrozzi, M.; Siegrist, M.R.; Tran, M.Q.; Tran, T.M.

    1996-03-01

    The parallel velocity distribution function of the weakly relativistic electron beam of a quasi-optical gyrotron (QOG) has been determined by measuring the Doppler-shifted Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) at an angle θ=15 o with respect to the external magnetic DC-field. Due to the Doppler shift, the frequency of the spontaneous cyclotron emission at the fundamental (ν 0 =100 GHz) is upshifted to 140 GHz. A broadening of the spectrum up to 10 GHz (Full Width at Half Maximum FWHM) was measured. The measured mean frequency agrees well with the theoretical predictions, but the observed line-width, and hence the parallel velocity distribution function, is 2-3 times larger than expected. Considerations on ECE-measurements of the electron beam energy spread, performed at larger angles θ, are also discussed. (author) 12 figs., 18 refs

  19. Structure and Function of an Actin-Based Filter in the Proximal Axon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varuzhan Balasanyan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The essential organization of microtubules within neurons has been described; however, less is known about how neuronal actin is arranged and the functional implications of its arrangement. Here, we describe, in live cells, an actin-based structure in the proximal axon that selectively prevents some proteins from entering the axon while allowing the passage of others. Concentrated patches of actin in proximal axons are present shortly after axonal specification in rat and zebrafish neurons imaged live, and they mark positions where anterogradely traveling vesicles carrying dendritic proteins halt and reverse. Patches colocalize with the ARP2/3 complex, and when ARP2/3-mediated nucleation is blocked, a dendritic protein mislocalizes to the axon. Patches are highly dynamic, with few persisting longer than 30 min. In neurons in culture and in vivo, actin appears to form a contiguous, semipermeable barrier, despite its apparently sparse distribution, preventing axonal localization of constitutively active myosin Va but not myosin VI. : Balasanyan et al. find dynamic patches of actin in proximal axons of live neurons, mature and newly differentiated, in culture and in vivo. Patches contribute to a filter that sequesters some proteins within the somatodendritic domain while allowing others to pass into the axon, leading to polarized localization of proteins.

  20. Neurobiology of axonal transport defects in motor neuron diseases: Opportunities for translational research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Kurt J; Hafezparast, Majid

    2017-09-01

    Intracellular trafficking of cargoes is an essential process to maintain the structure and function of all mammalian cell types, but especially of neurons because of their extreme axon/dendrite polarisation. Axonal transport mediates the movement of cargoes such as proteins, mRNA, lipids, membrane-bound vesicles and organelles that are mostly synthesised in the cell body and in doing so is responsible for their correct spatiotemporal distribution in the axon, for example at specialised sites such as nodes of Ranvier and synaptic terminals. In addition, axonal transport maintains the essential long-distance communication between the cell body and synaptic terminals that allows neurons to react to their surroundings via trafficking of for example signalling endosomes. Axonal transport defects are a common observation in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, and mutations in components of the axonal transport machinery have unequivocally shown that impaired axonal transport can cause neurodegeneration (reviewed in El-Kadi et al., 2007, De Vos et al., 2008; Millecamps and Julien, 2013). Here we review our current understanding of axonal transport defects and the role they play in motor neuron diseases (MNDs) with a specific focus on the most common form of MND, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimating regional pore pressure distribution using 3D seismic velocities in the Dutch Central North Sea Graben

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winthaegen, P.L.A.; Verweij, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The application of the empirical Eaton method to calibrated sonic well information and 3D seismic interval velocity data in the southeastern part of the Central North Sea Graben, using the Japsen (Glob. Planet. Change 24 (2000) 189) normal velocitydepth trend, resulted in the identification of an

  2. Application of one-dimensional model to calculate water velocity distributions over elastic elements simulating Canadian waterweed plants (Elodea Canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrak, Elżbieta; Kubrak, Janusz; Rowiński, Paweł

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional model for vertical profiles of longitudinal velocities in open-channel flows is verified against laboratory data obtained in an open channel with artificial plants. Those plants simulate Canadian waterweed which in nature usually forms dense stands that reach all the way to the water surface. The model works particularly well for densely spaced plants.

  3. The velocity distribution caused by an airplane at the points of a vertical plane containing the span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Max M

    1925-01-01

    A formula for the computation of the vertical velocity component on all sides of an airplane is deduced and discussed. The formation is of value for the interpretation of such free flight tests where two airplanes fly alongside each other to facilitate observation.

  4. The effect of reported high-velocity small raindrops on inferred drop size distributions and derived power laws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been shown that at high rainfall intensities, small raindrops may fall with much larger velocities than would be expected from their diameters. These were argued to be fragments of recently broken-up larger drops. In this paper we quantify the effect of this phenomenon on raindrop

  5. Effect of Superficial Gas Velocity on the Solid Temperature Distribution in Gas Fluidized Beds with Heat Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaei, Mohammad; Jegers, Jeroen; van Sint Annaland, Martin; Kuipers, Johannes A M; Deen, Niels G

    2017-08-02

    The hydrodynamics and heat transfer of cylindrical gas-solid fluidized beds for polyolefin production was investigated with the two-fluid model (TFM) based on the kinetic theory of granular flow (KTGF). It was found that the fluidized bed becomes more isothermal with increasing superficial gas velocity. This is mainly due to the increase of solids circulation and improvement in gas solid contact. It was also found that the average Nusselt number weakly depends on the gas velocity. The TFM results were qualitatively compared with simulation results of computational fluid dynamics combined with the discrete element model (CFD-DEM). The TFM results were in very good agreement with the CFD-DEM outcomes, so the TFM can be a reliable source for further investigations of fluidized beds especially large lab-scale reactors.

  6. Influence of crack distribution of rocks on P-wave velocity anisotropy - a laboratory and field scale study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilhelm, J.; Rudajev, Vladimír; Živor, Roman; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Pros, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2010), s. 1099-1110 ISSN 0016-8025 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/06/0906; GA AV ČR IAA300130906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : anisotropy * fracture * stiffness * seismic velocity * shallow seismic refraction method * ultrasound radiation Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.493, year: 2010

  7. Building America Case Study: Standard- Versus High-Velocity Air Distribution in High-Performance Townhomes, Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Poerschke, R. Beach, T. Begg

    2017-06-01

    IBACOS investigated the performance of a small-diameter high-velocity heat pump system compared to a conventional system in a new construction triplex townhouse. A ductless heat pump system also was installed for comparison, but the homebuyer backed out because of aesthetic concerns about that system. In total, two buildings, having identical solar orientation and comprised of six townhomes, were monitored for comfort and energy performance.

  8. Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Fernando M; Bonni, Azad; Sousa, Mónica M

    2014-01-01

    Although neurons execute a cell intrinsic program of axonal growth during development, following the establishment of connections, the developmental growth capacity declines. Besides environmental challenges, this switch largely accounts for the failure of adult central nervous system (CNS) axons to regenerate. Here, we discuss the cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration, including not only the regulation of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, but also the modulation of local protein translation, retrograde and anterograde axonal transport, and microtubule dynamics. We further explore the causes underlying the failure of CNS neurons to mount a vigorous regenerative response, and the paradigms demonstrating the activation of cell intrinsic axon growth programs. Finally, we present potential mechanisms to support axon regeneration, as these may represent future therapeutic approaches to promote recovery following CNS injury and disease. PMID:24531721

  9. Lateral velocity distributions in laser-induced desorption of CO from Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001): experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowski, S.; Kluener, T.; Freund, H.J. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195, Berlin (Germany); Klinkmann, I.; Al-Shamery, K. [Fachbereich 9, Carl v. Ossietzky Universitaet Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, 26111, Oldenburg (Germany); Pykavy, M.; Staemmler, V. [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstrasse 150, 44780, Bochum (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    Quantum state resolved determination of lateral velocity distributions in laser-induced desorption of CO from a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) surface is investigated. Experimentally, Doppler profiles are obtained via a (1+1{sup '})-REMPI detection scheme for various rovibrational states and desorption velocities. The experimental findings are directly compared to theoretical results from high-dimensional stochastic quantum dynamical wave packet calculations based on complete first-principles potential energy surfaces. Reasonable quantitative agreement between experiment and theory concerning the total width as well as the full width at half maximum of the lateral velocity distributions is found. Depending on the rotational state a single-peaked or a double-peaked shape of the Doppler profiles is predicted theoretically. In order to support our theoretical predictions we suggest refined experimental investigations of the state-resolved Doppler profiles with an enhanced signal to noise ratio and further theoretical studies concerning the nature of the electronically excited intermediate. (orig.)

  10. Uniformity control of the deposition rate profile of a-Si:H film by gas velocity and temperature distributions in a capacitively coupled plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2018-03-01

    The effect of neutral transport on the deposition rate profiles of thin films formed by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is investigated to improve the uniformity of amorphous hydrogenated silicon films. The PECVD reactor with a cylindrical showerhead is numerically simulated with a variation of the gas velocity and temperature in the capacitively coupled plasma with an intermediate-pressure SiH4/He gas mixture. The modulation of the gas velocity distribution results in a noticeable change in the density distributions of neutral molecules such as SiH4, SiH3, H, SiH2, and Si2H6, especially in the vicinity of the electrode edge. With the locally accelerated gas flow, the concomitant increase in Si2H6 density near the electrode edge induces increases in both the electron density and the deposition rate profile near the electrode edge. In addition, it is observed that changing the surface temperature distribution by changing the sidewall temperature can also effectively modulate the plasma density distributions. The simulated deposition rate profile matches the experimental data well, even under non-isothermal wall boundary conditions.

  11. Sorting of Dendritic and Axonal Vesicles at the Pre-axonal Exclusion Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginny G. Farías

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized sorting of newly synthesized proteins to the somatodendritic and axonal domains of neurons occurs by selective incorporation into distinct populations of vesicular transport carriers. An unresolved issue is how the vesicles themselves are sorted to their corresponding neuronal domains. Previous studies concluded that the axon initial segment (AIS is an actin-based filter that selectively prevents passage of somatodendritic vesicles into the axon. We find, however, that most somatodendritic vesicles fail to enter the axon at a more proximal region in the axon hillock, herein referred to as the pre-axonal exclusion zone (PAEZ. Forced coupling of a somatodendritic cargo protein to an axonally directed kinesin is sufficient to drive transport of whole somatodendritic vesicles through the PAEZ toward the distal axon. Based on these findings, we propose that polarized sorting of transport vesicles occurs at the PAEZ and depends on the ability of the vesicles to acquire an appropriately directed microtubule motor.

  12. Effect of pressure on 3D distribution of P-wave velocity and attenuation in antigorite serpentinite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svitek, Tomáš; Vavryčuk, Václav; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Petružálek, Matěj; Kern, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 4 (2017), WA33-WA43 ISSN 0016-8033 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13967S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03950S; GA ČR(CZ) GC16-19751J Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : antigorite * serpentinite * P-wawe velocity Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy; DB - Geology ; Mineralogy (GFU-E) OBOR OECD: Geology; Geology (GFU-E) Impact factor: 2.391, year: 2016

  13. The Statistical Distribution of Turbulence Driven Velocity Extremes in the Atmosperic Boundary Layer cartwright/Longuet-Higgins Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2007-01-01

    associated with large excursions from the mean [2]. Thus, the more extreme turbulence excursions (i.e. the upper tail of the turbulence PDF) seem to follow an Exponential-like distribution rather than a Gaussian distribution, and a Gaussian estimate may under-predict the probability of large turbulence......The statistical distribution of extreme wind excursions above a mean level, for a specified recurrence period, is of crucial importance in relation to design of wind sensitive structures. This is particularly true for wind turbine structures. Based on an assumption of a Gaussian "mother......" distribution, Cartwright and Longuet-Higgens [1] derived an asymptotic expression for the distribution of the largest excursion from the mean level during an arbitrary recurrence period. From its inception, this celebrated expression has been widely used in wind engineering (as well as in off-shore engineering...

  14. Radial glia phagocytose axonal debris from degenerating overextending axons in the developing olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Daniel A; Wegner, Michael; Stolt, C Claus; Chehrehasa, Fatemeh; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James A

    2015-02-01

    Axon targeting during the development of the olfactory system is not always accurate, and numerous axons overextend past the target layer into the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. To date, the fate of the mis-targeted axons has not been determined. We hypothesized that following overextension, the axons degenerate, and cells within the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb phagocytose the axonal debris. We utilized a line of transgenic mice that expresses ZsGreen fluorescent protein in primary olfactory axons. We found that overextending axons closely followed the filaments of radial glia present in the olfactory bulb during embryonic development. Following overextension into deeper layers of the olfactory bulb, axons degenerated and radial glia responded by phagocytosing the resulting debris. We used in vitro analysis to confirm that the radial glia had phagocytosed debris from olfactory axons. We also investigated whether the fate of overextending axons was altered when the development of the olfactory bulb was perturbed. In mice that lacked Sox10, a transcription factor essential for normal olfactory bulb development, we observed a disruption to the morphology and positioning of radial glia and an accumulation of olfactory axon debris within the bulb. Our results demonstrate that during early development of the olfactory system, radial glia play an important role in removing overextended axons from the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Mapping axonal density and average diameter using non-monotonic time-dependent gradient-echo MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Daniel; Cruz, Tomás L; Jespersen, Sune N

    2017-01-01

    Abstract White Matter (WM) microstructures, such as axonal density and average diameter, are crucial to the normal function of the Central Nervous System (CNS) as they are closely related with axonal conduction velocities. Conversely, disruptions of these microstructural features may result......, the axonal density can be extracted. We then experimentally demonstrate that maps derived from MGE acquired at 16.4 T in ex-vivo spinal cords, where the different tracts characterized by different microstructures are clearly contrasted in parametric maps extracted by fitting the MGE decay to the model. When...

  16. Regulating Axonal Responses to Injury: The Intersection between Signaling Pathways Involved in Axon Myelination and The Inhibition of Axon Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sudheendra N. R.; Pearse, Damien D.

    2016-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors adversely affect the gene programs that govern the expression of regeneration-associated genes (RAGs) and the production of a diversity of extracellular matrix molecules (ECM). Insufficient RAG expression in the injured neuron and the presence of inhibitory ECM at the lesion, leads to structural alterations in the axon that perturb the growth machinery, or form an extraneous barrier to axonal regeneration, respectively. Here, the role of myelin, both intact and debris, in antagonizing axon regeneration has been the focus of numerous investigations. These studies have employed antagonizing antibodies and knockout animals to examine how the growth cone of the re-growing axon responds to the presence of myelin and myelin-associated inhibitors (MAIs) within the lesion environment and caudal spinal cord. However, less attention has been placed on how the myelination of the axon after SCI, whether by endogenous glia or exogenously implanted glia, may alter axon regeneration. Here, we examine the intersection between intracellular signaling pathways in neurons and glia that are involved in axon myelination and axon growth, to provide greater insight into how interrogating this complex network of molecular interactions may lead to new therapeutics targeting SCI. PMID:27375427

  17. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  18. Torsional Behavior of Axonal Microtubule Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Carole; Soheilypour, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal microtubule (MT) bundles crosslinked by microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau are responsible for vital biological functions such as maintaining mechanical integrity and shape of the axon as well as facilitating axonal transport. Breaking and twisting of MTs have been previously observed in damaged undulated axons. Such breaking and twisting of MTs is suggested to cause axonal swellings that lead to axonal degeneration, which is known as “diffuse axonal injury”. In particular, overstretching and torsion of axons can potentially damage the axonal cytoskeleton. Following our previous studies on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension and compression, this work seeks to characterize the mechanical behavior of MT bundles under pure torsion as well as a combination of torsional and tensile loads using a coarse-grained computational model. In the case of pure torsion, a competition between MAP tau tensile and MT bending energies is observed. After three turns, a transition occurs in the mechanical behavior of the bundle that is characterized by its diameter shrinkage. Furthermore, crosslink spacing is shown to considerably influence the mechanical response, with larger MAP tau spacing resulting in a higher rate of turns. Therefore, MAP tau crosslinking of MT filaments protects the bundle from excessive deformation. Simultaneous application of torsion and tension on MT bundles is shown to accelerate bundle failure, compared to pure tension experiments. MAP tau proteins fail in clusters of 10–100 elements located at the discontinuities or the ends of MT filaments. This failure occurs in a stepwise fashion, implying gradual accumulation of elastic tensile energy in crosslinks followed by rupture. Failure of large groups of interconnecting MAP tau proteins leads to detachment of MT filaments from the bundle near discontinuities. This study highlights the importance of torsional loading in axonal damage after traumatic brain injury

  19. Population alignment collisional radiative model for helium-like carbon. Polarization of emission lines and anisotropy of the electron velocity distribution function in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamae, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Takashi; Zhang, Honglin; Kilcrease, David P.; Csanak, George; Berrington, Keith A.

    2003-08-01

    The polarization of emission lines from a plasma carries information about the anisotropic velocity distribution of electrons in the plasma, and thus polarization spectroscopy can give information that is inaccessible by other methods. We have developed a comprehensive population-alignment collisional-radiative (PACR) model code for helium-like carbon CV ions. This code is intended to correlate quantitatively the observed polarization of emission lines from the ions in a plasma with the anisotropy of the electron velocity distribution function. Specifically, the longitudinal alignment of CV triplet emission lines for the 1s2s 3 S 1 - 1s2p 3 P 1,2 ) transitions are studied by this PACR model. The predominant process which produces alignment in the 1s2p 3 P 1,2 levels is the alignment production from the ground state, 1s 21 S 1 and from the metastable level, 1s2s 3 S 1 . The alignment-production fluxes from these levels are in the opposite directions in the temperature range of practical interest, depending on the electron density n e . When n e > 10 16 m -3 , the alignment-production flux from the metastable level is larger than that from the ground state. An anisotropic electron velocity distribution function that has higher values in the axial (toroidal) direction than in the radial (poloidal) direction produces negative longitudinal alignment of the emission lines, i.e., higher intensity of the linear polarized component in the radial direction than that in the axial direction. (author)

  20. Retinal ganglion cells: Energetics, compartmentation, axonal transport, cytoskeletons and vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dao-Yi; Cringle, Stephen J; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Morgan, William H; Yu, Paula K; Su, Er-Ning

    2013-09-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are specialized projection neurons that relay an immense amount of visual information from the retina to the brain. RGC signal inputs are collected by dendrites and output is distributed from the cell body via very thin (0.5-1 μm) and long (∼50 mm) axons. The RGC cell body is larger than other retinal neurons, but is still only a very small fraction (one ten thousandths) of the length and total surface area of the axon. The total distance traversed by RGCs extends from the retina, starting from synapses with bipolar and amacrine cells, to the brain, to synapses with neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus. This review will focus on the energy demands of RGCs and the relevant tissues that surround them. RGC survival and function unexceptionally depends upon free energy, predominantly adenosine triphosphate (ATP). RGC energy metabolism is vastly different when compared to that of the photoreceptors. Each subcellular component of the RGC is remarkably different in terms of structure, function and extracellular environment. The energy demands and distribution of each component are also distinct as evidenced by the uneven distribution of mitochondria and ATP within the RGC - signifying the presence of intracellular energy gradients. In this review we will describe RGCs as having four subcellular components, (1) Dendrites, (2) Cell body, (3) Non-myelinated axon, including intraocular and optic nerve head portions, and (4) Myelinated axon, including the intra-orbital and intracranial portions. We will also describe how RGCs integrate information from each subcellular component in order achieve intracellular homeostatic stability as well as respond to perturbations in the extracellular environment. The possible cellular mechanisms such as axonal transport and axonal cytoskeleton proteins that are involved in maintaining RGC energy homeostasis during normal and disease conditions will also be discussed in depth. The emphasis of this

  1. IMP2 axonal localization, RNA interactome, and function in the development of axon trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preitner, Nicolas; Quan, Jie; Li, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    RNA-based regulatory mechanisms play important roles in the development and plasticity of neural circuits and neurological disease. Developing axons provide a model well suited to the study of RNA-based regulation, and contain specific subsets of mRNAsthat are locally translated and have roles...... to strong defects in commissural axon trajectories at the midline intermediate target. These results reveal a highly distinctive axonal enrichment of IMP2, show that it interacts with a network of axon guidance-related mRNAs, and reveal that it is required for normal axon pathfinding during vertebrate...

  2. Bergmann glia and the recognition molecule CHL1 organize GABAergic axons and direct innervation of Purkinje cell dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Ango

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The geometric and subcellular organization of axon arbors distributes and regulates electrical signaling in neurons and networks, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In rodent cerebellar cortex, stellate interneurons elaborate characteristic axon arbors that selectively innervate Purkinje cell dendrites and likely regulate dendritic integration. We used GFP BAC transgenic reporter mice to examine the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of stellate cell axons and their innervation pattern. We show that stellate axons are organized and guided towards Purkinje cell dendrites by an intermediate scaffold of Bergmann glial (BG fibers. The L1 family immunoglobulin protein Close Homologue of L1 (CHL1 is localized to apical BG fibers and stellate cells during the development of stellate axon arbors. In the absence of CHL1, stellate axons deviate from BG fibers and show aberrant branching and orientation. Furthermore, synapse formation between aberrant stellate axons and Purkinje dendrites is reduced and cannot be maintained, leading to progressive atrophy of axon terminals. These results establish BG fibers as a guiding scaffold and CHL1 a molecular signal in the organization of stellate axon arbors and in directing their dendritic innervation.

  3. Squid Giant Axons Synthesize NF Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, Marianna; Chun, Jong Tai; Giuditta, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Squid giant axon has been an excellent model system for studying fundamental topics in neurobiology such as neuronal signaling. It has been also useful in addressing the questions of local protein synthesis in the axons. Incubation of isolated squid giant axons with [ 35 S]methionine followed by immunoprecipitation with a rabbit antibody against all squid neurofilament (NF) proteins demonstrates the local synthesis of a major 180 kDa NF protein and of several NF proteins of lower molecular weights. Their identification as NF proteins is based on their absence in the preimmune precipitates. Immunoprecipitates washed with more stringent buffers confirmed these results. Our data are at variance with a recent study based on the same experimental procedure that failed to visualize the local synthesis of NF proteins by the giant axon and thereby suggested their exclusive derivation from nerve cell bodies (as reported by Gainer et al. in Cell Mol Neurobiol 37:475-486, 2017). By reviewing the pertinent literature, we confute the claims that mRNA translation is absent in mature axons because of a putative translation block and that most proteins of mature axons are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. Given the intrinsic axonal capacity to synthesize proteins, we stress the glial derivation of axonal and presynaptic RNAs and the related proposal that these neuronal domains are endowed with largely independent gene expression systems (as reported by Giuditta et al. in Physiol Rev 88:515-555, 2008).

  4. Ascending Midbrain Dopaminergic Axons Require Descending GAD65 Axon Fascicles for Normal Pathfinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marcela Garcia-Peña

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Nigrostriatal pathway (NSP is formed by dopaminergic axons that project from the ventral midbrain to the dorsolateral striatum as part of the medial forebrain bundle. Previous studies have implicated chemotropic proteins in the formation of the NSP during development but little is known of the role of substrate-anchored signals in this process. We observed in mouse and rat embryos that midbrain dopaminergic axons ascend in close apposition to descending GAD65-positive axon bundles throughout their trajectory to the striatum. To test whether such interaction is important for dopaminergic axon pathfinding, we analyzed transgenic mouse embryos in which the GAD65 axon bundle was reduced by the conditional expression of the diphtheria toxin. In these embryos we observed dopaminergic misprojection into the hypothalamic region and abnormal projection in the striatum. In addition, analysis of Robo1/2 and Slit1/2 knockout embryos revealed that the previously described dopaminergic misprojection in these embryos is accompanied by severe alterations in the GAD65 axon scaffold. Additional studies with cultured dopaminergic neurons and whole embryos suggest that NCAM and Robo proteins are involved in the interaction of GAD65 and dopaminergic axons. These results indicate that the fasciculation between descending GAD65 axon bundles and ascending dopaminergic axons is required for the stereotypical NSP formation during brain development and that known guidance cues may determine this projection indirectly by instructing the pathfinding of the axons that are part of the GAD65 axon scaffold.

  5. Reduced axonal transport in Parkinson's disease cybrid neurites is restored by light therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Taboada Luis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been hypothesized that reduced axonal transport contributes to the degeneration of neuronal processes in Parkinson's disease (PD. Mitochondria supply the adenosine triphosphate (ATP needed to support axonal transport and contribute to many other cellular functions essential for the survival of neuronal cells. Furthermore, mitochondria in PD tissues are metabolically and functionally compromised. To address this hypothesis, we measured the velocity of mitochondrial movement in human transmitochondrial cybrid "cytoplasmic hybrid" neuronal cells bearing mitochondrial DNA from patients with sporadic PD and disease-free age-matched volunteer controls (CNT. The absorption of low level, near-infrared laser light by components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mtETC enhances mitochondrial metabolism, stimulates oxidative phosphorylation and improves redox capacity. PD and CNT cybrid neuronal cells were exposed to near-infrared laser light to determine if the velocity of mitochondrial movement can be restored by low level light therapy (LLLT. Axonal transport of labeled mitochondria was documented by time lapse microscopy in dopaminergic PD and CNT cybrid neuronal cells before and after illumination with an 810 nm diode laser (50 mW/cm2 for 40 seconds. Oxygen utilization and assembly of mtETC complexes were also determined. Results The velocity of mitochondrial movement in PD cybrid neuronal cells (0.175 +/- 0.005 SEM was significantly reduced (p Conclusion The results from this study support our proposal that axonal transport is reduced in sporadic PD and that a single, brief treatment with near-infrared light can restore axonal transport to control levels. These results are the first demonstration that LLLT can increase axonal transport in model human dopaminergic neuronal cells and they suggest that LLLT could be developed as a novel treatment to improve neuronal function in patients with PD.

  6. Non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions associated with steep temperature gradients in the solar transition region. Paper 2: The effect of non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions on ionization equilibrium calculations for carbon, nitrogen and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1979-01-01

    Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution functions, previously computed for Dupree's model of the solar transition region are used to calculate ionization rates for ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Ionization equilibrium populations for these ions are then computed and compared with similar calculations assuming Maxwellian distribution functions for the electrons. The results show that the ion populations change (compared to the values computed with a Maxwellian) in some cases by several orders of magnitude depending on the ion and its temperature of formation.

  7. The Genetics of Axon Guidance and Axon Regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Andrew D.; Hutter, Harald; Jin, Yishi; Wadsworth, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The correct wiring of neuronal circuits depends on outgrowth and guidance of neuronal processes during development. In the past two decades, great progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of axon outgrowth and guidance. Genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans has played a key role in elucidating conserved pathways regulating axon guidance, including Netrin signaling, the slit Slit/Robo pathway, Wnt signaling, and others. Axon guidance factors were first identified by screens for mutations affecting animal behavior, and by direct visual screens for axon guidance defects. Genetic analysis of these pathways has revealed the complex and combinatorial nature of guidance cues, and has delineated how cues guide growth cones via receptor activity and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Several axon guidance pathways also affect directed migrations of non-neuronal cells in C. elegans, with implications for normal and pathological cell migrations in situations such as tumor metastasis. The small number of neurons and highly stereotyped axonal architecture of the C. elegans nervous system allow analysis of axon guidance at the level of single identified axons, and permit in vivo tests of prevailing models of axon guidance. C. elegans axons also have a robust capacity to undergo regenerative regrowth after precise laser injury (axotomy). Although such axon regrowth shares some similarities with developmental axon outgrowth, screens for regrowth mutants have revealed regeneration-specific pathways and factors that were not identified in developmental screens. Several areas remain poorly understood, including how major axon tracts are formed in the embryo, and the function of axon regeneration in the natural environment. PMID:28114100

  8. Meninges-derived cues control axon guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Tracey A C S; DeLoughery, Zachary J; Jaworski, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    The axons of developing neurons travel long distances along stereotyped pathways under the direction of extracellular cues sensed by the axonal growth cone. Guidance cues are either secreted proteins that diffuse freely or bind the extracellular matrix, or membrane-anchored proteins. Different populations of axons express distinct sets of receptors for guidance cues, which results in differential responses to specific ligands. The full repertoire of axon guidance cues and receptors and the identity of the tissues producing these cues remain to be elucidated. The meninges are connective tissue layers enveloping the vertebrate brain and spinal cord that serve to protect the central nervous system (CNS). The meninges also instruct nervous system development by regulating the generation and migration of neural progenitors, but it has not been determined whether they help guide axons to their targets. Here, we investigate a possible role for the meninges in neuronal wiring. Using mouse neural tissue explants, we show that developing spinal cord meninges produce secreted attractive and repulsive cues that can guide multiple types of axons in vitro. We find that motor and sensory neurons, which project axons across the CNS-peripheral nervous system (PNS) boundary, are attracted by meninges. Conversely, axons of both ipsi- and contralaterally projecting dorsal spinal cord interneurons are repelled by meninges. The responses of these axonal populations to the meninges are consistent with their trajectories relative to meninges in vivo, suggesting that meningeal guidance factors contribute to nervous system wiring and control which axons are able to traverse the CNS-PNS boundary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Hot Spots Ignition Probability Model for Low-Velocity Impacted Explosive Particles Based on the Particle Size and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-fu Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle size and distribution play an important role in ignition. The size and distribution of the cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX particles were investigated by Laser Particle Size Analyzer Malvern MS2000 before experiment and calculation. The mean size of particles is 161 μm. Minimum and maximum sizes are 80 μm and 263 μm, respectively. The distribution function is like a quadratic function. Based on the distribution of micron scale explosive particles, a microscopic model is established to describe the process of ignition of HMX particles under drop weight. Both temperature of contact zones and ignition probability of powder explosive can be predicted. The calculated results show that the temperature of the contact zones between the particles and the drop weight surface increases faster and higher than that of the contact zones between two neighboring particles. For HMX particles, with all other conditions being kept constant, if the drop height is less than 0.1 m, ignition probability will be close to 0. When the drop heights are 0.2 m and 0.3 m, the ignition probability is 0.27 and 0.64, respectively, whereas when the drop height is more than 0.4 m, ignition probability will be close to 0.82. In comparison with experimental results, the two curves are reasonably close to each other, which indicates our model has a certain degree of rationality.

  10. Building America Case Study: Standard- Versus High-Velocity Air Distribution in High-Performance Townhomes, Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-06-09

    IBACOS investigated the performance of a small-diameter high velocity heat pump system compared to a conventional system in a new construction triplex townhouse. A ductless heat pump system also was installed for comparison, but the homebuyer backed out because of aesthetic concerns about that system. In total, two buildings, having identical solar orientation and comprised of six townhomes, were monitored for comfort and energy performance. Results show that the small-diameter system provides more uniform temperatures from floor to floor in the three-story townhome. No clear energy consumption benefit was observed from either system. The builder is continuing to explore the small-diameter system as its new standard system to provide better comfort and indoor air quality. The homebuilder also explored the possibility of shifting its townhome product to meet the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home National Program Requirements. Ultimately, the builder decided that adoption of these practices would be too disruptive midstream in the construction cycle. However, the townhomes met the ENERGY STAR Version 3.0 program requirements.

  11. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzit, Omar, E-mail: omar.bouzit@yahoo.fr; Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, U.S.T.H.B, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Bains, A. S., E-mail: bainsphysics@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N5E2 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  12. Developmental downregulation of LIS1 expression limits axonal extension and allows axon pruning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Kumamoto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The robust axonal growth and regenerative capacities of young neurons decrease substantially with age. This developmental downregulation of axonal growth may facilitate axonal pruning and neural circuit formation but limits functional recovery following nerve damage. While external factors influencing axonal growth have been extensively investigated, relatively little is known about the intrinsic molecular changes underlying the age-dependent reduction in regeneration capacity. We report that developmental downregulation of LIS1 is responsible for the decreased axonal extension capacity of mature dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. In contrast, exogenous LIS1 expression or endogenous LIS1 augmentation by calpain inhibition restored axonal extension capacity in mature DRG neurons and facilitated regeneration of the damaged sciatic nerve. The insulator protein CTCF suppressed LIS1 expression in mature DRG neurons, and this reduction resulted in excessive accumulation of phosphoactivated GSK-3β at the axon tip, causing failure of the axonal extension. Conversely, sustained LIS1 expression inhibited developmental axon pruning in the mammillary body. Thus, LIS1 regulation may coordinate the balance between axonal growth and pruning during maturation of neuronal circuits.

  13. Dynamics of target recognition by interstitial axon branching along developing cortical axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastmeyer, M; O'Leary, D D

    1996-02-15

    Corticospinal axons innervate their midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal targets by extending collateral branches interstitially along their length. To establish that the axon shaft rather than the axonal growth cone is responsible for target recognition in this system, and to characterize the dynamics of interstitial branch formation, we have studied this process in an in vivo-like setting using slice cultures from neonatal mice containing the entire pathway of corticospinal axons. Corticospinal axons labeled with the dye 1,1'-dioctodecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (or Dil) were imaged using time-lapse video microscopy of their pathway overlying the basilar pons, their major hindbrain target. The axon shaft millimeters behind the growth cone exhibits several dynamic behaviors, including the de novo formation of varicosities and filopodia-like extensions, and a behavior that we term "pulsation," which is characterized by a variable thickening and thining of short segments of the axon. An individual axon can have multiple sites of branching activity, with many of the branches being transient. These dynamic behaviors occur along the portion of the axon shaft overlying the basilar pons, but not just caudal to it. Once the collaterals extend into the pontine neuropil, they branch further in the neuropil, while the parent axon becomes quiescent. Thus, the branching activity is spatially restricted to specific portions of the axon, as well as temporally restricted to a relatively brief time window. These findings provide definitive evidence that collateral branches form de novo along corticospinal axons and establish that the process of target recognition in this system is a property of the axon shaft rather than the leading growth cone.

  14. Determination of concentration distribution and velocity of a catalyst in a model of a fluidized bed reactor using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, V.A. dos.

    1981-09-01

    A simplified model of a cracking unit was construct. The gaseous phase consisted of air, the solid phase (zeolite catalyst cracking) and both the phases circulate at the ambiente temperature in the steady state with 500 g of catalyst and air flow of 1600 1/h. Measurements for the circulation time of the solid phase (catalyst), concentration and radial distribution of catalyst have been carried out. The reduced experimental model of the cracking reactor (FCC) was used and radioctive tracer and attenuation of γ-radiation techniques were employed. (E.G.) [pt

  15. Profuse and Selective Growth in vitro of Rat Spinal Axons on a Micro-Patterned Poly (ethylene imine) Grid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mouveroux, J

    2001-01-01

    To distribute neurites (axons) along a surface and to guide them towards specific point targets we cultured spinal cord explants on coverslips printed with a micro-patterned grid of poly (ethylene imine) (PEI) lanes...

  16. Effect of Magnetic Flux Density and Applied Current on Temperature, Velocity and Entropy Generation Distributions in MHD Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kiyasatfar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, simulation of steady state, incompressible and fully developed laminar flow has been conducted in a magneto hydrodynamic (MHD pump. The governing equations are solved numerically by finite-difference method. The effect of the magnetic flux density and current on the flow and temperature distributions in a MHD pump is investigated. The obtained results showed that controlling the flow and the temperature is possible through the controlling of the applied current and the magnetic flux. Furthermore, the effects of the magnetic flux density and current on entropy generation in MHD pump are considered. Our presented numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data showed in literature.

  17. Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions in Solar Flares from Extreme Ultraviolet Lines: A Possible Diagnostic of Ion Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Labrosse, Nicolas [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-10

    In a solar flare, a large fraction of the magnetic energy released is converted rapidly to the kinetic energy of non-thermal particles and bulk plasma motion. This will likely result in non-equilibrium particle distributions and turbulent plasma conditions. We investigate this by analyzing the profiles of high temperature extreme ultraviolet emission lines from a major flare (SOL2014-03-29T17:44) observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode . We find that in many locations the line profiles are non-Gaussian, consistent with a kappa distribution of emitting ions with properties that vary in space and time. At the flare footpoints, close to sites of hard X-ray emission from non-thermal electrons, the κ index for the Fe xvi 262.976 Å line at 3 MK takes values of 3–5. In the corona, close to a low-energy HXR source, the Fe xxiii 263.760 Å line at 15 MK shows κ values of typically 4–7. The observed trends in the κ parameter show that we are most likely detecting the properties of the ion population rather than any instrumental effects. We calculate that a non-thermal ion population could exist if locally accelerated on timescales ≤0.1 s. However, observations of net redshifts in the lines also imply the presence of plasma downflows, which could lead to bulk turbulence, with increased non-Gaussianity in cooler regions. Both interpretations have important implications for theories of solar flare particle acceleration.

  18. Abdominal aorta: characterisation of blood flow and measurement of its regional distribution by cine magnetic resonance phase-shift velocity mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amanuma, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Saitama Medical School (Japan); Mohiaddin, R.H. [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hasegawa, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Saitama Medical School (Japan); Heshiki, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Saitama Medical School (Japan); Longmore, D.B. [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1992-12-01

    Magnetic resonance phase-shift-induced velocity mapping is a powerful technique for measuring in vivo blood velocity and flow non-invasively. Using this method we examined dimensions, distensibility, blood flow and its regional distribution in the abdominal aorta in 10 normal volunteers. Data were acquired at three levels of the descending aorta. Thirty percent reduction in diastolic cross sectional area was observed in the caudal direction between these levels. Total blood flow (ml/min) in the abdominal aorta at the three sites was 4094{+-}1600, 2339{+-}910 and 1602{+-}549 respectively. Flows in the coeliac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and renal arteries were also calculated. The net flow in the abdominal aorta above the coeliac trunk was persistently forward, while there was considerable backflow (13% of total instantaneous flow) below the renal arteries during early diastole. Magnetic resonance imaging is a non-invasive technique for quantitative assessment of blood flow in the abdominal aorta and its main branches. (orig.)

  19. Effect of a Nonplanar Melt-Solid Interface on Lateral Compositional Distribution during Unidirectional Solidification of a Binary Alloy with a Constant Growth Velocity V. Part 1; Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jai-Ching; Watring, Dale A.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Su, Ching-Hua; Gillies, Don; Szofran, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Infrared detector materials, such as Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, Hg(1-x)Zn(x)Te have energy gaps almost linearly proportional to its composition. Due to the wide separation of liquidus and solidus curves of their phase diagram, there are compositional segregations in both of axial and radial directions of these crystals grown in the Bridgman system unidirectionally with constant growth rate. It is important to understand the mechanisms which affect lateral segregation such that large uniform radial composition crystal is possible. Following Coriell, etc's treatment, we have developed a theory to study the effect of a curved melt-solid interface shape on the lateral composition distribution. The system is considered to be cylindrical system with azimuthal symmetric with a curved melt-solid interface shape which can be expressed as a linear combination of a series of Bessell's functions. The results show that melt-solid interface shape has a dominate effect on lateral composition distribution of these systems. For small values of b, the solute concentration at the melt-solid interface scales linearly with interface shape with a proportional constant of the product of b and (1 - k), where b = VR/D, with V as growth velocity, R as sample radius, D as diffusion constant and k as distribution constant. A detailed theory will be presented. A computer code has been developed and simulations have been performed and compared with experimental results. These will be published in another paper.

  20. Effect of a Nonplanar Melt-Solid Interface On Lateral Compositional Distribution During Unidirectional Solidification of a Binary Alloy with a Constant Growth Velocity V. Pt. 1; Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jai-Ching; Watring, D.; Lehoczky. S. L.; Su, C. H.; Gillies, D.; Szofran, F.; Sha, Y. G.; Sha, Y. G.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared detected materials, such as Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, Hg(1-x)Zn(x)Te have energy gaps almost linearly proportional to their composition. Due to the wide separation of liquidus and solidus curves of their phase diagram, there are compositional segregation in both of the axial and radial directions of these crystals grown in the Bridgman system unidirectionally with constant growth rate. It is important to understand the mechanisms, which affect lateral segregation such that large radially uniform composition crystal can be produced. Following Coriel, etc's treatment, we have developed a theory to study the effect of a curved melt-solid interface shape on lateral composition distribution. The model is considered to be a cylindrical system with azimuthal symmetry and a curved melt-solid interface shape which can be expressed as a linear combination of a series of Bessell's functions. The results show that melt-solid interface shape has a dominant effect on the lateral composition distribution of these systems. For small values of beta, the solute concentration at the melt-solid interface scales linearly with interface shape with a proportional constant of the produce of beta and (1 -k), where beta = VR/D, with V as growth velocity, R as the sample radius, D as the diffusion constant and k as the distribution constant. A detailed theory will be presented. A computer code has been developed and simulations have been performed and compared with experimental results. These will be published in another paper.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: giant axonal neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connect the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to muscles and to sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound. However, axons in the central nervous system are affected as well. The signs and symptoms ...

  2. Drug therapy for chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrancken, A. F. J. E.; van Schaik, I. N.; Hughes, R. A. C.; Notermans, N. C.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathy is an insidiously progressive sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy that affects elderly people. Although severe disability or handicap does not occur, it reduces quality of life. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether drug therapy for chronic idiopathic

  3. A Simple Method for 3D Analysis of Immunolabeled Axonal Tracts in a Transparent Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Belle

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clearing techniques have been developed to transparentize mouse brains, thereby preserving 3D structure, but their complexity has limited their use. Here, we show that immunolabeling of axonal tracts followed by optical clearing with solvents (3DISCO and light-sheet microscopy reveals brain connectivity in mouse embryos and postnatal brains. We show that the Robo3 receptor is selectively expressed by medial habenula axons forming the fasciculus retroflexus (FR and analyzed the development of this commissural tract in mutants of the Slit/Robo and DCC/Netrin pathways. Netrin-1 and DCC are required to attract FR axons to the midline, but the two mutants exhibit specific and heterogeneous axon guidance defects. Moreover, floor-plate-specific deletion of Slit ligands with a conditional Slit2 allele perturbs not only midline crossing by FR axons but also their anteroposterior distribution. In conclusion, this method represents a unique and powerful imaging tool to study axonal connectivity in mutant mice.

  4. Essential role of axonal VGSC inactivation in time-dependent deceleration and unreliability of spike propagation at cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The output of the neuronal digital spikes is fulfilled by axonal propagation and synaptic transmission to influence postsynaptic cells. Similar to synaptic transmission, spike propagation on the axon is not secure, especially in cerebellar Purkinje cells whose spiking rate is high. The characteristics, mechanisms and physiological impacts of propagation deceleration and infidelity remain elusive. The spike propagation is presumably initiated by local currents that raise membrane potential to the threshold of activating voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). Results We have investigated the natures of spike propagation and the role of VGSCs in this process by recording spikes simultaneously on the somata and axonal terminals of Purkinje cells in cerebellar slices. The velocity and fidelity of spike propagation decreased during long-lasting spikes, to which the velocity change was more sensitive than fidelity change. These time-dependent deceleration and infidelity of spike propagation were improved by facilitating axonal VGSC reactivation, and worsen by intensifying VGSC inactivation. Conclusion Our studies indicate that the functional status of axonal VGSCs is essential to influencing the velocity and fidelity of spike propagation. PMID:24382121

  5. 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves in a biotite gneiss, measured in oil as the pressure medium: Comparison with velocity measurements in a multi-anvil pressure apparatus and with texture-based calculated data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lokajíček, Tomáš; Kern, H.; Svitek, Tomáš; Ivankina, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 231, June (2014), s. 1-15 ISSN 0031-9201 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13102; GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/12/0915; GA ČR GA13-13967S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : 3D-velocity calculation * measured and calculated elastic properties * neutron diffraction * seismic anisotropy * velocity measurements Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.895, year: 2014

  6. EFA6 regulates selective polarised transport and axon regeneration from the axon initial segment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eva, R.; Koseki, H.; Kanamarlapudi, V.; Fawcett, James

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 21 (2017), s. 3663-3675 ISSN 0021-9533 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : axon regeneration * axon transport * neuronal polarisation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 4.431, year: 2016

  7. Axon initial segment Kv1 channels control axonal action potential waveform and synaptic efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, Maarten H. P.; Letzkus, Johannes J.; Stuart, Greg J.

    2007-01-01

    Action potentials are binary signals that transmit information via their rate and temporal pattern. In this context, the axon is thought of as a transmission line, devoid of a role in neuronal computation. Here, we show a highly localized role of axonal Kv1 potassium channels in shaping the action

  8. Axonal cleaved caspase-3 regulates axon targeting and morphogenesis in the developing auditory brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Rotschafer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Caspase-3 is a cysteine protease that is most commonly associated with cell death. Recent studies have shown additional roles in mediating cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and development of cell morphology. We investigated the role of caspase-3 in the development of chick auditory brainstem nuclei during embryogenesis. Immunofluorescence from embryonic days E6-13 revealed that the temporal expression of cleaved caspase-3 follows the ascending anatomical pathway. Expression is first seen in the auditory portion of VIIIth nerve including central axonal regions projecting to nucleus magnocellularis (NM, then later in NM axons projecting to nucleus laminaris (NL, and subsequently in NL dendrites. To examine the function of cleaved caspase-3 in chick auditory brainstem development, we blocked caspase-3 cleavage in developing chick embryos with the caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK from E6 to E9, then examined NM and NL morphology and NM axonal targeting on E10. NL lamination in treated embryos was disorganized and the neuropil around NL contained a significant number of glial cells normally excluded from this region. Additionally, NM axons projected into inappropriate portions of NL in Z-DEVD-FMK treated embyros. We found that the presence of misrouted axons was associated with more severe NL disorganization. The effects of axonal caspase-3 inhibition on both NL morphogenesis and NM axon targeting suggest that these developmental processes are coordinated, likely through communication between axons and their targets.

  9. Axon and dendrite geography predict the specificity of synaptic connections in a functioning spinal cord network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisyuk Roman

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How specific are the synaptic connections formed as neuronal networks develop and can simple rules account for the formation of functioning circuits? These questions are assessed in the spinal circuits controlling swimming in hatchling frog tadpoles. This is possible because detailed information is now available on the identity and synaptic connections of the main types of neuron. Results The probabilities of synapses between 7 types of identified spinal neuron were measured directly by making electrical recordings from 500 pairs of neurons. For the same neuron types, the dorso-ventral distributions of axons and dendrites were measured and then used to calculate the probabilities that axons would encounter particular dendrites and so potentially form synaptic connections. Surprisingly, synapses were found between all types of neuron but contact probabilities could be predicted simply by the anatomical overlap of their axons and dendrites. These results suggested that synapse formation may not require axons to recognise specific, correct dendrites. To test the plausibility of simpler hypotheses, we first made computational models that were able to generate longitudinal axon growth paths and reproduce the axon distribution patterns and synaptic contact probabilities found in the spinal cord. To test if probabilistic rules could produce functioning spinal networks, we then made realistic computational models of spinal cord neurons, giving them established cell-specific properties and connecting them into networks using the contact probabilities we had determined. A majority of these networks produced robust swimming activity. Conclusion Simple factors such as morphogen gradients controlling dorso-ventral soma, dendrite and axon positions may sufficiently constrain the synaptic connections made between different types of neuron as the spinal cord first develops and allow functional networks to form. Our analysis implies that

  10. ON Cone Bipolar Cell Axonal Synapses in the OFF Inner Plexiform Layer of the Rabbit Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, J. Scott; Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Mohammed, Shoeb; Hoang, John V.; Marc, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the rabbit retinal connectome RC1 reveals that the division between the ON and OFF inner plexiform layer (IPL) is not structurally absolute. ON cone bipolar cells make non-canonical axonal synapses onto specific targets and receive amacrine cell synapses in the nominal OFF layer, creating novel motifs, including inhibitory crossover networks. Automated transmission electron microscope (ATEM) imaging, molecular tagging, tracing, and rendering of ≈ 400 bipolar cells reveals axonal ribbons in 36% of ON cone bipolar cells, throughout the OFF IPL. The targets include GABA-positive amacrine cells (γACs), glycine-positive amacrine cells (GACs) and ganglion cells. Most ON cone bipolar cell axonal contacts target GACs driven by OFF cone bipolar cells, forming new architectures for generating ON-OFF amacrine cells. Many of these ON-OFF GACs target ON cone bipolar cell axons, ON γACs and/or ON-OFF ganglion cells, representing widespread mechanisms for OFF to ON crossover inhibition. Other targets include OFF γACs presynaptic to OFF bipolar cells, forming γAC-mediated crossover motifs. ON cone bipolar cell axonal ribbons drive bistratified ON-OFF ganglion cells in the OFF layer and provide ON drive to polarity-appropriate targets such as bistratified diving ganglion cells (bsdGCs). The targeting precision of ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses shows that this drive incidence is necessarily a joint distribution of cone bipolar cell axonal frequency and target cell trajectories through a given volume of the OFF layer. Such joint distribution sampling is likely common when targets are sparser than sources and when sources are coupled, as are ON cone bipolar cells. PMID:23042441

  11. Ndel1-derived peptides modulate bidirectional transport of injected beads in the squid giant axon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Segal

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectional transport is a key issue in cellular biology. It requires coordination between microtubule-associated molecular motors that work in opposing directions. The major retrograde and anterograde motors involved in bidirectional transport are cytoplasmic dynein and conventional kinesin, respectively. It is clear that failures in molecular motor activity bear severe consequences, especially in the nervous system. Neuronal migration may be impaired during brain development, and impaired molecular motor activity in the adult is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases leading to neuronal cell death. The mechanisms that regulate or coordinate kinesin and dynein activity to generate bidirectional transport of the same cargo are of utmost importance. We examined how Ndel1, a cytoplasmic dynein binding protein, may regulate non-vesicular bidirectional transport. Soluble Ndel1 protein, Ndel1-derived peptides or control proteins were mixed with fluorescent beads, injected into the squid giant axon, and the bead movements were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Automated tracking allowed for extraction and unbiased analysis of a large data set. Beads moved in both directions with a clear bias to the anterograde direction. Velocities were distributed over a broad range and were typically slower than those associated with fast vesicle transport. Ironically, the main effect of Ndel1 and its derived peptides was an enhancement of anterograde motion. We propose that they may function primarily by inhibition of dynein-dependent resistance, which suggests that both dynein and kinesin motors may remain engaged with microtubules during bidirectional transport.

  12. Increased mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons: implications for multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambonin, Jessica L.; Zhao, Chao; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Campbell, Graham R.; Engeham, Sarah; Ziabreva, Iryna; Schwarz, Nadine; Lee, Sok Ee; Frischer, Josa M.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Trapp, Bruce D.; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial content within axons increases following demyelination in the central nervous system, presumably as a response to the changes in energy needs of axons imposed by redistribution of sodium channels. Myelin sheaths can be restored in demyelinated axons and remyelination in some multiple sclerosis lesions is extensive, while in others it is incomplete or absent. The effects of remyelination on axonal mitochondrial content in multiple sclerosis, particularly whether remyelination completely reverses the mitochondrial changes that follow demyelination, are currently unknown. In this study, we analysed axonal mitochondria within demyelinated, remyelinated and myelinated axons in post-mortem tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis and controls, as well as in experimental models of demyelination and remyelination, in vivo and in vitro. Immunofluorescent labelling of mitochondria (porin, a voltage-dependent anion channel expressed on all mitochondria) and axons (neurofilament), and ultrastructural imaging showed that in both multiple sclerosis and experimental demyelination, mitochondrial content within remyelinated axons was significantly less than in acutely and chronically demyelinated axons but more numerous than in myelinated axons. The greater mitochondrial content within remyelinated, compared with myelinated, axons was due to an increase in density of porin elements whereas increase in size accounted for the change observed in demyelinated axons. The increase in mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons was associated with an increase in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity. In vitro studies showed a significant increase in the number of stationary mitochondria in remyelinated compared with myelinated and demyelinated axons. The number of mobile mitochondria in remyelinated axons did not significantly differ from myelinated axons, although significantly greater than in demyelinated axons. Our neuropathological data and findings in

  13. Guidance of retinal axons in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Eloísa; Erskine, Lynda; Morenilla-Palao, Cruz

    2017-11-26

    In order to navigate through the surrounding environment many mammals, including humans, primarily rely on vision. The eye, composed of the choroid, sclera, retinal pigmented epithelium, cornea, lens, iris and retina, is the structure that receives the light and converts it into electrical impulses. The retina contains six major types of neurons involving in receiving and modifying visual information and passing it onto higher visual processing centres in the brain. Visual information is relayed to the brain via the axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a projection known as the optic pathway. The proper formation of this pathway during development is essential for normal vision in the adult individual. Along this pathway there are several points where visual axons face 'choices' in their direction of growth. Understanding how these choices are made has advanced significantly our knowledge of axon guidance mechanisms. Thus, the development of the visual pathway has served as an extremely useful model to reveal general principles of axon pathfinding throughout the nervous system. However, due to its particularities, some cellular and molecular mechanisms are specific for the visual circuit. Here we review both general and specific mechanisms involved in the guidance of mammalian RGC axons when they are traveling from the retina to the brain to establish precise and stereotyped connections that will sustain vision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Orbital velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Modestino, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    The trajectory and the orbital velocity are determined for an object moving in a gravitational system, in terms of fundamental and independent variables. In particular, considering a path on equipotential line, the elliptical orbit is naturally traced, verifying evidently the keplerian laws. The case of the planets of the solar system is presented.

  15. Dendritic Branch Intersections Are Structurally Regulated Targets for Efficient Axonal Wiring and Synaptic Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchas, Monika; Baranes, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic clustering on dendritic branches enhances plasticity, input integration and neuronal firing. However, the mechanisms guiding axons to cluster synapses at appropriate sites along dendritic branches are poorly understood. We searched for such a mechanism by investigating the structural overlap between dendritic branches and axons in a simplified model of neuronal networks - the hippocampal cell culture. Using newly developed software, we converted images of meshes of overlapping axonal and dendrites into topological maps of intersections, enabling quantitative study of overlapping neuritic geometry at the resolution of single dendritic branch-to-branch and axon-to-branch crossings. Among dendro-dendritic crossing configurations, it was revealed that the orientations through which dendritic branches cross is a regulated attribute. While crossing angle distribution among branches thinner than 1 µm appeared to be random, dendritic branches 1 µm or wider showed a preference for crossing each other at angle ranges of either 50°–70° or 80°–90°. It was then found that the dendro-dendritic crossings themselves, as well as their selective angles, both affected the path of axonal growth. Axons displayed 4 fold stronger tendency to traverse within 2 µm of dendro-dendritic intersections than at farther distances, probably to minimize wiring length. Moreover, almost 70% of the 50°–70° dendro-denritic crossings were traversed by axons from the obtuse angle’s zone, whereas only 15% traversed through the acute angle’s zone. By contrast, axons showed no orientation restriction when traversing 80°–90° crossings. When such traverse behavior was repeated by many axons, they converged in the vicinity of dendro-dendritic intersections, thereby clustering their synaptic connections. Thus, the vicinity of dendritic branch-to-branch crossings appears to be a regulated structure used by axons as a target for efficient wiring and as a preferred site for synaptic

  16. Distribution and inventories of fallout radionuclides (239+24Pu, 137Cs) and 21Pb to study the filling velocity of salt marshes in Donana National Park (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Anton, M.P.; Pozuelo, M.; Clemente, L.; Rodriguez, A.; Yanez, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Meral, J.

    2006-01-01

    Within an extensive multinational and multidisciplinary project carried out in Donana National Park (Spain) to investigate its preservation and regeneration, the filling velocity of the salt marshes has been evaluated through the calculation of their average sediment accumulation rates. 239+24 Pu and 137 Cs from weapons testing fallout and total 21 Pb distribution profiles and inventories have been determined in some of the most characteristic zones of the park, namely, the ponds (or 'lucios') and the waterjets (or 'canos'). Plutonium inventories range from 16 to 101 Bq m -2 , 137 Cs values fluctuate between 514 and 3758 Bq m -2 and unsupported 21 Pb values comprise between 124 and 9398 Bq m -2 . Average sedimentation rates range from 3 to 5 mm y -1 (1952-2002). These data are higher than those obtained by carbon dating for the period 6500 AD-present, estimated as 1.5-2 mm y -1 , suggesting an increase in the accumulation of sediments and the alteration of the park's hydrodynamics caused by the re-channeling of the major rivers feeding the salt marshes

  17. Sedimentation velocity analysis of heterogeneous protein-protein interactions: sedimentation coefficient distributions c(s) and asymptotic boundary profiles from Gilbert-Jenkins theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Julie; Schuck, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Interacting proteins in rapid association equilibrium exhibit coupled migration under the influence of an external force. In sedimentation, two-component systems can exhibit bimodal boundaries, consisting of the undisturbed sedimentation of a fraction of the population of one component, and the coupled sedimentation of a mixture of both free and complex species in the reaction boundary. For the theoretical limit of diffusion-free sedimentation after infinite time, the shapes of the reaction boundaries and the sedimentation velocity gradients have been predicted by Gilbert and Jenkins. We compare these asymptotic gradients with sedimentation coefficient distributions, c(s), extracted from experimental sedimentation profiles by direct modeling with superpositions of Lamm equation solutions. The overall shapes are qualitatively consistent and the amplitudes and weight-average s-values of the different boundary components are quantitatively in good agreement. We propose that the concentration dependence of the area and weight-average s-value of the c(s) peaks can be modeled by isotherms based on Gilbert-Jenkins theory, providing a robust approach to exploit the bimodal structure of the reaction boundary for the analysis of experimental data. This can significantly improve the estimates for the determination of binding constants and hydrodynamic parameters of the complexes.

  18. Quantitative Relationship between Axonal Injury and Mechanical Response in a Rodent Head Impact Acceleration Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A modified Marmarou impact acceleration model was developed to study the mechanical responses induced by this model and their correlation to traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was induced in 31 anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 g) by a custom-made 450-g impactor from heights of 1.25 m or 2.25 m. An accelerometer and angular rate sensor measured the linear and angular responses of the head, while the impact event was captured by a high-speed video camera. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction, as well as across the left and right hemispheres, was determined using β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry, and detailed TAI injury maps were constructed for the entire corpus callosum. Peak linear acceleration 1.25 m and 2.25 m impacts were 666±165 g and 907±501 g, respectively. Peak angular velocities were 95±24 rad/sec and 124±48 rad/sec, respectively. Compared to the 2.25-m group, the observed TAI counts in the 1.25-m impact group were significantly lower. Average linear acceleration, peak angular velocity, average angular acceleration, and surface righting time were also significantly different between the two groups. A positive correlation was observed between normalized total TAI counts and average linear acceleration (R2=0.612, pacceleration response of the rat head during impact, not necessarily the drop height. PMID:21895482

  19. Cortical axons, isolated in channels, display activity-dependent signal modulation as a result of targeted stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta K. Lewandowska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian cortical axons are extremely thin processes that are difficult to study as a result of their small diameter: they are too narrow to patch while intact, and super-resolution microscopy is needed to resolve single axons. We present a method for studying axonal physiology by pairing a high-density microelectrode array with a microfluidic axonal isolation device, and use it to study activity-dependent modulation of axonal signal propagation evoked by stimulation near the soma. Up to three axonal branches from a single neuron, isolated in different channels, were recorded from simultaneously using 10-20 electrodes per channel. The axonal channels amplified spikes such that propagations of individual signals along tens of electrodes could easily be discerned with high signal to noise. Stimulation from 10 Hz up to 160 Hz demonstrated similar qualitative results from all of the cells studied: extracellular action potential characteristics changed drastically in response to stimulation. Spike height decreased, spike width increased, and latency increased, as a result of reduced propagation velocity, as the number of stimulations and the stimulation frequencies increased. Quantitatively, the strength of these changes manifested itself differently in cells at different frequencies of stimulation. Some cells’ signal fidelity fell to 80% already at 10 Hz, while others maintained 80% signal fidelity at 80 Hz. Differences in modulation by axonal branches of the same cell were also seen for many different stimulation frequencies, starting at 10 Hz. Potassium ion concentration changes altered the behavior of the cells causing propagation failures at lower concentrations and improving signal fidelity at higher concentrations.

  20. Analysis of in situ water velocity distributions in the lowland river floodplain covered by grassland and reed marsh habitats - a case study of the bypass channel of Warta River (Western Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laks Ireneusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of in situ measurements of velocity distribution in the floodplain of the lowland river has been carried out. The survey area was located on a bypass channel of the Warta River (West of Poland which is filled with water only in case of flood waves. The floodplain is covered by grassland and reed marsh habitats. The velocity measurements were performed with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP in a cross-section with a bed reinforced with concrete slabs. The measured velocities have reflected the differentiated impact of various vegetation types on the loss of water flow energy. The statistical analyses have proven a relationship between the local velocities and the type of plant communities.

  1. BayesMT: Bayesian inference for the seismic moment tensor using regional and teleseismic-P waveforms with first-motion data and a calibrated prior distribution of velocity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, S. R.; Chiang, A.; Kim, S.; Letort, J.; Tkalcic, H.; Walter, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    The largest source of uncertainty in any source inversion is the velocity model used to construct the transfer function employed in the forward model that relates observed ground motion to the seismic moment tensor. We attempt to incorporate this uncertainty into an estimation of the seismic moment tensor using a posterior distribution of velocity models based on different and complementary data sets, including thickness constraints, velocity profiles, gravity data, surface wave group velocities, and regional body wave traveltimes. The posterior distribution of velocity models is then used to construct a prior distribution of Green's functions for use in Bayesian inference of an unknown seismic moment tensor using regional and teleseismic-P waveforms with first-motion data. The use of multiple data sets is important for gaining resolution to different components of the moment tensor. The combined likelihood is estimated using data-specific error models and the posterior of the seismic moment tensor is estimated and interpreted in terms of most-probable source-type. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-676976.

  2. The nigrostriatal pathway in the rat: A single-axon study of the relationship between dorsal and ventral tier nigral neurons and the striosome/matrix striatal compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensa, L; Parent, A

    2001-09-15

    Axons from dorsal/ventral tiers of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), ventral tegmental area (VTA), and retrorubral field (RRF) were traced after injecting their cell body with biotinylated dextran amine. Fifty-three single axons were reconstructed from serial sagittal sections with a camera lucida, and mu-opiate receptor immunostaining served to differentiate the striosome/matrix striatal compartments. Most dorsal tier SNc axons terminate within the matrix of the dorsal striatum, but their patterns of arborization vary markedly; some axons innervate one specific matriceal area, whereas others arborize in multiple discontinuous loci. Some dorsal tier SNc axons also project to both striosomes and matrix. Other dorsal tier SNc axons, as well as VTA axons, innervate the ventral striatum and send collaterals to striosomes lying ventrally in the dorsal striatum or to the ventral sector of the subcallosal streak (SS). Ventral tier SNc axons arborize principally in striosomes, but some ramify in both compartments or in striosomes and the SS. Ventral tier neurons that form deep clusters in substantia nigra pars reticulata innervate principally the matrix and the SS. The amygdala and ventral pallidum receive secondary collaterals from striatal axons of dorsal/ventral tier neurons or RRF neurons. The subthalamic nucleus receives collaterals from striatal axons of SNc clustered neurons, whereas the globus pallidus gets collaterals from striatal axons of dorsal/ventral tier SNc neurons. These findings reveal that the nigrostriatal pathway is composed of several neuronal subsystems, each endowed with a widely distributed axonal arborization that allows them to exert a multifaceted influence on striatal and/or extrastriatal structures.

  3. The effect of myelinating Schwann cells on axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, R

    2001-04-01

    Myelinating Schwann cells control the number of neurofilaments and elevate the phosphorylation state of neurofilaments in the axon, eventually leading to the typical large axon caliber. Conversely, absence of myelin leads to lower amounts of neurofilaments, reduced phosphorylation levels, and smaller axon diameters. In addition, myelinating Schwann cells mediate the spacing of Na(+) channel clusters during development of the node of Ranvier. When axons are associated with mutant Schwann cells in inherited neuropathies, their calibers are reduced and their neurofilaments are less phosphorylated and more closely spaced. Also, axonal transport is reduced and axons degenerate at the distal ends of long nerves. Myelin-associated glycoprotein may mediate some aspects of Schwann cell-axon communication, but much remains to be learned about the molecular bases of Schwann cell-axon communication. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Modeling molecular mechanisms in the axon

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, R.; Miller, K.E.; Kuhl, E.

    2016-01-01

    Axons are living systems that display highly dynamic changes in stiffness, viscosity, and internal stress. However, the mechanistic origin of these phenomenological properties remains elusive. Here we establish a computational mechanics model that interprets cellular-level characteristics as emergent properties from molecular-level events. We create an axon model of discrete microtubules, which are connected to neighboring microtubules via discrete crosslinking mechanisms that obey a set of simple rules. We explore two types of mechanisms: passive and active crosslinking. Our passive and active simulations suggest that the stiffness and viscosity of the axon increase linearly with the crosslink density, and that both are highly sensitive to the crosslink detachment and reattachment times. Our model explains how active crosslinking with dynein motors generates internal stresses and actively drives axon elongation. We anticipate that our model will allow us to probe a wide variety of molecular phenomena–both in isolation and in interaction–to explore emergent cellular-level features under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:28603326

  5. Macrophages Promote Axon Regeneration with Concurrent Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gensel, J.C.; Nakamura, S.; Guan, Z.; Rooijen, van N.; Ankeny, D.P.; Popovich, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    Activated macrophages can promote regeneration of CNS axons. However, macrophages also release factors that kill neurons. These opposing functions are likely induced simultaneously but are rarely considered together in the same experimental preparation. A goal of this study was to unequivocally

  6. Ciliary neurotrophic factor and fibroblast growth factor increase the speed and number of regenerating axons after optic nerve injury in adult Rana pipiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Meléndez, Giam S; Blagburn, Jonathan M; Blanco, Rosa E

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophins such as ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and growth factors such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) play important roles in neuronal survival and in axonal outgrowth during development. However, whether they can modulate regeneration after optic nerve injury in the adult animal is less clear. The present study investigates the effects of application of these neurotrophic factors on the speed, number, and distribution of regenerating axons in the frog Rana pipiens after optic nerve crush. Optic nerves were crushed and the factors, or phosphate-buffered saline, were applied to the stump or intraocularly. The nerves were examined at different times after axotomy, using anterograde labeling with biotin dextran amine and antibody against growth-associated protein 43. We measured the length, number, and distribution of axons projecting beyond the lesion site. Untreated regenerating axons show an increase in elongation rate over 3 weeks. CNTF more than doubles this rate, FGF-2 increases it, and BDNF has little effect. In contrast, the numbers of regenerating axons that have reached 200 μm at 2 weeks were more than doubled by FGF-2, increased by CNTF, and barely affected by BDNF. The regenerating axons were preferentially distributed in the periphery of the nerve; although the numbers of axons were increased by neurotrophic factor application, this overall distribution was substantially unaffected. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fast axonal transport of labeled proteins in motoneurons of exercise-trained rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasmin, B.J.; Lavoie, P.A.; Gardiner, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, the fast orthograde axonal transport of radiolabeled proteins was measured to determine the effects of endurance-running training on transport velocity and amounts of transported proteins in rat sciatic motoneurons. Female rats were subjected to a progressive running-training program for 10-12 wk. Twenty-four hours after the last training session, rats underwent right L4-L5 dorsal root ganglionectomy. The next day, 20 microCi of [3H]leucine was injected bilaterally in the vicinity of the motoneuronal cell bodies supplying the sciatic nerve, to study axonal transport parameters. Results showed that peak and average transport velocities of labeled proteins were significantly (P less than 0.05) increased by 22 and 29%, respectively, in the deafferented nerves of the runners as compared with controls. Moreover, the amount of total transported protein-bound radioactivity was increased in both left (40%) and right (37%) sciatic nerves of the runners. An exhaustive exercise session reduced (P less than 0.05) peak displacement (8%) and total transported protein-bound radioactivity (36%) in the sciatic nerves of control rats, whereas no changes were noticed in trained animals. The data suggest that chronic endurance running induces significant adaptations in the fast axonal transport of labeled proteins

  8. Distribution of motor unit potential velocities in short static and prolonged dynamic contractions at low forces: use of the within-subject's skewness and standard deviation variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaver-Król, E G; Henriquez, N R; Oosterloo, S J; Klaver, P; Bos, J M; Zwarts, M J

    2007-11-01

    Behaviour of motor unit potential (MUP) velocities in relation to (low) force and duration was investigated in biceps brachii muscle using a surface electrode array. Short static tests of 3.8 s (41 subjects) and prolonged dynamic tests (prolonged tests) of 4 min (30 subjects) were performed as position tasks, applying forces up to 20% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Four variables, derived from the inter-peak latency technique, were used to describe changes in the surface electromyography signal: the mean muscle fibre conduction velocity (CV), the proportion between slow and fast MUPs expressed as the within-subject skewness of MUP velocities, the within-subject standard deviation of MUP velocities [SD-peak velocity (PV)], and the amount of MUPs per second (peak frequency=PF). In short static tests and the initial phase of prolonged tests, larger forces induced an increase of the CV and PF, accompanied with the shift of MUP velocities towards higher values, whereas the SD-PV did not change. During the first 1.5-2 min of the prolonged lower force levels tests (unloaded, and loaded 5 and 10% MVC) the CV and SD-PV slightly decreased and the MUP velocities shifted towards lower values; then the three variables stabilized. The PF values did not change in these tests. However, during the prolonged higher force (20% MVC) test, the CV decreased and MUP velocities shifted towards lower values without stabilization, while the SD-PV broadened and the PF decreased progressively. It is argued that these combined results reflect changes in both neural regulatory strategies and muscle membrane state.

  9. Distribution of motor unit potential velocities in short static and prolonged dynamic contractions at low forces: use of the within-subject’s skewness and standard deviation variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, N. R.; Oosterloo, S. J.; Klaver, P.; Bos, J. M.; Zwarts, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Behaviour of motor unit potential (MUP) velocities in relation to (low) force and duration was investigated in biceps brachii muscle using a surface electrode array. Short static tests of 3.8 s (41 subjects) and prolonged dynamic tests (prolonged tests) of 4 min (30 subjects) were performed as position tasks, applying forces up to 20% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Four variables, derived from the inter-peak latency technique, were used to describe changes in the surface electromyography signal: the mean muscle fibre conduction velocity (CV), the proportion between slow and fast MUPs expressed as the within-subject skewness of MUP velocities, the within-subject standard deviation of MUP velocities [SD-peak velocity (PV)], and the amount of MUPs per second (peak frequency = PF). In short static tests and the initial phase of prolonged tests, larger forces induced an increase of the CV and PF, accompanied with the shift of MUP velocities towards higher values, whereas the SD-PV did not change. During the first 1.5–2 min of the prolonged lower force levels tests (unloaded, and loaded 5 and 10% MVC) the CV and SD-PV slightly decreased and the MUP velocities shifted towards lower values; then the three variables stabilized. The PF values did not change in these tests. However, during the prolonged higher force (20% MVC) test, the CV decreased and MUP velocities shifted towards lower values without stabilization, while the SD-PV broadened and the PF decreased progressively. It is argued that these combined results reflect changes in both neural regulatory strategies and muscle membrane state. PMID:17874124

  10. Diffuse Axonal Injury and Oxidative Stress: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Frati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is one of the world’s leading causes of morbidity and mortality among young individuals. TBI applies powerful rotational and translational forces to the brain parenchyma, which results in a traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI responsible for brain swelling and neuronal death. Following TBI, axonal degeneration has been identified as a progressive process that starts with disrupted axonal transport causing axonal swelling, followed by secondary axonal disconnection and Wallerian degeneration. These modifications in the axonal cytoskeleton interrupt the axoplasmic transport mechanisms, causing the gradual gathering of transport products so as to generate axonal swellings and modifications in neuronal homeostasis. Oxidative stress with consequent impairment of endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms plays a significant role in the secondary events leading to neuronal death. Studies support the role of an altered axonal calcium homeostasis as a mechanism in the secondary damage of axon, and suggest that calcium channel blocker can alleviate the secondary damage, as well as other mechanisms implied in the secondary injury, and could be targeted as a candidate for therapeutic approaches. Reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated axonal degeneration is mainly caused by extracellular Ca2+. Increases in the defense mechanisms through the use of exogenous antioxidants may be neuroprotective, particularly if they are given within the neuroprotective time window. A promising potential therapeutic target for DAI is to directly address mitochondria-related injury or to modulate energetic axonal energy failure.

  11. Diffuse Axonal Injury and Oxidative Stress: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frati, Alessandro; Cerretani, Daniela; Fiaschi, Anna Ida; Frati, Paola; Gatto, Vittorio; La Russa, Raffaele; Pesce, Alessandro; Pinchi, Enrica; Santurro, Alessandro; Fraschetti, Flavia; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2017-12-02

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the world's leading causes of morbidity and mortality among young individuals. TBI applies powerful rotational and translational forces to the brain parenchyma, which results in a traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) responsible for brain swelling and neuronal death. Following TBI, axonal degeneration has been identified as a progressive process that starts with disrupted axonal transport causing axonal swelling, followed by secondary axonal disconnection and Wallerian degeneration. These modifications in the axonal cytoskeleton interrupt the axoplasmic transport mechanisms, causing the gradual gathering of transport products so as to generate axonal swellings and modifications in neuronal homeostasis. Oxidative stress with consequent impairment of endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms plays a significant role in the secondary events leading to neuronal death. Studies support the role of an altered axonal calcium homeostasis as a mechanism in the secondary damage of axon, and suggest that calcium channel blocker can alleviate the secondary damage, as well as other mechanisms implied in the secondary injury, and could be targeted as a candidate for therapeutic approaches. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated axonal degeneration is mainly caused by extracellular Ca 2+ . Increases in the defense mechanisms through the use of exogenous antioxidants may be neuroprotective, particularly if they are given within the neuroprotective time window. A promising potential therapeutic target for DAI is to directly address mitochondria-related injury or to modulate energetic axonal energy failure.

  12. Specific effects of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-interacting protein 1 in neuronal axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK-interacting protein 3 plays an important role in brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB anterograde axonal transport. It remains unclear whether JNK-interacting protein 1 mediates similar effects, or whether JNK-interacting protein 1 affects the regulation of TrkB anterograde axonal transport. In this study, we isolated rat embryonic hippocampus and cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro. Coimmunoprecipitation results demonstrated that JNK-interacting protein 1 formed TrkB complexes in vitro and in vivo. Immunocytochemistry results showed that when JNK-interacting protein 1 was highly expressed, the distribution of TrkB gradually increased in axon terminals. However, the distribution of TrkB reduced in axon terminals after knocking out JNK-interacting protein 1. In addition, there were differences in distribution of TrkB after JNK-interacting protein 1 was knocked out compared with not. However, knockout of JNK-interacting protein 1 did not affect the distribution of TrkB in dendrites. These findings confirm that JNK-interacting protein 1 can interact with TrkB in neuronal cells, and can regulate the transport of TrkB in axons, but not in dendrites.

  13. Action potential propagation recorded from single axonal arbors using multi-electrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Kenneth R; Bridges, Daniel C; Wu, Bian; Randall, Connor; Audouard, Morgane; Jang, Jiwon; Hansma, Paul K; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2018-04-11

    We report the presence of co-occurring extracellular action potentials (eAPs) from cultured mouse hippocampal neurons among groups of planar electrodes on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). The invariant sequences of eAPs among co-active electrode groups, repeated co-occurrences and short inter-electrode latencies are consistent with action potential propagation in unmyelinated axons. Repeated eAP co-detection by multiple electrodes was widespread in all our data records. Co-detection of eAPs confirms they result from the same neuron and allows these eAPs to be isolated from all other spikes independently of spike sorting algorithms. We averaged co-occurring events and revealed additional electrodes with eAPs that would otherwise be below detection threshold. We used these eAP cohorts to explore the temperature sensitivity of action potential propagation and the relationship between voltage-gated sodium channel density and propagation velocity. The sequence of eAPs among co-active electrodes 'fingerprints' neurons giving rise to these events and identifies them within neuronal ensembles. We used this property and the non-invasive nature of extracellular recording to monitor changes in excitability at multiple points in single axonal arbors simultaneously over several hours, demonstrating independence of axonal segments. Over several weeks, we recorded changes in inter-electrode propagation latencies and ongoing changes in excitability in different regions of single axonal arbors. Our work illustrates how repeated eAP co-occurrences can be used to extract physiological data from single axons with low electrode density MEAs. However, repeated eAP co-occurrences leads to over-sampling spikes from single neurons and thus can confound traditional spike-train analysis.

  14. Axon degeneration: make the Schwann cell great again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keit Men Wong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Axonal degeneration is a pivotal feature of many neurodegenerative conditions and substantially accounts for neurological morbidity. A widely used experimental model to study the mechanisms of axonal degeneration is Wallerian degeneration (WD, which occurs after acute axonal injury. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS, WD is characterized by swift dismantling and clearance of injured axons with their myelin sheaths. This is a prerequisite for successful axonal regeneration. In the central nervous system (CNS, WD is much slower, which significantly contributes to failed axonal regeneration. Although it is well-documented that Schwann cells (SCs have a critical role in the regenerative potential of the PNS, to date we have only scarce knowledge as to how SCs 'sense' axonal injury and immediately respond to it. In this regard, it remains unknown as to whether SCs play the role of a passive bystander or an active director during the execution of the highly orchestrated disintegration program of axons. Older reports, together with more recent studies, suggest that SCs mount dynamic injury responses minutes after axonal injury, long before axonal breakdown occurs. The swift SC response to axonal injury could play either a pro-degenerative role, or alternatively a supportive role, to the integrity of distressed axons that have not yet committed to degenerate. Indeed, supporting the latter concept, recent findings in a chronic PNS neurodegeneration model indicate that deactivation of a key molecule promoting SC injury responses exacerbates axonal loss. If this holds true in a broader spectrum of conditions, it may provide the grounds for the development of new glia-centric therapeutic approaches to counteract axonal loss.

  15. Regulation of myelin genes implicated in psychiatric disorders by functional activity in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip R Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelination is a highly dynamic process that continues well into adulthood in humans. Several recent gene expression studies have found abnormal expression of genes involved in myelination in the prefrontal cortex of brains from patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Defects in myelination could contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness by impairing information processing as a consequence of altered impulse conduction velocity and synchrony between cortical regions carrying out higher level cognitive functions. Myelination can be altered by impulse activity in axons and by environmental experience. Psychiatric illness is treated by psychotherapy, behavioral modification, and drugs affecting neurotransmission, raising the possibility that myelinating glia may not only contribute to such disorders, but that activity-dependent effects on myelinating glia could provide one of the cellular mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effects of these treatments. This review examines evidence showing that genes and gene networks important for myelination can be regulated by functional activity in axons.

  16. Axonal transport of enzymes and labeled proteins in experimental axonopathy induced by p-bromophenylacetylurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Brimijoin, S.

    1981-01-01

    Axonal transport was studied by several techniques in the sciatic nerves of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with neuropathy induced by treatment with p-bromophenylacetylurea (BPAU) in dimethylsulfoxide solution. Control rats were treated with solvent alone. BPAU, 200 mg/kg, induced severe muscle weakness in the hindlimbs, beginning after a latent period of 1 week and progressing to near total paralysis by 2 weeks. Axonal transport of the endogenous transmitter enzymes, acetylcholinesterase, dopamine-β-hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase, was normal at both 2 and 15 days after administration of BPAU, as judged by the accumulation of enzyme activity above and below a set of double ligatures on the sciatic nerve. The velocity of fast anterograde transport of [ 35 S]methionine labeled protein was also unaffected by BPAU. However, 4 abnormalities of transport were detected in BPAU treated rats. These abnormalities are discussed. (Auth.)

  17. Draxin, an axon guidance protein, affects chick trunk neural crest migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuhong; Naser, Iftekhar B; Islam, Shahidul M; Zhang, Sanbing; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Chen, Sandy; Shinmyo, Yohei; Kawakami, Minoru; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2009-12-01

    The neural crest is a multipotent population of migratory cells that arises in the central nervous system and subsequently migrates along defined stereotypic pathways. In the present work, we analyzed the role of a repulsive axon guidance protein, draxin, in the migration of neural crest cells. Draxin is expressed in the roof plate of the chick trunk spinal cord and around the early migration pathway of neural crest cells. Draxin modulates chick neural crest cell migration in vitro by reducing the polarization of these cells. When exposed to draxin, the velocity of migrating neural crest cells was reduced, and the cells changed direction so frequently that the net migration distance was also reduced. Overexpression of draxin also caused some early migrating neural crest cells to change direction to the dorsolateral pathway in the chick trunk region, presumably due to draxin's inhibitory activity. These results demonstrate that draxin, an axon guidance protein, can also affect trunk neural crest migration in the chick embryo.

  18. A variational model for propagation time, volumetric and synchronicity optimization in the spinal cord axon network, and a method for testing it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Most information in the central nervous system in general and the (simpler) spinal cord in particular, is transmitted along bundles of parallel axons. Each axon's transmission time increases linearly with length and decreases as a power law of caliber. Therefore, evolution must find a distribution of axonal numbers, lengths and calibers that balances the various tradeoffs between gains in propagation time, signal throughput and synchronicity, against volumetric and metabolic costs. Here I apply a variational method to calculate the distribution of axonal caliber in the spinal cord as a function of axonal length, that minimizes the average axonal signal propagation time, subject to the constraints of white matter total volume and the variance of propagation times, and allowing for arbitrary fiber priorities and end-points. The Lagrange multipliers obtained thereof can be naturally interpreted as 'exchange rates', e.g., how much evolution is willing to pay, in white matter added volume, per unit time decrease of propagation time. This is, to my knowledge, the first model that quantifies explicitly these evolutionary tradeoffs, and can obtain them empirically by measuring the distribution of axonal calibers. We are in the process of doing so using the isotropic fractionator method. I thank FAPERJ for financial support.

  19. Motor axon excitability during Wallerian degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Krarup, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Axonal loss and degeneration are major factors in determining long-term outcome in patients with peripheral nerve disorders or injury. Following loss of axonal continuity, the isolated nerve stump distal to the lesion undergoes Wallerian degeneration in several phases. In the initial 'latent' phase...... at ankle distal to axotomy were monitored by 'threshold-tracking'. The plantar compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were recorded under anesthesia in three animal models: 8-week-old wild-type mice, 8-week-old slow Wallerian degeneration mutant mice and 3-year-old cats. We found that the progressive...... decrease in CMAP following crush injury was associated with slowing of conduction and marked abnormalities in excitability: increased peak threshold deviations during both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus, enhanced superexcitability during the recovery cycle and increased rheobase...

  20. B-RAF kinase drives developmental axon growth and promotes axon regeneration in the injured mature CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donovan, Kevin J.; Ma, Kaijie; Guo, Hengchang; Wang, Chen; Sun, Fang; Han, Seung Baek; Kim, Hyukmin; Wong, Jamie K.; Charron, Jean; Zou, Hongyan; Son, Young-Jin; He, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Activation of intrinsic growth programs that promote developmental axon growth may also facilitate axon regeneration in injured adult neurons. Here, we demonstrate that conditional activation of B-RAF kinase alone in mouse embryonic neurons is sufficient to drive the growth of long-range peripheral sensory axon projections in vivo in the absence of upstream neurotrophin signaling. We further show that activated B-RAF signaling enables robust regenerative growth of sensory axons into the spinal cord after a dorsal root crush as well as substantial axon regrowth in the crush-lesioned optic nerve. Finally, the combination of B-RAF gain-of-function and PTEN loss-of-function promotes optic nerve axon extension beyond what would be predicted for a simple additive effect. We conclude that cell-intrinsic RAF signaling is a crucial pathway promoting developmental and regenerative axon growth in the peripheral and central nervous systems. PMID:24733831

  1. A new model of traumatic axonal injury to determine the effects of strain and displacement rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anita; Lu, Ying; Chen, Chaoyang; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Cavanaugh, John M

    2006-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) continues to be a major health problem, with over 500,000 cases per year with a societal cost of approximately $85 billion in the US. Motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of such injuries. In many cases of TBI widespread disruption of the axons occurs through a process known as diffuse axonal injury (DAI) or traumatic axonal injury (TAI). In the current study, an in vivo TAI model was developed using spinal nerve roots of adult rats. This model was used to determine functional and structural responses of axons to various strains and displacement rates. Fifty-six L5 dorsal nerve roots were each subjected to a predetermined strain range (20%) at a specified displacement rate (0.01 mm/sec and 15 mm/sec) only once. Image analysis was used to determine actual strains on the roots during the pull. Neurophysiologic recordings were performed on the nerve root before and after stretch to determine functional changes in response to stretch, including conduction velocity (CV) and area of the evoked compound action potential (CAP). Structural changes including vascular injury, axotomy, and impaired axoplasmic transport (IAT) were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin, Palmgren silver impregnation and beta-APP staining techniques, respectively. Results showed that CV and the area of the CAP decreased as strain and displacement rate increased. Also, threshold strains for complete nerve conduction loss were 16% and 9% at 0.01 mm/sec and 15 mm/sec rate, respectively. These threshold values indicate the rate dependency of functional injury and indicate that axons tolerate slow loading rates better than higher loading rates. Histological studies revealed increased spacing, tearing of axons, IAT and occurrence of hemorrhage to be strain and displacement rate dependent. Linear relationships existed between the increasing strain and the occurrence rate of axonal injury as evidenced by multiple indicators (IAT, hemorrhage, torn fibers or primary

  2. Sensory axonal dysfunction in cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Hung, Kuo-Sheng; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in sensory axonal excitability in the distal nerve in patients with cervical radiculopathy. The patients were classified by the findings of cervical MRI into two subgroups: 22 patients with C6/7 root compression and 25 patients with cervical cord and root compression above/at C6/7. Patients were investigated using conventional nerve conduction studies (NCS) and nerve excitability testing. Sensory nerve excitability testing was undertaken with stimulation at the wrist and recording from digit II (dermatome C6/7). The results were compared with healthy controls. Both preoperative and postoperative tests were performed if the patient underwent surgery. Sensory axonal excitability was significantly different in both cohorts compared with healthy controls, including prolonged strength-duration time constant, reduced S2 accommodation, increased threshold electrotonus hyperpolarisation (TEh (90-100 ms)), and increased superexcitability. The changes in these excitability indices are compatible with axonal membrane hyperpolarisation. In five patients who underwent surgery, the postoperative sensory excitability was tested after 1 week, and showed significant changes in TE (TEh (90-100 ms) and TEh slope, pcervical radiculopathy. These findings suggest that the hyperpolarised pattern might be due to Na(+)-K(+) ATPase overactivation induced by proximal ischaemia, or could reflect the remyelinating process. Distal sensory axons were hyperpolarised even though there were no changes in NCS, suggesting that nerve excitability testing may be more sensitive to clinical symptoms than NCS in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Unidirectional ephaptic stimulation between two myelinated axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capllonch-Juan, Miguel; Kolbl, Florian; Sepulveda, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    Providing realistic sensory feedback for prosthetic devices strongly relies on an accurate modelling of machine-nerve interfaces. Models of these interfaces in the peripheral nervous system usually neglect the effects that ephaptic coupling can have on the selectivity of stimulating electrodes. In this contribution, we study the ephaptic stimulation between myelinated axons and show its relation with the separation between fibers and the conductivity of the medium that surrounds them.

  4. Multifunctional Silk Nerve Guides for Axon Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupaj, Marie C.

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a critical issue as 2.8% of trauma patients present with this type of injury, estimating a total of 200,000 nerve repair procedures yearly in the United States. While the peripheral nervous system exhibits slow regeneration, at a rate of 0.5 mm -- 9 mm/day following trauma, this regenerative ability is only possible under certain conditions. Clinical repairs have changed slightly in the last 30 years and standard methods of treatment include suturing damaged nerve ends, allografting, and autografting, with the autograft the gold standard of these approaches. Unfortunately, the use of autografts requires a second surgery and there is a shortage of nerves available for grafting. Allografts are a second option however allografts have lower success rates and are accompanied by the need of immunosuppressant drugs. Recently there has been a focus on developing nerve guides as an "off the shelf" approach. Although some natural and synthetic guidance channels have been approved by the FDA, these nerve guides are unfunctionalized and repair only short gaps, less than 3 cm in length. The goal of this project was to identify strategies for functionalizing peripheral nerve conduits for the outgrowth of neuron axons in vitro . To accomplish this, two strategies (bioelectrical and biophysical) were indentified for increasing axon outgrowth and promoting axon guidance. Bioelectrical strategies exploited electrical stimulation for increasing neurite outgrowth. Biophysical strategies tested a range of surface topographies for axon guidance. Novel methods were developed for integrating electrical and biophysical strategies into silk films in 2D. Finally, a functionalized nerve conduit system was developed that integrated all strategies for the purpose of attaching, elongating, and guiding nervous tissue in vitro. Future directions of this work include silk conduit translation into a rat sciatic nerve model in vivo for the purpose of repairing long

  5. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H Le

    Full Text Available Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1. Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr and chronic (2hr CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  6. Axonal branching patterns of nucleus accumbens neurons in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Anushree; Prensa, Lucía; Cebrián, Carolina; Mengual, Elisa

    2010-11-15

    The patterns of axonal collateralization of nucleus accumbens (Acb) projection neurons were investigated in the rat by means of single-axon tracing techniques using the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine. Seventy-three axons were fully traced, originating from either the core (AcbC) or shell (AcbSh) compartment, as assessed by differential calbindin D28k-immunoreactivity. Axons from AcbC and AcbSh showed a substantial segregation in their targets; target areas were either exclusively or preferentially innervated from AcbC or AcbSh. Axon collaterals in the subthalamic nucleus were found at higher than expected frequencies; moreover, these originated exclusively in the dorsal AcbC. Intercompartmental collaterals were observed from ventral AcbC axons into AcbSh, and likewise, interconnections at pallidal and mesencephalic levels were also observed, although mostly from AcbC axons toward AcbSh targets, possibly supporting crosstalk between the two subcircuits at several levels. Cell somata giving rise to short-range accumbal axons, projecting to the ventral pallidum (VP), were spatially intermingled with others, giving rise to long-range axons that innervated VP and more caudal targets. This anatomical organization parallels that of the dorsal striatum and provides the basis for possible dual direct and indirect actions from a single axon on either individual or small sets of neurons. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Transplantation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in an animal model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury: survival and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leyan; Ryu, Jiwon; Hiel, Hakim; Menon, Adarsh; Aggarwal, Ayushi; Rha, Elizabeth; Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Cummings, Brian J; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2015-05-14

    Diffuse axonal injury is an extremely common type of traumatic brain injury encountered in motor vehicle crashes, sports injuries, and in combat. Although many cases of diffuse axonal injury result in chronic disability, there are no current treatments for this condition. Its basic lesion, traumatic axonal injury, has been aggressively modeled in primate and rodent animal models. The inexorable axonal and perikaryal degeneration and dysmyelination often encountered in traumatic axonal injury calls for regenerative therapies, including therapies based on stem cells and precursors. Here we explore the proof of concept that treatments based on transplants of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells can replace or remodel myelin and, eventually, contribute to axonal regeneration in traumatic axonal injury. We derived human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from the human embryonic stem cell line H9, purified and characterized them. We then transplanted these human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into the deep sensorimotor cortex next to the corpus callosum of nude rats subjected to traumatic axonal injury based on the impact acceleration model of Marmarou. We explored the time course and spatial distribution of differentiation and structural integration of these cells in rat forebrain. At the time of transplantation, over 90 % of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells expressed A2B5, PDGFR, NG2, O4, Olig2 and Sox10, a profile consistent with their progenitor or early oligodendrocyte status. After transplantation, these cells survived well and migrated massively via the corpus callosum in both injured and uninjured brains. Human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells displayed a striking preference for white matter tracts and were contained almost exclusively in the corpus callosum and external capsule, the striatopallidal striae, and cortical layer 6. Over 3 months, human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells progressively matured into myelin basic protein(+) and adenomatous

  8. Distribution of motor unit potential velocities in short static and prolongd dynamic contractions at low forces: Use of the within-subject's skewness and standard deviation variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver-Krol, E.G.; Henriquez, N.R.; Oosterloo, Sebe J.; Klaver, P.; Bos, J.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Behaviour of motor unit potential (MUP) velocities in relation to (low) force and duration was investigated in biceps brachii muscle using a surface electrode array. Short static tests of 3.8 s (41 subjects) and prolonged dynamic tests (prolonged tests) of 4 min (30 subjects) were performed as

  9. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, AMI surface wind velocity, TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height, and ECMWF surface wind velocity during 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, D.; Fu, L.; Knauss, W.; Pihos, G.; Brown, O.; Freilich, M.; Wentz, F.

    1995-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1993 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (U.S.) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite; 10-m height wind speed and direction estimated from the Active Microwave Instrument (AMI) on the European Space Agency (ESA) European Remote Sensing (ERS-1) satellite; sea surface height estimated from the joint U.S.-France Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON spacecraft; and 10-m height wind speed and direction produced by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of annual mean, monthly mean, and sampling distributions are displayed.

  10. Comparison of the fastest regenerating motor and sensory myelinated axons in the same peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Sørensen, Jesper; Krarup, Christian

    2006-09-01

    Functional outcome after peripheral nerve regeneration is often poor, particularly involving nerve injuries far from their targets. Comparison of sensory and motor axon regeneration before target reinnervation is not possible in the clinical setting, and previous experimental studies addressing the question of differences in growth rates of different nerve fibre populations led to conflicting results. We developed an animal model to compare growth and maturation of the fastest growing sensory and motor fibres within the same mixed nerve after Wallerian degeneration. Regeneration of cat tibial nerve after crush (n = 13) and section (n = 7) was monitored for up to 140 days, using implanted cuff electrodes placed around the sciatic and tibial nerves and wire electrodes at plantar muscles. To distinguish between sensory and motor fibres, recordings were carried out from L6-S2 spinal roots using cuff electrodes. The timing of laminectomy was based on the presence of regenerating fibres along the nerve within the tibial cuff. Stimulation of unlesioned tibial nerves (n = 6) evoked the largest motor response in S1 ventral root and the largest sensory response in L7 dorsal root. Growth rates were compared by mapping the regenerating nerve fibres within the tibial nerve cuff to all ventral or dorsal roots and, regardless of the lesion type, the fastest growth was similar in sensory and motor fibres. Maturation was assessed as recovery of the maximum motor and sensory conduction velocities (CVs) within the tibial nerve cuff. Throughout the observation period the CV was approximately 14% faster in regenerated sensory fibres than in motor fibres in accordance with the difference observed in control nerves. Recovery of amplitude was only partial after section, whereas the root distribution pattern was restored. Our data suggest that the fastest growth and maturation rates that can be achieved during regeneration are similar for motor and sensory myelinated fibres.

  11. Can injured adult CNS axons regenerate by recapitulating development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Brett J; Bradke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), neurons typically fail to regenerate their axons after injury. During development, by contrast, neurons extend axons effectively. A variety of intracellular mechanisms mediate this difference, including changes in gene expression, the ability to form a growth cone, differences in mitochondrial function/axonal transport and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In turn, these intracellular processes are linked to extracellular differences between the developing and adult CNS. During development, the extracellular environment directs axon growth and circuit formation. In adulthood, by contrast, extracellular factors, such as myelin and the extracellular matrix, restrict axon growth. Here, we discuss whether the reactivation of developmental processes can elicit axon regeneration in the injured CNS. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Regulation and dysregulation of axon infrastructure by myelinating glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Simon; Chan, Jonah R

    2017-12-04

    Axon loss and neurodegeneration constitute clinically debilitating sequelae in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms of secondary degeneration are not well understood. Myelinating glia play a fundamental role in promoting the maturation of the axon cytoskeleton, regulating axon trafficking parameters, and imposing architectural rearrangements such as the nodes of Ranvier and their associated molecular domains. In the setting of demyelination, these changes may be reversed or persist as maladaptive features, leading to axon degeneration. In this review, we consider recent insights into axon-glial interactions during development and disease to propose that disruption of the cytoskeleton, nodal architecture, and other components of axon infrastructure is a potential mediator of pathophysiological damage after demyelination. © 2017 Pan and Chan.

  13. Active polysomes in the axoplasm of the squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, A; Menichini, E; Perrone Capano, C; Langella, M; Martin, R; Castigli, E; Kaplan, B B

    1991-01-01

    Axons and axon terminals are widely believed to lack the capacity to synthesize proteins, relying instead on the delivery of proteins made in the perikaryon. In agreement with this view, axoplasmic proteins synthesized by the isolated giant axon of the squid are believed to derive entirely from periaxonal glial cells. However, squid axoplasm is known to contain the requisite components of an extra-mitochondrial protein synthetic system, including protein factors, tRNAs, rRNAs, and a heterogeneous family of mRNAs. Hence, the giant axon could, in principle, maintain an endogenous protein synthetic capacity. Here, we report that the squid giant axon also contains active polysomes and mRNA, which hybridizes to a riboprobe encoding murine neurofilament protein. Taken together, these findings provide direct evidence that proteins (including the putative neuron-specific neurofilament protein) are also synthesized de novo in the axonal compartment.

  14. Fast axonal transport of 3H-leucin-labelled proteins in the unhurt and isolated optical nerve of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of radioactivity of amino acid molecules incorporated in protein after injection of 3 H-Leucin into the right bulb was investigated and determined along optical nerve after 1, 2, and 4 h. A slightly increased radioactivity at the point of entrance of the optical nerves into the optical duct was found. A slightly reduced axon diameter was discussed as a possible cause. The radioactivity brought into the optical nerve via the vascular system was determined by measuring the contralateral optical nerve. In relation to the axonally transported activity, it was low. The speed of the fast axonal transport is 168 mm/d. If the processes ruling the amino acids in the perikaryon are taken into consideration, the transport speed is 240 mm/d. The application of the protein synthesis prohibitor, Cycloheximide, 5 minutes after the injection of Leucinin completely prevented the appearance of axonally transported labelled proteins. When cycloheximide was administered 2 h after Leucin, a significantly loner radioactivity than in the nerve could be determined after another 2 h; i.e. the incorporation of Leucin was not completed yet after 2 h. The profile of active compounds was the same as in the control group. In other experiments, the axonal transport of labelled proteins in isolated optical nerve fibres was tested. If the separation was carried out 2 h after the injection of Leucin an extreme reduction in activity could be determined after 1 or 2 h. The continued distribution of activity after cycloheximide treatment and removal of perikarya in comparison with the control indicate the continuation of the transport, also after separation of the axon from the perikaryon. This means that, during the time of the experiment, the mechanism of the fast axonal transport functions independently of the perikaryon. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Subtle paranodal injury slows impulse conduction in a mathematical model of myelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Babbs

    Full Text Available This study explores in detail the functional consequences of subtle retraction and detachment of myelin around the nodes of Ranvier following mild-to-moderate crush or stretch mediated injury. An equivalent electrical circuit model for a series of equally spaced nodes of Ranvier was created incorporating extracellular and axonal resistances, paranodal resistances, nodal capacitances, time varying sodium and potassium currents, and realistic resting and threshold membrane potentials in a myelinated axon segment of 21 successive nodes. Differential equations describing membrane potentials at each nodal region were solved numerically. Subtle injury was simulated by increasing the width of exposed nodal membrane in nodes 8 through 20 of the model. Such injury diminishes action potential amplitude and slows conduction velocity from 19.1 m/sec in the normal region to 7.8 m/sec in the crushed region. Detachment of paranodal myelin, exposing juxtaparanodal potassium channels, decreases conduction velocity further to 6.6 m/sec, an effect that is partially reversible with potassium ion channel blockade. Conduction velocity decreases as node width increases or as paranodal resistance falls. The calculated changes in conduction velocity with subtle paranodal injury agree with experimental observations. Nodes of Ranvier are highly effective but somewhat fragile devices for increasing nerve conduction velocity and decreasing reaction time in vertebrate animals. Their fundamental design limitation is that even small mechanical retractions of myelin from very narrow nodes or slight loosening of paranodal myelin, which are difficult to notice at the light microscopic level of observation, can cause large changes in myelinated nerve conduction velocity.

  16. Peptide sharing between influenza A H1N1 hemagglutinin and human axon guidance proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchese, Guglielmo; Capone, Giovanni; Kanduc, Darja

    2014-03-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest that maternal microbial infections may cause fetal neurodevelopmental disorders, potentially increasing susceptibility to heavy psychopathologies such as schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder, autism, pervasive developmental disorders, bipolar disorders, psychosis, epilepsy, language and speech disorders, and cognitive impairment in adult offspring. However, the molecular pathomechanisms underlying such a relationship are not clear. Here we analyze the potential role of the maternal immune response to viral infection in determining fetal brain injuries that increase the risk of neurological disorders in the adult. We use influenza infection as a disease model and human axon guidance pathway, a key process in the formation of neural network during midgestation, as a potential fetal target of immune insults. Specifically, we examined influenza A H1N1 hemagglutinin (HA), an antigenic viral protein, for amino acid sequence similarity to a random library of 188 axon guidance proteins. We obtain the results that (1) contrary to any theoretical expectations, 45 viral pentapeptide matches are distributed throughout a subset of 36 guidance molecules; (2) in 24 guidance proteins, the peptide sharing with HA antigen involves already experimentally validated influenza HA epitopes; and (3) most of the axon guidance vs HA peptide overlap is conserved among influenza A viral strains and subsets. Taken together, our data indicate that immune cross-reactivity between influenza HA and axon guidance molecules is possible and may well represent a pathologic mechanism capable of determining neurodevelopmental disruption in the fetus.

  17. Schwann Cell Glycogen Selectively Supports Myelinated Axon Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angus M; Evans, Richard D; Black, Joel; Ransom, Bruce R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Interruption of energy supply to peripheral axons is a cause of axon loss. We determined if glycogen was present in mammalian peripheral nerve, and if it supported axon conduction during aglycemia. Methods We used biochemical assay and electron microscopy to determine the presence of glycogen, and electrophysiology to monitor axon function. Results Glycogen was present in sciatic nerve, its concentration varying directly with ambient [glucose]. Electron microscopy detected glycogen granules primarily in myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm and these diminished after exposure to aglycemia. During aglycemia, conduction failure in large myelinated axons (A fibers) mirrored the time-course of glycogen loss. Latency to CAP failure was directly related to nerve glycogen content at aglycemia onset. Glycogen did not benefit the function of slow-conducting, small diameter unmyelinated axons (C fibers) during aglycemia. Blocking glycogen breakdown pharmacologically accelerated CAP failure during aglycemia in A fibers, but not in C fibers. Lactate was as effective as glucose in supporting sciatic nerve function, and was continuously released into the extracellular space in the presence of glucose and fell rapidly during aglycemia. Interpretation Our findings indicated that glycogen is present in peripheral nerve, primarily in myelinating Schwann cells, and exclusively supports large diameter, myelinated axon conduction during aglycemia. Available evidence suggests that peripheral nerve glycogen breaks down during aglycemia and is passed, probably as lactate, to myelinated axons to support function. Unmyelinated axons are not protected by glycogen and are more vulnerable to dysfunction during periods of hypoglycemia. PMID:23034913

  18. Concepts for regulation of axon integrity by enwrapping glia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan eBeirowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Long axons and their enwrapping glia (Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes form a unique compound structure that serves as conduit for transport of electric and chemical information in the nervous system. The peculiar cytoarchitecture over an enormous length as well as its substantial energetic requirements make this conduit particularly susceptible to detrimental alterations. Degeneration of long axons independent of neuronal cell bodies is observed comparatively early in a range of neurodegenerative conditions as a consequence of abnormalities in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes. This leads to the most relevant disease symptoms and highlights the critical role that these glia have for axon integrity, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The quest to understand why and how axons degenerate is now a crucial frontier in disease-oriented research. This challenge is most likely to lead to significant progress if the inextricable link between axons and their flanking glia in pathological situations is recognized. In this review I compile recent advances in our understanding of the molecular programs governing axon degeneration, and mechanisms of enwrapping glia’s non-cell autonomous impact on axon-integrity. A particular focus is placed on emerging evidence suggesting that enwrapping glia nurture long axons by virtue of their intimate association, release of trophic substances, and neurometabolic coupling. The correction of defects in these functions has the potential to stabilize axons in a variety of neuronal diseases in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  19. Axonal branching patterns of ventral pallidal neurons in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Anushree; Prensa, Lucía; Mengual, Elisa

    2013-09-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is a key component of the cortico-basal ganglia circuits that process motivational and emotional information, and also a crucial site for reward. Although the main targets of the two VP compartments, medial (VPm) and lateral (VPl) have already been established, the collateralization patterns of individual axons have not previously been investigated. Here we have fully traced eighty-four axons from VPm, VPl and the rostral extension of VP into the olfactory tubercle (VPr), using the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine in the rat. Thirty to fifty percent of axons originating from VPm and VPr collateralized in the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus and lateral habenula, indicating a close association between the ventral basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop and the reward network at the single axon level. Additional collateralization of these axons in diverse components of the extended amygdala and corticopetal system supports a multisystem integration that may take place at the basal forebrain. Remarkably, we did not find evidence for a sharp segregation in the targets of axons arising from the two VP compartments, as VPl axons frequently collateralized in the caudal lateral hypothalamus and ventral tegmental area, the well-known targets of VPm, while VPm axons, in turn, also collateralized in typical VPl targets such as the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra pars compacta and reticulata, and retrorubral field. Nevertheless, VPl and VPm displayed collateralization patterns that paralleled those of dorsal pallidal components, confirming at the single axon level the parallel organization of functionally different basal ganglia loops.

  20. Differences in excitability properties of FDI and ADM motor axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong Seok; Sawai, Setsu; Misawa, Sonoko; Kanai, Kazuaki; Isose, Sagiri; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2009-03-01

    The first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles are innervated by the same ulnar nerve, but studies have shown that the former is much more severely affected in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, threshold tracking was used to investigate whether membrane properties differ between FDI and ADM motor axons. In 12 normal subjects, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from FDI and ADM after ulnar nerve stimulation at the wrist. The strength-duration time constant was significantly longer in the FDI axons than in the ADM axons, and latent addition studies showed greater threshold changes at the conditioning-test stimulus of 0.2 ms in FDI than in ADM axons. These findings suggest that nodal persistent sodium conductances are more prominent in FDI axons than in ADM axons, and therefore excitability is physiologically higher in FDI axons. Even in the same nerve at the same sites, membrane properties of FDI and ADM motor axons differ significantly, and thus their axonal/neuronal responses to disease may also differ.

  1. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2014-01-01

    agree very well with synthetic spectra calculated from a TRANSP/NUBEAM simulation. Based on the measured FIDA spectra alone, we infer f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion. Salient features of our measurement of f(v‖, v⊥) agree reasonably well with the simulation: the measured as well as the simulated f......(v‖, v⊥) are lopsided towards negative velocities parallel to the magnetic field, and they have similar shapes. Further, the peaks in the simulation of f(v‖, v⊥) at full and half injection energies of the neutral beam also appear in the measurement at similar velocity-space locations. We expect that we...... can measure spectra in up to seven views simultaneously in the next ASDEX Upgrade campaign which would further improve measurements of f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion....

  2. Effects of Port Shape on Steady Flow Characteristics in an SI Engine with Semi-Wedge Combustion Chamber (2) - Velocity Distribution (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Inkyoung; Ohm, Inyong [Seoul Nat’l Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    This study is the second investigation on the steady flow characteristics of an SI engine with a semi-edge combustion chamber as a function of the port shape with varying evaluation positions. For this purpose, the planar velocity profiles were measured from 1.75B, 1.75 times of bore position apart from the bottom of head, to 6.00B positions using particle – image velocimetry. The flow patterns were examined with both a straight and a helical port. The velocity profiles, streamlines, and centers of swirl were almost the same at the same valve lift regardless of the measuring position, which is quite different from the case of the pent-roof combustion chamber. All the eccentricity values of the straight port were out of distortion criterion 0.15 through the lifts and the position. However, the values of the helical port exceeded the distortion criterion by up to 4 mm lift, but decreased rapidly above the 3.00B position and the 5 mm lift. There always existed a relative offset effect in the evaluation of the swirl coefficient using the PIV method due to the difference of the ideal impulse swirl meter velocity profile assumption, except for the cylinder-center-base estimation that was below 4 mm of the straight port. Finally, it was concluded that taking the center as an evaluation basis and the assumption about the axial velocity profile did not have any qualitative effect on swirl evaluation, but affected the value owing to the detailed profile.

  3. Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Maria G; Alloatti, Matías; Cromberg, Lucas E; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Encalada, Sandra E; Pozo Devoto, Victorio M; Bruno, Luciana; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Falzone, Tomás L

    2014-04-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurons depends on the correct delivery of the proteasome complex. In neurodegenerative diseases, aggregation and accumulation of proteins in axons link transport defects with degradation impairments; however, the transport properties of proteasomes remain unknown. Here, using in vivo experiments, we reveal the fast anterograde transport of assembled and functional 26S proteasome complexes. A high-resolution tracking system to follow fluorescent proteasomes revealed three types of motion: actively driven proteasome axonal transport, diffusive behavior in a viscoelastic axonema and proteasome-confined motion. We show that active proteasome transport depends on motor function because knockdown of the KIF5B motor subunit resulted in impairment of the anterograde proteasome flux and the density of segmental velocities. Finally, we reveal that neuronal proteasomes interact with intracellular membranes and identify the coordinated transport of fluorescent proteasomes with synaptic precursor vesicles, Golgi-derived vesicles, lysosomes and mitochondria. Taken together, our results reveal fast axonal transport as a new mechanism of proteasome delivery that depends on membrane cargo 'hitch-hiking' and the function of molecular motors. We further hypothesize that defects in proteasome transport could promote abnormal protein clearance in neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Miro's N-Terminal GTPase Domain Is Required for Transport of Mitochondria into Axons and Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J.; Wellington, Andrea J.; Sangston, Ryan M.; Gonzalez, Migdalia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state. PMID:25855186

  5. Death Receptor 6 Promotes Wallerian Degeneration in Peripheral Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Kanchana K; Cheng, Irene; Park, Rachel E; Karim, Mardeen S; Edamura, Kazusa; Hughes, Christopher; Spano, Anthony J; Erisir, Alev; Deppmann, Christopher D

    2017-03-20

    Axon degeneration during development is required to sculpt a functional nervous system and is also a hallmark of pathological insult, such as injury [1, 2]. Despite similar morphological characteristics, very little overlap in molecular mechanisms has been reported between pathological and developmental degeneration [3-5]. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS), developmental axon pruning relies on receptor-mediated extrinsic degeneration mechanisms to determine which axons are maintained or degenerated [5-7]. Receptors have not been implicated in Wallerian axon degeneration; instead, axon autonomous, intrinsic mechanisms are thought to be the primary driver for this type of axon disintegration [8-10]. Here we survey the role of neuronally expressed, paralogous tumor necrosis factor receptor super family (TNFRSF) members in Wallerian degeneration. We find that an orphan receptor, death receptor 6 (DR6), is required to drive axon degeneration after axotomy in sympathetic and sensory neurons cultured in microfluidic devices. We sought to validate these in vitro findings in vivo using a transected sciatic nerve model. Consistent with the in vitro findings, DR6 -/- animals displayed preserved axons up to 4 weeks after injury. In contrast to phenotypes observed in Wld s and Sarm1 -/- mice, preserved axons in DR6 -/- animals display profound myelin remodeling. This indicates that deterioration of axons and myelin after axotomy are mechanistically distinct processes. Finally, we find that JNK signaling after injury requires DR6, suggesting a link between this novel extrinsic pathway and the axon autonomous, intrinsic pathways that have become established for Wallerian degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Origin, course, and laterality of spinocerebellar axons in the North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terman, J R; Wang, X M; Martin, G F

    1998-08-01

    Spinocerebellar axons have been studied extensively in placental mammals, but there have been no full reports on their origin, laterality, or spinal course in any marsupial. We have used the North American opossum (Didelphis virginiana) to obtain such information and to ask whether any spinocerebellar neurons innervate both the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum through axonal collaterals. To identify spinal neurons that project to the cerebellum, we employed the retrograde transport of Fluoro-Gold (FG) from the anterior lobe, the main target of spinocerebellar axons. In some cases, cerebellar injections of FG were combined with hemisections of the rostral cervical or midthoracic spinal cord, so that laterality of spinocerebellar connections could be established. To determine whether single neurons project to both the anterior lobe and the posterior lobe, injections of Fast Blue (FB) into the anterior lobe were combined with injections of Diamidino yellow (DY) or rhodamine B dextran (RBD) into the posterior lobe, or vice versa. Following injections of FG into the anterior lobe, neurons were labeled throughout the length of the spinal cord, which differed in laminar distribution and laterality of their projections. Among other areas, neurons were labeled in the central cervical nucleus, the nucleus centrobasalis, Clarke's nucleus, the dorsal horn dorsal spinocerebellar tract area, the spinal border region, and Stilling's nucleus. When anterior lobe injections of FB were combined with injections of RBD or DY into the posterior lobe, or vice versa, some double-labeled neurons were present in all major spinocerebellar groups. Cerebellar injections of FG also retrogradely labeled spinocerebellar axons, allowing us to document their locations in the gray matter as well as within the periphery of the lateral and ventral funiculi at all spinal levels. A few spinocerebellar axons also were found in the dorsal funiculus (a dorsal column-spinocerebellar tract

  7. Age-related changes in axonal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolkis, V V; Tanin, S A; Gorban, Y N

    1997-01-01

    In rats the rate of axonal transport (AT) or radiolabeled material decreased in the ventral roots of the spinal cord and the vagal and hypoglossal nerves with aging. A maximum AT deceleration in old age was observed in the vagus. The uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, inhibition of glycolysis and hypoxia induced a greater AT deceleration in old rats as compared to adults. Small doses of sodium fluoride accelerated AT, and this correlated with a rise in cAMP levels in ventral roots. High doses of sodium fluoride decelerated AT more markedly in old rats. It was shown that anabolic hormones (sex steroids and thyroxine) accelerated AT in both adult and old rats, whereas insulin induced a rise in AT rate in only adults. The catabolic steroid, hydrocortisone decelerated AT. In old rats castration diminished AT, while thyroidectomy had no effect. It was also shown that hydrocortisone and testosterone were transported along axons, reached fibers of the skeletal muscles, and hyperpolarized the plasma membrane. In old age the latent period was extended. Following 73 to 74 days of irradiation, AT slowed down in all the nerves studied in both adult and old rats. Following irradiation hormonal effects on AT changed, for example, the stimulatory effect of estradiol became weak, especially in old rats. Changes in AT could be an important mechanism of disordering the growth of neurons and innervated cells in old age.

  8. Presynaptic localization of Smn and hnRNP R in axon terminals of embryonic and postnatal mouse motoneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Dombert

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is caused by deficiency of the ubiquitously expressed survival motoneuron (SMN protein. SMN is crucial component of a complex for the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP particles. Other cellular functions of SMN are less characterized so far. SMA predominantly affects lower motoneurons, but the cellular basis for this relative specificity is still unknown. In contrast to nonneuronal cells where the protein is mainly localized in perinuclear regions and the nucleus, Smn is also present in dendrites, axons and axonal growth cones of isolated motoneurons in vitro. However, this distribution has not been shown in vivo and it is not clear whether Smn and hnRNP R are also present in presynaptic axon terminals of motoneurons in postnatal mice. Smn also associates with components not included in the classical SMN complex like RNA-binding proteins FUS, TDP43, HuD and hnRNP R which are involved in RNA processing, subcellular localization and translation. We show here that Smn and hnRNP R are present in presynaptic compartments at neuromuscular endplates of embryonic and postnatal mice. Smn and hnRNP R are localized in close proximity to each other in axons and axon terminals both in vitro and in vivo. We also provide new evidence for a direct interaction of Smn and hnRNP R in vitro and in vivo, particularly in the cytosol of motoneurons. These data point to functions of SMN beyond snRNP assembly which could be crucial for recruitment and transport of RNA particles into axons and axon terminals, a mechanism which may contribute to SMA pathogenesis.

  9. Differential calcium signaling mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels in rat retinal ganglion cells and their unmyelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Sargoy

    Full Text Available Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury.

  10. Using a semi-distributed physically-based hydrological model to explain diurnal to decadal scale ice velocity variations on Franz Josef Glacier (Ka Roimata o Hine Hukatere), New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, I. C.; Anderson, B. M.; Banwell, A. F.; Goodsell, B.; Owens, I. F.; Mackintosh, A. N.; Lawson, W.

    2011-12-01

    Franz Josef Glacier provides a rare opportunity to observe the dynamics of a fast-flowing, maritime glacier that differs significantly from many 'typical' alpine glaciers. In particular, Franz Josef Glacier tongue has limited ranges in both diurnal and seasonal temperature, significant volumes of melt and rainwater present year-round, and has been through a recent advance/retreat cycle. Previous studies indicate these factors have a significant influence on surface motion. This paper presents surface velocity measurements made over a ten year period between 2000 and 2010 at a variety of resolutions, notably hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly. A distributed degree-day based mass balance model is used to calculate spatial and temporal variations in snow / ice melt and rainfall across the glacier each day of the decade and these are used as input to a semi-distributed physically based model representing the englacial / subglacial drainage system. Key outputs are spatial and temporal variations in subglacial water pressure and discharge. Because the glacier is relatively thin and steep, subglacial conduits operate at atmospheric pressure over most of the glacier's length for most of the time. High pressure events are confined to specific places, generally at times of high melt or rain inputs. Daily to monthly ice velocity variations can be linked to corresponding fluctuations in subglacial water pressures. Year-to-year velocity variations are linked more to variations in glacier geometry and advance/retreat cycles. Short- to medium-term ice velocity variations reflect rapid changes in basal motion, whereas longer-term variations reflect changes in ice deformation and longitudinal stress gradients.

  11. Is action potential threshold lowest in the axon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, Maarten H. P.; Stuart, Greg J.

    2008-01-01

    Action potential threshold is thought to be lowest in the axon, but when measured using conventional techniques, we found that action potential voltage threshold of rat cortical pyramidal neurons was higher in the axon than at other neuronal locations. In contrast, both current threshold and voltage

  12. Wnts guide longitudinal axon tracts in the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prasad, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The human brain contains more than 10 billion neurons that form over 10 trillion connections. The establishment of these connections during development requires axons to extend through the extracellular environment to their synaptic targets. This process of axon guidance is mediated by molecular

  13. SDSS-IV MaNGA: What Shapes the Distribution of Metals in Galaxies? Exploring the Roles of the Local Gas Fraction and Escape Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Heckman, T.; Sánchez, S. F.; Zakamska, N. L.; Cleary, J.; Zhu, G.; Brinkmann, J.; Drory, N.; THE MaNGA TEAM

    2018-01-01

    We determine the local metallicity of the ionized gas for more than 9.2 × 105 star-forming regions (spaxels) located in 1023 nearby galaxies included in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV MaNGA integral field spectroscopy unit survey. We use the dust extinction derived from the Balmer decrement and the stellar template fitting in each spaxel to estimate the local gas and stellar mass densities, respectively. We also use the measured rotation curves to determine the local escape velocity (V esc). We then analyze the relationships between the local metallicity and both the local gas fraction (μ) and V esc. We find that metallicity decreases with both increasing μ and decreasing V esc. By examining the residuals in these relations we show that the gas fraction plays a more primary role in the local chemical enrichment than does V esc. We show that the gas-regulator model of chemical evolution provides a reasonable explanation of the metallicity on local scales. The best-fit parameters for this model are consistent with the metal loss caused by momentum-driven galactic outflows. We also argue that both the gas fraction and the local escape velocity are connected to the local stellar surface density, which in turn is a tracer of the epoch at which the dominant local stellar population formed.

  14. SnoN facilitates axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun L Do

    Full Text Available Adult CNS neurons exhibit a reduced capacity for growth compared to developing neurons, due in part to downregulation of growth-associated genes as development is completed. We tested the hypothesis that SnoN, an embryonically regulated transcription factor that specifies growth of the axonal compartment, can enhance growth in injured adult neurons. In vitro, SnoN overexpression in dissociated adult DRG neuronal cultures significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, TGF-β1, a negative regulator of SnoN, inhibited neurite outgrowth, and SnoN over-expression overcame this inhibition. We then examined whether SnoN influenced axonal regeneration in vivo: indeed, expression of a mutant form of SnoN resistant to degradation significantly enhanced axonal regeneration following cervical spinal cord injury, despite peri-lesional upregulation of TGF-β1. Thus, a developmental mechanism that specifies extension of the axonal compartment also promotes axonal regeneration after adult CNS injury.

  15. Motor Axonal Regeneration After Partial and Complete Spinal Cord Transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Paul; Blesch, Armin; Graham, Lori; Wang, Yaozhi; Samara, Ramsey; Banos, Karla; Haringer, Verena; Havton, Leif; Weishaupt, Nina; Bennett, David; Fouad, Karim; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    We subjected rats to either partial mid-cervical or complete upper thoracic spinal cord transections and examined whether combinatorial treatments support motor axonal regeneration into and beyond the lesion. Subjects received cAMP injections into brainstem reticular motor neurons to stimulate their endogenous growth state, bone marrow stromal cell grafts in lesion sites to provide permissive matrices for axonal growth, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gradients beyond the lesion to stimulate distal growth of motor axons. Findings were compared to several control groups. Combinatorial treatment generated motor axon regeneration beyond both C5 hemisection and complete transection sites. Yet despite formation of synapses with neurons below the lesion, motor outcomes worsened after partial cervical lesions and spasticity worsened after complete transection. These findings highlight the complexity of spinal cord repair, and the need for additional control and shaping of axonal regeneration. PMID:22699902

  16. Dogs with hearth diseases causing turbulent high-velocity blood flow have changes in patelet function and von Willebrand factor multimer distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier

    2005-01-01

    and echocardiography were performed in all dogs. PFA100 closure times (the ability of platelets to occlude a hole in a membrane at high shear rates), platelet activation markers (plasma thromboxane B2 concentration, platelet surface P-selectin expression), platelet aggregation (in whole blood and platelet-rich plasma......The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate platelet function using in vitro tests based on both high and low shear rates and von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimeric composition in dogs with cardiac disease and turbulent high-velocity blood flow. Client-owned asymptomatic, untreated...... with MVP (regardless of MR status) compared with control dogs. No significant difference in platelet activation markers was found among groups. The data suggest that a form of platelet dysfunction detected at high shear rates was present in dogs with MR and SAS, possibly associated with a qualitative v...

  17. Dogs with hearth diseases causing turbulent high-velocity blood flow have changes in patelet function and von Willebrand factor multimer distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate platelet function using in vitro tests based on both high and low shear rates and von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimeric composition in dogs with cardiac disease and turbulent high-velocity blood flow. Client-owned asymptomatic, untreated...... dogs were divided into 4 groups: 14 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (Cavaliers) with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and no or minimal mitral regurgitation (MR), 17 Cavaliers with MVP and moderate to severe MR, 14 control dogs, and 10 dogs with subaortic stenosis (SAS). Clinical examinations...... and echocardiography were performed in all dogs. PFA100 closure times (the ability of platelets to occlude a hole in a membrane at high shear rates), platelet activation markers (plasma thromboxane B2 concentration, platelet surface P-selectin expression), platelet aggregation (in whole blood and platelet-rich plasma...

  18. Plasticity of the Axon Initial Segment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders Victor; Cotel, Florence; Perrier, Jean François

    2017-01-01

    undergo important modifications during development. The development of the AIS is governed by intrinsic mechanisms. In addition, surrounding neuronal networks modify its maturation. As a result, neurons get tuned to particular physiological functions. Neuronal activity also influences the morphology......The axon initial segment (AIS) is a key neuronal compartment because it is responsible for action potential initiation. The local density of Na+ channels, the biophysical properties of K+ channels, as well as the length and diameter of the AIS determine the spiking of neurons. These parameters...... of the mature AIS. When excitatory neurons are hyperactive, their AIS undergo structural changes that decrease their excitability and thereby maintain the activity within a given range. These slow homeostatic regulatory mechanisms occur on a time scale of hours or days. In contrast, the activation...

  19. Acetylated tau destabilizes the cytoskeleton in the axon initial segment and is mislocalized to the somatodendritic compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Peter Dongmin; Tracy, Tara E; Son, Hye-In; Zhou, Yungui; Leite, Renata E P; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W; Grinberg, Lea T; Gan, Li

    2016-06-29

    Neurons are highly polarized cells in which asymmetric axonal-dendritic distribution of proteins is crucial for neuronal function. Loss of polarized distribution of the axonal protein tau is an early sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. The cytoskeletal network in the axon initial segment (AIS) forms a barrier between the axon and the somatodentritic compartment, contributing to axonal retention of tau. Although perturbation of the AIS cytoskeleton has been implicated in neurological disorders, the molecular triggers and functional consequence of AIS perturbation are incompletely understood. Here we report that tau acetylation and consequent destabilization of the AIS cytoskeleton promote the somatodendritic mislocalization of tau. AIS cytoskeletal proteins, including ankyrin G and βIV-spectrin, were downregulated in AD brains and negatively correlated with an increase in tau acetylated at K274 and K281. AIS proteins were also diminished in transgenic mice expressing tauK274/281Q, a tau mutant that mimics K274 and K281 acetylation. In primary neuronal cultures, the tauK274/281Q mutant caused hyperdynamic microtubules (MTs) in the AIS, shown by live-imaging of MT mobility and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Using photoconvertible tau constructs, we found that axonal tauK274/281Q was missorted into the somatodendritic compartment. Stabilizing MTs with epothilone D to restore the cytoskeletal barrier in the AIS prevented tau mislocalization in primary neuronal cultures. Together, these findings demonstrate that tau acetylation contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease by compromising the cytoskeletal sorting machinery in the AIS.

  20. Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Regulates Axon Guidance by Stabilizing CRMP2A Selectively in Distal Axons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balaštík, Martin; Zhou, X.Z.; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Weissová, Romana; Žiak, Jakub; Pazyra-Murphy, M.F.; Cosker, K.E.; Machoňová, Olga; Kozmiková, Iryna; Chen, CH.; Pastorino, L.; Asara, J.M.; Cole, A.; Sutherland, C.; Segal, R. A.; Lu, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2015), s. 812-828 ISSN 2211-1247 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11213; GA MŠk LK21307; GA ČR GA15-03796S; GA MŠk LO1419 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Pin1 * axon guidance * Semaphorin 3A Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.870, year: 2015

  1. Axon tension regulates fasciculation/defasciculation through the control of axon shaft zippering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmít, Daniel; Fouquet, C.; Pincet, F.; Zápotocký, Martin; Trembleau, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, Apr 19 (2017), č. článku e19907. ISSN 2050-084X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-16755S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12FR002 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : biophysics * cell adhesion * coarsening * developmental biology * mathematical model * mechanical tension * axon guidance Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 7.725, year: 2016

  2. Neuron Morphology Influences Axon Initial Segment Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Allan T; Bravo, Jaime J

    2016-01-01

    In most vertebrate neurons, action potentials are initiated in the axon initial segment (AIS), a specialized region of the axon containing a high density of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. It has recently been proposed that neurons use plasticity of AIS length and/or location to regulate their intrinsic excitability. Here we quantify the impact of neuron morphology on AIS plasticity using computational models of simplified and realistic somatodendritic morphologies. In small neurons (e.g., dentate granule neurons), excitability was highest when the AIS was of intermediate length and located adjacent to the soma. Conversely, neurons having larger dendritic trees (e.g., pyramidal neurons) were most excitable when the AIS was longer and/or located away from the soma. For any given somatodendritic morphology, increasing dendritic membrane capacitance and/or conductance favored a longer and more distally located AIS. Overall, changes to AIS length, with corresponding changes in total sodium conductance, were far more effective in regulating neuron excitability than were changes in AIS location, while dendritic capacitance had a larger impact on AIS performance than did dendritic conductance. The somatodendritic influence on AIS performance reflects modest soma-to-AIS voltage attenuation combined with neuron size-dependent changes in AIS input resistance, effective membrane time constant, and isolation from somatodendritic capacitance. We conclude that the impact of AIS plasticity on neuron excitability will depend largely on somatodendritic morphology, and that, in some neurons, a shorter or more distally located AIS may promote, rather than limit, action potential generation.

  3. Imaging of mitochondrial dynamics in motor and sensory axons of living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolea, Irene; Gan, Wen-Biao; Manfedi, Giovanni; Magrané, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate distribution and supply of mitochondria to critical neuronal sites are thought to be necessary for the normal maintenance of neuronal architecture and activity, including synaptic plasticity and function. Imaging of neurons in vitro has provided understanding of the basic mechanisms of mitochondrial transport and the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. However, in vivo imaging studies of neurons are preferable to in vitro approaches because of the advantage of being performed in their natural environment. Here, we present useful protocols to image and study axonal transport of mitochondria in vivo, in the peripheral nerves of mice. Imaging in motor and sensory axons of living mice allows researchers to analyze mitochondrial dynamics in two distinct neuronal populations that are often affected in peripheral neuropathies.

  4. Projectile velocity and target temperature dependence of charge-state distributions of multicharged ions scattered during grazing interactions with a Au(110) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Q; Zehner, DM; Meyer, FW

    We have made systematic measurements of scattered projectile charge-state distributions for multicharged He, N, Ne, Na, and Ar ions grazingly incident on a Au(110) single-crystal target. For projectiles whose neutral binding energies Lie below the valence band (N, Ar, He, and Ne), observed 1+ charge

  5. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  6. Axonal Regulation of Central Nervous System Myelination: Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingseisen, Anna; Lyons, David A

    2018-02-01

    Approximately half of the human brain consists of myelinated axons. Central nervous system (CNS) myelin is made by oligodendrocytes and is essential for nervous system formation, health, and function. Once thought simply as a static insulator that facilitated rapid impulse conduction, myelin is now known to be made and remodeled in to adult life. Oligodendrocytes have a remarkable capacity to differentiate by default, but many aspects of their development can be influenced by axons. However, how axons and oligodendrocytes interact and cooperate to regulate myelination in the CNS remains unclear. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of how such interactions generate the complexity of myelination known to exist in vivo. We highlight intriguing results that indicate that the cross-sectional size of an axon alone may regulate myelination to a surprising degree. We also review new studies, which have highlighted diversity in the myelination of axons of different neuronal subtypes and circuits, and structure-function relationships, which suggest that myelinated axons can be exquisitely fine-tuned to mediate precise conduction needs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how neuronal activity regulates CNS myelination, and aim to provide an integrated overview of how axon-oligodendrocyte interactions sculpt neuronal circuit structure and function.

  7. Regeneration of axons in the mouse retina after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, P; Berry, M

    1982-01-01

    It is generally accepted that most axons in the mammalian CNS show only transient growth in response to injury, and numerous hypotheses have been advanced to account for this phenomenon. Detailed knowledge of the time-course and extent of this so-called 'abortive regeneration' is, however, surprisingly lacking. The retina of the adult albino mouse provides a convenient system in which to quantify the response of central axons to injury, since the retina can be prepared as a whole mount, allowing silver-impregnated axons to be followed along their entire course. Using this experimental model, sprouting of injured axons was observed as early as 14 h post lesion (hpl) with rapid growth (20 micrometers/day on average) continuing until 10 dpl. Thereafter, a decline in the overall growth rate was observed, presumably regenerated sprouts began to degenerate. However, not all axons showed this abortive response: numerous unfasciculated axons continued in random growth until at least 100 dpl. One possible interpretation of these results is that the concept of abortive regeneration of injured axons is untenable in regions of the CNS which are lacking in myelin.

  8. Axonal and presynaptic RNAs are locally transcribed in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, the long-standing opinion that axonal and presynaptic proteins are exclusively derived from the neuron cell body has been substantially modified by the demonstration that active systems of protein synthesis are present in axons and nerve terminals. These observations have raised the issue of the cellular origin of the involved RNAs, which has been generally attributed to the neuron soma. However, data gathered in a number of model systems indicated that axonal RNAs are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. More recent experiments on the perfused squid giant axon have definitively proved that axoplasmic RNAs are transcribed in periaxonal glia. Their delivery to the axon occurs by a modulatory mechanism based on the release of neurotransmitters from the stimulated axon and on their binding to glial receptors. In additional experiments on squid optic lobe synaptosomes, presynaptic RNA has been also shown to be synthesized locally, presumably in nearby glia. Together with a wealth of literature data, these observations indicate that axons and nerve terminals are endowed with a local system of gene expression that supports the maintenance and plasticity of these neuronal domains.

  9. Protein synthesis in axons and terminals: significance for maintenance, plasticity and regulation of phenotype. With a critique of slow transport theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, J; Giuditta, A; Koenig, E

    2000-09-01

    This article focuses on local protein synthesis as a basis for maintaining axoplasmic mass, and expression of plasticity in axons and terminals. Recent evidence of discrete ribosomal domains, subjacent to the axolemma, which are distributed at intermittent intervals along axons, are described. Studies of locally synthesized proteins, and proteins encoded by RNA transcripts in axons indicate that the latter comprise constituents of the so-called slow transport rate groups. A comprehensive review and analysis of published data on synaptosomes and identified presynaptic terminals warrants the conclusion that a cytoribosomal machinery is present, and that protein synthesis could play a role in long-term changes of modifiable synapses. The concept that all axonal proteins are supplied by slow transport after synthesis in the perikaryon is challenged because the underlying assumptions of the model are discordant with known metabolic principles. The flawed slow transport model is supplanted by a metabolic model that is supported by evidence of local synthesis and turnover of proteins in axons. A comparison of the relative strengths of the two models shows that, unlike the local synthesis model, the slow transport model fails as a credible theoretical construct to account for axons and terminals as we know them. Evidence for a dynamic anatomy of axons is presented. It is proposed that a distributed "sprouting program," which governs local plasticity of axons, is regulated by environmental cues, and ultimately depends on local synthesis. In this respect, nerve regeneration is treated as a special case of the sprouting program. The term merotrophism is proposed to denote a class of phenomena, in which regional phenotype changes are regulated locally without specific involvement of the neuronal nucleus.

  10. Mitotic motors coregulate microtubule patterns in axons and dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shen; Liu, Mei; Mozgova, Olga I; Yu, Wenqian; Baas, Peter W

    2012-10-03

    Microtubules are nearly uniformly oriented in the axons of vertebrate neurons but are non-uniformly oriented in their dendrites. Studies to date suggest a scenario for establishing these microtubule patterns whereby microtubules are transported into the axon and nascent dendrites with plus-ends-leading, and then additional microtubules of the opposite orientation are transported into the developing dendrites. Here, we used contemporary tools to confirm that depletion of kinesin-6 (also called CHO1/MKLP1 or kif23) from rat sympathetic neurons causes a reduction in the appearance of minus-end-distal microtubules in developing dendrites, which in turn causes them to assume an axon-like morphology. Interestingly, we observed a similar phenomenon when we depleted kinesin-12 (also called kif15 or HKLP2). Both motors are best known for their participation in mitosis in other cell types, and both are enriched in the cell body and dendrites of neurons. Unlike kinesin-12, which is present throughout the neuron, kinesin-6 is barely detectable in the axon. Accordingly, depletion of kinesin-6, unlike depletion of kinesin-12, has no effect on axonal branching or navigation. Interestingly, depletion of either motor results in faster growing axons with greater numbers of mobile microtubules. Based on these observations, we posit a model whereby these two motors generate forces that attenuate the transport of microtubules with plus-ends-leading from the cell body into the axon. Some of these microtubules are not only prevented from moving into the axon but are driven with minus-ends-leading into developing dendrites. In this manner, these so-called "mitotic" motors coregulate the microtubule patterns of axons and dendrites.

  11. Effects of Short-Term Exenatide Treatment on Regional Fat Distribution, Glycated Hemoglobin Levels, and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity of Obese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Young Hong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMost type 2 diabetes mellitus patients are obese and have obesity related vascular complications. Exenatide treatment is well known for both decreasing glycated hemoglobin levels and reduction in body weight. So, this study aimed to determine the effects of exenatide on body composition, glycated hemoglobin levels, and vascular stiffness in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.MethodsFor 1 month, 32 obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were administered 5 µg of exenatide twice daily. The dosage was then increased to 10 µg. Patients' height, body weight, glycated hemoglobin levels, lipid profile, pulse wave velocity (PWV, body mass index, fat mass, and muscle mass were measured by using Inbody at baseline and after 3 months of treatment.ResultsAfter 3 months of treatment, glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly (P=0.007. Triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein levels decreased, while aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were no change. Body weight, and fat mass decreased significantly (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively, while interestingly, muscle mass did not decrease (P=0.289. In addition to, Waist-to-hip ratio and aortic PWV decreased significantly (P=0.006 and P=0.001, respectively.ConclusionEffects of short term exenatide use in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus with cardiometabolic high risk patients not only reduced body weight without muscle mass loss, body fat mass, and glycated hemoglobin levels but also improved aortic PWV in accordance with waist to hip ratio.

  12. Final Report (1994 to 1996) Diagnostic of the Spatial and Velocity Distribution of Alpha Particles in Tokamak Fusion Reactor using Beat-wave Generated Lower Hybrid Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.Q.; Horton, R.D.; Evans, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    The alpha particles in a fusion reactor play a key role in the sustaining the fusion reaction. It is the heating provided by the alpha particles that help a fusion reactor operating in the ignition regime. It is, therefore, essential to understand the behavior of the alpha population both in real space and velocity space in order to design the optimal confinement device for fusion application. Moreover, the alphas represent a strong source of free energy that may generate plasma instabilities. Theoretical studies has identified the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) as an instability that can be excited by the alpha population in a toroidal device. Since the alpha has an energy of 3.5 MeV, a good confinement device will retain it in the interior of the plasma. Therefore, alpha measurement system need to probe the interior of a high density plasma. Due to the conducting nature of a plasma, wave with frequencies below the plasma frequency can not penetrate into the interior of the plasma where the alphas reside. This project uses a wave that can interact with the perpendicular motion of the alphas to probe its characteristics. However, this wave (the lower hybrid wave) is below the plasma frequency and can not be directly launched from the plasma edge. This project was designed to non-linearly excite the lower hybrid in the interior of a magnetized plasma and measure its interaction with a fast ion population

  13. Effects of Short-Term Exenatide Treatment on Regional Fat Distribution, Glycated Hemoglobin Levels, and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity of Obese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ju Young; Park, Keun Young; Kim, Byung Joon; Hwang, Won Min; Kim, Dong Ho; Lim, Dong Mee

    2016-03-01

    Most type 2 diabetes mellitus patients are obese and have obesity related vascular complications. Exenatide treatment is well known for both decreasing glycated hemoglobin levels and reduction in body weight. So, this study aimed to determine the effects of exenatide on body composition, glycated hemoglobin levels, and vascular stiffness in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. For 1 month, 32 obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were administered 5 μg of exenatide twice daily. The dosage was then increased to 10 μg. Patients' height, body weight, glycated hemoglobin levels, lipid profile, pulse wave velocity (PWV), body mass index, fat mass, and muscle mass were measured by using Inbody at baseline and after 3 months of treatment. After 3 months of treatment, glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly (P=0.007). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein levels decreased, while aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were no change. Body weight, and fat mass decreased significantly (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively), while interestingly, muscle mass did not decrease (P=0.289). In addition to, Waist-to-hip ratio and aortic PWV decreased significantly (P=0.006 and P=0.001, respectively). Effects of short term exenatide use in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus with cardiometabolic high risk patients not only reduced body weight without muscle mass loss, body fat mass, and glycated hemoglobin levels but also improved aortic PWV in accordance with waist to hip ratio.

  14. Portable Conduction Velocity Experiments Using Earthworms for the College and High School Neuroscience Teaching Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Kyle M.; Gage, Gregory J.; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Wilson, W. Jeffrey; Marzullo, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The earthworm is ideal for studying action potential conduction velocity in a classroom setting, as its simple linear anatomy allows easy axon length measurements and the worm's sparse coding allows single action potentials to be easily identified. The earthworm has two giant fiber systems (lateral and medial) with different conduction velocities…

  15. Axonal Membranes and Their Domains: Assembly and Function of the Axon Initial Segment and Node of Ranvier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Nelson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are highly specialized cells of the nervous system that receive, process and transmit electrical signals critical for normal brain function. Here, we review the intricate organization of axonal membrane domains that facilitate rapid action potential conduction underlying communication between complex neuronal circuits. Two critical excitable domains of vertebrate axons are the axon initial segment (AIS and the nodes of Ranvier, which are characterized by the high concentrations of voltage-gated ion channels, cell adhesion molecules and specialized cytoskeletal networks. The AIS is located at the proximal region of the axon and serves as the site of action potential initiation, while nodes of Ranvier, gaps between adjacent myelin sheaths, allow rapid propagation of the action potential through saltatory conduction. The AIS and nodes of Ranvier are assembled by ankyrins, spectrins and their associated binding partners through the clustering of membrane proteins and connection to the underlying cytoskeleton network. Although the AIS and nodes of Ranvier share similar protein composition, their mechanisms of assembly are strikingly different. Here we will cover the mechanisms of formation and maintenance of these axonal excitable membrane domains, specifically highlighting the similarities and differences between them. We will also discuss recent advances in super resolution fluorescence imaging which have elucidated the arrangement of the submembranous axonal cytoskeleton revealing a surprising structural organization necessary to maintain axonal organization and function. Finally, human mutations in axonal domain components have been associated with a growing number of neurological disorders including severe cognitive dysfunction, epilepsy, autism, neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. Overall, this review highlights the assembly, maintenance and function of axonal excitable domains, particularly the AIS and nodes of

  16. Nociceptive afferents to the premotor neurons that send axons simultaneously to the facial and hypoglossal motoneurons by means of axon collaterals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Dong

    Full Text Available It is well known that the brainstem premotor neurons of the facial nucleus and hypoglossal nucleus coordinate orofacial nociceptive reflex (ONR responses. However, whether the brainstem PNs receive the nociceptive projection directly from the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus is still kept unclear. Our present study focuses on the distribution of premotor neurons in the ONR pathways of rats and the collateral projection of the premotor neurons which are involved in the brainstem local pathways of the orofacial nociceptive reflexes of rat. Retrograde tracer Fluoro-gold (FG or FG/tetramethylrhodamine-dextran amine (TMR-DA were injected into the VII or/and XII, and anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected into the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc. The tracing studies indicated that FG-labeled neurons receiving BDA-labeled fibers from the Vc were mainly distributed bilaterally in the parvicellular reticular formation (PCRt, dorsal and ventral medullary reticular formation (MdD, MdV, supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup and parabrachial nucleus (PBN with an ipsilateral dominance. Some FG/TMR-DA double-labeled premotor neurons, which were observed bilaterally in the PCRt, MdD, dorsal part of the MdV, peri-motor nucleus regions, contacted with BDA-labeled axonal terminals and expressed c-fos protein-like immunoreactivity which induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin into the lip. After retrograde tracer wheat germ agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP was injected into VII or XII and BDA into Vc, electron microscopic study revealed that some BDA-labeled axonal terminals made mainly asymmetric synapses on the dendritic and somatic profiles of WGA-HRP-labeled premotor neurons. These data indicate that some premotor neurons could integrate the orofacial nociceptive input from the Vc and transfer these signals simultaneously to different brainstem motonuclei by axonal collaterals.

  17. Velocity evolution of galaxy clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saslaw, W.C.; Aarseth, S.J.

    1982-02-15

    We have examined the changing velocity distribution of galaxies as they cluster in computer models of the expanding universe. The models are 4000-body numerical simulations of galaxies with a large range of masses interacting gravitationally. Clustering in velocity space is measured by calculating the residual peculiar velocities around the Hubble expansion. These form ''Hubble streaks as clustering progresses. We distinguish isolated field galaxies from clustered galaxies. In contrast to the usual belief, the velocity dispersion of the most extreme field galaxies does not decrease adiabatically. Rather, it is dominated by the perturbations of distant large clusters as they form and it decreases much more slowly than the inverse expansion length scale, R/sup -1/. The velocity dispersion of extreme field galaxies is a good cosmological indicator of ..cap omega.. = rho/rho/sub crit/. Preliminary comparison of several simulations with observtions shows that our universe agrees better with low density models, ..cap omega..< or =0.1. The velocity dispersion of cluster centers of mass is a good cosmological marker as well. We also suggest another new method for estimating ..cap omega.., based on the history of extreme field galaxies.

  18. Saltatory conduction in unmyelinated axons: Clustering of Na+ channels on lipid rafts allows micro-saltatory conduction in C-fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali eNeishabouri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The action potential (AP, the fundamental signal of the nervous system, is carried by two types of axons: unmyelinated and myelinated fibers. In the former the action potential propagates continuously along the axon as established in large-diameter fibers. In the latter axons the AP jumps along the Nodes of Ranvier – discrete, anatomically specialized regions which contain very high densities of sodium ion (Na + channels. Therefore saltatory conduction is thought as the hallmark of myelinated axons, which enables faster and more reliable propagation of signals than in unmyelinated axons of same outer diameter.Recent molecular anatomy showed that in C-fibers, the very thin (0.1 μm diameter axons of the peripheral nervous system, Nav1.8 channels are clustered together on lipid rafts that float in the cell membrane. This localized concentration of Na+ channels resembles in structure the ion channel organization at the Nodes of Ranvier, yet it is currently unknown whether this translates into equivalent phenomenon of saltatory conduction or related-functional benefits and efficiencies. Therefore, we modeled biophysically realistic unmyelinated axons with both conventional and lipid-raft based organization of Na+ channels. We find that action potentials are reliably conducted in a micro-saltatory fashion along lipid rafts.Comparing APs in unmyelinated fibers with and without lipid rafts did not reveal any significant difference in either the metabolic cost or AP propagation velocity. By investigating the efficiency of AP propagation over Nav1.8 channels, we find however that the specific inactivation properties of these channels significantly increase the metabolic cost of signaling in C-fibers.

  19. Unc-51/ATG1 controls axonal and dendritic development via kinesin-mediated vesicle transport in the Drosophila brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Mochizuki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Members of the evolutionary conserved Ser/Thr kinase Unc-51 family are key regulatory proteins that control neural development in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Previous studies have suggested diverse functions for the Unc-51 protein, including axonal elongation, growth cone guidance, and synaptic vesicle transport.In this work, we have investigated the functional significance of Unc-51-mediated vesicle transport in the development of complex brain structures in Drosophila. We show that Unc-51 preferentially accumulates in newly elongating axons of the mushroom body, a center of olfactory learning in flies. Mutations in unc-51 cause disintegration of the core of the developing mushroom body, with mislocalization of Fasciclin II (Fas II, an IgG-family cell adhesion molecule important for axonal guidance and fasciculation. In unc-51 mutants, Fas II accumulates in the cell bodies, calyx, and the proximal peduncle. Furthermore, we show that mutations in unc-51 cause aberrant overshooting of dendrites in the mushroom body and the antennal lobe. Loss of unc-51 function leads to marked accumulation of Rab5 and Golgi components, whereas the localization of dendrite-specific proteins, such as Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM and No distributive disjunction (Nod, remains unaltered. Genetic analyses of kinesin light chain (Klc and unc-51 double heterozygotes suggest the importance of kinesin-mediated membrane transport for axonal and dendritic development. Moreover, our data demonstrate that loss of Klc activity causes similar axonal and dendritic defects in mushroom body neurons, recapitulating the salient feature of the developmental abnormalities caused by unc-51 mutations.Unc-51 plays pivotal roles in the axonal and dendritic development of the Drosophila brain. Unc-51-mediated membrane vesicle transport is important in targeted localization of guidance molecules and organelles that regulate elongation and compartmentalization of

  20. Determination of mass and velocity distributions of soot particles in a nozzle beam from a flame by means of a Wien filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homann, K.H.; Wiese, W. [Institute fuer Physikalische Chemie, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    Size distributions of soot particles in flames have mainly been determined from electron micrographs of particles. However, there is a limit of about 3 nm below which the uncertainty in particle diameter determined in this way becomes too large for a sufficiently accurate mass determination. For an understanding of the soot formation mechanism it is of particular interest to study the mass growth of the first soot particles after their inception from large hydrocarbon molecules. This concerns a mass range of some 10{sup 3} to some 10{sup 4} u. High-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) has the shortcoming that ionization of soot particles in an ion source does not seem to be very effective. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the usually applied electron multiplier detectors decreases with ion mass in a uncontrollable way. The authors therefore developed a new method for the mass analysis of very small particles. Charged soot particles can be sampled from low-pressure flames via a nozzle beam which generates a current large enough to be measured with a Faraday detector and a sensitive electrometer. Their mass distribution is quasi-continuous so that high mass resolution is not necessary.

  1. Statistical analysis of 16-year phase velocity distribution of mesospheric and ionospheric waves in airglow images: Comparison between Rikubetsu and Shigaraki, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, S.; Shiokawa, K.; Fujinami, H.; Otsuka, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Yamamoto, M.

    2017-12-01

    A new spectral analysis technique has been developed to obtain power spectra in the horizontal phase velocity by using the 3-D Fast Fourier Transform [Matsuda et al., JGR, 2014]. Takeo et al. (JGR, 2017) studied spectral parameters of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) in the mesopause region and medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) in the thermosphere over 16 years by using airglow images at wavelengths of 557.7 nm (emission altitudes: 90-100 km) and 630.0 nm (200-300 km) obtained at Shigaraki (34.8N, 136.1E), Japan. In this study, we have applied the same spectral analysis technique to the 557.7 nm and 630.0-nm airglow images obtained at Rikubetsu (43.5N, 143.8E), Japan, for 16 years from 1999 to 2014. We compared spectral features of AGWs and MSTIDs over 16 years observed at Shigaraki and Rikubetsu, which are separated by 1,174 km. The propagation direction of mesospheric AGWs seen in 557.7-nm airglow images is northeastward in summer and southwestward in winter at both Shigaraki and Rikubetsu, probably due to wind filtering of these waves by the mesospheric jet. In winter, the propagation direction of AGWs gradually shifted from southwestward to northwestward as time progresses from evening to morning at both stations. We suggest that this local-time shift of propagation direction can also be explained by the wind filtering effect. The propagation direction of AGWs changed from southwestward to northeastward at Rikubetsu on the day of the reversal of eastward zonal wind at 60N and 10 hPa (about 35 km in altitude) by the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW), while such a SSW-associated change was not identified at Shigaraki, indicating that the effect of SSW wind reversal reached only to the Rikubetsu latitudes. For MSTIDs, there is a negative correlation between yearly variation of powers spectral density and F10.7 flux and propagation direction is southwestward in all season at both Shigaraki and Rikubetsu. This negative correlation can be

  2. Axon diameter mapping in crossing fibers with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hui; Dyrby, Tim B; Alexander, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    tissue than measures derived from diffusion tensor imaging. Most existing techniques for axon diameter mapping assume a single axon orientation in the tissue model, which limits their application to only the most coherently oriented brain white matter, such as the corpus callosum, where the single......This paper proposes a technique for a previously unaddressed problem, namely, mapping axon diameter in crossing fiber regions, using diffusion MRI. Direct measurement of tissue microstructure of this kind using diffusion MRI offers a new class of biomarkers that give more specific information about...... orientation assumption is a reasonable one. However, fiber crossings and other complex configurations are widespread in the brain. In such areas, the existing techniques will fail to provide useful axon diameter indices for any of the individual fiber populations. We propose a novel crossing fiber tissue...

  3. Fiber Optic Detection of Action Potentials in Axons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smela, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    In prior exploratory research, we had designed a fiber optic sensor utilizing a long period Bragg grating for the purpose of detecting action potentials in axons optically, through a change in index...

  4. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    cells, while other fibers were unmyelinated. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that some of the regenerated fibers were tyrosine hydroxylase- or serotonin-immunoreactive, indicating a central origin. These findings suggest that there is a considerable amount of spontaneous regeneration after spinal cord......Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total...... length of all NF-immunolabeled axons within the lesion cavities was increased 6- to 10-fold at 5, 10, and 15 wk post-lesion compared with 1 wk post-surgery. In ultrastructural studies we found the putatively regenerating axons within the lesion to be associated either with oligodendrocytes or Schwann...

  5. The nigrostriatal pathway: axonal collateralization and compartmental specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensa, L; Giménez-Amaya, J M; Parent, A; Bernácer, J; Cebrián, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews two of the major features of the nigrostriatal pathway, its axonal collateralization, and compartmental specificity, as revealed by single-axon labeling experiments in rodents and immunocytological analysis of human postmortem tissue. The dorsal and ventral tiers of the substantia nigra pars compacta harbor various types of neurons the axons of which branch not only within the striatum but also in other major components of the basal ganglia. Furthermore, some nigrostriatal axons send collaterals both to thalamus and to brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. In humans, the compartmental specificity of the nigrostriatal pathway is revealed by the fact that the matrix compartment is densely innervated by dopaminergic fibers, whereas the striosomes display different densities of dopaminergic terminals depending on their location within the striatum. The nigral neurons most severely affected in Parkinson's disease are the ventral tier cells that project to the matrix and form deep clusters in the substantia nigra pars reticulata.

  6. Syndecan Promotes Axon Regeneration by Stabilizing Growth Cone Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyson J. Edwards

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Growth cones facilitate the repair of nervous system damage by providing the driving force for axon regeneration. Using single-neuron laser axotomy and in vivo time-lapse imaging, we show that syndecan, a heparan sulfate (HS proteoglycan, is required for growth cone function during axon regeneration in C. elegans. In the absence of syndecan, regenerating growth cones form but are unstable and collapse, decreasing the effective growth rate and impeding regrowth to target cells. We provide evidence that syndecan has two distinct functions during axon regeneration: (1 a canonical function in axon guidance that requires expression outside the nervous system and depends on HS chains and (2 an intrinsic function in growth cone stabilization that is mediated by the syndecan core protein, independently of HS. Thus, syndecan is a regulator of a critical choke point in nervous system repair.

  7. Alteration of neural action potential patterns by axonal stimulation: the importance of stimulus location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crago, Patrick E; Makowski, Nathaniel S

    2014-10-01

    Stimulation of peripheral nerves is often superimposed on ongoing motor and sensory activity in the same axons, without a quantitative model of the net action potential train at the axon endpoint. We develop a model of action potential patterns elicited by superimposing constant frequency axonal stimulation on the action potentials arriving from a physiologically activated neural source. The model includes interactions due to collision block, resetting of the neural impulse generator, and the refractory period of the axon at the point of stimulation. Both the mean endpoint firing rate and the probability distribution of the action potential firing periods depend strongly on the relative firing rates of the two sources and the intersite conduction time between them. When the stimulus rate exceeds the neural rate, neural action potentials do not reach the endpoint and the rate of endpoint action potentials is the same as the stimulus rate, regardless of the intersite conduction time. However, when the stimulus rate is less than the neural rate, and the intersite conduction time is short, the two rates partially sum. Increases in stimulus rate produce non-monotonic increases in endpoint rate and continuously increasing block of neurally generated action potentials. Rate summation is reduced and more neural action potentials are blocked as the intersite conduction time increases. At long intersite conduction times, the endpoint rate simplifies to being the maximum of either the neural or the stimulus rate. This study highlights the potential of increasing the endpoint action potential rate and preserving neural information transmission by low rate stimulation with short intersite conduction times. Intersite conduction times can be decreased with proximal stimulation sites for muscles and distal stimulation sites for sensory endings. The model provides a basis for optimizing experiments and designing neuroprosthetic interventions involving motor or sensory stimulation.

  8. Fcγ receptor-mediated inflammation inhibits axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Anti-glycan/ganglioside antibodies are the most common immune effectors found in patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which is a peripheral autoimmune neuropathy. We previously reported that disease-relevant anti-glycan autoantibodies inhibited axon regeneration, which echo the clinical association of these antibodies and poor recovery in Guillain-Barré Syndrome. However, the specific molecular and cellular elements involved in this antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration are not previously defined. This study examined the role of Fcγ receptors and macrophages in the antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration. A well characterized antibody passive transfer sciatic nerve crush and transplant models were used to study the anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration in wild type and various mutant and transgenic mice with altered expression of specific Fcγ receptors and macrophage/microglia populations. Outcome measures included behavior, electrophysiology, morphometry, immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting. We demonstrate that the presence of autoantibodies, directed against neuronal/axonal cell surface gangliosides, in the injured mammalian peripheral nerves switch the proregenerative inflammatory environment to growth inhibitory milieu by engaging specific activating Fcγ receptors on recruited monocyte-derived macrophages to cause severe inhibition of axon regeneration. Our data demonstrate that the antibody orchestrated Fcγ receptor-mediated switch in inflammation is one mechanism underlying inhibition of axon regeneration. These findings have clinical implications for nerve repair and recovery in antibody-mediated immune neuropathies. Our results add to the complexity of axon regeneration in injured peripheral and central nervous systems as adverse effects of B cells and autoantibodies on neural injury and repair are increasingly recognized.

  9. Modality-Specific Axonal Regeneration: Towards selective regenerative neural interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa eLotfi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed submodality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type-specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5 fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased 3 fold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3-D Y-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a 5-fold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a Y-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted towards the sural nerve, while N-52+ large diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  10. Modality-specific axonal regeneration: toward selective regenerative neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Parisa; Garde, Kshitija; Chouhan, Amit K; Bengali, Ebrahim; Romero-Ortega, Mario I

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed sub-modality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5-fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased threefold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3D "Y"-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a fivefold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a "Y"-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted toward the sural nerve, while N-52+ large-diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  11. MR imaging of a diffuse axonal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yukiya; Okamoto, Hisayo; Mitsushima, Minoru; Hori, Tomokatsu; Sasaki, Mamoru; Teraoka, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    Six patients who had been diagnosed as having so-called a 'Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI)' were examined by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Yokogawa Resona 0.5T and Shimadzu SMT 50A). MRI revealed clear evidence of injured white matter in these patients, while X-ray CT scanning could not demonstrate such lesions definitely. The patients consisted of three adults and three adolescents. They had been injured by traffic accidents or falls. Every patient had lost consciousness immediately, and their coma had continued for at least two weeks after the trauma. X-ray CT scanning demonstrated no complicated lesion, such as intracranial hematoma or brain edema, resulting in increased intracranial pressure and cerebral herniation. In all of the patients, injuries of the deep white matter (corpus callosum, upper pons, or internal capsule, for example) were clearly found by T 2 -weighted imaging. Because these lesions had characteristic features in their localation, as has been described by Adams et al. these patients were diagnosed as having DAI. Also, it was interesting that the focal neurological deficits of these patients correlated well with the local injuries of the white matter. The three young patients recovered to various degrees, but the three adults passed into a vegetative state. The prognosis of the patients seemed to be determined by their age. Because the clinical diagnosis of DAI is controversial, the use of MRI will help in its clinical diagnosis and analysis. (author)

  12. Kinematics of turnaround and retrograde axonal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid axonal transport of a pulse of 35 S-methionine-labelled material was studied in vitro in the sensory neurons of amphibian sciatic nerve using a position-sensitive detector. For 10 nerves studied at 23.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C it was found that a pulse moved in the anterograde direction characterized by front edge, peak, and trailing edge transport rates of (mm/d) 180.8 +/- 2.2 (+/- SEM), 176.6 +/- 2.3, and 153.7 +/- 3.0, respectively. Following its arrival at a distal ligature, a smaller pulse was observed to move in the retrograde direction characterized by front edge and peak transport rates of 158.0 +/- 7.3 and 110.3 +/- 3.5, respectively, indicating that retrograde transport proceeds at a rate of 0.88 +/- 0.04 that of anterograde. The retrograde pulse was observed to disperse at a rate greater than the anterograde. Reversal of radiolabel at the distal ligature began 1.49 +/- 0.15 h following arrival of the first radiolabel. Considerable variation was seen between preparations in the way radiolabel accumulated in the end (ligature) regions of the nerve. Although a retrograde pulse was seen in all preparations, in 7 of 10 preparations there was no evidence of this pulse accumulating within less than 2-3 mm of a proximal ligature; however, accumulation was observed within less than 5 mm in all preparations

  13. MR imaging of a diffuse axonal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yukiya; Okamoto, Hisayo; Mitsushima, Minoru; Hori, Tomokatsu (Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine); Sasaki, Mamoru; Teraoka, Akira

    1989-04-01

    Six patients who had been diagnosed as having so-called a 'Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI)' were examined by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Yokogawa Resona 0.5T and Shimadzu SMT 50A). MRI revealed clear evidence of injured white matter in these patients, while X-ray CT scanning could not demonstrate such lesions definitely. The patients consisted of three adults and three adolescents. They had been injured by traffic accidents or falls. Every patient had lost consciousness immediately, and their coma had continued for at least two weeks after the trauma. X-ray CT scanning demonstrated no complicated lesion, such as intracranial hematoma or brain edema, resulting in increased intracranial pressure and cerebral herniation. In all of the patients, injuries of the deep white matter (corpus callosum, upper pons, or internal capsule, for example) were clearly found by T{sub 2}-weighted imaging. Because these lesions had characteristic features in their localation, as has been described by Adams et al. these patients were diagnosed as having DAI. Also, it was interesting that the focal neurological deficits of these patients correlated well with the local injuries of the white matter. The three young patients recovered to various degrees, but the three adults passed into a vegetative state. The prognosis of the patients seemed to be determined by their age. Because the clinical diagnosis of DAI is controversial, the use of MRI will help in its clinical diagnosis and analysis. (author).

  14. Developmental time windows for axon growth influence neuronal network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sol; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    Early brain connectivity development consists of multiple stages: birth of neurons, their migration and the subsequent growth of axons and dendrites. Each stage occurs within a certain period of time depending on types of neurons and cortical layers. Forming synapses between neurons either by growing axons starting at similar times for all neurons (much-overlapped time windows) or at different time points (less-overlapped) may affect the topological and spatial properties of neuronal networks. Here, we explore the extreme cases of axon formation during early development, either starting at the same time for all neurons (parallel, i.e., maximally overlapped time windows) or occurring for each neuron separately one neuron after another (serial, i.e., no overlaps in time windows). For both cases, the number of potential and established synapses remained comparable. Topological and spatial properties, however, differed: Neurons that started axon growth early on in serial growth achieved higher out-degrees, higher local efficiency and longer axon lengths while neurons demonstrated more homogeneous connectivity patterns for parallel growth. Second, connection probability decreased more rapidly with distance between neurons for parallel growth than for serial growth. Third, bidirectional connections were more numerous for parallel growth. Finally, we tested our predictions with C. elegans data. Together, this indicates that time windows for axon growth influence the topological and spatial properties of neuronal networks opening up the possibility to a posteriori estimate developmental mechanisms based on network properties of a developed network.

  15. Transport coefficients and orientational distributions of dilute colloidal dispersions composed of hematite particles (for an external magnetic field parallel to the angular velocity vector of simple shear flow)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Akira; Hayasaka, Ryo; Majima, Tamotsu

    We have treated a dilute dispersion composed of ferromagnetic rodlike particles with a magnetic moment normal to the particle axis, such as hematites, to investigate the influences of the magnetic field strength, shear rate, and random forces on the orientational distribution of rodlike particles and also on transport coefficients, such as viscosity and diffusion coefficient. In the present analysis, these rodlike particles are assumed to conduct the rotational Brownian motion in a simple shear flow as well as an external magnetic field. The results obtained here are summarized as follows. In the case of a strong magnetic field and a smaller shear rate, the rodlike particle can freely rotate in the xy-plane with the magnetic moment continuing to point the magnetic field direction. On the other hand, for a strong shear flow, the particle has a tendency to incline in the flow direction with the magnetic moment pointing to the magnetic field direction. In the case of the magnetic field applied normal to the direction of the sedimentation, the diffusion coefficient gives rise to smaller values than expected, since the rodlike particle sediments with the particle axis inclining toward directions normal to the movement direction and, of course, toward the direction along that direction.

  16. Sensory axon-derived neuregulin-1 is required for axoglial signaling and normal sensory function but not for long-term axon maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fricker, F.R.; Zhu, N.; Tsantoulas, C.

    2009-01-01

    to represent large-diameter axons that have failed to myelinate. Conditional neuregulin-1 ablation resulted in a reduced sensitivity to noxious mechanical stimuli. These findings emphasize the importance of neuregulin-1 in mediating the signaling between axons and both myelinating and nonmyelinating Schwann...... cells required for normal sensory function. Sensory neuronal survival and axonal maintenance, however, are not dependent on axon-derived neuregulin-1 signaling in adulthood Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6/17...

  17. Difference in trafficking of brain-derived neurotrophic factor between axons and dendrites of cortical neurons, revealed by live-cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohara Keigo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is sorted into a regulated secretory pathway of neurons, is supposed to act retrogradely through dendrites on presynaptic neurons or anterogradely through axons on postsynaptic neurons. Depending on which is the case, the pattern and direction of trafficking of BDNF in dendrites and axons are expected to be different. To address this issue, we analyzed movements of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged BDNF in axons and dendrites of living cortical neurons by time-lapse imaging. In part of the experiments, the expression of BDNF tagged with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was compared with that of nerve growth factor (NGF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, to see whether fluorescent protein-tagged BDNF is expressed in a manner specific to this neurotrophin. Results We found that BDNF tagged with GFP or CFP was expressed in a punctated manner in dendrites and axons in about two-thirds of neurons into which plasmid cDNAs had been injected, while NGF tagged with GFP or YFP was diffusely expressed even in dendrites in about 70% of the plasmid-injected neurons. In neurons in which BDNF-GFP was expressed as vesicular puncta in axons, 59 and 23% of the puncta were moving rapidly in the anterograde and retrograde directions, respectively. On the other hand, 64% of BDNF-GFP puncta in dendrites did not move at all or fluttered back and forth within a short distance. The rest of the puncta in dendrites were moving relatively smoothly in either direction, but their mean velocity of transport, 0.47 ± 0.23 (SD μm/s, was slower than that of the moving puncta in axons (0.73 ± 0.26 μm/s. Conclusion The present results show that the pattern and velocity of the trafficking of fluorescence protein-tagged BDNF are different between axons and dendrites, and suggest that the anterograde transport in axons may be the dominant stream of BDNF to release sites.

  18. Molecular Disorganization of Axons Adjacent to Human Cortical Microinfarcts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Coban

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs are microscopically identified wedge-shaped ischemic lesions that occur at or near the cortical surface and result from occlusion of penetrating arterioles. These microscopic lesions can be observed with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging in aging brains and in patients with cerebrovascular disease. Recent studies have suggested that strategically located microinfarcts strongly correlate with cognitive deficits, which can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease as well as other forms of dementia. We have recently shown that the molecular organization of axons into functional microdomains is altered in areas adjacent to white matter lacunar and microinfarcts, creating a peri-infarct penumbral injury in surviving axons. Whether similar changes in nodal, adjacent paranodal, and proximal axon initial segment molecular organization occur in the cortex adjacent to human CMIs is not known. Paraffin-embedded sections of autopsy brain tissue from five patients with CMIs were immunofluorescently labeled for nodal and paranodal markers including beta-IV spectrin, ankyrin-G, and contactin-associated protein. High magnification images from the peri-infarct cortical tissue were generated using confocal microscopy. In surviving cortical tissue adjacent to microinfarcts, we observed a dramatic loss of axon initial segments, suggesting that neuronal firing capacity in adjacent cortical tissue is likely compromised. The number of identifiable nodal/paranodal complexes in surviving cortical tissue is reduced adjacent to microinfarcts, while the average paranodal length is increased indicating a breakdown of axoglial contact. This axonal microdomain disorganization occurs in the relative absence of changes in the structural integrity of myelinated axons as measured by myelin basic protein and neurofilament staining. These findings indicate that the molecular organization of surviving axons adjacent to human CMIs is abnormal

  19. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  20. Peculiarities of axonal transport of steroid hormones (hydrocortisone, testosterone) in spinal root fibres of adult and old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolkis, V V; Tanin, S A

    1999-01-01

    The labelled steroid hormones [3H]hydrocortisone and [14C]testosterone, being injected into the gray matter of the rat spinal cord L5-L6 segments, were shown to be transported at a high velocity along the ventral (anterograde) and dorsal (retrograde) root fibres. The maximum velocity of axonal transport along the ventral and dorsal roots in adult rats was, on average, 3006 +/- 101 and 3028 +/- 48 mm/day for [3H]hydrocortisone and 4594 +/- 186 and 5185 +/- 485 mm/day for [14C]testosterone, respectively. In old rats, axonal transport of steroid hormones was markedly slower. Its maximum velocity along the ventral and dorsal roots averaged to 756 +/- 64 and 738 +/- 48 mm/day for [3H]hydrocortisone and 624 +/- 54 and 608 +/- 80 mm/day for [14C]testosterone, respectively. In old rats the amount of labelled hydrocortisone incorporated into the ventral root fibres was sharply reduced (by more than an order of the value) as compared to that in adult animals. At the same time, the intensity of the labelled testosterone incorporation into the ventral root fibres did not demonstrate any significant age-related difference. The injection of low doses of steroid hormones (from less than one microgram to a few micrograms) into the lumbar spinal cord resulted in a significant hyperpolarization several hours later first of the gastrocnemius and then of deltoideus muscle fibres. In old rats, such a hyperpolarization occurred much later. It is suggested that axonal transport of steroid hormones is one of the mechanisms responsible for the effects of hormones on the tissues, which undergoes considerable changes with ageing.

  1. Ultrasound systems for blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    Medical ultrasound scanners can be used both for displayinggray-scale images of the anatomy and for visualizing theblood flow dynamically in the body.The systems can interrogate the flow at a single position in the bodyand there find the velocity distribution over time. They can also show adynami....... The calculation of the velocity distribution is then explainedalong with the different physical effects influencing the estimation.The estimation of mean velocities using auto- andcross-correlation for color flow mapping is also described....... color image of velocity at up to 20 to 60 frames a second. Both measurements are performedby repeatedly pulsing in the same direction and then usethe correlation from pulse to pulse to determine the velocity.The paper gives a simple model for the interactionbetween the ultrasound and the moving blood...

  2. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Amanda E; Foust, Amanda J; Bal, Thierry; McCormick, David A

    2015-11-25

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons contain three main

  3. Mechanistic logic underlying the axonal transport of cytosolic proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David A.; Das, Utpal; Tang, Yong; Roy, Subhojit

    2011-01-01

    Proteins vital to presynaptic function are synthesized in the neuronal perikarya and delivered into synapses via two modes of axonal transport. While membrane-anchoring proteins are conveyed in fast axonal transport via motor-driven vesicles, cytosolic proteins travel in slow axonal transport; via mechanisms that are poorly understood. We found that in cultured axons, populations of cytosolic proteins tagged to photoactivable-GFP (PA-GFP) move with a slow motor-dependent anterograde bias; distinct from vesicular-trafficking or diffusion of untagged PA-GFP. The overall bias is likely generated by an intricate particle-kinetics involving transient assembly and short-range vectorial spurts. In-vivo biochemical studies reveal that cytosolic proteins are organized into higher-order structures within axon-enriched fractions that are largely segregated from vesicles. Data-driven biophysical modeling best predicts a scenario where soluble molecules dynamically assemble into mobile supra-molecular structures. We propose a model where cytosolic proteins are transported by dynamically assembling into multi-protein complexes that are directly/indirectly conveyed by motors. PMID:21555071

  4. Functional complexity of the axonal growth cone: a proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estrada-Bernal

    Full Text Available The growth cone, the tip of the emerging neurite, plays a crucial role in establishing the wiring of the developing nervous system. We performed an extensive proteomic analysis of axonal growth cones isolated from the brains of fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. Approximately 2000 proteins were identified at ≥ 99% confidence level. Using informatics, including functional annotation cluster and KEGG pathway analysis, we found great diversity of proteins involved in axonal pathfinding, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular traffic and carbohydrate metabolism, as expected. We also found a large and complex array of proteins involved in translation, protein folding, posttranslational processing, and proteasome/ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Immunofluorescence studies performed on hippocampal neurons in culture confirmed the presence in the axonal growth cone of proteins representative of these processes. These analyses also provide evidence for rough endoplasmic reticulum and reveal a reticular structure equipped with Golgi-like functions in the axonal growth cone. Furthermore, Western blot revealed the growth cone enrichment, relative to fetal brain homogenate, of some of the proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and catabolism. Our study provides a resource for further research and amplifies the relatively recently developed concept that the axonal growth cone is equipped with proteins capable of performing a highly diverse range of functions.

  5. Subtypes of GABAergic neurons project axons in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyoshi Higo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons in the neocortex have been regarded as interneurons and speculated to modulate the activity of neurons locally. Recently, however, several experiments revealed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons project cortico-cortically with long axons. In this study, we illustrate Golgi-like images of the nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons using a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d reaction and follow the emanating axon branches in cat brain sections. These axon branches projected cortico-cortically with other non-labeled arcuate fibers, contra-laterally via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure. The labeled fibers were not limited to the neocortex but found also in the fimbria of the hippocampus. In order to have additional information on these GABAergic neuron projections, we investigated green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled GABAergic neurons in GAD67-Cre knock-in / GFP Cre-reporter mice. GFP-labeled axons emanate densely, especially in the fimbria, a small number in the anterior commissure, and very sparsely in the corpus callosum. These two different approaches confirm that not only nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons but also other subtypes of GABAergic neurons project long axons in the cerebral cortex and are in a position to be involved in information processing.

  6. Axonal transport and axon sprouting in the adult rat dentate gyrus: an autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldowitz, D.; Cotman, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    In response to an entorhinal lesion, the commissural and associational afferents to the dentate gyrus have been shown to expand beyond their normal terminal zone into the area denervated by the entorhinal lesion. The present study has investigated the axonal transport of [ 3 H]-labeled proteins in the commissural and associational projections following an entorhinal lesion. Injections of [ 3 H]proline, [ 3 H]leucine or [ 3 H)fucose were given in the vicinity of the commissural and associational cells of origin before, immediately subsequent to, or at 5 to 15 days after the entorhinal lesion. The disposition of previously- or newly-synthesized proteins was examined in the commissural and associational terminal field at different times after an entorhinal lesion by light-microscopic autoradiography. (author)

  7. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders V.; Johansen, Emil O.; Perrier, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS...... in live tissue can be difficult because its identification is not always reliable. Here we provide a new technique allowing a fast and reliable identification of the AIS in live brain slice preparations. By simultaneous recording of extracellular local field potentials and whole-cell patch-clamp recording...... of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from...

  8. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Victor ePetersen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The axon initial segment (AIS is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS in live tissue can be difficult because its identification is not always reliable. Here we provide a new technique allowing a fast and reliable identification of the AIS in live brain slice preparations. By simultaneous recoding of extracellular local field potentials and whole-cell patch-clamp recording of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from the brain.

  9. Channelrhodopsin-2 localised to the axon initial segment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Grubb

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The light-gated cation channel Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 is a powerful and versatile tool for controlling neuronal activity. Currently available versions of ChR2 either distribute uniformly throughout the plasma membrane or are localised specifically to somatodendritic or synaptic domains. Localising ChR2 instead to the axon initial segment (AIS could prove an extremely useful addition to the optogenetic repertoire, targeting the channel directly to the site of action potential initiation, and limiting depolarisation and associated calcium entry elsewhere in the neuron. Here, we describe a ChR2 construct that we localised specifically to the AIS by adding the ankyrinG-binding loop of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(vII-III to its intracellular terminus. Expression of ChR2-YFP-Na(vII-III did not significantly affect the passive or active electrical properties of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. However, the tiny ChR2 currents and small membrane depolarisations resulting from AIS targeting meant that optogenetic control of action potential firing with ChR2-YFP-Na(vII-III was unsuccessful in baseline conditions. We did succeed in stimulating action potentials with light in some ChR2-YFP-Na(vII-III-expressing neurons, but only when blocking KCNQ voltage-gated potassium channels. We discuss possible alternative approaches to obtaining precise control of neuronal spiking with AIS-targeted optogenetic constructs and propose potential uses for our ChR2-YFP-Na(vII-III probe where subthreshold modulation of action potential initiation is desirable.

  10. Shortest loops are pacemakers in random networks of electrically coupled axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita eVladimirov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency oscillations (HFOs are an important part of brain activity in health and disease. However, their origins remain obscure and controversial. One possible mechanism depends on the presence of sparsely distributed gap junctions that electrically couple the axons of principal cells. A plexus of electrically coupled axons is modeled as a random network with bidirectional connections between its nodes. Under certain conditions the network can demonstrate one of two types of oscillatory activity. Type I oscillations (100-200 Hz are predicted to be caused by spontaneously spiking axons in a network with strong (high-conductance gap junctions. Type II oscillations (200-300 Hz require no spontaneous spiking and relatively weak (low-conductance gap junctions, across which spike propagation failures occur. The type II oscillations are reentrant and self-sustained. Here we examine what determines the frequency of type II oscillations. Using simulations we show that the distribution of loop lengths is the key factor for determining frequency in type II network oscillations. We first analyze spike failure between two electrically coupled cells using a model of anatomically reconstructed CA1 pyramidal neuron. Then network oscillations are studied by a cellular automaton model with random network connectivity, in which we control loop statistics. We show that oscillation periods can be predicted from the network's loop statistics. The shortest loop, around which a spike can travel, is the most likely pacemaker candidate.The principle of one loop as a pacemaker is remarkable, because random networks contain a large number of loops juxtaposed and superimposed, and their number rapidly grows with network size. This principle allows us to predict the frequency of oscillations from network connectivity and visa versa. We finally propose that type I oscillations may correspond to ripples, while type II oscillations correspond to so-called fast ripples.

  11. A co-culture microtunnel technique demonstrating a significant contribution of unmyelinated Schwann cells to the acceleration of axonal conduction in Schwann cell-regulated peripheral nerve development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Koji; Shimba, Kenta; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2017-08-14

    Schwann cells (SCs) contribute to the regulation of axonal conduction in a myelin-dependent and -independent manner. However, due to the lack of investigative techniques that are able to record axonal conduction under conditions that control the proliferation of specific SC types, little is known about the extent to which myelinated SCs (mSCs) and unmyelinated SCs (umSCs) modulate axonal conduction. In this study, a microtunnel-electrode approach was applied to a neuron/SC co-culture technique. Rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and SCs were co-cultured in a microtunnel-electrode device, which enabled recording of the conduction delay in multiple axons passing through microtunnels. Despite the absence of nuclei in the microtunnel when SCs were eliminated, cultured cells were densely packed and expressed S100 beta (an SC marker) at a rate of 96% in neuron/SC co-culture, indicating that SCs migrated into the microtunnel. In addition, supplementation with ascorbic acid after 6 days in vitro (DIV) successfully induced myelination from 22 DIV. Activity recording experiments indicated that the conduction delay decreased with culture length from 17 DIV in the neuron/SC co-culture but not in neuron monoculture. Interestingly, the SC-modulated shortening of conduction delay was attenuated at 17 DIV and 22 DIV by supplementing the culture medium with ascorbic acid and, at the same time, suppressing SC proliferation, suggesting that immature umSCs increased axonal conduction velocity in a cell density-dependent manner before the onset of myelination. These results suggest that this method is an effective tool for investigating the contributions of mSCs or umSCs to the regulation of axonal conduction.

  12. Perilesional edema in radiation necrosis reflects axonal degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Torres, Carlos J; Yuan, Liya; Schmidt, Robert E; Rich, Keith M; Ackerman, Joseph JH; Garbow, Joel R

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we characterized a Gamma Knife® radiation necrosis mouse model with various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols to identify biomarkers useful in differentiation from tumors. Though the irradiation was focal to one hemisphere, a contralateral injury was observed that appeared to be localized in the white matter only. Interestingly, this injury was identifiable in T2-weighted images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) maps, but not on post-contrast T1-weighted images. This observation of edema independent of vascular changes is akin to the perilesional edema seen in clinical radiation necrosis. The pathology underlying the observed white-matter MRI changes was explored by performing immunohistochemistry for healthy axons and myelin. The presence of both healthy axons and myelin was reduced in the contralateral white-matter lesion. Based on our immunohistochemical findings, the contralateral white-matter injury is most likely due to axonal degeneration

  13. The nano-architecture of the axonal cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterrier, Christophe; Dubey, Pankaj; Roy, Subhojit

    2017-12-01

    The corporeal beauty of the neuronal cytoskeleton has captured the imagination of generations of scientists. One of the easiest cellular structures to visualize by light microscopy, its existence has been known for well over 100 years, yet we have only recently begun to fully appreciate its intricacy and diversity. Recent studies combining new probes with super-resolution microscopy and live imaging have revealed surprising details about the axonal cytoskeleton and, in particular, have discovered previously unknown actin-based structures. Along with traditional electron microscopy, these newer techniques offer a nanoscale view of the axonal cytoskeleton, which is important for our understanding of neuronal form and function, and lay the foundation for future studies. In this Review, we summarize existing concepts in the field and highlight contemporary discoveries that have fundamentally altered our perception of the axonal cytoskeleton.

  14. The axon-protective WLD(S) protein partially rescues mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis after axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godzik, Katharina; Coleman, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The axon-protective Wallerian degeneration slow (WLD(S)) protein can ameliorate the decline in axonal ATP levels after neurite transection. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this effect is associated with maintenance of mitochondrial respiration and/or glycolysis. We used isolated neurites of superior cervical ganglion (SCG) cultures in the Seahorse XF-24 Metabolic Flux Analyser to determine mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis under different conditions. We observed that both mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis declined significantly during the latent phase of Wallerian degeneration. WLD(S) partially reduced the decline both in glycolysis and in mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that depleting NAD levels in uncut cultures led to changes in mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis similar to those rescued by WLD(S) after cut, suggesting that the maintenance of NAD levels in Wld(S) neurites after axonal injury at least partially underlies the maintenance of ATP levels. However, by using another axon-protective mutation (Sarm1(-/-)), we could demonstrate that rescue of basal ECAR (and hence probably glycolysis) rather than basal OCR (mitochondrial respiration) may be part of the protective phenotype to delay Wallerian degeneration. These findings open new routes to study glycolysis and the connection between NAD and ATP levels in axon degeneration, which may help to eventually develop therapeutic strategies to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Axoplasmic RNA species synthesized in the isolated squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapallino, M V; Cupello, A; Giuditta, A

    1988-07-01

    Isolated squid stellate nerves and giant fiber lobes were incubated for 8 hr in Millipore filtered sea water containing [3H]uridine. The electrophoretic patterns of radioactive RNA purified from the axoplasm of the giant axon and from the giant fiber lobe (cell bodies of the giant axon) demonstrated the presence of RNA species with mobilities corresponding to tRNA and rRNA. The presence of labeled rRNAs was confirmed by the behavior of the large rRNA component (31S) which, in the squid, readily dissociates into its two constituent moyeties (17S and 20S). Comparable results were obtained with the axonal sheath and the stellate nerve. In all the electrophoretic patterns, additional species of radioactive RNA migrated between the 4S and the 20S markers, i.e. with mobilities corresponding to presumptive mRNAs. Chromatographic analysis of the purified RNAs on oligo(dT)cellulose indicated the presence of labeled poly(A)+ RNA in all tissue samples. Radioactive poly(A)+ RNA represented approximately 1% of the total labeled RNA in the axoplasm, axonal sheath and stellate nerve, but more than 2% in the giant fiber lobe. The labeled poly(A)+ RNAs of the giant fibre lobe showed a prevalence of larger species in comparison to the axonal sheath and stellate nerve. In conclusion, the axoplasmic RNAs synthesized by the isolated squid giant axon appear to include all the major classes of axoplasmic RNAs, that is rRNA, tRNA and mRNA.

  16. Pannexin 1 Modulates Axonal Growth in Mouse Peripheral Nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Horton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The pannexin family of channels consists of three members—pannexin-1 (Panx1, pannexin-2 (Panx2, and pannexin-3 (Panx3 that enable the exchange of metabolites and signaling molecules between intracellular and extracellular compartments. Pannexin-mediated release of intracellular ATP into the extracellular space has been tied to a number of cellular activities, primarily through the activity of type P2 purinergic receptors. Previous work indicates that the opening of Panx1 channels and activation of purinergic receptors by extracellular ATP may cause inflammation and apoptosis. In the CNS (central nervous system and PNS (peripheral nervous system, coupled pannexin, and P2 functions have been linked to peripheral sensitization (pain pathways. Purinergic pathways are also essential for other critical processes in the PNS, including myelination and neurite outgrowth. However, whether such pathways are pannexin-dependent remains to be determined. In this study, we use a Panx1 knockout mouse model and pharmacological inhibitors of the Panx1 and the ATP-mediated signaling pathway to fill gaps in our understanding of Panx1 localization in peripheral nerves, roles for Panx1 in axonal outgrowth and myelination, and neurite extension. Our data show that Panx1 is localized to axonal, myelin, and vascular compartments of the peripheral nerves. Knockout of Panx1 gene significantly increased axonal caliber in vivo and axonal growth rate in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons. Furthermore, genetic knockout of Panx1 or inhibition of components of purinergic signaling, by treatment with probenecid and apyrase, resulted in denser axonal outgrowth from cultured DRG explants compared to untreated wild-types. Our findings suggest that Panx1 regulates axonal growth in the peripheral nervous system.

  17. Uncovering sensory axonal dysfunction in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available This study investigated sensory and motor nerve excitability properties to elucidate the development of diabetic neuropathy. A total of 109 type 2 diabetes patients were recruited, and 106 were analyzed. According to neuropathy severity, patients were categorized into G0, G1, and G2+3 groups using the total neuropathy score-reduced (TNSr. Patients in the G0 group were asymptomatic and had a TNSr score of 0. Sensory and motor nerve excitability data from diabetic patients were compared with data from 33 healthy controls. Clinical assessment, nerve conduction studies, and sensory and motor nerve excitability testing data were analyzed to determine axonal dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy. In the G0 group, sensory excitability testing revealed increased stimulus for the 50% sensory nerve action potential (P<0.05, shortened strength-duration time constant (P<0.01, increased superexcitability (P<0.01, decreased subexcitability (P<0.05, decreased accommodation to depolarizing current (P<0.01, and a trend of decreased accommodation to hyperpolarizing current in threshold electrotonus. All the changes progressed into G1 (TNSr 1-8 and G2+3 (TNSr 9-24 groups. In contrast, motor excitability only had significantly increased stimulus for the 50% compound motor nerve action potential (P<0.01 in the G0 group. This study revealed that the development of axonal dysfunction in sensory axons occurred prior to and in a different fashion from motor axons. Additionally, sensory nerve excitability tests can detect axonal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. These insights further our understanding of diabetic neuropathy and enable the early detection of sensory axonal abnormalities, which may provide a basis for neuroprotective therapeutic approaches.

  18. Two-Dimensional Distributed Velocity Collision Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-11

    graphics libraries are used in the Multiagent 6DOF Simulation: Open Graphics Library (OpenGL), OpenGL Utility Toolkit ( GLUT ), and the OpenGL User...rendering. GLUT (Reference 13) is a library of utilities for OpenGL programs, which primarily perform system-level input/output (I/O) with the host...number of geometric primitives (both in solid and wireframe mode) are also provided, including cubes, spheres and the Utah teapot. GLUT also has

  19. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  20. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T. [Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Perera, Surangi N. [Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53205 (United States); Svoboda, Kurt R., E-mail: svobodak@uwm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53205 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  1. ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES FOR M DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, J. S.; Ramsey, L. W.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pavlenko, Y.; Barnes, J. R.; Pinfield, D. J.; Gallardo, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic rotation velocities (v sin i) for 56 M dwarf stars using high-resolution Hobby-Eberly Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph red spectroscopy. In addition, we have also determined photometric effective temperatures, masses, and metallicities ([Fe/H]) for some stars observed here and in the literature where we could acquire accurate parallax measurements and relevant photometry. We have increased the number of known v sin i values for mid M stars by around 80% and can confirm a weakly increasing rotation velocity with decreasing effective temperature. Our sample of v sin is peak at low velocities (∼3 km s -1 ). We find a change in the rotational velocity distribution between early M and late M stars, which is likely due to the changing field topology between partially and fully convective stars. There is also a possible further change in the rotational distribution toward the late M dwarfs where dust begins to play a role in the stellar atmospheres. We also link v sin i to age and show how it can be used to provide mid-M star age limits. When all literature velocities for M dwarfs are added to our sample, there are 198 with v sin i ≤ 10 km s -1 and 124 in the mid-to-late M star regime (M3.0-M9.5) where measuring precision optical radial velocities is difficult. In addition, we also search the spectra for any significant Hα emission or absorption. Forty three percent were found to exhibit such emission and could represent young, active objects with high levels of radial-velocity noise. We acquired two epochs of spectra for the star GJ1253 spread by almost one month and the Hα profile changed from showing no clear signs of emission, to exhibiting a clear emission peak. Four stars in our sample appear to be low-mass binaries (GJ1080, GJ3129, Gl802, and LHS3080), with both GJ3129 and Gl802 exhibiting double Hα emission features. The tables presented here will aid any future M star planet search target selection to extract stars with low v

  2. IFNgamma enhances microglial reactions to hippocampal axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Hegelund, I V; Lomholt, N D

    2000-01-01

    Glial reactivity is implicated in CNS repair and regenerative responses. Microglia, the cells responding earliest to axonal injury, produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), a cytokine with both cytopathic and neuroprotective effects. We have studied activation of hippocampal microglia...... periods. Message for the immune cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) was undetectable, and glial reactivity to axonal lesions occurred as normal in IFNgamma-deficient mice. Microglial responses to lesion-induced neuronal injury were markedly enhanced in myelin basic protein promoter-driven transgenic mice...

  3. MAP2 Defines a Pre-axonal Filtering Zone to Regulate KIF1- versus KIF5-Dependent Cargo Transport in Sensory Neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gumy, Laura F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337608334; Katrukha, Eugene A; Grigoriev, Ilya; Jaarsma, Dick; Kapitein, Lukas C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298806630; Akhmanova, Anna|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156410591; Hoogenraad, Casper C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/227263502

    2017-01-01

    Polarized cargo transport is essential for neuronal function. However, the minimal basic components required for selective cargo sorting and distribution in neurons remain elusive. We found that in sensory neurons the axon initial segment is largely absent and that microtubule-associated protein 2

  4. Selective rab11 transport and the intrinsic regenerative ability of CNS axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Hiroaki; Donegá, Matteo; Lam, Brian Yh; Petrova, Veselina; van Erp, Susan; Yeo, Giles Sh; Kwok, Jessica Cf; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Eva, Richard; Fawcett, James W

    2017-08-08

    Neurons lose intrinsic axon regenerative ability with maturation, but the mechanism remains unclear. Using an in-vitro laser axotomy model, we show a progressive decline in the ability of cut CNS axons to form a new growth cone and then elongate. Failure of regeneration was associated with increased retraction after axotomy. Transportation into axons becomes selective with maturation; we hypothesized that selective exclusion of molecules needed for growth may contribute to regeneration decline. With neuronal maturity rab11 vesicles (which carry many molecules involved in axon growth) became selectively targeted to the somatodendritic compartment and excluded from axons by predominant retrograde transport However, on overexpression rab11 was mistrafficked into proximal axons, and these axons showed less retraction and enhanced regeneration after axotomy. These results suggest that the decline of intrinsic axon regenerative ability is associated with selective exclusion of key molecules, and that manipulation of transport can enhance regeneration.

  5. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  6. Axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the corticospinal tract in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus measured by q-space imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouhei Kamiya

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Previous studies suggest that compression and stretching of the corticospinal tract (CST potentially cause treatable gait disturbance in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH. Measurement of axon diameter with diffusion MRI has recently been used to investigate microstructural alterations in neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated alterations in the axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction of the CST in iNPH by q-space imaging (QSI analysis. METHODS: Nineteen patients with iNPH and 10 age-matched controls were recruited. QSI data were obtained with a 3-T system by using a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence with the diffusion gradient applied parallel to the antero-posterior axis. By using a two-component low-q fit model, the root mean square displacements of intra-axonal space ( =  axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the CST were calculated at the levels of the internal capsule and body of the lateral ventricle, respectively. RESULTS: Wilcoxon's rank-sum test revealed a significant increase in CST intra-axonal volume fraction at the paraventricular level in patients (p<0.001, whereas no significant difference was observed in the axon diameter. At the level of the internal capsule, neither axon diameter nor intra-axonal volume fraction differed significantly between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that in patients with iNPH, the CST does not undergo irreversible axonal damage but is rather compressed and/or stretched owing to pressure from the enlarged ventricle. These analyses of axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction yield insights into microstructural alterations of the CST in iNPH.

  7. Distribution and inventories of fallout radionuclides (239+240Pu, 137Cs) and 210Pb to study the filling velocity of salt marshes in Doñana National Park (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascó, C; Antón, M P; Pozuelo, M; Clemente, L; Rodríguez, A; Yañez, C; González, A; Meral, J

    2006-01-01

    Within an extensive multinational and multidisciplinary project carried out in Doñana National Park (Spain) to investigate its preservation and regeneration, the filling velocity of the salt marshes has been evaluated through the calculation of their average sediment accumulation rates. (239+240)Pu and (137)Cs from weapons testing fallout and total (210)Pb distribution profiles and inventories have been determined in some of the most characteristic zones of the park, namely, the ponds (or "lucios") and the waterjets (or "caños"). Plutonium inventories range from 16 to 101 Bq m(-2), (137)Cs values fluctuate between 514 and 3,758 Bq m(-2) and unsupported (210)Pb values comprise between 124 and 9398 Bq m(-2). Average sedimentation rates range from 3 to 5 mm y(-1) (1952-2002). These data are higher than those obtained by carbon dating for the period 6,500 AD-present, estimated as 1.5-2 mm y(-1), suggesting an increase in the accumulation of sediments and the alteration of the park's hydrodynamics caused by the re-channeling of the major rivers feeding the salt marshes.

  8. In search of a periodic table of the neurons: Axonal-dendritic circuitry as the organizing principle: Patterns of axons and dendrites within distinct anatomical parcels provide the blueprint for circuit-based neuronal classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Giorgio A; Wheeler, Diek W

    2016-10-01

    No one knows yet how to organize, in a simple yet predictive form, the knowledge concerning the anatomical, biophysical, and molecular properties of neurons that are accumulating in thousands of publications every year. The situation is not dissimilar to the state of Chemistry prior to Mendeleev's tabulation of the elements. We propose that the patterns of presence or absence of axons and dendrites within known anatomical parcels may serve as the key principle to define neuron types. Just as the positions of the elements in the periodic table indicate their potential to combine into molecules, axonal and dendritic distributions provide the blueprint for network connectivity. Furthermore, among the features commonly employed to describe neurons, morphology is considerably robust to experimental conditions. At the same time, this core classification scheme is suitable for aggregating biochemical, physiological, and synaptic information. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Analyses of Current And Wave Forces on Velocity Caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Buhrkall, Jeppe; Eskesen, Mark C. D.

    2015-01-01

    ) this paper investigates the current and wave forces on the velocity cap and the vertical cylinder. The Morison’s force model was used in the analyses of the extracted force time series in from the CFD model. Further the distribution of the inlet velocities around the velocity cap was also analyzed in detail...

  10. The species velocity of trees in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, B. D.; Napier, J.; de Lafontaine, G.; Heath, K.; Li, B.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has motivated interest in the paleo record to enhance our knowledge about past vegetation responses to climate change and help understand potential responses in the future. Additionally, polar regions currently experience the most rapid rates of climate change globally, prompting concern over changes in the ecological composition of high latitude ecosystems. Recent analyses have attempted to construct methods to estimate a species' ability to track climate change by computing climate velocity; a measure of the rate of climate displacement across a landscape which may indicate the speed an organism must migrate to keep pace with climate change. However, a challenge to using climate velocity in understanding range shifts is a lack of species-specificity in the velocity calculations: climate velocity does not actually use any species data in its analysis. To solve the shortcomings of climate velocity in estimating species displacement rates, we computed the "species velocity" of white spruce, green and grey alder populations across the state of Alaska from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to today. Species velocity represents the rate and direction a species is required to migrate to keep pace with a changing climate following the LGM. We used a species distribution model to determine past and present white spruce and alder distributions using statistically downscaled climate data at 60m. Species velocity was then derived from the change in species distribution per year by the change in distribution over Alaska (km/yr). High velocities indicate locations where the species environmental envelope is changing drastically and must disperse rapidly to survive climate change. As a result, high velocity regions are more vulnerable to distribution shifts and higher risk of local extinction. Conversely, low species velocities indicate locations where the local climate envelope is shifting relatively slowly, reducing the stress to disperse quickly

  11. Multiple sclerosis and anterograde axonal degeneration study by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Pardo, P.; Capdevila Cirera, A.; Sanz Marin, P.M.; Gili Planas, J.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system that affects specifically the myelin. Its diagnosis by imaging techniques is, since the development of magnetic resonance (MR), relatively simple, and its occasional association with anterograde axonal degeneration (WD) has been reported. In both disorders, there is a lengthening of the T1 and T2 relaxation times. In the present report, 76 patients with MS with less than 4 plaques in the typical periventricular position were studied retrospectively, resulting in a rate of association with anterograde axonal degeneration of 8%. We consider that in spite of their same behavior in MR,MS and WD, with moreover represent completely different pathologies, are perfectly differential by MR. The S-E images with longer repetition and echo times in the axial and coronal planes have proved to be those most sensitive for this differentiation. Given that MS is specific pathology of then myelin, the axonal damages in delayed until several plaques adjacent to an axon affect it. We consider that this, added to the restriction of our study group (less than 4 plaques), is the cause of the pow percentage of the MS-WD association in our study. (Author)

  12. Quantifying mechanical force in axonal growth and guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ibrahim Mahmoud Athamneh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical force plays a fundamental role in neuronal development, physiology, and regeneration. In particular, research has shown that force is involved in growth cone-mediated axonal growth and guidance as well as stretch-induced elongation when an organism increases in size after forming initial synaptic connections. However, much of the details about the exact role of force in these fundamental processes remain unknown. In this review, we highlight (1 standing questions concerning the role of mechanical force in axonal growth and guidance and (2 different experimental techniques used to quantify forces in axons and growth cones. We believe that satisfying answers to these questions will require quantitative information about the relationship between elongation, forces, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal transport, signaling, substrate adhesion, and stiffness contributing to directional growth advance. Furthermore, we address why a wide range of force values have been reported in the literature, and what these values mean in the context of neuronal mechanics. We hope that this review will provide a guide for those interested in studying the role of force in development and regeneration of neuronal networks.

  13. Model of fasciculation and sorting in mixed populations of axons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chaudhuri, D.; Borowski, P.; Zápotocký, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 2 (2011), e021908 ISSN 1539-3755 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : axon guidance * neurogenesis * mathematical model Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.255, year: 2011

  14. Axonal dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in somatosensory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A Marik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical topography can be remapped as a consequence of sensory deprivation, suggesting that cortical circuits are continually modified by experience. To see the effect of altered sensory experience on specific components of cortical circuits, we imaged neurons, labeled with a genetically modified adeno-associated virus, in the intact mouse somatosensory cortex before and after whisker plucking. Following whisker plucking we observed massive and rapid reorganization of the axons of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons, accompanied by a transient increase in bouton density. For horizontally projecting axons of excitatory neurons there was a net increase in axonal projections from the non-deprived whisker barrel columns into the deprived barrel columns. The axon collaterals of inhibitory neurons located in the deprived whisker barrel columns retracted in the vicinity of their somata and sprouted long-range projections beyond their normal reach towards the non-deprived whisker barrel columns. These results suggest that alterations in the balance of excitation and inhibition in deprived and non-deprived barrel columns underlie the topographic remapping associated with sensory deprivation.

  15. Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy in Association with Hepatitis E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araz Al-Saffar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS is an acute peripheral neuropathy that develops as a result of post-infectious immune-mediated nerve injury. It can be classified into classic and variant GBS. Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN is a subtype of GBS with the key clinical features of pure motor weakness, areflexia, absence of sensory symptoms, and lack of neurophysiologic evidence of demyelination. We reported a case of acute motor axonal neuropathy in association with hepatitis E infection. A young woman was referred to us after a period of nausea, fever, and diarrhea. She had unexplained muscle weakness at admission and has been diagnosed with acute hepatitis E infection. A rigorous clinical neurological assessment revealed bilateral symmetrical weakness, which affects the lower limbs more than the upper limbs, with no evidence of sensory involvement. Neurophysiological measurements indicated acute axonal injury without clues to demyelination. A diagnosis of acute motor axonal neuropathy subtype has been made, to which she only received supportive therapy. The symptoms resolved spontaneously and full recovery of motor function was attained after 35 days of weakness onset with complete normalization of neurophysiologic parameters.

  16. Investigation on the mechanism of peripheral axonal injury in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun- Hong Zhao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the angles of longitudinal section of sclera around optic nerve heads and the never fiber layer changes in healthy adults and patients with glaucoma, and to investigate the mechanism of peripheral retinal axonal injury, with the combined knowledge of biomechanics. METHODS: The optical nerves and their peripheral tissue specimen in the 12 eyes from health adult donators and 12 eyes from glaucoma patient donators were dyed by Glees' method to compare the angles of longitudinal section of sclera around optic nerve heads(through optic nerve center, and to observe the anatomical features of the peripheral retinal axons. RESULTS: The mean angle of longitudinal section of sclera around optic nerve in healthy adults was 73.3°, while that in patients with absolute glaucoma was 75.6°. The difference showed no significance(t=1.44, P>0.05. There was a sharp bend in the course of peripheral optical fiber in healthy adults. However, the optic nerve fiber disappeared completely in patients with glaucoma end stage. CONCLUSION: The angle between the medial edge and leading edge of sclera(around optic nerve headsis an acute angle. The optical fiber in glaucoma end stage disappeared completely. The phenomenon may be related to high intraocular pressure, the sclera shape, the shear modulus of sclera and axons, and “axonal bending-injury” mechanism.

  17. IFNgamma enhances microglial reactions to hippocampal axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Hegelund, I V; Lomholt, N D

    2000-01-01

    Glial reactivity is implicated in CNS repair and regenerative responses. Microglia, the cells responding earliest to axonal injury, produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), a cytokine with both cytopathic and neuroprotective effects. We have studied activation of hippocampal microglia to p...

  18. Transplantation of Glial Cells Enhances Action Potential Conduction of Amyelinated Spinal Cord Axons in the Myelin-Deficient Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzschneider, David A.; Archer, David R.; Kocsis, Jeffery D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Duncan, Ian D.

    1994-01-01

    A central issue in transplantation research is to determine how and when transplantation of neural tissue can influence the development and function of the mammalian central nervous system. Of particular interest is whether electrophysiological function in the traumatized or diseased mammalian central nervous system can be improved by the replacement of cellular elements that are missing or damaged. Although it is known that transplantation of neural tissue can lead to functional improvement in models of neurological disease characterized by neuronal loss, less is known about results of transplantation in disorders of myelin. We report here that transplantation of glial cells into the dorsal columns of neonatal myelin-deficient rat spinal cords leads to myelination and a 3-fold increase in conduction velocity. We also show that impulses can propagate into and out of the transplant region and that axons myelinated by transplanted cells do not have impaired frequency-response properties. These results demonstrate that myelination following central nervous system glial cell transplantation enhances action potential conduction in myelin-deficient axons, with conduction velocity approaching normal values.

  19. In search of a periodic table of the neurons: Axonal-dendritic circuitry as the organizing principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Wheeler, Diek W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary No one knows yet how to organize, in a simple yet predictive form, the knowledge concerning the anatomical, biophysical, and molecular properties of neurons that are accumulating in thousands of publications every year. The situation is not dissimilar to the state of Chemistry prior to Mendeleev’s tabulation of the elements. We propose that the patterns of presence or absence of axons and dendrites within known anatomical parcels may serve as the key principle to define neuron types. Just as the positions of the elements in the Periodic Table indicate their potential to combine into molecules, axonal and dendritic distributions provide the blueprint for network connectivity. Furthermore, among the features commonly employed to describe neurons, morphology is considerably robust to experimental conditions. At the same time, this core classification scheme is suitable for aggregating biochemical, physiological, and synaptic information. PMID:27516119

  20. In vivo imaging reveals rapid astrocyte depletion and axon damage in a model of neuromyelitis optica-related pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herwerth, Marina; Kalluri, Sudhakar Reddy; Srivastava, Rajneesh

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disease of the CNS, which resembles multiple sclerosis (MS). NMO differs from MS, however, in the distribution and histology of neuroinflammatory lesions and shows a more aggressive clinical course. Moreover, the majority of NMO patients carry...... of astrocyte injury in NMO and the mechanisms by which toxicity spreads to axons are not understood. METHODS: Here, we establish in vivo imaging of the spinal cord, one of the main sites of NMO pathology, as a powerful tool to study the formation of experimental NMO-related lesions caused by human AQP4...... antibody concentration and complement, specifically C1q. INTERPRETATION: In vivo imaging of the spinal cord reveals the swift development of NMO-related acute axon injury following AQP4 antibody-mediated astrocyte depletion. This approach will be useful in studying the mechanisms underlying the spread...

  1. Genetic Deletion of the Transcriptional Repressor NFIL3 Enhances Axon Growth In Vitro but Not Axonal Repair In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kallen, Loek R; Eggers, Ruben; Ehlert, Erich M; Verhaagen, J.; Smit, August B; van Kesteren, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    Axonal regeneration after injury requires the coordinated expression of genes in injured neurons. We previously showed that either reducing expression or blocking function of the transcriptional repressor NFIL3 activates transcription of regeneration-associated genes Arg1 and Gap43 and strongly

  2. Axonal regeneration and development of de novo axons from distal dendrites of adult feline commissural interneurons after a proximal axotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenrich, Keith K; Skelton, Nicole; MacDermid, Victoria E

    2007-01-01

    Following proximal axotomy, several types of neurons sprout de novo axons from distal dendrites. These processes may represent a means of forming new circuits following spinal cord injury. However, it is not know whether mammalian spinal interneurons, axotomized as a result of a spinal cord injur...

  3. Oligodendrocyte Development in the Absence of Their Target Axons In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Almeida

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes form myelin around axons of the central nervous system, enabling saltatory conduction. Recent work has established that axons can regulate certain aspects of oligodendrocyte development and myelination, yet remarkably oligodendrocytes in culture retain the ability to differentiate in the absence of axons and elaborate myelin sheaths around synthetic axon-like substrates. It remains unclear the extent to which the life-course of oligodendrocytes requires the presence of, or signals derived from axons in vivo. In particular, it is unclear whether the specific axons fated for myelination regulate the oligodendrocyte population in a living organism, and if so, which precise steps of oligodendrocyte-cell lineage progression are regulated by target axons. Here, we use live-imaging of zebrafish larvae carrying transgenic reporters that label oligodendrocyte-lineage cells to investigate which aspects of oligodendrocyte development, from specification to differentiation, are affected when we manipulate the target axonal environment. To drastically reduce the number of axons targeted for myelination, we use a previously identified kinesin-binding protein (kbp mutant, in which the first myelinated axons in the spinal cord, reticulospinal axons, do not fully grow in length, creating a region in the posterior spinal cord where most initial targets for myelination are absent. We find that a 73% reduction of reticulospinal axon surface in the posterior spinal cord of kbp mutants results in a 27% reduction in the number of oligodendrocytes. By time-lapse analysis of transgenic OPC reporters, we find that the reduction in oligodendrocyte number is explained by a reduction in OPC proliferation and survival. Interestingly, OPC specification and migration are unaltered in the near absence of normal axonal targets. Finally, we find that timely differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes does not depend at all on the presence of target axons

  4. Adult onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) and Nasu-Hakola disease: lesion staging and dynamic changes of axons and microglial subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Kinoshita, Michiaki; Suzuki-Kouyama, Emi; Inoue, Teruhiko; Nakahara, Asa; Tokiwai, Mika; Arai, Nobutaka; Satoh, Jun-Ichi; Aoki, Naoya; Jinnai, Kenji; Yazawa, Ikuru; Arai, Kimihito; Ishihara, Kenji; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Yagisita, Saburo; Amano, Naoji; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Terada, Seishi; Yoshida, Mari; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mitsuyama, Yoshio; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2017-11-01

    The brains of 10 Japanese patients with adult onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) encompassing hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) and eight Japanese patients with Nasu-Hakola disease (N-HD) and five age-matched Japanese controls were examined neuropathologically with special reference to lesion staging and dynamic changes of microglial subsets. In both diseases, the pathognomonic neuropathological features included spherically swollen axons (spheroids and globules), axon loss and changes of microglia in the white matter. In ALSP, four lesion stages based on the degree of axon loss were discernible: Stage I, patchy axon loss in the cerebral white matter without atrophy; Stage II, large patchy areas of axon loss with slight atrophy of the cerebral white matter and slight dilatation of the lateral ventricles; Stage III, extensive axon loss in the cerebral white matter and dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles without remarkable axon loss in the brainstem and cerebellum; Stage IV, devastated cerebral white matter with marked dilatation of the ventricles and axon loss in the brainstem and/or cerebellum. Internal capsule and pontine base were relatively well preserved in the N-HD, even at Stage IV, and the swollen axons were larger with a higher density in the ALSP. Microglial cells immunopositive for CD68, CD163 or CD204 were far more obvious in ALSP, than in N-HD, and the shape and density of the cells changed in each stage. With progression of the stage, clinical symptoms became worse to apathetic state, and epilepsy was frequently observed in patients at Stages III and IV in both diseases. From these findings, it is concluded that (i) shape, density and subsets of microglia change dynamically along the passage of stages and (ii) increase of IBA-1-, CD68-, CD163- and CD204-immunopositive cells precedes loss of axons in ALSP. © 2016

  5. The critical ionization velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect was first proposed in the context of space plasmas. This effect occurs for a neutral gas moving through a magnetized plasma and leads to rapid ionization and braking of the relative motion when a marginal velocity, 'the critical velocity', is exceeded. Laboratory experiments have clearly established the significance of the critical velocity and have provided evidence for an underlying mechanism which relies on the combined action of electron impact ionization and a collective plasma interaction heating electrons. There is experimental support for such a mechanism based on the heating of electrons by the modified two-stream instability as part of a feedback process. Several applications to space plasmas have been proposed and the possibility of space experiments has been discussed. (author)

  6. Antarctic Ice Velocity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This compilation of recent ice velocity data of the Antarctic ice sheet is intended for use by the polar scientific community. The data are presented in tabular form...

  7. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  8. An αII Spectrin-Based Cytoskeleton Protects Large-Diameter Myelinated Axons from Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Claire Yu-Mei; Zhang, Chuansheng; Zollinger, Daniel R; Leterrier, Christophe; Rasband, Matthew N

    2017-11-22

    Axons must withstand mechanical forces, including tension, torsion, and compression. Spectrins and actin form a periodic cytoskeleton proposed to protect axons against these forces. However, because spectrins also participate in assembly of axon initial segments (AISs) and nodes of Ranvier, it is difficult to uncouple their roles in maintaining axon integrity from their functions at AIS and nodes. To overcome this problem and to determine the importance of spectrin cytoskeletons for axon integrity, we generated mice with αII spectrin-deficient peripheral sensory neurons. The axons of these neurons are very long and exposed to the mechanical forces associated with limb movement; most lack an AIS, and some are unmyelinated and have no nodes. We analyzed αII spectrin-deficient mice of both sexes and found that, in myelinated axons, αII spectrin forms a periodic cytoskeleton with βIV and βII spectrin at nodes of Ranvier and paranodes, respectively, but that loss of αII spectrin disrupts this organization. Avil-cre;Sptan1 f/f mice have reduced numbers of nodes, disrupted paranodal junctions, and mislocalized Kv1 K + channels. We show that the density of nodal βIV spectrin is constant among axons, but the density of nodal αII spectrin increases with axon diameter. Remarkably, Avil-cre;Sptan1 f/f mice have intact nociception and small-diameter axons, but severe ataxia due to preferential degeneration of large-diameter myelinated axons. Our results suggest that nodal αII spectrin helps resist the mechanical forces experienced by large-diameter axons, and that αII spectrin-dependent cytoskeletons are also required for assembly of nodes of Ranvier. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A periodic axonal cytoskeleton consisting of actin and spectrin has been proposed to help axons resist the mechanical forces to which they are exposed (e.g., compression, torsion, and stretch). However, until now, no vertebrate animal model has tested the requirement of the spectrin cytoskeleton in

  9. Spastin-interacting protein NA14/SSNA1 functions in cytokinesis and axon development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Goyal

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs are a genetically diverse group of inherited neurological disorders (SPG1-72 with the cardinal feature of prominent lower-extremity spasticity due to a length-dependent axonopathy of corticospinal motor neurons. The most frequent form of autosomal dominant HSP results from mutations of the SPG4 gene product spastin. This is an ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA protein that binds to and severs microtubules. While spastin participates in crucial cellular processes such as cytokinesis, endosomal tubulation, and axon development, its role in HSP pathogenesis remains unclear. Spastin interacts in cells with the NA14 protein, a major target for auto-antibodies in Sjögren's syndrome (nuclear autoantigen 1; SSNA1. Our analysis of endogenous spastin and NA14 proteins in HeLa cells and rat cortical neurons in primary culture revealed a clear distribution of both proteins to centrosomes, with NA14 localizing specifically to centrioles. Stable NA14 knockdown in cell lines dramatically affected cell division, in particular cytokinesis. Furthermore, overexpression of NA14 in neurons significantly increased axon outgrowth and branching, while also enhancing neuronal differentiation. We postulate that NA14 may act as an adaptor protein regulating spastin localization to centrosomes, temporally and spatially regulating the microtubule-severing activity of spastin that is particularly critical during the cell cycle and neuronal development.

  10. Continuous time random walks for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Comolli, Alessandro; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Lester, Daniel R.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities in steady heterogeneous flows based on a stochastic relaxation process for the streamwise particle velocities. This approach describes the persistence of velocities over a characteristic spatial scale, unlike classical random walk methods, which model the persistence over a characteristic time scale. We first establish the relation between Eulerian and Lagrangian velocities for both equidistant and isochrone sampling along streamlines, under transient and stationary conditions. Based on this, we develop a space-continuous CTRW approach for the spatial and temporal dynamics of Lagrangian velocities. While classical CTRW formulations have nonstationary Lagrangian velocity statistics, the proposed approach quantifies the evolution of the Lagrangian velocity statistics under both stationary and nonstationary conditions. We provide explicit expressions for the Lagrangian velocity statistics and determine the behaviors of the mean particle velocity, velocity covariance, and particle dispersion. We find strong Lagrangian correlation and anomalous dispersion for velocity distributions that are tailed toward low velocities as well as marked differences depending on the initial conditions. The developed CTRW approach predicts the Lagrangian particle dynamics from an arbitrary initial condition based on the Eulerian velocity distribution and a characteristic correlation scale.

  11. Calculating Path-Dependent Travel Time Prediction Variance and Covariance for the SALSA3D Global Tomographic P-Velocity Model with a Distributed Parallel Multi-Core Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, J. R.; Encarnacao, A.; Ballard, S.; Young, C. J.; Phillips, W. S.; Begnaud, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recently our combined SNL-LANL research team has succeeded in developing a global, seamless 3D tomographic P-velocity model (SALSA3D) that provides superior first P travel time predictions at both regional and teleseismic distances. However, given the variable data quality and uneven data sampling associated with this type of model, it is essential that there be a means to calculate high-quality estimates of the path-dependent variance and covariance associated with the predicted travel times of ray paths through the model. In this paper, we show a methodology for accomplishing this by exploiting the full model covariance matrix. Our model has on the order of 1/2 million nodes, so the challenge in calculating the covariance matrix is formidable: 0.9 TB storage for 1/2 of a symmetric matrix, necessitating an Out-Of-Core (OOC) blocked matrix solution technique. With our approach the tomography matrix (G which includes Tikhonov regularization terms) is multiplied by its transpose (GTG) and written in a blocked sub-matrix fashion. We employ a distributed parallel solution paradigm that solves for (GTG)-1 by assigning blocks to individual processing nodes for matrix decomposition update and scaling operations. We first find the Cholesky decomposition of GTG which is subsequently inverted. Next, we employ OOC matrix multiply methods to calculate the model covariance matrix from (GTG)-1 and an assumed data covariance matrix. Given the model covariance matrix we solve for the travel-time covariance associated with arbitrary ray-paths by integrating the model covariance along both ray paths. Setting the paths equal gives variance for that path. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Pharmacogenetic stimulation of neuronal activity increases myelination in an axon-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitew, Stanislaw; Gobius, Ilan; Fenlon, Laura R; McDougall, Stuart J; Hawkes, David; Xing, Yao Lulu; Bujalka, Helena; Gundlach, Andrew L; Richards, Linda J; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Merson, Tobias D; Emery, Ben

    2018-01-22

    Mounting evidence suggests that neuronal activity influences myelination, potentially allowing for experience-driven modulation of neural circuitry. The degree to which neuronal activity is capable of regulating myelination at the individual axon level is unclear. Here we demonstrate that stimulation of somatosensory axons in the mouse brain increases proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) within the underlying white matter. Stimulated axons display an increased probability of being myelinated compared to neighboring non-stimulated axons, in addition to being ensheathed with thicker myelin. Conversely, attenuating neuronal firing reduces axonal myelination in a selective activity-dependent manner. Our findings reveal that the process of selecting axons for myelination is strongly influenced by the relative activity of individual axons within a population. These observed cellular changes are consistent with the emerging concept that adaptive myelination is a key mechanism for the fine-tuning of neuronal circuitry in the mammalian CNS.

  13. Effect of vesicle traps on traffic jam formation in fast axonal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for simulation of the formation of organelle traps in fast axonal transport. Such traps may form in the regions of microtubule polar mismatching. Depending on the orientation of microtubules pointing toward the trap region, these traps can accumulate either plus-end or minus-end oriented vesicles. The model predicts that the maximum concentrations of organelles occur at the boundaries of the trap regions; the overall concentration of organelles in the axon with traps is greatly increased compared to that in a healthy axon, which is expected to contribute to mechanical damages of the axon. The organelle traps induce hindrance to organelle transport down the axon; the total organelle flux down the axon with traps is found to be significantly reduced compared to that in a healthy axon. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficient retrograde transport of pseudorabies virus within neurons requires local protein synthesis in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Orkide O; Perlman, David H; Enquist, Lynn W

    2013-01-16

    After replicating in epithelial cells, alphaherpesviruses such as pseudorabies virus (PRV) invade axons of peripheral nervous system neurons and undergo retrograde transport toward the distant cell bodies. Although several viral proteins engage molecular motors to facilitate transport, the initial steps and neuronal responses to infection are poorly understood. Using compartmented neuron cultures to physically separate axon infection from cell bodies, we found that PRV infection induces local protein synthesis in axons, including proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling, intracellular trafficking, signaling, and metabolism. This rapid translation of axonal mRNAs is required for efficient PRV retrograde transport and infection of cell bodies. Furthermore, induction of axonal damage, which also induces local protein synthesis, prior to infection reduces virion trafficking, suggesting that host damage signals and virus particles compete for retrograde transport. Thus, similar to axonal damage, virus infection induces local protein translation in axons, and viruses likely exploit this response for invasion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A growing field: The regulation of axonal regeneration by Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Armando L; Udeh, Adanna; Kalahasty, Karthik; Hackam, Abigail S

    2018-01-01

    The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a highly conserved signaling cascade that plays critical roles during embryogenesis. Wnt ligands regulate axonal extension, growth cone guidance and synaptogenesis throughout the developing central nervous system (CNS). Recently, studies in mammalian and fish model systems have demonstrated that Wnt/β-catenin signaling also promotes axonal regeneration in the adult optic nerve and spinal cord after injury, raising the possibility that Wnt could be developed as a therapeutic strategy. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence that reveals novel roles for Wnt signaling in the injured CNS, and discuss possible mechanisms by which Wnt ligands could overcome molecular barriers inhibiting axonal growth to promote regeneration. A central challenge in the neuroscience field is developing therapeutic strategies that induce robust axonal regeneration. Although adult axons have the capacity to respond to axonal guidance molecules after injury, there are several major obstacles for axonal growth, including extensive neuronal death, glial scars at the injury site, and lack of axonal guidance signals. Research in rodents demonstrated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in retinal neurons and radial glia induced neuronal survival and axonal growth, but that activation within reactive glia at the injury site promoted proliferation and glial scar formation. Studies in zebrafish spinal cord injury models confirm an axonal regenerative role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and identified the cell types responsible. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt induces axonal and neurite growth through transcription-dependent effects of its central mediator β-catenin, potentially by inducing regeneration-promoting genes. Canonical Wnt signaling may also function through transcription-independent interactions of β-catenin with cytoskeletal elements, which could stabilize growing axons and control growth cone

  16. Squid Giant Axon Contains Neurofilament Protein mRNA but does not Synthesize Neurofilament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Harold; House, Shirley; Kim, Dong Sun; Chin, Hemin; Pant, Harish C

    2017-04-01

    When isolated squid giant axons are incubated in radioactive amino acids, abundant newly synthesized proteins are found in the axoplasm. These proteins are translated in the adaxonal Schwann cells and subsequently transferred into the giant axon. The question as to whether any de novo protein synthesis occurs in the giant axon itself is difficult to resolve because the small contribution of the proteins possibly synthesized intra-axonally is not easily distinguished from the large amounts of the proteins being supplied from the Schwann cells. In this paper, we reexamine this issue by studying the synthesis of endogenous neurofilament (NF) proteins in the axon. Our laboratory previously showed that NF mRNA and protein are present in the squid giant axon, but not in the surrounding adaxonal glia. Therefore, if the isolated squid axon could be shown to contain newly synthesized NF protein de novo, it could not arise from the adaxonal glia. The results of experiments in this paper show that abundant 3H-labeled NF protein is synthesized in the squid giant fiber lobe containing the giant axon's neuronal cell bodies, but despite the presence of NF mRNA in the giant axon no labeled NF protein is detected in the giant axon. This lends support to the glia-axon protein transfer hypothesis which posits that the squid giant axon obtains newly synthesized protein by Schwann cell transfer and not through intra-axonal protein synthesis, and further suggests that the NF mRNA in the axon is in a translationally repressed state.

  17. Neocortical axon arbors trade-off material and conduction delay conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian M L Budd

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The brain contains a complex network of axons rapidly communicating information between billions of synaptically connected neurons. The morphology of individual axons, therefore, defines the course of information flow within the brain. More than a century ago, Ramón y Cajal proposed that conservation laws to save material (wire length and limit conduction delay regulate the design of individual axon arbors in cerebral cortex. Yet the spatial and temporal communication costs of single neocortical axons remain undefined. Here, using reconstructions of in vivo labelled excitatory spiny cell and inhibitory basket cell intracortical axons combined with a variety of graph optimization algorithms, we empirically investigated Cajal's conservation laws in cerebral cortex for whole three-dimensional (3D axon arbors, to our knowledge the first study of its kind. We found intracortical axons were significantly longer than optimal. The temporal cost of cortical axons was also suboptimal though far superior to wire-minimized arbors. We discovered that cortical axon branching appears to promote a low temporal dispersion of axonal latencies and a tight relationship between cortical distance and axonal latency. In addition, inhibitory basket cell axonal latencies may occur within a much narrower temporal window than excitatory spiny cell axons, which may help boost signal detection. Thus, to optimize neuronal network communication we find that a modest excess of axonal wire is traded-off to enhance arbor temporal economy and precision. Our results offer insight into the principles of brain organization and communication in and development of grey matter, where temporal precision is a crucial prerequisite for coincidence detection, synchronization and rapid network oscillations.

  18. Impaired retention of spatial memory after transection of longitudinally oriented axons of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffenach, Hill-Aina; Sloviter, Robert S.; Moser, Edvard I.; Moser, May-Britt

    2002-03-01

    Longitudinally oriented axon collaterals of CA3 pyramidal cells may be critical for integrating distributed information in the hippocampus. To investigate the possible role of this pathway in the retention of spatial memory, we made a single transversely oriented cut through the dorsal CA3 region of each hippocampus. Although the lesion involved water maze in preoperatively trained rats. New learning in a different water maze was attenuated. No significant impairment occurred in rats with longitudinally oriented cuts, or in animals with ibotenic acid-induced lesions of similar magnitude. To characterize the effect of a focal lesion on the integrity of longitudinally projecting axons, we stained degenerating cells and fibers in rats with unilateral CA3 transections by using FluoroJade-B. Degenerating terminals were seen across a wide region posterior to the cut, and were present in the strata of areas CA3 and CA1 that are innervated by CA3 pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the integrity of longitudinally oriented, translamellar axons of CA3 pyramidal cells may be necessary for efficient acquisition and retention of spatial memory.

  19. Coevolution of axon guidance molecule Slit and its receptor Robo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yu

    Full Text Available Coevolution is important for the maintenance of the interaction between a ligand and its receptor during evolution. The interaction between axon guidance molecule Slit and its receptor Robo is critical for the axon repulsion in neural tissues, which is evolutionarily conserved from planarians to humans. However, the mechanism of coevolution between Slit and Robo remains unclear. In this study, we found that coordinated amino acid changes took place at interacting sites of Slit and Robo by comparing the amino acids at these sites among different organisms. In addition, the high level correlation between evolutionary rate of Slit and Robo was identified in vertebrates. Furthermore, the sites under positive selection of slit and robo were detected in the same lineage such as mosquito and teleost. Overall, our results provide evidence for the coevolution between Slit and Robo.

  20. Activated retinal glia mediated axon regeneration in experimental glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Barbara; Guidi, Alessandra; Fawcett, James W; Martin, Keith R

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of retinal ganglion cell axons in the optic nerve and their cell bodies in the retina. Reactive retinal glial changes have been observed in glaucoma but the role of such glial changes in the pathogenesis of the condition remains unclear. In the present study we found that retinal ganglion cells in an experimental animal model of glaucoma have an increased axon regenerative potential. Regeneration of adult rat retinal ganglion cell axons after optic nerve crush was significantly increased in vivo when combined with intraocular pressure-induced experimental glaucoma. This enhanced axon regeneration response was correlated with a significant increase in activation of glial fibrillary acidic protein+retinal glia. Using a dissociated retinal ganglion cell culture model we showed that reducing the number of activated retinal glia with a glial specific toxin, α-Aminoadipic acid, significantly reduced the growth potential of retinal ganglion cells from glaucomatous rat eyes, suggesting that activated retinal glia mediate, at least in part, the growth promoting effect. This was shown to be mediated by both membrane-bound and soluble glial-derived factors. Neurotrophin and ciliary neurotrophic/leukemia inhibitory factor blockers did not affect the regenerative potential, excluding these growth factors as principal mediators of the enhanced growth response occurring in glaucomatous retinal cultures. These observations are the first to reveal that retinal ganglion cells from glaucomatous rat eyes have an enhanced regenerative capacity. Furthermore, our results suggest that activated retinal glia mediate at least part of this response. Further work to understand and enhance the regeneration-promoting effect of activated retinal glia is required to determine if this approach could be useful as part of a therapeutic strategy to encourage optic nerve regeneration in glaucoma

  1. [Craniocerebral trauma: magnetic resonance imaging of diffuse axonal injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallouhi, A

    2014-09-01

    Acceleration-deceleration rotational brain trauma is a common cause of disability or death in young adults and often leads to a focal destruction of axons. The resulting pathology, axonal shear injury is referred to as diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The DAI-associated lesions occur bilaterally, are widely dispersed and have been observed in the surface and deep white matter. They are found near to and far from the impact site. When DAI is clinically suspected, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the method of choice for further clarification, especially in patients where cranial computed tomography (CT) is inconspicuous. To investigate the presence of DAI after traumatic brain injury (TBI), a multimodal MRI approach is applied including the common structural and also functional imaging sequences. For structural MRI, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) weighted and susceptibility contrast imaging (SWI) are the sequences mainly used. The SWI technique is extremely sensitive to blood breakdown products, which appear as small signal voids at three locations, at the gray-white interface, in the corpus callosum and in the brain stem. Functional MRI comprises a group of constantly developing techniques that have great potential in optimal evaluation of the white matter in patients after craniocerebral trauma. These imaging techniques allow the visualization of changes associated with shear injuries, such as functional impairment of axons and decreased blood flow and abnormal metabolic activity of the brain parts affected. The multimodal MRI approach in patients with DAI results in a more detailed and differentiated representation of the underlying pathophysiological changes of the injured nerve tracts and helps to improve the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of MRI. When DAI is suspected multimodal MRI should be performed as soon as possible after craniocerebral injury.

  2. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    cells, while other fibers were unmyelinated. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that some of the regenerated fibers were tyrosine hydroxylase- or serotonin-immunoreactive, indicating a central origin. These findings suggest that there is a considerable amount of spontaneous regeneration after spinal cord...... lesions in rodents and that the fibers remain several months after injury. The findings of tyrosine hydroxylase- and serotonin-immunoreactivity in the axons suggest that descending central fibers contribute to this endogenous repair of ischemic spinal cord injury....

  3. Polyethylene glycol restores axonal conduction after corpus callosum transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Ravinder; Riley, D Colton; Boyer, Richard B; Pollins, Alonda C; Shack, R Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P

    2017-05-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been shown to restore axonal continuity after peripheral nerve transection in animal models. We hypothesized that PEG can also restore axonal continuity in the central nervous system. In this current experiment, coronal sectioning of the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats was performed after animal sacrifice. 3Brain high-resolution microelectrode arrays (MEA) were used to measure mean firing rate (MFR) and peak amplitude across the corpus callosum of the ex-vivo brain slices. The corpus callosum was subsequently transected and repeated measurements were performed. The cut ends of the corpus callosum were still apposite at this time. A PEG solution was applied to the injury site and repeated measurements were performed. MEA measurements showed that PEG was capable of restoring electrophysiology signaling after transection of central nerves. Before injury, the average MFRs at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum were 0.76, 0.66, and 0.65 spikes/second, respectively, and the average peak amplitudes were 69.79, 58.68, and 49.60 μV, respectively. After injury, the average MFRs were 0.71, 0.14, and 0.25 spikes/second, respectively and peak amplitudes were 52.11, 8.98, and 16.09 μV, respectively. After application of PEG, there were spikes in MFR and peak amplitude at the injury site and contralaterally. The average MFRs were 0.75, 0.55, and 0.47 spikes/second at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum, respectively and peak amplitudes were 59.44, 45.33, 40.02 μV, respectively. There were statistically differences in the average MFRs and peak amplitudes between the midline and non-midline corpus callosum groups ( P < 0.01, P < 0.05). These findings suggest that PEG restores axonal conduction between severed central nerves, potentially representing axonal fusion.

  4. Polyethylene glycol restores axonal conduction after corpus callosum transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Bamba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG has been shown to restore axonal continuity after peripheral nerve transection in animal models. We hypothesized that PEG can also restore axonal continuity in the central nervous system. In this current experiment, coronal sectioning of the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats was performed after animal sacrifice. 3Brain high-resolution microelectrode arrays (MEA were used to measure mean firing rate (MFR and peak amplitude across the corpus callosum of the ex-vivo brain slices. The corpus callosum was subsequently transected and repeated measurements were performed. The cut ends of the corpus callosum were still apposite at this time. A PEG solution was applied to the injury site and repeated measurements were performed. MEA measurements showed that PEG was capable of restoring electrophysiology signaling after transection of central nerves. Before injury, the average MFRs at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum were 0.76, 0.66, and 0.65 spikes/second, respectively, and the average peak amplitudes were 69.79, 58.68, and 49.60 μV, respectively. After injury, the average MFRs were 0.71, 0.14, and 0.25 spikes/second, respectively and peak amplitudes were 52.11, 8.98, and 16.09 μV, respectively. After application of PEG, there were spikes in MFR and peak amplitude at the injury site and contralaterally. The average MFRs were 0.75, 0.55, and 0.47 spikes/second at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum, respectively and peak amplitudes were 59.44, 45.33, 40.02 μV, respectively. There were statistically differences in the average MFRs and peak amplitudes between the midline and non-midline corpus callosum groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.05. These findings suggest that PEG restores axonal conduction between severed central nerves, potentially representing axonal fusion.

  5. Two stable steady states in the Hodgkin-Huxley axons

    OpenAIRE

    Aihara, K.; Matsumoto, G.

    1983-01-01

    Two stable steady states were found in the numerical solution of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations for the intact squid axon bathed in potassium-rich sea water with an externally applied inward current. Under the conditions the two stable steady-states exist, the Hodgkin-Huxley equations have a complex bifurcation structure including, in addition to the two stable steady-states, a stable limit cycle, two unstable equilibrium points, and one asymptotically stable equilibrium point. It was also conc...

  6. Internalization and Axonal Transport of the HIV Glycoprotein gp120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berth, Sarah; Caicedo, Hector Hugo; Sarma, Tulika; Morfini, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    The HIV glycoprotein gp120, a neurotoxic HIV glycoprotein that is overproduced and shed by HIV-infected macrophages, is associated with neurological complications of HIV such as distal sensory polyneuropathy, but interactions of gp120 in the peripheral nervous system remain to be characterized. Here, we demonstrate internalization of extracellular gp120 in a manner partially independent of binding to its coreceptor CXCR4 by F11 neuroblastoma cells and cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Immunocytochemical and pharmacological experiments indicate that gp120 does not undergo trafficking through the endolysosomal pathway. Instead, gp120 is mainly internalized through lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent manner, with a minor fraction being internalized by fluid phase pinocytosis. Experiments using compartmentalized microfluidic chambers further indicate that, after internalization, endocytosed gp120 selectively undergoes retrograde but not anterograde axonal transport from axons to neuronal cell bodies. Collectively, these studies illuminate mechanisms of gp120 internalization and axonal transport in peripheral nervous system neurons, providing a novel framework for mechanisms for gp120 neurotoxicity. PMID:25636314

  7. Dendritic and Axonal Wiring Optimization of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    The way in which a neuronal tree expands plays an important role in its functional and computational characteristics. We aimed to study the existence of an optimal neuronal design for different types of cortical GABAergic neurons. To do this, we hypothesized that both the axonal and dendritic trees of individual neurons optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. We took the branching points of real three-dimensional neuronal reconstructions of the axonal and dendritic trees of different types of cortical interneurons and searched for the minimal wiring arborization structure that respects the branching points. We compared the minimal wiring arborization with real axonal and dendritic trees. We tested this optimization problem using a new approach based on graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques. We concluded that neuronal wiring is near-optimal in most of the tested neurons, although the wiring length of dendritic trees is generally nearer to the optimum. Therefore, wiring economy is related to the way in which neuronal arborizations grow irrespective of the marked differences in the morphology of the examined interneurons.

  8. Axonal Actin Transport Driven By Metastable Actin Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Nilaj; Ganguly, Archan; Roy, Subhojit; Jung, Peter

    Actin is one of the key constituents of the neuronal cytoskeleton and is responsible for driving important cellular processes like axon elongation. Axonal actin is synthesized in the cell body and transported at rates of 0.25 - 3 mm/day, as shown by in-vivo pulse-chase radiolabelling studies. However, the underlying transport mechanisms are unknown. Recent experiments in cultured neurons have revealed a dynamic network of metastable actin filaments (actin trails). Actin trails seem to originate from focal actin hotspots which colocalize with stationary endosomes. Interestingly, the number of actin trails extending anterogradely is higher than the ones extending retrogradely. We hypothesize that the bulk axonal transport of actin originates from this directional asymmetry of the number of actin trails. To test this, we constructed a computational model of actin trail growth and simulated the pulse-chase experiment. In our model, local, metastable trails, which grow with their barbed ends anchored to the hotspots, drive the bulk anterograde transport. Our results indicate that the observed bias of the nucleation probabilities and the elongation rate of actin trails are sufficient to drive the bulk transport of actin at rates that agree with in-vivo pulse chase experiments.

  9. Prediction of Functional Outcome in Axonal Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Eun Jung; Kim, Dae Yul; Chang, Min Cheol; Ko, Eun Jae

    2016-06-01

    To identify the factors that could predict the functional outcome in patients with the axonal type of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). Two hundred and two GBS patients admitted to our university hospital between 2003 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. We defined a good outcome as being "able to walk independently at 1 month after onset" and a poor outcome as being "unable to walk independently at 1 month after onset". We evaluated the factors that differed between the good and poor outcome groups. Twenty-four patients were classified into the acute motor axonal neuropathy type. There was a statistically significant difference between the good and poor outcome groups in terms of the GBS disability score at admission, and GBS disability score and Medical Research Council sum score at 1 month after admission. In an electrophysiologic analysis, the good outcome group showed greater amplitude of median, ulnar, deep peroneal, and posterior tibial nerve compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) and greater amplitude of median, ulnar, and superficial peroneal sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) than the poor outcome group. A lower GBS disability score at admission, high amplitude of median, ulnar, deep peroneal, and posterior tibial CMAPs, and high amplitude of median, ulnar, and superficial peroneal SNAPs were associated with being able to walk at 1 month in patients with axonal GBS.

  10. Differential distribution of voltage-gated ion channels in cortical neurons: implications for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Nicholas D; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2014-03-18

    Neurons contain different functional somatodendritic and axonal domains, each with a characteristic distribution of voltage-gated ion channels, synaptic inputs, and function. The dendritic tree of a cortical pyramidal neuron has 2 distinct domains, the basal and the apical dendrites, both containing dendritic spines; the different domains of the axon are the axonal initial segment (AIS), axon proper (which in myelinated axons includes the node of Ranvier, paranodes, juxtaparanodes, and internodes), and the axon terminals. In the cerebral cortex, the dendritic spines of the pyramidal neurons receive most of the excitatory synapses; distinct populations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons target specific cellular domains and thus exert different influences on pyramidal neurons. The multiple synaptic inputs reaching the somatodendritic region and generating excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) sum and elicit changes in membrane potential at the AIS, the site of initiation of the action potential.

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  12. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...... description of this momentum flow. The Prescribed Velocity Method is a practical method for the description of an Air Terminal Device which will save grid points close to the opening and ensure the right level of the momentum flow....

  13. Rearrangement of potassium ions and Kv1.1/Kv1.2 potassium channels in regenerating axons following end-to-end neurorrhaphy: ionic images from TOF-SIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chiung-Hui; Chang, Hung-Ming; Wu, Tsung-Huan; Chen, Li-You; Yang, Yin-Shuo; Tseng, To-Jung; Liao, Wen-Chieh

    2017-10-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 that cluster at juxtaparanodal (JXP) regions are essential in the regulation of nerve excitability and play a critical role in axonal conduction. When demyelination occurs, Kv1.1/Kv1.2 activity increases, suppressing the membrane potential nearly to the equilibrium potential of K + , which results in an axonal conduction blockade. The recovery of K + -dependent communication signals and proper clustering of Kv1.1/Kv1.2 channels at JXP regions may directly reflect nerve regeneration following peripheral nerve injury. However, little is known about potassium channel expression and its relationship with the dynamic potassium ion distribution at the node of Ranvier during the regenerative process of peripheral nerve injury (PNI). In the present study, end-to-end neurorrhaphy (EEN) was performed using an in vivo model of PNI. The distribution of K + at regenerating axons following EEN was detected by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry. The specific localization and expression of Kv1.1/Kv1.2 channels were examined by confocal microscopy and western blotting. Our data showed that the re-establishment of K + distribution and intensity was correlated with the functional recovery of compound muscle action potential morphology in EEN rats. Furthermore, the re-clustering of Kv1.1/1.2 channels 1 and 3 months after EEN at the nodal region of the regenerating nerve corresponded to changes in the K + distribution. This study provided direct evidence of K + distribution in regenerating axons for the first time. We proposed that the Kv1.1/Kv1.2 channels re-clustered at the JXP regions of regenerating axons are essential for modulating the proper patterns of K + distribution in axons for maintaining membrane potential stability after EEN.

  14. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery L Twiss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthesis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been documented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regenerating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regenerating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  15. Sodium Channel β2 Subunits Prevent Action Potential Propagation Failures at Axonal Branch Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, In Ha; Panzera, Lauren C; Chin, Morven; Hoppa, Michael B

    2017-09-27

    Neurotransmitter release depends on voltage-gated Na + channels (Na v s) to propagate an action potential (AP) successfully from the axon hillock to a synaptic terminal. Unmyelinated sections of axon are very diverse structures encompassing branch points and numerous presynaptic terminals with undefined molecular partners of Na + channels. Using optical recordings of Ca 2+ and membrane voltage, we demonstrate here that Na + channel β2 subunits (Na v β2s) are required to prevent AP propagation failures across the axonal arborization of cultured rat hippocampal neurons (mixed male and female). When Na v β2 expression was reduced, we identified two specific phenotypes: (1) membrane excitability and AP-evoked Ca 2+ entry were impaired at synapses and (2) AP propagation was severely compromised with >40% of axonal branches no longer responding to AP-stimulation. We went on to show that a great deal of electrical signaling heterogeneity exists in AP waveforms across the axonal arborization independent of axon morphology. Therefore, Na v β2 is a critical regulator of axonal excitability and synaptic function in unmyelinated axons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels are fulcrums of neurotransmission that convert electrical inputs into chemical outputs in the form of vesicle fusion at synaptic terminals. However, the role of the electrical signal, the presynaptic action potential (AP), in modulating synaptic transmission is less clear. What is the fidelity of a propagating AP waveform in the axon and what molecules shape it throughout the axonal arborization? Our work identifies several new features of AP propagation in unmyelinated axons: (1) branches of a single axonal arborization have variable AP waveforms independent of morphology, (2) Na + channel β2 subunits modulate AP-evoked Ca 2+ -influx, and (3) β2 subunits maintain successful AP propagation across the axonal arbor. These findings are relevant to understanding the flow of excitation in the

  16. Septin 7: Actin cross-organization is required for axonal association of Schwann cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro D Roth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin sheaths present two distinct domains: compacted myelin spirals and flanking non-compacted cytoplasmic channels, where lipid and protein segregation is established by unknown mechanisms. Septins, a conserved family of membrane and cytoskeletal interacting GTPases, form intracellular diffusion barriers during cell division and neurite extension and are expressed in myelinating cells. Septins, particularly septin 7 (Sept7, the central constituent of septin polymers, are associated with the cytoplasmic channels of myelinating cells. Here we show that Schwann cells deprived of Sept7 fail to wrap around axons from dorsal root ganglion neurons and exhibit disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Likewise, Sept7 distribution is dependent on microfilament but not microtubule organization.

  17. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Han, Dietbert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Materials and Methods:We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG - triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Results:Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6 - fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Conclusion: Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity

  18. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Wech, Tobias; Hahn, Dietbert; Köstler, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG-triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6-fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity distribution in vessels in the order of the voxel size. Thus

  19. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Han, Dietbert [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Wech, Tobias; Koestler, Herbert [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Comprehensive Heart Failure Center (CHFC)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose:Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Materials and Methods:We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG - triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Results:Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6 - fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Conclusion: Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity

  20. Sliding of microtubules by a team of dynein motors: Understanding the effect of spatial distribution of motor tails and mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanumant Pratap; Takshak, Anjneya; Mall, Utkarsh; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-06-01

    Molecular motors are natural nanomachines that use the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis to generate mechanical forces. Cytoplasmic dynein motors often work collectively as a team to drive important processes such as axonal growth, proplatelet formation and mitosis, as forces generated by single motors are insufficient. A large team of dynein motors is used to slide cytoskeletal microtubules with respect to one another during the process of proplatelet formation and axonal growth. These motors attach to a cargo microtubule via their tail domains, undergo the process of detachment and reattachment of their head domains on another track microtubule, while sliding the cargo microtubule along the track. Traditional continuum/mean-field approaches used in the past are not ideal for studying the sliding mechanism of microtubules, as they ignore spatial and temporal fluctuations due to different possible distributions of motor tails on cargo filament, as well as binding/unbinding of motors from their track. Therefore, these models cannot be used to address important questions such as how the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, or how the mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks affects the sliding velocity of cargo microtubule. To answer these, here we use a computational stochastic model where we model each dynein motor explicitly. In our model, we use both random as well as uniform distributions of dynein motors on cargo microtubule, as well as mutual exclusion of motors on microtubule tracks. We find that sliding velocities are least affected by the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, whereas they are greatly affected by mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks. We also find that sliding velocity depends on the length of cargo microtubule if mutual exclusion among motor heads is considered.

  1. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  2. The disruption of mitochondrial axonal transport is an early event in neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Errea, Oihana; Moreno, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba

    2015-01-01

    of neuroprotective therapies. Energy depletion due to mitochondrial dysfunction has been postulated as an important step in the damage of axons. This prompted us to study the effects of acute inflammation and oxidative stress on the morphology, transport, and function of mitochondria in axons. METHODS: Mouse......BACKGROUND: In brain inflammatory diseases, axonal damage is one of the most critical steps in the cascade that leads to permanent disability. Thus, identifying the initial events triggered by inflammation or oxidative stress that provoke axonal damage is critical for the development...... in axons, increasing the proportion of stationary mitochondria in axons after LPS challenge. Indeed, the two challenges used produced different effects: inflammation mostly reducing retrograde transport and oxidative stress slightly enhancing retrograde transportation. CONCLUSIONS: Neuroinflammation...

  3. Segregation of Axial Motor and Sensory Pathways via Heterotypic Trans-Axonal Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallarda, Benjamin W.; Bonanomi, Dario; Müller, Daniel; Brown, Arthur; Alaynick, William A.; Andrews, Shane E.; Lemke, Greg; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Marquardt, Till

    2011-01-01

    Execution of motor behaviors relies on circuitries effectively integrating immediate sensory feedback to efferent pathways controlling muscle activity. It remains unclear how, during neuromuscular circuit assembly, sensory and motor projections become incorporated into tightly coordinated, yet functionally separate pathways. We report that, within axial nerves, establishment of discrete afferent and efferent pathways depends on coordinate signaling between coextending sensory and motor projections. These heterotypic axon-axon interactions require motor axonal EphA3/EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinases activated by cognate sensory axonal ephrin-A ligands. Genetic elimination of trans-axonal ephrin-A → EphA signaling in mice triggers drastic motor-sensory miswiring, culminating in functional efferents within proximal afferent pathways. Effective assembly of a key circuit underlying motor behaviors thus critically depends on trans-axonal signaling interactions resolving motor and sensory projections into discrete pathways. PMID:18403711

  4. Role of calpains in the injury-induced dysfunction and degeneration of the mammalian axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Marek

    2013-12-01

    Axonal injury and degeneration, whether primary or secondary, contribute to the morbidity and mortality seen in many acquired and inherited central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders, such as traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, cerebral ischemia, neurodegenerative diseases, and peripheral neuropathies. The calpain family of proteases has been mechanistically linked to the dysfunction and degeneration of axons. While the direct mechanisms by which transection, mechanical strain, ischemia, or complement activation trigger intra-axonal calpain activity are likely different, the downstream effects of unregulated calpain activity may be similar in seemingly disparate diseases. In this review, a brief examination of axonal structure is followed by a focused overview of the calpain family. Finally, the mechanisms by which calpains may disrupt the axonal cytoskeleton, transport, and specialized domains (axon initial segment, nodes, and terminals) are discussed. © 2013.

  5. A Combinatorial Approach to Induce Sensory Axon Regeneration into the Dorsal Root Avulsed Spinal Cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeber, Jan; Konig, Niclas; Trolle, Carl

    2017-01-01

    restores sensory functions. In this study, we elucidate mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated ingrowth of sensory axons after dorsal root avulsion (DRA). We show that human spinal cord neural stem/progenitor cells (hscNSPC), and also, mesoporous silica particles loaded with growth factor mimetics (Meso......MIM), supported sensory axon regeneration. However, when hscNSPC and MesoMIM were combined, sensory axon regeneration failed. Morphological and tracing analysis showed that sensory axons grow through the newly established glial scar along “bridges” formed by migrating stem cells. Coimplantation of Meso......MIM prevented stem cell migration, “bridges” were not formed, and sensory axons failed to enter the spinal cord. MesoMIM applied alone supported sensory axons ingrowth, but without affecting glial scar formation. In vitro, the presence of MesoMIM significantly impaired migration of hscNSPC without affecting...

  6. Effects of Valproic Acid on Axonal Regeneration and Recovery of Motor Function after Peripheral Nerve Injury in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Rao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Valproic acid (VPA is used to be an effective anti-epileptic drug and mood stabilizer. It has recently been demonstrated that VPA could promote neurite outgrowth, activate the extracellular signal regulated kinase pathway, and increases bcl-2 and growth cone-associated protein 43 levels in spinal cord. In the present research we demonstrate the effect of VPA on peripheral nerve regeneration and recovery of motor function following sciatic nerve transaction in rats. Methods:   The rats in VPA group and control group were administered with valproic acid (300mg/kg and sodium chloride respectively after operation. Each animal was observed sciatic nerve index (SFI at 2-week intervals and studied electrophysiology at 4-week intervals for 12 weeks. Histological and morphometrical analyses were performed 12 weeks after operation. Using the digital image-analysis system, thickness of the myelin sheath was measured, and total numbers of regenerated axons were counted. Results:   There was a significant difference in SFI, electrophysiological index (motor-nerve conduct velocity, and morphometrical results (regenerated axon number and thickness of myelin sheath in nerve regeneration between the VPA group and controls (   P

  7. Clinical pathological and genetic analysis of 2 cases of mitochondrial myopathy presented as acute motor axonal neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-min YIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The main clinical manifestations of mitochondrial myopathy are chronic limb weakness and muscular soreness. Subclinical peripheral nerve injury is also reported, but acute axonal neuropathy.like syndrome concurrent with lactic acidosis is rare. In this paper the clinical features of 2 patients presenting as acute lactic acidosis and sudden muscle weakness were analyzed. Pathological changes and genetic mutations were detected.  Methods Electromyography (EMG and muscle biopsy were performed. Modified Gomori trichrome (MGT and succinodehydrogenase (SDH staining were used to identify pathological changes. Changes of ultra microstructure of muscular tissue were observed under electron microscope. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA full length sequencing was performed using 24 pairs of partially overlapping primers.  Results EMG showed a coexistence of neurogenic and myogenic changes. Dramatic decrease of motor nerve amplitude and moderately reduced sensory nerve amplitude were observed but nerve conduction velocity was normal in both patients. Impressive ragged red fibers were seen on MGT staining. Electron microscope showed dramatic mitochondrial abnormalities in Case 1 and paracrystaline inclusions in Case 2. mtDNA sequencing showed 3243A > G mutation in Case 1 and 8344A > G mutation in Case 2. Conclusions Mitochondrial myopathy can present as metabolic crisis like acute lactic acidosis, dyspnea and acute motor axonal neuropathy.like syndrome. It is a life.threatening phenotype that needs more attention. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.06.007

  8. Inter-axonal interaction defines tiled presynaptic innervation in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Mizumoto, Kota; Shen, Kang

    2013-01-01

    Cellular interactions between neighboring axons are essential for global topographic map formation. Here we show that axonal interactions also precisely instruct the location of synapses. Motoneurons form en passant synapses in Caenorhabditis elegans. While axons from the same neuron class significantly overlap, each neuron innervates a unique and tiled segment of the muscle field by restricting its synapses to a distinct subaxonal domain—a phenomenon we term “synaptic tiling”. Using DA8 and ...

  9. Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0524 TITLE:Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey D...29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0524...MCT1 in injured oligodendroglia of multiple sclerosis patients contributes to axon neurodegeneration and that increasing MCT1 will be protective in the

  10. Acutely damaged axons are remyelinated in multiple sclerosis and experimental models of demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Verena; van der Meer, Franziska; Wrzos, Claudia; Scheidt, Uta; Bahn, Erik; Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang; Junker, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Remyelination is in the center of new therapies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis to resolve and improve disease symptoms and protect axons from further damage. Although remyelination is considered beneficial in the long term, it is not known, whether this is also the case early in lesion formation. Additionally, the precise timing of acute axonal damage and remyelination has not been assessed so far. To shed light onto the interrelation between axons and the myelin sheath during de- and remyelination, we employed cuprizone- and focal lysolecithin-induced demyelination and performed time course experiments assessing the evolution of early and late stage remyelination and axonal damage. We observed damaged axons with signs of remyelination after cuprizone diet cessation and lysolecithin injection. Similar observations were made in early multiple sclerosis lesions. To assess the correlation of remyelination and axonal damage in multiple sclerosis lesions, we took advantage of a cohort of patients with early and late stage remyelinated lesions and assessed the number of APP- and SMI32- positive damaged axons and the density of SMI31-positive and silver impregnated preserved axons. Early de- and remyelinating lesions did not differ with respect to axonal density and axonal damage, but we observed a lower axonal density in late stage demyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions than in remyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions. Our findings suggest that remyelination may not only be protective over a long period of time, but may play an important role in the immediate axonal recuperation after a demyelinating insult. © 2017 The Authors GLIA Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    array probe is used along with two different estimators based on the correlation of the received signal. They can estimate the velocity spectrum as a function of time as for ordinary spectrograms, but they also work at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The approach is validated using simulations of pulsatile...... flow using the Womersly–Evans flow model. The relative bias of the mean estimated frequency is 13.6% and the mean relative standard deviation is 14.3% at 90°, where a traditional estimator yields zero velocity. Measurements have been conducted with an experimental scanner and a convex array transducer....... A pump generated artificial femoral and carotid artery flow in the phantom. The estimated spectra degrade when the angle is different from 90°, but are usable down to 60° to 70°. Below this angle the traditional spectrum is best and should be used. The conventional approach can automatically be corrected...

  12. Ribosomes and polyribosomes are present in the squid giant axon: an immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, J R; Kun, A; Benech, J C; Giuditta, A; Morillas, J; Benech, C R

    1999-05-01

    Ribosomes and polyribosomes were detected by immuno-electron microscopy in the giant axon and small axons of the squid using a polyclonal antibody against rat brain ribosomes. The ribosomal fraction used as antigen was purified by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient and shown to contain ribosomal RNAs and native ribosomes. The polyclonal antibody raised in rabbits reacted with at least ten proteins on immunoblots of purified rat brain ribosomes as well as with a set of multiple ribosomal proteins prepared from the squid giant fiber lobe. Immunoreactions were performed on cryostat sections of the stellate nerve cut at a distance of more than 3 cm from the stellate ganglion, using pre-embedding techniques. Ribosomes and polyribosomes were identified within the giant axon and small axons using electron microscopic methods, following binding of peroxidase-conjugated anti-rabbit IgG secondary antibody. Polysomes were more frequently localized in peripheral axoplasm, including the cortical layer of the giant axon, and were generally associated with unidentified cytoskeletal filaments or with dense matrix material. The immunochemical demonstration of ribosomes and polyribosomes in the giant axon and small axons of the squid confirms similar observations in the squid and the goldfish obtained with the method of electron spectroscopic imaging, and strongly supports the view that a local system of protein synthesis is present in axons. The immunochemical method here described offers an alternative tool for the selective identification of ribosomes, and is likely to prove of value in the analyses of other axonal systems.

  13. Regulation of Axonal Midline Guidance by Prolyl 4-Hydroxylation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torpe, Nanna; Pocock, Roger David John

    2014-01-01

    , little is known of its importance in the control of axon guidance. In a screen of prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) mutants, we found that genetic removal of a specific P4H subunit, DPY-18, causes dramatic defects in C. elegans neuroanatomy. In dpy-18 mutant animals, the axons of specific ventral nerve cord......Neuronal wiring during development requires that the growth cones of axons and dendrites are correctly guided to their appropriate targets. As in other animals, axon growth cones in Caenorhabditis elegans integrate information in their extracellular environment via interactions among transiently...

  14. Forced notch signaling inhibits commissural axon outgrowth in the developing chick central nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A collection of in vitro evidence has demonstrated that Notch signaling plays a key role in the growth of neurites in differentiated neurons. However, the effects of Notch signaling on axon outgrowth in an in vivo condition remain largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, the neural tubes of HH10-11 chick embryos were in ovo electroporated with various Notch transgenes of activating or inhibiting Notch signaling, and then their effects on commissural axon outgrowth across the floor plate midline in the chick developing central nerve system were investigated. Our results showed that forced expression of Notch intracellular domain, constitutively active form of RBPJ, or full-length Hes1 in the rostral hindbrain, diencephalon and spinal cord at stage HH10-11 significantly inhibited commissural axon outgrowth. On the other hand, inhibition of Notch signaling by ectopically expressing a dominant-negative form of RBPJ promoted commissural axonal growth along the circumferential axis. Further results revealed that these Notch signaling-mediated axon outgrowth defects may be not due to the alteration of axon guidance since commissural axon marker TAG1 was present in the axons in floor plate midline, and also not result from the changes in cell fate determination of commissural neurons since the expression of postmitotic neuron marker Tuj1 and specific commissural markers TAG1 and Pax7 was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We first used an in vivo system to provide evidence that forced Notch signaling negatively regulates commissural axon outgrowth.

  15. Alterations in the Local Axonal Environment Influence Target Reinnervation and Neuronal Survival after Postnatal Axotomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dainer, Hugh M

    2000-01-01

    Following peripheral nerve injury in adult animals, Schwann cells (SC) proliferate and provide guidance in the local axonal environment by generating the infrastructure along which regenerating nerves grow...

  16. N-Propionylmannosamine stimulates axonal elongation in a murine model of sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Witzel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that sialic acid plays an important role during nerve regeneration. Sialic acids can be modified in vitro as well as in vivo using metabolic oligosaccharide engineering of the N-acyl side chain. N-Propionylmannosamine (ManNProp increases neurite outgrowth and accelerates the reestablishment of functional synapses in vitro. We investigated the influence of systemic ManNProp application using a specific in vivo mouse model. Using mice expressing axonal fluorescent proteins, we quantified the extension of regenerating axons, the number of regenerating axons, the number of arborising axons and the number of branches per axon 5 days after injury. Sciatic nerves from non-expressing mice were grafted into those expressing yellow fluorescent protein. We began a twice-daily intraperitoneal application of either peracetylated ManNProp (200 mg/kg or saline solution 5 days before injury, and continued it until nerve harvest (5 days after transection. ManNProp significantly increased the mean distance of axonal regeneration (2.49 mm vs. 1.53 mm; P < 0.005 and the number of arborizing axons (21% vs. 16% P = 0.008 5 days after sciatic nerve grafting. ManNProp did not affect the number of regenerating axons or the number of branches per arborizing axon. The biochemical glycoengineering of the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid might be a promising approach for improving peripheral nerve regeneration.

  17. The time course of ongoing activity during neuritis and following axonal transport disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkeviciute, Ieva; Goodwin, George; Bove, Geoffrey M; Dilley, Andrew

    2018-02-21

    Local nerve inflammation (neuritis) leads to ongoing activity and axonal mechanical sensitivity (AMS) along intact nociceptor axons, and disrupts axonal transport. This phenomenon forms the most feasible cause of radiating pain, such as sciatica. We have previously shown that axonal transport disruption without inflammation or degeneration also leads to AMS, but does not cause ongoing activity at the time point when AMS occurs, despite causing cutaneous hypersensitivity. However, there have been no systematic studies of ongoing activity during neuritis or non-inflammatory axonal transport disruption. In this study, we present the time course of ongoing activity from primary sensory neurons following neuritis and vinblastine-induced axonal transport disruption. Whereas 24% of C/slow Aδ-fiber neurons had ongoing activity during neuritis, few (disruption of axonal transport without inflammation does not lead to ongoing activity in sensory neurons, including nociceptors, but does cause a rapid and transient development of AMS. Since it is proposed that AMS underlies mechanically-induced radiating pain, and a transient disruption of axonal transport (as previously reported) leads to transient AMS, it follows that processes that disrupt axonal transport, such as neuritis, must persist to maintain AMS and the associated symptoms.

  18. Segregation of ipsilateral retinal ganglion cell axons at the optic chiasm requires the Shh receptor Boc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Pierre J; Shimogori, Tomomi; Charron, Frédéric

    2010-01-06

    The pattern of contralaterally and ipsilaterally projecting retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons at the optic chiasm is essential for the establishment of binocular vision. Contralateral axons cross the chiasm midline as they progress from the optic nerve to the optic tract. In contrast, ipsilateral axons deviate from the chiasm and continue in the ipsilateral optic tract, avoiding the chiasm midline. The molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not completely understood. Here we show that the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptor Boc is enriched in ipsilateral RGCs of the developing retina. Together with the presence of Shh at the midline, this complementary expression pattern led us to hypothesize that Shh might repel ipsilateral RGC axons at the chiasm. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that only Boc-positive RGC axons retract in vitro in response to Shh and that this response is lost in Boc mutant RGCs. In vivo, we show that Boc is required for the normal segregation of ipsilateral axons at the optic chiasm and, conversely, that Boc expression in contralateral RGCs prevents their axons from crossing the optic chiasm. Together, these results suggest that Shh repels ipsilateral RGC axons at the optic chiasm via its receptor Boc. This work identifies a novel molecular pathway required for the segregation of axons at the optic chiasm.

  19. Biomarker evidence of axonal injury in neuroasymptomatic HIV-1 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jessen Krut

    Full Text Available Prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-1 infected patients is reported to be high. Whether this is a result of active HIV-related neurodegeneration is unclear. We examined axonal injury in HIV-1 patients by measuring the light subunit of neurofilament protein (NFL in CSF with a novel, sensitive method.With a cross-sectional design, CSF concentrations of neurofilament protein light (NFL (marker of neuronal injury, neopterin (intrathecal immunoactivation and CSF/Plasma albumin ratio (blood-brain barrier integrity were analyzed on CSF from 252 HIV-infected patients, subdivided into untreated neuroasymptomatics (n = 200, HIV-associated dementia (HAD (n = 14 and on combinations antiretroviral treatment (cART (n = 85, and healthy controls (n = 204. 46 HIV-infected patients were included in both treated and untreated groups, but sampled at different timepoints. Furthermore, 78 neuroasymptomatic patients were analyzed before and after treatment initiation.While HAD patients had the highest NFL concentrations, elevated CSF NFL was also found in 33% of untreated neuroasymptomatic patients, mainly in those with blood CD4+ cell counts below 250 cells/μL. CSF NFL concentrations in the untreated neuroasymptomatics and treated groups were equivalent to controls 18.5 and 3.9 years older, respectively. Neopterin correlated with NFL levels in untreated groups while the albumin ratio correlated with NFL in both untreated and treated groups.Increased CSF NFL indicates ongoing axonal injury in many neuroasymptomatic patients. Treatment decreases NFL, but treated patients retain higher levels than controls, indicating either continued virus-related injury or an aging-like effect of HIV infection. NFL correlates with neopterin and albumin ratio, suggesting an association between axonal injury, neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier permeability. NFL appears to be a sensitive biomarker of subclinical and clinical brain injury in HIV and warrants further

  20. Simulated auditory nerve axon demyelination alters sensitivity and response timing to extracellular stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Jesse M; O'Brien, Gabrielle E; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2018-04-01

    relative sensitivities were reversed. Comparison of threshold crossing between nodal segments demonstrated stimulus-dependent shifts in action potential initiation with different fiber demyelination states. For some demyelination scenarios, both phases of biphasic pulses could initiate action potentials at threshold resulting in bimodal latency and initiation site distributions and dramatically increased jitter. In summary, simulated demyelination leads to complex changes in fiber sensitivity and spike timing, mediated by alterations in action potential initiation site and slowed action potential conduction due to non-uniformities in the electrical properties of axons. Such demyelination-induced changes, if present in implantees, would have profound implications for the detection of fine temporal cues but not disrupt cues on the time scale of speech envelopes. These simulation results highlight the importance of exploring the SGN ultrastructural changes caused by a given etiology of hearing loss to more accurately predict cochlear implantation outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dark energy constraints from galaxy cluster peculiar velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Suman; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    Future multifrequency microwave background experiments with arcminute resolution and micro-Kelvin temperature sensitivity will be able to detect the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, providing a way to measure radial peculiar velocities of massive galaxy clusters. We show that cluster peculiar velocities have the potential to constrain several dark energy parameters. We compare three velocity statistics (the distribution of radial velocities, the mean pairwise streaming velocity, and the velocity correlation function) and analyze the relative merits of these statistics in constraining dark energy parameters. Of the three statistics, mean pairwise streaming velocity provides constraints that are least sensitive to velocity errors: the constraints on parameters degrade only by a factor of 2 when the random error is increased from 100 to 500 km/s. We also compare cluster velocities with other dark energy probes proposed in the Dark Energy Task Force report. For cluster velocity measurements with realistic priors, the eventual constraints on the dark energy density, the dark energy equation of state and its evolution are comparable to constraints from supernovae measurements, and better than cluster counts and baryon acoustic oscillations; adding velocity to other dark energy probes improves constraints on the figure of merit by more than a factor of 2. For upcoming Sunyaev-Zeldovich galaxy cluster surveys, even velocity measurements with errors as large as 1000 km/s will substantially improve the cosmological constraints compared to using the cluster number density alone.

  2. Mechanisms of hyperpolarization in regenerated mature motor axons in cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Krarup, Christian

    2004-01-01

    We found persistent abnormalities in the recovery of membrane excitability in long-term regenerated motor nerve fibres in the cat as indicated in the companion paper. These abnormalities could partly be explained by membrane hyperpolarization. To further investigate this possibility, we compared...... the changes in excitability in control nerves and long-term regenerated cat nerves (3-5 years after tibial nerve crush) during manoeuvres known to alter axonal membrane Na(+)-K(+) pump function: polarization, cooling to 20 degrees C, reperfusion after 10 min ischaemia, and up to 60 s of repetitive stimulation...

  3. Axonal neuropathy in female carriers of the fragile X premutation with fragile x-associated tremor ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Suresh; Devapriya, Inoka A; Fenton, Grace; Mcvay, Lindsey; Nguyen, Danh V; Tassone, Flora; Maselli, Ricardo A; Hagerman, Randi J

    2015-08-01

    In this study we examined whether females with the fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and non-FXTAS premutation carriers have electrophysiological signs of underlying peripheral neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) were performed on 19 women with FXTAS, 20 non-FXTAS carriers, and 26 age-matched controls. The results were compared with existing data on corresponding male carriers. Women with FXTAS and non-FXTAS carriers had reduced sensory nerve action potential amplitudes. Also, there was a strong trend for reduced compound muscle action potential amplitudes in women with FXTAS, but not in non-FXTAS carriers. No significant slowing of nerve conduction velocities, prolongation of F-wave latencies, or associations with molecular measures was observed. This study suggests an underlying axonal neuropathy in women with FXTAS. However, in comparison to men with FXTAS, the NCS abnormalities in women were less severe, possibly due to the effect of a normal X chromosome. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A Case of Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy Mimicking Brain Death and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya eRavikumar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case report of fulminant Guillain-Barré syndrome mimicking brain death. A previously healthy 60-year-old male was admitted to the neurointensive care unit after developing rapidly progressive weakness and respiratory failure. On presentation, the patient was found to have absent brainstem and spinal cord reflexes resembling that of brain death. Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN, a subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome, was diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid and nerve conduction velocity testing. An electroencephalogram showed that the patient had normal, appropriately reactive brain function. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound showed appropriate blood flow to the brain. Guillain-Barré syndrome rarely presents with weakness so severe as to mimic brain death. This article provides a review of similar literature. This case demonstrates the importance of performing a proper brain death examination, which includes evaluation for irreversible cerebral injury, exclusion of any confounding conditions, and performance of tests such as electroencephalography and transcranial dopplers when uncertainty exists about the reliability of the clinical exam.

  5. Relationship of acute axonal damage, Wallerian degeneration, and clinical disability in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailender; Dallenga, Tobias; Winkler, Anne; Roemer, Shanu; Maruschak, Brigitte; Siebert, Heike; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2017-03-17

    Axonal damage and loss substantially contribute to the incremental accumulation of clinical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis. Here, we assessed the amount of Wallerian degeneration in brain tissue of multiple sclerosis patients in relation to demyelinating lesion activity and asked whether a transient blockade of Wallerian degeneration decreases axonal loss and clinical disability in a mouse model of inflammatory demyelination. Wallerian degeneration and acute axonal damage were determined immunohistochemically in the periplaque white matter of multiple sclerosis patients with early actively demyelinating lesions, chronic active lesions, and inactive lesions. Furthermore, we studied the effects of Wallerian degeneration blockage on clinical severity, inflammatory pathology, acute axonal damage, and long-term axonal loss in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis using Wallerian degeneration slow (Wld S ) mutant mice. The highest numbers of axons undergoing Wallerian degeneration were found in the perilesional white matter of multiple sclerosis patients early in the disease course and with actively demyelinating lesions. Furthermore, Wallerian degeneration was more abundant in patients harboring chronic active as compared to chronic inactive lesions. No co-localization of neuropeptide Y-Y1 receptor, a bona fide immunohistochemical marker of Wallerian degeneration, with amyloid precursor protein, frequently used as an indicator of acute axonal transport disturbance, was observed in human and mouse tissue, indicating distinct axon-degenerative processes. Experimentally, a delay of Wallerian degeneration, as observed in Wld S mice, did not result in a reduction of clinical disability or acute axonal damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, further supporting that acute axonal damage as reflected by axonal transport disturbances does not share common molecular mechanisms with Wallerian degeneration. Furthermore, delaying Wallerian degeneration

  6. N-cadherin regulates primary motor axon growth and branching during zebrafish embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusés, Juan L

    2011-06-15

    N-cadherin is a classical type I cadherin that contributes to the formation of neural circuits by regulating growth cone migration and the formation of synaptic contacts. This study analyzed the role of N-cadherin in primary motor axons growth during development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. After exiting the spinal cord, primary motor axons migrate ventrally through a common pathway and form the first neuromuscular junction with the muscle pioneer cells located at the horizontal myoseptum, which serves as a choice point for cell-type-specific pathway selection. Analysis of N-cadherin mutants (cdh2(hi3644Tg) ) and embryos injected with N-cadherin antisense morpholinos showed primary motor axons extending aberrant axonal branches at the choice point in ∼40% of the somitic hemisegments and an ∼150% increase in the number of branches per axon length within the ventral myotome. Analysis of individual axons trajectories showed that the caudal (CaP) and rostral (RoP) motor neurons axons formed aberrant branches at the choice point that abnormally extended in the rostrocaudal axis and ventrally to the horizontal myoseptum. Expression of a dominant-interfering N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain in primary motor neurons caused some axons to stall abnormally at the horizontal myoseptum and to impair their migration into the ventral myotome. However, in N-cadherin-depleted embryos, the majority of primary motor axons innervated their appropriate myotomal territories, indicating that N-cadherin regulates motor axon growth and branching without severely affecting the mechanisms that control axonal target selection. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Plexin A3 and turnout regulate motor axonal branch morphogenesis in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Sainath

    Full Text Available During embryogenesis motor axons navigate to their target muscles, where individual motor axons develop complex branch morphologies. The mechanisms that control axonal branching morphogenesis have been studied intensively, yet it still remains unclear when branches begin to form or how branch locations are determined. Live cell imaging of individual zebrafish motor axons reveals that the first axonal branches are generated at the ventral extent of the myotome via bifurcation of the growth cone. Subsequent branches are generated by collateral branching restricted to their synaptic target field along the distal portion of the axon. This precisely timed and spatially restricted branching process is disrupted in turnout mutants we identified in a forward genetic screen. Molecular genetic mapping positioned the turnout mutation within a 300 kb region encompassing eight annotated genes, however sequence analysis of all eight open reading frames failed to unambiguously identify the turnout mutation. Chimeric analysis and single cell labeling reveal that turnout function is required cell non-autonomously for intraspinal motor axon guidance and peripheral branch formation. turnout mutant motor axons form the first branch on time via growth cone bifurcation, but unlike wild-type they form collateral branches precociously, when the growth cone is still navigating towards the ventral myotome. These precocious collateral branches emerge along the proximal region of the axon shaft typically devoid of branches, and they develop into stable, permanent branches. Furthermore, we find that null mutants of the guidance receptor plexin A3 display identical motor axon branching defects, and time lapse analysis reveals that precocious branch formation in turnout and plexin A3 mutants is due to increased stability of otherwise short-lived axonal protrusions. Thus, plexin A3 dependent intrinsic and turnout dependent extrinsic mechanisms suppress collateral branch

  8. On the pressure velocity and temperature factors and the effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By this, explicit results about the pressure, velocity and temperature distributions are obtained. It is observed that viscosity reduces the pressure, hence, the velocity and temperature distributions. Our results may find relevance in the medical treatment of high blood-pressure problem. Keywords: Viscosity pressure, velocity, ...

  9. Assessing the Role of the Cadherin/Catenin Complex at the Schwann Cell–Axon Interface and in the Initiation of Myelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewallen, Kathryn A.; Shen, Yun-An A.; De La Torre, Asia R.; Ng, Benjamin K.; Meijer, Dies

    2011-01-01

    Myelination is dependent on complex reciprocal interactions between the Schwann cell (SC) and axon. Recent evidence suggests that the SC–axon interface represents a membrane specialization essential for myelination; however, the manner in which this polarized-apical domain is generated remains a mystery. The cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin is enriched at the SC–axon interface and colocalizes with the polarity protein Par-3. The asymmetric localization is induced on SC–SC and SC–axon contact. Knockdown of N-cadherin in SCs cocultured with DRG neurons disrupts Par-3 localization and delays the initiation of myelination. However, knockdown or overexpression of neuronal N-cadherin does not influence the distribution of Par-3 or myelination, suggesting that homotypic interactions between SC and axonal N-cadherin are not essential for the events surrounding myelination. To further investigate the role of N-cadherin, mice displaying SC-specific gene ablation of N-cadherin were generated and characterized. Surprisingly, myelination is only slightly delayed, and mice are viable without any detectable myelination defects. β-Catenin, a downstream effector of N-cadherin, colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with N-cadherin on the initiation of myelination. To determine whether β-catenin mediates compensation on N-cadherin deletion, SC-specific gene ablation of β-catenin was generated and characterized. Consistent with our hypothesis, myelination is more severely delayed than when manipulating N-cadherin alone, but without any defect to the myelin sheath. Together, our results suggest that N-cadherin interacts with β-catenin in establishing SC polarity and the timely initiation of myelination, but they are nonessential components for the formation and maturation of the myelin sheath. PMID:21414924

  10. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  11. Imaging findings in diffuse axonal injury after closed head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizel, P.M.; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Goethem, J.W. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Schepper, A.M. de [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Edegem (Belgium); Dillen, C.; Cosyns, P. [Department of Psychiatry, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Edegem (Belgium); Verlooy, J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Edegem (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    Even in patients with closed head trauma, brain parenchyma can be severely injured due to disruption of axonal fibers by shearing forces during acceleration, deceleration, and rotation of the head. In this article we review the spectrum of imaging findings in patients with diffuse axonal injuries (DAI) after closed head trauma. Knowledge of the location and imaging characteristics of DAI is important to radiologists for detection and diagnosis. Common locations of DAI include: cerebral hemispheric gray-white matter interface and subcortical white matter, body and splenium of corpus callosum, basal ganglia, dorsolateral aspect of brainstem, and cerebellum. In the acute phase, CT may show punctate hemorrhages. The true extent of brain involvement is better appreciated with MR imaging, because both hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic lesions (gliotic scars) can be detected. The MR appearance of DAI lesions depends on several factors, including age of injury, presence of hemorrhage or blood-breakdown products (e. g., hemosiderin), and type of sequence used. Technical aspects in MR imaging of these patients are discussed. Non-hemorrhagic lesions can be detected with fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), proton-density-, or T2-weighted images, whereas gradient echo sequences with long TE increase the visibility of old hemorrhagic lesions. (orig.) With 12 figs., 12 refs.

  12. Rapid signaling in distinct dopaminergic axons during locomotion and reward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, MW; Dombeck, DA

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dopaminergic projections from the midbrain to striatum are critical for motor control, as their degeneration in Parkinson’s disease results in profound movement deficits. Paradoxically, most recording methods report rapid phasic dopamine signaling (~100ms bursts) to unpredicted rewards, with little evidence for movement-related signaling. The leading model posits that phasic signaling in striatum targeting dopamine neurons drive reward-based learning, while slow variations in firing (tens of seconds to minutes) in these same neurons bias animals towards or away from movement. However, despite widespread acceptance of this model, current methods have provided little evidence to support or refute it. Here, using new optical recording methods, we report the discovery of rapid phasic signaling in striatum-targeting dopaminergic axons that was associated with, and capable of triggering, locomotion in mice. Axons expressing these signals were largely distinct from those signaling during unexpected rewards. These results suggest that dopaminergic neuromodulation can differentially impact motor control and reward learning with sub-second precision and suggest that both precise signal timing and neuronal subtype are important parameters to consider in the treatment of dopamine-related disorders. PMID:27398617

  13. Effective velocity boundary condition at a mixed slip surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sbragaglia, M.; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the nature of the effective velocity boundary condition for liquid flow over a plane boundary on which small free-slip islands are randomly distributed. It is found that an effective Navier partial-slip condition for the velocity emerges from a statistical analysis valid for

  14. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    it virtually impossible to compensate for the factor and obtain correct velocity estimates for either CFM or spectral velocity estimation. This talk will describe methods for finding the correct velocity by estimating both the axial and lateral component of the velocity vector. The transverse oscillation...... method introduces an ultrasound field that oscillation not only along the ultrasound beam both also transverse to it to estimate both the lateral and axial velocity for the full velocity vector. The correct velocity magnitude can be found from this as well as the instantaneous angle. This can be obtained...... over the full region of interest and a real time image at a frame rate of 20 Hz can be displayed. Real time videos have been obtained from both our research systems and from commercial BK Medical scanners. The vector velocity images reveal the full complexity of the human blood flow. It is easy to see...

  15. The Kinesin Adaptor Calsyntenin-1 Organizes Microtubule Polarity and Regulates Dynamics during Sensory Axon Arbor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C. Halloran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Axon growth and branching, and development of neuronal polarity are critically dependent on proper organization and dynamics of the microtubule (MT cytoskeleton. MTs must organize with correct polarity for delivery of diverse cargos to appropriate subcellular locations, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating MT polarity remain poorly understood. Moreover, how an actively branching axon reorganizes MTs to direct their plus ends distally at branch points is unknown. We used high-speed, in vivo imaging of polymerizing MT plus ends to characterize MT dynamics in developing sensory axon arbors in zebrafish embryos. We find that axonal MTs are highly dynamic throughout development, and that the peripheral and central axons of sensory neurons show differences in MT behaviors. Furthermore, we show that Calsyntenin-1 (Clstn-1, a kinesin adaptor required for sensory axon branching, also regulates MT polarity in developing axon arbors. In wild type neurons the vast majority of MTs are directed in the correct plus-end-distal orientation from early stages of development. Loss of Clstn-1 causes an increase in MTs polymerizing in the retrograde direction. These misoriented MTs most often are found near growth cones and branch points, suggesting Clstn-1 is particularly important for organizing MT polarity at these locations. Together, our results suggest that Clstn-1, in addition to regulating kinesin-mediated cargo transport, also organizes the underlying MT highway during axon arbor development.

  16. The role of mitochondria in axonal degeneration and tissue repair in MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Horssen, J.; Witte, M.E.; Ciccarelli, O.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal injury is a key feature of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and is currently seen as the main correlate for permanent clinical disability. Although little is known about the pathogenetic mechanisms that drive axonal damage and loss, there is accumulating evidence highlighting the central

  17. The progeroid gene BubR1 regulates axon myelination and motor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, C.I.; Yoo, K.H.; Hussaini, S.M.; Jeon, B.T.; Welby, J.; Gan, H.; Scarisbrick, I.A.; Zhang, Z.; Baker, D.J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Rodriguez, M.; Jang, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Myelination, the process by which oligodendrocytes form the myelin sheath around axons, is key to axonal signal transduction and related motor function in the central nervous system (CNS). Aging is characterized by degenerative changes in the myelin sheath, although the molecular underpinnings of

  18. Modeling of the axon membrane skeleton structure and implications for its mechanical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihao Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that, unlike the soma and dendrites, the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under tension. Currently, the structure-function relationship of the axonal structure is unclear. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM to show that the stiffness of the axon plasma membrane is significantly higher than the stiffnesses of dendrites and somata. To examine whether the structure of the axon plasma membrane determines its overall stiffness, we introduced a coarse-grain molecular dynamics model of the axon membrane skeleton that reproduces the structure identified by super-resolution microscopy. Our proposed computational model accurately simulates the median value of the Young's modulus of the axon plasma membrane determined by atomic force microscopy. It also predicts that because the spectrin filaments are under entropic tension, the thermal random motion of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav, which are bound to ankyrin particles, a critical axonal protein, is reduced compared to the thermal motion when spectrin filaments are held at equilibrium. Lastly, our model predicts that because spectrin filaments are under tension, any axonal injuries that lacerate spectrin filaments will likely lead to a permanent disruption of the membrane skeleton due to the inability of spectrin filaments to spontaneously form their initial under-tension configuration.

  19. Axonal and presynaptic protein synthesis: new insights into the biology of the neuron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuditta, A.; Kaplan, B.B.; van Minnen, J.; Alvarez, J.; Koenig, E.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of a local mRNA translation system in axons and terminals was proposed almost 40 years ago. Over the ensuing period, an impressive body of evidence has grown to support this proposal - yet the nerve cell body is still considered to be the only source of axonal and presynaptic proteins.

  20. Blast overpressure induced axonal injury changes in rat brainstem and spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasu Kallakuri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blast induced neurotrauma has been the signature wound in returning soldiers from the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of importance is understanding the pathomechansim(s of blast overpressure (OP induced axonal injury. Although several recent animal models of blast injury indicate the neuronal and axonal injury in various brain regions, animal studies related to axonal injury in the white matter (WM tracts of cervical spinal cord are limited. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of axonal injury in WM tracts of cervical spinal cord in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to a single insult of blast OP. Materials and Methods: Sagittal brainstem sections and horizontal cervical spinal cord sections from blast and sham animals were stained by neurofilament light (NF-L chain and beta amyloid precursor protein immunocytochemistry and observed for axonal injury changes. Results: Observations from this preliminary study demonstrate axonal injury changes in the form of prominent swellings, retraction bulbs, and putative signs of membrane disruptions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord WM tracts of rats subjected to