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Sample records for axonal transport drug

  1. Tri-partite complex for axonal transport drug delivery achieves pharmacological effect

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    Frederickson Martyn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted delivery of pharmaceutical agents into selected populations of CNS (Central Nervous System neurons is an extremely compelling goal. Currently, systemic methods are generally used for delivery of pain medications, anti-virals for treatment of dermatomal infections, anti-spasmodics, and neuroprotectants. Systemic side effects or undesirable effects on parts of the CNS that are not involved in the pathology limit efficacy and limit clinical utility for many classes of pharmaceuticals. Axonal transport from the periphery offers a possible selective route, but there has been little progress towards design of agents that can accomplish targeted delivery via this intraneural route. To achieve this goal, we developed a tripartite molecular construction concept involving an axonal transport facilitator molecule, a polymer linker, and a large number of drug molecules conjugated to the linker, then sought to evaluate its neurobiology and pharmacological behavior. Results We developed chemical synthesis methodologies for assembling these tripartite complexes using a variety of axonal transport facilitators including nerve growth factor, wheat germ agglutinin, and synthetic facilitators derived from phage display work. Loading of up to 100 drug molecules per complex was achieved. Conjugation methods were used that allowed the drugs to be released in active form inside the cell body after transport. Intramuscular and intradermal injection proved effective for introducing pharmacologically effective doses into selected populations of CNS neurons. Pharmacological efficacy with gabapentin in a paw withdrawal latency model revealed a ten fold increase in half life and a 300 fold decrease in necessary dose relative to systemic administration for gabapentin when the drug was delivered by axonal transport using the tripartite vehicle. Conclusion Specific targeting of selected subpopulations of CNS neurons for drug delivery by axonal

  2. The genetics of axonal transport and axonal transport disorders.

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    Jason E Duncan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are specialized cells with a complex architecture that includes elaborate dendritic branches and a long, narrow axon that extends from the cell body to the synaptic terminal. The organized transport of essential biological materials throughout the neuron is required to support its growth, function, and viability. In this review, we focus on insights that have emerged from the genetic analysis of long-distance axonal transport between the cell body and the synaptic terminal. We also discuss recent genetic evidence that supports the hypothesis that disruptions in axonal transport may cause or dramatically contribute to neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

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    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  4. Where does slow axonal transport go?

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    Terada, Sumio

    2003-12-01

    Axonal transport is the specialized and well-developed intracellular transport system for regulated and/or long-distance transport based on generalized cellular machineries. Among them, slow axonal transport conveys cytoplasmic proteins. The motor molecule, the nature of transporting complex and the transport regulation mechanism for slow transport are still unclarified. There has been a dispute regarding the nature of transporting complex of cytoskeletal proteins, polymer-sliding hypothesis versus subunit-transport theory. Recent data supporting the hypothesis of polymer sliding in cultured neurons only reconfirm the previously reported structure and this inference suffers from the lack of ultrastructural evidence and the direct relevance to the physiological slow transport phenomenon in vivo. Observation of the moving cytoskeletal proteins in vivo using transgenic mice or squid giant axons revealed that subunits do move in a microtubule-dependent manner, strongly indicating the involvement of microtubule-based motor kinesin. If the slow transport rate reflects the intermittent fast transport dependent on kinesin motor, we have to investigate the molecular constituents of the transporting complex in more detail and evaluate why the motor and cargo interaction is so unstable. This kind of weak and fluctuating interaction between various molecular pairs could not be detected by conventional techniques, thus necessitating the establishment of a new experimental system before approaching the molecular regulation problem.

  5. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

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    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  6. Differential extraction of axonally transported proteoglycans

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    Elam, J.S. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Axonally transported proteoglycans were differentially solubilized by a sequence of extractions designed to infer their relationship to nerve terminal membranes. Groups of goldfish were injected unilaterally with 35SO4 and contralateral optic tecta containing axonally transported molecules were removed 16 h later. Tecta were homogenized in isotonic buffer and centrifuged at 100,000 g for 60 min to create a total supernatant fraction. Subsequent homogenizations followed by recentrifugation were with hypotonic buffer (lysis extract), 1 M NaCl, Triton X-100 or alternatively Triton-1 M NaCl. Populations of proteoglycans in each extract were isolated on DEAE ion exchange columns and evaluated for content of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Results show the distribution of transported proteoglycans to be 26.3% total soluble, 13.7% lysis extract, 13.8% NaCl extract, 12.2% Triton extract, and 46.2% Triton-NaCl extract. Proteoglycans from all fractions contained heparan sulfate as the predominant GAG, with lesser amounts of chondroitin (4 or 6) sulfate. The possible localizations of transported proteoglycans suggested by the extraction results are discussed.

  7. The pathophysiology of axonal transport in alzheimer’s disease

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    Vicario Orri, Elena; Opazo, Carlos; Muñoz López, Francisco José, 1964-

    2015-01-01

    Neurons communicate in the nervous system by carrying out information along the length of their axons to finally transmit it at the synapse. Proper function of axons and axon terminals relies on the transport of proteins, organelles, vesicles, and other elements from the site of synthesis in the cell body. Conversely, neurotrophins secreted from axonal targets and other components at nerve terminals need to travel toward the cell body for clearance. Molecular motors, namely kinesins and dynei...

  8. Fast axonal transport in early experimental disc edema.

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    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1980-02-01

    Previous work has documented impairment of slow axonal transport in papilledema, but the abnormalities in rapid transport were less certain. Therefore fast axonal transport was studied in 19 primate eyes subjected to ocular hypotony for 6 to 72 hr following surgical fistulization of the anterior chamber. Mild, irregular alterations in fast axonal transport were detected only after nerve head swelling was apparent. These changes in fast transport mechanisms in cases of nerve head edema occur after, and may be secondary to, impaired slow axoplasmic flow and the resultant axonal swelling. Furthermore, since prolonged complete interruption of axonal transport is theoretically inconsistent with the continued normal neuron function characteristic of papilledema and, moreover, since previous data shows a "slowdown" rather than complete blockade of axonal transport in papilledema, it is likely that in eyes with papilledema there does not exist a complete flock of axonal transport. Therefore we hypothesize that the swelling results when slow axoplasmic flow is locally slowed down but not totally stopped, with the axon distention producing secondary mild, irregular changes in fast axonal transport.

  9. Increased Human Wildtype Tau Attenuates Axonal Transport Deficits Caused by Loss of APP in Mouse Models

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    Smith, Karen D.B.; Erica Peethumnongsin; Han Lin; Hui Zheng; Pautler, Robia G.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is implicated in axonal elongation, synaptic plasticity, and axonal transport. However, the role of APP on axonal transport in conjunction with the microtubule associated protein tau continues to be debated. Here we measured in vivo axonal transport in APP knockout mice with Manganese Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to determine whether APP is necessary for maintaining normal axonal transport. We also tested how overexpression and mutations of tau affect axonal transport ...

  10. Morphology of axonal transport abnormalities in primate eyes.

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    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1981-11-01

    The ultrastructure of the retina and optic nerve head was studied in primate eyes after central retinal artery occlusion. Within 2 hours of the vascular occlusion the inner retinal layers undergo watery (isosmotic) swelling. This watery swelling of axons and astroglia extends into the nerve head as far back as the anterior boundary of the scleral lamina cribrosa. The swelling is increased 4 hours after the occlusion, and by 24 hours disintegration has occurred. At the optic nerve head mitochondria and vesicles of smooth endoplasmic reticulum begin to accumulate within 2 hours. The accumulation increases at 4 hours and persists to 24 hours. The watery swelling seems characteristic of ischaemic axons. Membranous organelles accumulate at the boundary of an ischaemic zone when material carried by axonal transport is brought via the healthy axon segment to the boundary, but they cannot proceed further into the ischaemic zone. Such accumulation is typical of locations where rapid orthograde axonal transport or retrograde axonal transport is blocked. In contrast, when slow axonal flow is impaired, the swelling is characterised by an excess of cytoplasmic gel without a marked accumulation of organelles. Rapid orthograde transport and retrograde transport seem to be closely related to one another, while slow axoplasmic flow seems fundamentally different. From morphological findings we suspect that, in experimental glaucoma, intraocular pressure first affects the intracellular physiological process of rapid orthograde and retrograde axonal transport. Watery swelling may not occur unless the ischaemic injury to cell metabolism is more advanced. In contrast, in experimental papilloedema, the swelling results predominantly from impaired slow axoplasmic flow.

  11. Computational Analysis of Axonal Transport: A Novel Assessment of Neurotoxicity, Neuronal Development and Functions

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    Toshiyuki Gotoh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport plays a crucial role in neuronal morphogenesis, survival and function. Despite its importance, however, the molecular mechanisms of axonal transport remain mostly unknown because a simple and quantitative assay system for monitoring this cellular process has been lacking. In order to better characterize the mechanisms involved in axonal transport, we formulate a novel computer-assisted monitoring system of axonal transport. Potential uses of this system and implications for future studies will be discussed.

  12. Rapid axonal transport in primate optic nerve. Distribution of pressure-induced interruption.

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    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1981-04-01

    Six primate eyes were studied after four hours of elevated intraocular pressure. Tissue specimens from the region of the lamina cribrosa were examined in cross section by transmission electron microscopy. Interruption in fast orthograde and retrograde axonal transport was identified in individual axons by noting accumulation of membraneous microorganelles, such as mitochondria and microvesicles within axon cylinders. Although organelle accumulation varied from bundle to bundle, involvement of individual axons was diffuse across the extent of a specific axon bundle. This observation contradicts the apparent association of axonal transport block with crosswise-oriented trabecular beams at the level of the lamina cribrosa as seen in tissue specimens examined in longitudinal section. It also fails to support the notion that blocked axonal transport with elevated pressure is produced by kinking of axons at the lamina.

  13. Axonal transport interruption and anatomy at the lamina cribrosa.

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    Radius, R L; Bade, B

    1982-10-01

    Pressure-induced, focal axonal transport abnormalities were studied in 14 cat eyes by the examination of serial step-section tissue radioautogram. Although the patterns of the transport interruption at the lamina cribrosa varied from eye to eye, the temporal sectors of the nerve head were most often involved by this abnormality. The anatomy at the lamina cribrosa was studied in adjacent (6 micrometers) cross-sectional specimens. The thickness of the extra-bundle trabeculae and the nerve fiber bundle dimensions including the cross-sectional area and the number and the shape (the ratio of the major and the minor axis diameters) of the laminar pores were measured by computer-assisted perimeter analysis. There was no correlation between the location of the transport interruption and any of these anatomic measurements.

  14. Neuroinflammation by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes impairs retrograde axonal transport in an oligodendrocyte mutant mouse.

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    Chi Wang Ip

    Full Text Available Mice overexpressing proteolipid protein (PLP develop a leukodystrophy-like disease involving cytotoxic, CD8+ T-lymphocytes. Here we show that these cytotoxic T-lymphocytes perturb retrograde axonal transport. Using fluorogold stereotactically injected into the colliculus superior, we found that PLP overexpression in oligodendrocytes led to significantly reduced retrograde axonal transport in retina ganglion cell axons. We also observed an accumulation of mitochondria in the juxtaparanodal axonal swellings, indicative for a disturbed axonal transport. PLP overexpression in the absence of T-lymphocytes rescued retrograde axonal transport defects and abolished axonal swellings. Bone marrow transfer from wildtype mice, but not from perforin- or granzyme B-deficient mutants, into lymphocyte-deficient PLP mutant mice led again to impaired axonal transport and the formation of axonal swellings, which are predominantly located at the juxtaparanodal region. This demonstrates that the adaptive immune system, including cytotoxic T-lymphocytes which release perforin and granzyme B, are necessary to perturb axonal integrity in the PLP-transgenic disease model. Based on our observations, so far not attended molecular and cellular players belonging to the immune system should be considered to understand pathogenesis in inherited myelin disorders with progressive axonal damage.

  15. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

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    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of tau bound to microtubules and inhibited axonal transport of tau. To determine whether differential tau clearance is responsible for the increase in phosphomimic tau, we inhibited autophagy in neurons which resulted in a 3-fold accumulation of phosphomimic tau compared with wild type tau, and endogenous tau was unaffected. In autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not in neurons, proteasomal degradation of phosphomutant tau was also reduced compared with wild type tau. Therefore, autophagic and proteasomal pathways are involved in tau degradation, with autophagy appearing to be the primary route for clearing phosphorylated tau in neurons. Defective autophagy might contribute to the accumulaton of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23601672

  16. Effect of vesicle traps on traffic jam formation in fast axonal transport.

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    Kuznetsov, A V

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for simulation of the formation of organelle traps in fast axonal transport. Such traps may form in the regions of microtubule polar mismatching. Depending on the orientation of microtubules pointing toward the trap region, these traps can accumulate either plus-end or minus-end oriented vesicles. The model predicts that the maximum concentrations of organelles occur at the boundaries of the trap regions; the overall concentration of organelles in the axon with traps is greatly increased compared to that in a healthy axon, which is expected to contribute to mechanical damages of the axon. The organelle traps induce hindrance to organelle transport down the axon; the total organelle flux down the axon with traps is found to be significantly reduced compared to that in a healthy axon.

  17. Cyclophilin D Deficiency Rescues Axonal Mitochondrial Transport in Alzheimer’s Neurons

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    Lan Guo; Heng Du; Shiqiang Yan; Xiaoping Wu; Guy M. McKhann; John Xi Chen; Shirley ShiDu Yan

    2013-01-01

    Normal axonal mitochondrial transport and function is essential for the maintenance of synaptic function. Abnormal mitochondrial motility and mitochondrial dysfunction within axons are critical for amyloid β (Aβ)-induced synaptic stress and the loss of synapses relevant to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms controlling axonal mitochondrial function and transport alterations in AD remain elusive. Here, we report an unexplored role of cyclophilin D (CypD)-depe...

  18. Axonal transport rate decreased at the onset of optic neuritis in EAE mice.

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    Lin, Tsen-Hsuan; Kim, Joong Hee; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Chiang, Chia-Wen; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Cross, Anne H; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2014-10-15

    Optic neuritis is frequently the first symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating neurodegenerative disease. Impaired axonal transport has been considered as an early event of neurodegenerative diseases. However, few studies have assessed the integrity of axonal transport in MS or its animal models. We hypothesize that axonal transport impairment occurs at the onset of optic neuritis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. In this study, we employed manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to assess axonal transport in optic nerves in EAE mice at the onset of optic neuritis. Axonal transport was assessed as (a) optic nerve Mn(2+) accumulation rate (in % signal change/h) by measuring the rate of increased total optic nerve signal enhancement, and (b) Mn(2+) transport rate (in mm/h) by measuring the rate of change in optic nerve length enhanced by Mn(2+). Compared to sham-treated healthy mice, Mn(2+) accumulation rate was significantly decreased by 19% and 38% for EAE mice with moderate and severe optic neuritis, respectively. The axonal transport rate of Mn(2+) was significantly decreased by 43% and 65% for EAE mice with moderate and severe optic neuritis, respectively. The degree of axonal transport deficit correlated with the extent of impaired visual function and diminished microtubule-associated tubulins, as well as the severity of inflammation, demyelination, and axonal injury at the onset of optic neuritis.

  19. Riluzole protects against glutamate-induced slowing of neurofilament axonal transport.

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    Stevenson, Alison

    2009-04-24

    Riluzole is the only drug approved for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) but its precise mode of action is not properly understood. Damage to axonal transport of neurofilaments is believed to be part of the pathogenic mechanism in ALS and this has been linked to defective glutamate handling and increased phosphorylation of neurofilament side-arm domains. Here, we show that riluzole protects against glutamate-induced slowing of neurofilament transport. Protection is associated with decreased neurofilament side-arm phosphorylation and inhibition of the activities of two neurofilament kinases, ERK and p38 that are activated in ALS. Thus, the anti-glutamatergic properties of riluzole include protection against glutamate-induced changes to neurofilament phosphorylation and transport.

  20. In vivo Imaging of Mitochondrial Transport in Single-Axon Regeneration of Zebrafish Mauthner Cells

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    Xu, Yang; Chen, Min; Hu, Bingbing; Huang, Rongchen; Hu, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial transport is essential for neuronal function, but the evidence of connections between mitochondrial transport and axon regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of living vertebrates remains limited. Here, we developed a novel model to explore mitochondrial transport in a single Mauthner axon (M axon) of zebrafish with non-invasive in vivo imaging. To confirm the feasibility of using this model, we treated labeled zebrafish with nocodazole and demonstrated that it could disrupt mitochondrial transport. We also used two-photon laser axotomy to precisely axotomize M axons and simultaneously recorded their regeneration and the process of mitochondrial transport in living zebrafish larvae. The findings showed that the injured axons with stronger regenerative capability maintain greater mitochondrial motility. Furthermore, to stimulate axon regeneration, treatment with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (db-cAMP) could also augment mitochondrial motility. Taken together, our results provide new evidence that mitochondrial motility is positively correlated with axon regeneration in the living vertebrate CNS. This promising model will be useful for further studies on the interaction between axon regeneration and mitochondrial dynamics, using various genetic and pharmacological techniques. PMID:28174522

  1. Neuronal Logistics : Axonal Transport in Development and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van den Berg (Robert)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractBrain cells are uniquely shaped among the many cell types of the body. While most cells are more or less rounded or square-shaped, neurons grow one or more long axons that can reach lengths of a meter or more. To keep these axons alive and functional, neurons are dependent on an intr

  2. Optic nerve fast axonal transport abnormalities in primates. Occurrence after short posterior ciliary artery occlusion.

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    Radius, R L

    1980-11-01

    Fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate (Aotus trivirgatus) optic nerve were studied in ten eyes at various intervals after occlusion of the lateral short posterior ciliary circulation. Evidence of focal axonal ischemia, as indicated by swelling of mitochondria and dissolution of cytoplasmic detail, was noted as early as one hour after occlusion. Accumulation of mitochondria, microvesicles, and dense bodies, indicating focal interruption of axonal transport mechanisms, was noted in eyes examined at 2, 4, and 6 hours. This accumulation of organelles was limited to the region of the lamina cribrosa. Nerve head abnormalities were not seen in two eyes studied at two weeks.

  3. In vivo axonal transport deficits in a mouse model of fronto-temporal dementia

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    Tabassum Majid

    2014-01-01

    Discussion: In our study, we identified the presence of age-dependent axonal transport deficits beginning at 3 months of age in rTg4510 mice. We correlated these deficits at 3 months to the presence of hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain and the presence within the olfactory epithelium. We observed tau pathology not only in the soma of these neurons but also within the axons and processes of these neurons. Our characterization of axonal transport in this tauopathy model provides a functional time point that can be used for future therapeutic interventions.

  4. Neurofilament subunit (NFL) head domain phosphorylation regulates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

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    Yates, Darran M

    2009-04-01

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are synthesised in neuronal cell bodies and then transported through axons. Neurofilament light chain (NFL) is a principal component of neurofilaments, and phosphorylation of NFL head domain is believed to regulate the assembly of neurofilaments. However, the role that NFL phosphorylation has on transport of neurofilaments is poorly understood. To address this issue, we monitored axonal transport of phosphorylation mutants of NFL. We mutated four known phosphorylation sites in NFL head domain to either preclude phosphorylation, or mimic permanent phosphorylation. Mutation to preclude phosphorylation had no effect on transport but mutation of three sites to mimic permanent phosphorylation inhibited transport. Mutation of all four sites together to mimic permanent phosphorylation proved especially potent at inhibiting transport and also disrupted neurofilament assembly. Our results suggest that NFL head domain phosphorylation is a regulator of neurofilament axonal transport.

  5. Impaired axonal transport in motor neurons correlates with clinical prion disease.

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    Vladimir Ermolayev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders causing motor dysfunctions, dementia and neuropathological changes such as spongiosis, astroglyosis and neuronal loss. The chain of events leading to the clinical disease and the role of distinct brain areas are still poorly understood. The role of nervous system integrity and axonal properties in prion pathology are still elusive. There is no evidence of both the functional axonal impairments in vivo and their connection with prion disease. We studied the functional axonal impairments in motor neurons at the onset of clinical prion disease using the combination of tracing as a functional assay for axonal transport with immunohistochemistry experiments. Well-established and novel confocal and ultramicroscopy techniques were used to image and quantify labeled neurons. Despite profound differences in the incubation times, 30% to 45% of neurons in the red nucleus of different mouse lines showed axonal transport impairments at the disease onset bilaterally after intracerebral prion inoculation and unilaterally -- after inoculation into the right sciatic nerve. Up to 94% of motor cortex neurons also demonstrated transport defects upon analysis by alternative imaging methods. Our data connect axonal transport impairments with disease symptoms for different prion strains and inoculation routes and establish further insight on the development of prion pathology in vivo. The alterations in localization of the proteins involved in the retrograde axonal transport allow us to propose a mechanism of transport disruption, which involves Rab7-mediated cargo attachment to the dynein-dynactin pathway. These findings suggest novel targets for therapeutic and diagnostic approaches in the early stages of prion disease.

  6. Difference Tracker: ImageJ plugins for fully automated analysis of multiple axonal transport parameters.

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    Andrews, Simon; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P

    2010-11-30

    Studies of axonal transport are critical, not only to understand its normal regulation, but also to determine the roles of transport impairment in disease. Exciting new resources have recently become available allowing live imaging of axonal transport in physiologically relevant settings, such as mammalian nerves. Thus the effects of disease, ageing and therapies can now be assessed directly in nervous system tissue. However, these imaging studies present new challenges. Manual or semi-automated analysis of the range of transport parameters required for a suitably complete evaluation is very time-consuming and can be subjective due to the complexity of the particle movements in axons in ex vivo explants or in vivo. We have developed Difference Tracker, a program combining two new plugins for the ImageJ image-analysis freeware, to provide fast, fully automated and objective analysis of a number of relevant measures of trafficking of fluorescently labeled particles so that axonal transport in different situations can be easily compared. We confirm that Difference Tracker can accurately track moving particles in highly simplified, artificial simulations. It can also identify and track multiple motile fluorescently labeled mitochondria simultaneously in time-lapse image stacks from live imaging of tibial nerve axons, reporting values for a number of parameters that are comparable to those obtained through manual analysis of the same axons. Difference Tracker therefore represents a useful free resource for the comparative analysis of axonal transport under different conditions, and could potentially be used and developed further in many other studies requiring quantification of particle movements.

  7. In vitro low frequency electromagnetic field effect on fast axonal transport.

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    Zborowski, M; Atkinson, M; Lewandowski, J J; Jacobs, G; Mitchell, D; Breuer, A C; Nosé, Y

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a low frequency electromagnetic field on fast axonal transport for future neuroprosthetic applications. Changes in speeds and densities of retrograde fast organelle transport in rat sciatic nerve preparations were measured in vitro upon exposure to 15 and 50 Hz pulsed magnetic fields with peak intensities of 4.4 and 8.8 mT. Maximum current density of the induced eddy current was calculated to be about 40 microA/cm2. Video enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy was used to record axons supporting active organelle transport. Strong effects were observed in myelinated axons (cessation of transport in up to 10 min). Such effects may eventually be used as part of a neuroprosthesis to noninvasively modify or couple to various parts of the nervous system.

  8. Cryo electron tomography of herpes simplex virus during axonal transport and secondary envelopment in primary neurons.

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    Iosune Ibiricu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1 egress in neurons, viral particles travel from the neuronal cell body along the axon towards the synapse. Whether HSV1 particles are transported as enveloped virions as proposed by the 'married' model or as non-enveloped capsids suggested by the 'separate' model is controversial. Specific viral proteins may form a recruitment platform for microtubule motors that catalyze such transport. However, their subviral location has remained elusive. Here we established a system to analyze herpesvirus egress by cryo electron tomography. At 16 h post infection, we observed intra-axonal transport of progeny HSV1 viral particles in dissociated hippocampal neurons by live-cell fluorescence microscopy. Cryo electron tomography of frozen-hydrated neurons revealed that most egressing capsids were transported independently of the viral envelope. Unexpectedly, we found not only DNA-containing capsids (cytosolic C-capsids, but also capsids lacking DNA (cytosolic A-/B-capsids in mid-axon regions. Subvolume averaging revealed lower amounts of tegument on cytosolic A-/B-capsids than on C-capsids. Nevertheless, all capsid types underwent active axonal transport. Therefore, even few tegument proteins on the capsid vertices seemed to suffice for transport. Secondary envelopment of capsids was observed at axon terminals. On their luminal face, the enveloping vesicles were studded with typical glycoprotein-like spikes. Furthermore, we noted an accretion of tegument density at the concave cytosolic face of the vesicle membrane in close proximity to the capsids. Three-dimensional analysis revealed that these assembly sites lacked cytoskeletal elements, but that filamentous actin surrounded them and formed an assembly compartment. Our data support the 'separate model' for HSV1 egress, i.e. progeny herpes viruses being transported along axons as subassemblies and not as complete virions within transport vesicles.

  9. Morphology of axonal transport abnormalities in primate eyes.

    OpenAIRE

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the retina and optic nerve head was studied in primate eyes after central retinal artery occlusion. Within 2 hours of the vascular occlusion the inner retinal layers undergo watery (isosmotic) swelling. This watery swelling of axons and astroglia extends into the nerve head as far back as the anterior boundary of the scleral lamina cribrosa. The swelling is increased 4 hours after the occlusion, and by 24 hours disintegration has occurred. At the optic nerve head mitocho...

  10. CAR-associated vesicular transport of an adenovirus in motor neuron axons.

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    Salinas, Sara; Bilsland, Lynsey G; Henaff, Daniel; Weston, Anne E; Keriel, Anne; Schiavo, Giampietro; Kremer, Eric J

    2009-05-01

    Axonal transport is responsible for the movement of signals and cargo between nerve termini and cell bodies. Pathogens also exploit this pathway to enter and exit the central nervous system. In this study, we characterised the binding, endocytosis and axonal transport of an adenovirus (CAV-2) that preferentially infects neurons. Using biochemical, cell biology, genetic, ultrastructural and live-cell imaging approaches, we show that interaction with the neuronal membrane correlates with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) surface expression, followed by endocytosis involving clathrin. In axons, long-range CAV-2 motility was bidirectional with a bias for retrograde transport in nonacidic Rab7-positive organelles. Unexpectedly, we found that CAR was associated with CAV-2 vesicles that also transported cargo as functionally distinct as tetanus toxin, neurotrophins, and their receptors. These results suggest that a single axonal transport carrier is capable of transporting functionally distinct cargoes that target different membrane compartments in the soma. We propose that CAV-2 transport is dictated by an innate trafficking of CAR, suggesting an unsuspected function for this adhesion protein during neuronal homeostasis.

  11. Antipsychotic drugs alter neuronal development including ALM neuroblast migration and PLM axonal outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Donohoe, Dallas R; Weeks, Kathrine; Aamodt, Eric J; Dwyer, Donard S

    2008-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are increasingly being prescribed for children and adolescents, and are used in pregnant women without a clear demonstration of safety in these populations. Global effects of these drugs on neurodevelopment (e.g., decreased brain size) have been reported in rats, but detailed knowledge about neuronal effects and mechanisms of action are lacking. Here we report on the evaluation of a comprehensive panel of antipsychotic drugs in a model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans) that is widely used to study neuronal development. Specifically, we examined the effects of the drugs on neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth in mechanosensory neurons visualized with green fluorescent protein expressed from the mec-3 promoter. Clozapine, fluphenazine, and haloperidol produced deficits in the development and migration of ALM neurons and axonal outgrowth in PLM neurons. The defects included failure of neuroblasts to migrate to the proper location, and excessive growth of axons past their normal termination point, together with abnormal morphological features of the processes. Although the antipsychotic drugs are potent antagonists of dopamine and serotonin receptors, the neurodevelopmental deficits were not rescued by co-incubation with serotonin or the dopaminergic agonist, quinpirole. Other antipsychotic drugs, risperidone, aripiprazole, quetiapine, trifluoperazine and olanzapine, also produced modest, but detectable, effects on neuronal development. This is the first report that antipsychotic drugs interfere with neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth in a developing nervous system.

  12. Effect of the degree of polar mismatching on traffic jam formation in fast axonal transport.

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    Kuznetsov, A V

    2010-12-01

    This paper simulates an axon with a region of reversed microtubule (MT) polarity, and investigates how the degree of polar mismatching in this region affects the formation of organelle traps in the axon. The model is based on modified Smith-Simmons equations governing molecular-motor-assisted transport in neurons. It is established that the structure that develops as a result of a region with disoriented MTs consists of two organelle traps, the trap to the left of this region accumulates plus-end-oriented organelles and the trap to the right of this region accumulates minus-end-oriented organelles. The presence of such a structure is shown to inhibit the transport of organelles down the axon. The degree by which the transport of organelles is inhibited depends on the degree of polar mismatching of MTs in the region between MT traps. Four cases with a different degree of polar mismatching are investigated.

  13. A simple method for imaging axonal transport in aging neurons using the adult Drosophila wing.

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    Vagnoni, Alessio; Bullock, Simon L

    2016-09-01

    There is growing interest in the link between axonal cargo transport and age-associated neuronal dysfunction. The study of axonal transport in neurons of adult animals requires intravital or ex vivo imaging approaches, which are laborious and expensive in vertebrate models. We describe simple, noninvasive procedures for imaging cargo motility within axons using sensory neurons of the translucent Drosophila wing. A key aspect is a method for mounting the intact fly that allows detailed imaging of transport in wing neurons. Coupled with existing genetic tools in Drosophila, this is a tractable system for studying axonal transport over the life span of an animal and thus for characterization of the relationship between cargo dynamics, neuronal aging and disease. Preparation of a sample for imaging takes ∼5 min, with transport typically filmed for 2-3 min per wing. We also document procedures for the quantification of transport parameters from the acquired images and describe how the protocol can be adapted to study other cell biological processes in aging neurons.

  14. Kinesin I transports tetramerized Kv3 channels through the axon initial segment via direct binding.

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    Xu, Mingxuan; Gu, Yuanzheng; Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2010-11-24

    Precise targeting of various voltage-gated ion channels to proper membrane domains is crucial for their distinct roles in neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. How each channel protein is transported within the cytoplasm is poorly understood. Here, we report that KIF5/kinesin I transports Kv3.1 voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels through the axon initial segment (AIS) via direct binding. First, we have identified a novel interaction between Kv3.1 and KIF5, confirmed by immunoprecipitation from mouse brain lysates and by pull-down assays with exogenously expressed proteins. The interaction is mediated by a direct binding between the Kv3.1 N-terminal T1 domain and a conserved region in KIF5 tail domains, in which proper T1 tetramerization is crucial. Overexpression of this region of KIF5B markedly reduces axonal levels of Kv3.1bHA. In mature hippocampal neurons, endogenous Kv3.1b and KIF5 colocalize. Suppressing the endogenous KIF5B level by RNA interference significantly reduces the Kv3.1b axonal level. Furthermore, mutating the Zn(2+)-binding site within T1 markedly decreases channel axonal targeting and forward trafficking, likely through disrupting T1 tetramerization and hence eliminating the binding to KIF5 tail. The mutation also alters channel activity. Interestingly, coexpression of the YFP (yellow fluorescent protein)-tagged KIF5B assists dendritic Kv3.1a and even mutants with a faulty axonal targeting motif to penetrate the AIS. Finally, fluorescently tagged Kv3.1 channels colocalize and comove with KIF5B along axons revealed by two-color time-lapse imaging. Our findings suggest that the binding to KIF5 ensures properly assembled and functioning Kv3.1 channels to be transported into axons.

  15. Tracking Quantum-Dot labeled neurotropic factors transport along primary neuronal axons in compartmental microfluidic chambers.

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    Gluska, Shani; Chein, Michael; Rotem, Nimrod; Ionescu, Ariel; Perlson, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, with very long axons. Neurotrophic factors like the neuronal growth factor (NGF) are secreted from neuronal targets to promote neuron survival and proper function. These neurotrophic factors must undergo retrograde axonal transport towards the cell body, wherein they initiate signaling pathways important for neurons' various functions and overall health. This process of long-distance axonal signaling is conducted by the dynein motor protein, which transmits signaling endosomes of ligand-receptor complexes retrogradely along microtubule tracks. Here we describe step by step the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) compartmentalized microfluidic chambers for tracking axonal transport of trophic factors, with a focus on labeled NGF. We describe in detail how to fabricate the molds, assemble the PDMS platform, plate neurons and image, as well as analyze NGF transport along the axon. This method is useful for studying molecular communication mechanisms within the neuron's different compartments as well as between the neuron and its diverse microenvironments, both in health and under pathological conditions.

  16. Organophosphate Related Alterations in Myelin and Axonal Transport in the Living Mammalian Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    and tri-o-cresyl phosphate (i.e., compounds associated with OP-induced delayed neuropathies -OPIDN) inhibited fast anterograde axonal transport in an ex...other deleterious effects of OPs that may be additive (or unrelated) to AChE inhibition and include oxidative stress, impairments of mitochondrial

  17. Novel RNA- and FMRP-binding protein TRF2-S regulates axonal mRNA transport and presynaptic plasticity.

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    Zhang, Peisu; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Liu, Yong; Tominaga-Yamanaka, Kumiko; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Ioannis, Grammatikakis; Martindale, Jennifer L; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Yang, In Hong; Gorospe, Myriam; Mattson, Mark P

    2015-11-20

    Despite considerable evidence that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate mRNA transport and local translation in dendrites, roles for axonal RBPs are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a non-telomeric isoform of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2-S) is a novel RBP that regulates axonal plasticity. TRF2-S interacts directly with target mRNAs to facilitate their axonal delivery. The process is antagonized by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Distinct from the current RNA-binding model of FMRP, we show that FMRP occupies the GAR domain of TRF2-S protein to block the assembly of TRF2-S-mRNA complexes. Overexpressing TRF2-S and silencing FMRP promotes mRNA entry to axons and enhances axonal outgrowth and neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. Our findings suggest a pivotal role for TRF2-S in an axonal mRNA localization pathway that enhances axon outgrowth and neurotransmitter release.

  18. Loss of fractalkine signaling exacerbates axon transport dysfunction in a chronic model of glaucoma

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    Kevin T Breen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration in glaucoma results in decline and loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, and is associated with activation of myeloid cells such as microglia and macrophages. The chemokine fractalkine (FKN or Cx3cl1 mediates communication from neurons to myeloid cells. Signaling through its receptor Cx3cr1 has been implicated in multiple neurodegenerative diseases, but the effects on neuronal pathology are variable. Since it is unknown how FKN-mediated crosstalk influences RGC degeneration in glaucoma, we assessed this in a chronic mouse model, DBA/2J. We analyzed a DBA/2J substrain deficient in Cx3cr1, and compared compartmentalized RGC degeneration and myeloid cell responses to those in standard DBA/2J mice. We found that loss of FKN signaling exacerbates axon transport dysfunction, an early event in neurodegeneration, with a significant increase in RGCs with somal accumulation of the axonal protein phosphorylated neurofilament, and reduced retinal expression of genes involved in axon transport, Kif1b and Atp8a2. There was no change in the loss of Brn3-positive RGCs, and no difference in the extent of damage to the proximal optic nerve, suggesting that the loss of fractalkine signaling primarily affects axon transport. Since Cx3cr1 is specifically expressed in myeloid cells, we assessed changes in retinal microglial number and activation, changes in gene expression, and the extent of macrophage infiltration. We found that loss of fractalkine signaling led to innate immune changes within the retina, including increased infiltration of peripheral macrophages and upregulated nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos-2 expression in myeloid cells, which contributes to the production of NO and can promote axon transport deficits. In contrast, resident retinal microglia appeared unchanged either in number, morphology, or expression of the myeloid activation marker ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1. There was also no significant increase in the

  19. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Retrograde Motoneuronal Axonal Transport in an SBMA Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halievski, Katherine; Kemp, Michael Q; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    Defects in axonal transport are seen in motoneuronal diseases, but how that impairment comes about is not well understood. In spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), a disorder linked to a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, the disease-causing AR disrupts axonal transport by acting in both a cell-autonomous fashion in the motoneurons themselves, and in a non-cell-autonomous fashion in muscle. The non-cell-autonomous mechanism is suggested by data from a unique "myogenic" transgenic (TG) mouse model in which an AR transgene expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle fibers triggers an androgen-dependent SBMA phenotype, including defects in retrograde transport. However, motoneurons in this TG model retain the endogenous AR gene, leaving open the possibility that impairments in transport in this model also depend on ARs in the motoneurons themselves. To test whether non-cell-autonomous mechanisms alone can perturb retrograde transport, we generated male TG mice in which the endogenous AR allele has the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm) and, consequently, is nonfunctional. Males carrying the Tfm allele alone show no deficits in motor function or axonal transport, with or without testosterone treatment. However, when Tfm males carrying the myogenic transgene (Tfm/TG) are treated with testosterone, they develop impaired motor function and defects in retrograde transport, having fewer retrogradely labeled motoneurons and deficits in endosomal flux based on time-lapse video microscopy of living axons. These findings demonstrate that non-cell-autonomous disease mechanisms originating in muscle are sufficient to induce defects in retrograde transport in motoneurons.

  20. Rabies Virus Hijacks and accelerates the p75NTR retrograde axonal transport machinery.

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    Gluska, Shani; Zahavi, Eitan Erez; Chein, Michael; Gradus, Tal; Bauer, Anja; Finke, Stefan; Perlson, Eran

    2014-08-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) is a neurotropic virus that depends on long distance axonal transport in order to reach the central nervous system (CNS). The strategy RABV uses to hijack the cellular transport machinery is still not clear. It is thought that RABV interacts with membrane receptors in order to internalize and exploit the endosomal trafficking pathway, yet this has never been demonstrated directly. The p75 Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) receptor (p75NTR) binds RABV Glycoprotein (RABV-G) with high affinity. However, as p75NTR is not essential for RABV infection, the specific role of this interaction remains in question. Here we used live cell imaging to track RABV entry at nerve terminals and studied its retrograde transport along the axon with and without the p75NTR receptor. First, we found that NGF, an endogenous p75NTR ligand, and RABV, are localized in corresponding domains along nerve tips. RABV and NGF were internalized at similar time frames, suggesting comparable entry machineries. Next, we demonstrated that RABV could internalize together with p75NTR. Characterizing RABV retrograde movement along the axon, we showed the virus is transported in acidic compartments, mostly with p75NTR. Interestingly, RABV is transported faster than NGF, suggesting that RABV not only hijacks the transport machinery but can also manipulate it. Co-transport of RABV and NGF identified two modes of transport, slow and fast, that may represent a differential control of the trafficking machinery by RABV. Finally, we determined that p75NTR-dependent transport of RABV is faster and more directed than p75NTR-independent RABV transport. This fast route to the neuronal cell body is characterized by both an increase in instantaneous velocities and fewer, shorter stops en route. Hence, RABV may employ p75NTR-dependent transport as a fast mechanism to facilitate movement to the CNS.

  1. Rabies Virus Hijacks and accelerates the p75NTR retrograde axonal transport machinery.

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    Shani Gluska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rabies virus (RABV is a neurotropic virus that depends on long distance axonal transport in order to reach the central nervous system (CNS. The strategy RABV uses to hijack the cellular transport machinery is still not clear. It is thought that RABV interacts with membrane receptors in order to internalize and exploit the endosomal trafficking pathway, yet this has never been demonstrated directly. The p75 Nerve Growth Factor (NGF receptor (p75NTR binds RABV Glycoprotein (RABV-G with high affinity. However, as p75NTR is not essential for RABV infection, the specific role of this interaction remains in question. Here we used live cell imaging to track RABV entry at nerve terminals and studied its retrograde transport along the axon with and without the p75NTR receptor. First, we found that NGF, an endogenous p75NTR ligand, and RABV, are localized in corresponding domains along nerve tips. RABV and NGF were internalized at similar time frames, suggesting comparable entry machineries. Next, we demonstrated that RABV could internalize together with p75NTR. Characterizing RABV retrograde movement along the axon, we showed the virus is transported in acidic compartments, mostly with p75NTR. Interestingly, RABV is transported faster than NGF, suggesting that RABV not only hijacks the transport machinery but can also manipulate it. Co-transport of RABV and NGF identified two modes of transport, slow and fast, that may represent a differential control of the trafficking machinery by RABV. Finally, we determined that p75NTR-dependent transport of RABV is faster and more directed than p75NTR-independent RABV transport. This fast route to the neuronal cell body is characterized by both an increase in instantaneous velocities and fewer, shorter stops en route. Hence, RABV may employ p75NTR-dependent transport as a fast mechanism to facilitate movement to the CNS.

  2. The microtubule-stabilizing drug Epothilone D increases axonal sprouting following transection injury in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela, Mariana; Blizzard, Catherine A; Chuckowree, Jyoti A; Dawkins, Edgar; Gasperini, Robert J; Young, Kaylene M; Dickson, Tracey C

    2015-05-01

    Neuronal cytoskeletal alterations, in particular the loss and misalignment of microtubules, are considered a hallmark feature of the degeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Therefore, microtubule-stabilizing drugs are attractive potential therapeutics for use following TBI. The best-known drug in this category is Paclitaxel, a widely used anti-cancer drug that has produced promising outcomes when employed in the treatment of various animal models of nervous system trauma. However, Paclitaxel is not ideal for the treatment of patients with TBI due to its limited blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Herein we have characterized the effect of the brain penetrant microtubule-stabilizing agent Epothilone D (Epo D) on post-injury axonal sprouting in an in vitro model of CNS trauma. Epo D was found to modulate axonal sprout number in a dose dependent manner, increasing the number of axonal sprouts generated post-injury. Elevated sprouting was observed when analyzing the total population of injured neurons, as well as in selective analysis of Thy1-YFP-labeled excitatory neurons. However, we found no effect of Epo D on axonal sprout length or outgrowth speed. These findings indicate that Epo D specifically affects injury-induced axonal sprout generation, but not net growth. Our investigation demonstrates that primary cultures of cortical neurons are tolerant of Epo D exposure, and that Epo D significantly increases their regenerative response following structural injury. Therefore Epo D may be a potent therapeutic for enhancing regeneration following CNS injury. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Traumatic Brain Injury'.

  3. Calsyntenin-1 shelters APP from proteolytic processing during anterograde axonal transport

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    Martin Steuble

    2012-06-01

    Endocytosis of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP is thought to represent the major source of substrate for the production of the amyloidogenic Aβ peptide by the β-secretase BACE1. The irreversible nature of proteolytic cleavage implies the existence of an efficient replenishment route for APP from its sites of synthesis to the cell surface. We recently found that APP exits the trans-Golgi network in intimate association with calsyntenin-1, a transmembrane cargo-docking protein for Kinesin-1-mediated vesicular transport. Here we characterized the function of calsyntenin-1 in neuronal APP transport using selective immunoisolation of intracellular trafficking organelles, immunocytochemistry, live-imaging, and RNAi. We found that APP is co-transported with calsyntenin-1 along axons to early endosomes in the central region of growth cones in carriers that exclude the α-secretase ADAM10. Intriguingly, calsyntenin-1/APP organelles contained BACE1, suggesting premature cleavage of APP along its anterograde path. However, we found that APP contained in calsyntenin-1/APP organelles was stable. We further analyzed vesicular trafficking of APP in cultured hippocampal neurons, in which calsyntenin-1 was reduced by RNAi. We found a markedly increased co-localization of APP and ADAM10 in axons and growth cones, along with increased proteolytic processing of APP and Aβ secretion in these neurons. This suggested that the reduced capacity for calsyntenin-1-dependent APP transport resulted in mis-sorting of APP into additional axonal carriers and, therefore, the premature encounter of unprotected APP with its ectodomain proteases. In combination, our results characterize calsyntenin-1/APP organelles as carriers for sheltered anterograde axonal transport of APP.

  4. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

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    Le, Michelle H; Weissmiller, April M; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  5. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

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    Michelle H Le

    Full Text Available Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1. Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr and chronic (2hr CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  6. Disruption of mitochondrial DNA replication in Drosophila increases mitochondrial fast axonal transport in vivo.

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    Rehan M Baqri

    Full Text Available Mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase (pol gamma cause several progressive human diseases including Parkinson's disease, Alper's syndrome, and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. At the cellular level, disruption of pol gamma leads to depletion of mtDNA, disrupts the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and increases susceptibility to oxidative stress. Although recent studies have intensified focus on the role of mtDNA in neuronal diseases, the changes that take place in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial axonal transport when mtDNA replication is disrupted are unknown. Using high-speed confocal microscopy, electron microscopy and biochemical approaches, we report that mutations in pol gamma deplete mtDNA levels and lead to an increase in mitochondrial density in Drosophila proximal nerves and muscles, without a noticeable increase in mitochondrial fragmentation. Furthermore, there is a rise in flux of bidirectional mitochondrial axonal transport, albeit with slower kinesin-based anterograde transport. In contrast, flux of synaptic vesicle precursors was modestly decreased in pol gamma-alpha mutants. Our data indicate that disruption of mtDNA replication does not hinder mitochondrial biogenesis, increases mitochondrial axonal transport, and raises the question of whether high levels of circulating mtDNA-deficient mitochondria are beneficial or deleterious in mtDNA diseases.

  7. Inhibition of fast axonal transport by pathogenic SOD1 involves activation of p38 MAP kinase.

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    Gerardo A Morfini

    Full Text Available Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS.

  8. Fluorescence Imaging of Fast Retrograde Axonal Transport in Living Animals

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    Dawid Schellingerhout

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to enable an in vivo imaging technology that can assess the anatomy and function of peripheral nerve tissue (neurography. To do this, we designed and tested a fluorescently labeled molecular probe based on the nontoxic C fragment of tetanus toxin (TTc. TTc was purified, labeled, and subjected to immunoassays and cell uptake assays. The compound was then injected into C57BL/6 mice (N = 60 for in vivo imaging and histologic studies. Image analysis and immunohistochemistry were performed. We found that TTc could be labeled with fluorescent moieties without loss of immunoreactivity or biologic potency in cell uptake assays. In vivo fluorescent imaging experiments demonstrated uptake and retrograde transport of the compound along the course of the sciatic nerve and in the spinal cord. Ex vivo imaging and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of TTc in the sciatic nerve and spinal cord, whereas control animals injected with human serum albumin did not exhibit these features. We have demonstrated neurography with a fluorescently labeled molecular imaging contrast agent based on the TTc.

  9. Pressure-induced optic nerve axonal transport interruption in cat eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Bade, B

    1981-12-01

    After intravitreal injection of tritiated leucine, optic nerve axonal transport was studied in 30 cat eyes by tissue radioautography. Twenty-five experimental eyes were examined after four hours of acute pressure elevation with perfusion pressures maintained at 20 to 70 mm Hg. In five control specimens, intraocular pressures were maintained at 10 mm Hg for the four-hour interval. The extent of leucine accumulation, as seen by radioautographs, was inversely proportional to the perfusion pressure. Accumulation was limited to the region fo the lamina cribrosa. The anatomic distribution and pressure response of this transport interruption were similar to those seen in primate eyes studied under similar conditions.

  10. Pressure-induced optic nerve axonal transport interruption in cat eyes

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    Radius, R.L.; Bade, B.

    1981-12-01

    After intravitreal injection of tritiated leucine, optic nerve axonal transport was studied in 30 cat eyes by tissue radioautography. Twenty-five experimental eyes were examined after four hours of acute pressure elevation with perfusion pressures maintained at 20 to 70 mm Hg. In five control specimens, intraocular pressures were maintained at 10 mm Hg for the four-hour interval. The extent of leucine accumulation, as seen by radioautographs, was inversely proportional to the perfusion pressure. Accumulation was limited to the region fo the lamina cribrosa. The anatomic distribution and pressure response of this transport interruption were similar to those seen in primate eyes studied under similar conditions.

  11. Botulinum neurotoxins A and E undergo retrograde axonal transport in primary motor neurons.

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    Laura Restani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The striking differences between the clinical symptoms of tetanus and botulism have been ascribed to the different fate of the parental neurotoxins once internalised in motor neurons. Tetanus toxin (TeNT is known to undergo transcytosis into inhibitory interneurons and block the release of inhibitory neurotransmitters in the spinal cord, causing a spastic paralysis. In contrast, botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs block acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction, therefore inducing a flaccid paralysis. Whilst overt experimental evidence supports the sorting of TeNT to the axonal retrograde transport pathway, recent findings challenge the established view that BoNT trafficking is restricted to the neuromuscular junction by highlighting central effects caused by these neurotoxins. These results suggest a more complex scenario whereby BoNTs also engage long-range trafficking mechanisms. However, the intracellular pathways underlying this process remain unclear. We sought to fill this gap by using primary motor neurons either in mass culture or differentiated in microfluidic devices to directly monitor the endocytosis and axonal transport of full length BoNT/A and BoNT/E and their recombinant binding fragments. We show that BoNT/A and BoNT/E are internalised by spinal cord motor neurons and undergo fast axonal retrograde transport. BoNT/A and BoNT/E are internalised in non-acidic axonal carriers that partially overlap with those containing TeNT, following a process that is largely independent of stimulated synaptic vesicle endo-exocytosis. Following intramuscular injection in vivo, BoNT/A and TeNT displayed central effects with a similar time course. Central actions paralleled the peripheral spastic paralysis for TeNT, but lagged behind the onset of flaccid paralysis for BoNT/A. These results suggest that the fast axonal retrograde transport compartment is composed of multifunctional trafficking organelles orchestrating the simultaneous transfer

  12. Axonal transport and neurodegenerative disease: vesicle-motor complex formation and their regulation

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    Anderson EN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Eric N Anderson,* Joseph A White II,* Shermali GunawardenaDepartment of Biological Sciences, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The process of axonal transport serves to move components over very long distances on microtubule tracks in order to maintain neuronal viability. Molecular motors – kinesin and dynein – are essential for the movement of neuronal cargoes along these tracks; defects in this pathway have been implicated in the initiation or progression of some neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting that this process may be a key contributor in neuronal dysfunction. Recent work has led to the identification of some of the motor-cargo complexes, adaptor proteins, and their regulatory elements in the context of disease proteins. In this review, we focus on the assembly of the amyloid precursor protein, huntingtin, mitochondria, and the RNA-motor complexes and discuss how these may be regulated during long-distance transport in the context of neurodegenerative disease. As knowledge of these motor-cargo complexes and their involvement in axonal transport expands, insight into how defects in this pathway contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases becomes evident. Therefore, a better understanding of how this pathway normally functions has important implications for early diagnosis and treatment of diseases before the onset of disease pathology or behavior. Keywords: kinesin, dynein, amyloid precursor protein, huntingtin, microtubules

  13. Ndel1-derived peptides modulate bidirectional transport of injected beads in the squid giant axon

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    Michal Segal

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectional transport is a key issue in cellular biology. It requires coordination between microtubule-associated molecular motors that work in opposing directions. The major retrograde and anterograde motors involved in bidirectional transport are cytoplasmic dynein and conventional kinesin, respectively. It is clear that failures in molecular motor activity bear severe consequences, especially in the nervous system. Neuronal migration may be impaired during brain development, and impaired molecular motor activity in the adult is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases leading to neuronal cell death. The mechanisms that regulate or coordinate kinesin and dynein activity to generate bidirectional transport of the same cargo are of utmost importance. We examined how Ndel1, a cytoplasmic dynein binding protein, may regulate non-vesicular bidirectional transport. Soluble Ndel1 protein, Ndel1-derived peptides or control proteins were mixed with fluorescent beads, injected into the squid giant axon, and the bead movements were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Automated tracking allowed for extraction and unbiased analysis of a large data set. Beads moved in both directions with a clear bias to the anterograde direction. Velocities were distributed over a broad range and were typically slower than those associated with fast vesicle transport. Ironically, the main effect of Ndel1 and its derived peptides was an enhancement of anterograde motion. We propose that they may function primarily by inhibition of dynein-dependent resistance, which suggests that both dynein and kinesin motors may remain engaged with microtubules during bidirectional transport.

  14. The Myriad Roles of Miro in the Nervous System: Axonal Transport of Mitochondria and Beyond

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    Bingwei eLu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial rho GTPase (Miro is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein containing two GTPase domains and two helix-loop-helix Ca2+-binding domains called EF hands. Pioneering genetic studies in Drosophila first revealed a key function of Miro in regulating the axonal transport of mitochondria, during which Miro forms a multi-protein transport complex with Milton and Kinesin heavy chain (KHC to link trafficking mitochondria with the microtubule cytoskeleton. Recent studies showed that through binding to the EF hands of Miro and causing conformational changes of Miro and alteration of protein-protein interactions within the transport complex, Ca2+ can alter the engagement of mitochondria with the microtubule (MT/kinesin network, offering one mechanism to match mitochondrial distribution with neuronal activity. Despite the importance of the Miro/Milton/Kinesin complex in regulating mitochondrial transport in metazoans, not all components of the transport complex are conserved in lower organisms, and transport-independent functions of Miro are emerging. Here we review the diverse functions of the evolutionarily conserved Miro proteins that are relevant to the development, maintenance, and functioning of the nervous system and discuss the potential contribution of Miro dysfunction to the pathogenesis of diseases of the nervous system.

  15. Stress-Induced CDK5 Activation Disrupts Axonal Transport via Lis1/Ndel1/Dynein

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    Eva Klinman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport is essential for neuronal function, and defects in transport are associated with multiple neurodegenerative diseases. Aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5 activity, driven by the stress-induced activator p25, also is observed in these diseases. Here we show that elevated CDK5 activity increases the frequency of nonprocessive events for a range of organelles, including lysosomes, autophagosomes, mitochondria, and signaling endosomes. Transport disruption induced by aberrant CDK5 activation depends on the Lis1/Ndel1 complex, which directly regulates dynein activity. CDK5 phosphorylation of Ndel1 favors a high affinity Lis1/Ndel/dynein complex that blocks the ATP-dependent release of dynein from microtubules, inhibiting processive motility of dynein-driven cargo. Similar transport defects observed in neurons from a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are rescued by CDK5 inhibition. Together, these studies identify CDK5 as a Lis1/Ndel1-dependent regulator of transport in stressed neurons, and suggest that dysregulated CDK5 activity contributes to the transport deficits observed during neurodegeneration.

  16. Quantitative measurements and modeling of cargo-motor interactions during fast transport in the living axon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamster, Pamela E.; Loewenberg, Michael; Pascal, Jennifer; Chauviere, Arnaud; Gonzales, Aaron; Cristini, Vittorio; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2012-10-01

    The kinesins have long been known to drive microtubule-based transport of sub-cellular components, yet the mechanisms of their attachment to cargo remain a mystery. Several different cargo-receptors have been proposed based on their in vitro binding affinities to kinesin-1. Only two of these—phosphatidyl inositol, a negatively charged lipid, and the carboxyl terminus of the amyloid precursor protein (APP-C), a trans-membrane protein—have been reported to mediate motility in living systems. A major question is how these many different cargo, receptors and motors interact to produce the complex choreography of vesicular transport within living cells. Here we describe an experimental assay that identifies cargo-motor receptors by their ability to recruit active motors and drive transport of exogenous cargo towards the synapse in living axons. Cargo is engineered by derivatizing the surface of polystyrene fluorescent nanospheres (100 nm diameter) with charged residues or with synthetic peptides derived from candidate motor receptor proteins, all designed to display a terminal COOH group. After injection into the squid giant axon, particle movements are imaged by laser-scanning confocal time-lapse microscopy. In this report we compare the motility of negatively charged beads with APP-C beads in the presence of glycine-conjugated non-motile beads using new strategies to measure bead movements. The ensuing quantitative analysis of time-lapse digital sequences reveals detailed information about bead movements: instantaneous and maximum velocities, run lengths, pause frequencies and pause durations. These measurements provide parameters for a mathematical model that predicts the spatiotemporal evolution of distribution of the two different types of bead cargo in the axon. The results reveal that negatively charged beads differ from APP-C beads in velocity and dispersion, and predict that at long time points APP-C will achieve greater progress towards the presynaptic

  17. Failure of unilateral carotid artery ligation to affect pressure-induced interruption of rapid axonal transport in primate optic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Schwartz, E L; Anderson, D R

    1980-02-01

    Previous experiments showed that optic nerve axonal transport can be blocked at the level of the lamina cribrosa by elevated intraocular pressure. In an effort to discover if this blockage might be secondary to pressure-induced ischemia, we studied the effect of unilateral common carotid artery ligation upont the pressure-induced interruption of axonal transport. In 13 owl monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus), the right common carotid artery was ligated within the anterior cervical triangle. Three days later, ophtalmodynomometry was performed on all experimental eyes. In nine of the 13 animals, this estimate of ophthalmic artery pressure was 10 to 20 mm Hg less in the right compared to the left eye. Optic nerve axonal transport was studied in right and left eyes during 5 hours of increased intraocular pressure (ocular pressure 35 mm Hg less than mean femoral artery blood pressure). No significant difference in the extent to which the transport mechanisms were interrupted could be demonstrated when comparing right and left eyes of the experimental animals. These observations fail to support a vascular mechanism for this pressure-induced interruption of axonal transport.

  18. Unc-51/ATG1 controls axonal and dendritic development via kinesin-mediated vesicle transport in the Drosophila brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Mochizuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Members of the evolutionary conserved Ser/Thr kinase Unc-51 family are key regulatory proteins that control neural development in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Previous studies have suggested diverse functions for the Unc-51 protein, including axonal elongation, growth cone guidance, and synaptic vesicle transport. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we have investigated the functional significance of Unc-51-mediated vesicle transport in the development of complex brain structures in Drosophila. We show that Unc-51 preferentially accumulates in newly elongating axons of the mushroom body, a center of olfactory learning in flies. Mutations in unc-51 cause disintegration of the core of the developing mushroom body, with mislocalization of Fasciclin II (Fas II, an IgG-family cell adhesion molecule important for axonal guidance and fasciculation. In unc-51 mutants, Fas II accumulates in the cell bodies, calyx, and the proximal peduncle. Furthermore, we show that mutations in unc-51 cause aberrant overshooting of dendrites in the mushroom body and the antennal lobe. Loss of unc-51 function leads to marked accumulation of Rab5 and Golgi components, whereas the localization of dendrite-specific proteins, such as Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM and No distributive disjunction (Nod, remains unaltered. Genetic analyses of kinesin light chain (Klc and unc-51 double heterozygotes suggest the importance of kinesin-mediated membrane transport for axonal and dendritic development. Moreover, our data demonstrate that loss of Klc activity causes similar axonal and dendritic defects in mushroom body neurons, recapitulating the salient feature of the developmental abnormalities caused by unc-51 mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Unc-51 plays pivotal roles in the axonal and dendritic development of the Drosophila brain. Unc-51-mediated membrane vesicle transport is important in targeted localization of guidance molecules

  19. Drug transporters in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Stenvang, Jan; Moreira, José

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances that have taken place in the past decade, including the development of novel molecular targeted agents, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of cancer treatment. In breast cancer, anthracyclines and taxanes are the two main chemotherapeutic options used on a routine...... basis. Although effective, their usefulness is limited by the inevitable development of resistance, a lack of response to drug-induced cancer cell death. A large body of research has resulted in the characterization of a plethora of mechanisms involved in resistance; ATP-binding cassette transporter...

  20. Pressure-induced fast axonal transport abnormalities and the anatomy at the lamina cribrosa in primate eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L

    1983-03-01

    In ten owl monkey eyes (Aotus trivirgatus) the location of pressure-induced (perfusion pressure 35 mmHg) axonal transport abnormalities was determined by the examination of serial step cross-section tissue radio autographs from the optic nerve head. The degree of the local transport interruption did not correlate with the fiber bundle cross-section area, the shape of the laminar pores or the density of the inter-bundle septa in that region.

  1. Sensory neuropathy in progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mice is associated with defects in microtubule polymerization and axonal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Michael K; Bellouze, Sarah; Jacquier, Arnaud; Schaller, Sébastien; Richard, Laurence; Mathis, Stéphane; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Haase, Georg

    2016-08-04

    Motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are now recognized as multi-system disorders also involving various non-motor neuronal cell types. The precise extent and mechanistic basis of non-motor neuron damage in human ALS and ALS animal models remain however unclear. To address this, we here studied progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mice carrying a missense loss-of-function mutation in tubulin binding cofactor E (TBCE). These mice manifest a particularly aggressive form of motor axon dying back and display a microtubule loss, similar to that induced by human ALS-linked TUBA4A mutations. Using whole nerve confocal imaging of pmn × thy1.2-YFP16 fluorescent reporter mice and electron microscopy, we demonstrate axonal discontinuities, bead-like spheroids and ovoids in pmn suralis nerves indicating prominent sensory neuropathy. The axonal alterations qualitatively resemble those in phrenic motor nerves but do not culminate in the loss of myelinated fibers. We further show that the pmn mutation decreases the level of TBCE, impedes microtubule polymerization in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and causes progressive loss of microtubules in large and small caliber suralis axons. Live imaging of axonal transport using GFP-tagged tetanus toxin C-fragment (GFP-TTC) demonstrates defects in microtubule-based transport in pmn DRG neurons, providing a potential explanation for the axonal alterations in sensory nerves. This study unravels sensory neuropathy as a pathological feature of mouse pmn, and discusses the potential contribution of cytoskeletal defects to sensory neuropathy in human motor neuron disease.

  2. Recent advances in understanding hepatic drug transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Bruno; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Cells need to strictly control their internal milieu, a function which is performed by the plasma membrane. Selective passage of molecules across the plasma membrane is controlled by transport proteins. As the liver is the central organ for drug metabolism, hepatocytes are equipped with numerous drug transporters expressed at the plasma membrane. Drug disposition includes absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of a drug and hence multiple passages of drugs and their metabolites across membranes. Consequently, understanding the exact mechanisms of drug transporters is essential both in drug development and in drug therapy. While many drug transporters are expressed in hepatocytes, and some of them are well characterized, several transporters have only recently been identified as new drug transporters. Novel powerful tools to deorphanize (drug) transporters are being applied and show promising results. Although a large set of tools are available for studying transport in vitro and in isolated cells, tools for studying transport in living organisms, including humans, are evolving now and rely predominantly on imaging techniques, e.g. positron emission tomography. Imaging is an area which, certainly in the near future, will provide important insights into "transporters at work" in vivo. PMID:27781095

  3. Endosome-mediated retrograde axonal transport of P2X3 receptor signals in primary sensory neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Qiao Chen; BinWang; Chengbiao Wu; Jin Pan; Bo Yuan; Yuan-Yuan Su; Xing-Yu Jiang; Xu Zhang; Lan Bao

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors adopt signaling endosomes to transmit retrograde signals.However,the mechanisms of retrograde signaling for other ligand/receptor systems are poorly understood.Here,we report that the signals of the purinergic (P)2X3 receptor,an ATP-gated ion channel are retrogradely transported in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron axons.We found that Rab5,a small GTPase,controls the early sorting of P2X3 receptors into endosomes,while Rab7 mediates the fast retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.Intraplantar injection and axonal application into the microfluidic chamber of α,β-methylene-ATP (α,β-MeATP),a P2X selective agonist,enhanced the endocytosis and retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.The α,β-MeATP-induced Ca2+ influx activated a pathway comprised of protein kinase C,rat sarcoma viral oncogene and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK),which associated with endocytic P2X3 receptors to form signaling endosomes.Disruption of the lipid rafts abolished the α,β-MeATP-induced ERK phosphorylation,endocytosis and retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.Furthermore,treatment of peripheral axons with α,β-MeATP increased the activation level of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein in the cell bodies of DRG neurons and enhanced neuronal excitability.Impairment of either microtubule-based axonal transport in vivo or dynein function in vitro blocked α,β-MeATP-induced retrograde signals.These results indicate that P2X3 receptor-activated signals are transmitted via retrogradely transported endosomes in primary sensory neurons and provide a novel signaling mechanism for ligand-gated channels.

  4. Limited trafficking of a neurotropic virus through inefficient retrograde axonal transport and the type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Karen Z; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2010-03-05

    Poliovirus is an enteric virus that rarely invades the human central nervous system (CNS). To identify barriers limiting poliovirus spread from the periphery to CNS, we monitored trafficking of 10 marked viruses. After oral inoculation of susceptible mice, poliovirus was present in peripheral neurons, including vagus and sciatic nerves. To model viral trafficking in peripheral neurons, we intramuscularly injected mice with poliovirus, which follows a muscle-sciatic nerve-spinal cord-brain route. Only 20% of the poliovirus population successfully moved from muscle to brain, and three barriers limiting viral trafficking were identified. First, using light-sensitive viruses, we found limited viral replication in peripheral neurons. Second, retrograde axonal transport of poliovirus in peripheral neurons was inefficient; however, the efficiency was increased upon muscle damage, which also increased the transport efficiency of a non-viral neural tracer, wheat germ agglutinin. Third, using susceptible interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor knockout mice, we demonstrated that the IFN response limited viral movement from the periphery to the brain. Surprisingly, the retrograde axonal transport barrier was equivalent in strength to the IFN barrier. Illustrating the importance of barriers created by the IFN response and inefficient axonal transport, IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout mice with muscle damage permitted 80% of the viral population to access the brain, and succumbed to disease three times faster than mice with intact barriers. These results suggest that multiple separate barriers limit poliovirus trafficking from peripheral neurons to the CNS, possibly explaining the rare incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis. This study identifies inefficient axonal transport as a substantial barrier to poliovirus trafficking in peripheral neurons, which may limit CNS access for other viruses.

  5. Limited trafficking of a neurotropic virus through inefficient retrograde axonal transport and the type I interferon response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Z Lancaster

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Poliovirus is an enteric virus that rarely invades the human central nervous system (CNS. To identify barriers limiting poliovirus spread from the periphery to CNS, we monitored trafficking of 10 marked viruses. After oral inoculation of susceptible mice, poliovirus was present in peripheral neurons, including vagus and sciatic nerves. To model viral trafficking in peripheral neurons, we intramuscularly injected mice with poliovirus, which follows a muscle-sciatic nerve-spinal cord-brain route. Only 20% of the poliovirus population successfully moved from muscle to brain, and three barriers limiting viral trafficking were identified. First, using light-sensitive viruses, we found limited viral replication in peripheral neurons. Second, retrograde axonal transport of poliovirus in peripheral neurons was inefficient; however, the efficiency was increased upon muscle damage, which also increased the transport efficiency of a non-viral neural tracer, wheat germ agglutinin. Third, using susceptible interferon (IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout mice, we demonstrated that the IFN response limited viral movement from the periphery to the brain. Surprisingly, the retrograde axonal transport barrier was equivalent in strength to the IFN barrier. Illustrating the importance of barriers created by the IFN response and inefficient axonal transport, IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout mice with muscle damage permitted 80% of the viral population to access the brain, and succumbed to disease three times faster than mice with intact barriers. These results suggest that multiple separate barriers limit poliovirus trafficking from peripheral neurons to the CNS, possibly explaining the rare incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis. This study identifies inefficient axonal transport as a substantial barrier to poliovirus trafficking in peripheral neurons, which may limit CNS access for other viruses.

  6. Release of kinesin from vesicles by hsc70 and regulation of fast axonal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, M. Y.; Morfini, G.; Szebenyi, G.; Brady, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The nature of kinesin interactions with membrane-bound organelles and mechanisms for regulation of kinesin-based motility have both been surprisingly difficult to define. Most kinesin is recovered in supernatants with standard protocols for purification of motor proteins, but kinesin recovered on membrane-bound organelles is tightly bound. Partitioning of kinesin between vesicle and cytosolic fractions is highly sensitive to buffer composition. Addition of either N-ethylmaleimide or EDTA to homogenization buffers significantly increased the fraction of kinesin bound to organelles. Given that an antibody against kinesin light chain tandem repeats also releases kinesin from vesicles, these observations indicated that specific cytoplasmic factors may regulate kinesin release from membranes. Kinesin light tandem repeats contain DnaJ-like motifs, so the effects of hsp70 chaperones were evaluated. Hsc70 released kinesin from vesicles in an MgATP-dependent and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive manner. Recombinant kinesin light chains inhibited kinesin release by hsc70 and stimulated the hsc70 ATPase. Hsc70 actions may provide a mechanism to regulate kinesin function by releasing kinesin from cargo in specific subcellular domains, thereby effecting delivery of axonally transported materials.

  7. Parkinson's disease-associated kinase PINK1 regulates Miro protein level and axonal transport of mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Liu

    Full Text Available Mutations in Pten-induced kinase 1 (PINK1 are linked to early-onset familial Parkinson's disease (FPD. PINK1 has previously been implicated in mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics, quality control, and electron transport chain function. However, it is not clear how these processes are interconnected and whether they are sufficient to explain all aspects of PINK1 pathogenesis. Here we show that PINK1 also controls mitochondrial motility. In Drosophila, downregulation of dMiro or other components of the mitochondrial transport machinery rescued dPINK1 mutant phenotypes in the muscle and dopaminergic (DA neurons, whereas dMiro overexpression alone caused DA neuron loss. dMiro protein level was increased in dPINK1 mutant but decreased in dPINK1 or dParkin overexpression conditions. In Drosophila larval motor neurons, overexpression of dPINK1 inhibited axonal mitochondria transport in both anterograde and retrograde directions, whereas dPINK1 knockdown promoted anterograde transport. In HeLa cells, overexpressed hPINK1 worked together with hParkin, another FPD gene, to regulate the ubiquitination and degradation of hMiro1 and hMiro2, apparently in a Ser-156 phosphorylation-independent manner. Also in HeLa cells, loss of hMiro promoted the perinuclear clustering of mitochondria and facilitated autophagy of damaged mitochondria, effects previously associated with activation of the PINK1/Parkin pathway. These newly identified functions of PINK1/Parkin and Miro in mitochondrial transport and mitophagy contribute to our understanding of the complex interplays in mitochondrial quality control that are critically involved in PD pathogenesis, and they may explain the peripheral neuropathy symptoms seen in some PD patients carrying particular PINK1 or Parkin mutations. Moreover, the different effects of loss of PINK1 function on Miro protein level in Drosophila and mouse cells may offer one explanation of the distinct phenotypic manifestations of PINK1

  8. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive axon terminals enriched in the pontine nuclei of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, T; Houtani, T; Toida, K; Kase, M; Yamashita, T; Ishimura, K; Sugimoto, T

    2007-06-08

    Information to the cerebellum enters via many afferent sources collectively known as precerebellar nuclei. We investigated the distribution of cholinergic terminal-like structures in the mouse precerebellar nuclei by immunohistochemistry for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). VAChT is involved in acetylcholine transport into synaptic vesicles and is regarded as a reliable marker for cholinergic terminals and preterminal axons. In adult male mice, brains were perfusion-fixed. Polyclonal antibodies for VAChT, immunoglobulin G-peroxidase and diaminobenzidine were used for immunostaining. In the mouse brain, immunoreactivity was seen in almost all major cholinergic cell groups including brainstem motoneurons. In precerebellar nuclei, the signal could be detected as diffusely beaded terminal-like structures. It was seen heaviest in the pontine nuclei and moderate in the pontine reticulotegmental nucleus; however, it was seen less in the medial solitary nucleus, red nucleus, lateral reticular nucleus, inferior olivary nucleus, external cuneate nucleus and vestibular nuclear complex. In particular, VAChT-immunoreactive varicose fibers were so dense in the pontine nuclei that detailed distribution was studied using three-dimensional reconstruction of the pontine nuclei. VAChT-like immunoreactivity clustered predominantly in the medial and ventral regions suggesting a unique regional difference of the cholinergic input. Electron microscopic observation in the pontine nuclei disclosed ultrastructural features of VAChT-immunoreactive varicosities. The labeled bouton makes a symmetrical synapse with unlabeled dendrites and contains pleomorphic synaptic vesicles. To clarify the neurons of origin of VAChT-immunoreactive terminals, VAChT immunostaining combined with wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase retrograde labeling was conducted by injecting a retrograde tracer into the right pontine nuclei. Double-labeled neurons were seen bilaterally in the

  9. R-Flurbiprofen Improves Axonal Transport in the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease as Determined by MEMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen D.B.; Paylor, Richard; Pautler, Robia G.

    2011-01-01

    Axonal pathology is a prevalent feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and is thought to occur predominantly due to the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ). However, it remains unclear whether therapeutics geared towards reducing Aβ improves axonal deficits. We have previously used Manganese Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to demonstrate that axonal transport deficits occur before plaque formation in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. Here we tested whether axonal transport deficits in the Tg2576 mouse model improve in response to the Aβ42 selective lowering agent R-Flurbiprofen (R-F). We demonstrated that in young animals (before Aβ plaque formation), R-F treatment reduced Aβ42 levels and coincided with a significant improvement in axonal transport (p=0.0186) iHowever, in older animals (after plaque formation had occurred), we observed that R-F treatment did not reduce Aβ42 levels although we still observed a significant improvement in axonal transport as assessed with MEMRI (p=0.0329). We then determined that R-F treatment reduced tau hyper-phosphorylation in the older animals. These data indicate that both Aβ42 and tau comprise a role in axonal transport rate deficits in the Tg2576 models. PMID:21500269

  10. Targeting of herpesvirus capsid transport in axons is coupled to association with specific sets of tegument proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Luxton, G.W. Gant; Haverlock, Sarah; Coller, Kelly Elizabeth; Antinone, Sarah Elizabeth; Pincetic, Andrew; Smith, Gregory Allan

    2005-01-01

    The capsids of neurotropic herpesviruses have the remarkable ability to move in specific directions within axons. By modulating bidirectional capsid transport to favor either retrograde (minus-end) or anterograde (plus-end) motion, these viruses travel to sensory ganglia or peripheral tissue at specific stages of infection. By using correlative motion analysis to simultaneously monitor the trafficking of distinct viral proteins in living neurons, we demonstrate that viral “tegument” proteins ...

  11. Co-culture of oligodendrocytes and neurons can be used to assess drugs for axon regeneration in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Gang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel in vitro model in which to investigate the efficacy of experimental drugs for the promotion of axon regeneration in the central nervous system. We co-cultured rat hippocampal neurons and cerebral cortical oligodendrocytes, and tested the co-culture system using a Nogo-66 receptor antagonist peptide (NEP1-40, which promotes axonal growth. Primary cultured oligodendrocytes suppressed axonal growth in the rat hippocampus, but NEP1-40 stimulated axonal growth in the co-culture system. Our results confirm the validity of the neuron-oligodendrocyte co-culture system as an assay for the evaluation of drugs for axon regeneration in the central nervous system.

  12. Co-culture of oligodendrocytes and neurons can be used to assess drugs for axon regeneration in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Lin; Yao, Yu-Chen; Liu, Ying-Fu; Li, Yi-Peng; Yang, Kai; Lu, Lei; Cheng, Yuan-Chi; Chen, Xu-Yi; Tu, Yue

    2015-10-01

    We present a novel in vitro model in which to investigate the efficacy of experimental drugs for the promotion of axon regeneration in the central nervous system. We co-cultured rat hippocampal neurons and cerebral cortical oligodendrocytes, and tested the co-culture system using a Nogo-66 receptor antagonist peptide (NEP1-40), which promotes axonal growth. Primary cultured oligodendrocytes suppressed axonal growth in the rat hippocampus, but NEP1-40 stimulated axonal growth in the co-culture system. Our results confirm the validity of the neuron-oligodendrocyte co-culture system as an assay for the evaluation of drugs for axon regeneration in the central nervous system.

  13. Membrane transporters and new drug development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EndoH

    2002-01-01

    Molecular biology has made it possible to identify membrane transporter molecules that transport hydrophilic endogenous and exogenous compounds across cellular membranes.Ther are two possibilities on transporters relevant to new drug development,drug targets and pharmacokinetics.Human genome database predicts that more than 10% of common diseases may be tightly related with membrane transporter dysfunction.Thus,membrane transporters would be possible molecular targets for new drug development.As an example,I will talk on our discovery of L-type amino acid transporter 1(LAT1) being oncofetal and upregulated in cancers for their rapid growth and metastasis.We provide evidence that inhibition of LAT1 functions may become novel types of anticancer tools.As another example in human pharmacokinetics,application of stable expressing cell lines of human drug transporters will be proposed including organic anion and cation transporters which are distributed in various organs including the liver and kidney.These transporters are multispecific in their substrate recognition,and better molecules to anticipate drug-drug interactions in human bodies before new drug candidates are given in clinical trials.This in vitro technique may contribute to decide suitable compounds in particular by high throughout screening strategy.

  14. A role for cyclin-dependent kinase(s) in the modulation of fast anterograde axonal transport: effects defined by olomoucine and the APC tumor suppressor protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, N.; Bloom, G. S.; Brady, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Proteins that interact with both cytoskeletal and membrane components are candidates to modulate membrane trafficking. The tumor suppressor proteins neurofibromin (NF1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) both bind to microtubules and interact with membrane-associated proteins. The effects of recombinant NF1 and APC fragments on vesicle motility were evaluated by measuring fast axonal transport along microtubules in axoplasm from squid giant axons. APC4 (amino acids 1034-2844) reduced only anterograde movements, whereas APC2 (aa 1034-2130) or APC3 (aa 2130-2844) reduced both anterograde and retrograde transport. NF1 had no effect on organelle movement in either direction. Because APC contains multiple cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation motifs, the kinase inhibitor olomoucine was examined. At concentrations in which olomoucine is specific for cyclin-dependent kinases (5 microM), it reduced only anterograde transport, whereas anterograde and retrograde movement were both affected at concentrations at which other kinases are inhibited as well (50 microM). Both anterograde and retrograde transport also were inhibited by histone H1 and KSPXK peptides, substrates for proline-directed kinases, including CDKs. Our data suggest that CDK-like axonal kinases modulate fast anterograde transport and that other axonal kinases may be involved in modulating retrograde transport. The specific effect of APC4 on anterograde transport suggests a model in which the binding of APC to microtubules may limit the activity of axonal CDK kinase or kinases in restricted domains, thereby affecting organelle transport.

  15. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  16. Organophosphate-Related Alterations in Myelin and Axonal Transport in the Living Mammalian Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Rusyniak DE, Nanagas KA. 2004. Organophosphate poisoning . Sem Neurol.24:197–204. Silva AC, Lee JH, Aoki I, Koretsky AP. 2004. Manganese-enhanced...Sungurtekin H, Gurses E, Balci C. 2006. Evaluation of several clinical scoring tools in organophosphate poisoned patients. Clin. Toxicol (Phila) 44:121...1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0536 TITLE: " Organophosphate -Related Alterations in Myelin and Axonal

  17. Transporter protein and drug resistance of Trypanosoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Noraine P; Mingala, Claro N

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma infection is one of the most important infections in livestock and humans. One of the main problems of its therapeutic control and treatment is the resurgence of drug resistance. One of the most studied causes of such resistance is the function of its adenosine transporter gene. A trypanosomal gene TbAT1 from Trypanosoma brucei has been cloned in yeast to demonstrate its function in the transport of adenosine and trypanocidal agents. Drug resistant trypanosomes showed a defective TbAT1 variant; furthermore, deletion of the gene and set point mutations in the transporter gene has been demonstrated from isolates from relapse patients. The molecular understanding of the mechanism of action trypanocidal agents and function of transporter gene can lead to control of drug resistance of Trypanosomes.

  18. Drug Transporters in the Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    The enterocyte monolayer in the intestinal membrane impacts on the bioavailability (BA) of many orally administered active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The monolayer expresses a multitude of membrane transporters belonging to the solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) families ...

  19. Dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) stimulates Aβ42 generation by promoting amyloid precursor protein axonal transport during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunmin; Nah, Jihoon; Han, Jonghee; Choi, Seon-Guk; Kim, Hyunjoo; Park, Jaesang; Pyo, Ha-Kyung; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is generated through the sequential cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. Hypoxia is a known risk factor for AD and stimulates Aβ generation by γ-secretase; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we showed that dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) regulates Aβ generation through changes in subcellular localization of the γ-secretase complex and its substrate C99 under hypoxic conditions. DUSP26 was identified as a novel γ-secretase regulator from a genome-wide functional screen using a cDNA expression library. The phosphatase activity of DUSP26 was required for the increase in Aβ42 generation through γ-secretase, but this regulation did not affect the amount of the γ-secretase complex. Interestingly, DUSP26 induced the accumulation of C99 in the axons by stimulating anterograde transport of C99-positive vesicles. Additionally, DUSP26 induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation for APP processing and axonal transport of C99. Under hypoxic conditions, DUSP26 expression levels were elevated together with JNK activation, and treatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125, or the DUSP26 inhibitor NSC-87877, reduced hypoxia-induced Aβ generation by diminishing vesicle trafficking of C99 to the axons. Finally, we observed enhanced DUSP26 expression and JNK activation in the hippocampus of AD patients. Our results suggest that DUSP26 mediates hypoxia-induced Aβ generation through JNK activation, revealing a new regulator of γ-secretase-mediated APP processing under hypoxic conditions. We propose the role of phosphatase dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) in the selective regulation of Aβ42 production in neuronal cells under hypoxic stress. Induction of DUSP26 causes JNK-dependent shift in the subcellular localization of γ-secretase and C99 from the cell body to axons for Aβ42 generation. These findings provide a

  20. Drug transport in HEMA conjunctival inserts containing precipitated drug particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chhavi; Chauhan, Anuj

    2010-07-01

    This paper focuses on exploring the mechanism of cyclosporine A transport in hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) rods to develop conjunctival inserts for extended ocular delivery. Cylindrical conjunctival HEMA inserts were prepared by thermal polymerization in presence of drug at high loadings to create rods containing particles of drug dispersed in the matrix. The drug release rates were measured to explore the effect of length, drug loading, crosslinking, and mixing in the release medium. Also microstructure of the inserts was characterized by SEM imaging. The inserts release the drug for a period of about a month at therapeutic rates. The rates of drug release are zero order and independent of drug loading and crosslinking for certain period of time. These effects were shown to arise due to a mass-transfer boundary layer in the fluid and a mathematical model was developed by coupling mass transfer in the insert with that in the boundary layer in the surrounding fluid. The model with diffusivity in the insert and boundary layer thickness as parameters fits the experimental data and explains all trends in release kinetics. The fitted diffusivity is about twice that obtained by direct measurements, which agreed well with the value obtained by using the Brinkman's equation but only after accounting for drug binding to the polymer.

  1. Distribution of pressure-induced fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate optic nerve. An autoradiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L

    1981-07-01

    The distribution of transport abnormalities in primate optic nerve from eyes subjected to five hours of pressure elevation (perfusion pressure of 35 mm Hg) was studied. Tissue autoradiography and electron microscopy were used to localize regions of the lamina cribrosa with increased transport interruption. A preferential involvement by this transport abnormality involved the superior, temporal, and inferior portions, to the exclusion of the nasal portion, of the optic nerve head. This observation supports the hypothesis that transport interruption seen in this model may be pertinent to the study of clinical glaucomatous neuropathy.

  2. Glia to axon RNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, José Roberto; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José Roberto; Calliari, Aldo; Cal, Karina; Bresque, Mariana; Dipaolo, Andrés; Farias, Joaquina; Mercer, John A

    2014-03-01

    The existence of RNA in axons has been a matter of dispute for decades. Evidence for RNA and ribosomes has now accumulated to a point at which it is difficult to question, much of the disputes turned to the origin of these axonal RNAs. In this review, we focus on studies addressing the origin of axonal RNAs and ribosomes. The neuronal soma as the source of most axonal RNAs has been demonstrated and is indisputable. However, the surrounding glial cells may be a supplemental source of axonal RNAs, a matter scarcely investigated in the literature. Here, we review the few papers that have demonstrated that glial-to-axon RNA transfer is not only feasible, but likely. We describe this process in both invertebrate axons and vertebrate axons. Schwann cell to axon ribosomes transfer was conclusively demonstrated (Court et al. [2008]: J. Neurosci 28:11024-11029; Court et al. [2011]: Glia 59:1529-1539). However, mRNA transfer still remains to be demonstrated in a conclusive way. The intercellular transport of mRNA has interesting implications, particularly with respect to the integration of glial and axonal function. This evolving field is likely to impact our understanding of the cell biology of the axon in both normal and pathological conditions. Most importantly, if the synthesis of proteins in the axon can be controlled by interacting glia, the possibilities for clinical interventions in injury and neurodegeneration are greatly increased.

  3. The multiple sclerosis drug fingolimod (FTY720) stimulates neuronal gene expression, axonal growth and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadou, Sofia; Knöll, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is a new generation oral treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). So far, FTY720 was mainly considered to target trafficking of immune cells but not brain cells such as neurons. Herein, we analyzed FTY720's potential to directly alter neuronal function. In CNS neurons, we identified a FTY720 governed gene expression response. FTY720 upregulated immediate early genes (IEGs) encoding for neuronal activity associated transcription factors such as c-Fos, FosB, Egr1 and Egr2 and induced actin cytoskeleton associated genes (actin isoforms, tropomyosin, calponin). Stimulation of primary neurons with FTY720 enhanced neurite growth and altered growth cone morphology. In accordance, FTY720 enhanced axon regeneration in mice upon facial nerve axotomy. We identified components of a FTY720 engaged signaling cascade including S1P receptors, G12/13G-proteins, RhoA-GTPases and the transcription factors SRF/MRTF. In summary, we uncovered a broader cellular and therapeutic operation mode of FTY720, suggesting beneficial FTY720 effects also on CNS neurons during MS therapy and for treatment of other neurodegenerative diseases requiring neuroprotective and neurorestorative processes.

  4. Expression, transport, and axonal sorting of neuronal CCL21 in large dense-core vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Eiko K.; Vinet, Jonathan; Stanulovic, Vesna S.; Meijer, Michel; Wesseling, Evelyn; Sjollema, Klaas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.; Biber, Knut

    2008-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, and neuron-neuron communication is based on directed transport and release of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and neurotrophins. Directed communication may also be attributed to neuron-microglia signaling, since neuronal damage can induce a microglia reaction at

  5. Expression, transport, and axonal sorting of neuronal CCL21 in large dense-core vesicles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, E.K. de; Vinet, J.; Stanulovic, V.S.; Meijer, Michel; Wesseling, E.; Sjollema, K.; Boddeke, H.W.; Biber, K.

    2008-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, and neuron-neuron communication is based on directed transport and release of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and neurotrophins. Directed communication may also be attributed to neuron-microglia signaling, since neuronal damage can induce a microglia reaction at

  6. Novel High-Throughput Drug Screening Platform for Chemotherapy-Induced Axonal Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    is based upon the bioluminescent measurement of ATP that is present in all metabolically active cells. Since cells need ATP to remain alive the assay...The cells are incubated for 24 hours and cytotoxicity and therapeutic effect of drugs together with taxol are evaluated by the ATP assay, which

  7. Snapin Recruits Dynein to BDNF-TrkB Signaling Endosomes for Retrograde Axonal Transport and Is Essential for Dendrite Growth of Cortical Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhou

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophin signaling is crucial for neuron growth. While the “signaling endosomes” hypothesis is one of the accepted models, the molecular machinery that drives retrograde axonal transport of TrkB signaling endosomes is largely unknown. In particular, mechanisms recruiting dynein to TrkB signaling endosomes have not been elucidated. Here, using snapin deficient mice and gene rescue experiments combined with compartmentalized cultures of live cortical neurons, we reveal that Snapin, as a dynein adaptor, mediates retrograde axonal transport of TrkB signaling endosomes. Such a role is essential for dendritic growth of cortical neurons. Deleting snapin or disrupting Snapin-dynein interaction abolishes TrkB retrograde transport, impairs BDNF-induced retrograde signaling from axonal terminals to the nucleus, and decreases dendritic growth. Such defects were rescued by reintroducing the snapin gene. Our study indicates that Snapin-dynein coupling is one of the primary mechanisms driving BDNF-TrkB retrograde transport, thus providing mechanistic insights into the regulation of neuronal growth and survival.

  8. JIP3 regulates neuronal radial migration by mediating TrkB axonal anterograde transport in the developing cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huixian; Yu, Hui; Li, Ting; Zhao, Yan; Hou, Ming; Chen, Zheyu; Wang, Yue; Sun, Tao

    2017-04-15

    Radial migration is essential for the precise lamination and the coordinated function of the cerebral cortex. However, the molecular mechanisms for neuronal radial migration are not clear. Here, we report that c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting protein-3 (JIP3) is highly expressed in the brain of embryonic mice and essential for radial migration. Knocking down JIP3 by in utero electroporation specifically perturbs the radial migration of cortical neurons but has no effect on neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we illustrate that JIP3 knockdown delays but does not block the migration of cortical neurons by investigating the distribution of neurons with JIP3 knocked down in the embryo and postnatal mouse. Finally, we find that JIP3 regulates cortical neuronal migration by mediating TrkB axonal anterograde transport during brain development. These findings deepen our understanding of the regulation of neuronal development by JIP3 and provide us a novel view on the regulating mechanisms of neuronal radial migration.

  9. Sequence determinants of the Caenhorhabditis elegans dopamine transporter dictating in vivo axonal export and synaptic localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sarah B; Hardaway, J Andrew; Hardie, Shannon L; Wright, Jane; Glynn, Ryan M; Bermingham, Daniel P; Han, Qiao; Sturgeon, Sarah M; Freeman, Phyllis; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-01-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) acts across phylogeny to modulate both simple and complex behaviors. The presynaptic DA transporter (DAT) is a major determinant of DA signaling capacity in ensuring efficient extracellular DA clearance. In humans, DAT is also a major target for prescribed and abused psychostimulants. Multiple structural determinants of DAT function and regulation have been defined, though largely these findings have arisen from heterologous expression or ex vivo cell culture studies. Loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the Caenhorhabditis elegans DAT (dat-1) produces rapid immobility when animals are placed in water, a phenotype termed swimming-induced paralysis (Swip). The ability of a DA neuron-expressed, GFP-tagged DAT-1 fusion protein (GFP::DAT-1) to localize to synapses and rescue Swip in these animals provides a facile approach to define sequences supporting DAT somatic export and function in vivo. In prior studies, we found that truncation of the last 25 amino acids of the DAT-1 C-terminus (Δ25) precludes Swip rescue, supported by a deficit in GFP::DAT-1 synaptic localization. Here, we further defined the elements within Δ25 required for DAT-1 export and function in vivo. We identified two conserved motifs ((584)KW(585) and (591)PYRKR(595)) where mutation results in a failure of GFP::DAT-1 to be efficiently exported to synapses and restore DAT-1 function. The (584)KW(585) motif conforms to a sequence proposed to support SEC24 binding, ER export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and surface expression of mammalian DAT proteins, whereas the (591)PYRKR(595) sequence conforms to a 3R motif identified as a SEC24 binding site in vertebrate G-protein coupled receptors. Consistent with a potential role of SEC24 orthologs in DAT-1 export, we demonstrated DA neuron-specific expression of a sec-24.2 transcriptional reporter. Mutations of the orthologous C-terminal sequences in human DAT (hDAT) significantly reduced

  10. Three-dimensional aligned nanofibers-hydrogel scaffold for controlled non-viral drug/gene delivery to direct axon regeneration in spinal cord injury treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lan Huong; Gao, Mingyong; Lin, Junquan; Wu, Wutian; Wang, Jun; Chew, Sing Yian

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) often lead to persistent neurological dysfunction due to failure in axon regeneration. Unfortunately, currently established treatments, such as direct drug administration, do not effectively treat SCI due to rapid drug clearance from our bodies. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional aligned nanofibers-hydrogel scaffold as a bio-functionalized platform to provide sustained non-viral delivery of proteins and nucleic acid therapeutics (small non-coding RNAs), along with synergistic contact guidance for nerve injury treatment. A hemi-incision model at cervical level 5 in the rat spinal cord was chosen to evaluate the efficacy of this scaffold design. Specifically, aligned axon regeneration was observed as early as one week post-injury. In addition, no excessive inflammatory response and scar tissue formation was triggered. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential of our scaffold for neural tissue engineering applications. PMID:28169354

  11. Effects of microwave radiation on microtubules and axonal transport. [Brain and vagus nerve of rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsson, L.E.; Hamnerius, Y.; McLean, W.G.

    1977-04-01

    Microwave radiation is known to have a variety of effects on man and experimental animals. We have looked for a common factor in these effects and have suggested that the action of the radiation on the subcellular structure microtubules could be such a factor. We have therefore studied the effect of 3.1 GHz pulsed microwave radiation on the chemical and functional properties of microtubules in vitro. The biological materials were obtained from albino rabbits. We have investigated the binding of colchicine in brain extracts, the polymerization of microtubules in brain extracts, and the transport of proteins in the vagus nerve during microwave irradiation. The absorbed power density was carefully determined and the temperature was kept within permissible limits. No effect of the radiation could be detected at absorbed power densities lower than 4 x 10/sup 5/ W/m/sup 3/ (mean).

  12. Interplay of drug metabolizing enzymes with cellular transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Riha, Juliane; Brenner, Stefan; Höferl, Martina; Jäger, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic substances and their metabolites are substrates for drug metabolizing enzymes and cellular transporters. These proteins may not only contribute to bioavailability of molecules but also to uptake into organs and, consequently, to overall elimination. The coordinated action of uptake transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and efflux pumps, therefore, is a precondition for detoxification and elimination of drugs. As the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to predict alterations in drug disposal, adverse drug reactions and, finally, drug-drug interactions, this review illustrates the interplay between selected uptake/efflux transporters and phase I/II metabolizing enzymes.

  13. Transporter-Mediated Drug–Drug Interactions with Oral Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg König

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Uptake transporters (e.g., members of the SLC superfamily of solute carriers and export proteins (e.g., members of the ABC transporter superfamily are important determinants for the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Alterations of drug transport due to concomitantly administered drugs that interfere with drug transport may alter the kinetics of drug substrates. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that many drugs used for the treatment of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases (e.g., oral antidiabetic drugs, statins are substrates for uptake transporters and export proteins expressed in the intestine, the liver and the kidney. Since most patients with type 2 diabetes receive more than one drug, transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions are important molecular mechanisms leading to alterations in oral antidiabetic drug pharmacokinetics with the risk of adverse drug reactions. This review focuses on uptake transporters of the SLCO/SLC21 (OATP and SLC22 (OCT/OAT family of solute carriers and export pumps of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily (especially P-glycoprotein as well as the export proteins of the SLC47 (MATE family and their role for transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions with oral antidiabetic drugs.

  14. Thiazolidinediones Promote Axonal Growth through the Activation of the JNK Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.; Godoy, Juan A.; Alfaro, Ivan; Cabezas, Deny; von Bernhardi, Rommy; Bronfman, Miguel; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    The axon is a neuronal process involved in protein transport, synaptic plasticity, and neural regeneration. It has been suggested that their structure and function are profoundly impaired in neurodegenerative diseases. Previous evidence suggest that Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors-γ (PPARγ promote neuronal differentiation on various neuronal cell types. In addition, we demonstrated that activation of PPARγby thiazolidinediones (TZDs) drugs that selectively activate PPARγ prevent neurite loss and axonal damage induced by amyloid-β (Aβ). However, the potential role of TZDs in axonal elongation and neuronal polarity has not been explored. We report here that the activation of PPARγ by TZDs promoted axon elongation in primary hippocampal neurons. Treatments with different TZDs significantly increased axonal growth and branching area, but no significant effects were observed in neurite elongation compared to untreated neurons. Treatment with PPARγ antagonist (GW 9662) prevented TZDs-induced axonal growth. Recently, it has been suggested that the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) plays an important role regulating axonal growth and neuronal polarity. Interestingly, in our studies, treatment with TZDs induced activation of the JNK pathway, and the pharmacological blockage of this pathway prevented axon elongation induced by TZDs. Altogether, these results indicate that activation of JNK induced by PPARγactivators stimulates axonal growth and accelerates neuronal polarity. These novel findings may contribute to the understanding of the effects of PPARγ on neuronal differentiation and validate the use of PPARγ activators as therapeutic agents in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23741474

  15. Development of Human Membrane Transporters: Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Miriam G; Nies, Anne T; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Schaeffeler, Elke; Tibboel, Dick; Schwab, Matthias; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2016-05-01

    Membrane transporters play an essential role in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and consequently they mediate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of many drugs. The clinical relevance of transporters in drug disposition and their effect in adults have been shown in drug-drug interaction and pharmacogenomic studies. Little is known, however, about the ontogeny of human membrane transporters and their roles in pediatric pharmacotherapy. As they are involved in the transport of endogenous substrates, growth and development may be important determinants of their expression and activity. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge on human membrane transporters in pediatric drug disposition and effect. Existing pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic data on membrane substrate drugs frequently used in children are presented and related, where possible, to existing ex vivo data, providing a basis for developmental patterns for individual human membrane transporters. As data for individual transporters are currently still scarce, there is a striking information gap regarding the role of human membrane transporters in drug therapy in children.

  16. Transportation and retention in outpatient drug abuse treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, P D; Lemon, S C; Stein, M D

    2001-09-01

    To determine whether certain types of transportation assistance improve outpatient treatment retention beyond thresholds shown to have therapeutic benefits, we analyzed data from 1,144 clients in 22 outpatient methadone maintenance (OMM) programs and 2,031 clients in 22 outpatient drug-free (ODF) programs in the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcomes Study (DATOS), a national, 12-month, longitudinal study of drug abuse treatment programs. Directors' surveys provided information about provision of car, van, or contracted transportation services or individual vouchers/payment for public transportation. Chart-abstracted treatment retention was dichotomized at 365 days for OMM and 90 days for ODF. Separate multivariate hierarchical linear models revealed that provision of car, van, or contracted transportation services improved treatment retention beyond these thresholds for both OMM and ODF, but individual vouchers or payment for public transportation did not. Future research should validate whether car, van, or contracted transportation services improve retention and other treatment outcomes in outpatient drug abuse treatment.

  17. Stereoselectivity of chiral drug transport: a focus on enantiomer-transporter interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Quan; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2014-08-01

    Drug transporters and drug metabolism enzymes govern drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. Many literature works presenting important aspects related to stereochemistry of drug metabolism are available. However, there is very little literature on stereoselectivity of chiral drug transport and enantiomer-transporter interaction. In recent years, the experimental research within this field showed good momentum. Herein, an up-to-date review on this topic was presented. Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP), Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRP), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Organic Anion Transporters (OATs), Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides (OATPs), Organic Cation Transporters (OCTs), Peptide Transport Proteins (PepTs), Human Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter (PCFT) and Multidrug and Toxic Extrusion Proteins (MATEs), have been reported to exhibit either positive or negative enantio-selective substrate recognition. The approaches utilized to study chirality in enantiomer-transporter interaction include inhibition experiments of specific transporters in cell models (e.g. Caco-2 cells), transport study using drug resistance cell lines or transgenic cell lines expressing transporters in wild type or variant, the use of transporter knockout mice, pharmacokinetics association of single nucleotide polymorphism in transporters, pharmacokinetic interaction study of racemate in the presence of specific transporter inhibitor or inducer, molecule cellular membrane affinity chromatography and pharmacophore modeling. Enantiomer-enantiomer interactions exist in chiral transport. The strength and/or enantiomeric preference of stereoselectivity may be species or tissue-specific, concentration-dependent and transporter family member-dependent. Modulation of specific drug transporter by pure enantiomers might exhibit opposite stereoselectivity. Further studies with integrated approaches will open up new horizons in stereochemistry of pharmacokinetics.

  18. Role of monocarboxylate transporters in drug delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Nisha; Morris, Marilyn E

    2014-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are known to mediate the transport of short chain monocarboxylates such as lactate, pyruvate and butyrate. Currently, fourteen members of this transporter family have been identified by sequence homology, of which only the first four members (MCT1- MCT4) have been shown to mediate the proton-linked transport of monocarboxylates. Another transporter family involved in the transport of endogenous monocarboxylates is the sodium coupled MCTs (SMCTs). These act as a symporter and are dependent on a sodium gradient for their functional activity. MCT1 is the predominant transporter among the MCT isoforms and is present in almost all tissues including kidney, intestine, liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain. The various isoforms differ in terms of their substrate specificity and tissue localization. Due to the expression of these transporters in the kidney, intestine, and brain, they may play an important role in influencing drug disposition. Apart from endogenous short chain monocarboxylates, they also mediate the transport of exogenous drugs such as salicylic acid, valproic acid, and simvastatin acid. The influence of MCTs on drug pharmacokinetics has been extensively studied for γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) including distribution of this drug of abuse into the brain and the results will be summarized in this review. The physiological role of these transporters in the brain and their specific cellular localization within the brain will also be discussed. This review will also focus on utilization of MCTs as potential targets for drug delivery into the brain including their role in the treatment of malignant brain tumors.

  19. Axonal transport of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat vagus nerve: high and low affinity agonist receptors move in opposite directions and differ in nucleotide sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarbin, M.A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1982-07-01

    The presence and transport of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites have been detected in the rat vagus nerve. These binding sites accumulate both proximal and distal to ligatures in a time-dependent manner. The results of double ligature and colchicine experiments are compatible with the notion that the anterogradely transported binding sites move by fast transport. Most of the sites accumulating proximal to ligatures bind the agonist carbachol with high affinity, while most of the sites accumulating distally bind carbachol with a low affinity. Also, the receptors transported in the anterograde direction are affected by a guanine nucleotide analogue (GppNHp), while those transported in the retrograde direction are less, or not, affected. The bulk of the sites along the unligated nerve trunk bind carbachol with a low affinity and are less sensitive to GppNHp modulation than the anterogradely transported sites. These results suggest that some receptors in the vagus may undergo axonal transport in association with regulatory proteins and that receptor molecules undergo changes in their binding and regulatory properties during their life cycle. These data also support the notion that the high and low affinity agonist form of the muscarinic receptor represent different modulated forms of a single receptor molecule.

  20. UNC-16 (JIP3) Acts Through Synapse-Assembly Proteins to Inhibit the Active Transport of Cell Soma Organelles to Caenorhabditis elegans Motor Neuron Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Stacey L; Morrison, Logan M; Yorks, Rosalina M; Hoover, Christopher M; Boominathan, Soorajnath; Miller, Kenneth G

    2015-09-01

    The conserved protein UNC-16 (JIP3) inhibits the active transport of some cell soma organelles, such as lysosomes, early endosomes, and Golgi, to the synaptic region of axons. However, little is known about UNC-16's organelle transport regulatory function, which is distinct from its Kinesin-1 adaptor function. We used an unc-16 suppressor screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to discover that UNC-16 acts through CDK-5 (Cdk5) and two conserved synapse assembly proteins: SAD-1 (SAD-A Kinase), and SYD-2 (Liprin-α). Genetic analysis of all combinations of double and triple mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(-) backgrounds showed that the three proteins (CDK-5, SAD-1, and SYD-2) are all part of the same organelle transport regulatory system, which we named the CSS system based on its founder proteins. Further genetic analysis revealed roles for SYD-1 (another synapse assembly protein) and STRADα (a SAD-1-interacting protein) in the CSS system. In an unc-16(-) background, loss of the CSS system improved the sluggish locomotion of unc-16 mutants, inhibited axonal lysosome accumulation, and led to the dynein-dependent accumulation of lysosomes in dendrites. Time-lapse imaging of lysosomes in CSS system mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(-) backgrounds revealed active transport defects consistent with the steady-state distributions of lysosomes. UNC-16 also uses the CSS system to regulate the distribution of early endosomes in neurons and, to a lesser extent, Golgi. The data reveal a new and unprecedented role for synapse assembly proteins, acting as part of the newly defined CSS system, in mediating UNC-16's organelle transport regulatory function.

  1. ABC transporters in anticancer drug transport – Less ons for Therapy, Drug Development and Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh P.K

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The structural aspects as well as the classification of the ABC superfamily (the largest group of transmembrane proteins has been highlighted. Over-expression of one or more of these transporters, barring exceptions, can correlate with an increased drug resistance (the multidrug resistance phenotype. Hence, studying these proteins, using experimental and in silico approaches, has tremendous benefit for patient selection as well as stratification into “good” and “poor” drug responders. Further, the need to obtain a better insight into “intrinsic” and “extrinsic” mechanisms of resistance were reiterated upon, based on the relative recruitment of the different signal transduction molecules. The concept of the reversal of the MDR phenotype, has been discussed and extended in the context of combination therapy. This form of therapy involves the use of a cocktail of synthetic and biopharmaceutical drugs as well as nanotechnology-based approaches, for improvements in their pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD profile. Such strategies have targeted the heterogeneous cancer and cancer stem cells, signaling molecules, marker enzymes as well as the microenvironment for improved efficacy and safety as well as to minimize the chance of relapse

  2. Transport of peptidomimetic drugs by the intestinal Di/tri-peptide transporter, PepT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Steffansen, Bente;

    2002-01-01

    capable of transporting a number of orally administered peptidomimetic drugs. Absorbed peptides may be hydrolysed in the cells due to the high peptidase activity present in the cytosol. Peptidomimetic drugs may, if resistant to the cellular enzyme activity, pass the basolateral membrane via a basolateral...... peptide transport mechanism and enter the systemic circulation. As the number of new peptide and peptidomimetic drugs are rapidly increasing, the peptide transport system has gained increasing attention as a possible drug delivery system for small peptides and peptide-like compounds. In this paper we give...

  3. Transport of peptidomimetic drugs by the intestinal Di/tri-peptide transporter, PepT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Steffansen, Bente;

    2002-01-01

    peptide transport mechanism and enter the systemic circulation. As the number of new peptide and peptidomimetic drugs are rapidly increasing, the peptide transport system has gained increasing attention as a possible drug delivery system for small peptides and peptide-like compounds. In this paper we give...... capable of transporting a number of orally administered peptidomimetic drugs. Absorbed peptides may be hydrolysed in the cells due to the high peptidase activity present in the cytosol. Peptidomimetic drugs may, if resistant to the cellular enzyme activity, pass the basolateral membrane via a basolateral...

  4. Divide and conquer: processive transport enables multidrug transporters to tackle challenging drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Fluman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug transporters are membrane proteins that catalyze efflux of antibiotics and other toxic compounds from cells, thereby conferring drug resistance on various organisms. Unlike most solute transporters that transport a single type of compound or similar analogues, multidrug transporters are extremely promiscuous. They transport a broad spectrum of dissimilar drugs and represent a serious obstacle to antimicrobial or anticancer chemotherapy. Many challenging aspects of multidrug transporters, which are unique, have been studied in detail, including their ability to interact with chemically unrelated drugs, and how they utilize energy to drive efflux of compounds that are not only structurally but electrically different. A new and surprising dimension of the promiscuous nature of multidrug transporters has been described recently: they can move long molecules through the membrane in a processive manner.

  5. Disruption of the MAP1B-related Protein FUTSCH Leads to Changes in the Neuronal Cytoskeleton, Axonal Transport Defects, and Progressive Neurodegeneration in DrosophilaD⃞V⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Alexandre Bettencourt; Schwärzel, Martin; Schulze, Sabine; Niyyati, Mahtab; Heisenberg, Martin; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2005-01-01

    The elaboration of neuronal axons and dendrites is dependent on a functional cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal components have been shown to play a major role in the maintenance of the nervous system through adulthood, and changes in neurofilaments and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) have been linked to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Here we show that Futsch, the fly homolog of MAP1B, is involved in progressive neurodegeneration. Although Futsch is widely expressed throughout the CNS, degeneration in futscholk primarily occurs in the olfactory system and mushroom bodies. Consistent with the predicted function of Futsch, we find abnormalities in the microtubule network and defects in axonal transport. Degeneration in the adult brain is preceded by learning deficits, revealing a neuronal dysfunction before detectable levels of cell death. Futsch is negatively regulated by the Drosophila Fragile X mental retardation gene, and a mutation in this gene delays the onset of neurodegeneration in futscholk. A similar effect is obtained by expression of either fly or bovine tau, suggesting a certain degree of functional redundancy of MAPs. The futscholk mutants exhibit several characteristics of human neurodegenerative diseases, providing an opportunity to study the role of MAPs in progressive neurodegeneration within an experimentally accessible, in vivo model system. PMID:15772149

  6. Disruption of the MAP1B-related protein FUTSCH leads to changes in the neuronal cytoskeleton, axonal transport defects, and progressive neurodegeneration in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt da Cruz, Alexandre; Schwärzel, Martin; Schulze, Sabine; Niyyati, Mahtab; Heisenberg, Martin; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2005-05-01

    The elaboration of neuronal axons and dendrites is dependent on a functional cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal components have been shown to play a major role in the maintenance of the nervous system through adulthood, and changes in neurofilaments and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) have been linked to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Here we show that Futsch, the fly homolog of MAP1B, is involved in progressive neurodegeneration. Although Futsch is widely expressed throughout the CNS, degeneration in futsch(olk) primarily occurs in the olfactory system and mushroom bodies. Consistent with the predicted function of Futsch, we find abnormalities in the microtubule network and defects in axonal transport. Degeneration in the adult brain is preceded by learning deficits, revealing a neuronal dysfunction before detectable levels of cell death. Futsch is negatively regulated by the Drosophila Fragile X mental retardation gene, and a mutation in this gene delays the onset of neurodegeneration in futsch(olk). A similar effect is obtained by expression of either fly or bovine tau, suggesting a certain degree of functional redundancy of MAPs. The futsch(olk) mutants exhibit several characteristics of human neurodegenerative diseases, providing an opportunity to study the role of MAPs in progressive neurodegeneration within an experimentally accessible, in vivo model system.

  7. Loss of the Coffin-Lowry syndrome-associated gene RSK2 alters ERK activity, synaptic function and axonal transport in Drosophila motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherina Beck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plastic changes in synaptic properties are considered as fundamental for adaptive behaviors. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK-mediated signaling has been implicated in regulation of synaptic plasticity. Ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2 acts as a regulator and downstream effector of ERK. In the brain, RSK2 is predominantly expressed in regions required for learning and memory. Loss-of-function mutations in human RSK2 cause Coffin-Lowry syndrome, which is characterized by severe mental retardation and low IQ scores in affected males. Knockout of RSK2 in mice or the RSK ortholog in Drosophila results in a variety of learning and memory defects. However, overall brain structure in these animals is not affected, leaving open the question of the pathophysiological consequences. Using the fly neuromuscular system as a model for excitatory glutamatergic synapses, we show that removal of RSK function causes distinct defects in motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction. Based on histochemical and electrophysiological analyses, we conclude that RSK is required for normal synaptic morphology and function. Furthermore, loss of RSK function interferes with ERK signaling at different levels. Elevated ERK activity was evident in the somata of motoneurons, whereas decreased ERK activity was observed in axons and the presynapse. In addition, we uncovered a novel function of RSK in anterograde axonal transport. Our results emphasize the importance of fine-tuning ERK activity in neuronal processes underlying higher brain functions. In this context, RSK acts as a modulator of ERK signaling.

  8. Loss of the Coffin-Lowry syndrome-associated gene RSK2 alters ERK activity, synaptic function and axonal transport in Drosophila motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Katherina; Ehmann, Nadine; Andlauer, Till F M; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Strecker, Katrin; Fischer, Matthias; Kittel, Robert J; Raabe, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Plastic changes in synaptic properties are considered as fundamental for adaptive behaviors. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated signaling has been implicated in regulation of synaptic plasticity. Ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2) acts as a regulator and downstream effector of ERK. In the brain, RSK2 is predominantly expressed in regions required for learning and memory. Loss-of-function mutations in human RSK2 cause Coffin-Lowry syndrome, which is characterized by severe mental retardation and low IQ scores in affected males. Knockout of RSK2 in mice or the RSK ortholog in Drosophila results in a variety of learning and memory defects. However, overall brain structure in these animals is not affected, leaving open the question of the pathophysiological consequences. Using the fly neuromuscular system as a model for excitatory glutamatergic synapses, we show that removal of RSK function causes distinct defects in motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction. Based on histochemical and electrophysiological analyses, we conclude that RSK is required for normal synaptic morphology and function. Furthermore, loss of RSK function interferes with ERK signaling at different levels. Elevated ERK activity was evident in the somata of motoneurons, whereas decreased ERK activity was observed in axons and the presynapse. In addition, we uncovered a novel function of RSK in anterograde axonal transport. Our results emphasize the importance of fine-tuning ERK activity in neuronal processes underlying higher brain functions. In this context, RSK acts as a modulator of ERK signaling.

  9. Transportation of drug-gold nanocomposites by actinomyosin motor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Harsimran, E-mail: microsimbac@gmail.com; Chaudhary, Archana; Kaur, Inderpreet [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Biomolecular Electronics and Nanotechnology Division (BEND), Central Scientific Instruments Organization - CSIO (India); Singh, Kashmir [Panjab University, Department of Biotechnology (India); Bharadwaj, Lalit M. [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Biomolecular Electronics and Nanotechnology Division (BEND), Central Scientific Instruments Organization - CSIO (India)

    2011-06-15

    Nanotechnology is playing an important role in drug delivery to overcome limitations of conventional drug delivery systems in terms of solubility, in vivo stability, pharmacokinetics, and bio-distribution. The controlled transportation of drug into the cell and within the cell is a major challenge to be addressed. Cellular molecular motors have been exploited for their cargo carrying capacity for various applications including engineering and health care. Combination of nanotechnology and biomolecular motors can address some of the challenges in drug delivery. In the present study, transportation of drug nanocomposites has been demonstrated. Nanocomposites of 6-mercaptopurine and levodopa drugs (cancer and Parkinson's disease, respectively) were prepared with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by covalent attachment and these nanocomposites were attached to actin filaments. These nanocomposites were in-turn transported by actin filaments on myosin tracks. Characterization of drug nanocomposites formation was done by UV-Vis spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy. GNP composites of 6-mercaptopurine and levodopa were formed by sulfide and amide bond formation, respectively. Average velocity of actin filament attached to nanocomposites was found to be 3.17 and 3.89 {mu}m/s for levodopa and 6-mercaptopurine, respectively, as compared to actin filaments with velocity of 4.0-6.0 {mu}m/s. Three concepts have been proposed for the study of drug transportation into the cell based on polycationic complex formation, interaction of actin with cellular myosin and Biomolecular Adaptor for Retrograde Transport (BART) technology. The aspects of this study heads toward the development of an approach to utilize molecular motors for nanoscale transportation endogenously.

  10. Transporter assays and assay ontologies: useful tools for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Chichester, Christine; Zander Balderud, Linda; Engkvist, Ola; Gaulton, Anna; Overington, John P

    2014-06-01

    Transport proteins represent an eminent class of drug targets and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) associated genes. There exists a large number of distinct activity assays for transport proteins, depending on not only the measurement needed (e.g. transport activity, strength of ligand–protein interaction), but also due to heterogeneous assay setups used by different research groups. Efforts to systematically organize this (divergent) bioassay data have large potential impact in Public-Private partnership and conventional commercial drug discovery. In this short review, we highlight some of the frequently used high-throughput assays for transport proteins, and we discuss emerging assay ontologies and their application to this field. Focusing on human P-glycoprotein (Multidrug resistance protein 1; gene name: ABCB1, MDR1), we exemplify how annotation of bioassay data per target class could improve and add to existing ontologies, and we propose to include an additional layer of metadata supporting data fusion across different bioassays.

  11. Impact of fungal drug transporters on fungicide sensitivity, multidrug resistance and virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, de M.A.; Andrade, A.C.; Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Stergiopoulos, I.; Zwiers, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Drug transporters are membrane proteins that provide protection for organisms against natural toxic products and fungicides. In plant pathogens, drug transporters function in baseline sensitivity to fungicides, multidrug resistance (MDR) and virulence on host plants. This paper describes drug transp

  12. Multiple Drug Transport Pathways through Human P-Glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, James W; Vogel, Pia D; Wise, John G

    2015-07-21

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) is a plasma membrane efflux pump that is commonly associated with therapy resistances in cancers and infectious diseases. P-gp can lower the intracellular concentrations of many drugs to subtherapeutic levels by translocating them out of the cell. Because of the broad range of substrates transported by P-gp, overexpression of P-gp causes multidrug resistance. We reported previously on dynamic transitions of P-gp as it moved through conformations based on crystal structures of homologous ABCB1 proteins using in silico targeted molecular dynamics techniques. We expanded these studies here by docking transport substrates to drug binding sites of P-gp in conformations open to the cytoplasm, followed by cycling the pump through conformations that opened to the extracellular space. We observed reproducible transport of two substrates, daunorubicin and verapamil, by an average of 11-12 Å through the plane of the membrane as P-gp progressed through a catalytic cycle. Methylpyrophosphate, a ligand that should not be transported by P-gp, did not show this movement through P-gp. Drug binding to either of two subsites on P-gp appeared to determine the initial pathway used for drug movement through the membrane. The specific side-chain interactions with drugs within each pathway seemed to be, at least in part, stochastic. The docking and transport properties of a P-gp inhibitor, tariquidar, were also studied. A mechanism of inhibition by tariquidar that involves stabilization of an outward open conformation with tariquidar bound in intracellular loops or at the drug binding domain of P-gp is presented.

  13. Enhanced cellular transport and drug targeting using dendritic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, R. M.; Kolhe, Parag; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2003-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers possess highly branched architectures, with a large number of controllable, tailorable, peripheral' functionalities. Since the surface chemistry of these materials can be modified with relative ease, these materials have tremendous potential in targeted drug delivery. The large density of end groups can also be tailored to create enhanced affinity to targeted cells, and can also encapsulate drugs and deliver them in a controlled manner. We are developing tailor-modified dendritic systems for drug delivery. Synthesis, drug/ligand conjugation, in vitro cellular and in vivo drug delivery, and the targeting efficiency to the cell are being studied systematically using a wide variety of experimental tools. Results on PAMAM dendrimers and polyol hyperbranched polymers suggest that: (1) These materials complex/encapsulate a large number of drug molecules and release them at tailorable rates; (2) The drug-dendrimer complex is transported very rapidly through a A549 lung epithelial cancel cell line, compared to free drug, perhaps by endocytosis. The ability of the drug-dendrimer-ligand complexes to target specific asthma and cancer cells is currently being explored using in vitro and in vivo animal models.

  14. Copper transport systems are involved in multidrug resistance and drug transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Komatsu, Masaharu; Ikeda, Ryuji; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Akiyama, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element and several copper containing proteins are indispensable for such processes as oxidative respiration, neural development and collagen remodeling. Copper metabolism is precisely regulated by several transporters and chaperone proteins. Copper Transport Protein 1 (CTR1) selectively uptakes copper into cells. Subsequently three chaperone proteins, HAH1 (human atx1 homologue 1), Cox17p and CCS (copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase) transport copper to the Golgi apparatus, mitochondria and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase respectively. Defects in the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B are responsible for Menkes disease and Wilson's disease respectively. These proteins transport copper via HAH1 to the Golgi apparatus to deliver copper to cuproenzymes. They also prevent cellular damage from an excess accumulation of copper by mediating the efflux of copper from the cell. There is increasing evidence that copper transport mechanisms may play a role in drug resistance. We, and others, found that ATP7A and ATP7B are involved in drug resistance against the anti-tumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (CDDP). A relationship between the expression of ATP7A or ATP7B in tumors and CDDP resistance is supported by clinical studies. In addition, the copper uptake transporter CTR1 has also been reported to play a role in CDDP sensitivity. Furthermore, we have recently found that the effect of ATP7A on drug resistance is not limited to CDDP. Using an ex vivo drug sensitivity assay, the histoculture drug response assay (HDRA), the expression of ATP7A in human surgically resected colon cancer cells correlated with sensitivity to 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38). ATP7A-overexpressing cells are resistant to many anticancer drugs including SN-38, 7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino] carbonyloxycamptothecin (CPT-11), vincristine, paclitaxel, etoposide, doxorubicin (Dox), and mitoxantron. The mechanism by which ATP7A and copper

  15. Transport of dicationic drugs pentamidine and furamidine by human organic cation transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Ju, Wujian; Wu, Huali; Tidwell, Richard R; Hall, James E; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2009-02-01

    The antiparasitic activity of aromatic diamidine drugs, pentamidine and furamidine, depends on their entry into the pathogenic protozoa via membrane transporters. However, no such diamidine transporter has been identified in mammalian cells. The goal of this study is to investigate whether these dicationic drugs are substrates for human organic cation transporters (hOCTs, solute carrier family 22A1-3) and whether hOCTs play a role in their tissue distribution, elimination, and toxicity. Inhibitory and substrate activities of pentamidine and furamidine were studied in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The results of [(3)H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium uptake study showed that pentamidine is a potent inhibitor for all three OCT isoforms (IC50 pentamidine and furamidine was 4.4- and 9.3-fold greater, respectively, in CHO-hOCT1 cells compared with the mock cells. Ranitidine, an hOCT1 inhibitor, reversed this hOCT1-mediated potentiation of cytotoxicity. This is the first finding that dicationic drugs, such as pentamidine and furamidine, are substrates for hOCT1. In humans, aromatic diamidines are primarily eliminated in the bile but are distributed and cause toxicity in both liver and kidney. These transporters may play important roles in the disposition of aromatic diamidines in humans, as well as resultant drug-drug interactions and toxicity involving diamidine drugs.

  16. Amphetamines, new psychoactive drugs and the monoamine transporter cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In monoaminergic neurons, the vesicular transporters and the plasma membrane transporters operate in a relay. Amphetamine and its congeners target this relay to elicit their actions: most amphetamines are substrates, which pervert the relay to elicit efflux of monoamines into the synaptic cleft. However, some amphetamines act as transporter inhibitors. Both compound classes elicit profound psychostimulant effects, which render them liable to recreational abuse. Currently, a surge of new psychoactive substances occurs on a global scale. Chemists bypass drug bans by ingenuous structural variations, resulting in a rich pharmacology. A credible transport model must account for their distinct mode of action and link this to subtle differences in activity and undesired, potentially deleterious effects.

  17. Hepatic drug transporters and nuclear receptors: Regulation by therapeutic agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The canalicular membrane represents the excretory pole of hepatocytes. Bile is an important route of elimina-tion of potentially toxic endo- and xenobiotics (including drugs and toxins), mediated by the major canalicular transporters: multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1, ABCB1), also known as P-glycoprotein, multidrug re-sistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2). Their activities depend on regulation of expression and proper localization at the canalicular membrane, as regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional events, re-spectively. At transcriptional level, specific nuclear re-ceptors (NR)s modulated by ligands, co-activators and co-repressors, mediate the physiological requirements of these transporters. This complex system is also re-sponsible for alterations occurring in specific liver pa-thologies. We briefly describe the major Class Ⅱ NRs, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and their role in regulating expression of multidrug resistance proteins. Several therapeutic agents regulate the expression of relevant drug trans-porters through activation/inactivation of these NRs. We provide some representative examples of the action of therapeutic agents modulating liver drug transporters, which in addition, involve CAR or PXR as mediators.

  18. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pss; Yallapu, Murali M; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B; Kumar, Santosh

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described.

  19. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, defective axonal transport of mitochondria, abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and synaptic degeneration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Marcus J; Manczak, Maria; Mao, Peizhong; Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2011-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in synapses and synaptic mitochondria causes synaptic mitochondrial failure and synaptic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study was to better understand the effects of Aβ in mitochondrial activity and synaptic alterations in neurons from a mouse model of AD. Using primary neurons from a well-characterized Aβ precursor protein transgenic (AβPP) mouse model (Tg2576 mouse line), for the first time, we studied mitochondrial activity, including axonal transport of mitochondria, mitochondrial dynamics, morphology and function. Further, we also studied the nature of Aβ-induced synaptic alterations, and cell death in primary neurons from Tg2576 mice, and we sought to determine whether the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31 could mitigate the effects of oligomeric Aβ. We found significantly decreased anterograde mitochondrial movement, increased mitochondrial fission and decreased fusion, abnormal mitochondrial and synaptic proteins and defective mitochondrial function in primary neurons from AβPP mice compared with wild-type (WT) neurons. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a large number of small mitochondria and structurally damaged mitochondria, with broken cristae in AβPP primary neurons. We also found an increased accumulation of oligomeric Aβ and increased apoptotic neuronal death in the primary neurons from the AβPP mice relative to the WT neurons. Our results revealed an accumulation of intraneuronal oligomeric Aβ, leading to mitochondrial and synaptic deficiencies, and ultimately causing neurodegeneration in AβPP cultures. However, we found that the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31 restored mitochondrial transport and synaptic viability, and decreased the percentage of defective mitochondria, indicating that SS31 protects mitochondria and synapses from Aβ toxicity.

  20. Structure and localisation of drug binding sites on neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravna, Aina W; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Dahl, Svein G

    2009-10-01

    The dopamine (DAT), serotontin (SERT) and noradrenalin (NET) transporters are molecular targets for different classes of psychotropic drugs. The crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus LeuT(Aa) was used as a template for molecular modeling of DAT, SERT and NET, and two putative drug binding sites (pocket 1 and 2) in each transporter were identified. Cocaine was docked into binding pocket 1 of DAT, corresponding to the leucine binding site in LeuT(Aa), which involved transmembrane helices (TMHs) 1, 3, 6 and 8. Clomipramine was docked into binding pocket 2 of DAT, involving TMHs 1, 3, 6, 10 and 11, and extracellular loops 4 and 6, corresponding to the clomipramine binding site in a crystal structure of a LeuT(Aa)-clomipramine complex. The structures of the proposed cocaine- and tricyclic antidepressant-binding sites may be of particular interest for the design of novel DAT interacting ligands.

  1. Computing along the axon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Haiming; Tseren-Onolt Ishdorj; Gheorghe Pǎun

    2007-01-01

    A special form of spiking neural P systems, called axon P systems, corresponding to the activity of Ranvier nodes of neuron axon, is considered and a class of SN-like P systems where the computation is done along the axon is introduced and their language generative power is investigated.

  2. The Role of Transporters in the Toxicity of Chemotherapeutic Drugs: Focus on Transporters for Organic Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucke, Anna; Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer is one of the most important achievements of modern medicine, even allowing the cure of some lethal diseases such as testicular cancer and other malignant neoplasms. The number and type of chemotherapeutic agents available have steadily increased and have developed until the introduction of targeted tumor therapy. It is now evident that transporters play an important role for determining toxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs not only against target but also against nontarget cells. This is of special importance for intracellularly active hydrophilic drugs, which cannot freely penetrate the plasma membrane. Because many important chemotherapeutic agents are substrates of transporters for organic cations, this review discusses the known interaction of these substances with these transporters. A particular focus is given to the role of transporters for organic cations in the development of side effects of chemotherapy with platinum derivatives and in the efficacy of recently developed tyrosine kinase inhibitors to specifically target cancer cells. It is evident that specific inhibition of uptake transporters may be a possible strategy to protect against undesired side effects of platinum derivatives without compromising their antitumor efficacy. These transporters are also important for efficient targeting of tyrosine kinase inhibitors to cancer cells. However, in order to achieve the aims of protecting from undesired toxicities and improving the specificity of uptake by tumor cells, an exact knowledge of transporter expression, function, regulation under normal and pathologic conditions, and of genetically and epigenetically regulation is mandatory.

  3. Intriguing possibilities and beneficial aspects of transporter-conscious drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Toshihiko

    2015-08-01

    It has been revealed that many types of drugs interact with transporter proteins within an organism. Transporter proteins absorb or excrete materials, including drugs and nutrients, across the cell membrane. Some hydrophobic drugs are excreted from the cell as xenobiotics by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. However, solute carrier (SLC) transporters are tissue-specifically expressed and have substrate specificities. Thus, transporter-conscious drug design is an excellent method of delivering drugs to pharmaceutical target organs and provides advantages in absorption, distribution, excretion, and toxicity of drugs (ADMET) due to transport systems. In fact, based on this strategy, the bioavailability of prodrugs designed as peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) substrates was better than that of the corresponding parent compounds due to the transport system in the small intestine. Furthermore, in central nervous system (CNS) drug developing, drug delivery into brain across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a serious problem. However, this problem can be also solved by the use of the transport systems at the BBB. Therefore, transporter-consciously designed drugs not only may effectively elicit activity but also may control adverse side effects caused by off-targets and drug-drug interactions and, consequently, may show good performance in clinical trials. In this review, I introduce possibilities and advantages of transporter-conscious drug designs.

  4. Expression of Genes for Drug Transporters in the Human Female Genital Tract and Modulatory Effect of Antiretroviral Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin Hijazi

    Full Text Available Anti-retroviral (ARV -based microbicides are one of the strategies pursued to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Delivery of ARV drugs to subepithelial CD4+ T cells at concentrations for protection is likely determined by drug transporters expressed in the cervicovaginal epithelium. To define the role of drug transporters in mucosal disposition of topically applied ARV-based microbicides, these must be tested in epithelial cell line-based biopharmaceutical assays factoring the effect of relevant drug transporters. We have characterised gene expression of influx and efflux drug transporters in a panel of cervicovaginal cell lines and compared this to expression in cervicovaginal tissue. We also investigated the effect of dapivirine, darunavir and tenofovir, currently at advanced stages of microbicides development, on expression of drug transporters in cell lines. Expression of efflux ABC transporters in cervical tissue was best represented in HeLa, Ect1/E6E7 and End1/E6E7 cell lines. Expression of influx OCT and ENT transporters in ectocervix matched expression in Hela while expression of influx SLCO transporters in vagina was best reflected in VK2/E6E7 cell line. Stimulation with darunavir and dapivirine upregulated MRP transporters, including MRP5 involved in transport of tenofovir. Dapivirine also significantly downregulated tenofovir substrate MRP4 in cervical cell lines. Treatment with darunavir and dapivirine showed no significant effect on expression of BCRP, MRP2 and P-glycoprotein implicated in efflux of different ARV drugs. Darunavir strongly induced expression in most cell lines of CNT3 involved in cell uptake of nucleotide/nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors and SLCO drug transporters involved in cell uptake of protease inhibitors. This study provides insight into the suitability of cervicovaginal cell lines for assessment of ARV drugs in transport kinetics studies. The modulatory effect of darunavir and dapivirine on

  5. From nose to brain: understanding transport capacity and transport rate of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongbing; Hu, Kaili; Jiang, Xinguo

    2008-10-01

    The unique relationship between nasal cavity and cranial cavity tissues in anatomy and physiology makes intranasal delivery to the brain feasible. An intranasal delivery provides some drugs with short channels to bypass the blood-brain barrier (BBB), especially for those with fairly low brain concentrations after a routine delivery, thus greatly enhancing the therapeutic effect on brain diseases. In the past two decades, a good number of encouraging outcomes have been reported in the treatment of diseases of the brain or central nervous system (CNS) through nasal administration. In spite of the significant merit of bypassing the BBB, direct nose-to-brain delivery still bears the problems of low efficiency and volume for capacity due to the limited volume of the nasal cavity, the small area ratio of olfactory mucosa to nasal mucosa and the limitations of low dose and short retention time of drug absorption. It is crucial that selective distribution and retention time of drugs or preparations on olfactory mucosa should be enhanced so as to increase the direct delivery efficiency. In this article, we first briefly review the nose-to-brain transport pathways, before detailing the impacts on them, followed by a comprehensive summary of effective methods, including formulation modification, agglutinant-mediated transport and a brain-homing, peptide-mediated delivery based on phage display screening technique, with a view to providing a theoretic reference for elevating the therapeutic effects on brain diseases.

  6. Enhancements and limits in drug membrane transport using supersaturated solutions of poorly water soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Shweta A; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Alonzo, David E; Wu, Jianwei; Zhu, Donghua; Catron, Nathaniel D; Gao, Yi; Taylor, Lynne S

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) give rise to supersaturated solutions (solution concentration greater than equilibrium crystalline solubility). We have recently found that supersaturating dosage forms can exhibit the phenomenon of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Thus, the high supersaturation generated by dissolving ASDs can lead to a two-phase system wherein one phase is an initially nanodimensioned and drug-rich phase and the other is a drug-lean continuous aqueous phase. Herein, the membrane transport of supersaturated solutions, at concentrations above and below the LLPS concentration has been evaluated using a side-by-side diffusion cell. Measurements of solution concentration with time in the receiver cell yield the flux, which reflects the solute thermodynamic activity in the donor cell. As the nominal concentration of solute in the donor cell increases, a linear increase in flux was observed up to the concentration where LLPS occurred. Thereafter, the flux remained essentially constant. Both nifedipine and felodipine solutions exhibit such behavior as long as crystallization is absent. This suggests that there is an upper limit in passive membrane transport that is dictated by the LLPS concentration. These results have several important implications for drug delivery, especially for poorly soluble compounds requiring enabling formulation technologies.

  7. Modeling the transport of drugs eluted from stents: physical phenomena driving drug distribution in the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozsak, Franz; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Barakat, Abdul I

    2014-04-01

    Despite recent data that suggest that the overall performance of drug-eluting stents (DES) is superior to that of bare-metal stents, the long-term safety and efficacy of DES remain controversial. The risk of late stent thrombosis associated with the use of DES has also motivated the development of a new and promising treatment option in recent years, namely drug-coated balloons (DCB). Contrary to DES where the drug of choice is typically sirolimus and its derivatives, DCB use paclitaxel since the use of sirolimus does not appear to lead to satisfactory results. Since both sirolimus and paclitaxel are highly lipophilic drugs with similar transport properties, the reason for the success of paclitaxel but not sirolimus in DCB remains unclear. Computational models of the transport of drugs eluted from DES or DCB within the arterial wall promise to enhance our understanding of the performance of these devices. The present study develops a computational model of the transport of the two drugs paclitaxel and sirolimus eluted from DES in the arterial wall. The model takes into account the multilayered structure of the arterial wall and incorporates a reversible binding model to describe drug interactions with the constituents of the arterial wall. The present results demonstrate that the transport of paclitaxel in the arterial wall is dominated by convection while the transport of sirolimus is dominated by the binding process. These marked differences suggest that drug release kinetics of DES should be tailored to the type of drug used.

  8. Axonal GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Federico F; Marty, Alain; Stell, Brandon M

    2008-09-01

    Type A GABA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are well established as the main inhibitory receptors in the mature mammalian forebrain. In recent years, evidence has accumulated showing that GABA(A)Rs are prevalent not only in the somatodendritic compartment of CNS neurons, but also in their axonal compartment. Evidence for axonal GABA(A)Rs includes new immunohistochemical and immunogold data: direct recording from single axonal terminals; and effects of local applications of GABA(A)R modulators on action potential generation, on axonal calcium signalling, and on neurotransmitter release. Strikingly, whereas presynaptic GABA(A)Rs have long been considered inhibitory, the new studies in the mammalian brain mostly indicate an excitatory action. Depending on the neuron that is under study, axonal GABA(A)Rs can be activated by ambient GABA, by GABA spillover, or by an autocrine action, to increase either action potential firing and/or transmitter release. In certain neurons, the excitatory effects of axonal GABA(A)Rs persist into adulthood. Altogether, axonal GABA(A)Rs appear as potent neuronal modulators of the mammalian CNS.

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy Reveals Important Differences in Axonal Resistance to Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdesian, Margaret H.; Sanchez, Fernando S.; Lopez, Monserratt; Thostrup, Peter; Durisic, Nela; Belkaid, Wiam; Liazoghli, Dalinda; Grütter, Peter; Colman, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal degeneration after traumatic brain injury and nerve compression is considered a common underlying cause of temporary as well as permanent disability. Because a proper functioning of neural network requires phase coherence of all components, even subtle changes in circuitry may lead to network failure. However, it is still not possible to determine which axons will recover or degenerate after injury. Several groups have studied the pressure threshold for axonal injury within a nerve, but difficulty accessing the injured region; insufficient imaging methods and the extremely small dimensions involved have prevented the evaluation of the response of individual axons to injury. We combined microfluidics with atomic force microscopy and in vivo imaging to estimate the threshold force required to 1), uncouple axonal transport without impairing axonal survival, and 2), compromise axonal survival in both individual and bundled axons. We found that rat hippocampal axons completely recover axonal transport with no detectable axonal loss when compressed with pressures up to 65 ± 30 Pa for 10 min, while dorsal root ganglia axons can resist to pressures up to 540 ± 220 Pa. We investigated the reasons for the differential susceptibility of hippocampal and DRG axons to mechanical injury and estimated the elasticity of live axons. We found that dorsal root ganglia axons have a 20% lower elastic modulus than hippocampal axons. Our results emphasize the importance of the integrity of the axonal cytoskeleton in deciding the axonal fate after damage and open up new avenues to improve injury diagnosis and to identify ways to protect axons. PMID:22947856

  10. Delineation on Therapeutic Significance of Transporters as Molecular Targets of Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANAI Yoshikat; HE Xin; LIU Chang-xiao

    2011-01-01

    Transporters are membrane proteins mediating permeation of organic and inorganic solutes through the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organella.They play essential roles in the epithelial absorption and cellular uptake of nutrients as well as absorption,distribution,metabolism,and excretion of drugs.Because transporters contribute to determining the distribution of compounds in the body in concert with metabolic/synthetic enzymes,the drugs that affect the functions of transporters are expected to alter the distribution of compounds in the body and to ameliorate disrupted homeostasis.In this context,drugs targeting transporters have been used clinically.Such drugs include antidepressants targeting monoamine transporters,diuretics targeting inorganic ion transporters of renal tubules,and uricosuric agents targeting renal urate transporters.Now new transporter-targeting drugs designed based on post-genome drug development strategy have been in the process of clinical trials or basic/clinical researches.For example,the inhibitors of renal Na/glucose cotransporter SGLT2 have been proved for their efficacy in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.The cancer L-type amino acid transporter 1(LAT1)has been considered as a target of cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.The transporter-targeting drugs are expected to provide new rationale in the therapeutics of various diseases.

  11. Axons take a dive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Paredes, Mercedes F; Huang, Eric J; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult mammalian brain, neural stem cells (NSCs) and ependymal (E1) cells share the apical surface of the ventricular–subventricular zone (V–SVZ). In a recent article, we show that supraependymal serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from the raphe nuclei in mice form an extensive plexus on the walls of the lateral ventricles where they contact E1 cells and NSCs. Here we further characterize the contacts between 5HT supraependymal axons and E1 cells in mice, and show that suprependymal axons tightly associated to E1 cells are also present in the walls of the human lateral ventricles. These observations raise interesting questions about the function of supraependymal axons in the regulation of E1 cells. PMID:26413556

  12. Axonal bleb recording

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqin Hu; Yousheng Shu

    2012-01-01

    Patch-clamp recording requires direct accessibility of the cell membrane to patch pipettes and allows the investigation of ion channel properties and functions in specific cellular compartments.The cell body and relatively thick dendrites are the most accessible compartments of a neuron,due to their large diameters and therefore great membrane surface areas.However,axons are normally inaccessible to patch pipettes because of their thin structure; thus studies of axon physiology have long been hampered by the lack of axon recording methods.Recently,a new method of patchclamp recording has been developed,enabling direct and tight-seal recording from cortical axons.These recordings are performed at the enlarged structure (axonal bleb) formed at the cut end of an axon after slicing procedures.This method has facilitated studies of the mechanisms underlying the generation and propagation of the main output signal,the action potential,and led to the finding that cortical neurons communicate not only in action potential-mediated digital mode but also in membrane potential-dependent analog mode.

  13. A useful tool for drug interaction evaluation: The University of Washington Metabolism and Transport Drug Interaction Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hachad Houda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Metabolism and Transport Drug Interaction Database (http://www.druginteractioninfo.org is a web-based research and analysis tool developed in the Department of Pharmaceutics at the University of Washington. The database has the largest manually curated collection of data related to drug interactions in humans. The tool integrates information from the literature, public repositories, reference textbooks, guideline documents, product prescribing labels and clinical review sections of new drug approval (NDA packages. The database's easy-to-use web portal offers tools for visualisation, reporting and filtering of information. The database helps scientists to mine kinetics information for drug-metabolising enzymes and transporters, to assess the extent of in vivo drug interaction studies, as well as case reports for drugs, therapeutic proteins, food products and herbal derivatives. This review provides a brief description of the database organisation, its search functionalities and examples of use.

  14. Exploiting Specific Interactions toward Next-Generation Polymeric Drug Transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieczorek, Sebastian; Krause, Eberhard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Roeder, Beate; Hirsch, Anna K. H.; Boerner, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    A generic method describes advanced tailoring of polymer drug carriers based on polymer-block-peptides. Combinatorial means are used to select suitable peptide segments to specifically complex small-molecule drugs. The resulting specific drug formulation agents render insoluble drugs water-soluble a

  15. [Carboxyl nanodiamond as intracellular transporters of anticancer drug--podophyllotoxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao-Li; Wang, Bin; Peng, Yan; Ni, Jing-Man

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the intracellular transporters effect and the cytotoxicity of carboxyl nanodiamond (CND) - podophyllotoxin (PPT). Nanodiamond (ND) was treated with mixed carboxylic acid and finally got 64 nm CND by centrifugation, and then it was reacted with PPT to form CND-PPT. UV spectrophotometry was used to calculate the content of PPT in CND-PPT, the particle size distribution and zeta potential were measured by Dynamic laser scattering instrument. CND, PPT, CND-PPT and CND + PPT (physical mixture of CND and PPT) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, at the same time, thermal analysis and element analysis were used to estimate the content of the PPT in CND-PPT. The affect of CND, PPT, CND-PPT on HeLa cell was measured with MTT assay. The results showed that content of PPT combined with CND accounted for about 10%. MTT assay showed that CND has low cytotoxicity and CND-PPT can increase the water soluble of PPT. As a conclusion, CND as a hydrophilic pharmaceutical carrier combined with PPT is able to increase the water solubility of PPT, at low concentration, CND-PPT can enhance the antitumor activity in comparison with PPT, so CND can be used as a potential anticancer drug carrier.

  16. Quantitative Prediction of Human Renal Clearance and Drug-Drug Interactions of Organic Anion Transporter Substrates Using In Vitro Transport Data: A Relative Activity Factor Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathialagan, Sumathy; Piotrowski, Mary A; Tess, David A; Feng, Bo; Litchfield, John; Varma, Manthena V

    2017-04-01

    Organic anion transporters (OATs) are important in the renal secretion, and thus, the clearance, of many drugs; and their functional change can result in pharmacokinetic variability. In this study, we applied transport rates measured in vitro using OAT-transfected human embryonic kidney cells to predict human renal secretory and total renal clearance of 31 diverse drugs. Selective substrates to OAT1 (tenofovir), OAT2 (acyclovir and ganciclovir), and OAT3 (benzylpenicillin, oseltamivir acid) were used to obtain relative activity factors (RAFs) for these individual transporters by relating in vitro transport clearance (after physiologic scaling) to in vivo secretory clearance. Using the estimated RAFs (0.64, 7.3, and 4.1, respectively, for OAT1, OAT2, and OAT3, respectively) and the in vitro active clearances, renal secretory clearance and total renal clearance were predicted with average fold errors (AFEs) of 1.89 and 1.40, respectively. The results show that OAT3-mediated transport play a predominant role in renal secretion for 22 of the 31 drugs evaluated. This mechanistic static approach was further applied to quantitatively predict renal drug-drug interactions (AFE ∼1.6) of the substrate drugs with probenecid, a clinical probe OAT inhibitor. In conclusion, the proposed in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approach is the first comprehensive attempt toward mechanistic modeling of renal secretory clearance based on routinely employed in vitro cell models.

  17. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  18. Pharmacogenomics of the human ABC transporter ABCG2: from functional evaluation to drug molecular design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Tamura, Ai; Saito, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    In the post-genome-sequencing era, emerging genomic technologies are shifting the paradigm for drug discovery and development. Nevertheless, drug discovery and development still remain high-risk and high-stakes ventures with long and costly timelines. Indeed, the attrition of drug candidates in preclinical and development stages is a major problem in drug design. For at least 30% of the candidates, this attrition is due to poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Thus, pharmaceutical companies have begun to seriously re-evaluate their current strategies of drug discovery and development. In that light, we propose that a transport mechanism-based design might help to create new, pharmacokinetically advantageous drugs, and as such should be considered an important component of drug design strategy. Performing enzyme- and/or cell-based drug transporter, interaction tests may greatly facilitate drug development and allow the prediction of drug-drug interactions. We recently developed methods for high-speed functional screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to study the substrate specificity of ABC transporters and to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms on their function. These methods would provide a practical tool to screen synthetic and natural compounds, and these data can be applied to the molecular design of new drugs. In this review article, we present an overview on the genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and new camptothecin analogues that can circumvent AGCG2-associated multidrug resistance of cancer.

  19. Pharmacogenetics of drug-induced birth defects : the role of polymorphisms of placental transporter proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daud, Aizati N. A.; Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Bakker, Marian K.; Wang, Hao; de Walle, Hermien E. K.; Plosch, Torsten; Wilffert, Bob

    2014-01-01

    One of the ongoing issues in perinatal medicine is the risk of birth defects associated with maternal drug use. The teratogenic effect of a drug depends, apart from other factors, on the exposition of the fetus to the drug. Transporter proteins are known to be involved in the pharmacokinetics of dru

  20. Drug Transporter Expression and Activity in Human Hepatoma HuH-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Jouan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatoma cells may represent a valuable alternative to the use of human hepatocytes for studying hepatic drug transporters, which is now a regulatory issue during drug development. In the present work, we have characterized hepatic drug transporter expression, activity and regulation in human hepatoma HuH-7 cells, in order to determine the potential relevance of these cells for drug transport assays. HuH-7 cells displayed notable multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP activity, presumed to reflect expression of various hepatic MRPs, including MRP2. By contrast, they failed to display functional activities of the uptake transporters sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP, organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs and organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1, and of the canalicular transporters P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. Concomitantly, mRNA expressions of various sinusoidal and canalicular hepatic drug transporters were not detected (NTCP, OATP1B1, organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2, OCT1 and bile salt export pump or were found to be lower (OATP1B3, OATP2B1, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1, BCRP and MRP3 in hepatoma HuH-7 cells than those found in human hepatocytes, whereas other transporters such as OAT7, MRP4 and MRP5 were up-regulated. HuH-7 cells additionally exhibited farnesoid X receptor (FXR- and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2-related up-regulation of some transporters. Such data indicate that HuH-7 cells, although expressing rather poorly some main hepatic drug transporters, may be useful for investigating interactions of drugs with MRPs, notably MRP2, and for studying FXR- or Nrf2-mediated gene regulation.

  1. Transporter-Enzyme Interplay: Deconvoluting Effects of Hepatic Transporters and Enzymes on Drug Disposition Using Static and Dynamic Mechanistic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Manthena V; El-Kattan, Ayman F

    2016-07-01

    A large body of evidence suggests hepatic uptake transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), are of high clinical relevance in determining the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs, based on which recent regulatory guidances to industry recommend appropriate assessment of investigational drugs for the potential drug interactions. We recently proposed an extended clearance classification system (ECCS) framework in which the systemic clearance of class 1B and 3B drugs is likely determined by hepatic uptake. The ECCS framework therefore predicts the possibility of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving OATPs and the effects of genetic variants of SLCO1B1 early in the discovery and facilitates decision making in the candidate selection and progression. Although OATP-mediated uptake is often the rate-determining process in the hepatic clearance of substrate drugs, metabolic and/or biliary components also contribute to the overall hepatic disposition and, more importantly, to liver exposure. Clinical evidence suggests that alteration in biliary efflux transport or metabolic enzymes associated with genetic polymorphism leads to change in the pharmacodynamic response of statins, for which the pharmacological target resides in the liver. Perpetrator drugs may show inhibitory and/or induction effects on transporters and enzymes simultaneously. It is therefore important to adopt models that frame these multiple processes in a mechanistic sense for quantitative DDI predictions and to deconvolute the effects of individual processes on the plasma and hepatic exposure. In vitro data-informed mechanistic static and physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are proven useful in rationalizing and predicting transporter-mediated DDIs and the complex DDIs involving transporter-enzyme interplay.

  2. Assessment of drug metabolism enzyme and transporter pharmacogenetics in drug discovery and early development: perspectives of the I-PWG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, William; Tremaine, Larry M; Arefayene, Million; de Kanter, Ruben; Evers, Raymond; Guo, Yingying; Kalabus, James; Lin, Wen; Loi, Cho-Ming; Xiao, Guangqing

    2016-04-01

    Genetic variants of drug metabolism enzymes and transporters can result in high pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability, unwanted characteristics of efficacious and safe drugs. Ideally, the contributions of these enzymes and transporters to drug disposition can be predicted from in vitro experiments and in silico modeling in discovery or early development, and then be utilized during clinical development. Recently, regulatory agencies have provided guidance on the preclinical investigation of pharmacogenetics, for application to clinical drug development. This white paper summarizes the results of an industry survey conducted by the Industry Pharmacogenomics Working Group on current practice and challenges with using in vitro systems and in silico models to understand pharmacogenetic causes of variability in drug disposition.

  3. Mathematical modeling of coupled drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticle transport in patient-specific coronary artery walls

    KAUST Repository

    Hossain, Shaolie S.

    2011-08-20

    The majority of heart attacks occur when there is a sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, exposing prothrombotic emboli to coronary blood flow, forming clots that can cause blockages of the arterial lumen. Diseased arteries can be treated with drugs delivered locally to vulnerable plaques. The objective of this work was to develop a computational tool-set to support the design and analysis of a catheter-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system to treat vulnerable plaques and diffuse atherosclerosis. A threedimensional mathematical model of coupled mass transport of drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticles was developed and solved numerically utilizing isogeometric finite element analysis. Simulations were run on a patient-specific multilayered coronary artery wall segment with a vulnerable plaque and the effect of artery and plaque inhomogeneity was analyzed. The method captured trends observed in local drug delivery and demonstrated potential for optimizing drug design parameters, including delivery location, nanoparticle surface properties, and drug release rate. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

  4. Mathematical modeling of coupled drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticle transport in patient-specific coronary artery walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Shaolie S.; Hossainy, Syed F. A.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Calo, Victor M.; Hughes, Thomas J. R.

    2012-02-01

    The majority of heart attacks occur when there is a sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, exposing prothrombotic emboli to coronary blood flow, forming clots that can cause blockages of the arterial lumen. Diseased arteries can be treated with drugs delivered locally to vulnerable plaques. The objective of this work was to develop a computational tool-set to support the design and analysis of a catheter-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system to treat vulnerable plaques and diffuse atherosclerosis. A three-dimensional mathematical model of coupled mass transport of drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticles was developed and solved numerically utilizing isogeometric finite element analysis. Simulations were run on a patient-specific multilayered coronary artery wall segment with a vulnerable plaque and the effect of artery and plaque inhomogeneity was analyzed. The method captured trends observed in local drug delivery and demonstrated potential for optimizing drug design parameters, including delivery location, nanoparticle surface properties, and drug release rate.

  5. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larrivee, D. (Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of (3H)proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the (3H)proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced (3H)proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins (3H)proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons.

  6. Induction of Drug Transporters Alters Disposition of Risperidone - A Study in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Holthoewer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetic interactions, e.g. modulation of drug transporters like P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier, can be a reason for treatment non-response. This study focuses on the influence of induction of drug transporters on the disposition of the antipsychotic drugs risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone. Brain and serum concentrations of risperidone and its active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone, which are known P-glycoprotein substrates, were measured after drug transporter induction with rifampicin, dexamethasone or 5-pregnene-3beta-ol-20-on-16alpha-carbonitrile using high performance liquid chromatography. Disposition of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone was dramatically decreased in mouse brain and serum after drug transporter induction. The metabolism of risperidone was also affected.

  7. Di/tri-peptide transporters as drug delivery targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Brodin, Birger

    2003-01-01

    . PepT1-mediated transport is up-regulated by short-term exposure to receptor agonists such as EGF, insulin, leptin, and clonidine, and down-regulated by VIP. Overall, the regulation of di/tri-peptide transport may be contributed to 1) changes in apical proton-motive force 2) recruitment of di...

  8. Polyester-Based, Biodegradable Core-Multishell Nanocarriers for the Transport of Hydrophobic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina A. Walker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A water-soluble, core-multishell (CMS nanocarrier based on a new hyperbranched polyester core building block was synthesized and characterized towards drug transport and degradation of the nanocarrier. The hydrophobic drug dexamethasone was encapsulated and the enzyme-mediated biodegradability was investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The new CMS nanocarrier can transport one molecule of dexamethasone and degrades within five days at a skin temperature of 32 °C to biocompatible fragments.

  9. Excitatory amino acid transporters as potential drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Erichsen, Mette Navy; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are transmembrane proteins responsible for the uptake of (S)-glutamate (Glu) from the synaptic cleft, thereby terminating the glutamatergic neurotransmitter signal. Today five subtypes have been identified. Except for EAAT2, their individual...

  10. Assembly & Transport Mechanism of Tripartite Drug Efflux Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Rajeev; Bavro, Vassiliy N.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug efflux (MDR) pumps remove a variety of compounds from the cell into the external environment. There are five different classes of MDR pumps in bacteria, and quite often a single bacterial species expresses multiple classes of pumps. Although under normal circumstances MDR pumps confer low-level intrinsic resistance to drugs, the presence of drugs and mutations in regulatory genes lead to high level expression of MDR pumps that can pose problems with therapeutic treatments. This revi...

  11. Elucidation of common pharmacophores from analysis of targeted metabolites transported by the multispecific drug transporter-Organic anion transporter1 (Oat1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsova, Valentina L; Tsigelny, Igor F; Nagle, Megha A; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2011-06-01

    Organic anion transporter 1 (Oat1), first identified as NKT, is a multispecific transporter responsible for the handling of drugs and toxins in the kidney and choroid plexus, but its normal physiological role appears to be in small molecule metabolite regulation. Metabolites transported by Oat1 and which are altered in the blood and urine of the murine Oat1 knockout, may serve as templates for further drug design. This may lead to better tissue targeting of drugs or design of Oat1 inhibitors that prolong the half-life of current drugs. Due to the multispecificity of the transporter, 19 of known targeted metabolites have different chemical structures and properties that make constructing a common pharmacophore model difficult. Here we propose an approach that clustered the metabolites into four distinct groups which allowed for the construction of a consensus pharmacophore for each cluster. The screening of commercial molecular databases determined the top candidates whose interaction with Oat1 was confirmed in an experimental model of organic anion transport. Thus, these candidate selections represent potential molecules for further drug design.

  12. Pharmacogenetics of drug-induced birth defects: the role of polymorphisms of placental transporter proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Aizati N A; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Bakker, Marian K; Wang, Hao; de Walle, Hermien E K; Plösch, Torsten; Wilffert, Bob

    2014-05-01

    One of the ongoing issues in perinatal medicine is the risk of birth defects associated with maternal drug use. The teratogenic effect of a drug depends, apart from other factors, on the exposition of the fetus to the drug. Transporter proteins are known to be involved in the pharmacokinetics of drugs and have an effect on drug level and fetal drug exposure. This condition may subsequently alter the risk of teratogenicity, which occurs in a dose-dependent manner. This review focuses on the clinically important polymorphisms of transporter proteins and their effects on the mRNA and protein expression in placental tissue. We also propose a novel approach on how the different genotypes of the polymorphism can be translated into phenotypes to facilitate genetic association studies. The last section looks into the recent studies exploring the association between P-glycoprotein polymorphisms and the risk of fetal birth defects associated with medication use during pregnancy.

  13. Ex vivo preparations of human tissue for drug metabolism, toxicity and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, Genoveva

    2012-01-01

    Before new drugs are allowed on the market, their safety and metabolite profile should be extensively tested, as often reactive metabolites are the ultimate toxicant. The exposure of the target cell to the drug and its metabolites is determined by the expression levels of the transporters and the me

  14. Beauvericin counteracted multi-drug resistant Candida albicans by blocking ABC transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Yaojun; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    screening and whole-cell based mechanism study, identified a natural product, beauvericin (BEA) as a drug efflux pump modulator, which can reverse the multi-drug resistant phenotype of Candida albicans by specifically blocking the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters; meantime, BEA alone has fungicidal...

  15. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  16. Protonation of a Glutamate Residue Modulates the Dynamics of the Drug Transporter EmrE

    OpenAIRE

    Gayen, Anindita; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary active transport proteins play a central role in conferring bacterial multidrug resistance. In this work, we investigated the proton-coupled transport mechanism for the Escherichia coli drug efflux pump EmrE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our results show that the global conformational motions necessary for transport are modulated in an allosteric fashion by the protonation state of a membrane-embedded glutamate residue. These observations directly correlate wi...

  17. Schisandra chinensis regulates drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters via activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He JL

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jin-Lian He,1 Zhi-Wei Zhou,2,3 Juan-Juan Yin,2 Chang-Qiang He,1 Shu-Feng Zhou,2,3 Yang Yu1 1College of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs and drug transporters are regulated via epigenetic, transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and translational and posttranslational modifications. Phase I and II DMEs and drug transporters play an important role in the disposition and detoxification of a large number of endogenous and exogenous compounds. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 is a critical regulator of a variety of important cytoprotective genes that are involved in disposition and detoxification of xenobiotics. Schisandra chinensis (SC is a commonly used traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been primarily used to protect the liver because of its potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. SC can modulate some DMEs and drug transporters, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of Nrf2 in the regulatory effect of SC extract (SCE on selected DMEs and drug transporters in human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2 cells. The results showed that SCE, schisandrin A, and schisandrin B significantly increased the expression of NAD(PH: Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-oxidase or:quinone oxidoreductase 1, heme oxygenase-1, glutamate–cysteine ligase, and glutathione S-transferase A4 at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Incubation of HepG2 cells with SCE resulted in a significant

  18. Interaction Potential of the Multitargeted Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Dovitinib with Drug Transporters and Drug Metabolising Enzymes Assessed in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Weiss

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dovitinib (TKI-258 is under development for the treatment of diverse cancer entities. No published information on its pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential is available. Thus, we assessed its interaction with important drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters and its efficacy in multidrug resistant cells in vitro. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1 inhibition was evaluated by calcein assay, inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2 by pheophorbide A efflux, and inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs by 8-fluorescein-cAMP uptake. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4, 2C19, and 2D6 was assessed by using commercial kits. Induction of transporters and enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Possible aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR activating properties were assessed by a reporter gene assay. Substrate characteristics were evaluated by growth inhibition assays in cells over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Dovitinib weakly inhibited CYP2C19, CYP3A4, P-gp and OATPs. The strongest inhibition was observed for BCRP (IC50 = 10.3 ± 4.5 μM. Among the genes investigated, dovitinib only induced mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, ABCC3 (coding for multidrug resistance-associated protein 3, and ABCG2 and suppressed mRNA expression of some transporters and drug metabolising enzymes. AhR reporter gene assay demonstrated that dovitinib is an activator of this nuclear receptor. Dovitinib retained its efficacy in cell lines over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Our analysis indicates that dovitinib will most likely retain its efficacy in tumours over-expressing P-gp or BCRP and gives first evidence that dovitinib might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions.

  19. Nano carriers for drug transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinming; Tsibouklis, John; Weng, Tingting; Zhang, Buning; Yin, Guoqiang; Feng, Guangzhu; Cui, Yingde; Savina, Irina N; Mikhalovska, Lyuba I; Sandeman, Susan R; Howel, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V

    2017-01-01

    Effective therapy lies in achieving a therapeutic amount of drug to the proper site in the body and then maintaining the desired drug concentration for a sufficient time interval to be clinically effective for treatment. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) hinders most drugs from entering the central nervous system (CNS) from the blood stream, leading to the difficulty of delivering drugs to the brain via the circulatory system for the treatment, diagnosis and prevention of brain diseases. Several brain drug delivery approaches have been developed, such as intracerebral and intracerebroventricular administration, intranasal delivery and blood-to-brain delivery, as a result of transient BBB disruption induced by biological, chemical or physical stimuli such as zonula occludens toxin, mannitol, magnetic heating and ultrasound, but these approaches showed disadvantages of being dangerous, high cost and unsuitability for most brain diseases and drugs. The strategy of vector-mediated blood-to-brain delivery, which involves improving BBB permeability of the drug-carrier conjugate, can minimize side effects, such as being submicrometre objects that behave as a whole unit in terms of their transport and properties, nanomaterials, are promising carrier vehicles for direct drug transport across the intact BBB as a result of their potential to enter the brain capillary endothelial cells by means of normal endocytosis and transcytosis due to their small size, as well as their possibility of being functionalized with multiple copies of the drug molecule of interest. This review provids a concise discussion of nano carriers for drug transport across the intact BBB, various forms of nanomaterials including inorganic/solid lipid/polymeric nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, quantum dots, nanogels, liposomes, micelles, dendrimers, polymersomes and exosomes are critically evaluated, their mechanisms for drug transport across the BBB are reviewed, and the future directions of this area are fully

  20. Influence of excipients on drug absorption via modulation of intestinal transporters activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetal P Thakkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major factors affecting oral drug bioavailability is the activity of intestinal transport proteins, particularly for the drugs that undergo absorption by active transport mechanism. Many of the active pharmacological agents and the excipients used in their formulation are reported to modulate the activity of these transporters thereby either enhancing or decreasing the drug absorption and its systemic availability. These excipients are considered pharmacologically "inert" and have been used since years in pharmaceutical formulations. Appreciable interest is developing on the data demonstrating the role of excipients in altering the drug absorption across the intestine. Careful selection of the excipients thus is very important. A correctly chosen excipient can enhance the drug bioavailability and thus its therapeutic efficacy without increasing its dose. For locally acting drugs having systemic side effects, a proper excipient could lead to a decrease in its systemic absorption, thus reducing its side effects. This review focuses on the current findings of the excipients identified to modulate the activity of transporters, their mechanism of modulating the transporter′s activity and various formulation strategies using these excipients to enhance drug absorption.

  1. In silico methods for predicting drug-drug interactions with cytochrome P-450s, transporters and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Ni; Fan, Xiaohui; Ekins, Sean

    2015-06-23

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are associated with severe adverse effects that may lead to the patient requiring alternative therapeutics and could ultimately lead to drug withdrawal from the market if they are severe. To prevent the occurrence of DDI in the clinic, experimental systems to evaluate drug interaction have been integrated into the various stages of the drug discovery and development process. A large body of knowledge about DDI has also accumulated through these studies and pharmacovigillence systems. Much of this work to date has focused on the drug metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome P-450s as well as drug transporters, ion channels and occasionally other proteins. This combined knowledge provides a foundation for a hypothesis-driven in silico approach, using either cheminformatics or physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PK) modeling methods to assess DDI potential. Here we review recent advances in these approaches with emphasis on hypothesis-driven mechanistic models for important protein targets involved in PK-based DDI. Recent efforts with other informatics approaches to detect DDI are highlighted. Besides DDI, we also briefly introduce drug interactions with other substances, such as Traditional Chinese Medicines to illustrate how in silico modeling can be useful in this domain. We also summarize valuable data sources and web-based tools that are available for DDI prediction. We finally explore the challenges we see faced by in silico approaches for predicting DDI and propose future directions to make these computational models more reliable, accurate, and publically accessible.

  2. Drug release from hydrogel: a new understanding of transport phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perale, G; Rossi, F; Santoro, M; Marchetti, P; Mele, A; Castiglione, F; Raffa, E; Masi, M

    2011-06-01

    In tissue engineering, i.e., in combined advanced technologies to replace damaged or missing parts of living tissues, emerging strategies strongly point toward the use of hydrogels also for their ability of being vehicles for local controlled drug delivery. The investigation of drug release mechanisms in such matrices thus plays a key role in the design of smart system but literature is still very controversial on theoretical interpretations and understanding of available data. In this framework we used the new HRMAS-NMR DOSY technique to study the diffusive motions of sodium fluorescein, a drug mimetic small chromophoric molecule, loaded in a promising hydrogel developed for tissue engineering. While fluorescein behavior in water was as expected, also showing aggregation from mid concentrations, data collected within hydrogel samples surprisingly showed no aggregation and diffusion coefficients were always higher with respect to aqueous solution. Furthermore, the promotion of diffusion increased along with fluorescein concentration. The proportion of this effect was directly linked to hydrogel mesh size, thus carrying intrinsic novelty, but also complexity, and suggesting that not only strictly hydrodynamic effects should be considered but also electrostatic interactions between polymer chains and drug molecules might be key players in avoiding fluorescein aggregation and also affecting diffusivity.

  3. Changes in microtubule stability and density in myelin-deficient shiverer mouse CNS axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, L. L.; Witt, A. S.; Payne, H. R.; Shine, H. D.; Brady, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    Altered axon-Schwann cell interactions in PNS myelin-deficient Trembler mice result in changed axonal transport rates, neurofilament and microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation, neurofilament density, and microtubule stability. To determine whether PNS and CNS myelination have equivalent effects on axons, neurofilaments, and microtubules in CNS, myelin-deficient shiverer axons were examined. The genetic defect in shiverer is a deletion in the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene, an essential component of CNS myelin. As a result, shiverer mice have little or no compact CNS myelin. Slow axonal transport rates in shiverer CNS axons were significantly increased, in contrast to the slowing in demyelinated PNS nerves. Even more striking were substantial changes in the composition and properties of microtubules in shiverer CNS axons. The density of axonal microtubules is increased, reflecting increased expression of tubulin in shiverer, and the stability of microtubules is drastically reduced in shiverer axons. Shiverer transgenic mice with two copies of a wild-type myelin basic protein transgene have an intermediate level of compact myelin, making it possible to determine whether the actual level of compact myelin is an important regulator of axonal microtubules. Both increased microtubule density and reduced microtubule stability were still observed in transgenic mouse nerves, indicating that signals beyond synaptogenesis and the mere presence of compact myelin are required for normal regulation of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton.

  4. Inhibition of Human Drug Transporter Activities by the Pyrethroid Pesticides Allethrin and Tetramethrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedik, Lisa; Bruyere, Arnaud; Le Vee, Marc; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Potin, Sophie; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Pyrethroids are widely-used chemical insecticides, to which humans are commonly exposed, and known to alter functional expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. Limited data have additionally suggested that drug transporters, that constitute key-actors of the drug detoxification system, may also be targeted by pyrethroids. The present study was therefore designed to analyze the potential regulatory effects of these pesticides towards activities of main ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) drug transporters, using transporter-overexpressing cells. The pyrethroids allethrin and tetramethrin were found to inhibit various ABC and SLC drug transporters, including multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), organic anion transporter polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter (MATE) 1, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and OCT2, with IC50 values however ranging from 2.6 μM (OCT1 inhibition by allethrin) to 77.6 μM (OAT3 inhibition by tetramethrin) and thus much higher than pyrethroid concentrations (in the nM range) reached in environmentally pyrethroid-exposed humans. By contrast, allethrin and tetramethrin cis-stimulated OATP2B1 activity and failed to alter activities of OATP1B3, OAT1 and MATE2-K, whereas P-glycoprotein activity was additionally moderately inhibited. Twelve other pyrethoids used at 100 μM did not block activities of the various investigated transporters, or only moderately inhibited some of them (inhibition by less than 50%). In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that molecular parameters, including molecular weight and lipophilicity, are associated with transporter inhibition by allethrin/tetramethrin and successfully predicted transporter inhibition by the pyrethroids imiprothrin and prallethrin. Taken together, these data fully demonstrated that two pyrethoids, i.e., allethrin and tetramethrin, can

  5. The Role of Folate Transport in Antifolate Drug Action in Trypanosoma brucei*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Simon; Sienkiewicz, Natasha; Ong, Han B.; Wall, Richard J.; Horn, David

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize mechanisms of resistance to antifolate drugs in African trypanosomes. Genome-wide RNAi library screens were undertaken in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei exposed to the antifolates methotrexate and raltitrexed. In conjunction with drug susceptibility and folate transport studies, RNAi knockdown was used to validate the functions of the putative folate transporters. The transport kinetics of folate and methotrexate were further characterized in whole cells. RNA interference target sequencing experiments identified a tandem array of genes encoding a folate transporter family, TbFT1–3, as major contributors to antifolate drug uptake. RNAi knockdown of TbFT1–3 substantially reduced folate transport into trypanosomes and reduced the parasite's susceptibly to the classical antifolates methotrexate and raltitrexed. In contrast, knockdown of TbFT1–3 increased susceptibly to the non-classical antifolates pyrimethamine and nolatrexed. Both folate and methotrexate transport were inhibited by classical antifolates but not by non-classical antifolates or biopterin. Thus, TbFT1–3 mediates the uptake of folate and classical antifolates in trypanosomes, and TbFT1–3 loss-of-function is a mechanism of antifolate drug resistance. PMID:27703008

  6. Norepinephrine transporter function and desipramine: residual drug effects versus short-term regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Gregory A; Jia, Weihong; Li, Jing; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Mandela, Prashant; Pan, Jun

    2005-04-30

    Previous research has shown that exposure of norepinephrine transporter (NET)-expressing cells to desipramine (DMI) downregulates the norepinephrine transporter, although changes in the several transporter parameters do not demonstrate the same time course. Exposures to desipramine for effects of residual desipramine on norepinephrine transporter binding and uptake were re-evaluated following exposures of PC12 cells to desipramine using different methods to remove residual drug. Using a method that minimizes residual drug, exposure of intact PC12 cells to desipramine for 4h had no effect on uptake capacity or [(3)H]nisoxetine binding to the norepinephrine transporter, while exposures for > or =16 h reduced uptake capacity. Desipramine-induced reductions in binding to the transporter required >24 h or greater periods of desipramine exposure. This study confirms that uptake capacity of the norepinephrine transporter is reduced earlier than changes in radioligand binding, but with a different time course than originally shown. Special pre-incubation procedures are required to abolish effects of residual transporter inhibitor when studying inhibitor-induced transporter regulation.

  7. Pharmacogenomics of Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters:Relevance to Precision Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shabbir Ahmed; Zhan Zhou; Jie Zhou; Shu-Qing Chen

    2016-01-01

    The interindividual genetic variations in drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters influence the efficacy and toxicity of numerous drugs. As a fundamental element in precision med-icine, pharmacogenomics, the study of responses of individuals to medication based on their genomic information, enables the evaluation of some specific genetic variants responsible for an individual’s particular drug response. In this article, we review the contributions of genetic polymorphisms to major individual variations in drug pharmacotherapy, focusing specifically on the pharmacoge-nomics of phase-I drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Substantial frequency differences in key variants of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters, as well as their possible functional consequences, have also been discussed across geographic regions. The current effort illustrates the common presence of variability in drug responses among individuals and across all geographic regions. This information will aid health-care professionals in prescribing the most appropriate treatment aimed at achieving the best possible beneficial outcomes while avoiding unwanted effects for a particular patient.

  8. Regulation of human hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by diesel exhaust particle extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Le Vee

    Full Text Available Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP, whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute

  9. Mechanism of coupling drug transport reactions located in two different membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen I. Zgurskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Gram- negative bacteria utilize a diverse array of multidrug transporters to pump toxic compounds out of cells. Some transporters together with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs and outer membrane channels assemble trans-envelope complexes that expel multiple antibiotics across outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and into the external medium. Others further potentiate this efflux by pumping drugs across the inner membrane into the periplasm. Together these transporters create a powerful network of efflux that protect bacteria against a broad range of antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the mechanism of coupling transport reactions located in two different membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and biophysical approaches we have reconstructed the sequence of events leading to the assembly of trans-envelope drug efflux complexes and characterized the roles of periplasmic and outer membrane proteins in this process. Our recent data suggest a critical step in the activation of intermembrane efflux pumps, which is controlled by MFPs. We propose that the reaction cycles of transporters are tightly coupled to the assembly of the trans-envelope complexes. Transporters and MFPs exist in the inner membrane as dormant complexes. The activation of complexes is triggered by MFP binding to the outer membrane channel, which leads to a conformational change in the membrane proximal domain of MFP needed for stimulation of transporters. The activated MFP-transporter complex engages the outer membrane channel to expel substrates across the outer membrane. The recruitment of the channel is likely triggered by binding of effectors (substrates to MFP or MFP-transporter complexes. This model together with recent structural and functional advances in the field of drug efflux provides a fairly detailed understanding of the mechanism of drug efflux across the two membranes.

  10. Transport of diclofenac by breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and stimulation of multidrug resistance protein 2 (ABCC2)-mediated drug transport by diclofenac and benzbromarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagas, Jurjen S; van der Kruijssen, Cornelia M M; van de Wetering, Koen; Beijnen, Jos H; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2009-01-01

    Diclofenac is an important analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug, widely used for treatment of postoperative pain, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic pain associated with cancer. Consequently, diclofenac is often used in combination regimens and undesirable drug-drug interactions may occur. Because many drug-drug interactions may occur at the level of drug transporting proteins, we studied interactions of diclofenac with apical ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug efflux transporters. Using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK)-II cells transfected with human P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1/ABCB1), multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and murine Bcrp1, we found that diclofenac was efficiently transported by murine Bcrp1 and moderately by human BCRP but not by P-gp or MRP2. Furthermore, in Sf9-BCRP membrane vesicles diclofenac inhibited transport of methotrexate in a concentration-dependent manner. We next used MDCK-II-MRP2 cells to study interactions of diclofenac with MRP2-mediated drug transport. Diclofenac stimulated paclitaxel, docetaxel, and saquinavir transport at only 50 microM. We further found that the uricosuric drug benzbromarone stimulated MRP2 at an even lower concentration, having maximal stimulatory activity at only 2 microM. Diclofenac and benzbromarone stimulated MRP2-mediated transport of amphipathic lipophilic drugs at 10- and 250-fold lower concentrations, respectively, than reported for other MRP2 stimulators. Because these concentrations are readily achieved in patients, adverse drug-drug interactions may occur, for example, during cancer therapy, in which drug concentrations are often critical and stimulation of elimination via MRP2 may result in suboptimal chemotherapeutic drug concentrations. Moreover, stimulation of MRP2 activity in tumors may lead to increased efflux of chemotherapeutic drugs and thereby drug resistance.

  11. Motor neuron synapse and axon defects in a C. elegans alpha-tubulin mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Baran

    Full Text Available Regulation of microtubule dynamics underlies many fundamental cellular mechanisms including cell division, cell motility, and transport. In neurons, microtubules play key roles in cell migration, axon outgrowth, control of axon and synapse growth, and the regulated transport of vesicles and structural components of synapses. Loss of synapse and axon integrity and disruption of axon transport characterize many neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, mutations that specifically alter the assembly or stability of microtubules have been found to directly cause neurodevelopmental defects or neurodegeneration in vertebrates. We report here the characterization of a missense mutation in the C-terminal domain of C. elegans alpha-tubulin, tba-1(ju89, that disrupts motor neuron synapse and axon development. Mutant ju89 animals exhibit reduction in the number and size of neuromuscular synapses, altered locomotion, and defects in axon extension. Although null mutations of tba-1 show a nearly wild-type pattern, similar axon outgrowth defects were observed in animals lacking the beta-tubulin TBB-2. Genetic analysis reveals that tba-1(ju89 affects synapse development independent of its role in axon outgrowth. tba-1(ju89 is an altered function allele that most likely perturbs interactions between TBA-1 and specific microtubule-associated proteins that control microtubule dynamics and transport of components needed for synapse and axon growth.

  12. Protonation of a glutamate residue modulates the dynamics of the drug transporter EmrE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Anindita; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J

    2016-03-01

    Secondary active transport proteins play a central role in conferring bacterial multidrug resistance. In this work, we investigated the proton-coupled transport mechanism for the Escherichia coli drug efflux pump EmrE using NMR spectroscopy. Our results show that the global conformational motions necessary for transport are modulated in an allosteric fashion by the protonation state of a membrane-embedded glutamate residue. These observations directly correlate with the resistance phenotype for wild-type EmrE and the E14D mutant as a function of pH. Furthermore, our results support a model in which the pH gradient across the inner membrane of E. coli may be used on a mechanistic level to shift the equilibrium of the transporter in favor of an inward-open resting conformation poised for drug binding.

  13. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced drug transport in cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Plumley, John B.; Withers, Nathan J.; Kopciuch, Michael; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Huber, Dale L.; Smyth, Hugh D.; Osinski, Marek

    2012-10-01

    Iron oxide colloidal nanoparticles (ferrofluids) are investigated for application in the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung infections, the leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. We investigate the use of iron oxide nanoparticles to increase the effectiveness of administering antibiotics through aerosol inhalation using two mechanisms: directed particle movement in the presence of an inhomogeneous static external magnetic field and magnetic hyperthermia. Magnetic hyperthermia is an effective method for decreasing the viscosity of the mucus and biofilm, thereby enhancing drug, immune cell, and antibody penetration to the affected area. Iron oxide nanoparticles of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power). Nanoparticles in the superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited excellent heating power. Additionally, iron oxide / zinc selenide core/shell nanoparticles were prepared, in order to enable imaging of the iron oxide nanoparticles. We also report on synthesis and characterization of MnSe/ZnSeS alloyed quantum dots.

  14. Leishmania panamensis infection and antimonial drugs modulate expression of macrophage drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes: impact on intracellular parasite survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Maria Adelaida; Navas, Adriana; Márquez, Ricardo; Rojas, Laura Jimena; Vargas, Deninson Alejandro; Blanco, Victor Manuel; Koren, Roni; Zilberstein, Dan; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment failure is multifactorial. Despite the importance of host cell drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the accumulation, distribution and metabolism of drugs targeting intracellular pathogens, their impact on the efficacy of antileishmanials is unknown. We examined the contribution of pharmacologically relevant determinants in human macrophages in the antimony-mediated killing of intracellular Leishmania panamensis and its relationship with the outcome of treatment with meglumine antimoniate. Methods Patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis who failed (n = 8) or responded (n = 8) to treatment were recruited. Gene expression profiling of pharmacological determinants in primary macrophages was evaluated by quantitative RT–PCR and correlated to the drug-mediated intracellular parasite killing. Functional validation was conducted through short hairpin RNA gene knockdown. Results Survival of L. panamensis after exposure to antimonials was significantly higher in macrophages from patients who failed treatment. Sixteen macrophage drug-response genes were modulated by infection and exposure to meglumine antimoniate. Correlation analyses of gene expression and intracellular parasite survival revealed the involvement of host cell metallothionein-2A and ABCB6 in the survival of Leishmania during exposure to antimonials. ABCB6 was functionally validated as a transporter of antimonial compounds localized in both the cell and phagolysosomal membranes of macrophages, revealing a novel mechanism of host cell-mediated regulation of intracellular drug exposure and parasite survival within phagocytes. Conclusions These results provide insight into host cell mechanisms regulating the intracellular exposure of Leishmania to antimonials and variations among individuals that impact parasite survival. Understanding of host cell determinants of intracellular pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics opens new avenues to improved drug efficacy for intracellular

  15. A hybrid cellular automaton model of solid tumor growth and bioreductive drug transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmi, Nabila; Hossain, M A; Phillips, Roger M

    2012-01-01

    Bioreductive drugs are a class of hypoxia selective drugs that are designed to eradicate the hypoxic fraction of solid tumors. Their activity depends upon a number of biological and pharmacological factors and we used a mathematical modeling approach to explore the dynamics of tumor growth, infusion, and penetration of the bioreductive drug Tirapazamine (TPZ). An in-silico model is implemented to calculate the tumor mass considering oxygen and glucose as key microenvironmental parameters. The next stage of the model integrated extra cellular matrix (ECM), cell-cell adhesion, and cell movement parameters as growth constraints. The tumor microenvironments strongly influenced tumor morphology and growth rates. Once the growth model was established, a hybrid model was developed to study drug dynamics inside the hypoxic regions of tumors. The model used 10, 50 and 100 \\mu {\\rm M} as TPZ initial concentrations and determined TPZ pharmacokinetic (PK) (transport) and pharmacodynamics (cytotoxicity) properties inside hypoxic regions of solid tumor. The model results showed that diminished drug transport is a reason for TPZ failure and recommend the optimization of the drug transport properties in the emerging TPZ generations. The modeling approach used in this study is novel and can be a step to explore the behavioral dynamics of TPZ.

  16. ATP7A (Menkes Protein) functions in Axonal Targeting and Synaptogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Meskini, Rajaâ El; Crabtree, Kelli L.; Cline, Laura B.; Mains, Richard E.; Eipper, Betty A.; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2007-01-01

    Menkes Disease (MD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the copper transporter, ATP7A, a P-type ATPase. We previously used the olfactory system to demonstrate that ATP7A expression is developmentally, not constitutive, regulated, peaking during synaptogenesis when it is highly expressed in extending axons in a copper-independent manner. Although not known to be associated with axonal functions, we explored the possibility that the inability of mutant ATP7A to support axon o...

  17. Several hPepT1-transported drugs are substrates of the Escherichia coli proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YdgR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Aduri, Nanda G; Iqbal, Mazhar

    2017-01-01

    Proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters found in all kingdoms of life. POTs utilize the proton electrochemical gradient for the uptake of nutrient dipeptides and tripeptides. The human POT hPepT1 is known to transport a number of drugs. As part of ongoi...

  18. Drug transport into the mammalian brain: the nasal pathway and its specific metabolic barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, Alain; Leclerc, Séverine; Heydel, Jean-Marie; Minn, Anne-Laure; Denizcot, Claire; Cattarelli, Martine; Netter, Patrick; Gradinaru, Daniela

    2002-06-01

    It is generally accepted that the rate of entry into and distribution of drugs and other xenobiotics within the central nervous system (CNS) depends on the particular anatomy of the brain microvessels forming the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and of the choroid plexus forming the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (CSF), which possess tight junctions preventing the passage of most polar substances. Drug entry to the CNS also depends on the physicochemical properties of the substances, which can be metabolised during this transport to pharmacologically inactive, non-penetrating polar products. Finally, the entry of drugs may be prevented by multiple complex specialized carriers, which are able to catalyse the active transport of numerous drugs and xenobiotics out of the CNS. Nasal delivery is currently considered as an efficient tool for systemic administration of drugs that are poorly absorbed via the oral route, and increasing evidence suggests that numerous drugs and potentially toxic xenobiotics can reach the CNS by this route. This short review summarizes recent knowledge on factors controlling the nasal pathway, focusing on drug metabolising enzymes in olfactory mucosa, olfactory bulb and brain, which should constitute a CNS metabolic barrier.

  19. ROLE OF TRANSPORTERS IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF PLATINUM-BASED DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliha eHarrach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platinum derivatives used as chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin and oxaliplatin have a potent antitumor activity. However, severe side effects such as nephro-, oto-, and neurotoxicity are associated with their use. Effects and side effects of platinum-based drugs are in part caused by their transporter-mediated uptake in target and non target cells. In this mini review, the transport systems involved in cellular handling of platinum derivatives are illustrated, focusing on transporters for cisplatin. The copper transporter 1 seems to be of particular importance for cisplatin uptake in tumor cells, while the organic cation transporter (OCT 2, due to its specific organ distribution, may play a major role in the development of undesired cisplatin side effects. In polarized cells, e.g. in renal proximal tubule cells, apically expressed transporters, such as multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1, mediate secretion of cisplatin and in this way contribute to the control of its toxic effects. Specific inhibition of cisplatin uptake transporters such as the OCTs may be an attractive therapeutic option to reduce its toxicity, without impairing its antitumor efficacy.

  20. Predicting Drug Extraction in the Human Gut Wall: Assessing Contributions from Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporter Proteins using Preclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sheila Annie; Jones, Christopher R; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Hatley, Oliver J D

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal metabolism can limit oral bioavailability of drugs and increase the risk of drug interactions. It is therefore important to be able to predict and quantify it in drug discovery and early development. In recent years, a plethora of models-in vivo, in situ and in vitro-have been discussed in the literature. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge in the quantitative prediction of gut-wall metabolism. As well as discussing the successes of current models for intestinal metabolism, the challenges in the establishment of good preclinical models are highlighted, including species differences in the isoforms; regional abundances and activities of drug metabolizing enzymes; the interplay of enzyme-transporter proteins; and lack of knowledge on enzyme abundances and availability of empirical scaling factors. Due to its broad specificity and high abundance in the intestine, CYP3A is the enzyme that is frequently implicated in human gut metabolism and is therefore the major focus of this review. A strategy to assess the impact of gut wall metabolism on oral bioavailability during drug discovery and early development phases is presented. Current gaps in the mechanistic understanding and the prediction of gut metabolism are highlighted, with suggestions on how they can be overcome in the future.

  1. Effect of drug efflux transporters on placental transport of antiretroviral agent abacavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumanova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Greenwood, Susan L; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2015-11-01

    Abacavir is as a frequent part of combination antiretroviral therapy used in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to investigate, using in vitro, in situ and ex vivo experimental approaches, whether the transplacental pharmacokinetics of abacavir is affected by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters functionally expressed in the placenta: P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (ABCC2) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 5 (ABCC5). In vitro transport assays revealed that abacavir is a substrate of human ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters but not of ABCC2 or ABCC5. In addition, in situ experiments using dually perfused rat term placenta confirmed interactions of abacavir with placental Abcb1/Abcg2. In contrast, uptake studies in human placental villous fragments did not reveal any interaction of abacavir with efflux transporters suggesting a large contribution of passive diffusion and/or influx mechanisms to net transplacental abacavir transfer.

  2. 75 FR 8528 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Office of the Secretary 49 CFR Part 40 RIN OST 2105-AD84 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and... Purpose In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13, (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq... Department published a Federal Register notice [71 FR 49383] to update the MIS form and its...

  3. MFS transporters of Candida species and their role in clinical drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K Redhu, Archana; Shah, Abdul H; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-06-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) and MFS (major facilitator superfamily) exporters, belonging to two different superfamilies, are one of the most prominent contributors of multidrug resistance (MDR) in yeast. While the role of ABC efflux pump proteins in the development of MDR is well documented, the MFS transporters which are also implicated in clinical drug resistance have not received due attention. The MFS superfamily is the largest known family of secondary active membrane carriers, and MFS exporters are capable of transporting a host of substrates ranging from small molecules, including organic and inorganic ions, to complex biomolecules, such as peptide and lipid moieties. A few of the members of the drug/H(+) antiporter family of the MFS superfamily function as multidrug transporters and employ downhill transport of protons to efflux their respective substrates. This review focuses on the recent developments in MFS of Candida and highlights their role in drug transport by using the example of the relatively well characterized promiscuous Mdr1 efflux pump of the pathogenic yeast C. albicans.

  4. Glycolysis inhibition inactivates ABC transporters to restore drug sensitivity in malignant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Nakano

    Full Text Available Cancer cells eventually acquire drug resistance largely via the aberrant expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, ATP-dependent efflux pumps. Because cancer cells produce ATP mostly through glycolysis, in the present study we explored the effects of inhibiting glycolysis on the ABC transporter function and drug sensitivity of malignant cells. Inhibition of glycolysis by 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA suppressed ATP production in malignant cells, and restored the retention of daunorubicin or mitoxantrone in ABC transporter-expressing, RPMI8226 (ABCG2, KG-1 (ABCB1 and HepG2 cells (ABCB1 and ABCG2. Interestingly, although side population (SP cells isolated from RPMI8226 cells exhibited higher levels of glycolysis with an increased expression of genes involved in the glycolytic pathway, 3BrPA abolished Hoechst 33342 exclusion in SP cells. 3BrPA also disrupted clonogenic capacity in malignant cell lines including RPMI8226, KG-1, and HepG2. Furthermore, 3BrPA restored cytotoxic effects of daunorubicin and doxorubicin on KG-1 and RPMI8226 cells, and markedly suppressed subcutaneous tumor growth in combination with doxorubicin in RPMI8226-implanted mice. These results collectively suggest that the inhibition of glycolysis is able to overcome drug resistance in ABC transporter-expressing malignant cells through the inactivation of ABC transporters and impairment of SP cells with enhanced glycolysis as well as clonogenic cells.

  5. New approaches to overcome transport related drug resistance in trypanosomatid parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Garcia-Salcedo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania and Trypanosoma are members of the Trypanosomatidae family that cause severe human infections such as leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and sleeping sickness affecting millions of people worldwide. Despite efforts to eradicate them, migrations are expanding these infections to developing countries. There are no vaccines available and current treatments depend only on chemotherapy. Drug resistance is a major obstacle for the treatment of these diseases given that existing drugs are old and limited, with some having severe side effects. Most resistance mechanisms developed by these parasites are related with a decreased uptake or increased efflux of the drug due to mutations or altered expression of membrane transporters. Different new approaches have been elaborated that can overcome these mechanisms of resistance including the use of inhibitors of efflux pumps and drug carriers for both active and passive targeting. Here we review new formulations that have been successfully applied to circumvent resistance related to drug transporters, opening alternative ways to solve drug resistance in protozoan parasitic diseases.

  6. New Approaches to Overcome Transport Related Drug Resistance in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Salcedo, Jose A.; Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Valverde-Pozo, Javier; Soriano, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania and Trypanosoma are members of the Trypanosomatidae family that cause severe human infections such as leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and sleeping sickness affecting millions of people worldwide. Despite efforts to eradicate them, migrations are expanding these infections to developing countries. There are no vaccines available and current treatments depend only on chemotherapy. Drug resistance is a major obstacle for the treatment of these diseases given that existing drugs are old and limited, with some having severe side effects. Most resistance mechanisms developed by these parasites are related with a decreased uptake or increased efflux of the drug due to mutations or altered expression of membrane transporters. Different new approaches have been elaborated that can overcome these mechanisms of resistance including the use of inhibitors of efflux pumps and drug carriers for both active and passive targeting. Here we review new formulations that have been successfully applied to circumvent resistance related to drug transporters, opening alternative ways to solve drug resistance in protozoan parasitic diseases. PMID:27733833

  7. Exploring multiple drug and herbicide resistance in plants--spotlight on transporter proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Sarah S; Lloyd, Alan M

    2011-02-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) has been extensively studied in bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells due to the great clinical significance of this problem. MDR is not well studied in plant systems, although plant genomes contain large numbers of genes encoding putative MDR transporters (MDRTs). Biochemical pathways in the chloroplast are the targets of many herbicides and antibiotics, yet very little data is available regarding mechanisms of drug transport across the chloroplast membrane. MDRTs typically have broad substrate specificities, and may transport essential compounds and metabolites in addition to toxins. Indeed, plant transporters belonging to MDR families have also been implicated in the transport of a wide variety of compounds including auxins, flavonoids, glutathione conjugates, metal chelators, herbicides and antibiotics, although definitive evidence that a single transporter is capable of moving both toxins and metabolites has not yet been provided. Current understanding of plant MDR can be expanded via the characterization of candidate genes, especially MDRTs predicted to localize to the chloroplast, and also via traditional forward genetic approaches. Novel plant MDRTs have the potential to become endogenous selectable markers, aid in phytoremediation strategies, and help us to understand how plants have evolved to cope with toxins in their environment.

  8. Drug Transport Microdevice Mimicking an Idealized Nanoscale Bio-molecular Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jae Hwan Lee; Ramana M. Pidaparti

    2011-01-01

    Molecular motors are nature's nano-devices and the essential agents of movement that are an integral part of many living organisms.The supramolecular motor,called Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC),controls the transport of all cellular material between the cytoplasm and the nucleus that occurs naturally in biological cells of many organisms.In order to understand the design characteristics of the NPC,we developed a microdevice for drug/fluidic transport mimicking the coarse-grained representation of the NPC geometry through computational fluid dynamic analysis and optimization.Specifically,the role of the central plug in active fluidic/particle transport and passive transport (without central plug) was investigated.Results of flow rate,pressure and velocity profiles obtained from the models indicate that the central plug plays a major role in transport through this biomolecular machine.The results of this investigation show that fluidic transport and flow passages are important factors in designing NPC based nano- and micro-devices for drug delivery.

  9. Transport of carbamazepine and drug interactions at blood-brain barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-jing SUN; Lin XIE; Xiao-dong LIU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the characteristics of carbamazepine (CBZ) transport and drug interactions at the blood-brain barrier. Methods: Cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (rBMEC) were used as an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). When cells became confluent, CBZ uptake over time was recorded by incubation of the cells in a medium containing 10 mg/L CBZ at 37 ℃. The steady-state uptake of CBZ by rBMEC was tested for different CBZ concentrations at 37 ℃. The effects of various agents on the steady-state uptake of CBZ and efflux of CBZ from rBMEC were also studied. Results: The uptake of CBZ by rBMEC was time- and concentration-dependent. The steady-state uptake occurred at 30 min for incubation. The steady-state uptake was significantly increased (P<0.01) by treatment with dinitrophenol. The co-administration of cyclosporine A significantly increased the steady-state uptake of CBZ by the rBMEC, whereas co-administration of olanzapine significantly decreased the uptake in a concentration- and temperature-dependent manner. The efflux of CBZ from rBMEC was inhibited by CsA. Conclusion: The transport of CBZ at the BBB is mediated by many transporters. Some specific ABC (ATP-binding cassette,ABC ) efflux transporters may be involved in the transport of CBZ. Drugs influence the transport of CBZ at the BBB in different ways.

  10. Role of the dopamine transporter in the action of psychostimulants, nicotine, and other drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J; Reith, M E A

    2008-11-01

    A number of studies over the last two decades have demonstrated the critical importance of dopamine (DA) in the behavioral pharmacology and addictive properties of abused drugs. The DA transporter (DAT) is a major target for drugs of abuse in the category of psychostimulants, and for methylphenidate (MPH), a drug used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which can also be a psychostimulant drug of abuse. Other drugs of abuse such as nicotine, ethanol, heroin and morphine interact with the DAT in more indirect ways. Despite the different ways in which drugs of abuse can affect DAT function, one evolving theme in all cases is regulation of the DAT at the level of surface expression. DAT function is dynamically regulated by multiple intracellular and extracellular signaling pathways and several protein-protein interactions. In addition, DAT expression is regulated through the removal (internalization) and recycling of the protein from the cell surface. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that individual differences in response to novel environments and psychostimulants can be predicted based on individual basal functional DAT expression. Although current knowledge of multiple factors regulating DAT activity has greatly expanded, many aspects of this regulation remain to be elucidated; these data will enable efforts to identify drugs that might be used therapeutically for drug dependence therapeutics.

  11. Coupled gel spreading and diffusive transport models describing microbicidal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Claire; MacMillan, Kelsey; Ham, Anthony S.; Szeri, Andrew J.; Katz, David F.

    2016-11-01

    Gels are a drug delivery platform being evaluated for application of active pharmaceutical ingredients, termed microbicides, that act topically against infection by sexually transmitted HIV. Despite success in one Phase IIb trial of a vaginal gel delivering tenofovir, problems of user adherence to designed gel application regimen compromised results in two other trials. The microbicide field is responding to this issue by simultaneously analyzing behavioral determinants of adherence and pharmacological determinants of drug delivery. Central to both user adherence and mucosal drug delivery are gel properties (e.g. rheology) and applied volume. The specific problem to be solved here is to develop a model for how gel rheology and volume, interacting with loaded drug concentration, govern the transport of the microbicide drug tenofovir into the vaginal mucosa to its stromal layer. The analysis here builds upon our current understanding of vaginal gel deployment and drug delivery, incorporating key features of the gel's environment, fluid production and subsequent gel dilution, and vaginal wall elasticity. We consider the microbicide drug tenofovir as it is the most completely studied drug, in both in vitroand in vivostudies, for use in vaginal gel application. Our goal is to contribute to improved pharmacological understanding of gel functionality, providing a computational tool that can be used in future vaginal microbicide gel design.

  12. Multifunctional Silk Nerve Guides for Axon Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupaj, Marie C.

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a critical issue as 2.8% of trauma patients present with this type of injury, estimating a total of 200,000 nerve repair procedures yearly in the United States. While the peripheral nervous system exhibits slow regeneration, at a rate of 0.5 mm -- 9 mm/day following trauma, this regenerative ability is only possible under certain conditions. Clinical repairs have changed slightly in the last 30 years and standard methods of treatment include suturing damaged nerve ends, allografting, and autografting, with the autograft the gold standard of these approaches. Unfortunately, the use of autografts requires a second surgery and there is a shortage of nerves available for grafting. Allografts are a second option however allografts have lower success rates and are accompanied by the need of immunosuppressant drugs. Recently there has been a focus on developing nerve guides as an "off the shelf" approach. Although some natural and synthetic guidance channels have been approved by the FDA, these nerve guides are unfunctionalized and repair only short gaps, less than 3 cm in length. The goal of this project was to identify strategies for functionalizing peripheral nerve conduits for the outgrowth of neuron axons in vitro . To accomplish this, two strategies (bioelectrical and biophysical) were indentified for increasing axon outgrowth and promoting axon guidance. Bioelectrical strategies exploited electrical stimulation for increasing neurite outgrowth. Biophysical strategies tested a range of surface topographies for axon guidance. Novel methods were developed for integrating electrical and biophysical strategies into silk films in 2D. Finally, a functionalized nerve conduit system was developed that integrated all strategies for the purpose of attaching, elongating, and guiding nervous tissue in vitro. Future directions of this work include silk conduit translation into a rat sciatic nerve model in vivo for the purpose of repairing long

  13. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robin; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-01-06

    In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialized glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarization followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasizing the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during central nervous system (CNS) myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of proteolipid protein (PLP) transport by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases.

  14. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin eWhite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialised glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarisation followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasising the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during CNS myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of PLP (proteolipid protein transport by SNARE proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases.

  15. Inhibition of kinesin-5 improves regeneration of injured axons by a novel microtubule-based mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter W. Baas; Andrew J. Matamoros

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules have been identiifed as a powerful target for augmenting regeneration of injured adult axons in the central nervous system. Drugs that stabilize microtubules have shown some promise, but there are concerns that abnormally stabilizing microtubules may have only limited beneifts for regeneration, while at the same time may be detrimental to the normal work that microtubules perform for the axon. Kinesin-5 (also called kif11 or Eg5), a molecular motor protein best known for its crucial role in mitosis, acts as a brake on microtubule movements by other motor proteins in the axon. Drugs that inhibit kinesin-5, originally developed to treat cancer, result in greater mobility of microtubules in the axon and an overall shift in the forces on the microtubule array. As a result, the axon grows faster, retracts less, and more readily enters environments that are inhibitory to axonal regeneration. Thus, drugs that inhibit kinesin-5 offer a novel microtubule-based means to boost axonal regeneration without the concerns that ac-company abnormal stabilization of the microtubule array. Even so, inhibiting kinesin-5 is not without its own caveats, such as potential problems with navigation of the regenerating axon to its target, as well as morphological effects on dendrites that could affect learning and memory if the drugs reach the brain.

  16. Inhibition of kinesin-5 improves regeneration of injured axons by a novel microtubule-based mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Baas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules have been identified as a powerful target for augmenting regeneration of injured adult axons in the central nervous system. Drugs that stabilize microtubules have shown some promise, but there are concerns that abnormally stabilizing microtubules may have only limited benefits for regeneration, while at the same time may be detrimental to the normal work that microtubules perform for the axon. Kinesin-5 (also called kif11 or Eg5, a molecular motor protein best known for its crucial role in mitosis, acts as a brake on microtubule movements by other motor proteins in the axon. Drugs that inhibit kinesin-5, originally developed to treat cancer, result in greater mobility of microtubules in the axon and an overall shift in the forces on the microtubule array. As a result, the axon grows faster, retracts less, and more readily enters environments that are inhibitory to axonal regeneration. Thus, drugs that inhibit kinesin-5 offer a novel microtubule-based means to boost axonal regeneration without the concerns that accompany abnormal stabilization of the microtubule array. Even so, inhibiting kinesin-5 is not without its own caveats, such as potential problems with navigation of the regenerating axon to its target, as well as morphological effects on dendrites that could affect learning and memory if the drugs reach the brain.

  17. Intestinal transporters for endogenic and pharmaceutical organic anions: The challenges of deriving in-vitro kinetic parameters for the prediction of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandvuinet, Anne Sophie; Vestergaard, Henrik Tang; Rapin, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This review provides an overview of intestinal human transporters for organic anions and stresses the need for standardization of the various in-vitro methods presently employed in drug-drug interaction (DDI) investigations. Key findings Current knowledge on the intestinal expression o...... the involvement of other transporters than P-glycoprotein. Moreover, the interplay between various processes that a drug is subject to in-vivo such as translocation by several transporters and dissolution should be considered. © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society....

  18. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery L Twiss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthesis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been documented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regenerating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regenerating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  19. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twiss, Jeffery L; Kalinski, Ashley L; Sachdeva, Rahul; Houle, John D

    2016-09-01

    Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthesis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been documented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regenerating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regenerating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  20. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffery L Twiss; Ashley L Kalinski; Rahul Sachdeva; John D Houle

    2016-01-01

    Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthe-sis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been docu-mented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regen-erating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regen-erating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  1. MRP3, an organic anion transporter able to transport anti-cancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Kool, Marcel; Marcel VAN DER LINDEN; Haas, Marcel; Scheffer, George L.; de Vree, J. Marleen L.; Smith, Alexander J.; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J.; Ponne, Nico; Scheper, Rik J.; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Baas, Frank; Borst, Piet

    1999-01-01

    The human multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) gene family contains at least six members: MRP1, encoding the multidrug-resistance protein; MRP2 or cMOAT, encoding the canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter; and four homologs, called MRP3, MRP4, MRP5, and MRP6. In this report, we characterize MRP3, the closest homolog of MRP1. Cell lines were retrovirally transduced with MRP3 cDNA, and new monoclonal antibodies specific for MRP3 were generated. We show that MRP3 is an organic anion ...

  2. The importance of drug-transporting P-glycoproteins in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tellingen, O

    2001-03-31

    The importance of specific transport in toxicology is becoming increasingly clear and the work on P-glycoprotein has certainly been a major contribution to these growing insights. P-Glycoproteins were discovered by their ability to confer multidrug resistance in mammalian tumour cells. They are localised in the cell membrane where they actively extrude a wide range of compounds including many anti-cancer drugs from the cell. Besides in tumour cells, drug-transporting P-glycoproteins are also expressed in a polarised fashion in normal tissues that perform an excretory or barrier function, such as the liver, kidneys, intestines, brain endothelial cells. Based on this expression profile, it has been proposed that P-glycoproteins are important in protecting the host by reducing exposure to xenobiotics. Further studies with P-glycoprotein knockout mice have clearly established this protective function. In general, the clearance of substrate drugs is lower in knockout mice due to a diminished hepatobiliary excretion, direct intestinal excretion and/or increased enterohepatic cycling. Moreover, their uptake in sanctuary sites, such as the brain or the foetus, was profoundly higher in P-glycoprotein knockout mice, as was the uptake of drugs from the gastro-intestinal tract into the systemic circulation following oral ingestion. These results clearly highlight the impact that transport proteins can play in toxicology.

  3. Specificity of drug transport mediated by CaMDR1: a major facilitator of Candida albicans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Avmeet Kohli; Vinita Gupta; Shankarling Krishnamurthy; Seyed E Hasnain; Rajendra Prasad

    2001-09-01

    CaMDR1 encodes a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein in Candida albicans whose expression has been linked to azole resistance and which is frequently encountered in this human pathogenic yeast. In this report we have overexpressed CaMdr1p in Sf9 insect cells and demonstrated for the first time that it can mediate methotrexate (MTX) and fluconazole (FLC) transport. MTX appeared to be a better substrate for CaMdr1p among these two tested drugs. Due to severe toxicity of these drugs to insect cells, further characterization of CaMdr1p as a drug transporter could not be done with this system. Therefore, as an alternative, CaMdr1p and Cdr1p, which is an ABC protein (ATP binding cassette) also involved in azole resistance in C. albicans, were independently expressed in a common hypersensitive host JG436 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This allowed a better comparison between the functionality of the two export pumps. We observed that while both FLC and MTX are effluxed by CaMdr1p, MTX appeared to be a poor substrate for Cdr1p. JG436 cells expressing Cdr1p thus conferred resistance to other antifungal drugs but remained hypersensitive to MTX. Since MTX is preferentially transported by CaMdr1p, it can be used for studying the function of this MFS protein.

  4. Directed transport of bacteria-based drug delivery vehicles: bacterial chemotaxis dominates particle shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahari, Ali; Traore, Mahama A; Scharf, Birgit E; Behkam, Bahareh

    2014-10-01

    Several attenuated and non-pathogenic bacterial species have been demonstrated to actively target diseased sites and successfully deliver plasmid DNA, proteins and other therapeutic agents into mammalian cells. These disease-targeting bacteria can be employed for targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging cargos in the form of a bio-hybrid system. The bio-hybrid drug delivery system constructed here is comprised of motile Escherichia coli MG1655 bacteria and elliptical disk-shaped polymeric microparticles. The transport direction for these vehicles can be controlled through biased random walk of the attached bacteria in presence of chemoattractant gradients in a process known as chemotaxis. In this work, we utilize a diffusion-based microfluidic platform to establish steady linear concentration gradients of a chemoattractant and investigate the roles of chemotaxis and geometry in transport of bio-hybrid drug delivery vehicles. Our experimental results demonstrate for the first time that bacterial chemotactic response dominates the effect of body shape in extravascular transport; thus, the non-spherical system could be more favorable for drug delivery applications owing to the known benefits of using non-spherical particles for vascular transport (e.g. relatively long circulation time).

  5. Role of calpains in the injury-induced dysfunction and degeneration of the mammalian axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Marek

    2013-12-01

    Axonal injury and degeneration, whether primary or secondary, contribute to the morbidity and mortality seen in many acquired and inherited central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders, such as traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, cerebral ischemia, neurodegenerative diseases, and peripheral neuropathies. The calpain family of proteases has been mechanistically linked to the dysfunction and degeneration of axons. While the direct mechanisms by which transection, mechanical strain, ischemia, or complement activation trigger intra-axonal calpain activity are likely different, the downstream effects of unregulated calpain activity may be similar in seemingly disparate diseases. In this review, a brief examination of axonal structure is followed by a focused overview of the calpain family. Finally, the mechanisms by which calpains may disrupt the axonal cytoskeleton, transport, and specialized domains (axon initial segment, nodes, and terminals) are discussed.

  6. Down-regulation of intestinal drug transporters in chronic renal failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naud, Judith; Michaud, Josée; Boisvert, Caroline; Desbiens, Karine; Leblond, Francois A; Mitchell, Andrew; Jones, Christine; Bonnardeaux, Alain; Pichette, Vincent

    2007-03-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with an increased bioavailability of drugs by a poorly understood mechanism. One hypothesis is a reduction in the elimination of drugs by the intestine, i.e., drug elimination mediated by protein membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug-resistance-related protein (MRP) 2. The present study aimed to investigate the repercussions of CRF on intestinal transporters involved in drug absorption [organic anion-transportingpolypeptide (Oatp)] and those implicated in drug extrusion (Pgp and MRP2). Pgp, MRP2, MRP3, Oatp2, and Oatp3 protein expression and Pgp, MRP2, and Oatp3 mRNA expression were assessed in the intestine of CRF (induced by five-sixth nephrectomy) and control rats. Pgp and MRP2 activities were measured using the everted gut technique. Rat enterocytes and Caco-2 cells were incubated with sera from control and CRF rats to characterize the mechanism of transporters' down-regulation. Protein expression of Pgp, MRP2, and MRP3 were reduced by more than 40% (p CRF rats, whereas Oatp2 and Oatp3 expression remained unchanged. There was no difference in the mRNA levels assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Pgp and MRP2 activities were decreased by 30 and 25%, respectively, in CRF rats compared with control (p CRF in rats is associated with a decrease in intestinal Pgp and MRP2 protein expression and function secondarily to serum uremic factors. This reduction could explain the increased bioavailability of drugs in CRF.

  7. Characterization of rhodamine-123 as a tracer dye for use in in vitro drug transport assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Forster

    Full Text Available Fluorescent tracer dyes represent an important class of sub-cellular probes and allow the examination of cellular processes in real-time with minimal impact upon these processes. Such tracer dyes are becoming increasingly used for the examination of membrane transport processes, as they are easy-to-use, cost effective probe substrates for a number of membrane protein transporters. Rhodamine 123, a member of the rhodamine family of flurone dyes, has been used to examine membrane transport by the ABCB1 gene product, MDR1. MDR1 is viewed as the archetypal drug transport protein, and is able to efflux a large number of clinically relevant drugs. In addition, ectopic activity of MDR1 has been associated with the development of multiple drug resistance phenotype, which results in a poor patient response to therapeutic intervention. It is thus important to be able to examine the potential for novel compounds to be MDR1 substrates. Given the increasing use rhodamine 123 as a tracer dye for MDR1, a full characterisation of its spectral properties in a range of in vitro assay-relevant media is warranted. Herein, we determine λmax for excitation and emission or rhodamine 123 and its metabolite rhodamine 110 in commonly used solvents and extraction buffers, demonstrating that fluorescence is highly dependent on the chemical environment: Optimal parameters are 1% (v/v methanol in HBSS, with λex = 505 nm, λem = 525 nm. We characterise the uptake of rhodamine 123 into cells, via both passive and active processes, and demonstrate that this occurs primarily through OATP1A2-mediated facilitated transport at concentrations below 2 µM, and via micelle-mediated passive diffusion above this. Finally, we quantify the intracellular sequestration and metabolism of rhodamine 123, demonstrating that these are both cell line-dependent factors that may influence the interpretation of transport assays.

  8. Is nose-to-brain transport of drugs in man a reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illum, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier that segregates the brain interstitial fluid from the circulating blood provides an efficient barrier for the diffusion of most, especially polar, drugs from the blood to receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). Hence limitations are evident in the treatment of CNS diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, especially exploiting neuropeptides and similar polar and large molecular weight drugs. In recent years interest has been expressed in the use of the nasal route for delivery of drugs to the brain, exploiting the olfactory pathway. A wealth of studies has reported proof of nose-to-brain delivery of a range of different drugs in animal models, such as the rat. Studies in man have mostly compared the pharmacological effects (e.g. brain functions) of nasally applied drugs with parenterally applied drugs and have shown a distinct indication of direct nose-to-brain transport. Recent studies in volunteers involving cerebrospinal fluid sampling, blood sampling and pharmacokinetic analysis after nasal, and in some instances parenteral administration of different drugs, have in my opinion confirmed the likely existence of a direct pathway from nose to brain.

  9. Intestinal drug transport via the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1 (SLC36A1) is inhibited by Gly-X(aa) dipeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Sidsel; Langthaler, Louise; Kall, Morten A

    2012-01-01

    The oral absorption of some drug substances is mediated by nutrient transporters. As a consequence, nutrients and drugs may compete for available transporters, and interactions at the level of intestinal absorption are possible. Recently, we have identified δ-aminolevulinic acid, Gly-Gly, and Gly......-Sar as substrates of the amino acid transporter PAT1. The aim of the present study is to investigate if other Gly-containing dipeptides interact with PAT1, and whether they can inhibit PAT1 mediated drug absorption, in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro methods included two-electrode voltage clamp measurements on h......PAT1 expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes, which were used to investigate the PAT1-mediated transport of 17 different Gly-containing dipeptides (Gly-X(aa) or X(aa)-Gly). Also, the transepithelial transport of the PAT1 substrate gaboxadol was investigated across Caco-2 cell monolayers in the presence...

  10. Electrically enhanced microextraction for highly selective transport of three β-blocker drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidi, Shahram; Yamini, Yadollah; Rezazadeh, Maryam

    2011-12-15

    Facilitated transport of three β-blocker drugs including atenolol (ATE), betaxolol (BET) and propranolol (PRO) was investigated under electrical field across a supported liquid membrane (SLM) using phosphoric acid derivatives as selective ion carriers, dissolved in 2-nitro phenyl octyl ether (NPOE). In the presence of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (DEHP) and tris-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEHP) in the membrane phase, the three β-blockers showed completely different transport behaviors which enabled highly selective separation of the drugs. Each β-blocker migrated from 3 mL of sample solutions, through a thin layer of specific organic solvent immobilized in the pores of a porous hollow fiber, and into a 15 μL acidic aqueous acceptor solution present inside the lumen of the fiber. The influences of fundamental parameters affecting the transport of target drugs including type of ion carrier for selective separation of each drug and its concentration in the membrane phase, extraction voltage, time of transport, pH of donor and acceptor phases, stirring speed of donor phase and salt effect were studied and optimized. After microextraction process, the extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Under optimal conditions, ATE was selectively extracted from different saliva samples with recovery of 37%, which corresponded to preconcentration factor of 74. A good linearity was achieved for calibration curve with a coefficient of determination higher than 0.997. Limits of detection and intra-day precision (n=3) were less than 2 μg L(-1) and 8.8%, respectively.

  11. Carboxymefloquine, the major metabolite of the antimalarial drug mefloquine, induces drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter expression by activation of pregnane X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedade, Rita; Traub, Stefanie; Bitter, Andreas; Nüssler, Andreas K; Gil, José P; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Malaria patients are frequently coinfected with HIV and mycobacteria causing tuberculosis, which increases the use of coadministered drugs and thereby enhances the risk of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) by xenobiotics, which include many drugs, induces drug metabolism and transport, thereby resulting in possible attenuation or loss of the therapeutic responses to the drugs being coadministered. While several artemisinin-type antimalarial drugs have been shown to activate PXR, data on nonartemisinin-type antimalarials are still missing. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate the potential of nonartemisinin antimalarial drugs and drug metabolites to activate PXR. We screened 16 clinically used antimalarial drugs and six major drug metabolites for binding to PXR using the two-hybrid PXR ligand binding domain assembly assay; this identified carboxymefloquine, the major and pharmacologically inactive metabolite of the antimalarial drug mefloquine, as a potential PXR ligand. Two-hybrid PXR-coactivator and -corepressor interaction assays and PXR-dependent promoter reporter gene assays confirmed carboxymefloquine to be a novel PXR agonist which specifically activated the human receptor. In the PXR-expressing intestinal LS174T cells and in primary human hepatocytes, carboxymefloquine induced the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters on the mRNA and protein levels. The crucial role of PXR for the carboxymefloquine-dependent induction of gene expression was confirmed by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the receptor. Thus, the clinical use of mefloquine may result in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions by means of its metabolite carboxymefloquine. Whether these in vitro findings are of in vivo relevance has to be addressed in future clinical drug-drug interaction studies.

  12. Assessment of Amino Acid/Drug Transporters for Renal Transport of [18F]Fluciclovine (anti-[18F]FACBC in Vitro

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    Masahiro Ono

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available [18F]Fluciclovine (trans-1-amino-3-[18F]fluorocyclobutanecarboxylic acid; anti-[18F]FACBC, a positron emission tomography tracer used for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer, is transported via amino acid transporters (AATs with high affinity (Km: 97–230 μM. However, the mechanism underlying urinary excretion is unknown. In this study, we investigated the involvement of AATs and drug transporters in renal [18F]fluciclovine reuptake. [14C]Fluciclovine (trans-1-amino-3-fluoro[1-14C]cyclobutanecarboxylic acid was used because of its long half-life. The involvement of AATs in [14C]fluciclovine transport was measured by apical-to-basal transport using an LLC-PK1 monolayer as model for renal proximal tubules. The contribution of drug transporters herein was assessed using vesicles/cells expressing the drug transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4, organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1, organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3 , organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2, organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1, and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3. The apical-to-basal transport of [14C]fluciclovine was attenuated by l-threonine, the substrate for system alanine-serine-cysteine (ASC AATs. [14C]Fluciclovine uptake by drug transporter-expressing vesicles/cells was not significantly different from that of control vesicles/cells. Fluciclovine inhibited P-gp, MRP4, OAT1, OCT2, and OATP1B1 (IC50 > 2.95 mM. Therefore, system ASC AATs may be partly involved in the renal reuptake of [18F]fluciclovine. Further, given that [18F]fluciclovine is recognized as an inhibitor with millimolar affinity for the tested drug transporters, slow urinary excretion of [18F]fluciclovine may be mediated by system ASC AATs, but not by drug transporters.

  13. Transporter protein and drug-conjugated gold nanoparticles capable of bypassing the blood-brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhua; Walker, Janelle Buttry; Minic, Zeljka; Liu, Fangchao; Goshgarian, Harry; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-05-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to the inability of many drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we show that wheat germ agglutinin horse radish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) chemically conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be transported to the spinal cord and brainstem following intramuscular injection into the diaphragm of rats. We synthesized and determined the size and chemical composition of a three-part nanoconjugate consisting of WGA-HRP, AuNPs, and drugs for the treatment of diaphragm paralysis associated with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Upon injection into the diaphragm muscle of rats, we show that the nanoconjugate is capable of delivering the drug at a much lower dose than the unconjugated drug injected systemically to effectively induce respiratory recovery in rats following SCI. This study not only demonstrates a promising strategy to deliver drugs to the CNS bypassing the BBB but also contributes a potential nanotherapy for the treatment of respiratory muscle paralysis resulted from cervical SCI.

  14. Modeling structure-function relationships for diffusive drug transport in inert porous geopolymer matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämstorp, Erik; Strømme, Maria; Frenning, Göran

    2011-10-01

    A unique structure-function relationship investigation of mechanically strong geopolymer drug delivery vehicles for sustained release of potent substances is presented. The effect of in-synthesis water content on geopolymer pore structure and diffusive drug transport is investigated. Scanning electron microscopy, N2 gas adsorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry, compression strength test, drug permeation, and release experiments are performed. Effective diffusion coefficients are measured and compared with corresponding theoretical values as derived from pore size distribution and connectivity via pore-network modeling. By solely varying the in-synthesis water content, mesoporous and mechanically strong geopolymers with porosities of 8%-45% are obtained. Effective diffusion coefficients of the model drugs Saccharin and Zolpidem are observed to span two orders of magnitude (∼1.6-120 × 10(-8) cm(2) /s), comparing very well to theoretical estimations. The ability to predict drug permeation and release from geopolymers, and materials alike, allows future formulations to be tailored on a structural and chemical level for specific applications such as controlled drug delivery of highly potent substances.

  15. The Microtubule Regulatory Protein Stathmin Is Required to Maintain the Integrity of Axonal Microtubules in Drosophila.

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    Jason E Duncan

    Full Text Available Axonal transport, a form of long-distance, bi-directional intracellular transport that occurs between the cell body and synaptic terminal, is critical in maintaining the function and viability of neurons. We have identified a requirement for the stathmin (stai gene in the maintenance of axonal microtubules and regulation of axonal transport in Drosophila. The stai gene encodes a cytosolic phosphoprotein that regulates microtubule dynamics by partitioning tubulin dimers between pools of soluble tubulin and polymerized microtubules, and by directly binding to microtubules and promoting depolymerization. Analysis of stai function in Drosophila, which has a single stai gene, circumvents potential complications with studies performed in vertebrate systems in which mutant phenotypes may be compensated by genetic redundancy of other members of the stai gene family. This has allowed us to identify an essential function for stai in the maintenance of the integrity of axonal microtubules. In addition to the severe disruption in the abundance and architecture of microtubules in the axons of stai mutant Drosophila, we also observe additional neurological phenotypes associated with loss of stai function including a posterior paralysis and tail-flip phenotype in third instar larvae, aberrant accumulation of transported membranous organelles in stai deficient axons, a progressive bang-sensitive response to mechanical stimulation reminiscent of the class of Drosophila mutants used to model human epileptic seizures, and a reduced adult lifespan. Reductions in the levels of Kinesin-1, the primary anterograde motor in axonal transport, enhance these phenotypes. Collectively, our results indicate that stai has an important role in neuronal function, likely through the maintenance of microtubule integrity in the axons of nerves of the peripheral nervous system necessary to support and sustain long-distance axonal transport.

  16. Genetically encoded photocrosslinkers locate the high-affinity binding site of antidepressant drugs in the human serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Hall, Lena Sørensen;

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode photocrosslin......Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode...

  17. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Claire Munday

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (Berenil®, cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (MPXR is the result of loss of a separate High Affinity Pentamidine Transporter (HAPT1. A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the selectivity region of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a possible structural rationale for this

  18. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Jane C.; Settimo, Luca; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (DA; Berenil®), cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (melarsoprol/pentamidine cross resistance, MPXR) is the result of loss of a separate high affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1). A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the “selectivity region” of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a

  19. Transcellular degradation of axonal mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Chung-ha O; Kim, Keun-Young; Bushong, Eric A; Mills, Elizabeth A; Boassa, Daniela; Shih, Tiffany; Kinebuchi, Mira; Phan, Sebastien; Zhou, Yi; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A; Nguyen, Judy V; Jin, Yunju; Ellisman, Mark H; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas

    2014-07-01

    It is generally accepted that healthy cells degrade their own mitochondria. Here, we report that retinal ganglion cell axons of WT mice shed mitochondria at the optic nerve head (ONH), and that these mitochondria are internalized and degraded by adjacent astrocytes. EM demonstrates that mitochondria are shed through formation of large protrusions that originate from otherwise healthy axons. A virally introduced tandem fluorophore protein reporter of acidified mitochondria reveals that acidified axonal mitochondria originating from the retinal ganglion cell are associated with lysosomes within columns of astrocytes in the ONH. According to this reporter, a greater proportion of retinal ganglion cell mitochondria are degraded at the ONH than in the ganglion cell soma. Consistently, analyses of degrading DNA reveal extensive mtDNA degradation within the optic nerve astrocytes, some of which comes from retinal ganglion cell axons. Together, these results demonstrate that surprisingly large proportions of retinal ganglion cell axonal mitochondria are normally degraded by the astrocytes of the ONH. This transcellular degradation of mitochondria, or transmitophagy, likely occurs elsewhere in the CNS, because structurally similar accumulations of degrading mitochondria are also found along neurites in superficial layers of the cerebral cortex. Thus, the general assumption that neurons or other cells necessarily degrade their own mitochondria should be reconsidered.

  20. The Mesenteric Lymph Duct Cannulated Rat Model: Application to the Assessment of Intestinal Lymphatic Drug Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevaskis, Natalie L.; Hu, Luojuan; Caliph, Suzanne M.; Han, Sifei; Porter, Christopher J.H.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal lymphatic system plays key roles in fluid transport, lipid absorption and immune function. Lymph flows directly from the small intestine via a series of lymphatic vessels and nodes that converge at the superior mesenteric lymph duct. Cannulation of the mesenteric lymph duct thus enables the collection of mesenteric lymph flowing from the intestine. Mesenteric lymph consists of a cellular fraction of immune cells (99% lymphocytes), aqueous fraction (fluid, peptides and proteins such as cytokines and gut hormones) and lipoprotein fraction (lipids, lipophilic molecules and apo-proteins). The mesenteric lymph duct cannulation model can therefore be used to measure the concentration and rate of transport of a range of factors from the intestine via the lymphatic system. Changes to these factors in response to different challenges (e.g., diets, antigens, drugs) and in disease (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, diabetes) can also be determined. An area of expanding interest is the role of lymphatic transport in the absorption of orally administered lipophilic drugs and prodrugs that associate with intestinal lipid absorption pathways. Here we describe, in detail, a mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model which enables evaluation of the rate and extent of lipid and drug transport via the lymphatic system for several hours following intestinal delivery. The method is easily adaptable to the measurement of other parameters in lymph. We provide detailed descriptions of the difficulties that may be encountered when establishing this complex surgical method, as well as representative data from failed and successful experiments to provide instruction on how to confirm experimental success and interpret the data obtained. PMID:25866901

  1. Calpain Inhibition Reduces Axolemmal Leakage in Traumatic Axonal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Sándor

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-induced, calpain-mediated proteolysis (CMSP has recently been implicated to the pathogenesis of diffuse (traumatic axonal injury (TAI. Some studies suggested that subaxolemmal CMSP may contribute to axolemmal permeability (AP alterations observed in TAI. Seeking direct evidence for this premise we investigated whether subaxolemmal CMSP may contribute to axolemmal permeability alterations (APA and pre-injury calpain-inhibition could reduce AP in a rat model of TAI. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP, a tracer that accumulates in axons with APA was administered one hour prior to injury into the lateral ventricle; 30 min preinjury a single tail vein bolus injection of 30 mg/kg MDL-28170 (a calpain inhibitor or its vehicle was applied in Wistar rats exposed to impact acceleration brain injury. Histological detection of traumatically injured axonal segments accumulating HRP and statistical analysis revealed that pre-injury administration of the calpain inhibitor MDL-28170 significantly reduced the average length of HRP-labeled axonal segments. The axono-protective effect of pre-injury calpain inhibition recently demonstrated with classical immunohistochemical markers of TAI was further corroborated in this experiment; significant reduction of the length of labeled axons in the drug-treated rats implicate CMSP in the progression of altered AP in TAI.

  2. Role of organic cation transporter OCT2 and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins MATE1 and MATE2-K for transport and drug interactions of the antiviral lamivudine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Fabian; König, Jörg; Hoier, Eva; Mandery, Kathrin; Fromm, Martin F

    2013-09-15

    The antiviral lamivudine is cleared predominantly by the kidney with a relevant contribution of renal tubular secretion. It is not clear which drug transporters mediate lamivudine renal secretion. Our aim was to investigate lamivudine as substrate of the renal drug transporters organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins MATE1 and MATE2-K. Uptake experiments were performed in OCT2, MATE1, or MATE2-K single-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK) cells. Transcellular transport experiments were performed in OCT2 and/or MATE1 single- or double-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCK) cells grown on transwell filters. Lamivudine uptake was significantly increased in HEK-OCT2, HEK-MATE1, and HEK-MATE2-K cells compared to control cells. In transcellular experiments, OCT2 located in the basolateral membrane had no effect on transcellular lamivudine transport. MATE1 located in the apical membrane decreased intracellular concentrations and increased transcellular transport of lamivudine from the basal to the apical compartment. MATE1- or MATE2-K-mediated transport was increased by an oppositely directed pH gradient. Several simultaneously administered drugs inhibited OCT2- or MATE2-K-mediated lamivudine uptake. The strongest inhibitors were carvedilol for OCT2 and trimethoprim for MATE2-K (inhibition by 96.3 and 83.7% at 15 μM, respectively, ptransport in OCT2-MATE1 double-transfected cells was inhibited by trimethoprim with an IC₅₀ value of 6.9 μM. Lamivudine is a substrate of renal drug transporters OCT2, MATE1, and MATE2-K. Concomitant administration of drugs that inhibit these transporters could decrease renal clearance of lamivudine.

  3. Targeting the Plasmodium vivax equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (PvENT1) for antimalarial drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniskin, Roman; Frame, I J; Sosa, Yvett; Akabas, Myles H

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Plasmodium falciparum and vivax cause most cases of malaria. Emerging resistance to current antimalarial medications makes new drug development imperative. Ideally a new antimalarial drug should treat both falciparum and vivax malaria. Because malaria parasites are purine auxotrophic, they rely on purines imported from the host erythrocyte via Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters (ENTs). Thus, the purine import transporters represent a potential target for antimalarial drug development. For falciparum parasites the primary purine transporter is the P. falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1 (PfENT1). Recently we identified potent PfENT1 inhibitors with nanomolar IC50 values using a robust, yeast-based high throughput screening assay. In the current work we characterized the Plasmodium vivax ENT1 (PvENT1) homologue and its sensitivity to the PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed a yeast codon-optimized PvENT1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvENT1-expressing yeast imported both purines ([(3)H]adenosine) and pyrimidines ([(3)H]uridine), whereas wild type (fui1Δ) yeast did not. Based on radiolabel substrate uptake inhibition experiments, inosine had the lowest IC50 (3.8 μM), compared to guanosine (14.9 μM) and adenosine (142 μM). For pyrimidines, thymidine had an IC50 of 183 μM (vs. cytidine and uridine; mM range). IC50 values were higher for nucleobases compared to the corresponding nucleosides; hypoxanthine had a 25-fold higher IC50 than inosine. The archetypal human ENT1 inhibitor 4-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) had no effect on PvENT1, whereas dipyridamole inhibited PvENT1, albeit with a 40 μM IC50, a 1000-fold less sensitive than human ENT1 (hENT1). The PfENT1 inhibitors blocked transport activity of PvENT1 and the five known naturally occurring non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with similar IC50 values. Thus, the PfENT1 inhibitors also target PvENT1. This implies that development of novel antimalarial drugs

  4. Targeting the Plasmodium vivax equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (PvENT1 for antimalarial drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Deniskin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Plasmodium falciparum and vivax cause most cases of malaria. Emerging resistance to current antimalarial medications makes new drug development imperative. Ideally a new antimalarial drug should treat both falciparum and vivax malaria. Because malaria parasites are purine auxotrophic, they rely on purines imported from the host erythrocyte via Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters (ENTs. Thus, the purine import transporters represent a potential target for antimalarial drug development. For falciparum parasites the primary purine transporter is the P. falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1 (PfENT1. Recently we identified potent PfENT1 inhibitors with nanomolar IC50 values using a robust, yeast-based high throughput screening assay. In the current work we characterized the Plasmodium vivax ENT1 (PvENT1 homologue and its sensitivity to the PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed a yeast codon-optimized PvENT1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvENT1-expressing yeast imported both purines ([3H]adenosine and pyrimidines ([3H]uridine, whereas wild type (fui1Δ yeast did not. Based on radiolabel substrate uptake inhibition experiments, inosine had the lowest IC50 (3.8 μM, compared to guanosine (14.9 μM and adenosine (142 μM. For pyrimidines, thymidine had an IC50 of 183 μM (vs. cytidine and uridine; mM range. IC50 values were higher for nucleobases compared to the corresponding nucleosides; hypoxanthine had a 25-fold higher IC50 than inosine. The archetypal human ENT1 inhibitor 4-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR had no effect on PvENT1, whereas dipyridamole inhibited PvENT1, albeit with a 40 μM IC50, a 1000-fold less sensitive than human ENT1 (hENT1. The PfENT1 inhibitors blocked transport activity of PvENT1 and the five known naturally occurring non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with similar IC50 values. Thus, the PfENT1 inhibitors also target PvENT1. This implies that development of novel

  5. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance.

  6. Functional characterization of liver enhancers that regulate drug-associated transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Skewes-Cox, P; Fukushima, H; Hesselson, S; Yee, S W; Ramsey, L B; Nguyen, L; Eshragh, J L; Castro, R A; Wen, C C; Stryke, D; Johns, S J; Ferrin, T E; Kwok, P-Y; Relling, M V; Giacomini, K M; Kroetz, D L; Ahituv, N

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about how genetic variations in enhancers influence drug response. In this study, we investigated whether nucleotide variations in enhancers that regulate drug transporters can alter their expression levels. Using comparative genomics and liver-specific transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analyses, we identified evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) surrounding nine liver membrane transporters that interact with commonly used pharmaceuticals. The top 50 ECRs were screened for enhancer activity in vivo, of which five--located around ABCB11, SLC10A1, SLCO1B1, SLCO1A2, and SLC47A1--exhibited significant enhancer activity. Common variants identified in a large ethnically diverse cohort (n = 272) were assayed for differential enhancer activity, and three variants were found to have significant effects on reporter activity as compared with the reference allele. In addition, one variant was associated with reduced SLCO1A2 mRNA expression levels in human liver tissues, and another was associated with increased methotrexate (MTX) clearance in patients. This work provides a general model for the rapid characterization of liver enhancers and identifies associations between enhancer variants and drug response.

  7. Drug transport mechanism of P-glycoprotein monitored by single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, S.; Verhalen, B.; Zarrabi, N.; Wilkens, S.; Börsch, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we monitor the catalytic mechanism of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Pgp, a member of the ATP binding cassette family of transport proteins, is found in the plasma membrane of animal cells where it is involved in the ATP hydrolysis driven export of hydrophobic molecules. When expressed in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, the transport activity of Pgp can lead to the failure of chemotherapy by excluding the mostly hydrophobic drugs from the interior of the cell. Despite ongoing effort, the catalytic mechanism by which Pgp couples MgATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation of drug molecules across the lipid bilayer is poorly understood. Using site directed mutagenesis, we have introduced cysteine residues for fluorescence labeling into different regions of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of Pgp. Double-labeled single Pgp molecules showed fluctuating FRET efficiencies during drug stimulated ATP hydrolysis suggesting that the NBDs undergo significant movements during catalysis. Duty cycle-optimized alternating laser excitation (DCO-ALEX) is applied to minimize FRET artifacts and to select the appropriate molecules. The data show that Pgp is a highly dynamic enzyme that appears to fluctuate between at least two major conformations during steady state turnover.

  8. Entecavir interacts with influx transporters hOAT1, hCNT2, hCNT3, but not with hOCT2: the potential for renal transporter-mediated cytotoxicity and drug-drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František eTrejtnar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Entecavir (ETV is one of the most potent agents for the treatment of the hepatitis B viral infection. The drug is principally eliminated by the kidney. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of ETV to interact in vitro with the renal SLC transporters hOAT1, hOCT2, hCNT2 and hCNT3. Potential drug-drug interactions of ETV at the renal transporters with antiviral drugs known to be excreted by the kidney (adefovir, tenofovir, cidofovir as well as transporter-dependent cytotoxicity were also examined. Interactions with the selected transporters along with cytotoxicity were studied in several transiently-transfected cellular models using specific substrates and inhibitors. ETV was found to be both a substrate and inhibitor of hOAT1 (IC50 = 175.3 µM, hCNT2 (IC50 = 241.9 µM and hCNT3 (IC50 = 278.4 µM transporters, although it interacted with the transporters with relatively low affinities. ETV inhibited the cellular uptake of adefovir, tenofovir and cidofovir by hOAT1; however, effective inhibition was shown at ETV concentrations exceeding therapeutic levels. In comparison with adefovir, tenofovir and cidofovir, ETV displayed no transporter-mediated cytotoxicity in cells transfected with hOAT1, hCNT2, and hCNT3. No significant interaction of ETV with hOCT2 was detected. The study demonstrates interactions of ETV with several human renal transporters. For the first time, an interaction of ETV with the hCNTs was proved. We show that the potency of ETV to cause nephrotoxicity and/or clinically significant drug-drug interactions related to the tested transporters is considerably lower than that of adefovir, tenofovir and cidofovir.

  9. Significance of transcytosis in Alzheimer's disease: BACE1 takes the scenic route to axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggia-Prévot, Virginie; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2015-08-01

    Neurons have developed elaborate mechanisms for sorting of proteins to their destination in dendrites and axons as well as dynamic local trafficking. Recent evidence suggests that polarized axonal sorting of β-site converting enzyme 1 (BACE1), a type I transmembrane aspartyl protease involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, entails an unusual journey. In hippocampal neurons, BACE1 internalized from dendrites is conveyed in recycling endosomes via unidirectional retrograde transport towards the soma and sorted to axons where BACE1 becomes enriched. In comparison to other transmembrane proteins that undergo transcytosis or elimination in somatodendritic compartment, vectorial transport of internalized BACE1 in dendrites is unique and intriguing. Dysfunction of protein transport contributes to pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, characterization of BACE1 transcytosis is an important addition to the multiple lines of evidence that highlight the crucial role played by endosomal trafficking pathway as well as axonal sorting mechanisms in AD pathogenesis.

  10. Application of magnetic liposomes for magnetically guided transport of muscle relaxants and anti-cancer photodynamic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Alyautdin, Renat N.; Torshina, N.L.; Kuznetsov, O.A. E-mail: oleg@louisiana.edu

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic liposomes containing submicron-sized ferromagnetic particles were prepared encapsulating the muscle relaxant drugs, diadony or diperony, for local anesthesia. Alternatively, metal phthalocyanines (Photosense or Teraphthal), sensitizers for photodynamic or catalytic cancer therapy were loaded into the magnetic liposomes. Animal trials demonstrated successful magnetically guided transport of the drug-loaded liposomes.

  11. Action-potential modulation during axonal conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takuya; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2011-02-04

    Once initiated near the soma, an action potential (AP) is thought to propagate autoregeneratively and distribute uniformly over axonal arbors. We challenge this classic view by showing that APs are subject to waveform modulation while they travel down axons. Using fluorescent patch-clamp pipettes, we recorded APs from axon branches of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons ex vivo. The waveforms of axonal APs increased in width in response to the local application of glutamate and an adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist to the axon shafts, but not to other unrelated axon branches. Uncaging of calcium in periaxonal astrocytes caused AP broadening through ionotropic glutamate receptor activation. The broadened APs triggered larger calcium elevations in presynaptic boutons and facilitated synaptic transmission to postsynaptic neurons. This local AP modification may enable axonal computation through the geometry of axon wiring.

  12. Iontoforese no transporte ocular de drogas Iontophoresis for ocular drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Ligório Fialho

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O método mais comum de administração de drogas no olho é por meio de colírios. Entretanto, por este método, não é possível atingir a concentração terapêutica nos fluidos e tecidos posteriores do olho. A administração sistêmica apresenta reduzido acesso ao segmento posterior do olho devido à presença das barreiras oculares. Injeções subconjuntivais e retrobulbares não são capazes de proporcionar níveis adequados da droga, e a injeção intravítrea é método invasivo, inconveniente e que apre-senta riscos de perfuração do bulbo ocular ou descolamento da retina. A iontoforese, no entanto, apresenta-se como alternativa para o transporte de doses terapêuticas de drogas para o segmento posterior do olho. A iontoforese é uma técnica que consiste na administração de drogas para o organismo através dos tecidos, utilizando um campo elétrico. O eletrodo ativo, que se encontra em contato com a droga, é colocado no local a ser tratado, e um segundo eletrodo, com a finalidade de fechar o circuito elétrico, é colocado em outro local do organismo. O campo elétrico facilita o transporte da droga, que deve se encontrar, preferencialmente, na forma ionizada. A iontoforese pode ser considerada como um método seguro e não invasivo de transporte de drogas para locais específicos do olho. Aplicada experimentalmente para o tratamento de doenças oculares, esta técnica tem evoluído muito nos últimos anos e, atualmente, testes clínicos de fase III encontram-se em andamento.The most traditional method of ocular drug delivery is through the use of eyedrops. However, by this method, the therapeutic concentration in deep ocular fluids and tissues can not be efficiently reached. Systemic administration presents poor access to the posterior segment of the eye due to ocular barriers. Subconjuntival and retrobulbar injections are not able to produce adequate levels of the drug, and intravitreal injection is an invasive and problematic

  13. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/41n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Vaquer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2 trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology

  14. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-09-24

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is highly specialized for the biosynthesis of many different monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), many of which have powerful biological activities. Such MIAs include the commercially important chemotherapy drugs vinblastine, vincristine, and other synthetic derivatives that are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline. However, previous studies have shown that biosynthesis of these MIAs involves extensive movement of metabolites between specialized internal leaf cells and the leaf epidermis that require the involvement of unknown secretory processes for mobilizing catharanthine to the leaf surface and vindoline to internal leaf cells. Spatial separation of vindoline and catharanthine provides a clear explanation for the low levels of dimers that accumulate in intact plants. The present work describes the molecular cloning and functional identification of a unique catharanthine transporter (CrTPT2) that is expressed predominantly in the epidermis of young leaves. CrTPT2 gene expression is activated by treatment with catharanthine, and its in planta silencing redistributes catharanthine to increase the levels of catharanthine-vindoline drug dimers in the leaves. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CrTPT2 is closely related to a key transporter involved in cuticle assembly in plants and that may be unique to MIA-producing plant species, where it mediates secretion of alkaloids to the plant surface.

  15. Fruit juice, organic anion transporting polypeptides, and drug interactions in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-11-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are a group of membrane transport proteins that facilitate the influx of endogenous and exogenous substances across biological membranes. OATPs are found in enterocytes and hepatocytes and in brain, kidney, and other tissues. In enterocytes, OATPs facilitate the gastrointestinal absorption of certain orally administered drugs. Fruit juices such as grapefruit juice, orange juice, and apple juice contain substances that are OATP inhibitors. These fruit juices diminish the gastrointestinal absorption of certain antiallergen, antibiotic, antihypertensive, and β-blocker drugs. While there is no evidence, so far, that OATP inhibition affects the absorption of psychotropic medications, there is no room for complacency because the field is still nascent and because the necessary studies have not been conducted. Patients should therefore err on the side of caution, taking their medications at least 4 hours distant from fruit juice intake. Doing so is especially desirable with grapefruit juice, orange juice, and apple juice; with commercial fruit juices in which OATP-inhibiting substances are likely to be present in higher concentrations; with calcium-fortified fruit juices; and with medications such as atenolol and fexofenadine, the absorption of which is substantially diminished by concurrent fruit juice intake.

  16. Uptake of NO-releasing drugs by the P2 nucleoside transporter in trypanosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Soulère

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO· has been identified as a principal regulatory molecule of the immune system and the major cytotoxic mediator of activated immune cells. NO· can also react rapidly with a variety of biological species, particularly with the superoxide radical anion O2·- at almost diffusion-limited rates to form peroxynitrite anion (ONOO-. ONOO- and its proton-catalyzed decomposition products are capable of oxidizing a great diversity of biomolecules and can act as a source of toxic hydroxyl radicals. As a consequence, a strategy for the development of molecules with potential trypanocidal activities could be developed to increase the concentration of nitric oxide in the parasites through NO·-releasing compounds. In this way, the rate of formation of peroxynitrite from NO· and O2·- would be faster than the rate of dismutation of superoxide radicals by superoxide dismutases which constitute the primary antioxidant enzymatic defense system in trypanosomes. The adenosine transport systems of parasitic protozoa, which are also in certain cases implicated in the selective uptake of active drugs such as melarsoprol or pentamidine, could be exploited to specifically target these NO·-releasing compounds inside the parasites. In this work, we present the synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of a series of molecules that contain both a group which would specifically target these drugs inside the parasites via the purine transporter, and an NO·-donor group that would exert a specific pharmacological effect by increasing NO level, and thus the peroxynitrite concentration inside the parasite.

  17. Identification of a novel topoisomerase inhibitor effective in cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Fayad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural product structures have high chemical diversity and are attractive as lead structures for discovery of new drugs. One of the disease areas where natural products are most frequently used as therapeutics is oncology. METHOD AND FINDINGS: A library of natural products (NCI Natural Product set was screened for compounds that induce apoptosis of HCT116 colon carcinoma cells using an assay that measures an endogenous caspase-cleavage product. One of the apoptosis-inducing compounds identified in the screen was thaspine (taspine, an alkaloid from the South American tree Croton lechleri. The cortex of this tree is used for medicinal purposes by tribes in the Amazonas basin. Thaspine was found to induce conformational activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bak and Bax, mitochondrial cytochrome c release and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization in HCT116 cells. Analysis of the gene expression signature of thaspine-treated cells suggested that thaspine is a topoisomerase inhibitor. Inhibition of both topoisomerase I and II was observed using in vitro assays, and thaspine was found to have a reduced cytotoxic effect on a cell line with a mutated topoisomerase II enzyme. Interestingly, in contrast to the topoisomerase II inhibitors doxorubicin, etoposide and mitoxantrone, thaspine was cytotoxic to cell lines overexpressing the PgP or MRP drug efflux transporters. We finally show that thaspine induces wide-spread apoptosis in colon carcinoma multicellular spheroids and that apoptosis is induced in two xenograft mouse models in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: The alkaloid thaspine from the cortex of Croton lechleri is a dual topoisomerase inhibitor effective in cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters and induces wide-spread apoptosis in multicellular spheroids.

  18. Analysis of perfusion, microcirculation and drug transport in tumors. A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Paolo; Cattaneo, Laura

    2013-11-01

    We address blood flow through a network of capillaries surrounded by a porous interstitium. We develop a computational model based on the Immersed Boundary method [C. S. Peskin. Acta Numer. 2002.]. The advantage of such an approach relies in its efficiency, because it does not need a full description of the real geometry allowing for a large economy of memory and CPU time and it facilitates handling fully realistic vascular networks [L. Cattaneo and P. Zunino. Technical report, MOX, Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano, 2013.]. The analysis of perfusion and drug release in vascularized tumors is a relevant application of such techniques. Blood vessels in tumors are substantially leakier than in healthy tissue and they are tortuous. These vascular abnormalities lead to an impaired blood supply and abnormal tumor microenvironment characterized by hypoxia and elevated interstitial fluid pressure that reduces the distribution of drugs through advection [L.T. Baxter and R.K. Jain. Microvascular Research, 1989]. Finally, we discuss the application of the model to deliver nanoparticles. In particular, transport of nanoparticles in the vessels network, their adhesion to the vessel wall and the drug release in the surrounding tissue will be addressed.

  19. In vitro drug response and efflux transporters associated with drug resistance in pediatric high grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna J E Veringa

    Full Text Available Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGG, including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG, are the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. While it is clear that surgery (if possible, and radiotherapy are beneficial for treatment, the role of chemotherapy for these tumors is still unclear. Therefore, we performed an in vitro drug screen on primary glioma cells, including three DIPG cultures, to determine drug sensitivity of these tumours, without the possible confounding effect of insufficient drug delivery. This screen revealed a high in vitro cytotoxicity for melphalan, doxorubicine, mitoxantrone, and BCNU, and for the novel, targeted agents vandetanib and bortezomib in pHGG and DIPG cells. We subsequently determined the expression of the drug efflux transporters P-gp, BCRP1, and MRP1 in glioma cultures and their corresponding tumor tissues. Results indicate the presence of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP1 in the tumor vasculature, and expression of MRP1 in the glioma cells themselves. Our results show that pediatric glioma and DIPG tumors per se are not resistant to chemotherapy. Treatment failure observed in clinical trials, may rather be contributed to the presence of drug efflux transporters that constitute a first line of drug resistance located at the blood-brain barrier or other resistance mechanism. As such, we suggest that alternative ways of drug delivery may offer new possibilities for the treatment of pediatric high-grade glioma patients, and DIPG in particular.

  20. Drug transport and transport-metabolism interplay in the human and rat intestine : ex vivo studies with precision-cut intestinal slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The intestine plays an important role in uptake and metabolism of physiological, but also xenobiotic compounds, such as medical drugs. This function is supported by specialized transporters and metabolic enzymes. Together these proteins determine the concentration of compounds in intestinal cells an

  1. Fractional derivatives in the transport of drugs across biological materials and human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Michele; Cametti, Cesare

    2016-11-01

    The diffusion of drugs across a composite structure such as a biological membrane is a rather complex phenomenon, because of its inhomogeneous nature, yielding a diffusion rate and a drug solubility strongly dependent on the local position across the membrane itself. These problems are particularly strengthened in composite structures of a considerable thickness like, for example, the human skin, where the high heterogeneity provokes the transport through different simultaneous pathways. In this note, we propose a generalization of the diffusion model based on Fick's 2nd equation by substituting a diffusion constant by means of the memory formalism approach (diffusion with memory). In particular, we employ two different definitions of the fractional derivative, i.e., the usual Caputo fractional derivative and a new definition recently proposed by Caputo and Fabrizio. The model predictions have been compared to experimental results concerning the permeation of two different compounds through human skin in vivo, such as piroxicam, an anti-inflammatory drug, and 4-cyanophenol, a test chemical model compound. Moreover, we have also considered water penetration across human stratum corneum and the diffusion of an antiviral agent employed as model drugs across the skin of male hairless rats. In all cases, a satisfactory good agreement based on the diffusion with memory has been found. However, the model based on the new definition of fractional derivative gives a better description of the experimental data, on the basis of the residuals analysis. The use of the new definition widens the applicability of the fractional derivative to diffusion processes in highly heterogeneous systems.

  2. Quantitative analysis of microtubule transport in growing nerve processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma*, Ytao; Shakiryanova*, Dinara; Vardya, Irina;

    2004-01-01

    the translocation of MT plus ends in the axonal shaft by expressing GFP-EB1 in Xenopus embryo neurons in culture. Formal quantitative analysis of MT assembly/disassembly indicated that none of the MTs in the axonal shaft were rapidly transported. Our results suggest that transport of axonal MTs is not required...

  3. Modeling of drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticle transport in patient-specific coronary artery walls to treat vulnerable plaques

    KAUST Repository

    Hossain, Shaolie S.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to develop computational tools to support the design of a catheter-based local drug delivery system that uses nanoparticles as drug carriers in order to treat vulnerable plaques and diffuse atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Recapitulation of complex transport and action of drugs at the tumor microenvironment using tumor-microenvironment-on-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bumsoo; Qu, Chunjing; Park, Kinam; Konieczny, Stephen F; Korc, Murray

    2016-09-28

    Targeted delivery aims to selectively distribute drugs to targeted tumor tissues but not to healthy tissues. This can address many clinical challenges by maximizing the efficacy but minimizing the toxicity of anti-cancer drugs. However, a complex tumor microenvironment poses various barriers hindering the transport of drugs and drug delivery systems. New tumor models that allow for the systematic study of these complex environments are highly desired to provide reliable test beds to develop drug delivery systems for targeted delivery. Recently, research efforts have yielded new in vitro tumor models, the so called tumor-microenvironment-on-chip, that recapitulate certain characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. These new models show benefits over other conventional tumor models, and have the potential to accelerate drug discovery and enable precision medicine. However, further research is warranted to overcome their limitations and to properly interpret the data obtained from these models. In this article, key features of the in vivo tumor microenvironment that are relevant to drug transport processes for targeted delivery were discussed, and the current status and challenges for developing in vitro transport model systems were reviewed.

  5. Quantifying mechanical force in axonal growth and guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ibrahim Mahmoud Athamneh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical force plays a fundamental role in neuronal development, physiology, and regeneration. In particular, research has shown that force is involved in growth cone-mediated axonal growth and guidance as well as stretch-induced elongation when an organism increases in size after forming initial synaptic connections. However, much of the details about the exact role of force in these fundamental processes remain unknown. In this review, we highlight (1 standing questions concerning the role of mechanical force in axonal growth and guidance and (2 different experimental techniques used to quantify forces in axons and growth cones. We believe that satisfying answers to these questions will require quantitative information about the relationship between elongation, forces, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal transport, signaling, substrate adhesion, and stiffness contributing to directional growth advance. Furthermore, we address why a wide range of force values have been reported in the literature, and what these values mean in the context of neuronal mechanics. We hope that this review will provide a guide for those interested in studying the role of force in development and regeneration of neuronal networks.

  6. A Stochastic Multiscale Model That Explains the Segregation of Axonal Microtubules and Neurofilaments in Neurological Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Xue

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The organization of the axonal cytoskeleton is a key determinant of the normal function of an axon, which is a long thin projection of a neuron. Under normal conditions two axonal cytoskeletal polymers, microtubules and neurofilaments, align longitudinally in axons and are interspersed in axonal cross-sections. However, in many neurotoxic and neurodegenerative disorders, microtubules and neurofilaments segregate apart from each other, with microtubules and membranous organelles clustered centrally and neurofilaments displaced to the periphery. This striking segregation precedes the abnormal and excessive neurofilament accumulation in these diseases, which in turn leads to focal axonal swellings. While neurofilament accumulation suggests an impairment of neurofilament transport along axons, the underlying mechanism of their segregation from microtubules remains poorly understood for over 30 years. To address this question, we developed a stochastic multiscale model for the cross-sectional distribution of microtubules and neurofilaments in axons. The model describes microtubules, neurofilaments and organelles as interacting particles in a 2D cross-section, and is built upon molecular processes that occur on a time scale of seconds or shorter. It incorporates the longitudinal transport of neurofilaments and organelles through this domain by allowing stochastic arrival and departure of these cargoes, and integrates the dynamic interactions of these cargoes with microtubules mediated by molecular motors. Simulations of the model demonstrate that organelles can pull nearby microtubules together, and in the absence of neurofilament transport, this mechanism gradually segregates microtubules from neurofilaments on a time scale of hours, similar to that observed in toxic neuropathies. This suggests that the microtubule-neurofilament segregation can be a consequence of the selective impairment of neurofilament transport. The model generates the

  7. Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    transporter-- and hypothesize that loss of, or injury to, oligodendroglia in MS may produce axon damage through a failure of energy supply via loss of...function of this critical oligodendroglial protein. The successful completion of the Aims in this grant will not only further our understanding of axon...term, independent of this proposal- new innovative approaches toward enhancing this oligodendroglial pathway may provide one day – a powerful means

  8. Sonic Hedgehog Guides Axons via Zipcode Binding Protein 1-Mediated Local Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepelletier, Léa; Langlois, Sébastien D; Kent, Christopher B; Welshhans, Kristy; Morin, Steves; Bassell, Gary J; Yam, Patricia T; Charron, Frédéric

    2017-02-15

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) attracts spinal cord commissural axons toward the floorplate. How Shh elicits changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that drive growth cone turning is unknown. We find that the turning of rat commissural axons up a Shh gradient requires protein synthesis. In particular, Shh stimulation increases β-actin protein at the growth cone even when the cell bodies have been removed. Therefore, Shh induces the local translation of β-actin at the growth cone. We hypothesized that this requires zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1), an mRNA-binding protein that transports β-actin mRNA and releases it for local translation upon phosphorylation. We found that Shh stimulation increases phospho-ZBP1 levels in the growth cone. Disruption of ZBP1 phosphorylation in vitro abolished the turning of commissural axons toward a Shh gradient. Disruption of ZBP1 function in vivo in mouse and chick resulted in commissural axon guidance errors. Therefore, ZBP1 is required for Shh to guide commissural axons. This identifies ZBP1 as a new mediator of noncanonical Shh signaling in axon guidance.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sonic hedgehog (Shh) guides axons via a noncanonical signaling pathway that is distinct from the canonical Hedgehog signaling pathway that specifies cell fate and morphogenesis. Axon guidance is driven by changes in the growth cone in response to gradients of guidance molecules. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of how Shh orchestrates changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that are required for growth cone turning. Here, we show that the guidance of axons by Shh requires protein synthesis. Zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1) is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates the local translation of proteins, including actin, in the growth cone. We demonstrate that ZBP1 is required for Shh-mediated axon guidance, identifying a new member of the noncanonical Shh signaling pathway.

  9. Blood-brain barrier transport of drugs for the treatment of brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabathuler, Reinhard

    2009-06-01

    The central nervous system is a sanctuary protected by barriers that regulate brain homeostasis and control the transport of endogenous compounds into the brain. The blood-brain barrier, formed by endothelial cells of the brain capillaries, restricts access to brain cells allowing entry only to amino acids, glucose and hormones needed for normal brain cell function and metabolism. This very tight regulation of brain cell access is essential for the survival of neurons which do not have a significant capacity to regenerate, but also prevents therapeutic compounds, small and large, from reaching the brain. As a result, various strategies are being developed to enhance access of drugs to the brain parenchyma at therapeutically meaningful concentrations to effectively manage disease.

  10. A Combined Approach Using Transporter-Flux Assays and Mass Spectrometry to Examine Psychostimulant Street Drugs of Unknown Content

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenauer, Rudolf; Luf, Anton; Holy, Marion; Freissmuth, Michael; SCHMID, RAINER; Sitte, Harald H

    2012-01-01

    The illicit consumption of psychoactive compounds may cause short and long-term health problems and addiction. This is also true for amphetamines and cocaine, which target monoamine transporters. In the recent past, an increasing number of new compounds with amphetamine-like structure such as mephedrone or 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) entered the market of illicit drugs. Subtle structural changes circumvent legal restrictions placed on the parent compound. These novel drugs are effec...

  11. Sodium glucose co-transporter inhibitors – A new class of old drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Aneeta; Kudyar, Surbhi; Gupta, Anil K.; Kudyar, Rattan P.; Malhotra, Pavan

    2015-01-01

    Sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT) inhibitors are a new class of drugs which are used in the pharmacotherapy of Type-II diabetes, which happens to be a major risk factor for developing both micro as well as macro-vascular complications. These drugs inhibit the glucose reabsorption by inhibiting SGLT, which exhibits a novel and promising mechanism of action by promoting the urinary glucose excretion hence providing a basis of therapeutic intervention. Results of SGLT-II inhibitors are very encouraging as there is a significant elevation of GLP-1 level, which forms the basis of relevance in treatment of diabetes. It targets the HbA1C and keeps a check on its levels. It also exerts other positive benefits such as weight loss, reduction in blood glucose levels, reduction in blood pressure and improvement in insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction: All contributing to effective glycemic control. SGLT inhibition will develop as effective modality as it has the capability of inhibiting reabsorption of greater percentage of filtered glucose load. PMID:26539362

  12. Effect of cationized gelatins on the paracellular transport of drugs through caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Toshinobu; Kanbayashi, Hiroshi; Nagao, Tomonobu; Chono, Sumio; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-06-01

    Cationized gelatins, candidate absorption enhancers, were prepared by addition of ethylenediamine or spermine to gelatin and the effects of the resulting ethylenediaminated gelatin (EG) and sperminated gelatin (SG) on the paracellular transport of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF), FITC-dextran-4 (FD4), and insulin through caco-2 cell monolayers were examined. The Renkin function was used for characterization of the paracellular pathway and changes in the pore radius (R) and pore occupancy/length ratio (epsilon/L) calculated from the apparent permeability coefficients (P(app)) of CF and FD4 are discussed. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) increased the R of the caco-2 cell monolayer and the P(app) of all compounds examined was markedly increased by the addition of EDTA. On the other hand, EG and SG did not increase R and their enhancing effects were not as strong as those of EDTA. The increase in epsilon/L could be the enhancing mechanism for the cationized gelatins. The number of pathways for water-soluble drugs, such as CF and FD4, in the caco-2 monolayers could be increased by the addition of the cationized gelatins. The ratios of the permeability coefficients of insulin (observed/calculated based on the Renkin function) suggest that insulin undergoes enzymatic degradation during transport which is not inhibited by enhancers.

  13. Flavonoid-mediated inhibition of intestinal ABC transporters may affect the oral bioavailability of drugs, food-borne toxic compounds and bioactive ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, W.; Schutte, M.E.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The transcellular transport of ingested food ingredients across the intestinal epithelial barrier is an important factor determining bioavailability upon oral intake. This transcellular transport of many chemicals, food ingredients, drugs or toxic compounds over the intestinal epithelium can be high

  14. Targeted axonal import (TAxI) peptide delivers functional proteins into spinal cord motor neurons after peripheral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Drew L; Bergen, Jamie M; Johnson, Russell N; Back, Heidi; Ravits, John M; Horner, Philip J; Pun, Suzie H

    2016-03-01

    A significant unmet need in treating neurodegenerative disease is effective methods for delivery of biologic drugs, such as peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids into the central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are no operative technologies for the delivery of macromolecular drugs to the CNS via peripheral administration routes. Using an in vivo phage-display screen, we identify a peptide, targeted axonal import (TAxI), that enriched recombinant bacteriophage accumulation and delivered protein cargo into spinal cord motor neurons after intramuscular injection. In animals with transected peripheral nerve roots, TAxI delivery into motor neurons after peripheral administration was inhibited, suggesting a retrograde axonal transport mechanism for delivery into the CNS. Notably, TAxI-Cre recombinase fusion proteins induced selective recombination and tdTomato-reporter expression in motor neurons after intramuscular injections. Furthermore, TAxI peptide was shown to label motor neurons in the human tissue. The demonstration of a nonviral-mediated delivery of functional proteins into the spinal cord establishes the clinical potential of this technology for minimally invasive administration of CNS-targeted therapeutics.

  15. Antibacterial drug treatment increases intestinal bile acid absorption via elevated levels of ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter but not organic solute transporter α protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial drug treatment increases the bile acid pool size and hepatic bile acid concentration through the elevation of hepatic bile acid synthesis. However, the involvement of intestinal bile acid absorption in the increased bile acid pool size remains unclear. To determine whether intestinal bile acid absorption contributes to the increased bile acid pool in mice treated with antibacterial drugs, we evaluated the levels of bile acid transporter proteins and the capacity of intestinal bile acid absorption. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in ampicillin (ABPC)-treated mice, whereas organic solute transporter α (OSTα) mRNA levels, but not protein levels, significantly decreased in mice. Similar alterations in the expression levels of bile acid transporters were observed in mice treated with bacitracin/neomycin/streptomycin. The capacity for intestinal bile acid absorption was evaluated by an in situ loop method. Increased ileal absorption of taurochenodeoxycholic acid was observed in mice treated with ABPC. These results suggest that intestinal bile acid absorption is elevated in an ASBT-dependent manner in mice treated with antibacterial drugs.

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the methotrexate transport in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosogi, Aiko; Gao, Feng; Tomimatsu, Takashi; Hirata, Koji; Horie, Toshiharu

    2003-06-13

    Methotrexate (MTX) is used not only for the cancer chemotherapy but also for the treatment of rheumatic disease, often together with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). MTX is actively cotransported with H(+) in the small intestine, mediated by a reduced folate carrier (RFC). The coadministration of some NSAIDs with MTX to rats caused a decrease of MTX absorption through the small intestine. This may be due to the uncoupling effect of oxidative phosphorylation of the NSAIDs. The present study investigated whether flufenamic acid, diclofenac and indomethacin, NSAIDs, decreased ATP content of rat-derived intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6 cells and affected the MTX transport in IEC-6 cells. The MTX uptake in IEC-6 cells was dependent on medium pH and maximum around pH 4.5-5.5. The MTX uptake was composed of a transport inhibited by 4, 4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2, 2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) and a non-saturable one. The DIDS-sensitive component in the MTX uptake showed a saturation kinetics (Michaelis-Menten constant (Km): 3.91 +/- 0.52 microM, Maximum velocity (Vmax): 94.66 +/- 6.56 pmol/mg protein/5 min). The cellular ATP content in IEC-6 cells decreased significantly at 30 min after the cells were started to incubate with the NSAIDs (250 microM flufenamic acid, 500 microM diclofenac and 500 microM indomethacin). The MTX uptake in IEC-6 cells in the presence of the NSAIDs decreased with the reduction of cellular ATP content and showed a good correlation with the ATP content (correlation coefficient: 0.982). Thus it seems likely that the ATP content in IEC-6 cells with the NSAIDs decreased due to the uncoupling effect of oxidative phosphorylation of the NSAIDs, resulting in the inhibition of the secondary active transport of MTX in IEC-6 cells. The present results also suggest that IEC-6 cells are useful to evaluate the drug interaction relating to this carrier system.

  17. Calpain-mediated cleavage of collapsin response mediator protein-2 drives acute axonal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Nan; Michel, Uwe; Lenz, Christof; Friedel, Caroline C.; Köster, Sarah; d’Hedouville, Zara; Tönges, Lars; Urlaub, Henning; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul; Koch, Jan C.

    2016-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a key initiating event in many neurological diseases. Focal lesions to axons result in a rapid disintegration of the perilesional axon by acute axonal degeneration (AAD) within several hours. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of AAD are only incompletely understood. Here, we studied AAD in vivo through live-imaging of the rat optic nerve and in vitro in primary rat cortical neurons in microfluidic chambers. We found that calpain is activated early during AAD of the optic nerve and that calpain inhibition completely inhibits axonal fragmentation on the proximal side of the crush while it attenuates AAD on the distal side. A screening of calpain targets revealed that collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) is a main downstream target of calpain activation in AAD. CRMP2-overexpression delayed bulb formation and rescued impairment of axonal mitochondrial transport after axotomy in vitro. In vivo, CRMP2-overexpression effectively protected the proximal axon from fragmentation within 6 hours after crush. Finally, a proteomic analysis of the optic nerve was performed at 6 hours after crush, which identified further proteins regulated during AAD, including several interactors of CRMP2. These findings reveal CRMP2 as an important mediator of AAD and define it as a putative therapeutic target. PMID:27845394

  18. The use of proteomic analysis to study trafficking defects in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoqin; Brown, Kristy J; Rayavarapu, Sree; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Liu, Judy S

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in microtubule subunits and microtubule-associated proteins are the causes of many neurological disorders. These human conditions are usually associated with axonal tract defects or degeneration. The molecular mechanisms of these axonal dysfunction are still largely unknown. Conventional methods may not yield a complete analysis of downstream molecules related to axonal dysfunctions. Therefore, we devised a simple unbiased method to screen molecular motors and axonal molecules, which might be involved in axonal defects. We performed our analysis in the mouse with a targeted deletion in the doublecortin (Dcx) gene. Dcx is a microtubule-associated protein with direct effects on microtubule motors. Furthermore, the knockout of Dcx and its functionally redundant structurally similar paralog, doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk1), in mouse results in thinner or absent axon tracts, including the corpus callosum and anterior commissures. We compared protein profiles of corpus callosum from Dcx knockout and wild-type mouse of P0-P2 using mass spectrometry. This strategy allowed us to identify novel candidates downstream of Dcx involved in axon transport.

  19. The Signature Sequence Region of the Human Drug Transporter Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Is Important for Protein Surface Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennina Taylor-Wells

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs encompass a family of membrane transport proteins responsible for the uptake of xenobiotic compounds. Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1 mediates the uptake of clinically relevant compounds such as statins and chemotherapeutic agents into hepatocytes, playing an important role in drug delivery and detoxification. The OATPs have a putative 12-transmembrane domain topology and a highly conserved signature sequence (human OATP1B1: DSRWVGAWWLNFL, spanning the extracellular loop 3/TM6 boundary. The presence of three conserved tryptophan residues at the TM interface suggests a structural role for the sequence. This was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within the sequence D251E, W254F, W258/259F, and N261A. Transport was measured using the substrate estrone-3-sulfate and surface expression detected by luminometry and confocal microscopy, facilitated by an extracellular FLAG epitope. Uptake of estrone-3-sulfate and the surface expression of D251E, W254F, and W258/259F were both significantly reduced from the wild type OATP1B1-FLAG in transfected HEK293T cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that protein was produced but was retained intracellularly. The uptake and expression of N261A were not significantly different. The reduction in surface expression and intracellular protein retention indicates a structural and/or membrane localization role for these signature sequence residues in the human drug transporter OATP1B1.

  20. The Signature Sequence Region of the Human Drug Transporter Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Is Important for Protein Surface Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Wells, Jennina; Meredith, David

    2014-01-01

    The organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) encompass a family of membrane transport proteins responsible for the uptake of xenobiotic compounds. Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) mediates the uptake of clinically relevant compounds such as statins and chemotherapeutic agents into hepatocytes, playing an important role in drug delivery and detoxification. The OATPs have a putative 12-transmembrane domain topology and a highly conserved signature sequence (human OATP1B1: DSRWVGAWWLNFL), spanning the extracellular loop 3/TM6 boundary. The presence of three conserved tryptophan residues at the TM interface suggests a structural role for the sequence. This was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within the sequence D251E, W254F, W258/259F, and N261A. Transport was measured using the substrate estrone-3-sulfate and surface expression detected by luminometry and confocal microscopy, facilitated by an extracellular FLAG epitope. Uptake of estrone-3-sulfate and the surface expression of D251E, W254F, and W258/259F were both significantly reduced from the wild type OATP1B1-FLAG in transfected HEK293T cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that protein was produced but was retained intracellularly. The uptake and expression of N261A were not significantly different. The reduction in surface expression and intracellular protein retention indicates a structural and/or membrane localization role for these signature sequence residues in the human drug transporter OATP1B1.

  1. Raltegravir permeability across blood-tissue barriers and the potential role of drug efflux transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, M Tozammel; Kis, Olena; De Rosa, María F; Bendayan, Reina

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate raltegravir transport across several blood-tissue barrier models and the potential interactions with drug efflux transporters. Raltegravir uptake, accumulation, and permeability were evaluated in vitro in (i) P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), or MRP4-overexpressing MDA-MDR1 (P-gp), HEK-ABCG2, HeLa-MRP1, or HEK-MRP4 cells, respectively; (ii) cell culture systems of the human blood-brain (hCMEC/D3), mouse blood-testicular (TM4), and human blood-intestinal (Caco-2) barriers; and (iii) rat jejunum and ileum segments using an in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion model. [(3)H]Raltegravir accumulation by MDA-MDR1 (P-gp) and HEK-ABCG2-overexpressing cells was significantly enhanced in the presence of PSC833 {6-[(2S,4R,6E)-4-methyl-2-(methylamino)-3-oxo-6-octenoic acid]-7-L-valine-cyclosporine}, a P-gp inhibitor, or Ko143 [(3S,6S,12aS)-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydro-9-methoxy-6-(2-methylpropyl)-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-propanoic acid 1,1-dimethylethyl ester], a BCRP inhibitor, suggesting the inhibition of a P-gp- or BCRP-mediated efflux process, respectively. Furthermore, [(3)H]raltegravir accumulation by human cerebral microvessel endothelial hCMEC/D3 and mouse Sertoli TM4 cells was significantly increased by PSC833 and Ko143. In human intestinal Caco-2 cells grown on Transwell filters, PSC833, but not Ko143, significantly decreased the [(3)H]raltegravir efflux ratios. In rat intestinal segments, [(3)H]raltegravir in situ permeability was significantly enhanced by the concurrent administration of PSC833 and Ko143. In contrast, in the transporter inhibition assays, raltegravir (10 to 500 μM) did not increase the accumulation of substrate for P-gp (rhodamine-6G), BCRP ([(3)H]mitoxantrone), or MRP1 [2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF)] by MDA-MDR1 (P-gp)-, HEK-ABCG2-, or HeLa-MRP1-overexpressing

  2. Genetic analyses of roundabout (ROBO) axon guidance receptors in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, A; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Kazuo; Suda, Shiro; Thanseem, Ismail; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Hattori, Eiji; Toyota, Tomoko; Miyachi, Taishi; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Kawai, Masayoshi; Sekine, Yoshimoto; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Sugihara, Gen-Ichi; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Koizumi, Keita; Higashida, Haruhiro; Takei, Nori; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Mori, Norio

    2008-10-05

    Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder diagnosed in early childhood. Abnormalities of serotonergic neurotransmission have been reported in autism. Serotonin transporter (SERT) modulates serotonin levels, and is a major therapeutic target in autism. Factors that regulate SERT expression might be implicated in the pathophysiology of autism. One candidate SERT regulatory protein is the roundabout axon guidance molecule, ROBO. SerT expression in Drosophila is regulated by robo; it plays a vital role in mammalian neurodevelopment also. Here, we examined the associations of ROBO3 and ROBO4 with autism, in a trio association study using DNA from 252 families recruited to AGRE. Four SNPs of ROBO3 (rs3923890, P = 0.023; rs7925879, P = 0.017; rs4606490, P = 0.033; and rs3802905, P = 0.049) and a single SNP of ROBO4 (rs6590109, P = 0.009) showed associations with autism; the A/A genotype of rs3923890 showed lower ADI-R_A scores, which reflect social interaction. Significant haplotype associations were also observed for ROBO3 and ROBO4. We further compared the mRNA expressions of ROBO1, ROBO2, ROBO3, and ROBO4 in the lymphocytes of 19 drug-naïve autistic patients and 20 age- and sex-matched controls. Expressions of ROBO1 (P = 0.018) and ROBO2 (P = 0.023) were significantly reduced in the autistic group; the possibility of using the altered expressions of ROBO as peripheral markers for autism, may be explored. In conclusion, we suggest a possible role of ROBO in the pathogenesis of autism. Abnormalities of ROBO may lead to autism either by interfering with serotonergic system, or by disrupting neurodevelopment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report relating ROBO with autism.

  3. Ion channels and transporters in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2014-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy is the major challenge in the treatment of cancer. MDR can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux and the failure to undergo drug-induced apoptosis. Evasion of drug-induced apoptosis through modulation of ion...

  4. Axon degeneration and PGC-1α-mediated protection in a zebrafish model of α-synuclein toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley C. O’Donnell

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available α-synuclein (aSyn expression is implicated in neurodegenerative processes, including Parkinson’s disease (PD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB. In animal models of these diseases, axon pathology often precedes cell death, raising the question of whether aSyn has compartment-specific toxic effects that could require early and/or independent therapeutic intervention. The relevance of axonal pathology to degeneration can only be addressed through longitudinal, in vivo monitoring of different neuronal compartments. With current imaging methods, dopaminergic neurons do not readily lend themselves to such a task in any vertebrate system. We therefore expressed human wild-type aSyn in zebrafish peripheral sensory neurons, which project elaborate superficial axons that can be continuously imaged in vivo. Axonal outgrowth was normal in these neurons but, by 2 days post-fertilization (dpf, many aSyn-expressing axons became dystrophic, with focal varicosities or diffuse beading. Approximately 20% of aSyn-expressing cells died by 3 dpf. Time-lapse imaging revealed that focal axonal swelling, but not overt fragmentation, usually preceded cell death. Co-expressing aSyn with a mitochondrial reporter revealed deficits in mitochondrial transport and morphology even when axons appeared overtly normal. The axon-protective protein Wallerian degeneration slow (WldS delayed axon degeneration but not cell death caused by aSyn. By contrast, the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α, which has roles in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and reactive-oxygen-species detoxification, abrogated aSyn toxicity in both the axon and the cell body. The rapid onset of axonal pathology in this system, and the relatively moderate degree of cell death, provide a new model for the study of aSyn toxicity and protection. Moreover, the accessibility of peripheral sensory axons will allow effects of aSyn to be studied in different neuronal compartments and might have utility in

  5. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of the combination between cytotoxic drug and efflux transporter inhibitors based on a tumour growth inhibition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostelly, Alexandre; Payen, Léa; Guitton, Jérôme; Di Pietro, Attilio; Falson, Pierre; Honorat, Mylène; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Gèze, Annabelle; Freyer, Gilles; Tod, Michel

    2014-04-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters such as ABCG2 confer resistance to various anticancer drugs including irinotecan and its active metabolite, SN38. Early quantitative evaluation of efflux transporter inhibitors-cytotoxic combination requires quantitative drug-disease models. A proof-of-concept study has been carried out for studying the effect of a new ABCG2 transporter inhibitor, MBLI87 combined to irinotecan in mice xenografted with cells overexpressing ABCG2. Mice were treated with irinotecan alone or combined to MBLI87, and tumour size was periodically measured. To model those data, a tumour growth inhibition model was developed. Unperturbed tumour growth was modelled using Simeoni's model. Drug effect kinetics was accounted for by a Kinetic-Pharmacodynamic approach. Effect of inhibitor was described with a pharmacodynamic interaction model where inhibitor enhances activity of cytotoxic. This model correctly predicted tumour growth dynamics from our study. MBLI87 increased irinotecan potency by 20% per μmol of MBLI87. This model retains enough complexity to simultaneously describe tumour growth and effect of this type of drug combination. It can thus be used as a template to early evaluate efflux transporter inhibitors in-vivo.

  7. Inhibition of bile salt transport by drugs associated with liver injury in primary hepatocytes from human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Kan; Cai, Lining; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Qin; Woolf, Thomas F; Ge, Weigong; Guo, Lei; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-05

    Interference of bile salt transport is one of the underlying mechanisms for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). We developed a novel bile salt transport activity assay involving in situ biosynthesis of bile salts from their precursors in primary human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse hepatocytes in suspension as well as LC-MS/MS determination of extracellular bile salts transported out of hepatocytes. Glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids were rapidly formed in hepatocytes and effectively transported into the extracellular medium. The bile salt formation and transport activities were time‒ and bile-acid-concentration‒dependent in primary human hepatocytes. The transport activity was inhibited by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibitors ketoconazole, saquinavir, cyclosporine, and troglitazone. The assay was used to test 86 drugs for their potential to inhibit bile salt transport activity in human hepatocytes, which included 35 drugs associated with severe DILI (sDILI) and 51 with non-severe DILI (non-sDILI). Approximately 60% of the sDILI drugs showed potent inhibition (with IC50 values drugs showed this strength of inhibition in primary human hepatocytes and these drugs are associated only with cholestatic and mixed hepatocellular cholestatic (mixed) injuries. The sDILI drugs, which did not show substantial inhibition of bile salt transport activity, are likely to be associated with immune-mediated liver injury. Twenty-four drugs were also tested in monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes. Species differences in potency were observed with mouse being less sensitive than other species to inhibition of bile salt transport. In summary, a novel assay has been developed using hepatocytes in suspension from human and animal species that can be used to assess the potential for drugs and/or drug-derived metabolites to inhibit bile salt transport and/or formation activity. Drugs causing sDILI, except those by immune-mediated mechanism, are highly associated with potent

  8. Highlights From the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists/ International Transporter Consortium Joint Workshop on Drug Transporters in Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion: From the Bench to the Bedside - Clinical Pharmacology Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronaldson, P T; Bauer, B; El-Kattan, A F; Shen, H; Salphati, L; Louie, S W

    2016-11-01

    The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists/International Transporter Consortium Joint Workshop on Drug Transporters in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion was held with the objective of discussing innovative advances in transporter pharmacology. Specific topics included (i) transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB); (ii) emerging transport proteins; (iii) recent advances in achieving hepatoselectivity and optimizing clearance for organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) substrates; (iv) utility of animal models for transporter studies; and (v) clinical correlation of transporter polymorphisms. Here, we present state-of-the-art highlights from this workshop in these key areas of focus.

  9. Drug interactions with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins): the importance of CYP enzymes, transporters and pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuvonen, Pertti J

    2010-03-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) can cause skeletal muscle toxicity; the risk of toxicity is elevated by drug interactions and pharmacogenetic factors that increase the concentration of statins in the plasma. Statins are substrates for several membrane transporters that may mediate drug interactions. Inhibitors of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 can decrease the hepatic uptake of many statins, as well as the therapeutic index of these agents. Potent inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 can significantly increase the plasma concentrations of the active forms of simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin. Fluvastatin, which is metabolized by CYP2C9, is less prone to pharmacokinetic interactions, while pravastatin, rosuvastatin and pitavastatin are not susceptible to any CYP inhibition. An understanding of the mechanisms of statin interactions will help to minimize drug interactions and to develop statins that are less prone to adverse interactions.

  10. A Drosophila model to identify polyamine-drug conjugates that target the polyamine transporter in an intact epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Chung; Iltis, Mark; Kaur, Navneet; Bayer, Cynthia; Delcros, Jean-Guy; von Kalm, Laurence; Phanstiel, Otto

    2008-01-24

    Polyamine transport is elevated in many tumor types, suggesting that toxic polyamine-drug conjugates could be targeted to cancer cells via the polyamine transporter (PAT). We have previously reported the use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and its PAT-deficient mutant cell line, CHO-MG, to screen anthracene-polyamine conjugates for their PAT-selective targeting ability. We report here a novel Drosophila-based model for screening anthracene-polyamine conjugates in a developing and intact epithelium ( Drosophila imaginal discs), wherein cell-cell adhesion properties are maintained. Data from the Drosophila assay are consistent with previous results in CHO cells, indicating that the Drosophila epithelium has a PAT with vertebrate-like characteristics. This assay will be of use to medicinal chemists interested in screening drugs that use PAT for cellular entry, and it offers the possibility of genetic dissection of the polyamine transport process, including identification of a Drosophila PAT.

  11. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  12. High-quality genotyping data from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue on the drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters plus array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, H.I.; Straaten, T. van der; Coenen, M.J.H.; Flucke, U.E.; Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Guchelaar, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus array covers 1936 markers in 231 genes involved in drug metabolism and transport. Blood- and saliva-derived DNA works well on the DMET array, but the utility of DNA from FFPE tissue has not been reported for this array. As the abi

  13. Cable energy function of cortical axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na(+)-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na(+)-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20-70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship.

  14. Motor axon excitability during Wallerian degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Krarup, Christian

    2008-01-01

    , action potential propagation and structural integrity of the distal segment are maintained. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo the changes in membrane function of motor axons during the 'latent' phase of Wallerian degeneration. Multiple indices of axonal excitability of the tibial nerve...

  15. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course.

  16. A short update on the structure of drug binding sites on neurotransmitter transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielsen Mari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dopamine (DAT, noradrenalin (NET and serotonin (SERT transporters are molecular targets for different classes of psychotropic drugs. Cocaine and the SSRI (S-citalopram block neurotransmitter reuptake competitively, but while cocaine is a non-selective reuptake inhibitor, (S-citalopram is a selective SERT inhibitor. Findings Here we present comparisons of the binding sites and the electrostatic potential surfaces (EPS of DAT, NET and SERT homology models based on two different LeuTAa templates; with a substrate (leucine in an occluded conformation (PDB id 2a65, and with an inhibitor (tryptophan in an open-to-out conformation (PDB id 3f3a. In the occluded homology models, two conserved aromatic amino acids (tyrosine and phenylalanine formed a gate between the putative binding pockets, and this contact was interrupted in the open to out conformation. The EPS of DAT and NET were generally negative in the vestibular area, whereas the EPS of the vestibular area of SERT was more neutral. Conclusions The findings presented here contribute as an update on the structure of the binding sites of DAT, NET and SERT. The updated models, which have larger ligand binding site areas than models based on other templates, may serve as improved tools for virtual ligand screening.

  17. Ascending Midbrain Dopaminergic Axons Require Descending GAD65 Axon Fascicles for Normal Pathfinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marcela Garcia-Peña

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Nigrostriatal pathway (NSP is formed by dopaminergic axons that project from the ventral midbrain to the dorsolateral striatum as part of the medial forebrain bundle. Previous studies have implicated chemotropic proteins in the formation of the NSP during development but little is known of the role of substrate-anchored signals in this process. We observed in mouse and rat embryos that midbrain dopaminergic axons ascend in close apposition to descending GAD65-positive axon bundles throughout their trajectory to the striatum. To test whether such interaction is important for dopaminergic axon pathfinding, we analyzed transgenic mouse embryos in which the GAD65 axon bundle was reduced by the conditional expression of the diphtheria toxin. In these embryos we observed dopaminergic misprojection into the hypothalamic region and abnormal projection in the striatum. In addition, analysis of Robo1/2 and Slit1/2 knockout embryos revealed that the previously described dopaminergic misprojection in these embryos is accompanied by severe alterations in the GAD65 axon scaffold. Additional studies with cultured dopaminergic neurons and whole embryos suggest that NCAM and Robo proteins are involved in the interaction of GAD65 and dopaminergic axons. These results indicate that the fasciculation between descending GAD65 axon bundles and ascending dopaminergic axons is required for the stereotypical NSP formation during brain development and that known guidance cues may determine this projection indirectly by instructing the pathfinding of the axons that are part of the GAD65 axon scaffold.

  18. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure.

  19. A macroscopic model of traffic jams in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V; Avramenko, A A

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a minimal macroscopic model capable of explaining the formation of traffic jams in fast axonal transport. The model accounts for the decrease of the number density of positively (and negatively) oriented microtubules near the location of the traffic jam due to formation of microtubule swirls; the model also accounts for the reduction of the effective velocity of organelle transport in the traffic jam region due to organelles falling off microtubule tracks more often in the swirl region. The model is based on molecular-motor-assisted transport equations and the hydrodynamic model of traffic jams in highway traffic. Parametric analyses of the model's predictions for various values of viscosity of the traffic flow, variance of the velocity distribution, diffusivity of microtubule-bound and free organelles, rate constants for binding to and detachment from microtubules, relaxation time, and average motor velocities of the retrograde and anterograde transport, are carried out.

  20. Investigating how the attributes of self-associated drug complexes influence the passive transport of molecules through biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inacio, R; Barlow, D; Kong, X; Keeble, J; Jones, S A

    2016-05-01

    Relatively little is known about how drug self-association influences absorption into the human body. This study presented two hydrophobic membranes with a series of solutions containing different types of tetracaine aggregates with the aim of understanding how the attributes of supramolecular aggregate formation influenced passive membrane transport. The data showed that aqueous solutions of the unprotonated form of tetracaine displayed a significantly higher (ptransport compared to solutions with mixtures of the unprotonated and protonated drug microspecies (e.g. transport through the skin was 0.96±0.31μgcm(-2)min(-1) and 1.59±0.26μgcm(-2)min(-1) respectively). However, despite an enhanced rate of drug transport and a better membrane partitioning the unionised molecules showed a significantly longer (ptransport studies showed that larger tetracaine aggregates with smaller surface charge gave rise to the longer lag times. These large aggregates demonstrated more extensive intermolecular bonding and therefore, it was suggest that it was the enhanced propensity of the unionised species to form tightly bound drug aggregates that caused the delay in the membrane penetration.

  1. Combining PET biodistribution and equilibrium dialysis assays to assess the free brain concentration and BBB transport of CNS drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Roger N; Summerfield, Scott G; Salinas, Cristian A; Read, Kevin D; Guo, Qi; Searle, Graham E; Parker, Christine A; Jeffrey, Phil; Laruelle, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The passage of drugs in and out of the brain is controlled by the blood–brain barrier (BBB), typically, using either passive diffusion across a concentration gradient or active transport via a protein carrier. In-vitro and preclinical measurements of BBB penetration do not always accurately predict the in-vivo situation in humans. Thus, the ability to assay the concentration of novel drug candidates in the human brain in vivo provides valuable information for derisking of candidate molecules early in drug development. Here, positron emission tomography (PET) measurements are combined with in-vitro equilibrium dialysis assays to enable assessment of transport and estimation of the free brain concentration in vivo. The PET and equilibrium dialysis data were obtained for 36 compounds in the pig. Predicted P-glycoprotein (P-gp) status of the compounds was consistent with the PET/equilibrium dialysis results. In particular, Loperamide, a well-known P-gp substrate, exhibited a significant concentration gradient consistent with active efflux and after inhibition of the P-gp process the gradient was removed. The ability to measure the free brain concentration and assess transport of novel compounds in the human brain with combined PET and equilibrium dialysis assays can be a useful tool in central nervous system (CNS) drug development. PMID:22274741

  2. Modeling Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Inhibition to Elucidate Interaction Risks in Early Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Ismael; Winiwarter, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    The importance of transporter proteins for the disposition of drugs has become increasingly apparent during the past decade. A noted drug-drug interaction risk is the inhibition of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), key transporters for the liver uptake of the widely used statins. We show here the development of a ligand-based in silico model for interaction with OATP1B1, an important representative of the OATP family. The model is based on a structural overlay of 6 known OATP1B1 inhibitors. A data set of about 150 compounds with published OATP1B1 inhibition data was compared to the resulting "transportophor," and a similarity threshold was defined to distinguish between active and inactive molecules. In addition, using a statistical model based on physicochemical properties of the compounds as prefilter was found to enhance the overall predictivity of the model (final accuracy 0.73, specificity 074, and sensitivity 0.71, based on 126 compounds). The combined model was validated using an in-house data set (accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity were 0.63, 0.59, and 0.78, respectively; 62 compounds). The model gives also a structural overlay to the most similar template enabling visualization of where a change in a given structure might reduce the interaction with the transporter.

  3. Miro, MCU, and calcium: bridging our understanding of mitochondrial movement in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eNiescier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are extremely polarized structures with long axons and dendrites, which require proper distribution of mitochondria and maintenance of mitochondrial dynamics for neuronal functions and survival. Indeed, recent studies show that various neurological disorders are linked to mitochondrial transport in neurons. Mitochondrial anterograde transport is believed to deliver metabolic energy to synaptic terminals where energy demands are high, while mitochondrial retrograde transport is required to repair or remove damaged mitochondria in axons. It has been suggested that Ca2+ plays a key role in regulating mitochondrial transport by altering the configuration of mitochondrial protein, miro. However, molecular mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial transport in neurons still are not well characterized. In this review, we will discuss the roles of miro in mitochondrial transport and how the recently identified components of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter add to our current model of mitochondrial mobility regulation.

  4. Miro, MCU, and calcium: bridging our understanding of mitochondrial movement in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niescier, Robert F; Chang, Karen T; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2013-09-10

    Neurons are extremely polarized structures with long axons and dendrites, which require proper distribution of mitochondria and maintenance of mitochondrial dynamics for neuronal functions and survival. Indeed, recent studies show that various neurological disorders are linked to mitochondrial transport in neurons. Mitochondrial anterograde transport is believed to deliver metabolic energy to synaptic terminals where energy demands are high, while mitochondrial retrograde transport is required to repair or remove damaged mitochondria in axons. It has been suggested that Ca(2) (+) plays a key role in regulating mitochondrial transport by altering the configuration of mitochondrial protein, miro. However, molecular mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial transport in neurons still are not well characterized. In this review, we will discuss the roles of miro in mitochondrial transport and how the recently identified components of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter add to our current model of mitochondrial mobility regulation.

  5. Characterization of axo-axonic synapses in the piriform cortex of Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinjun; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2012-03-01

    Previous anatomical and physiological studies have established major glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal subtypes within the piriform cortical circuits. However, quantitative information regarding axo-axonic inhibitory synapses mediated by chandelier cells across major cortical subdivisions of piriform cortex is lacking. Therefore, we examined the properties of these synapses across the entire piriform cortex. Our results show the following. 1) γ-Aminobutyric acid membrane transporter 1-positive varicosities, whose appearance resembles chandelier cartridges, are found around the initial segments of axons of glutamatergic cells across layers II and III. 2) Both the density of axo-axonic cartridges and the degree of γ-aminobutyric acid membrane transporter 1 innervation in each axo-axonic synapse are significantly higher in the piriform cortex than in the neocortex. 3) Glutamate decarboxylase 67, vesicular GABA transporter, and parvalbumin, but not calbindin, are colocalized with the presynaptic varicosities, whereas gephyrin, Na-K-2Cl cotransporter 1, and GABA(A) receptor α1 subunit, but not K-Cl cotransporter 2, are colocalized at the presumed postsynaptic sites. 4) The axo-axonic cartridges innervate the majority of excitatory neurons and are distributed more frequently in putative centrifugal cells and posterior piriform cortex. We further describe the morphology of chandelier cells by using parvalbumin-immunoreactivity and single-cell labeling. In summary, our results demonstrate that a small population of chandelier cells mediates abundant axo-axonic synapses across the entire piriform cortex. Because of the critical location of these inhibitory synapses in relation to action potential regulation, our results highlight a critical role of axo-axonic synapses in regulating information flow and olfactory-related oscillations within the piriform cortex in vivo.

  6. Effect of graded Nrf2 activation on phase-I and -II drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Connie Wu

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is a transcription factor that induces a battery of cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative/electrophilic stress. Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1 sequesters Nrf2 in the cytosol. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Nrf2 in regulating the mRNA of genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes and xenobiotic transporters. Microarray analysis was performed in livers of Nrf2-null, wild-type, Keap1-knockdown mice with increased Nrf2 activation, and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout mice with maximum Nrf2 activation. In general, Nrf2 did not have a marked effect on uptake transporters, but the mRNAs of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, and organic anion transporter 2 were decreased with Nrf2 activation. The effect of Nrf2 on cytochrome P450 (Cyp genes was minimal, with only Cyp2a5, Cyp2c50, Cyp2c54, and Cyp2g1 increased, and Cyp2u1 decreased with enhanced Nrf2 activation. However, Nrf2 increased mRNA of many other phase-I enzymes, such as aldo-keto reductases, carbonyl reductases, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1. Many genes involved in phase-II drug metabolism were induced by Nrf2, including glutathione S-transferases, UDP- glucuronosyltransferases, and UDP-glucuronic acid synthesis enzymes. Efflux transporters, such as multidrug resistance-associated proteins, breast cancer resistant protein, as well as ATP-binding cassette g5 and g8 were induced by Nrf2. In conclusion, Nrf2 markedly alters hepatic mRNA of a large number of drug metabolizing enzymes and xenobiotic transporters, and thus Nrf2 plays a central role in xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification.

  7. Efficient simulations of tubulin-driven axonal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Stefan; Henningsson, Erik; Heyden, Anders

    2016-08-01

    This work concerns efficient and reliable numerical simulations of the dynamic behaviour of a moving-boundary model for tubulin-driven axonal growth. The model is nonlinear and consists of a coupled set of a partial differential equation (PDE) and two ordinary differential equations. The PDE is defined on a computational domain with a moving boundary, which is part of the solution. Numerical simulations based on standard explicit time-stepping methods are too time consuming due to the small time steps required for numerical stability. On the other hand standard implicit schemes are too complex due to the nonlinear equations that needs to be solved in each step. Instead, we propose to use the Peaceman-Rachford splitting scheme combined with temporal and spatial scalings of the model. Simulations based on this scheme have shown to be efficient, accurate, and reliable which makes it possible to evaluate the model, e.g. its dependency on biological and physical model parameters. These evaluations show among other things that the initial axon growth is very fast, that the active transport is the dominant reason over diffusion for the growth velocity, and that the polymerization rate in the growth cone does not affect the final axon length.

  8. Laser-based single-axon transection for high-content axon injury and regeneration studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Kunik

    Full Text Available The investigation of the regenerative response of the neurons to axonal injury is essential to the development of new axoprotective therapies. Here we study the retinal neuronal RGC-5 cell line after laser transection, demonstrating that the ability of these cells to initiate a regenerative response correlates with axon length and cell motility after injury. We show that low energy picosecond laser pulses can achieve transection of unlabeled single axons in vitro and precisely induce damage with micron precision. We established the conditions to achieve axon transection, and characterized RGC-5 axon regeneration and cell body response using time-lapse microscopy. We developed an algorithm to analyze cell trajectories and established correlations between cell motility after injury, axon length, and the initiation of the regeneration response. The characterization of the motile response of axotomized RGC-5 cells showed that cells that were capable of repair or regrowth of damaged axons migrated more slowly than cells that could not. Moreover, we established that RGC-5 cells with long axons could not recover their injured axons, and such cells were much more motile. The platform we describe allows highly controlled axonal damage with subcellular resolution and the performance of high-content screening in cell cultures.

  9. Myelin Lipids Inhibit Axon Regeneration Following Spinal Cord Injury: a Novel Perspective for Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Fernando M; da Silva, Tiago F; Morgado, Marlene M; Rodrigues, Lorena G; Rodrigues, Daniel; Pereira, Marta I L; Marques, Ana; Sousa, Vera F; Coentro, João; Sá-Miranda, Clara; Sousa, Mónica M; Brites, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Lack of axon regeneration following spinal cord injury has been mainly ascribed to the inhibitory environment of the injury site, i.e., to chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and myelin-associated inhibitors (MAIs). Here, we used shiverer (shi) mice to assess axon regeneration following spinal cord injury in the presence of MAIs and CSPG but in the absence of compact myelin. Although in vitro shi neurons displayed a similar intrinsic neurite outgrowth to wild-type neurons, in vivo, shi fibers had increased regenerative capacity, suggesting that the wild-type spinal cord contains additional inhibitors besides MAIs and CSPG. Our data show that besides myelin protein, myelin lipids are highly inhibitory for neurite outgrowth and suggest that this inhibitory effect is released in the shi spinal cord given its decreased lipid content. Specifically, we identified cholesterol and sphingomyelin as novel myelin-associated inhibitors that operate through a Rho-dependent mechanism and have inhibitory activity in multiple neuron types. We further demonstrated the inhibitory action of myelin lipids in vivo, by showing that delivery of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, a drug that reduces the levels of lipids specifically in the injury site, leads to increased axon regeneration of wild-type (WT) dorsal column axons following spinal cord injury. In summary, our work shows that myelin lipids are important modulators of axon regeneration that should be considered together with protein MAIs as critical targets in strategies aiming at improving axonal growth following injury.

  10. Extra-neurohypophyseal axonal projections from individual vasopressin-containing magnocellular neurons in rat hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Salvador Hernandez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional neuroanatomical, immunohistochemical techniques and electrophysiological recording, as well as in vitro labeling methods may fail to detect long range extra-neurohypophyseal-projecting axons from vasopressin (AVP-containing magnocellular neurons (magnocells in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN. Here, we used in vivo extracellular recording, juxtacellular labeling, post hoc anatomo-immunohistochemical analysis and camera lucida reconstruction to address this question. We demonstrate that all well-labeled AVP immunopositive neurons inside the PVN possess main axons joining the tract of Greving and multi-axon-like processes, as well as axonal collaterals branching very near to the somata, which project to extra-neurohypophyseal regions. The detected regions in this study include the medial and lateral preoptical area, suprachiasmatic nucleus, lateral habenula, medial and central amygdala and the conducting systems, such as stria medullaris, the fornix and the internal capsule. Expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 was observed in axon-collaterals. These results, in congruency with several previous reports in the literature, provided unequivocal evidence that AVP magnocells have an uncommon feature of possessing multiple axon-like processes emanating from somata or proximal dendrites. Furthermore, the long-range non-neurohypophyseal projections are more common than an occasional phenomenon as previously thought.

  11. Recent advances in the understanding of the interaction of antidepressant drugs with serotonin and norepinephrine transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Kristensen, Anders Skov; Bang-Andersen, Benny;

    2009-01-01

    and amphetamine. Seminal advances in the understanding of the structure and function of this transporter family have recently been accomplished by structural studies of a bacterial transporter, as well as medicinal chemistry and pharmacological studies of mammalian transporters. This feature article focuses...

  12. Neuronal and non-neuronal GABA transporters as targets for antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karsten K; White, H Steve; Schousboe, Arne

    2010-01-01

    of such transporters pointing in particular to an interesting role of the transporters located extrasynaptically. It is suggested that the betaine-GABA transporter BGT1 should receive particular interest in this context as the GABA analogue EF 1502 (N-[4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)-3-butenyl]-4-(methylamino)-4...

  13. ROCK2 is a major regulator of axonal degeneration, neuronal death and axonal regeneration in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J C; Tönges, L; Barski, E; Michel, U; Bähr, M; Lingor, P

    2014-05-15

    The Rho/ROCK/LIMK pathway is central for the mediation of repulsive environmental signals in the central nervous system. Several studies using pharmacological Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitors have shown positive effects on neurite regeneration and suggest additional pro-survival effects in neurons. However, as none of these drugs is completely target specific, it remains unclear how these effects are mediated and whether ROCK is really the most relevant target of the pathway. To answer these questions, we generated adeno-associated viral vectors to specifically downregulate ROCK2 and LIM domain kinase (LIMK)-1 in rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in vitro and in vivo. We show here that specific knockdown of ROCK2 and LIMK1 equally enhanced neurite outgrowth of RGCs on inhibitory substrates and both induced substantial neuronal regeneration over distances of more than 5 mm after rat optic nerve crush (ONC) in vivo. However, only knockdown of ROCK2 but not LIMK1 increased survival of RGCs after optic nerve axotomy. Moreover, knockdown of ROCK2 attenuated axonal degeneration of the proximal axon after ONC assessed by in vivo live imaging. Mechanistically, we demonstrate here that knockdown of ROCK2 resulted in decreased intraneuronal activity of calpain and caspase 3, whereas levels of pAkt and collapsin response mediator protein 2 and autophagic flux were increased. Taken together, our data characterize ROCK2 as a specific therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases and demonstrate new downstream effects of ROCK2 including axonal degeneration, apoptosis and autophagy.

  14. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/33n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Sames

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF, Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF, The Neuropathy Association (TNA and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies

  15. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3am

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Sames

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF, Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF, The Neuropathy Association (TNA and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies

  16. 3-Halo Chloroquine Derivatives Overcome Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter-Mediated Drug Resistance in P. falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edaye, Sonia; Tazoo, Dagobert; Bohle, D Scott; Georges, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphism in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) was shown to cause chloroquine resistance. In this report, we examined the antimalarial potential of novel 3-halo chloroquine derivatives (3-chloro, 3-bromo, and 3-iodo) against chloroquine-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum. All three derivatives inhibited the proliferation of P. falciparum; with 3-iodo chloroquine being most effective. Moreover, 3-iodo chloroquine was highly effective at potentiating and reversing chloroquine toxicity of drug-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum.

  17. A heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs is present in the axons of primary sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschrafi, Armaz; Kar, Amar N; Gale, Jenna R; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Vargas, Jose Noberto S; Sales, Naomi; Wilson, Gabriel; Tompkins, Miranda; Gioio, Anthony E; Kaplan, Barry B

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are enriched in subcellular regions of high energy consumption, such as axons and pre-synaptic nerve endings. Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial maintenance in these distal structural/functional domains of the neuron depends on the "in-situ" translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs. In support of this notion, we recently provided evidence for the axonal targeting of several nuclear-encoded mRNAs, such as cytochrome c oxidase, subunit 4 (COXIV) and ATP synthase, H+ transporting and mitochondrial Fo complex, subunit C1 (ATP5G1). Furthermore, we showed that axonal trafficking and local translation of these mRNAs plays a critical role in the generation of axonal ATP. Using a global gene expression analysis, this study identified a highly diverse population of nuclear-encoded mRNAs that were enriched in the axon and presynaptic nerve terminals. Among this population of mRNAs, fifty seven were found to be at least two-fold more abundant in distal axons, as compared with the parental cell bodies. Gene ontology analysis of the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs suggested functions for these gene products in molecular and biological processes, including but not limited to oxidoreductase and electron carrier activity and proton transport. Based on these results, we postulate that local translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs present in the axons may play an essential role in local energy production and maintenance of mitochondrial function.

  18. Drug-protein hydrogen bonds govern the inhibition of the ATP hydrolysis of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chufan, Eduardo E; Kapoor, Khyati; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. This multidrug transporter utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of a variety of hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Most of the substrates and modulators of P-gp stimulate its basal ATPase activity, although some inhibit it. The molecular mechanisms that are in play in either case are unknown. In this report, mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies of P-gp led to the identification of a pair of phenylalanine-tyrosine structural motifs in the transmembrane region that mediate the inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by certain drugs (zosuquidar, elacridar and tariquidar), with high affinity (IC50's ranging from 10 to 30nM). Upon mutation of any of these residues, drugs that inhibit the ATPase activity of P-gp switch to stimulation of the activity. Molecular modeling revealed that the phenylalanine residues F978 and F728 interact with tyrosine residues Y953 and Y310, respectively, in an edge-to-face conformation, which orients the tyrosines in such a way that they establish hydrogen-bond contacts with the inhibitor. Biochemical investigations along with transport studies in intact cells showed that the inhibitors bind at a high affinity site to produce inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and transport function. Upon mutation, they bind at lower affinity sites, stimulating ATP hydrolysis and only poorly inhibiting transport. These results also reveal that screening chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the basal ATP hydrolysis can be a reliable tool to identify modulators with high affinity for P-gp.

  19. Axon initial segment Kv1 channels control axonal action potential waveform and synaptic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Maarten H P; Letzkus, Johannes J; Stuart, Greg J

    2007-08-16

    Action potentials are binary signals that transmit information via their rate and temporal pattern. In this context, the axon is thought of as a transmission line, devoid of a role in neuronal computation. Here, we show a highly localized role of axonal Kv1 potassium channels in shaping the action potential waveform in the axon initial segment (AIS) of layer 5 pyramidal neurons independent of the soma. Cell-attached recordings revealed a 10-fold increase in Kv1 channel density over the first 50 microm of the AIS. Inactivation of AIS and proximal axonal Kv1 channels, as occurs during slow subthreshold somatodendritic depolarizations, led to a distance-dependent broadening of axonal action potentials, as well as an increase in synaptic strength at proximal axonal terminals. Thus, Kv1 channels are strategically positioned to integrate slow subthreshold signals, providing control of the presynaptic action potential waveform and synaptic coupling in local cortical circuits.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus and Lipopolysaccharide Modulate Gene Expressions of Drug Transporters in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Correlation to Inflammatory Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Tallkvist, Jonas; Artursson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation in the mammary gland (mastitis) is the most common disease in dairy herds worldwide, often caused by the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). Little is known about the effects of mastitis on drug transporters and the impact on transporter-mediated excretion of drugs into milk. We used murine mammary epithelial HC11 cells, after lactogenic differentiation into a secreting phenotype, and studied gene expressions of ABC- and SLC- transporters after treatment of cells with S. aureus and lipopolysaccharide, an endotoxin secreted by E. coli. The studied transporters were Bcrp, Mdr1, Mrp1, Oatp1a5, Octn1 and Oct1. In addition, Csn2, the gene encoding β-casein, was analyzed. As biomarkers of the inflammatory response, gene expressions of the cytokines Il6 and Tnfα and the chemokine Cxcl2 were determined. Our results show that S. aureus and LPS treatment of cells, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, induced an up-regulation of Mdr1 and of the inflammatory biomarkers, except that Tnfα was not affected by lipopolysaccharide. By simple regression analysis we could demonstrate statistically significant positive correlations between each of the transporters with each of the inflammatory biomarkers in cells treated with S. aureus. The coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.7–0.9 for all but one correlation. After treatment of cells with lipopolysaccharide, statistically significant correlations were only found between Mdr1 and the two parameters Cxcl2 and Il6. The expression of Csn2 was up-regulated in cells treated with S. aureus, indicating that the secretory function of the cells was not impaired. The strong correlation in gene expressions between transporters and inflammatory biomarkers may suggest a co-regulation and that the transporters have a role in the transport of cytokines and chemokines. Our results demonstrate that transporters in mammary cells can be affected by infection, which may have an impact on

  1. The developmentally regulated expression of Menkes protein ATP7A suggests a role in axon extension and synaptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Meskini, Rajaâ; Cline, Laura B; Eipper, Betty A; Ronnett, Gabriele V

    2005-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutation of the copper transporter ATP7A. While several enzymes expressed in mature neurons require copper, MD neurodegenerative changes cannot be explained by known requirements for ATP7A in neuronal development. To investigate additional roles for ATP7A during development, we characterized its pattern of expression using the olfactory system as a neurodevelopmental model. ATP7A expression in neurons was developmentally regulated rather than constitutively. Initially expressed in the cell bodies of developing neurons, ATP7A protein later shifted to extending axons, peaking prior to synaptogenesis. Similarly, after injury-stimulated neurogenesis, ATP7A expression increased in neurons and axons preceding synaptogenesis. Interestingly, copper-transport-deficient ATP7A still exhibits axonal localization. These results support a role for ATP7A in axon extension, which may contribute to the severe neurodegeneration characteristic of MD.

  2. Antagonistic changes in sensitivity to antifungal drugs by mutations of an important ABC transporter gene in a fungal pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Guan

    Full Text Available Fungal pathogens can be lethal, especially among immunocompromised populations, such as patients with AIDS and recipients of tissue transplantation or chemotherapy. Prolonged usage of antifungal reagents can lead to drug resistance and treatment failure. Understanding mechanisms that underlie drug resistance by pathogenic microorganisms is thus vital for dealing with this emerging issue. In this study, we show that dramatic sequence changes in PDR5, an ABC (ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter protein gene in an opportunistic fungal pathogen, caused the organism to become hypersensitive to azole, a widely used antifungal drug. Surprisingly, the same mutations conferred growth advantages to the organism on polyenes, which are also commonly used antimycotics. Our results indicate that Pdr5p might be important for ergosterol homeostasis. The observed remarkable sequence divergence in the PDR5 gene in yeast strain YJM789 may represent an interesting case of adaptive loss of gene function with significant clinical implications.

  3. Comparison of the Ability of Various Imaging Modalities (CT & Plain X- Ray in Detecting Drug Transport in Body Packers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Sanei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "ndrugs within the human body. In our country due to vast common border with Afghanistan which is the biggest Opium producer in the world and has the second place in Heroine production, drug smuggling has potential national threat and besides it has a global impact as using our territory as the major smuggling route to the west. Furthermore, in recent years new generations of African smugglers of new types of drugs are using our country as a transit route to transport drugs to Europe or Africa. In this way handmade or automatically produced packets are swallowed, rectally or vaginally inserted, and then transported. The first choice modality is plain x-ray of the abdomen in upright and supine positions. Recently abdominal and pelvic CT without contrast has shown a great success rate in the detection of body packers with changing window modality to detect different types of drugs. "nMaterials and Methods: Plain x-ray and abdominal and pelvic CT without contrast were performed for 12 cases who confessed to drug packet ingestion. The presence, number and location of the packets were evaluated in different modalities and the density of the packets were also measured in Hounsfield units (HU. "nResults: The mean age of our cases was 28.2±5.9 years (range, 17-35 years. Eleven (91.6 % patients were male and only one case was female. All patients had characteristic findings in plain x-ray and also all packets were visualized in all patients "nConclusion: Plain x-ray has a distinctive position in detecting packets in intestines especially when oral contrast materials are used. It is cheaper and more accessible than CT, but using different Hounsfield units in CT windows can even characterize different types of drugs even before extracting them.  

  4. Genetics Home Reference: giant axonal neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R. Proteomic analysis in giant axonal neuropathy: new insights into disease mechanisms. Muscle Nerve. 2012 Aug;46( ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  5. Fabrication of functional hollow microspheres constructed from MOF shells: Promising drug delivery systems with high loading capacity and targeted transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuechuan; Hai, Xiao; Baigude, Huricha; Guan, Weihua; Liu, Zhiliang

    2016-11-01

    An advanced multifunctional, hollow metal-organic framework (MOF) drug delivery system with a high drug loading level and targeted delivery was designed and fabricated for the first time and applied to inhibit tumour cell growth. This hollow MOF targeting drug delivery system was prepared via a simple post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from hollow ZIF-8 successfully obtained for the first time via a mild phase transformation under solvothermal conditions. As a result, the hollow ZIF-8 exhibits a higher loading capacity for the model anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Subsequently, 5-FU-loaded ZIF-8 was encapsulated into polymer layers (FA-CHI-5-FAM) with three components: a chitosan (CHI) backbone, the imaging agent 5-carboxyfluorescein (5-FAM), and the targeting reagent folic acid (FA). Thus, an advanced drug delivery system, ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM, was fabricated. A cell imaging assay demonstrated that ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM could target and be taken up by MGC-803 cells. Furthermore, the as-prepared ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM exhibited stronger cell growth inhibitory effects on MGC-803 cells because of the release of 5-FU, as confirmed by a cell viability assay. In addition, a drug release experiment in vitro indicated that ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM exhibited high loading capacity (51%) and a sustained drug release behaviour. Therefore, ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM could provide targeted drug transportation, imaging tracking and localized sustained release.

  6. Genetic dissection of myelinated axons in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In the vertebrate nervous system, the myelin sheath allows for rapid and efficient conduction of action potentials along axons. Despite the essential function of myelin, many questions remain unanswered about the mechanisms that govern the development of myelinated axons. The fundamental properties of myelin are widely shared among vertebrates, and the zebrafish has emerged as a powerful system to study myelination in vivo. This review will highlight recent advances from genetic screens in ze...

  7. Transport rankings of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs across blood-brain barrier in vitro models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Novakova

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to conduct a comprehensive study about the transport properties of NSAIDs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vitro. Transport studies with celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam and tenoxicam were accomplished across Transwell models based on cell line PBMEC/C1-2, ECV304 or primary rat brain endothelial cells. Single as well as group substance studies were carried out. In group studies substance group compositions, transport medium and serum content were varied, transport inhibitors verapamil and probenecid were added. Resulted permeability coefficients were compared and normalized to internal standards diazepam and carboxyfluorescein. Transport rankings of NSAIDs across each model were obtained. Single substance studies showed similar rankings as corresponding group studies across PBMEC/C1-2 or ECV304 cell layers. Serum content, glioma conditioned medium and inhibitors probenecid and verapamil influenced resulted permeability significantly. Basic differences of transport properties of the investigated NSAIDs were similar comparing all three in vitro BBB models. Different substance combinations in the group studies and addition of probenecid and verapamil suggested that transporter proteins are involved in the transport of every tested NSAID. Results especially underlined the importance of same experimental conditions (transport medium, serum content, species origin, cell line for proper data comparison.

  8. Crossing axons in the third nerve nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfang, D C

    1975-12-01

    The research presented in this paper studied the pathway taken by the crossed fibers of the third nerve nucleus in an animal whose nucleus has been well mapped and found to correlate well with higher mammals and man. Autoradiography using tritiated amino acid labeled the cell bodies an axons of the left side of the oculomotor nucleus of the cat. Axons so labeled could be seen emerging from the ventral portion of the left nucleus through the median longitudinal fasciculus (mlf) to join the left oculomotor nerve. Labeled axons were also seen to emerge from the medial border of the caudal left nucleus, cross the midline, and pass through the right nucleus and the right mlf to join the right oculomotor nerve. These latter axons must be the crossed axons of the superior rectus and levator palpebrae subnuclei. Since the path of these crossed axons is through the caudal portion of the nucleus of the opposite side, the destruction of one lateral half of the oculomotor nucleus would result in a bilateral palsy of the crossed subnuclei. Bilateral palsy of the superior rectus and bilateral assymetrical palsy of the levator palpebrae muscles would result.

  9. Non-invasive, in-vivo monitoring of neuronal transport impairment in a mouse model of tauopathy using MEMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Anne; Khan, Umer; Hoang, Dung M.; Novikov, Dmitry S.; Krishnamurthy, Pavan; Rajamohamed Sait, Hameetha B.; Little, Benjamin W.; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Wadghiri, Youssef Z.

    2012-01-01

    The impairment of axonal transport by overexpression or hyperphosphorylation of tau is well documented for in vitro conditions; however, only a few studies on this phenomenon have been conducted in vivo, using invasive procedures, and with contradictory results. Here we used the non-invasive, Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging technique (MEMRI), to study for the first time a pure model of tauopathy, the JNPL3 transgenic mouse line, which overexpresses a mutated (P301L) form of the human tau protein. We show progressive impairment in neuronal transport as tauopathy advances. These findings are further supported by a significant correlation between the severity of the impairment in neuronal transport assessed by MEMRI, and the degree of abnormal tau assessed by histology. Unlike conventional techniques that focus on axonal transport measurement, MEMRI can provide a global analysis of neuronal transport, i.e. from dendrites to axons and at the macroscopic scale of fiber tracts. Neuronal transport impairment has been shown to be a key pathogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease and numerous other neurodegenerative disorders. Hence, MEMRI provides a promising set of functional biomarkers to be used during preclinical trials to facilitate the selection of new drugs aimed at restoring neuronal transport in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22960250

  10. A pleiotropic drug resistance transporter in Nicotiana tabacum is involved in defense against the herbivore Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Manuela D; Siegmund, Stephanie E G; Drozak, Anna; Trombik, Tomasz; Bultreys, Alain; Baldwin, Ian T; Boutry, Marc

    2012-12-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters are a group of membrane proteins belonging to the ABCG sub-family of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. There is clear evidence for the involvement of plant ABC transporters in resistance to fungal and bacterial pathogens, but not in the biotic stress response to insect or herbivore attack. Here, we describe a PDR transporter, ABCG5/PDR5, from Nicotiana tabacum. GFP fusion and subcellular fractionation studies revealed that ABCG5/PDR5 is localized to the plasma membrane. Staining of transgenic plants expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the ABCG5/PDR5 transcription promoter and immunoblotting of wild-type plants showed that, under standard growth conditions, ABCG5/PDR5 is highly expressed in roots, stems and flowers, but is only expressed at marginal levels in leaves. Interestingly, ABCG5/PDR5 expression is induced in leaves by methyl jasmonate, wounding, pathogen infiltration, or herbivory by Manduca sexta. To address the physiological role of ABCG5/PDR5, N. tabacum plants silenced for the expression of ABCG5/PDR5 were obtained. No phenotypic modification was observed under standard conditions. However, a small increase in susceptibility to the fungus Fusarium oxysporum was observed. A stronger effect was observed in relation to herbivory: silenced plants allowed better growth and faster development of M. sexta larvae than wild-type plants, indicating an involvement of this PDR transporter in resistance to M. sexta herbivory.

  11. Rethinking Drug Treatment Approaches in ALS by Targeting ABC Efflux Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    intraperitoneally with Riluzole-HCl (12 mg/kg). After 1 h, mice were sacrificed with carbon dioxide , blood was collected via cardiac puncture, and mice were...compensatory response to a leaking BSCB. However, activation of P-gp can still pre- vent effective drug delivery in the CNS, reducing drug bioavailability

  12. Binding of the Multimodal Antidepressant Drug Vortioxetine to the Human Serotonin Transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Wang, Danyang

    2015-01-01

    SERT. X-ray crystal structures of the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT and the Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter were used to build homology models of hSERT. Comparative modeling and ligand docking suggest that vortioxetine can adopt several distinct binding modes within the central...

  13. The secondary multidrug transporter LmrP contains multiple drug interaction sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, M; Koole, LA; van Veen, HW; Konings, WN

    1999-01-01

    The secondary multidrug transporter LmrP of Lactococcus lactis mediates the efflux of Hoechst 33342 from the cytoplasmic leaflet of the membrane. Kinetic analysis of Hoechst 33342 transport in inside-out membrane vesicles of L. lactis showed that the LmrP-mediated H+/Hoechst 33342 antiport reaction

  14. Are lipid rafts involved in ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance of tumor cells?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan Willem; Klappe, Karin; Hummel, Ina; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Sietsma, Hannie; Meszaros, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, lipid rafts have been implicated in several cellular functions, including protein transport in polarized cells and signal transduction. Also in multidrug resistance lipid rafts may be important with regard to the localization of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in these

  15. Evaluation of drug-drug interaction between henagliflozin, a novel sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, and metformin in healthy Chinese males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liupeng; Wu, Chunyong; Shen, Lu; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Ying; Liu, Fang; Wang, Youqun; Yang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    1. Henagliflozin is a novel sodium-glucose transporter 2 inhibitor and presents a complementary therapy to metformin for patients with T2DM due to its insulin-independent mechanism of action. This study evaluated the potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between henagliflozin and metformin in healthy Chinese male subjects. 2. In open-label, single-center, single-arm, two-period, three-treatment self-control study, 12 subjects received 25 mg henagliflozin, 1000 mg metformin or the combination. Lack of PK interaction was defined as the ratio of geometric means and 90% confidence interval (CI) for combination: monotherapy being within the range of 0.80-1.25. 3. Co-administration of henagliflozin with metformin had no effect on henagliflozin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) (GRM: 1.08; CI: 1.05, 1.10) and peak plasma concentration (Cmax) (GRM: 0.99; CI: 0.92, 1.07). Reciprocally, co-administration of metformin with henagliflozin had no clinically significant on metformin AUC0-24 (GRM: 1.09, CI: 1.02, 1.16) although there was an 11% increase in metformin Cmax (GRM 1.12; CI 1.02, 1.23). All monotherapies and combination therapy were well tolerated. 4. Henagliflozin can be co-administered with metformin without dose adjustment of either drug.

  16. Axon injury triggers EFA-6 mediated destabilization of axonal microtubules via TACC and doublecortin like kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lizhen; Chuang, Marian; Koorman, Thijs; Boxem, Mike; Jin, Yishi; Chisholm, Andrew D

    2015-09-04

    Axon injury triggers a series of changes in the axonal cytoskeleton that are prerequisites for effective axon regeneration. In Caenorhabditis elegans the signaling protein Exchange Factor for ARF-6 (EFA-6) is a potent intrinsic inhibitor of axon regrowth. Here we show that axon injury triggers rapid EFA-6-dependent inhibition of axonal microtubule (MT) dynamics, concomitant with relocalization of EFA-6. EFA-6 relocalization and axon regrowth inhibition require a conserved 18-aa motif in its otherwise intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain. The EFA-6 N-terminus binds the MT-associated proteins TAC-1/Transforming-Acidic-Coiled-Coil, and ZYG-8/Doublecortin-Like-Kinase, both of which are required for regenerative growth cone formation, and which act downstream of EFA-6. After injury TAC-1 and EFA-6 transiently relocalize to sites marked by the MT minus end binding protein PTRN-1/Patronin. We propose that EFA-6 acts as a bifunctional injury-responsive regulator of axonal MT dynamics, acting at the cell cortex in the steady state and at MT minus ends after injury.

  17. Moving out: from sterol transport to drug resistance - the ABCG subfamily of efflux pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Karobi; Silverton, Latoya; Limpert, Katy; Im, Kate; Dean, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins are typically ATP-driven transmembrane pumps that have been evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to humans. In humans these transporters are subdivided into seven subfamilies, ranging from A to G. The ABCG subfamily of transporters is the primary focus of this review. This subfamily of proteins has been conserved throughout evolution and plays a central role in several cellular processes, such as sterol homeostasis and multidrug resistance. Functional polymorphisms/mutations in some of these G-subfamily transporters have clinical consequences in humans.

  18. pHluorin enables insights into the transport mechanism of antiporter Mdr1: R215 is critical for drug/H+ antiport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redhu, Archana Kumari; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Banerjee, Atanu; Moreno, Alexis; Falson, Pierre; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) is a member of the major facilitator superfamily that contributes to MDR of Candida albicans This antiporter belongs to the drug/H(+) antiporter 1 family, pairing the downhill gradient of protons to drug extrusion. Hence, drug efflux from cytosol to extracellular space and the parallel import of H(+) towards cytosol are inextricably linked processes. For monitoring the drug/H(+) antiporter activity of Mdr1p, we developed a new system, exploiting a GFP variant pHluorin, which changes its fluorescence properties with pH. This enabled us to measure the cytosolic pH correlated to drug efflux. Since protonation of charged residues is a key step in proton movement, we explored the role of all charged residues of the 12 transmembrane segments (TMSs) of Mdr1p in drug/H(+) transport by mutational analysis. This revealed that the conserved residue R(215), positioned close to the C-terminal end of TMS-4, is critical for drug/H(+) antiport, allowing protonation over a range of pH, in contrast with its H(215) or K(215) variants that failed to transport drugs at basic pH. Mutation of other residues of TMS-4 highlights the role of this TMS in drug transport, as confirmed by in silico modelling of Mdr1p and docking of drugs. The model points to the importance of R(215) in proton transport, suggesting that it may adopt two main conformations, one oriented towards the extracellular face and the other towards the centre of Mdr1p. Together, our results not only establish a new system for monitoring drug/H(+) transport, but also unveil a positively charged residue critical to Mdr1p function.

  19. Cholestasis and regulation of genes related to drug metabolism and biliary transport in rat liver following treatment with cyclosporine A and sirolimus (Rapamycin)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramow, S; Ott, P; Thomsen Nielsen, F;

    2001-01-01

    Cyclosporine A and sirolimus are used alone or in combination as immunosuppressants in organ transplantation. To elucidate hepatic side effects, we examined hepatic mRNA of proteins involved in biliary and hepatocellular transport of drugs, formation of glutathione (GSH) and drug metabolising cyt...

  20. MDR3 P-glycoprotein, a phosphatidylcholine translocase, transports several cytotoxic drugs and directly interacts with drags as judged by interference with nucleotide trapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.J.; van Helvoort, A.; van Meer, G.; Szabó, K.; Welker, E.; Szakács, G.; Váradi, A.; Sarkadi, B.; Borst, P.

    2000-01-01

    The human MDR3 gene is a member of the multidrug resistance (MDR) gene family. The MDR3 P-glycoprotein is a transmembrane protein that translocates phosphatidylcholine. The MDR1 P-glycoprotein related transports cytotoxic drugs. Its overexpression can make cells resistant to a variety of drugs. Atte

  1. Pair correlation microscopy reveals the role of nanoparticle shape in intracellular transport and site of drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Thammasiraphop, Kitiphume; Duong, Hien T. T.; Yeow, Jonathan; Karagoz, Bunyamin; Boyer, Cyrille; Gooding, J. Justin; Gaus, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticle size, surface charge and material composition are known to affect the uptake of nanoparticles by cells. However, whether nanoparticle shape affects transport across various barriers inside the cell remains unclear. Here we used pair correlation microscopy to show that polymeric nanoparticles with different shapes but identical surface chemistries moved across the various cellular barriers at different rates, ultimately defining the site of drug release. We measured how micelles, vesicles, rods and worms entered the cell and whether they escaped from the endosomal system and had access to the nucleus via the nuclear pore complex. Rods and worms, but not micelles and vesicles, entered the nucleus by passive diffusion. Improving nuclear access, for example with a nuclear localization signal, resulted in more doxorubicin release inside the nucleus and correlated with greater cytotoxicity. Our results therefore demonstrate that drug delivery across the major cellular barrier, the nuclear envelope, is important for doxorubicin efficiency and can be achieved with appropriately shaped nanoparticles.

  2. How to distinguish between the vacuum cleaner and flippase mechanisms of the LmrA multi-drug transporter in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeyr, JHS; Rohwer, JM; Snoep, JL; Westerhoff, HV; Konings, WN

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model of the LmrA multi-drug transport system of Lactococcus lactis is used to explore the possibility of distinguishing experimentally between two putative transport mechanisms, i.e., the vacuum-cleaner and the flippase mechanisms. This comparative model also serves as an example of num

  3. How Schwann Cells Sort Axons: New Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltri, M Laura; Poitelon, Yannick; Previtali, Stefano Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves contain large myelinated and small unmyelinated (Remak) fibers that perform different functions. The choice to myelinate or not is dictated to Schwann cells by the axon itself, based on the amount of neuregulin I-type III exposed on its membrane. Peripheral axons are more important in determining the final myelination fate than central axons, and the implications for this difference in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes are discussed. Interestingly, this choice is reversible during pathology, accounting for the remarkable plasticity of Schwann cells, and contributing to the regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system. Radial sorting is the process by which Schwann cells choose larger axons to myelinate during development. This crucial morphogenetic step is a prerequisite for myelination and for differentiation of Remak fibers, and is arrested in human diseases due to mutations in genes coding for extracellular matrix and linkage molecules. In this review we will summarize progresses made in the last years by a flurry of reverse genetic experiments in mice and fish. This work revealed novel molecules that control radial sorting, and contributed unexpected ideas to our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control radial sorting of axons.

  4. Imaging axonal degeneration and repair in pre-clinical animal models of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya S Yandamuri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a central nervous system (CNS disease characterized by chronic neuroinflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage. Infiltration of activated lymphocytes and myeloid cells are thought to be primarily responsible for white matter damage and axonopathy. Over time, this neurologic damage manifests clinically as debilitating motor and cognitive symptoms. Existing MS therapies focus on symptom relief and delay of disease progression through reduction of neuroinflammation. However, long-term strategies to remyelinate, protect, or regenerate axons have remained elusive, posing a challenge to treating progressive forms of MS. Preclinical mouse models and techniques such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and genomic and proteomic analysis have provided advances in our understanding of discrete time-points of pathology following disease induction. More recently, in vivo and in situ two-photon microscopy (2P has made it possible to visualize continuous real-time cellular behavior and structural changes occurring within the CNS during neuropathology. Research utilizing 2P imaging to study axonopathy in neuroinflammatory demyelinating disease has focused on five areas: (1 axonal morphologic changes (2 organelle transport and health, (3 relationship to inflammation, (4 neuronal excitotoxicity, and (5 regenerative therapies. 2P imaging may also be used to identify novel therapeutic targets via identification and clarification of dynamic cellular and molecular mechanisms of axonal regeneration and remyelination. Here, we review tools that have made 2P accessible for imaging neuropathologies and advances in our understanding of axonal degeneration and repair in preclinical models of demyelinating diseases.

  5. ATP7A (Menkes protein) functions in axonal targeting and synaptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Meskini, Rajaâ; Crabtree, Kelli L; Cline, Laura B; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A; Ronnett, Gabriele V

    2007-03-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the copper transporter, ATP7A, a P-type ATPase. We previously used the olfactory system to demonstrate that ATP7A expression is developmentally, not constitutive, regulated, peaking during synaptogenesis when it is highly expressed in extending axons in a copper-independent manner. Although not known to be associated with axonal functions, we explored the possibility that the inability of mutant ATP7A to support axon outgrowth contributes to the neurodegeneration seen in MD. In vivo analysis of the olfactory system in mottled brindled (Atp7aMobr) mice, a rodent model for MD, demonstrates that ATP7A deficiency affects olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) maturation. Disrupted OSN axonal projections and mitral/tufted cell dendritic growth lead to altered synapse integrity and glomerular disorganization in the olfactory bulbs of Atp7aMobr mice. Our data indicate that the neuronal abnormalities observed in MD are a result of specific age-dependent developmental defects. This study demonstrates a role for ATP7A and/or copper in axon outgrowth and synaptogenesis, and will further help identify the cause of the neuropathology that characterizes MD.

  6. Association of drug transporter expression with mortality and progression-free survival in stage IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Warta

    Full Text Available Drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (ABCB1 have been associated with chemotherapy resistance and are considered unfavorable prognostic factors for survival of cancer patients. Analyzing mRNA expression levels of a subset of drug transporters by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR or protein expression by tissue microarray (TMA in tumor samples of therapy naïve stage IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC (qRT-PCR, n = 40; TMA, n = 61, this in situ study re-examined the significance of transporter expression for progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas database was used to externally validate the respective findings (n = 317. In general, HNSCC tended to lower expression of drug transporters compared to normal epithelium. High ABCB1 mRNA tumor expression was associated with both favorable progression-free survival (PFS, p = 0.0357 and overall survival (OS, p = 0.0535. Similar results were obtained for the mRNA of ABCC1 (MRP1, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1; PFS, p = 0.0183; OS, p = 0.038. In contrast, protein expression of ATP7b (copper transporter ATP7b, mRNA expression of ABCG2 (BCRP, breast cancer resistance protein, ABCC2 (MRP2, and SLC31A1 (hCTR1, human copper transporter 1 did not correlate with survival. Cluster analysis however revealed that simultaneous high expression of SLC31A1, ABCC2, and ABCG2 indicates poor survival of HNSCC patients. In conclusion, this study militates against the intuitive dogma where high expression of drug efflux transporters indicates poor survival, but demonstrates that expression of single drug transporters might indicate even improved survival. Prospectively, combined analysis of the 'transportome' should rather be performed as it likely unravels meaningful data on the impact of drug transporters on survival of patients with HNSCC.

  7. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Johnston, Geoffrey L; Dhingra, Satish K; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp P; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria.

  8. The poorly membrane permeable antipsychotic drugs amisulpride and sulpiride are substrates of the organic cation transporters from the SLC22 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Pereira, Joao N; Tadjerpisheh, Sina; Abu Abed, Manar; Saadatmand, Ali R; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio A; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Tzvetkov, Mladen V

    2014-11-01

    Variations in influx transport at the blood-brain barrier might affect the concentration of psychotropic drugs at their site of action and as a consequence might alter therapy response. Furthermore, influx transporters in organs such as the gut, liver and kidney may influence absorption, distribution, and elimination. Here, we analyzed 30 commonly used psychotropic drugs using a parallel artificial membrane permeability assay. Amisulpride and sulpiride showed the lowest membrane permeability (P e sulpiride by the organic cation transporters of the SLC22 family OCT1, OCT2, OCT3, OCTN1, and OCTN2 Amisulpride was found to be transported by all five transporters studied. In contrast, sulpiride was only transported by OCT1 and OCT2. OCT1 showed the highest transport ability both for amisulpride (CLint = 1.9 ml/min/mg protein) and sulpiride (CLint = 4.2 ml/min/mg protein) and polymorphisms in OCT1 significantly reduced the uptake of both drugs. Furthermore, we observed carrier-mediated uptake that was inhibitable by known OCT inhibitors in the immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that amisulpride and sulpiride are substrates of organic cation transporters of the SLC22 family. SLC22 transporters may play an important role in the distribution of amisulpride and sulpiride, including their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier.

  9. Automated Axon Counting in Rodent Optic Nerve Sections with AxonJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Kasra; Scheetz, Todd E.; Christopher, Mark; Miller, Kathy; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Tandon, Anamika; Anderson, Michael G.; Fingert, John H.; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a publicly available tool, AxonJ, which quantifies the axons in optic nerve sections of rodents stained with paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In this study, we compare AxonJ’s performance to human experts on 100x and 40x images of optic nerve sections obtained from multiple strains of mice, including mice with defects relevant to glaucoma. AxonJ produced reliable axon counts with high sensitivity of 0.959 and high precision of 0.907, high repeatability of 0.95 when compared to a gold-standard of manual assessments and high correlation of 0.882 to the glaucoma damage staging of a previously published dataset. AxonJ allows analyses that are quantitative, consistent, fully-automated, parameter-free, and rapid on whole optic nerve sections at 40x. As a freely available ImageJ plugin that requires no highly specialized equipment to utilize, AxonJ represents a powerful new community resource augmenting studies of the optic nerve using mice.

  10. Diverse modes of axon elaboration in the developing neocortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of axonal arbors is a critical step in the establishment of precise neural circuits, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms of axonal elaboration in the neocortex. We used in vivo two-photon time-lapse microscopy to image axons in the neocortex of green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice over the first 3 wk of postnatal development. This period spans the elaboration of thalamocortical (TC and Cajal-Retzius (CR axons and cortical synaptogenesis. Layer 1 collaterals of TC and CR axons were imaged repeatedly over time scales ranging from minutes up to days, and their growth and pruning were analyzed. The structure and dynamics of TC and CR axons differed profoundly. Branches of TC axons terminated in small, bulbous growth cones, while CR axon branch tips had large growth cones with numerous long filopodia. TC axons grew rapidly in straight paths, with frequent interstitial branch additions, while CR axons grew more slowly along tortuous paths. For both types of axon, new branches appeared at interstitial sites along the axon shaft and did not involve growth cone splitting. Pruning occurred via retraction of small axon branches (tens of microns, at both CR and TC axons or degeneration of large portions of the arbor (hundreds of microns, for TC axons only. The balance between growth and retraction favored overall growth, but only by a slight margin. Given the identical layer 1 territory upon which CR and TC axons grow, the differences in their structure and dynamics likely reflect distinct intrinsic growth programs for axons of long projection neurons versus local interneurons.

  11. Implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting in permeable microvessels: Comparison of two-fluid statistical transport model with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChiBin, Zhang; XiaoHui, Lin; ZhaoMin, Wang; ChangBao, Wang

    2017-03-01

    In experiments and theoretical analyses, this study examines the capture efficiency (CE) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) for implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) in microvessels. It also proposes a three-dimensional statistical transport model of MDCPs for IA-MDT in permeable microvessels, which describes blood flow by the two-fluid (Casson and Newtonian) model. The model accounts for the permeable effect of the microvessel wall and the coupling effect between the blood flow and tissue fluid flow. The MDCPs move randomly through the microvessel, and their transport state is described by the Boltzmann equation. The regulated changes and factors affecting the CE of the MDCPs in the assisted magnetic targeting were obtained by solving the theoretical model and by experimental testing. The CE was negatively correlated with the blood flow velocity, and positively correlated with the external magnetic field intensity and microvessel permeability. The predicted CEs of the MDCPs were consistent with the experimental results. Additionally, under the same external magnetic field, the predicted CE was 5-8% higher in the IA-MDT model than in the model ignoring the permeability effect of the microvessel wall.

  12. Effects of natural nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitors on anticancer drug efflux transporter human P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabekura, Tomohiro; Hiroi, Takashi; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Uwai, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein plays an important role in cancer chemotherapy. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors play critical roles in development and progression of cancer. In this study, the effects of natural compounds that can inhibit NF-κB activation on the function of P-glycoprotein were investigated using human MDR1 gene-transfected KB/MDR1 cells. The accumulation of daunorubicin or rhodamine 123, fluorescent substrates of P-glycoprotein, in KB/MDR1 cells increased in the presence of caffeic acid phenetyl ester (CAPE), licochalcone A, anacardic acid, celastrol, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, lupeol, zerumbone, thymoquinone, emodin, and anethol had no effects. The ATPase activities of P-glycoprotein were stimulated by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, celastrol, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulated NF-κB activation was inhibited by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, and xanthohumol. KB/MDR1 cells were sensitized to vinblastine cytotoxicity by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol, showing that these natural NF-κB inhibitors reverse multidrug resistance. These results suggest that natural compounds, such as CAPE, licochalcone A, and anacardic acid, have dual inhibitory effects on the anticancer drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein and NF-κB activation, and may become useful to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  13. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite's food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M; Lee, Andrew H; Shafik, Sarah H; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M; Daley, Daniel A; Hoke, Matthew J; Altenhofen, Lindsey M; Painter, Heather J; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J P; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E; Fidock, David A; Cooper, Roland A; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs.

  14. Neural Progenitor Cells Promote Axonal Growth and Alter Axonal mRNA Localization in Adult Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Jin, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The inhibitory environment of the spinal cord and the intrinsic properties of neurons prevent regeneration of axons following CNS injury. However, both ascending and descending axons of the injured spinal cord have been shown to regenerate into grafts of embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Previous studies have shown that grafts composed of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) and neural-restricted progenitors (NRPs) can provide a permissive microenvironment for axon growth. We have used cocultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons together with NPCs, which have shown significant enhancement of axon growth by embryonic rat GRP and GRPs/NRPs, both in coculture conditions and when DRGs are exposed to conditioned medium from the NPC cultures. This growth-promoting effect of NPC-conditioned medium was also seen in injury-conditioned neurons. DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs showed altered expression of regeneration-associated genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We found that levels of GAP-43 mRNA increased in DRG cell bodies and axons. However, hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) mRNA decreased in the cell bodies of DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs, which is distinct from the increase in cell body HAMP mRNA levels seen in DRGs after injury conditioning. Endogenous GAP-43 and β-actin mRNAs as well as reporter RNAs carrying axonally localizing 3'UTRs of these transcripts showed significantly increased levels in distal axons in the DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs. These results indicate that axon growth promoted by NPCs is associated not only with enhanced transcription of growth-associated genes but also can increase localization of some mRNAs into growing axons. PMID:28197547

  15. Precision-cut intestinal slices : alternative model for drug transport, metabolism, and toxicology research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME-tox) processes of drugs are of importance and require preclinical investigation intestine in addition to the liver. Various models have been developed for prediction of ADME-tox in the intestine. In this review, pre

  16. Effect of hypouricaemic and hyperuricaemic drugs on the renal urate efflux transporter, multidrug resistance protein 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Sheikh, A.A.K.; Heuvel, J.J.M.W. van den; Koenderink, J.B.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol and oxypurinol are used to treat hyperuricaemia, whereas loop and thiazide diuretics can cause iatrogenic hyperuricaemia. Some uricosuric drugs and salicylate have a bimodal action on urate renal excretion. The mechanisms of action

  17. 75 FR 8524 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Officers (MROs), Substance Abuse Professionals (SAPs), Breath Alcohol Technicians (BATs), etc. Some of these commenters wanted MROs to be responsible for reporting both drug and alcohol results to States... agencies. MROs often perform services for employers in multiple States and without having any ties...

  18. THE LACTOCOCCAL LMRP GENE ENCODES A PROTON MOTIVE FORCE-DEPENDENT DRUG TRANSPORTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H; Poelarends, G.J.; van Veen, H.W.; Poolman, B.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    To genetically dissect the drug extrusion systems of Lactococcus lactis, a chromosomal. DNA library was made in Escherichia coli and recombinant strains were selected for resistance to high concentrations of ethidium bromide. Recombinant strains were found to be resistant not only to ethidium bromid

  19. 75 FR 5722 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... laboratories and Medical Review Officers (MROs). In the 2004 IFR, we indicated that we intended to fully... for the transportation industry, and the instructions that were given to MROs, laboratories, and... of and standards for collectors and MROs. We are issuing this notice of proposed rulemaking to...

  20. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venturi Vittorio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putative TetR regulator. The B. cenocepacia rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated increased sensitivity to inhibitory compounds, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in drug resistance. Moreover, the rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated reduced accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactones in the growth medium. In contrast, deletion of the rnd-1 operon had no detectable phenotypes under the conditions assayed. Conclusion Two of the three inactivated RND efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia J2315 contribute to the high level of intrinsic resistance of this strain to some antibiotics and other inhibitory compounds. Furthermore, these efflux systems also mediate accumulation in the growth medium of quorum sensing molecules that have been shown to contribute to infection. A systematic study of RND efflux systems in B. cenocepacia is required to provide a full picture of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in this opportunistic

  1. A new hypothesis of drug refractory epilepsy: neural network hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Min; Xi, Zhi-Qin; Wu, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2011-06-01

    Drug refractory is an important clinical problem in epilepsy, affecting a substantial number of patients globally. Mechanisms underlying drug refractory need to be understood to develop rational therapies. Current two prevailing theories on drug refractory epilepsy (DRE) include the target hypothesis and the transporter hypothesis. However, those hypotheses could not be adequate to explain the mechanisms of all the DRE. Thus, we propose another possible mechanism of DRE, which is neural network hypothesis. It is hypothesized that seizure-induced alterations of brain plasticity including axonal sprouting, synaptic reorganization, neurogenesis and gliosis could contribute to the formation of abnormal neural network, which has not only avoided the inhibitory effect of endogenous antiepileptic system but also prevented the traditional antiepileptic drugs from entering their targets, eventually leading to DRE. We will illustrate this hypothesis at molecular and structural level based on our recent studies and other related researches.

  2. Flozins, inhibitors of type 2 renal sodium-glucose co-transporter – not only antihyperglycemic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizerski Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The kidneys play a crucial role in the regulation of the carbohydrate metabolism. In normal physiological conditions, the glucose that filters through the renal glomeruli is subsequently nearly totally reabsorbed in the proximal renal tubules. Two transporters are engaged in this process: sodium-glucose co-transporter type 1 (SGLT1, and sodium-glucose co-transporter type type 2 (SGLT2 - this being located in the luminal membrane of the renal tubular epithelial cells. It was found that the administration of dapagliflozin, a selective SGLT2 inhibitor, in patients with type 2 diabetes, is associated with the reduction of HbA1c concentration by 0.45-1.11%. Additional benefits from the treatment with dapagliflozin are the reduction of arterial blood pressure and a permanent reduction of body weight. This outcome is related to the effect of osmotic diuresis and to the considerable loss of the glucose load by way of urine excretion. Dapagliflozin may be successfully applied in type 2 diabetes monotherapy, as well as in combined therapy (including insulin, where it is equally effective as other oral anti-diabetic drugs. Of note: serious adverse effects of dapagliflozin administration are rarely observed. What is more, episodes of severe hypoglycaemia related with the treatment occur only sporadically, most often in the course of diabetes polytherapy. The most frequent effects of the SGLT2 inhibitors are inseparably associated with the mechanism of their action (the glucuretic effect, and cover urogenital infections with a mild clinical course. At present, clinical trials are being continued of the administration of several subsequent drugs from this group, the most advanced of these being the use of canagliflozin and empagliflozin.

  3. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cellular Drug Transporters Are Associated with Intolerance to Antiretroviral Therapy in Brazilian HIV-1 Positive Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Mônica Barcellos; Campagnari, Francine; de Almeida, Tailah Bernardo; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Tanuri, Amilcar; Cardoso, Cynthia Chester

    2016-01-01

    Adverse reactions are the main cause of treatment discontinuation among HIV+ individuals. Genes related to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) influence drug bioavailability and treatment response. We have investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 ADME genes and intolerance to therapy in a case-control study including 764 individuals. Results showed that 15 SNPs were associated with intolerance to nucleoside and 11 to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs), and 8 to protease inhibitors (PIs) containing regimens under alpha = 0.05. After Bonferroni adjustment, two associations remained statistically significant. SNP rs2712816, at SLCO2B1 was associated to intolerance to NRTIs (ORGA/AA = 2.37; p = 0.0001), while rs4148396, at ABCC2, conferred risk of intolerance to PIs containing regimens (ORCT/TT = 2.64; p = 0.00009). Accordingly, haplotypes carrying rs2712816A and rs4148396T alleles were also associated to risk of intolerance to NRTIs and PIs, respectively. Our data reinforce the role of drug transporters in response to HIV therapy and may contribute to a future development of personalized therapies. PMID:27648838

  4. Myelin-associated glycoprotein and its axonal receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaar, Ronald L; Lopez, Pablo H H

    2009-11-15

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is expressed on the innermost myelin membrane wrap, directly apposed to the axon surface. Although it is not required for myelination, MAG enhances long-term axon-myelin stability, helps to structure nodes of Ranvier, and regulates the axon cytoskeleton. In addition to its role in axon-myelin stabilization, MAG inhibits axon regeneration after injury; MAG and a discrete set of other molecules on residual myelin membranes at injury sites actively signal axons to halt elongation. Both the stabilizing and the axon outgrowth inhibitory effects of MAG are mediated by complementary MAG receptors on the axon surface. Two MAG receptor families have been described, sialoglycans (specifically gangliosides GD1a and GT1b) and Nogo receptors (NgRs). Controversies remain about which receptor(s) mediates which of MAG's biological effects. Here we review the findings and challenges in associating MAG's biological effects with specific receptors.

  5. Dopaminergic and glutamatergic microdomains in a subset of rodent mesoaccumbens axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Qi, Jia; Li, Xueping; Wang, Hui-Ling; Britt, Jonathan P; Hoffman, Alexander F; Bonci, Antonello; Lupica, Carl R; Morales, Marisela

    2015-03-01

    Mesoaccumbens fibers are thought to co-release dopamine and glutamate. However, the mechanism is unclear, and co-release by mesoaccumbens fibers has not been documented. Using electron microcopy, we found that some mesoaccumbens fibers have vesicular transporters for dopamine (VMAT2) in axon segments that are continuous with axon terminals that lack VMAT2, but contain vesicular glutamate transporters type 2 (VGluT2). In vivo overexpression of VMAT2 did not change the segregation of the two vesicular types, suggesting the existence of highly regulated mechanisms for maintaining this segregation. The mesoaccumbens axon terminals containing VGluT2 vesicles make asymmetric synapses, commonly associated with excitatory signaling. Using optogenetics, we found that dopamine and glutamate were released from the same mesoaccumbens fibers. These findings reveal a complex type of signaling by mesoaccumbens fibers in which dopamine and glutamate can be released from the same axons, but are not normally released at the same site or from the same synaptic vesicles.

  6. A high affinity RIM-binding protein/Aplip1 interaction prevents the formation of ectopic axonal active zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Matthias; Böhme, Mathias A; Driller, Jan H; Babikir, Husam; Mampell, Malou M; Rey, Ulises; Ramesh, Niraja; Matkovic, Tanja; Holton, Nicole; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Göttfert, Fabian; Kamin, Dirk; Quentin, Christine; Klinedinst, Susan; Andlauer, Till FM; Hell, Stefan W; Collins, Catherine A; Wahl, Markus C; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) fuse at active zones (AZs) covered by a protein scaffold, at Drosophila synapses comprised of ELKS family member Bruchpilot (BRP) and RIM-binding protein (RBP). We here demonstrate axonal co-transport of BRP and RBP using intravital live imaging, with both proteins co-accumulating in axonal aggregates of several transport mutants. RBP, via its C-terminal Src-homology 3 (SH3) domains, binds Aplip1/JIP1, a transport adaptor involved in kinesin-dependent SV transport. We show in atomic detail that RBP C-terminal SH3 domains bind a proline-rich (PxxP) motif of Aplip1/JIP1 with submicromolar affinity. Pointmutating this PxxP motif provoked formation of ectopic AZ-like structures at axonal membranes. Direct interactions between AZ proteins and transport adaptors seem to provide complex avidity and shield synaptic interaction surfaces of pre-assembled scaffold protein transport complexes, thus, favouring physiological synaptic AZ assembly over premature assembly at axonal membranes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06935.001 PMID:26274777

  7. Effects of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) on the Metabolism and Transport of Anticancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Mooiman, K.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), such as herbs and dietary supplements, has become more popular among cancer patients. Cancer patients use these supplements for different reasons such as reduction of side effects and improvement of their quality of life. In general, the use of CAM is considered as safe. However, concomitant use of CAM and anticancer drugs could result in serious safety issues since CAM have the potential to cause pharmacokinetic interactions with conv...

  8. Noninvasive technique for monitoring drug transport through the murine cochlea using micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghpanahi, Masoumeh; Gladstone, Miriam B; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D; Borkholder, David A

    2013-10-01

    Local delivery of drugs to the inner ear has the potential to treat inner ear disorders including permanent hearing loss or deafness. Current mathematical models describing the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery to the inner ear have been based on large rodent studies with invasive measurements of concentration at few locations within the cochlea. Hence, estimates of clearance and diffusion parameters are based on fitting measured data with limited spatial resolution to a model. To overcome these limitations, we developed a noninvasive imaging technique to monitor and characterize drug delivery inside the mouse cochlea using micro-computed tomography (μCT). To increase the measurement accuracy, we performed a subject-atlas image registration to exploit the information readily available in the atlas image of the mouse cochlea and pass segmentation or labeling information from the atlas to our μCT scans. The approach presented here has the potential to quantify concentrations at any point along fluid-filled scalae of the inner ear. This may permit determination of spatially dependent diffusion and clearance parameters for enhanced models.

  9. Modeling molecular mechanisms in the axon

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, R.; Miller, K. E.; Kuhl, E.

    2017-03-01

    Axons are living systems that display highly dynamic changes in stiffness, viscosity, and internal stress. However, the mechanistic origin of these phenomenological properties remains elusive. Here we establish a computational mechanics model that interprets cellular-level characteristics as emergent properties from molecular-level events. We create an axon model of discrete microtubules, which are connected to neighboring microtubules via discrete crosslinking mechanisms that obey a set of simple rules. We explore two types of mechanisms: passive and active crosslinking. Our passive and active simulations suggest that the stiffness and viscosity of the axon increase linearly with the crosslink density, and that both are highly sensitive to the crosslink detachment and reattachment times. Our model explains how active crosslinking with dynein motors generates internal stresses and actively drives axon elongation. We anticipate that our model will allow us to probe a wide variety of molecular phenomena—both in isolation and in interaction—to explore emergent cellular-level features under physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. A Microfluidics Approach to Investigate Axon Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-26

    coat the substrate with PLL. The cells of one dissociated embryonic spinal cord was re-suspended in 3 µl of freshly-prepared Modified Frog Ringer’s...Surround repulsion of spinal sensory axons in higher vertebrate embryos . Neuron 18, 889-897 (1997). 8. Colamarino, S. & Tessier-Lavigne, M. The

  11. Speciifc effects of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-interacting protein 1 in neuronal axons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Tang; Qiang Wen; Xiao-jian Zhang; Quan-cheng Kan

    2016-01-01

    c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting protein 3 plays an important role in brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) anterograde axonal transport. It remains unclear whether JNK-interacting protein 1 mediates similar effects, or whether JNK-interacting protein 1 affects the regulation of TrkB anterograde axonal transport. In this study, we isolated rat embryonic hippocampus and cultured hippocampal neuronsin vitro. Coimmunoprecipitation results demonstrated that JNK-interacting protein 1 formed TrkB com-plexesin vitro andin vivo. Immunocytochemistry results showed that when JNK-interacting protein 1 was highly expressed, the distribution of TrkB gradually increased in axon terminals. However, the distribution of TrkB reduced in axon terminals after knocking out JNK-interact-ing protein 1. In addition, there were differences in distribution of TrkB after JNK-interacting protein 1 was knocked out compared with not. However, knockout of JNK-interacting protein 1 did not affect the distribution of TrkB in dendrites. These ifndings conifrm that JNK-inter-acting protein 1 can interact with TrkB in neuronal cells, and can regulate the transport of TrkB in axons, but not in dendrites.

  12. Mechanisms of axon degeneration: from development to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Smita; Caroni, Pico

    2007-10-01

    Axon degeneration is an active, tightly controlled and versatile process of axon segment self-destruction. Although not involving cell death, it resembles apoptosis in its logics. It involves three distinct steps: induction of competence in specific neurons, triggering of degeneration at defined axon segments of competent neurons, and rapid fragmentation and removal of the segments. The mechanisms that initiate degeneration are specific to individual settings, but the final pathway of pruning is shared; it involves microtubule disassembly, axon swellings, axon fragmentation, and removal of the remnants by locally recruited phagocytes. The tight regulatory properties of axon degeneration distinguish it from passive loss phenomena, and confer significance to processes that involve it. Axon degeneration has prominent roles in development, upon lesions and in disease. In development, it couples the progressive specification of neurons and circuits to the removal of defined axon branches. Competence might involve transcriptional switches, and local triggering can involve axon guidance molecules and synaptic activity patterns. Lesion-induced Wallerian degeneration is inhibited in the presence of Wld(S) fusion protein in neurons; it involves early local, and later, distal degeneration. It has recently become clear that like in other settings, axon degeneration in disease is a rapid and specific process, which should not be confused with a variety of disease-related pathologies. Elucidating the specific mechanisms that initiate axon degeneration should open up new avenues to investigate principles of circuit assembly and plasticity, to uncover mechanisms of disease progression, and to identify ways of protecting synapses and axons in disease.

  13. Morphometry of Axons in Optic Nerves of Siamese's Twins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinzu Gu; Zhenping Zhang; Qi Lin; Jiongji Liang; Wenyu Lu; Xiulan Ye; A A Sadun

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the development of optic nerve, we examined four optic nerves from Siameses Twins by absolute counts of axons.Methods: Mean axon diameter, mean axon density, totally axonal population and optic nerve area were noted for each optic nerve. The mean axon diameter and the mean axon density were compared between paraxial (inner sectors)and cortical (outer sectors)areas of the nerves.Results: More myelinated axons were seen in the inner sectors as compared to the outer sectors(average 11 axons/1 000 μm2 in inner sectors and 34 axons/l 000 μm2 in outer sectors( P=0. 036) . The myelinated fibers were also smaller(63 microns) in the outer sectors as compared to the inner sectors(72 microns) ( P = 0. 001 ). The average cross sectors area for the four 40 week stage optical nerves of Siamese Twins was 3.32 × 103 as compared to 1 million axons for 32-week-old normals.Conclusion: Our finding of fewer axonal number and small myelinated fibers in the Siamese Twins suggests hypoplasia. Myelination was more abnormal in the paraxial optic nerve than that in the peripheral sectors, suggesting anomalous development of optic nerve peripherally and delayed developnent centrally. Axonal density is higher in inner sectors than that in outer sectors, suggesting delayed development of the outer nerve sector.

  14. MAPK signaling promotes axonal degeneration by speeding the turnover of the axonal maintenance factor NMNAT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lauren J; Summers, Daniel W; Sasaki, Yo; Brace, EJ; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Injury-induced (Wallerian) axonal degeneration is regulated via the opposing actions of pro-degenerative factors such as SARM1 and a MAPK signal and pro-survival factors, the most important of which is the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT2 that inhibits activation of the SARM1 pathway. Here we investigate the mechanism by which MAPK signaling facilitates axonal degeneration. We show that MAPK signaling promotes the turnover of the axonal survival factor NMNAT2 in cultured mammalian neurons as well as the Drosophila ortholog dNMNAT in motoneurons. The increased levels of NMNAT2 are required for the axonal protection caused by loss of MAPK signaling. Regulation of NMNAT2 by MAPK signaling does not require SARM1, and so cannot be downstream of SARM1. Hence, pro-degenerative MAPK signaling functions upstream of SARM1 by limiting the levels of the essential axonal survival factor NMNAT2 to promote injury-dependent SARM1 activation. These findings are consistent with a linear molecular pathway for the axonal degeneration program. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22540.001 PMID:28095293

  15. Atomic modelling and systematic mutagenesis identify residues in multiple drug binding sites that are essential for drug resistance in the major Candida transporter Cdr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nim, Shweta; Lobato, Lucia Gonzalez; Moreno, Alexis; Chaptal, Vincent; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Falson, Pierre; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-11-01

    The ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporter Cdr1 (Candida drug resistance 1) protein (Cdr1p) of Candida albicans, shows promiscuity towards the substrate it exports and plays a major role in antifungal resistance. It has two transmembrane domains (TMDs) comprising of six transmembrane helices (TMH) that envisage and confer the substrate specificity and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), interconnected by extracellular loops (ECLs) and intracellular loops (ICLs) Cdr1p. This study explores the diverse substrate specificity spectrum to get a deeper insight into the structural and functional features of Cdr1p. By screening with the variety of compounds towards an in-house TMH 252 mutant library of Cdr1p, we establish new substrates of Cdr1p. The localization of substrate-susceptible mutants in an ABCG5/G8 homology model highlights the common and specific binding pockets inside the membrane domain, where rhodamines and tetrazoliums mainly engage the N-moiety of Cdr1p, binding between TMH 2, 11 and surrounded by TMH 1, 5. Whereas, tin chlorides involve both N and C moieties located at the interface of TMH 2, 11, 1 and 5. Further, screening of the in house TMH mutant library of Cdr1p displays the TMH12 interaction with tetrazolium chloride, trimethyltin chloride and a Ca(2+) ionophore, A23187. In silico localization reveals a binding site at the TMH 12, 9 and 10 interface, which is widely exposed to the lipid interface. Together, for the first time, our study shows the molecular localization of Cdr1p substrates-binding sites and demonstrates the participation of TMH12 in a peripheral drug binding site.

  16. AxonQuant: A Microfluidic Chamber Culture-Coupled Algorithm That Allows High-Throughput Quantification of Axonal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Published methods for imaging and quantitatively analyzing morphological changes in neuronal axons have serious limitations because of their small sample sizes, and their time-consuming and nonobjective nature. Here we present an improved microfluidic chamber design suitable for fast and high-throughput imaging of neuronal axons. We developed the AxonQuant algorithm, which is suitable for automatic processing of axonal imaging data. This microfluidic chamber-coupled algorithm allows calculation of an ‘axonal continuity index' that quantitatively measures axonal health status in a manner independent of neuronal or axonal density. This method allows quantitative analysis of axonal morphology in an automatic and nonbiased manner. Our method will facilitate large-scale high-throughput screening for genes or therapeutic compounds for neurodegenerative diseases involving axonal damage. When combined with imaging technologies utilizing different gene markers, this method will provide new insights into the mechanistic basis for axon degeneration. Our microfluidic chamber culture-coupled AxonQuant algorithm will be widely useful for studying axonal biology and neurodegenerative disorders. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Numerical simulation of the tumor interstitial fluid transport: Consideration of drug delivery mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Mohammad Charjouei; Deyranlou, Amin; Sharifi, Alireza; Niazmand, Hamid

    2015-09-01

    The interstitial fluid transport plays an important role in terms of its effect on the delivery of therapeutic agents to the cancerous organs. In this study, a comprehensive numerical simulation of the interstitial fluid transport establishing 3D models of tumor and normal tissue is accomplished. Different shapes of solid tumors and their surrounding normal tissues are selected, by employing the porous media model and incorporating Darcy's model and Starling's law. Besides, effects of the tumor radius, normal tissue size, tissue hydraulic conductivity and necrotic core are investigated on the interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and interstitial fluid velocity (IFV). Generally, results suggest that the configurations of the tumor and surrounding normal tissue affect IFP and IFV distributions inside the interstitium, which are much more pronounced for various configuration of the tumor. Furthermore, findings demonstrate that larger tumors are more prone for producing elevated IFP comparing with the smaller ones and impress both IFP and IFV dramatically. Nevertheless, normal tissue size has less impact on IFP and IFV, until its volume ratio to the tumor remains greater than unity; conversely, for the values lower than unity the variations become more significant. Finally, existence of necrotic core and its location in the tumor interstitium alters IFP and IFV patterns and increases IFV, considerably.

  18. The transporter-mediated cellular uptake of pharmaceutical drugs is based on their metabolite-likeness and not on their bulk biophysical properties: Towards a systems pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas B. Kell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Several recent developments are brought together: (i the new availability of a consensus, curated human metabolic network reconstruction (Recon2, approximately a third of whose steps are represented by transporters, (ii the recognition that most successful (marketed drugs, as well as natural products, bear significant similarities to the metabolites in Recon2, (iii the recognition that to get into and out of cells such drugs hitchhike on the transporters that are part of normal intermediary metabolism, and the consequent recognition that for intact biomembrane Phospholipid Bilayer diffusion Is Negligible (PBIN, and (iv the consequent recognition that we need to exploit this and to use more phenotypic assays to understand how drugs affect cells and organisms. I show in particular that lipophilicity is a very poor predictor of drug permeability, and that we need to (and can bring together our knowledge of both pharmacology and systems biology modelling into a new systems pharmacology.

  19. Transport and cytotoxicity of the anticancer drug 3-bromopyruvate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Paweł; Zarzycki, Marek; Ko, Young H; Casal, Margarida; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the cytotoxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the novel antitumor agent 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP). 3-BP enters the yeast cells through the lactate/pyruvate H(+) symporter Jen1p and inhibits cell growth at minimal inhibitory concentration of 1.8 mM when grown on non-glucose conditions. It is not submitted to the efflux pumps conferring Pleiotropic Drug Resistance in yeast. Yeast growth is more sensitive to 3-BP than Gleevec (Imatinib methanesulfonate) which in contrast to 3-BP is submitted to the PDR network of efflux pumps. The sensitivity of yeast to 3-BP is increased considerably by mutations or chemical treatment by buthionine sulfoximine that decrease the intracellular concentration of glutathione.

  20. Motor and dorsal root ganglion axons serve as choice points for the ipsilateral turning of dI3 axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Oshri; Hadas, Yoav; Vald, Lilach; Hong, Seulgi; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Klar, Avihu

    2010-11-17

    The axons of the spinal intersegmental interneurons are projected longitudinally along various funiculi arrayed along the dorsal-ventral axis of the spinal cord. The roof plate and the floor plate have a profound role in patterning their initial axonal trajectory. However, other positional cues may guide the final architecture of interneuron tracks in the spinal cord. To gain more insight into the organization of specific axonal tracks in the spinal cord, we focused on the trajectory pattern of a genetically defined neuronal population, dI3 neurons, in the chick spinal cord. Exploitation of newly characterized enhancer elements allowed specific labeling of dI3 neurons and axons. dI3 axons are projected ipsilaterally along two longitudinal fascicules at the ventral lateral funiculus (VLF) and the dorsal funiculus (DF). dI3 axons change their trajectory plane from the transverse to the longitudinal axis at two novel checkpoints. The axons that elongate at the DF turn at the dorsal root entry zone, along the axons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and the axons that elongate at the VLF turn along the axons of motor neurons. Loss and gain of function of the Lim-HD protein Isl1 demonstrate that Isl1 is not required for dI3 cell fate. However, Isl1 is sufficient to impose ipsilateral turning along the motor axons when expressed ectopically in the commissural dI1 neurons. The axonal patterning of dI3 neurons, revealed in this study, highlights the role of established axonal cues-the DRG and motor axons-as intermediate guidepost cues for dI3 axons.

  1. Effect of formulation pH on transport of naltrexone species and pore closure in microneedle-enhanced transdermal drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Priyanka; Brogden, Nicole K.; Stinchcomb, Audra L.

    2013-01-01

    Microneedle-enhanced transdermal drug delivery greatly improves the subset of pharmacologically active molecules that can be transported across the skin. Formulation pH plays an important role in all drug delivery systems; however, for transdermal delivery it becomes specifically significant since a wide range of pH values can be exploited for patch formulation as long as it does not lead to skin irritation or sensitization issues. Wound healing literature has shown significant pH effects on ...

  2. Sequence and gene expression of chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt in the association of in vitro drugs resistance of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Patrick G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance (CQR transporter protein (PfCRT is known to be the important key of CQR. Recent studies have definitively demonstrated a link between mutations in the gene pfcrt and resistance to chloroquine in P. falciparum. Although these mutations are predictive of chloroquine resistance, they are not quantitatively predictive of the degree of resistance. Methods In this study, a total of 95 recently adapted P. falciparum isolates from Thailand were included in the analysis. Parasites were characterized for their drug susceptibility phenotypes and genotypes with respect to pfcrt. From the original 95 isolates, 20 were selected for complete pfcrt sequence analysis. Results Almost all of the parasites characterized carried the previously reported mutations K76T, A220S, Q271E, N326S, I356T and R371I. On complete sequencing, isolates were identified with novel mutations at K76A and E198K. There was a suggestion that parasites carrying E198K were less resistant than those that did not. In addition, pfcrt and pfmdr1 gene expression were investigated by real-time PCR. No relationship between the expression level of either of these genes and response to drug was observed. Conclusion Data from the present study suggest that other genes must contribute to the degree of resistance once the resistance phenotype is established through mutations in pfcrt.

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies ABCG2 (BCRP) as an allopurinol transporter and a determinant of drug response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, CC; Yee, SW; Liang, X; Hoffmann, TJ; Kvale, MN; Banda, Y; Jorgenson, E; Schaefer, C; Risch, N; Giacomini, KM

    2015-01-01

    The first-line treatment of hyperuricemia, which causes gout, is allopurinol. The allopurinol response is highly variable, with many users failing to achieve target serum uric acid (SUA) levels. No genome-wide association study (GWAS) has examined the genetic factors affecting allopurinol effectiveness. Using 2,027 subjects in Kaiser Permanente’s Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort, we conducted a GWAS of allopurinol-related SUA reduction, first in the largest ethnic group, non-Hispanic white (NHW) subjects, and then in a stratified transethnic meta-analysis. ABCG2, encoding the efflux pump BCRP, was associated with SUA reduction in NHW subjects (P = 2 × 10−8), and a missense allele (rs2231142) was associated with a reduced response (P = 3 × 10−7) in the meta-analysis. Isotopic uptake studies in cells demonstrated that BCRP transports allopurinol and genetic variants in ABCG2 affect this transport. Collectively, this first GWAS of allopurinol response demonstrates that ABCG2 is a key determinant of response to the drug. PMID:25676789

  4. The Prostaglandin Transporter: Eicosanoid Reuptake, Control of Signaling, and Development of High-Affinity Inhibitors as Drug Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Victor L; Chi, Yuling; Lu, Run

    2015-01-01

    We discovered the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) and cloned the human cDNA and gene. PGT transports extracellular prostaglandins (PGs) into the cytoplasm for enzymatic inactivation. PGT knockout mice have elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and neonatal patent ductus arteriosus, which reflects PGT's control over PGE2 signaling at EP1/EP4 cell-surface receptors. Interestingly, rescued PGT knockout pups have a nearly normal phenotype, as do human PGT nulls. Given the benign phenotype of PGT genetic nulls, and because PGs are useful medicines, we have approached PGT as a drug target. Triazine library screening yielded a lead compound of inhibitory constant 50% (IC50) = 3.7 μM, which we developed into a better inhibitor of IC50 378 nM. Further structural improvements have yielded 26 rationally designed derivatives with IC50 < 100 nM. The therapeutic approach of increasing endogenous PGs by inhibiting PGT offers promise in diseases such as pulmonary hypertension and obesity.

  5. Axon Membrane Skeleton Structure is Optimized for Coordinated Sodium Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yihao; Li, He; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-01-01

    Axons transmit action potentials with high fidelity and minimal jitter. This unique capability is likely the result of the spatiotemporal arrangement of sodium channels along the axon. Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under entropic tension. Sodium channels also exhibit a periodic distribution pattern, as they bind to ankyrin G, which associates with spectrin. Here, we elucidate the relationship between the axon membrane skeleton structure and the function of the axon. By combining cytoskeletal dynamics and continuum diffusion modeling, we show that spectrin filaments under tension minimize the thermal fluctuations of sodium channels and prevent overlap of neighboring channel trajectories. Importantly, this axon skeletal arrangement allows for a highly reproducible band-like activation of sodium channels leading to coordinated sodium propagation along the axon.

  6. Motor axon synapses on renshaw cells contain higher levels of aspartate than glutamate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannette S Richards

    Full Text Available Motoneuron synapses on spinal cord interneurons known as Renshaw cells activate nicotinic, AMPA and NMDA receptors consistent with co-release of acetylcholine and excitatory amino acids (EAA. However, whether these synapses express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs capable of accumulating glutamate into synaptic vesicles is controversial. An alternative possibility is that these synapses release other EAAs, like aspartate, not dependent on VGLUTs. To clarify the exact EAA concentrated at motor axon synapses we performed a quantitative postembedding colloidal gold immunoelectron analysis for aspartate and glutamate on motor axon synapses (identified by immunoreactivity to the vesicular acetylcholine transporter; VAChT contacting calbindin-immunoreactive (-IR Renshaw cell dendrites. The results show that 71% to 80% of motor axon synaptic boutons on Renshaw cells contained aspartate immunolabeling two standard deviations above average neuropil labeling. Moreover, VAChT-IR synapses on Renshaw cells contained, on average, aspartate immunolabeling at 2.5 to 2.8 times above the average neuropil level. In contrast, glutamate enrichment was lower; 21% to 44% of VAChT-IR synapses showed glutamate-IR two standard deviations above average neuropil labeling and average glutamate immunogold density was 1.7 to 2.0 times the neuropil level. The results were not influenced by antibody affinities because glutamate antibodies detected glutamate-enriched brain homogenates more efficiently than aspartate antibodies detecting aspartate-enriched brain homogenates. Furthermore, synaptic boutons with ultrastructural features of Type I excitatory synapses were always labeled by glutamate antibodies at higher density than motor axon synapses. We conclude that motor axon synapses co-express aspartate and glutamate, but aspartate is concentrated at higher levels than glutamate.

  7. Characterization of Axo-Axonic Synapses in the Piriform Cortex of Mus musculus

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xinjun; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Previous anatomical and physiological studies have established major glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal subtypes within the piriform cortical circuits. However, quantitative information regarding axo-axonic inhibitory synapses mediated by chandelier cells across major cortical subdivisions of piriform cortex is lacking. Therefore, we examined the properties of these synapses across the entire piriform cortex. Our results show the following. 1) γ-Aminobutyric acid membrane transporter 1-posi...

  8. Axonal BACE1 dynamics and targeting in hippocampal neurons: a role for Rab11 GTPase

    OpenAIRE

    Buggia-Prévot, Virginie; Fernandez, Celia G; Riordan, Sean; Vetrivel, Kulandaivelu S.; Roseman, Jelita; Waters, Jack; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Vassar, Robert; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Background BACE1 is one of the two enzymes that cleave amyloid precursor protein to generate Alzheimer's disease (AD) beta amyloid peptides. It is widely believed that BACE1 initiates APP processing in endosomes, and in the brain this cleavage is known to occur during axonal transport of APP. In addition, BACE1 accumulates in dystrophic neurites surrounding brain senile plaques in individuals with AD, suggesting that abnormal accumulation of BACE1 at presynaptic terminals contributes to patho...

  9. Exploiting the Phenomenon of Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation for Enhanced and Sustained Membrane Transport of a Poorly Water-Soluble Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indulkar, Anura S; Gao, Yi; Raina, Shweta A; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Taylor, Lynne S

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies on aqueous supersaturated lipophilic drug solutions prepared by methods including antisolvent addition, pH swing, or dissolution of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) have demonstrated that when crystallization is slow, these systems undergo liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) when the concentration of the drug in the medium exceeds its amorphous solubility. Following LLPS, a metastable equilibrium is formed where the concentration of drug in the continuous phase corresponds to the amorphous solubility while the dispersed phase is composed of a nanosized drug-rich phase. It has been reasoned that the drug-rich phase may act as a reservoir, enabling the rate of passive transport of the drug across a membrane to be maintained at the maximum value for an extended period of time. Herein, using clotrimazole as a model drug, and a flow-through diffusion cell, the reservoir effect is demonstrated. Supersaturated clotrimazole solutions at concentrations below the amorphous solubility show a linear relationship between the maximum flux and the initial concentration. Once the concentration exceeds the amorphous solubility, the maximum flux achieved reaches a plateau. However, the duration for which the high flux persists was found to be highly dependent on the number of drug-rich nanodroplets present in the donor compartment. Macroscopic amorphous particles of clotrimazole did not lead to the same reservoir effect observed with the nanodroplets formed through the process of LLPS. A first-principles mathematical model was developed which was able to fit the experimental receiver concentration-time profiles for concentration regimes both below and above amorphous solubility, providing support for the contention that the nanodroplet phase does not directly diffuse across the membrane but, instead, rapidly replenishes the drug in the aqueous phase that has been removed by transport across the membrane. This study provides important insight into the properties of

  10. Schwann cells-axon interaction in myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveggia, Carla

    2016-08-01

    The remarkable interaction between glial cells and axons is crucial for nervous system development and homeostasis. Alterations in this continuous communication can cause severe pathologies that can compromise the integrity of the nervous system. The most dramatic consequence of this interaction is the generation of the myelin sheath, made by myelinating glial cells: Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system and oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. In this review I will focus on signals coming from axons in the first part and then on those from Schwann cells that promote the formation and the maintenance of peripheral myelin. I will discuss their inter-relationship together with seminal and important advances recently made.

  11. Interspecies variation in axon-myelin relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, J P; O'Sullivan, A W

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to determine the extent and nature of interspecies differences in axon calibre and myelin sheath thickness and in the various relationships between these. Morphometric analysis of the axon perimeter-myelin sheath thickness relationship was performed on an equivalent nerve fibre population in a mammal, the rat, a bird, the chicken, an amphibian, the frog, a bony fish, the trout, and a cartilaginous fish, the dogfish. The abducent nerve was studied. It is especially suitable for this purpose because its fibres are closely similar in type and in peripheral distribution across the species studied. The relationship differed substantially between species. Differences were present in its setting, as described by the positions of the scatterplots, in the g ratio and in the regression and correlation data relating the parameters. Both parameters were markedly larger in the fish species than in all of the others. In addition, in rat, chicken, frog and trout, where large and small fibre classes could be differentiated clearly, the setting of the relationship between the two parameters was different for the two classes. In the main, variation in each of the parameters was greater between than within species. The larger fibres in the fish species were closely similar in axon perimeter and sheath thickness despite their long evolutionary separation. From this study and from others in the series, it may be concluded that there is no fixed or constant relationship between axon calibre and the thickness of the surrounding myelin sheath. Each nerve tends to have its own particular relationship and this differs between species.

  12. Dimethyl Fumarate Ameliorates Lewis Rat Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis and Mediates Axonal Protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi Pitarokoili

    Full Text Available Dimethyl fumarate is an immunomodulatory and neuroprotective drug, approved recently for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. In view of the limited therapeutic options for human acute and chronic polyneuritis, we used the animal model of experimental autoimmune neuritis in the Lewis rat to study the effects of dimethyl fumarate on autoimmune inflammation and neuroprotection in the peripheral nervous system.Experimental autoimmune neuritis was induced by immunization with the neuritogenic peptide (amino acids 53-78 of P2 myelin protein. Preventive treatment with dimethyl fumarate given at 45 mg/kg twice daily by oral gavage significantly ameliorated clinical neuritis by reducing demyelination and axonal degeneration in the nerve conduction studies. Histology revealed a significantly lower degree of inflammatory infiltrates in the sciatic nerves. In addition, we detected a reduction of early signs of axonal degeneration through a reduction of amyloid precursor protein expressed in axons of the peripheral nerves. This reduction correlated with an increase of nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2-related factor 2 positive axons, supporting the neuroprotective potential of dimethyl fumarate. Furthermore, nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2-related factor 2 expression in Schwann cells was only rarely detected and there was no increase of Schwann cells death during EAN.We conclude that immunomodulatory and neuroprotective dimethyl fumarate may represent an innovative therapeutic option in human autoimmune neuropathies.

  13. Geniposide Alleviates Amyloid-Induced Synaptic Injury by Protecting Axonal Mitochondrial Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijing; Zhao, Chunhui; Lv, Cui; Liu, Xiaoli; Du, Shijing; Li, Zhi; Wang, Yongyan; Zhang, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic and mitochondrial pathologies are early events in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Normal axonal mitochondrial function and transport play crucial roles in maintaining synaptic function by producing high levels of adenosine triphosphate and buffering calcium. However, there can be abnormal axonal mitochondrial trafficking, distribution, and fragmentation, which are strongly correlated with amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced synaptic loss and dysfunction. The present study examined the neuroprotective effect of geniposide, a compound extracted from gardenia fruit in Aβ-treated neurons and an AD mouse model. Geniposide alleviated Aβ-induced axonal mitochondrial abnormalities by increasing axonal mitochondrial density and length and improving mitochondrial motility and trafficking in cultured hippocampal neurons, consequently ameliorating synaptic damage by reversing synaptic loss, addressing spine density and morphology abnormalities, and ameliorating the decreases in synapse-related proteins in neurons and APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. These findings provide new insights into the effects of geniposide administration on neuronal and synaptic functions under conditions of Aβ enrichment. PMID:28179878

  14. Retinoic acid signaling in axonal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika ePuttagunta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Following an acute central nervous system injury, axonal regeneration and functional recovery are extremely limited. This is due to an extrinsic inhibitory growth environment and the lack of intrinsic growth competence. Retinoic acid (RA signaling, essential in developmental dorsoventral patterning and specification of spinal motor neurons, has been shown through its receptor, the transcription factor RA receptor β2 (RARß2, to induce axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury (SCI. Recently, it has been shown that in dorsal root ganglia neurons, cAMP levels were greatly increased by lentiviral RARβ2 expression and contributed to neurite outgrowth. Moreover, RARβ agonists, in cerebellar granule neurons and in the brain in vivo, induced phosphoinositide 3-kinase dependent phosphorylation of AKT that was involved in RARβ-dependent neurite outgrowth. More recently, RA-RARß pathways were shown to directly transcriptionally repress a member of the inhibitory Nogo receptor complex, Lingo-1, under an axonal growth inhibitory environment in vitro as well as following spinal injury in vivo. This perspective focuses on these newly discovered molecular mechanisms and future directions in the field.

  15. MRI of the diffuse axonal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Yang Gu; Woo, Young Hoon; Suh, Soo Jhi [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-01-15

    CT has facilitated early recognition and treatment of focal brain injuries in patients with head trauma. However, CT shows relatively low sensitivity in identifying non hemorrhage contusion and injuries of white matter. MR is known to be superior to CT in detection of white matter injuries, such as diffuse axonal injury. MR imaging in 14 cases of diffuse axonal injury on 2.0T was studied. The corpus callosum, especially the body portion, was the most commonly involved site. The lesions ranged from 5 to 20mm in size with ovoid to elliptical shape. T2WI was the most sensitive pulse sequence in detecting lesions such as white matter degeneration, hemorrhagic and non hemorrhagic contusion. The lesions were nonspecific as high and low signal intensities on T2WI and T1WI respectively. CT showed white matter abnormality in only 1 case of 14 cases. We propose MR imaging as the primary imaging procedure for the detection of diffuse axonal injury because of its multiplanar capabilities and higher sensitivity.

  16. Shh goes multidirectional in axon guidance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola Bovolenta; Luisa Sanchez-Arrones

    2012-01-01

    Shh and Wnts,secreted by the floor and roof plate of the spinal cord,direct longitudinal growth of the axons from the adjacent ventral funiculus and cortico-spinal tract.Whether these midline cues influencethe directionality of axons elongating in more lateral positions of the spinal cord is unexplored.Song and colleagues investigate this possibility and demonstrate that the location of descending raphe-spinal tract in the ventrolateral spinal cord is dictated by the simultaneous repellent activity of Shh gradients in both the anteriorto-posterior (A-P) and medial-tolateral (M-L) axis. The spinal cord is the main pathway for exchange of information between the brain and the rest of the body.Sensory information collected in the body periphery is conveyed to the brain by axonal tracts that ascend along the spinal cord whereas motor information travels from the brain to the periphery in descending tracts.Precise spatial organization of these fiber tracts is thus essential for animal behavior and survival.

  17. Axon-glial relations during regeneration of axons in the adult rat anterior medullary velum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M; Hunter, A S; Duncan, A; Lordan, J; Kirvell, S; Tsang, W L; Butt, A M

    1998-12-01

    The anterior medullary velum (AMV) of adult Wistar rats was lesioned in the midsagittal plane, transecting all decussating axons including those of the central projection of the IVth nerve. At selected times up to 200 days after transection, the degenerative and regenerative responses of axons and glia were analyzed using transmission and scanning electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. In particular, both the capacity of oligodendrocytes to remyelinate regenerated fibers and the stability of the CNS/PNS junctional zone of the IVth nerve rootlet were documented. Transected central AMV axons exhibited four patterns of fiber regeneration in which fibers grew: rostrocaudally in the reactive paralesion neuropil (Group 1); randomly within the AMV (Group 2); into the ipsilateral IVth nerve rootlet, after turning at the lesion edge and growing recurrently through the old degenerated contralateral central trochlear nerve trajectory (Group 3); and ectopically through paralesion tears in the ependyma onto the surface of the IVth ventricle (Group 4). Group 1-3 axons regenerated unperturbed through degenerating central myelin, reactive astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and large accumulations of hematogenous macrophages. Only Group 3 axons survived long term in significant numbers, and all became myelinated by oligodendrocytes, ultimately establishing thin sheaths with relatively normal nodal gaps and intersegmental myelin sheath lengths. Schwann cells at the CNS/PNS junction of the IVth nerve rootlet did not invade the CNS, but astrocyte processes grew across the junction into the PNS portion of the IVth nerve. The basal lamina of the junctional glia limitans remained stable throughout the experimental period.

  18. The C-terminal domains of NF-H and NF-M subunits maintain axonal neurofilament content by blocking turnover of the stationary neurofilament network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala V Rao

    Full Text Available Newly synthesized neurofilaments or protofilaments are incorporated into a highly stable stationary cytoskeleton network as they are transported along axons. Although the heavily phosphorylated carboxyl-terminal tail domains of the heavy and medium neurofilament (NF subunits have been proposed to contribute to this process and particularly to stability of this structure, their function is still obscure. Here we show in NF-H/M tail deletion [NF-(H/M(tailΔ] mice that the deletion of both of these domains selectively lowers NF levels 3-6 fold along optic axons without altering either rates of subunit synthesis or the rate of slow axonal transport of NF. Pulse labeling studies carried out over 90 days revealed a significantly faster rate of disappearance of NF from the stationary NF network of optic axons in NF-(H/M(tailΔ mice. Faster NF disappearance was accompanied by elevated levels of NF-L proteolytic fragments in NF-(H/M(tailΔ axons. We conclude that NF-H and NF-M C-terminal domains do not normally regulate NF transport rates as previously proposed, but instead increase the proteolytic resistance of NF, thereby stabilizing the stationary neurofilament cytoskeleton along axons.

  19. Control of Mycosphaerella graminicola on wheat seedlings by medical drugs known to modulate the activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roohparvar, R.; Huser, A.; Zwiers, L.H.; Waard, de M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Medical drugs known to modulate the activity of human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins (modulators) were tested for the ability to potentiate the activity of the azole fungicide cyproconazole against in vitro growth of Mycosphaerella graminicola and to control disease development due

  20. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on human organic anion transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3: a novel candidate for food-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwai, Yuichi; Ozeki, Yukihiro; Isaka, Tomonori; Honjo, Hiroaki; Iwamoto, Kikuo

    2011-01-01

    Several kinds of food have been shown to influence the absorption and metabolism of drugs, although there is little information about their effect on the renal excretion of drugs. In this study, we performed uptake experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes to assess the inhibitory effects of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and quinic acid, which are contained in coffee, fruits and vegetables, on human organic anion transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3; these transporters mediate renal tubular uptake of anionic drugs from blood. Injection of hOAT1 and hOAT3 cRNA into oocytes stimulated uptake of typical substrates of hOAT1 and hOAT3 (p-aminohippurate and estrone sulfate, respectively); among the three compounds tested, caffeic acid most strongly inhibited these transporters. The apparent 50% inhibitory concentrations of caffeic acid were estimated to be 16.6 µM for hOAT1 and 5.4 µM for hOAT3. Eadie-Hofstee plot analysis showed that caffeic acid inhibited both transporters in a competitive manner. In addition to the transport of p-aminohippurate and estrone sulfate, that of antifolates and antivirals was inhibited by caffeic acid. These findings show that caffeic acid has inhibitory potential against hOAT1 and hOAT3, suggesting that renal excretion of their substrates could be affected in patients consuming a diet including caffeic acid.

  1. Understanding the structure, dynamics, and mass transport properties of self assembling peptide hydrogels for injectable, drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Monica Cristina

    hydrogels as a function of peptide sequence and concentration. Changes in nanoscale dynamics and structure inherently lead to substantial differences in bulk properties, such as the elastic modulus and network mesh size. Learning how the material properties of the gels influence the transport rate of therapeutics through the hydrogel is essential to the development of delivery vehicles. The remainder of the thesis focuses on correlating the mesh sizes of MAX1 and MAX8 gels to the diffusion and mass transport properties of model dextran and protein probes. Here, work is centered on how peptide charge and concentration, as well as probe structure, in particular hydrodynamic diameter and charge, dictate the temporal release of model probes from the peptide hydrogels. Experiments include self diffusion studies and bulk release experiments with model dextrans and proteins from gels before and after syringe delivery. Overall, this thesis will demonstrate the importance of understanding material properties from the nanoscale up to the macroscale for application based design. With this approach, better and specific development of self-assembling peptide materials can be achieved, allowing for the rational engineering of peptide sequences to form hydrogels appropriate for specific drug delivery applications.

  2. Characterizing drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters that are bona fide CAR-target genes in mouse intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinhee Park

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intestine is responsible for the biotransformation of many orally-exposed chemicals. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR/Nr1i3 is known to up-regulate many genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (drug-processing genes/DPGs in liver, but less is known regarding its effect in intestine. Sixty-day-old wild-type and Car−/− mice were administered the CAR-ligand TCPOBOP or vehicle once daily for 4 days. In wild-type mice, Car mRNA was down-regulated by TCPOBOP in liver and duodenum. Car−/− mice had altered basal intestinal expression of many DPGs in a section-specific manner. Consistent with the liver data (Aleksunes and Klaassen, 2012, TCPOBOP up-regulated many DPGs (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, Aldh1a1, Aldh1a7, Gsta1, Gsta4, Gstm1-m4, Gstt1, Ugt1a1, Ugt2b34, Ugt2b36, and Mrp2–4 in specific sections of small intestine in a CAR-dependent manner. However, the mRNAs of Nqo1 and Papss2 were previously known to be up-regulated by TCPOBOP in liver but were not altered in intestine. Interestingly, many known CAR-target genes were highest expressed in colon where CAR is minimally expressed, suggesting that additional regulators are involved in regulating their expression. In conclusion, CAR regulates the basal expression of many DPGs in intestine, and although many hepatic CAR-targeted DPGs were bona fide CAR-targets in intestine, pharmacological activation of CAR in liver and intestine are not identical.

  3. Role of Ectopic Gene Conversion in the Evolution of a Candida krusei Pleiotropic Drug Resistance Transporter Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamping, Erwin; Zhu, Jing-yi; Niimi, Masakazu; Cannon, Richard David

    2017-01-01

    Gene duplications enable the evolution of novel gene function, but strong positive selection is required to preserve advantageous mutations in a population. This is because frequent ectopic gene conversions (EGCs) between highly similar, tandem-duplicated, sequences, can rapidly remove fate-determining mutations by replacing them with the neighboring parent gene sequences. Unfortunately, the high sequence similarities between tandem-duplicated genes severely hamper empirical studies of this important evolutionary process, because deciphering their correct sequences is challenging. In this study, we employed the eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae to clone and functionally characterize all 30 alleles of an important pair of tandem-duplicated multidrug efflux pump genes, ABC1 and ABC11, from seven strains of the diploid pathogenic yeast Candida krusei. Discovery and functional characterization of their closest ancestor, C. krusei ABC12, helped elucidate the evolutionary history of the entire gene family. Our data support the proposal that the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters Abc1p and Abc11p have evolved by concerted evolution for ∼134 MY. While >90% of their sequences remained identical, very strong purifying selection protected six short DNA patches encoding just 18 core amino acid (aa) differences in particular trans membrane span (TMS) regions causing two distinct efflux pump functions. A proline-kink change at the bottom of Abc11p TMS3 was possibly fate determining. Our data also enabled the first empirical estimates for key parameters of eukaryotic gene evolution, they provided rare examples of intron loss, and PDR transporter phylogeny confirmed that C. krusei belongs to a novel, yet unnamed, third major Saccharomycotina lineage. PMID:28159755

  4. Dynamics of axon fasciculation in the presence of neuronal turnover

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Debasish; Mohanty, P K; Zapotocky, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We formulate and characterize a model aiming to describe the formation of fascicles of axons mediated by contact axon-axon interactions. The growing axons are represented as interacting directed random walks in two spatial dimensions. To mimic axonal turnover in the mammalian olfactory system, the random walkers are injected and removed at specified rates. In the dynamical steady state, the position-dependent distribution of fascicle sizes obeys a scaling law. We identify several distinct time scales that emerge from the dynamics, are sensitive functions of the microscopic parameters of the model, and can exceed the average axonal lifetime by orders of magnitude. We discuss our findings in terms of an analytically tractable, effective model of fascicle dynamics.

  5. KSRP modulation of GAP-43 mRNA stability restricts axonal outgrowth in embryonic hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark W Bird

    Full Text Available The KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP promotes the decay of AU-rich element (ARE-containing mRNAs. Although KSRP is expressed in the nervous system, very little is known about its role in neurons. In this study, we examined whether KSRP regulates the stability of the ARE-containing GAP-43 mRNA. We found that KSRP destabilizes this mRNA by binding to its ARE, a process that requires the presence of its fourth KH domain (KH4. Furthermore, KSRP competed with the stabilizing factor HuD for binding to these sequences. We also examined the functional consequences of KSRP overexpression and knockdown on the differentiation of primary hippocampal neurons in culture. Overexpression of full length KSRP or KSRP without its nuclear localization signal hindered axonal outgrowth in these cultures, while overexpression of a mutant protein without the KH4 domain that has less affinity for binding to GAP-43's ARE had no effect. In contrast, depletion of KSRP led to a rise in GAP-43 mRNA levels and a dramatic increase in axonal length, both in KSRP shRNA transfected cells and neurons cultured from Ksrp(+/- and Ksrp(-/- embryos. Finally we found that overexpression of GAP-43 rescued the axonal outgrowth deficits seen with KSRP overexpression, but only when cells were transfected with GAP-43 constructs containing 3' UTR sequences targeting the transport of this mRNA to axons. Together, our results suggest that KSRP is an important regulator of mRNA stability and axonal length that works in direct opposition to HuD to regulate the levels of GAP-43 and other ARE-containing neuronal mRNAs.

  6. Role of MRP transporters in regulating antimicrobial drug inefficacy and oxidative stress-induced pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Upal; Barber, Paul; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Batrakova, Elena V; Mondal, Debasis; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV) used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB) therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH) conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9) have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function, and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  7. Role of MRP Transporters in Regulating Antimicrobial Drug Inefficacy and Oxidative Stress-induced Pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upal eRoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9 have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  8. How drugs get into cells: tested and testable predictions to help discriminate between transporter-mediated uptake and lipoidal bilayer diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Bruce Kell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One approach to experimental science involves creating hypotheses, then testing them by varying one or more independent variables and assessing the effects of this variation on the processes of interest. We use this strategy to compare the intellectual status and available evidence for two models or views of mechanisms of transmembrane drug transport into intact biological cells. One (BDII asserts that lipoidal phospholipid Bilayer Diffusion Is Important, while a second (PBIN proposes that in normal intact cells Phospholipid Bilayer diffusion Is Negligible (i.e. may be neglected quantitatively, because evolution selected against it, and with transmembrane drug transport being effected by genetically encoded proteinaceous carriers or pores, whose ‘natural’ biological roles and substrates are based in intermediary metabolism. Despite a recent review elsewhere, we can find no evidence able to support BDII as we can find no experiments in intact cells in which phospholipid bilayer diffusion was either varied independently or measured directly (although there are many papers where it was inferred by seeing a covariation of other dependent variables. By contrast, we find an abundance of evidence showing cases in which changes in the activities of named and genetically identified transporters led to measurable changes in the rate or extent of drug uptake. PBIN also has considerable predictive power, and accounts readily for the large differences in drug uptake between tissues, cells and species, in accounting for the metabolite-likeness of marketed drugs, in pharmacogenomics, and in providing a straightforward explanation for the late-stage appearance of toxicity and of lack of efficacy during drug discovery programmes despite macroscopically adequate pharmacokinetics. Consequently, the view that Phospholipid Bilayer diffusion Is Negligible (PBIN provides a starting hypothesis for assessing cellular drug uptake that is much better supported by the

  9. Chlorpyrifos-Oxon Disrupts Zebrafish Axonal Growth and Motor Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dongren; Lauridsen, Holly; Buels, Kalmia; Chi, Lai-Har; La Du, Jane; Bruun, Donald A.; Olson, James R.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    Axonal morphology is a critical determinant of neuronal connectivity, and perturbation of the rate or extent of axonal growth during development has been linked to neurobehavioral deficits in animal models and humans. We previously demonstrated that the organophosphorus pesticide (OP) chlorpyrifos (CPF) inhibits axonal growth in cultured neurons. In this study, we used a zebrafish model to determine whether CPF, its oxon metabolite (CPFO), or the excreted metabolite trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP...

  10. A unified cell biological perspective on axon-myelin injury

    OpenAIRE

    Simons, Mikael; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Demyelination and axon loss are pathological hallmarks of the neuroinflammatory disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). Although we have an increasingly detailed understanding of how immune cells can damage axons and myelin individually, we lack a unified view of how the axon–myelin unit as a whole is affected by immune-mediated attack. In this review, we propose that as a result of the tight cell biological interconnection of axons and myelin, damage to either can spread, which might convert a loc...

  11. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialized glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarization followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is...

  12. The oncology drug elesclomol selectively transports copper to the mitochondria to induce oxidative stress in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Masazumi; Vo, Nha H; Shin Ogawa, Luisa; Chimmanamada, Dinesh; Inoue, Takayo; Chu, John; Beaudette-Zlatanova, Britte C; Lu, Rongzhen; Blackman, Ronald K; Barsoum, James; Koya, Keizo; Wada, Yumiko

    2012-05-15

    Elesclomol is an investigational drug that exerts potent anticancer activity through the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and is currently under clinical evaluation as a novel anticancer therapeutic. Here we report the first description of selective mitochondrial ROS induction by elesclomol in cancer cells based on the unique physicochemical properties of the compound. Elesclomol preferentially chelates copper (Cu) outside of cells and enters as elesclomol-Cu(II). The elesclomol-Cu(II) complex then rapidly and selectively transports the copper to mitochondria. In this organelle Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I), followed by subsequent ROS generation. Upon dissociation from the complex, elesclomol is effluxed from cells and repeats shuttling elesclomol-Cu complexes from the extracellular to the intracellular compartments, leading to continued copper accumulation within mitochondria. An optimal range of redox potentials exhibited by copper chelates of elesclomol and its analogs correlated with the elevation of mitochondrial Cu(I) levels and cytotoxic activity, suggesting that redox reduction of the copper triggers mitochondrial ROS induction. Importantly the mitochondrial selectivity exhibited by elesclomol is a distinct characteristic of the compound that is not shared by other chelators, including disulfiram. Together these findings highlight a unique mechanism of action with important implications for cancer therapy.

  13. Single rodent mesohabenular axons release glutamate and GABA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H.; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Huiling; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is involved in reward, aversion, addiction, and depression, through descending interactions with several brain structures, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA provides reciprocal inputs to LHb, but their actions are unclear. Here we show that the majority of rat and mouse VTA neurons innervating LHb co-express markers for both glutamate-signaling (vesicular glutamate transporter 2, VGluT2) and GABA-signaling (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD; and vesicular GABA transporter, VGaT). A single axon from these mesohabenular neurons co-expresses VGluT2-protein and VGaT-protein, and surprisingly establishes symmetric and asymmetric synapses on LHb neurons. In LHb slices, light activation of mesohabenular fibers expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) driven by VGluT2 or VGaT promoters elicits release of both glutamate and GABA onto single LHb neurons. In vivo light-activation of mesohabenular terminals inhibits or excites LHb neurons. Our findings reveal an unanticipated type of VTA neuron that co-transmits glutamate and GABA, and provides the majority of mesohabenular inputs. PMID:25242304

  14. Corticostriatal combinatorics: the implications of corticostriatal axonal arborizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, T; Wilson, C J

    2002-02-01

    The complete striatal axonal arborizations of 16 juxtacellularly stained cortical pyramidal cells were analyzed. Corticostriatal neurons were located in the medial agranular or anterior cingulate cortex of rats. All axons were of the extended type and formed synaptic contacts in both the striosomal and matrix compartments as determined by counterstaining for the mu-opiate receptor. Six axonal arborizations were from collaterals of brain stem-projecting cells and the other 10 from bilaterally projecting cells with no brain stem projections. The distribution of synaptic boutons along the axons were convolved with the average dendritic tree volume of spiny projection neurons to obtain an axonal innervation volume and innervation density map for each axon. Innervation volumes varied widely, with single axons occupying between 0.4 and 14.2% of the striatum (average = 4%). The total number of boutons formed by individual axons ranged from 25 to 2,900 (average = 879). Within the innervation volume, the density of innervation was extremely sparse but inhomogeneous. The pattern of innervation resembled matrisomes, as defined by bulk labeling and functional mapping experiments, superimposed on a low background innervation. Using this sample as representative of all corticostriatal axons, the total number of corticostriatal neurons was estimated to be 17 million, about 10 times the number of striatal projection neurons.

  15. Molecular analysis of axon repulsion by the notochord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher N G; Ohta, Kunimasa; Quick, Marie M; Fleming, Angeleen; Keynes, Roger; Tannahill, David

    2003-03-01

    During development of the amniote peripheral nervous system, the initial trajectory of primary sensory axons is determined largely by the action of axon repellents. We have shown previously that tissues flanking dorsal root ganglia, the notochord lying medially and the dermamyotomes lying laterally, are sources of secreted molecules that prevent axons from entering inappropriate territories. Although there is evidence suggesting that SEMA3A contributes to the repellent activity of the dermamyotome, the nature of the activity secreted by the notochord remains undetermined. We have employed an expression cloning strategy to search for axon repellents secreted by the notochord, and have identified SEMA3A as a candidate repellent. Moreover, using a spectrum of different axon populations to assay the notochord activity, together with neuropilin/Fc receptor reagents to block semaphorin activity in collagen gel assays, we show that SEMA3A probably contributes to notochord-mediated repulsion. Sympathetic axons that normally avoid the midline in vivo are also repelled, in part, by a semaphorin-based notochord activity. Although our results implicate semaphorin signalling in mediating repulsion by the notochord, repulsion of early dorsal root ganglion axons is only partially blocked when using neuropilin/Fc reagents. Moreover, retinal axons, which are insensitive to SEMA3A, are also repelled by the notochord. We conclude that multiple factors act in concert to guide axons in this system, and that further notochord repellents remain to be identified.

  16. Differences in excitability properties of FDI and ADM motor axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong Seok; Sawai, Setsu; Misawa, Sonoko; Kanai, Kazuaki; Isose, Sagiri; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2009-03-01

    The first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles are innervated by the same ulnar nerve, but studies have shown that the former is much more severely affected in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, threshold tracking was used to investigate whether membrane properties differ between FDI and ADM motor axons. In 12 normal subjects, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from FDI and ADM after ulnar nerve stimulation at the wrist. The strength-duration time constant was significantly longer in the FDI axons than in the ADM axons, and latent addition studies showed greater threshold changes at the conditioning-test stimulus of 0.2 ms in FDI than in ADM axons. These findings suggest that nodal persistent sodium conductances are more prominent in FDI axons than in ADM axons, and therefore excitability is physiologically higher in FDI axons. Even in the same nerve at the same sites, membrane properties of FDI and ADM motor axons differ significantly, and thus their axonal/neuronal responses to disease may also differ.

  17. Axonal autophagy during regeneration of the rat sciatic nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kangrong Lu; Zhongxian Piao; Zhenxi Liu; Weiwang Gu; Wanshan Wang; Nngjie Piao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The removal of degenerated axonal debris during Wallerian degeneration is very important for nerve regeneration. However, the mechanism by which debris is removed is not been completely understood. Considerable controversy remains as to the clearance pathway and cells that are involved. OBJECTIVE: To investigate axonal autophagy during removal of degenerated axonal debris by transecting the sciatic nerve in a rat Wallerian degeneration model.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Experimental neuropathological analysis. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory Animal Service Center of the Southern Medical University between January and June 2005. MATERIALS: Fifty-four adult, Wistar rats of either sex, weighing 180-250 g, were obtained from the Laboratory Animal Service Center of the Southern Medical University. Animals were randomly divided into nine groups of six rats. METHODS: Wallerian degeneration was induced by transecting the rat sciatic nerve, and tissue samples from the distal stump were obtained 0.2, 0.4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, and 15 days post-transection. Ultrathin sections were prepared for electron microscopy to study ultrastructure and enzyme cytochemistry staining. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ultrastructure (axon body, autophagic body, and cystoskeleton) of axons and myelin sheaths observed with electron microscopy; acidic phosphatase activity detected by Gomori staining using electron microscopy. RESULTS: The major changes of degenerating axons after transection were axoplasm swelling and separation of axons from their myelin sheath between five hours and two days post-transection. At four days post-transection, the axoplasm condensed and axons were completely separated from the myelin sheath, forming dissociative axon bodies. Vacuoles of different sizes formed in axons during the early phase after lesion. Larger dissociative axon bodies were formed when the axons were completely separated from the myelin sheath during a late phase. The axolemma

  18. Crossing the Border: Molecular Control of Motor Axon Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Bravo-Ambrosio

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms heavily rely on the function of motor circuits for their survival and for adapting to ever-changing environments. Unique among central nervous system (CNS neurons, motor neurons (MNs project their axons out of the CNS. Once in the periphery, motor axons navigate along highly stereotyped trajectories, often at considerable distances from their cell bodies, to innervate appropriate muscle targets. A key decision made by pathfinding motor axons is whether to exit the CNS through dorsal or ventral motor exit points (MEPs. In contrast to the major advances made in understanding the mechanisms that regulate the specification of MN subtypes and the innervation of limb muscles, remarkably little is known about how MN axons project out of the CNS. Nevertheless, a limited number of studies, mainly in Drosophila, have identified transcription factors, and in some cases candidate downstream effector molecules, that are required for motor axons to exit the spinal cord. Notably, specialized neural crest cell derivatives, referred to as Boundary Cap (BC cells, pre-figure and demarcate MEPs in vertebrates. Surprisingly, however, BC cells are not required for MN axon exit, but rather restrict MN cell bodies from ectopically migrating along their axons out of the CNS. Here, we describe the small set of studies that have addressed motor axon exit in Drosophila and vertebrates, and discuss our fragmentary knowledge of the mechanisms, which guide motor axons out of the CNS.

  19. A unified cell biological perspective on axon-myelin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mikael; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin

    2014-08-04

    Demyelination and axon loss are pathological hallmarks of the neuroinflammatory disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). Although we have an increasingly detailed understanding of how immune cells can damage axons and myelin individually, we lack a unified view of how the axon-myelin unit as a whole is affected by immune-mediated attack. In this review, we propose that as a result of the tight cell biological interconnection of axons and myelin, damage to either can spread, which might convert a local inflammatory disease process early in MS into the global progressive disorder seen during later stages. This mode of spreading could also apply to other neurological disorders.

  20. Present status of studies on diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Ma; Chonggong Zhang; Yi Li

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explain the present status of study on diffuse axonal injury,investigate its pathogenesis and pathophysiological changes ,and suggest principles for the diagnosis and treatment.DATA SOURCES: Articles about diffuse axonal injury published in English from January 1994 to October 2006 were searched in Pubmed database using the keywords of "diffuse axonal injury,pathogenesis,therapy".STUDY SELECTION: The collected articles were primarily screened to select those associated with diffuse axonal injury,the obviously irrelated articles were excluded,and the rest ones were retrieved manually,and the full-texes were searched.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 98 articles were collected,41 of them were involved.and the other 57 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: Diffuse axonal injury is mainly caused by acceleratory or deceleratory injury,and its pathophysiological change is a progressive duration,local axonal injury finally develops to axonal breakage,mainly includes inactivation of natrium channel,intracellular Ca2+ overloading,activation of calcium protease,caspase etc.,and mitochondrial injury.At present,there is still lack of effective therapeutic methods for diffuse axonal injury,so we should actively explore more effective methods to relieve the pain of patients and improve their prognosis.CONCLUSION: At present,diffuse axonal injury has not attracted enough attentions in China,the mechanisms for its diagnosis and attack are still unclear,and the treatments are mainly aiming at the symptoms.

  1. Dopaminergic axon guidance: which makes what?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia ePrestoz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesotelencephalic pathways in the adult central nervous system have been studied in great detail because of their implication in major physiological functions as well as in psychiatric, neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the ontogeny of these pathways and the molecular mechanisms that guide dopaminergic axons during embryogenesis have been only recently studied. This line of research is of crucial interest for the repair of lesioned circuits in adulthood following neurodegenerative diseases or common traumatic injuries. For instance, in the adult, the anatomic and functional repair of the nigrostriatal pathway following dopaminergic embryonic neuron transplantation suggests that specific guidance cues exist which govern embryonic fibers outgrowth, and suggests that axons from transplanted embryonic cells are able to respond to theses cues, which then guide them to their final targets. In this review, we first synthesize the work that has been performed in the last few years on developing mesotelencephalic pathways, and summarize the current knowledge on the identity of cellular and molecular signals thought to be involved in establishing mesotelencephalic dopaminergic neuronal connectivity during embryogenesis in the central nervous system of rodents. Then, we review the modulation of expression of these molecular signals in the lesioned adult brain and discuss their potential role in remodeling the mesotelencephalic dopaminergic circuitry, with a particular focus on Parkinson’s disease. Identifying guidance molecules involved in the connection of grafted cells may be useful for cellular therapy in Parkinsonian patients, as these molecules may help direct axons from grafted cells along the long distance they have to travel from the substantia nigra to the striatum.

  2. Axonal regeneration and development of de novo axons from distal dendrites of adult feline commissural interneurons after a proximal axotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenrich, Keith K; Skelton, Nicole; MacDermid, Victoria E

    2007-01-01

    at 4-5 weeks post injury. The somata of axotomized CINs were identified by the presence of immunoreactivity for the axonal growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Nearly half of the CINs had de novo axons that emerged from distal dendrites. These axons lacked immunoreactivity for the dendritic protein......Following proximal axotomy, several types of neurons sprout de novo axons from distal dendrites. These processes may represent a means of forming new circuits following spinal cord injury. However, it is not know whether mammalian spinal interneurons, axotomized as a result of a spinal cord injury......, develop de novo axons. Our goal was to determine whether spinal commissural interneurons (CINs), axotomized by 3-4-mm midsagittal transection at C3, form de novo axons from distal dendrites. All experiments were performed on adult cats. CINs in C3 were stained with extracellular injections of Neurobiotin...

  3. IMP2 axonal localization, RNA interactome, and function in the development of axon trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preitner, Nicolas; Quan, Jie; Li, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    RNA-based regulatory mechanisms play important roles in the development and plasticity of neural circuits and neurological disease. Developing axons provide a model well suited to the study of RNA-based regulation, and contain specific subsets of mRNAs that are locally translated and have roles i...

  4. White-matter astrocytes, axonal energy metabolism, and axonal degeneration in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambron, Melissa; D'haeseleer, Miguel; Laureys, Guy; Clinckers, Ralph; Debruyne, Jan; De Keyser, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a diffuse axonal degeneration occurring throughout the white matter of the central nervous system causes progressive neurologic disability. The underlying mechanism is unclear. This review describes a number of pathways by which dysfunctional astrocytes in M

  5. Effect of formulation pH on transport of naltrexone species and pore closure in microneedle-enhanced transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Priyanka; Brogden, Nicole K; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2013-06-03

    Microneedle-enhanced transdermal drug delivery greatly improves the subset of pharmacologically active molecules that can be transported across the skin. Formulation pH plays an important role in all drug delivery systems; however, for transdermal delivery it becomes specifically significant since a wide range of pH values can be exploited for patch formulation as long as it does not lead to skin irritation or sensitization issues. Wound healing literature has shown significant pH effects on barrier recovery. Stability and solubility of the drug, and thus transport across skin, are all affected by formulation pH. The current study examined the role of ionization state of the drug naltrexone on transdermal flux and permeability across microneedle treated skin, as compared to intact skin. Impedance spectroscopy was done in pigs in vivo to assess the role of formulation pH on the rate of micropore closure under the influence of three different pH conditions. The data indicated that while there was significant advantage of using a lower pH formulation in terms of total transport across microneedle treated skin, the pH however did not have any significant effect on the rate of micropore closure beyond the first 24 h.

  6. Intranasal administration of milnacipran in rats: evaluation of the transport of drugs to the systemic circulation and central nervous system and the pharmacological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masaki; Katoh, Takuya; Mori, Mutsuhiro; Maeno, Takuya; Ohtake, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Jun; Morimoto, Yasunori; Natsume, Hideshi

    2011-01-01

    Recently, transnasal drug delivery has attracted a great deal of attention as an administration route to deliver drugs directly to the central nervous systems (CNS) and drug targeting of the CNS is expected to increase. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of using a transnasal delivery system for milnacipran, a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), by evaluating the transport to the systemic circulation and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the pharmacological effect after intranasal (i.n.) administration. Moreover, the effect of chitosan as a bioadhesive material on the transport to the systemic circulation and CSF and the pharmacological effect after i.n. administration were evaluated. As a result, i.n. administration of milnacipran was found to produce a higher direct delivery to the CNS as well as to the systemic circulation, suggesting that this is a promising route of administration and an alternative to peroral (p.o.) administration. Furthermore, the i.n. co-administration with chitosan led to increased plasma and CSF concentrations and an enhanced pharmacological effect, evaluated by means of the forced swimming test. The results suggested that chitosan produced a long residence time of milnacipran in the nasal cavity due to its bioadhesive effect, leading to the enhanced transport of milnacipran from the systemic circulation to the CNS via the blood-brain barrier by an increase in systemic absorption as well as direct transport to the CNS, resulting in a higher antidepressant effect compared to that with p.o. administration.

  7. AxonPacking: An Open-Source Software to Simulate Arrangements of Axons in White Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingasson, Tom; Duval, Tanguy; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS AxonPacking: Open-source software for simulating white matter microstructure.Validation on a theoretical disk packing problem.Reproducible and stable for various densities and diameter distributions.Can be used to study interplay between myelin/fiber density and restricted fraction. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can provide parameters that describe white matter microstructure, such as the fiber volume fraction (FVF), the myelin volume fraction (MVF) or the axon volume fraction (AVF) via the fraction of restricted water (fr). While already being used for clinical application, the complex interplay between these parameters requires thorough validation via simulations. These simulations required a realistic, controlled and adaptable model of the white matter axons with the surrounding myelin sheath. While there already exist useful algorithms to perform this task, none of them combine optimisation of axon packing, presence of myelin sheath and availability as free and open source software. Here, we introduce a novel disk packing algorithm that addresses these issues. The performance of the algorithm is tested in term of reproducibility over 50 runs, resulting density, and stability over iterations. This tool was then used to derive multiple values of FVF and to study the impact of this parameter on fr and MVF in light of the known microstructure based on histology sample. The standard deviation of the axon density over runs was lower than 10(-3) and the expected hexagonal packing for monodisperse disks was obtained with a density close to the optimal density (obtained: 0.892, theoretical: 0.907). Using an FVF ranging within [0.58, 0.82] and a mean inter-axon gap ranging within [0.1, 1.1] μm, MVF ranged within [0.32, 0.44] and fr ranged within [0.39, 0.71], which is consistent with the histology. The proposed algorithm is implemented in the open-source software AxonPacking (https://github.com/neuropoly/axonpacking) and can be useful for

  8. Finding novel pharmaceuticals in the systems biology era using multiple effective drug targets, phenotypic screening and knowledge of transporters: where drug discovery went wrong and how to fix it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Douglas B

    2013-12-01

    Despite the sequencing of the human genome, the rate of innovative and successful drug discovery in the pharmaceutical industry has continued to decrease. Leaving aside regulatory matters, the fundamental and interlinked intellectual issues proposed to be largely responsible for this are: (a) the move from 'function-first' to 'target-first' methods of screening and drug discovery; (b) the belief that successful drugs should and do interact solely with single, individual targets, despite natural evolution's selection for biochemical networks that are robust to individual parameter changes; (c) an over-reliance on the rule-of-5 to constrain biophysical and chemical properties of drug libraries; (d) the general abandoning of natural products that do not obey the rule-of-5; (e) an incorrect belief that drugs diffuse passively into (and presumably out of) cells across the bilayers portions of membranes, according to their lipophilicity; (f) a widespread failure to recognize the overwhelmingly important role of proteinaceous transporters, as well as their expression profiles, in determining drug distribution in and between different tissues and individual patients; and (g) the general failure to use engineering principles to model biology in parallel with performing 'wet' experiments, such that 'what if?' experiments can be performed in silico to assess the likely success of any strategy. These facts/ideas are illustrated with a reasonably extensive literature review. Success in turning round drug discovery consequently requires: (a) decent systems biology models of human biochemical networks; (b) the use of these (iteratively with experiments) to model how drugs need to interact with multiple targets to have substantive effects on the phenotype; (c) the adoption of polypharmacology and/or cocktails of drugs as a desirable goal in itself; (d) the incorporation of drug transporters into systems biology models, en route to full and multiscale systems biology models that

  9. Regulation of myelin genes implicated in psychiatric disorders by functional activity in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip R Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelination is a highly dynamic process that continues well into adulthood in humans. Several recent gene expression studies have found abnormal expression of genes involved in myelination in the prefrontal cortex of brains from patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Defects in myelination could contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness by impairing information processing as a consequence of altered impulse conduction velocity and synchrony between cortical regions carrying out higher level cognitive functions. Myelination can be altered by impulse activity in axons and by environmental experience. Psychiatric illness is treated by psychotherapy, behavioral modification, and drugs affecting neurotransmission, raising the possibility that myelinating glia may not only contribute to such disorders, but that activity-dependent effects on myelinating glia could provide one of the cellular mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effects of these treatments. This review examines evidence showing that genes and gene networks important for myelination can be regulated by functional activity in axons.

  10. A Systems-Level Analysis of the Peripheral Nerve Intrinsic Axonal Growth Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Vijayendran; Coppola, Giovanni; Nawabi, Homaira; Omura, Takao; Versano, Revital; Huebner, Eric A.; Zhang, Alice; Costigan, Michael; Yekkirala, Ajay; Barrett, Lee; Blesch, Armin; Michaelevski, Izhak; Davis-Turak, Jeremy; Gao, Fuying; Langfelder, Peter; Horvath, Steve; He, Zhigang; Benowitz, Larry; Fainzilber, Mike; Tuszynski, Mark; Woolf, Clifford J.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The regenerative capacity of the injured CNS in adult mammals is severely limited, yet axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) regrow, albeit to a limited extent, after injury. We reasoned that coordinate regulation of gene expression in injured neurons involving multiple pathways was central to PNS regenerative capacity. To provide a framework for revealing pathways involved in PNS axon regrowth after injury, we applied a comprehensive systems biology approach, starting with gene expression profiling of dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) combined with multi-level bioinformatic analyses and experimental validation of network predictions. We used this rubric to identify a drug that accelerates DRG neurite outgrowth in vitro and optic nerve outgrowth in vivo by inducing elements of the identified network. The work provides a functional genomics foundation for understanding neural repair and proof of the power of such approaches in tackling complex problems in nervous system biology. PMID:26898779

  11. [Current progress in functions of axon guidance molecule Robo and underlying molecular mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Tong; Zhou, Qi-Sheng; Yu, Qi; Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2014-06-25

    The axon guidance molecule Robo is a transmembrane protein which is conserved during evolution. Robo and its ligand, Slit, have been implicated in regulating many developmental processes, such as axon guidance, neuronal migration, tumor metastasis, angiogenesis, lung morphogenesis, kidney morphogenesis, heart morphogenesis, ovary development and gonad development. Robo function mainly depends on the binding of its Ig1 domain to the LRR-2 domain of Slit ligand. Meanwhile, Robo function is also mediated by binding to some signaling molecules, including the heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and tyrosine kinase Abelson. Several transcription factors, including Hox, Midline and Nkx2.9, were shown to regulate robo expression. In addition, alternative splicing and transport regulation also affect Robo function. In this review, we summarized the studies on the molecular structure, functions and molecular mechanism of Robo, which would propose a novel strategy for the research of neural development, as well as prevention and treatment of nervous system diseases and cancers.

  12. Human breast cancer resistance protein : Interactions with steroid drugs, hormones, the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine, and transport of cimetidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavek, P; Merino, G; Wagenaar, E; Bolscher, E; Novotna, M; Jonker, JW; Schinkel, AH

    2005-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette drug efflux transporter that extrudes xenotoxins from cells, mediating drug resistance and affecting the pharmacological behavior of many compounds. To study the interaction of human wild-type BCRP with steroid drugs, hormo

  13. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M.; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2−∕−), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−Abcg2−∕−) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders. PMID:27257556

  14. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Brzozowska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabidiol (CBD is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−, Bcrp knockout (Abcg2−∕−, combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−Abcg2−∕− and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders.

  15. Molecular disruptions of the panglial syncytium block potassium siphoning and axonal saltatory conduction: pertinence to neuromyelitis optica and other demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, J E

    2010-07-28

    The panglial syncytium maintains ionic conditions required for normal neuronal electrical activity in the central nervous system (CNS). Vital among these homeostatic functions is "potassium siphoning," a process originally proposed to explain astrocytic sequestration and long-distance disposal of K(+) released from unmyelinated axons during each action potential. Fundamentally different, more efficient processes are required in myelinated axons, where axonal K(+) efflux occurs exclusively beneath and enclosed within the myelin sheath, precluding direct sequestration of K(+) by nearby astrocytes. Molecular mechanisms for entry of excess K(+) and obligatorily-associated osmotic water from axons into innermost myelin are not well characterized, whereas at the output end, axonally-derived K(+) and associated osmotic water are known to be expelled by Kir4.1 and aquaporin-4 channels concentrated in astrocyte endfeet that surround capillaries and that form the glia limitans. Between myelin (input end) and astrocyte endfeet (output end) is a vast network of astrocyte "intermediaries" that are strongly inter-linked, including with myelin, by abundant gap junctions that disperse excess K(+) and water throughout the panglial syncytium, thereby greatly reducing K(+)-induced osmotic swelling of myelin. Here, I review original reports that established the concept of potassium siphoning in unmyelinated CNS axons, summarize recent revolutions in our understanding of K(+) efflux during axonal saltatory conduction, then describe additional components required by myelinated axons for a newly-described process of voltage-augmented "dynamic" potassium siphoning. If any of several molecular components of the panglial syncytium are compromised, K(+) siphoning is blocked, myelin is destroyed, and axonal saltatory conduction ceases. Thus, a common thread linking several CNS demyelinating diseases is the disruption of potassium siphoning/water transport within the panglial syncytium

  16. Axonal accumulation of synaptic markers in APP transgenic Drosophila depends on the NPTY motif and is paralleled by defects in synaptic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusu, Patricia; Jansen, Anna; Soba, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular plaques, which consist mainly of beta-amyloid derived from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). An additional feature of AD is axonopathy, which might contribute to impairment of cognitive functions....... Specifically, axonal transport defects have been reported in AD animal models, including mice and flies that overexpress APP and tau. Here we demonstrate that the APP-induced traffic jam of vesicles in peripheral nerves of Drosophila melanogaster larvae depends on the four residues NPTY motif in the APP...... intracellular domain. Furthermore, heterologous expression of Fe65 and JIP1b, scaffolding proteins interacting with the NPTY motif, also perturb axonal transport. Together, these data indicate that JIP1b or Fe65 may be involved in the APP-induced axonal transport defect. Moreover, we have characterized...

  17. A genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transport as a mechanism of resistance to the anticancer drug bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouida, Mustapha; Pagé, Nicolas; Leduc, Anick; Peter, Matthias; Ramotar, Dindial

    2004-02-01

    The potent DNA damaging agent bleomycin (BLM) is highly effective for treating various cancers, although, in certain individuals, the development of cellular resistance to the drug can severely diminish its antineoplastic properties. We performed two independent genome-wide screens using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant collection to isolate variants exhibiting either sensitivity or resistance to BLM. This procedure reproducibly identified a relatively large collection of 231 BLM-hypersensitive mutants, representing genes belonging to diverse functional groups. In contrast, only five BLM-resistant mutants could be recovered by our screens. Among these latter mutants, three were deleted for genes involved in plasma membrane transport, including the L-carnitine transporter Agp2, as well as the kinases Ptk2 and Sky1, which are involved in regulating polyamine transport. We further showed that Agp2 acts as a transporter of BLM and that overexpression of this transporter significantly enhances BLM-induced cell killing. Our data strongly implicate membrane transport as a key determinant in BLM resistance in yeast. This finding is critical, given that very little is known about BLM transport in human cells. Indeed, characterization of analogous mechanisms in humans may ultimately lead to enhancement of the antitumor properties of BLM.

  18. Interactions of human P-glycoprotein transport substrates and inhibitors at the drug binding domain: Functional and molecular docking analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Onat; Saeed, Mohamed E M; Valoti, Massimo; Frosini, Maria; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    Rhodamine 123 (R123) transport substrate sensitizes P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to inhibition by compound 2c (cis-cis) N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl ester isomer in a concentration-dependent manner in human MDR1-gene transfected mouse T-lymphoma L5178 cells as shown previously. By contrast, epirubicin (EPI) concentration changes left unaltered 2c IC50 values of EPI efflux. To clarify this discrepancy, defined molecular docking (DMD) analyses of 12 N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl esters, the highly flexible aryl ester analog 4, and several P-gp substrate/non-substrate inhibitors were performed on human P-gp drug- or nucleotide-binding domains (DBD or NBD). DMD measurements yielded lowest binding energy (LBE, kcal/mol) values (mean ± SD) ranging from -11.8 ± 0.54 (valspodar) to -3.98 ± 0.01 (4). Lys234, Ser952 and Tyr953 residues formed H-bonds with most of the compounds. Only 2c docked also at ATP binding site (LBE value of -6.9 ± 0.30 kcal/mol). Inhibition of P-gp-mediated R123 efflux by 12 N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl esters and 4 significantly correlated with LBE values. DMD analysis of EPI, (3)H-1EPI, (3)H-2EPI, (14)C-1EPI, (14)C-2EPI, R123 and 2c before and after previous docking of each of them indicated that pre-docking of either 2c or EPI significantly reduced LBE of both EPI and R123, and that of both (3)H-2EPI and (14)C-2EPI, respectively. Since the clusters of DBD amino acid residues interacting with EPI were different, if EPI docked alone or after pre-docking of EPI or 2c, the existence of alternative secondary binding site for EPI on P-gp is credible. In conclusion, 2c may allocate the drug-binding pocket and reduce strong binding of EPI and R123 in agreement with P-gp inhibition experiments, where 2c reduced efflux of EPI and R123.

  19. Current status of rational design of pro-drugs targeting the intestinal di/tri-peptide transporter hPEPT1 (SLC15A1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Lasse; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Steffansen, Bente;

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal di/tri-peptide transporter hPEPT1 has broad substrate specificity, accommodating uptake of the majority of investigated di- and tripeptides, as well as of a number of drug compounds. This transport system has a high capacity and it has been hypothesized that hPEPT1-mediated uptake ...... in the field, the present review aims at giving a brief overview of structure-activity relationships for hPEPT1, and to provide a critical evaluation of whether hPEPT1-targeted prodrugs can be rationally designed....

  20. Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration after SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    TITLE: Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration after SCI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Alan Plunkett, Ph.D. Martin...TYPE FINAL 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Sept 2011 - 1 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration...available that restore motor impairments resulting fromspinal cord injury (SCI). Soldiers with SCI are permanently paralyzed and in needof lifelong care

  1. Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration after SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    currently employed to investigate the evolution of the scar and the time course of axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. The data from these...Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA. It has been established in amphibians and fish that neurons can successfully regenerate their axons in the damaged central

  2. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard;

    2002-01-01

    Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total l...

  3. Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribosylation) improves axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Alexandra B; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Sekine, Yuichi; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Miller, David M; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a neuron to regenerate its axon after injury depends in part on its intrinsic regenerative potential. Here, we identify novel intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration: poly(ADP-ribose) glycohodrolases (PARGs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARGs, which remove poly(ADP-ribose) from proteins, act in injured C. elegans GABA motor neurons to enhance axon regeneration. PARG expression is regulated by DLK signaling, and PARGs mediate DLK function in enhancing axon regeneration. Conversely, PARPs, which add poly(ADP-ribose) to proteins, inhibit axon regeneration of both C. elegans GABA neurons and mammalian cortical neurons. Furthermore, chemical PARP inhibitors improve axon regeneration when administered after injury. Our results indicate that regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) levels is a critical function of the DLK regeneration pathway, that poly-(ADP ribosylation) inhibits axon regeneration across species, and that chemical inhibition of PARPs can elicit axon regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12734.001

  4. Axon guidance of rat cortical neurons by microcontact printed gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Rita; Zentis, Peter D; Rajappa, Lionel T; Hofmann, Boris; Banzet, Marko; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Meffert, Simone H

    2011-03-01

    Substrate-bound gradients expressed in numerous spatio-temporal patterns play a crucial role during the development of complex neural circuits. A deeper understanding of the axon guidance mechanism is provided by studying the effect of a defined substrate-bound cue on a confined neural network. In this study, we constructed a discontinuous substrate-bound gradient to control neuronal cell position, the path of neurite growth, and axon directionality. A variety of gradient patterns, with slight changes in slope, width, and length were designed and fabricated by microcontact printing using laminin/poly-l-lysine (PLL) or PLL alone. The gradients were tested for neurite growth and their impact on axon guidance of embryonic rat cortical neurons. The neurite length was determined and the axon was evaluated by Tau-1 immunostaining. We found that the microgradients of laminin/PLL and PLL directed neurons' adhesion, differentially controlled the neurite growth, and guided up to 84% of the axons. The effect of the protein micropattern on axon guidance and neurite growth depended on the protein and geometric parameters used. Our approach proved to be very successful in guiding axons of single multipolar neurons with very high efficiency. It could thereby be useful to engineer defined neural networks for analyzing signal processing of functional circuits, as well as to unravel fundamental questions of the axon guidance mechanism.

  5. SnoN facilitates axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun L Do

    Full Text Available Adult CNS neurons exhibit a reduced capacity for growth compared to developing neurons, due in part to downregulation of growth-associated genes as development is completed. We tested the hypothesis that SnoN, an embryonically regulated transcription factor that specifies growth of the axonal compartment, can enhance growth in injured adult neurons. In vitro, SnoN overexpression in dissociated adult DRG neuronal cultures significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, TGF-β1, a negative regulator of SnoN, inhibited neurite outgrowth, and SnoN over-expression overcame this inhibition. We then examined whether SnoN influenced axonal regeneration in vivo: indeed, expression of a mutant form of SnoN resistant to degradation significantly enhanced axonal regeneration following cervical spinal cord injury, despite peri-lesional upregulation of TGF-β1. Thus, a developmental mechanism that specifies extension of the axonal compartment also promotes axonal regeneration after adult CNS injury.

  6. Internodal function in normal and regenerated mammalian axons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, M; Krarup, C

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Following Wallerian degeneration, peripheral myelinated axons have the ability to regenerate and, given a proper pathway, establish functional connections with targets. In spite of this capacity, the clinical outcome of nerve regeneration remains unsatisfactory. Early studies have found...... that regenerated internodes remain persistently short though this abnormality did not seem to influence recovery in conduction. It remains unclear to which extent abnormalities in axonal function itself may contribute to the poor outcome of nerve regeneration. METHODS: We review experimental evidence indicating...... that internodes play an active role in axonal function. RESULTS: By investigating internodal contribution to axonal excitability we have found evidence that axonal function may be permanently compromised in regenerated nerves. Furthermore, we illustrate that internodal function is also abnormal in regenerated...

  7. Dipeptidomimetic ketomethylene isosteres as pro-moieties for drug transport via the human intestinal di-/tripeptide transporter hPEPT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Våbenø, Jon; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Ingebrigtsen, Truls;

    2004-01-01

    . The stability, the affinity for the di-/tripeptide transporter hPEPT1, and the transepithelial transport properties of the model prodrugs were investigated. ValPsi[COCH(2)]Asp(OBn) was the compound with highest chemical stability in buffers at pH 6.0 and 7.4, with half-lives of 190 and 43 h, respectively. All...... five compounds showed high affinity for hPEPT1 (K(i) values COCH(2)]Asp(OBn) and ValPsi[COCH(2)]Asp(OBn) had the highest affinities with K(i) values of 68 and 19 microM, respectively. An hPEPT1-mediated transport component was demonstrated for the transepithelial transport of three...

  8. X-ray scattering study of pike olfactory nerve: elastic, thermodynamic and physiological properties of the axonal membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzati, Vittorio; Benoit, Evelyne; Charpentier, Gilles; Vachette, Patrice

    2004-10-08

    The effects of several agents, sugars, isotonic KCl, and a variety of drugs, on the structure of the axonal membranes of unmyelinated pike olfactory nerve have been studied by synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering experiments. The main effects of the sugars are: (i) to increase the electron density of the extra-axonal space and thereby yield the absolute scale of the electron density profile; (ii) to osmotically stress the membrane and thus yield its elastic modulus of area compressibility, since the related strain, thickness dilation, is directly determined by the X-ray scattering experiments. Exposure to isotonic KCl, a depolarizing agent, induces membrane thickness to increase. The energy liberated in this process is a function of the amplitude of the dilation and of the elastic modulus of the membrane. This energy turns out to be close to the thermal energy liberated by the pike olfactory nerve during the initial phase of action potential that has previously been measured by others. Electrical depolarization thus seems to be accompanied by a thickness dilation of the axonal membrane. Another effect of isotonic KCl is to induce a large fraction of the membranes to pair by tight apposition of their extra-axonal faces. Local anaesthetics and some drugs have the effect of altering membrane thickness. All these observations are interpreted in terms of a modulation of the conformational disorder of the hydrocarbon chains of the lipid molecules.

  9. Signaling mechanisms in cortical axon growth, guidance and branching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eKalil

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise wiring of cortical circuits during development depends upon axon extension, guidance and branching to appropriate targets. Motile growth cones at axon tips navigate through the nervous system by responding to molecular cues, which modulate signaling pathways within axonal growth cones. Intracellular calcium signaling has emerged as a major transducer of guidance cues but exactly how calcium signaling pathways modify the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton to evoke growth cone behaviors and axon branching is still mysterious. Axons must often pause in their outgrowth while their branches extend into targets. Some evidence suggests a competition between growth of axons and branches but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Since it is difficult to study growing axons deep within the mammalian brain, much of what we know about signaling pathways and cytoskeletal dynamics has come from studies of axonal growth cones, in many cases from non-mammalian species, growing in tissue culture. Consequently it is not well understood how guidance cues relevant to mammalian neural development in vivo signal to the growth cone cytoskeleton during axon outgrowth and guidance. In this review we describe our recent work in dissociated cultures of developing rodent sensorimotor cortex in the context of the current literature on molecular guidance cues, calcium signaling pathways and cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate growth cone behaviors. A major challenge is to relate findings in tissue culture to mechanisms of cortical development in vivo. Toward this goal, we describe our recent work in cortical slices, which preserve the complex cellular and molecular environment of the mammalian brain but allow direct visualization of growth cone behaviors and calcium signaling. Findings from this work suggest that mechanisms regulating axon growth and guidance in dissociated culture neurons also underlie development of cortical connectivity in vivo.

  10. Drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy subjects: biological variations and importance of pre-analytical steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siest, Gérard; Jeannesson, Elise; Marteau, Jean-Brice; Samara, Anastasia; Pfister, Michèle; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2009-05-01

    Quantification in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of mRNA of drug metabolizing enzymes or drug targets could give interesting, new information in the field of pharmacogenomics and molecular mechanisms. However, for the interpretation of these data, it is necessary to know mRNA biological variations. In this review, we propose a strategy based on the production and interpretation of clinical chemistry reference values. We discuss the concept of reference values; the necessity to master pre-analytical variations of CYP and ABC transporters; the choice of the analytical methods and of the reference genes; and finally the biological variations themselves. In particular, we focus on the importance of considering homogeneity for age, sex, degree of adiposity, tobacco and alcohol intake, food habits, and drug consumption, including their inductive effects, at the phase of subject recruitment. All this information is useful to define the partition and exclusion factors to obtain mRNA reference limits.

  11. Clinical features of diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the mechanism of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) and study the relationship between DAI and brain concussion, brain contusion, and primary brain stem injury.Methods: The clinical data and iconographic characteristics of 56 patients with DAI were analyzed retrospectively.Results: Traffic accidents were the main cause of DAI. Among the 56 cases, 34 were injured for at least twice, and 71.43% of the patients were complicated with contusion.Conclusions: It is considered that DAI is a common pattern of primary brain injury, which is often underestimated. And DAI includes cerebral concussion and primary brain injury, and is often complicated by cerebral cortex contusion. Therefore, it is very simple and practical to divide primary brain injuries into local and diffuse injuries.

  12. In vitro metabolic stability and intestinal transport of P57AS3 (P57) from Hoodia gordonii and its interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madgula, Vamsi L M; Avula, Bharathi; Pawar, Rahul S; Shukla, Yatin J; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Khan, Shabana I

    2008-08-01

    Hoodia gordonii, a succulent cactus-like plant growing in South Africa, has been used in traditional medicine for its appetite suppressant properties. Its use as a dietary supplement to promote weight loss has recently gained popularity. An oxypregnane steroidal glycoside P57AS3 (P57) is reported to be the active constituent of the sap extract responsible for anorexigenic activity. No information is available about its metabolic stability, intestinal transport and interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. In the present investigation, the metabolic stability of P57 in human liver microsomes and its interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A2, 2C9, 3A4 and 2D6) were determined. Intestinal transport of P57 was studied in the Caco-2 cell model of intestinal transport and absorption. P57 was metabolically stable in the presence of human liver microsomes. The compound inhibited CYP3A4 activity with an IC50 value of 45 microM, whereas the activity of CYP 1A2, 2C9 and 2D6 was not inhibited. In the Caco-2 model, P57 exhibited a higher transport in the secretory direction than in the absorptive direction with efflux ratios of 3.1 and 3.8 at 100 and 200 microM, respectively. The efflux was inhibited by selective inhibitors of multidrug resistance associated proteins MRP1/MRP2 (MK-571) and P-gp (verapamil). In conclusion, intestinal transport of P57 was mediated by P-gp and MRP transporters. The compound was metabolically stable and showed weak inhibition of CYP 3A4.

  13. A pleiotropic drug resistance transporter is involved in reduced sensitivity to multiple fungicide classes in Sclerotinia homoeocarpa (F.T. Bennett).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Hyunkyu; Hulvey, Jon; Popko, James T; Lopes, John; Swaminathan, Aishwarya; Chang, Taehyun; Jung, Geunhwa

    2015-04-01

    Dollar spot, caused by Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, is a prevalent turfgrass disease, and the fungus exhibits widespread fungicide resistance in North America. In a previous study, an ABC-G transporter, ShatrD, was associated with practical field resistance to demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicides. Mining of ABC-G transporters, also known as pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters, from RNA-Seq data gave an assortment of transcripts, several with high sequence similarity to functionally characterized transporters from Botrytis cinerea, and others with closest blastx hits from Aspergillus and Monilinia. In addition to ShatrD, another PDR transporter showed significant over-expression in replicated RNA-Seq data, and in a collection of field-resistant isolates, as measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. These isolates also showed reduced sensitivity to unrelated fungicide classes. Using a yeast complementation system, we sought to test the hypothesis that this PDR transporter effluxes DMI as well as chemically unrelated fungicides. The transporter (ShPDR1) was cloned into the Gal1 expression vector and transformed into a yeast PDR transporter deletion mutant, AD12345678. Complementation assays indicated that ShPDR1 complemented the mutant in the presence of propiconazole (DMI), iprodione (dicarboximide) and boscalid (SDHI, succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor). Our results indicate that the over-expression of ShPDR1 is correlated with practical field resistance to DMI fungicides and reduced sensitivity to dicarboximide and SDHI fungicides. These findings highlight the potential for the eventual development of a multidrug resistance phenotype in this pathogen. In addition, this study presents a pipeline for the discovery and validation of fungicide resistance genes using de novo next-generation sequencing and molecular biology techniques in an unsequenced plant pathogenic fungus.

  14. The Effect of Millisecond Pulsed Electric Fields (msPEF) on Intracellular Drug Transport with Negatively Charged Large Nanocarriers Made of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN): In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbacka, Julita; Pucek, Agata; Wilk, Kazimiera Anna; Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Rossowska, Joanna; Kulbacki, Marek; Kotulska, Małgorzata

    2016-10-01

    Drug delivery technology is still a dynamically developing field of medicine. The main direction in nanotechnology research (nanocarriers, nanovehicles, etc.) is efficient drug delivery to target cells with simultaneous drug reduction concentration. However, nanotechnology trends in reducing the carrier sizes to several nanometers limit the volume of the loaded substance and may pose a danger of uncontrolled access into the cells. On the other hand, nanoparticles larger than 200 nm in diameter have difficulties to undergo rapid diffusional transport through cell membranes. The main advantage of large nanoparticles is higher drug encapsulation efficiency and the ability to deliver a wider array of drugs. Our present study contributes a new approach with large Tween 80 solid lipid nanoparticles SLN (i.e., hydrodynamic GM-SLN-glycerol monostearate, GM, as the lipid and ATO5-SLNs-glyceryl palmitostearate, ATO5, as the lipid) with diameters DH of 379.4 nm and 547 nm, respectively. They are used as drug carriers alone and in combination with electroporation (EP) induced by millisecond pulsed electric fields. We evaluate if EP can support the transport of large nanocarriers into cells. The study was performed with two cell lines: human colon adenocarcinoma LoVo and hamster ovarian fibroblastoid CHO-K1 with coumarin 6 (C6) as a fluorescent marker for encapsulation. The biological safety of the potential treatment procedure was evaluated with cell viability after their exposure to nanoparticles and EP. The EP efficacy was evaluated by FACS method. The impact on intracellular structure organization of cytoskeleton was visualized by CLSM method with alpha-actin and beta-tubulin. The obtained results indicate low cytotoxicity of both carrier types, free and loaded with C6. The evaluation of cytoskeleton proteins indicated no intracellular structure damage. The intracellular uptake and accumulation show that SLNs do not support transport of C6 coumarin. Only application of

  15. Antidepressant drugs transactivate TrkB neurotrophin receptors in the adult rodent brain independently of BDNF and monoamine transporter blockade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Rantamäki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antidepressant drugs (ADs have been shown to activate BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor TrkB in the rodent brain but the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. ADs act as monoamine reuptake inhibitors and after prolonged treatments regulate brain bdnf mRNA levels indicating that monoamine-BDNF signaling regulate AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo. However, recent findings demonstrate that Trk receptors can be transactivated independently of their neurotrophin ligands. METHODOLOGY: In this study we examined the role of BDNF, TrkB kinase activity and monoamine reuptake in the AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo and in vitro by employing several transgenic mouse models, cultured neurons and TrkB-expressing cell lines. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a chemical-genetic TrkB(F616A mutant and TrkB overexpressing mice, we demonstrate that ADs specifically activate both the maturely and immaturely glycosylated forms of TrkB receptors in the brain in a TrkB kinase dependent manner. However, the tricyclic AD imipramine readily induced the phosphorylation of TrkB receptors in conditional bdnf⁻/⁻ knock-out mice (132.4±8.5% of control; P = 0.01, indicating that BDNF is not required for the TrkB activation. Moreover, using serotonin transporter (SERT deficient mice and chemical lesions of monoaminergic neurons we show that neither a functional SERT nor monoamines are required for the TrkB phosphorylation response induced by the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine or citalopram, or norepinephrine selective reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. However, neither ADs nor monoamine transmitters activated TrkB in cultured neurons or cell lines expressing TrkB receptors, arguing that ADs do not directly bind to TrkB. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings suggest that ADs transactivate brain TrkB receptors independently of BDNF and monoamine reuptake blockade and emphasize the need of an intact tissue context for the

  16. In vitro profiling of the metabolism and drug-drug interaction of tofogliflozin, a potent and highly specific sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, using human liver microsomes, human hepatocytes, and recombinant human CYP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Mizuki; Kawashima, Kosuke; Yamaguchi, Koji; Nagao, Shunsuke; Sato, Mika; Suzuki, Masayuki; Honda, Kiyofumi; Hagita, Hitoshi; Kuhlmann, Olaf; Poirier, Agnes; Fowler, Stephen; Funk, Christoph; Simon, Sandrine; Aso, Yoshinori; Ikeda, Sachiya; Ishigai, Masaki

    2015-03-01

    Abstract 1. The metabolism and drug-drug interaction (DDI) risk of tofogliflozin, a potent and highly specific sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, were evaluated by in vitro studies using human liver microsomes, human hepatocytes, and recombinant human CYPs. 2. The main metabolite of tofogliflozin was the carboxylated derivative (M1) in human hepatocytes, which was the same as in vivo. The metabolic pathway of tofogliflozin to M1 was considered to be as follows: first, tofogliflozin was catalyzed to the primary hydroxylated derivative (M4) by CYP2C18, CYP4A11 and CYP4F3B, then M4 was oxidized to M1. 3. Tofogliflozin had no induction potential on CYP1A2 and CYP3A4. Neither tofogliflozin nor M1 had inhibition potential on CYPs, with the exception of a weak CYP2C19 inhibition by M1. 4. Not only are multiple metabolic enzymes involved in the tofogliflozin metabolism, but the drug is also excreted into urine after oral administration, indicating that tofogliflozin is eliminated through multiple pathways. Thus, the exposure of tofogliflozin would not be significantly altered by DDI caused by any co-administered drugs. Also, tofogliflozin seems not to cause significant DDI of co-administered drugs because tofogliflozin has no CYP induction or inhibition potency, and the main metabolite M1 has no clinically relevant CYP inhibition potency.

  17. Calpains mediate axonal cytoskeleton disintegration during Wallerian degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Marek; Ferguson, Toby A; Schoch, Kathleen M; Li, Jian; Qian, Yaping; Shofer, Frances S; Saatman, Kathryn E; Neumar, Robert W

    2013-08-01

    In both the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS), transected axons undergo Wallerian degeneration. Even though Augustus Waller first described this process after transection of axons in 1850, the molecular mechanisms may be shared, at least in part, by many human diseases. Early pathology includes failure of synaptic transmission, target denervation, and granular disintegration of the axonal cytoskeleton (GDC). The Ca(2+)-dependent protease calpains have been implicated in GDC but causality has not been established. To test the hypothesis that calpains play a causal role in axonal and synaptic degeneration in vivo, we studied transgenic mice that express human calpastatin (hCAST), the endogenous calpain inhibitor, in optic and sciatic nerve axons. Five days after optic nerve transection and 48 h after sciatic nerve transection, robust neurofilament proteolysis observed in wild-type controls was reduced in hCAST transgenic mice. Protection of the axonal cytoskeleton in sciatic nerves of hCAST mice was nearly complete 48 h post-transection. In addition, hCAST expression preserved the morphological integrity of neuromuscular junctions. However, compound muscle action potential amplitudes after nerve transection were similar in wild-type and hCAST mice. These results, in total, provide direct evidence that calpains are responsible for the morphological degeneration of the axon and synapse during Wallerian degeneration.

  18. Local erythropoietin signaling enhances regeneration in peripheral axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, C; Martinez, J A; Liu, W Q; Diggle, J; Guo, G F; Ramji, N; Mi, R; Hoke, A; Zochodne, D W

    2008-06-23

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and its receptor (EPO-R), mediate neuroprotection from axonopathy and apoptosis in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We examined the impact and potential mechanisms of local EPO signaling on regenerating PNS axons in vivo and in vitro. As a consequence of injury, peripheral nerve axons and DRG neurons have a marked increase in the expression of EPO and EPO-R. Local delivery of EPO via conduit over 2 weeks to rat sciatic nerve following crush injury increased the density and maturity of regenerating myelinated axons growing distally from the crush site. In addition, EPO also rescued retrograde degeneration and atrophy of axons. EPO substantially increased the density and intensity of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression within outgrowing axons. Behavioral improvements in sensorimotor function also occurred in rats exposed to near nerve EPO delivery. EPO delivery led to decreased nuclear factor kappaB (NFkB) activation but increased phosphorylation of Akt and STAT3 within nerve and dorsal root ganglia neurons indicating rescue from an injury phenotype. Spinal cord explant studies also demonstrated a similar dose-dependent effect of EPO upon motor axonal outgrowth. Local EPO signaling enhances regenerating peripheral nervous system axons in addition to its known neuroprotection. Exogenous EPO may have a therapeutic role in a large number of peripheral nerve diseases through its impact on regeneration.

  19. Effect of Intestinal Flora on Protein Expression of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters in the Liver and Kidney of Germ-Free and Antibiotics-Treated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, Takuya; Hirayama-Kurogi, Mio; Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2016-08-01

    Dysbiosis (alteration of intestinal flora) is associated with various host physiologies, including diseases. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of dysbiosis on protein expression levels in mouse liver and kidney by quantitative proteomic analysis, focusing in particular on drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in order to investigate the potential impact of dysbiosis on drug pharmacokinetics. Germ-free (GF) mice and antibiotics-treated mice were used as dysbiosis models. Expression levels of 825 and 357 proteins were significantly changed in the liver and kidney, respectively, of GF mice (vs specific-pathogen-free mice), while 306 and 178 proteins, respectively, were changed in antibiotics-treated mice (vs vehicle controls). Among them, 52 and 16 drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter proteins were significantly changed in the liver and kidney, respectively, of GF mice, while 25 and 8, respectively were changed in antibiotics-treated mice. Expression of mitochondrial proteins was also changed in the liver and kidney of both model mice. In GF mice, Oatp1a1 was decreased in both the liver and kidney, while Sult1a1 and two Cyp enzymes were increased and Gstp1, four Cyp enzymes, three Ces enzymes, Bcrp1, and Oct1 were decreased in the liver. In antibiotics-treated mice, Cyp51a1 was increased and three Cyp enzymes, Bcrp1, and Bsep were decreased in the liver. Notably, the expression of Cyp2b10 and Cyp3a11 was greatly decreased in the liver of both models. Cyp2b activity in the liver microsomal fraction was also decreased. Our results indicate that dysbiosis changes the protein expression of multiple drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the liver and kidney and may alter pharmacokinetics in the host.

  20. Drug resistance is conferred on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of full-length melanoma-associated human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCB5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keniya, Mikhail V; Holmes, Ann R; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M; Cannon, Richard D

    2014-10-01

    ABCB5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is highly expressed in melanoma cells, and may contribute to the extreme resistance of melanomas to chemotherapy by efflux of anti-cancer drugs. Our goal was to determine whether we could functionally express human ABCB5 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in order to demonstrate an efflux function for ABCB5 in the absence of background pump activity from other human transporters. Heterologous expression would also facilitate drug discovery for this important target. DNAs encoding ABCB5 sequences were cloned into the chromosomal PDR5 locus of a S. cerevisiae strain in which seven endogenous ABC transporters have been deleted. Protein expression in the yeast cells was monitored by immunodetection using both a specific anti-ABCB5 antibody and a cross-reactive anti-ABCB1 antibody. ABCB5 function in recombinant yeast cells was measured by determining whether the cells possessed increased resistance to known pump substrates, compared to the host yeast strain, in assays of yeast growth. Three ABCB5 constructs were made in yeast. One was derived from the ABCB5-β mRNA, which is highly expressed in human tissues but is a truncation of a canonical full-size ABC transporter. Two constructs contained full-length ABCB5 sequences: either a native sequence from cDNA or a synthetic sequence codon-harmonized for S. cerevisiae. Expression of all three constructs in yeast was confirmed by immunodetection. Expression of the codon-harmonized full-length ABCB5 DNA conferred increased resistance, relative to the host yeast strain, to the putative substrates rhodamine 123, daunorubicin, tetramethylrhodamine, FK506, or clorgyline. We conclude that full-length ABCB5 can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae and confers drug resistance.

  1. Analysis of the effect of the bovine adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 single nucleotide polymorphism Y581S on transcellular transport of veterinary drugs using new cell culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, R; González-Lobato, L; Baro, M F; Valbuena, S; de la Fuente, A; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I; Marques, M M; Merino, G

    2011-12-01

    In commercial dairy production, the risk of drug residues and environmental pollutants in milk from ruminants has become an outstanding problem. One of the main determinants of active drug secretion into milk is the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2/breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP). It is located in several organs associated with drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion, and its expression is highly induced during lactation in the mammary gland of ruminants, mice, and humans. As a consequence, potential contamination of milk could expose suckling infants to xenotoxins. In cows, a SNP for this protein affecting quality and quantity of milk production has been described previously (Y581S). In this study, our main purpose was to determine whether this polymorphism has an effect on transcellular transport of veterinary drugs because this could alter substrate pharmacokinetics and milk residues. We stably expressed the wild-type bovine ABCG2 and the Y581S variant in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells (MDCKII) and MEF3.8 cell lines generating cell models in which the functionality of the bovine transporter could be addressed. Functional studies confirmed the greater functional activity in mitoxantrone accumulation assays for the Y581S variant with a greater relative V(MAX) value (P = 0.040) and showed for the first time that the Y581S variant presents greater transcellular transport of the model ABCG2 substrate nitrofurantoin (P = 0.024) and of 3 veterinary antibiotics, the fluoroquinolone agents enrofloxacin (P = 0.035), danofloxacin (P = 0.001), and difloxacin (P = 0.008), identified as new substrates of the bovine ABCG2. In addition, the inhibitory effect of the macrocyclic lactone ivermectin on the activity of wild-type bovine ABCG2 and the Y581S variant was also confirmed, showing a greater inhibitory potency on the wild-type protein at all the concentrations tested (5 μM, P = 0.017; 10 μM, P = 0.001; 25 μM, P = 0.008; and 50 μM, P = 0

  2. In vitro in vivo correlation (IVIVC) for drugs in extended release formulations which are extensively metabolized or absorbed with transporters

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of commercially available garlic supplements especially by chronic patients is continuously rising due to disease preventing effects, recognized in numerous preclinical and clinical studies. However, combining inconventional therapy utilized drugs with garlic phytochemicals can lead to serious pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Namely, in some cases significant plasma profile changes of applied drugs and their metabolites, caused by intestinal and hepatic CYP in...

  3. Axon guidance and neuronal migration research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Proper migration of neuronal somas and axonal growth cones to designated locations in the developing brain is essential for the assembly of functional neuronal circuits.Rapid progress in research of axon guidance and neuronal migration has been made in the last twenty years.Chinese researchers began their exploration in this field ten years ago and have made significant contributions in clarifying the signal transduction of axon guidance and neuronal migration.Several unique experimental approaches,including the migration assay of single isolated neurons in response to locally delivered guidance cues,have been developed by Chinese neuroscientists to investigate the molecular machinery underlying these guidance events.

  4. The gut microbiota ellagic acid-derived metabolite urolithin A and its sulfate conjugate are substrates for the drug efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Miguel, Verónica; Merino, Gracia; Lucas, Ricardo; Morales, Juan C; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Alvarez, Ana I; Espín, Juan C

    2013-05-08

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is a drug efflux transporter that can affect the pharmacological and toxicological properties of many molecules. Urolithins, metabolites produced by the gut microbiota from ellagic acid (EA) and ellagitannins, have been acknowledged with in vivo anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive properties. This study evaluated whether urolithins (Uro-A, -B, -C, and -D) and their main phase II metabolites Uro-A sulfate, Uro-A glucuronide, and Uro-B glucuronide as well as their precursor EA were substrates for ABCG2/BCRP. Parental and Bcrp1-transduced MDCKII cells were used for active transport assays. Uro-A and, to a lesser extent, Uro-A sulfate showed a significant increase in apically directed translocation in Bcrp1-transduced cells. Bcrp1 did not show affinity for the rest of the tested compounds. Data were confirmed for murine, human, bovine, and ovine BCRP-transduced subclones as well as with the use of the selective BCRP inhibitor Ko143. The transport inhibition by Uro-A was analyzed by flow cytometry compared to Ko143 using the antineoplastic agent mitoxantrone as a model substrate. Results showed that Uro-A was able to inhibit mitoxantrone transport in a dose-dependent manner. This study reports for the first time that Uro-A and its sulfate conjugate are ABCG2/BCRP substrates. The results suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of these gut microbiota-derived metabolites could modulate ABCG2/BCRP-mediated transport processes and mechanisms of cancer drug resistance. Further in vivo investigations are warranted.

  5. Nostocyclopeptide-M1: a potent, nontoxic inhibitor of the hepatocyte drug transporters OATP1B3 and OATP1B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfindal, Lars; Myhren, Lene; Kleppe, Rune; Krakstad, Camilla; Selheim, Frode; Jokela, Jouni; Sivonen, Kaarina; Døskeland, Stein O

    2011-04-01

    We have isolated a novel cyanobacterial cyclic peptide (nostocyclopeptide M1; Ncp-M1) that blocks the hepatotoxic action of microcystin (MC) and nodularin (Nod). We show here that Ncp-M1 is nontoxic to primary hepatocytes in long-term culture. Ncp-M1 does not affect any known intracellular targets or pathways involved in MC action, like protein phosphatases, CaM-KII, or ROS-dependent cell death effectors. In support of this conclusion Ncp-M1 had no protective effect when microinjected into cells. Rather, the antitoxin effect was solely due to blocked hepatocyte uptake of MC and Nod. The hepatic uptake of MC and Nod is mainly via the closely related organic anion transporters OATP1B1 and OATP1B3, which also mediate hepatic transport of endogenous metabolites and hormones as well as drugs. OATP1B3 is also expressed in some aggressive cancers, where it confers apoptosis resistance. We show that Ncp-M1 inhibits transport through OATP1B3 and OATP1B1 expressed in HEK293 cells. The Ncp-M1 molecule has several nonproteinogenic amino acids and an imino bond, which hamper its synthesis. Moreover, a cyclic all L-amino acid heptapeptide analogue of Ncp-M1 also inhibits the OATP1B1/1B3 transporters, and with higher OATP1B3 preference than Ncp-M1 itself. The nontoxic Ncp-M1 and its synthetic cyclic peptide analogues thus provide new tools to probe the role of OATB1B1/1B3 mediated drug and metabolite transport in liver and cancer cells. They can also serve as scaffolds to design new, exopeptidase resistant OATP1B3-specific modulators.

  6. Organic anion and cation SLC22 "drug" transporter (Oat1, Oat3, and Oct1 regulation during development and maturation of the kidney proximal tubule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Gallegos

    Full Text Available Proper physiological function in the pre- and post-natal proximal tubule of the kidney depends upon the acquisition of selective permeability, apical-basolateral epithelial polarity and the expression of key transporters, including those involved in metabolite, toxin and drug handling. Particularly important are the SLC22 family of transporters, including the organic anion transporters Oat1 (originally identified as NKT and Oat3 as well as the organic cation transporter Oct1. In ex vivo cultures of metanephric mesenchyme (MM; the embryonic progenitor tissue of the nephron Oat function was evident before completion of nephron segmentation and corresponded with the maturation of tight junctions as measured biochemically by detergent extractability of the tight junction protein, ZO-1. Examination of available time series microarray data sets in the context of development and differentiation of the proximal tubule (derived from both in vivo and in vitro/ex vivo developing nephrons allowed for correlation of gene expression data to biochemically and functionally defined states of development. This bioinformatic analysis yielded a network of genes with connectivity biased toward Hnf4α (but including Hnf1α, hyaluronic acid-CD44, and notch pathways. Intriguingly, the Oat1 and Oat3 genes were found to have strong temporal co-expression with Hnf4α in the cultured MM supporting the notion of some connection between the transporters and this transcription factor. Taken together with the ChIP-qPCR finding that Hnf4α occupies Oat1, Oat3, and Oct1 proximal promoters in the in vivo differentiating rat kidney, the data suggest a network of genes with Hnf4α at its center plays a role in regulating the terminal differentiation and capacity for drug and toxin handling by the nascent proximal tubule of the kidney.

  7. Action potentials initiate in the axon initial segment and propagate through axon collaterals reliably in cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Amanda; Popovic, Marko; Zecevic, Dejan; McCormick, David A

    2010-05-19

    Purkinje neurons are the output cells of the cerebellar cortex and generate spikes in two distinct modes, known as simple and complex spikes. Revealing the point of origin of these action potentials, and how they conduct into local axon collaterals, is important for understanding local and distal neuronal processing and communication. By using a recent improvement in voltage-sensitive dye imaging technique that provided exceptional spatial and temporal resolution, we were able to resolve the region of spike initiation as well as follow spike propagation into axon collaterals for each action potential initiated on single trials. All fast action potentials, for both simple and complex spikes, whether occurring spontaneously or in response to a somatic current pulse or synaptic input, initiated in the axon initial segment. At discharge frequencies of less than approximately 250 Hz, spikes propagated faithfully through the axon and axon collaterals, in a saltatory manner. Propagation failures were only observed for very high frequencies or for the spikelets associated with complex spikes. These results demonstrate that the axon initial segment is a critical decision point in Purkinje cell processing and that the properties of axon branch points are adjusted to maintain faithful transmission.

  8. Npn-1 contributes to axon-axon interactions that differentially control sensory and motor innervation of the limb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa-Eva Huettl

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1 in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG, we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs.

  9. Npn-1 contributes to axon-axon interactions that differentially control sensory and motor innervation of the limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Soellner, Heidi; Bianchi, Elisa; Novitch, Bennett G; Huber, Andrea B

    2011-02-01

    The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1) in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs.

  10. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca(2+) did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport.

  11. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in Candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca2+ did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport. PMID:26220356

  12. Differential Trafficking of Transport Vesicles Contributes to the Localization of Dendritic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmad Al-Bassam

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In neurons, transmembrane proteins are targeted to dendrites in vesicles that traffic solely within the somatodendritic compartment. How these vesicles are retained within the somatodendritic domain is unknown. Here, we use a novel pulse-chase system, which allows synchronous release of exogenous transmembrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to follow movements of post-Golgi transport vesicles. Surprisingly, we found that post-Golgi vesicles carrying dendritic proteins were equally likely to enter axons and dendrites. However, once such vesicles entered the axon, they very rarely moved beyond the axon initial segment but instead either halted or reversed direction in an actin and Myosin Va-dependent manner. In contrast, vesicles carrying either an axonal or a nonspecifically localized protein only rarely halted or reversed and instead generally proceeded to the distal axon. Thus, our results are consistent with the axon initial segment behaving as a vesicle filter that mediates the differential trafficking of transport vesicles.

  13. Structural plasticity of axon terminals in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolla, Nadine; Galimberti, Ivan; Caroni, Pico

    2007-10-01

    There is now conclusive evidence for widespread ongoing structural plasticity of presynaptic boutons and axon side-branches in the adult brain. The plasticity complements that of postsynaptic spines, but axonal plasticity samples larger volumes of neuropil, and has a larger impact on circuit remodeling. Axons from distinct neurons exhibit unique ratios of stable (t1/2>9 months) and dynamic (t1/2 5-20 days) boutons, which persist as spatially intermingled subgroups along terminal arbors. In addition, phases of side-branch dynamics mediate larger scale remodeling guided by synaptogenesis. The plasticity is most pronounced during critical periods; its patterns and outcome are controlled by Hebbian mechanisms and intrinsic neuronal factors. Novel experience, skill learning, life-style, and age can persistently modify local circuit structure through axonal structural plasticity.

  14. Sodium Channels, Mitochondria, and Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Anna-Karin; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Estacion, Mark; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy results from damage to peripheral nerves and is often accompanied by pain in affected limbs. Treatment represents an unmet medical need and a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying axonal injury is needed. Longer nerve fibers tend to degenerate first (length-dependence), and patients carrying pathogenic mutations throughout life usually become symptomatic in mid- or late-life (time-dependence). The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels can contribute to axonal injury and sodium channel gain-of-function mutations have been linked to peripheral neuropathy. Recent studies have implicated sodium channel activity, mitochondrial compromise, and reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange in time- and length-dependent axonal injury. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying axonal injury in peripheral neuropathy may provide new therapeutic strategies for this painful and debilitating condition.

  15. Coordinate control of lipid composition and drug transport activities is required for normal multidrug resistance in fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Shahi, Puja; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi present a special problem in the clinic as the range of drugs that can be used to treat these types of infections is limited. This situation is further complicated by the presence of robust inducible gene networks encoding different proteins that confer tolerance to many available antifungal drugs. The transcriptional control of these multidrug resistance systems in several key fungi will be discussed. Experiments in the non-pathogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided m...

  16. Modality-Specific Axonal Regeneration: Towards selective regenerative neural interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa eLotfi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed submodality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type-specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5 fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased 3 fold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3-D Y-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a 5-fold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a Y-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted towards the sural nerve, while N-52+ large diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  17. Electrophysiology of a nonmyelinated glutamatergic axon in rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Alle, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The common theme of the presented work on the nonmyelinated hippocampal mossy fiber (the axon of the granule cell in the dentate gyrus) is the generation of subthreshold and suprathreshold electrical signals. Subthreshold depolarizations in the axon can occur due to passive propagation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials, which are generated in the somato-dendritic domain. The remote passive propagation of these comparatively slow but transient signals is due to a space constant...

  18. 6-Sulphated chondroitins have a positive influence on axonal regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Lin

    Full Text Available Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs upregulated in the glial scar inhibit axon regeneration via their sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. Chondroitin 6-sulphotransferase-1 (C6ST-1 is upregulated after injury leading to an increase in 6-sulphated GAG. In this study, we ask if this increase in 6-sulphated GAG is responsible for the increased inhibition within the glial scar, or whether it represents a partial reversion to the permissive embryonic state dominated by 6-sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. Using C6ST-1 knockout mice (KO, we studied post-injury changes in chondroitin sulphotransferase (CSST expression and the effect of chondroitin 6-sulphates on both central and peripheral axon regeneration. After CNS injury, wild-type animals (WT showed an increase in mRNA for C6ST-1, C6ST-2 and C4ST-1, but KO did not upregulate any CSSTs. After PNS injury, while WT upregulated C6ST-1, KO showed an upregulation of C6ST-2. We examined regeneration of nigrostriatal axons, which demonstrate mild spontaneous axon regeneration in the WT. KO showed many fewer regenerating axons and more axonal retraction than WT. However, in the PNS, repair of the median and ulnar nerves led to similar and normal levels of axon regeneration in both WT and KO. Functional tests on plasticity after the repair also showed no evidence of enhanced plasticity in the KO. Our results suggest that the upregulation of 6-sulphated GAG after injury makes the extracellular matrix more permissive for axon regeneration, and that the balance of different CSs in the microenvironment around the lesion site is an important factor in determining the outcome of nervous system injury.

  19. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders V.; Johansen, Emil O.; Perrier, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS...... of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from...

  20. Multi-Drug Resistance Transporters and a Mechanism-Based Strategy for Assessing Risks of Pesticide Combinations to Honey Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseman, Alex J; Miller, Kaliah; Kunkle, Grace; Dively, Galen P; Pettis, Jeffrey S; Evans, Jay D; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Hawthorne, David J

    2016-01-01

    Annual losses of honey bee colonies remain high and pesticide exposure is one possible cause. Dangerous combinations of pesticides, plant-produced compounds and antibiotics added to hives may cause or contribute to losses, but it is very difficult to test the many combinations of those compounds that bees encounter. We propose a mechanism-based strategy for simplifying the assessment of combinations of compounds, focusing here on compounds that interact with xenobiotic handling ABC transporters. We evaluate the use of ivermectin as a model substrate for these transporters. Compounds that increase sensitivity of bees to ivermectin may be inhibiting key transporters. We show that several compounds commonly encountered by honey bees (fumagillin, Pristine, quercetin) significantly increased honey bee mortality due to ivermectin and significantly reduced the LC50 of ivermectin suggesting that they may interfere with transporter function. These inhibitors also significantly increased honey bees sensitivity to the neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid. This mechanism-based strategy may dramatically reduce the number of tests needed to assess the possibility of adverse combinations among pesticides. We also demonstrate an in vivo transporter assay that provides physical evidence of transporter inhibition by tracking the dynamics of a fluorescent substrate of these transporters (Rhodamine B) in bee tissues. Significantly more Rhodamine B remains in the head and hemolymph of bees pretreated with higher concentrations of the transporter inhibitor verapamil. Mechanism-based strategies for simplifying the assessment of adverse chemical interactions such as described here could improve our ability to identify those combinations that pose significantly greater risk to bees and perhaps improve the risk assessment protocols for honey bees and similar sensitive species.

  1. Multi-Drug Resistance Transporters and a Mechanism-Based Strategy for Assessing Risks of Pesticide Combinations to Honey Bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J Guseman

    Full Text Available Annual losses of honey bee colonies remain high and pesticide exposure is one possible cause. Dangerous combinations of pesticides, plant-produced compounds and antibiotics added to hives may cause or contribute to losses, but it is very difficult to test the many combinations of those compounds that bees encounter. We propose a mechanism-based strategy for simplifying the assessment of combinations of compounds, focusing here on compounds that interact with xenobiotic handling ABC transporters. We evaluate the use of ivermectin as a model substrate for these transporters. Compounds that increase sensitivity of bees to ivermectin may be inhibiting key transporters. We show that several compounds commonly encountered by honey bees (fumagillin, Pristine, quercetin significantly increased honey bee mortality due to ivermectin and significantly reduced the LC50 of ivermectin suggesting that they may interfere with transporter function. These inhibitors also significantly increased honey bees sensitivity to the neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid. This mechanism-based strategy may dramatically reduce the number of tests needed to assess the possibility of adverse combinations among pesticides. We also demonstrate an in vivo transporter assay that provides physical evidence of transporter inhibition by tracking the dynamics of a fluorescent substrate of these transporters (Rhodamine B in bee tissues. Significantly more Rhodamine B remains in the head and hemolymph of bees pretreated with higher concentrations of the transporter inhibitor verapamil. Mechanism-based strategies for simplifying the assessment of adverse chemical interactions such as described here could improve our ability to identify those combinations that pose significantly greater risk to bees and perhaps improve the risk assessment protocols for honey bees and similar sensitive species.

  2. Role of Electrostatic Interactions on the Transport of Druglike Molecules in Hydrogel-Based Articular Cartilage Mimics: Implications for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fengbin; Baldursdottir, Stefania; Hvidt, Søren; Jensen, Henrik; Larsen, Susan W; Yaghmur, Anan; Larsen, Claus; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-03-07

    In the field of drug delivery to the articular cartilage, it is advantageous to apply artificial tissue models as surrogates of cartilage for investigating drug transport and release properties. In this study, artificial cartilage models consisting of 0.5% (w/v) agarose gel containing 0.5% (w/v) chondroitin sulfate or 0.5% (w/v) hyaluronic acid were developed, and their rheological and morphological properties were characterized. UV imaging was utilized to quantify the transport properties of the following four model compounds in the agarose gel and in the developed artificial cartilage models: H-Ala-β-naphthylamide, H-Lys-Lys-β-naphthylamide, lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin. The obtained results showed that the incorporation of the polyelectrolytes chondroitin sulfate or hyaluronic acid into agarose gel induced a significant reduction in the apparent diffusivities of the cationic model compounds as compared to the pure agarose gel. The decrease in apparent diffusivity of the cationic compounds was not caused by a change in the gel structure since a similar reduction in apparent diffusivity was not observed for the net negatively charged protein α-lactalbumin. The apparent diffusivity of the cationic compounds in the negatively charged hydrogels was highly dependent on the ionic strength, pointing out the importance of electrostatic interactions between the diffusant and the polyelectrolytes. Solution based affinity studies between the model compounds and the two investigated polyelectrolytes further confirmed the electrostatic nature of their interactions. The results obtained from the UV imaging diffusion studies are important for understanding the effect of drug physicochemical properties on the transport in articular cartilage. The extracted information may be useful in the development of hydrogels for in vitro release testing having features resembling the articular cartilage.

  3. Inhibition of ALDH1A1 activity decreases expression of drug transporters and reduces chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski, Radosław; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Sosińska, Patrycja; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Zawierucha, Piotr; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The high mortality of ovarian cancer patients results from the failure of treatment caused by the inherent or acquired chemotherapy drug resistance. It was reported that overexpression of aldehyde dehydrogenase A1 (ALDH1A1) in cancer cells can be responsible for the development of drug resistance. To add the high expression of the drug transporter proteins the ALDHA1 is considered as a molecular target in cancer therapy. Therefore, we analysed drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines according to ALDHA1 expression and the association with drug resistance. The expression of ALDH1A1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) was determined using a microarray and confirmed by Q-PCR, western blot and fluorescence analysis. ALDH1A1 activity was determined using an Aldefluor assay. The impact of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB) on chemotherapy resistance was assessed by the MTT chemosensitivity assay. The most abundant expression of ALDH1A1 was noted in paclitaxel- and topotecan-resistant cell lines where two populations of ALDH-positive and ALDH-negative cells could be observed. Those cell lines also revealed the overexpression of P-gp and BCRP respectively, and were able to form spheres in non-adherent conditions. Pre-treatment with ATRA and DEAB reduced chemotherapy resistance in both cell lines. ATRA treatment led to downregulation of the ALDH1A1, P-gp and BCRP proteins. DEAB treatment led to downregulation of the P-gp protein and BCRP transcript and protein. Our results indicate that ALDH1A1-positive cancer cells can be responsible for drug resistance development in ovarian cancer. Developing more specific ALDH1A1 inhibitors can increase chemotherapy effectiveness in ovarian cancer.

  4. Axon morphology at the lamina cribrosa in monkey eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Klewin, K M

    1986-01-01

    The eyes of 8 monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus) were studied. The mean cross-section area and the least diameter of axon cylinders were calculated from measurements made by computer assisted planimetry of electron photomicrographs of sections through the optic nerve head at the level of the lamina cribrosa. The density of intrabundle connective tissue and glial cell elements in nerve fiber bundles was also calculated. The mean cross-section area and minimum diameter of axons in the temporal part were less than in the nasal part of the nerve. The values for axons in the superior and inferior parts of the nerve were intermediate. A similar pattern of increasing dimensions was seen in axons from the more axial nerve compared to neurons in the more circumferential nerve sectors. The density of the intrabundle, nonaxonal tissue elements did not differ significantly across the nerve. Although axon dimensions may play some role in defining the vulnerability of neuronal tissue to a pressure insult, the results of this anatomic investigation do not support the hypothesis that differences in axonal distribution by size across the nerve section define the regional vulnerability of the nerve head to elevated intraocular pressure.

  5. Uncovering sensory axonal dysfunction in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Chang, Tsui-San; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated sensory and motor nerve excitability properties to elucidate the development of diabetic neuropathy. A total of 109 type 2 diabetes patients were recruited, and 106 were analyzed. According to neuropathy severity, patients were categorized into G0, G1, and G2+3 groups using the total neuropathy score-reduced (TNSr). Patients in the G0 group were asymptomatic and had a TNSr score of 0. Sensory and motor nerve excitability data from diabetic patients were compared with data from 33 healthy controls. Clinical assessment, nerve conduction studies, and sensory and motor nerve excitability testing data were analyzed to determine axonal dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy. In the G0 group, sensory excitability testing revealed increased stimulus for the 50% sensory nerve action potential (Pmotor excitability only had significantly increased stimulus for the 50% compound motor nerve action potential (Pdevelopment of axonal dysfunction in sensory axons occurred prior to and in a different fashion from motor axons. Additionally, sensory nerve excitability tests can detect axonal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. These insights further our understanding of diabetic neuropathy and enable the early detection of sensory axonal abnormalities, which may provide a basis for neuroprotective therapeutic approaches.

  6. Uptake and transport of a novel anticancer drug-delivery system: lactosyl-norcantharidin-associated N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles across intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Q

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Min Guan1, Qiao-Ling Zhu1, Yang Liu1, Yong-Yan Bei1, Zong-Lin Gu1, Xue-Nong Zhang1, Qiang Zhang21Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Soochow University, Suzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Peking University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: In this paper, novel liver-targeting nanoparticles (NPs, lactosyl-norcantharidin (Lac-NCTD-associated N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC NPs (Lac-NCTD-TMC-NPs, were prepared using ionic cross-linkage. The physical properties, particle size, and encapsulation efficiency of the nanoparticles were then investigated. The continuous line of heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2 cell monolayer model was used to study the transport mechanism of Lac-NCTD, and the effects of factors such as time, temperature, pH level, drug concentration, enhancers, and inhibitors. This model was also used to indicate the differences among Lac-NCTD, Lac-NCTD-associated chitosan NPs (Lac-NCTD-CS-NPs, and Lac-NCTD-TMC-NPs in the absorption and transportation of membranes. Drug concentration levels were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Active transport and paracellular transport were suggested to be both the primary and secondary mechanisms for Lac-NCTD absorption, respectively. Lac-NCTD uptake and absorption were not controlled by pH levels, but were positively correlated to uptake time, and negatively correlated to temperature. The basolateral to apical apparent permeability coefficients (Papps were higher than those of the apical to basolateral values. The inhibitor of P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 significantly enhanced the uptake amount of Lac-NCTD. Compared with Lac-NCTD, Lac-NCTD-CS-NPs and Lac-NCTD-TMC-NPs significantly enhanced drug absorption. Additionally, the latter exhibited stronger action. Lac-NCTD-NPs could penetrate the plasma membrane of

  7. Ultrastructural observation of effect of moderate hypothermia on axonal damage in an animal model of diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓川; 唐文渊; 郑履平

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of moderate hypothermia on responses of axonal cytoskeleton to axonal injury in the acute stage of injury. Methods: Of fifteen adult guinea pigs, twelve animals were subjected to stretch injury to the right optic nerves and divided into the normothermic group (n=6) in which the animal's core temperature was maintained at 36.0-37.5℃ and the hypothermia group (n=6) in which the core temperature was reduced to 32.0-32.5℃ after stretch injury. Remaining three animals sustained no injury to the right optic nerves and served as control group. Half of injured animals (n=3) of either normothermic group or hypothermic group were killed at either 2 hours or 4 hours after injury. The ultrastructural changes of axonal cytoskeleton of the right optic nerve fibers from the animals were examined under a transmission electron microscope and analyzed by quantitative analysis with a computer image analysis system. Results: At 2 hours after stretch injury, there was a significant reduction in the mean number of microtubules (P<0.001), and a significant increase in the mean intermicrotubule spacing (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in axons of all sizes in normothermic animals. The mean number of neurofilaments also decreased statistically (P<0.01) in large and medium subgroups of axons in the same experimental group at 2 hours. By 4 hours, the large subgroup of axons in normothermic animals still demonstrated a significant decline in the mean number of microtubules (P<0.01) and an increase in the mean intermicrotubule spacing (P<0.05), while the medium and small subgroups of axons displayed a significant increase in the mean number of neurofilaments (P<0.05) and reduction in the mean interneurofilament spacing (P<0.05). On the contrary, either the mean number of microtubules and the mean intermicrotubule spacing, or the mean number of neurofilaments and interneurofilament spacing in axons of all sizes in hypothermic stretch-injured animals was not

  8. Drug: D10133 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10133.gif Antidepressant serotonin transporter inhibitor [HSA:6532] [KO:K05037]; noradrenalin transporter in...lassification of drugs [BR:br08310] Transporters Solute carrier family SLC6 SLC6A2 (noradrenalin transporter

  9. Formulation of olfactory-targeted microparticles with tamarind seed polysaccharide to improve nose-to-brain transport of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarragudi, Sasi B; Richter, Robert; Lee, Helen; Walker, Greg F; Clarkson, Andrew N; Kumar, Haribalan; Rizwan, Shakila B

    2017-05-01

    Targeted delivery and retention of drug formulations in the olfactory mucosa, the target site for nose-to-brain drug absorption is a major challenge due to the geometrical complexity of the nose and nasal clearance. Recent modelling data indicates that 10μm-sized microparticles show maximum deposition in the olfactory mucosa. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that 10μm-sized mucoadhesive microparticles would preferentially deposit on, and increase retention of drug on, the olfactory mucosa in a novel 3D-printed human nasal-replica cast under simulated breathing. The naturally occurring mucoadhesive polymer, tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) was used to formulate the microparticles using a spray drying technique. Physicochemical properties of microparticles such as size, morphology and mucoadhesiveness was investigated using a combination of laser diffraction, electron microscopy and texture-analysis. Furthermore, FITC-dextrans (5-40kDa) were incorporated in TSP-microparticles as model