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Sample records for axonal agglomerates behavioral

  1. Filtration behavior of silver nanoparticle agglomerates and effects of the agglomerate model in data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many data evaluation procedures for particle measuring devices and in filtration models, spherical particles are assumed. However, significant fractions of aerosol particles are agglomerates of small primary spheres. The morphology of particles in filtration processes may not be known a priori and if the filtration data are processed with wrong assumption, errors can be induced. In this work, we have quantified such errors for the case of open-structured agglomerates. Filtration efficiency tests with polydisperse silver nanoparticle agglomerates and their sintered spheres were performed. After the sintering process, particles with a compact structure with the shape close to a sphere are obtained, which are referred to as sintered spheres in the present study. The testing method involved generation of particulate forms, passing the particles through the testing section, and measurement of the particle number concentrations and size distributions before and after the filter. Measurements of the aerosols upstream and downstream of the filter were conducted using scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPS, TSI Inc.), which covered the rage from 10 to 480 nm. Particles were additionally characterized from the electron microscopic images and the average primary particle size was determined to be 16.8 nm. The number-size distribution curves were obtained and used for penetration calculation. The penetration was dependent on the particle size and morphology. Silver-sintered spheres were captured with a lower efficiency than agglomerates with the same mobility diameter because of the stronger interception effect for agglomerates. Data analysis of the number-size distribution for agglomerates was processed based on sphere assumption and using the model for open-structured agglomerates developed by Lall and Friedlander. The efficiencies based on total concentrations of number, surface and volume were affected when the agglomerate model was used. The effect was weakest for the

  2. Filtration behavior of silver nanoparticle agglomerates and effects of the agglomerate model in data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buha, Jelena, E-mail: jelena.buha@empa.ch [Empa, Analytical Chemistry (Switzerland); Fissan, Heinz [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology e.V. (IUTA) (Germany); Wang, Jing, E-mail: jing.wang@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [Empa, Analytical Chemistry (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15

    In many data evaluation procedures for particle measuring devices and in filtration models, spherical particles are assumed. However, significant fractions of aerosol particles are agglomerates of small primary spheres. The morphology of particles in filtration processes may not be known a priori and if the filtration data are processed with wrong assumption, errors can be induced. In this work, we have quantified such errors for the case of open-structured agglomerates. Filtration efficiency tests with polydisperse silver nanoparticle agglomerates and their sintered spheres were performed. After the sintering process, particles with a compact structure with the shape close to a sphere are obtained, which are referred to as sintered spheres in the present study. The testing method involved generation of particulate forms, passing the particles through the testing section, and measurement of the particle number concentrations and size distributions before and after the filter. Measurements of the aerosols upstream and downstream of the filter were conducted using scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPS, TSI Inc.), which covered the rage from 10 to 480 nm. Particles were additionally characterized from the electron microscopic images and the average primary particle size was determined to be 16.8 nm. The number-size distribution curves were obtained and used for penetration calculation. The penetration was dependent on the particle size and morphology. Silver-sintered spheres were captured with a lower efficiency than agglomerates with the same mobility diameter because of the stronger interception effect for agglomerates. Data analysis of the number-size distribution for agglomerates was processed based on sphere assumption and using the model for open-structured agglomerates developed by Lall and Friedlander. The efficiencies based on total concentrations of number, surface and volume were affected when the agglomerate model was used. The effect was weakest for the

  3. Characterizing the dynamic behavior of nano-TiO2 agglomerates in suspensions by photocorrelation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are small but easily form agglomerates in suspension, depending on the strength of particle–particle and particle–media interactions. To understand the agglomeration behavior of nanoparticles in media and relate to it to product performance testing, measurement methods are desired to characterize highly scattering metal oxide nanoparticle suspensions without dilution. In this article, we describe the advantages of using photocorrelation spectroscopy (PCS) in a backscattering detection configuration to carry out a realistic agglomerate size measurement in multiple scattering media found in most metal oxide nanoparticle suspensions. The dynamic behavior of nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles in buffer solutions of different chemical composition and pH values was investigated as a sample system using PCS. The resulting autocorrelation functions (AFs) at different time intervals, particle concentrations, and pH values were measured at several detection angles. The AF exhibits a multi-mode relaxation time feature and the calculated hydrodynamic diameters strongly depended on media composition and detection angle. This result indicates that the size and dispersion of nano-TiO2 agglomerates are significantly affected by solution media. A measurement protocol for determining size and dispersion of metal oxide particles in media is proposed and related to a performance test found in industry.

  4. Study of agglomeration behavior of combustion-synthesized nano-crystalline ceria using new fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Srirupa T.; Bedekar, Vinila [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Patra, A.; Sastry, P.U. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)], E-mail: aktyagi@barc.gov.in

    2008-10-20

    Ceria powders were prepared by gel combustion process using cerium nitrate and hitherto unexplored amino acid fuels such as aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine, tryptophan, phenyl alanine, valine, etc. These powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, surface area analysis, sinterability, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The combustion-synthesized powders were agglomerates of nano-crystallites. SAXS profiles of the powders prepared using tryptophan, phenyl alanine and dimethyl urea exhibited fractal behavior.

  5. Bruchpilot in Ribbon-Like Axonal Agglomerates, Behavioral Defects, and Early Death in SRPK79D Kinase Mutants of Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa Nieratschker; Alice Schubert; Mandy Jauch; Nicole Bock; Daniel Bucher; Sonja Dippacher; Georg Krohne; Esther Asan; Sigrid Buchner; Erich Buchner

    2009-01-01

    Defining the molecular structure and function of synapses is a central theme in brain research. In Drosophila the Bruchpilot (BRP) protein is associated with T-shaped ribbons ("T-bars") at presynaptic active zones (AZs). BRP is required for intact AZ structure and normal evoked neurotransmitter release. By screening for mutations that affect the tissue distribution of Bruchpilot, we have identified a P-transposon insertion in gene CG11489 (location 79D) which shows high homology to mammalian ...

  6. Fractal and agglomeration behavior in Gd and Sm doped CeO2 nano-crystalline powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocrystalline Gd, Sm doped ceria powders were synthesized by a combustion technique, using glycine as the fuel. These powders, after calcination at 600 oC, were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and were found to be phase pure. The crystallite sizes, as calculated from X-ray line broadening were in the range of 11-13 nm, which were in close agreement with those obtained from the SAXS studies. The TEM studies also showed the particle sizes to be in the range of 10-15 nm. These powders showed a high surface area as observed from BET technique. The extent and nature of agglomeration was studied by a particle size analyzer. The fractal behaviour of these nano-sized powders prepared by combustion synthesis, has also been investigated by small angle X-ray scattering technique. Results showed that the powders contain aggregates with rough fractal surfaces above a length scale of 20 nm. These parameters of the powders and their agglomerates were found to play a significant role in the sintering behavior

  7. Application of synchrotron radiation X-ray computed tomography to investigate the agglomerating behavior of TiB2 particles in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • SR-CT was a powerful tool to investigate the TiB2 distribution in Al-TiB2 in situ composites. • Three kinds of agglomerations frequently present in the composites. • Agglomerations formed via the diffused atoms reacting with intermediate products. • The composites containing agglomerations show a much reduced ductility. - Abstract: Agglomeration of reinforcing particles has a number of deleterious effects on the properties of in situ metal matrix composites (MMCs). In order to better understand this phenomenon, the agglomerating behavior of TiB2 particles in aluminum based in situ MMCs was investigated using synchrotron radiation X-ray computed tomography (SR-CT) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). SR-CT was shown to be a powerful tool for visualizing and quantifying the three-dimensional (3D) features within the composites. Based on the SR-CT and FESEM results, a formation mechanism of the flaky agglomerates, flocculent agglomerates and clusters of coarse TiB2 particles, which are most frequently presented in the in situ Al/TiB2 composite, has been proposed. The mechanism shows that the formation of these three kinds of agglomerates can be attributed to three parallel processes, i.e. diffusing titanium atoms reacting with AlB2, aluminum melt directly reacting with emulsified salt, diffusing boron atoms reacting with TiAl3, respectively. Moreover, the mechanism may shed some light on how to design better processing techniques for obtaining homogenous particle distribution in in situ Al/TiB2 composites in the future

  8. Dysregulation of the Axonal Trafficking of Nuclear-encoded Mitochondrial mRNA alters Neuronal Mitochondrial Activity and Mouse Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Amar N.; Sun, Ching-Yu; Reichard, Kathryn; Gervasi, Noreen M.; Pickel, James; Nakazawa, Kazu; Gioio, Anthony E.; Kaplan, Barry B.

    2013-01-01

    Local translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs is essential for mitochondrial activity, yet there is little insight into the role that axonal trafficking of these transcripts play in neuronal function and behavior. Previously, we identified a 38 nucleotide stem-loop structure (zipcode) in the 3′ untranslated region of the Cytochrome C oxidase IV (COXIV) mRNA that directs the transport of a reporter mRNA to the axon of superior cervical ganglion neurons (SCG). Over-expression of a ch...

  9. The impact of motor axon misdirection and attrition on behavioral deficit following experimental nerve injuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Daniel de Villiers Alant

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve transection and neuroma-in-continuity injuries are associated with permanent functional deficits, often despite successful end-organ reinnervation. Axonal misdirection with non-specific reinnervation, frustrated regeneration and axonal attrition are believed to be among the anatomical substrates that underlie the poor functional recovery associated with these devastating injuries. Yet, functional deficits associated with axonal misdirection in experimental neuroma-in-continuity injuries have not yet been studied. We hypothesized that experimental neuroma-in-continuity injuries would result in motor axon misdirection and attrition with proportional persistent functional deficits. The femoral nerve misdirection model was exploited to assess major motor pathway misdirection and axonal attrition over a spectrum of experimental nerve injuries, with neuroma-in-continuity injuries simulated by the combination of compression and traction forces in 42 male rats. Sciatic nerve injuries were employed in an additional 42 rats, to evaluate the contribution of axonal misdirection to locomotor deficits by a ladder rung task up to 12 weeks. Retrograde motor neuron labeling techniques were utilized to determine the degree of axonal misdirection and attrition. Characteristic histological neuroma-in-continuity features were demonstrated in the neuroma-in-continuity groups and poor functional recovery was seen despite successful nerve regeneration and muscle reinnervation. Good positive and negative correlations were observed respectively between axonal misdirection (p<.0001, r(2=.67, motor neuron counts (attrition (p<.0001, r(2=.69 and final functional deficits. We demonstrate prominent motor axon misdirection and attrition in neuroma-in-continuity and transection injuries of mixed motor nerves that contribute to the long-term functional deficits. Although widely accepted in theory, to our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence to

  10. Influences of Different Components on Agglomeration Behavior of MoS2 During Oxidation Roasting Process in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Wang, Jing-Song; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-05-01

    An agglomeration of the furnace charge always takes place during the oxidation roasting process of molybdenite concentrate (with the main component of MoS2) in multiple hearth furnaces, which greatly affects the production process and furnace service life. In the present work, a preliminary study about the influence of various components on the agglomeration phenomenon of pure MoS2 have been carried out. The results show that reaction temperature, impurity content, and air flow rate have significant effects on the agglomeration extent. Meanwhile, the impurity type added into the pure MoS2 plays a crucial role. It was found that CaO and MgO have a stronger sulfur-fixing effect and that the desulphurization of the roasted product was uncompleted. It was also concluded that the agglomeration is due to the formation of low-melting-point eutectics, including that between MoO3 and impurities and that between MoO3 and Mo4O11. It is suggested that decreasing the impurities contents, especially K, Cu, Pb, and Fe, is an effective method for reducing the extent of agglomeration.

  11. Influences of Different Components on Agglomeration Behavior of MoS2 During Oxidation Roasting Process in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Wang, Jing-Song; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-08-01

    An agglomeration of the furnace charge always takes place during the oxidation roasting process of molybdenite concentrate (with the main component of MoS2) in multiple hearth furnaces, which greatly affects the production process and furnace service life. In the present work, a preliminary study about the influence of various components on the agglomeration phenomenon of pure MoS2 have been carried out. The results show that reaction temperature, impurity content, and air flow rate have significant effects on the agglomeration extent. Meanwhile, the impurity type added into the pure MoS2 plays a crucial role. It was found that CaO and MgO have a stronger sulfur-fixing effect and that the desulphurization of the roasted product was uncompleted. It was also concluded that the agglomeration is due to the formation of low-melting-point eutectics, including that between MoO3 and impurities and that between MoO3 and Mo4O11. It is suggested that decreasing the impurities contents, especially K, Cu, Pb, and Fe, is an effective method for reducing the extent of agglomeration.

  12. Effect of Electromagnetic Vibration on the Agglomeration Behavior of Primary Silicon in Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yecong; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei; He, Yanjie

    2012-05-01

    An experimental apparatus that enables the simultaneous application of an alternating electric field and a stationary magnetic field was developed. Electromagnetic vibration was induced in a hypereutectic Al-Si alloy melt during solidification at a constant cooling rate. The results showed that the silicon particles collide with each other and agglomerate into clusters with the application of an electromagnetic vibration. With the increase of the electromagnetic force F, the sizes of the silicon clusters decrease and the clusters become more compact.

  13. Defining urban agglomerations to detect agglomeration economies

    CERN Document Server

    Cottineau, Clementine; Hatna, Erez; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Agglomeration economies are a persistent subject of debate among economists and urban planners. Their definition turns on whether or not larger cities and regions are more efficient and more productive than smaller ones. We complement existing discussion on agglomeration economies and the urban wage premium here by providing a sensitivity analysis of estimated coefficients to different delineations of urban agglomeration as well as to different definitions of the economic measure that summarises the urban premium. This quantity can consist of total wages measured at the place of work, or of income registered at the place of residence. The chosen option influences the scaling behaviour of city size as well as the spatial distribution of the phenomenon at the city level. Spatial discrepancies between the distribution of jobs and the distribution of households at different economic levels makes city definitions crucial to the estimation of economic relations which vary with city size. We argue this point by regr...

  14. Variations in ventral root axon morphology and locomotor behavior components across different inbred strains of mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mooij-van Malsen, J. G.; Yu, K. L.; Veldman, H.; Oppelaar, H; van den Berg, L. H.; Olivier, B.; Kas, M. J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Locomotion is a complex behavior affected by many different brain- and spinal cord systems, as well as by variations in the peripheral nervous system. Recently, we found increased gene expression for EphA4, a gene intricately involved in motor neuron development, between high-active parental strain

  15. Advances in food powder agglomeration engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuq, B; Gaiani, C; Turchiuli, C; Galet, L; Scher, J; Jeantet, R; Mandato, S; Petit, J; Murrieta-Pazos, I; Barkouti, A; Schuck, P; Rondet, E; Delalonde, M; Dumoulin, E; Delaplace, G; Ruiz, T

    2013-01-01

    Food powders are used in everyday life in many ways and offer technological solutions to the problem of food production. The natural origin of food powders, diversity in their chemical composition, variability of the raw materials, heterogeneity of the native structures, and physicochemical reactivity under hydrothermal stresses contribute to the complexity in their behavior. Food powder agglomeration has recently been considered according to a multiscale approach, which is followed in the chapter layout: (i) at the particle scale, by a presentation of particle properties and surface reactivity in connection with the agglomeration mechanisms, (ii) at the mechanisms scale, by describing the structuration dynamics of agglomerates, (iii) at the process scale, by a presentation of agglomeration technologies and sensors and by studying the stress transmission mode in the powder bed, and finally (iv) by an integration of the acquired knowledge, thanks to a dimensional analysis carried out at each scale. PMID:23522795

  16. Agglomeration and Market Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Masahisa; Thisse, Jacques-François

    2002-01-01

    The most salient feature of the spatial economy is the presence of a large variety of economic agglomerations. Our purpose is to review some of the main explanations for this universal phenomenon, as they are proposed in urban economics and modern economic geography. We first show why the competitive framework can hardly be the foundation for the economics of agglomeration. We then briefly review the alternative modelling strategies. In the hope of making our Paper accessible to a broad audie...

  17. Agglomeration and Co-Agglomeration of Services Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Kolko, Jed

    2007-01-01

    Economic research on industry location and agglomeration has focused nearly exclusively on manufacturing. This paper shows that services are prominent among the most agglomerated industries, especially at the county level. Because traditional measures of knowledge spillovers, natural resource inputs, and labor pooling explain little of agglomeration in services industries, this paper takes an alternative approach and looks at co-agglomeration to assess why industries cluster together. By cons...

  18. Computing along the axon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Haiming; Tseren-Onolt Ishdorj; Gheorghe Pǎun

    2007-01-01

    A special form of spiking neural P systems, called axon P systems, corresponding to the activity of Ranvier nodes of neuron axon, is considered and a class of SN-like P systems where the computation is done along the axon is introduced and their language generative power is investigated.

  19. Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowiecki, Karol Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates agglomeration effects for classical music production in a wide range of cities for a global sample of composers born between 1750 and 1899. Theory suggests a trade-off between agglomeration economies (peer effects) and diseconomies (peer crowding). I test this hypothesis...

  20. Fragmentation and bond strength of airborne diesel soot agglomerates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messerer Armin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of diesel soot aerosol particles to break up into smaller units under mechanical stress was investigated by a direct impaction technique which measures the degree of fragmentation of individual agglomerates vs. impact energy. Diesel aerosol was generated by an idling diesel engine used for passenger vehicles. Both the aerosol emitted directly and aerosol that had undergone additional growth by Brownian coagulation ("aging" was investigated. Optionally a thermo-desoption technique at 280°C was used to remove all high-volatility and the majority of low-volatility HC adsorbates from the aerosol before aging. Results It was found that the primary soot agglomerates emitted directly from the engine could not be fragmented at all. Soot agglomerates permitted to grow additionally by Brownian coagulation of the primary emitted particles could be fragmented to a maximum of 75% and 60% respectively, depending on whether adsorbates were removed from their surface prior to aging or not. At most, these aged agglomerates could be broken down to roughly the size of the agglomerates from the primary emission. The energy required for a 50% fragmentation probability of all bonds within an agglomerate was reduced by roughly a factor of 2 when aging "dry" agglomerates. Average bond energies derived from the data were 0.52*10-16 and 1.2*10-16 J, respectively. This is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than estimates for pure van-der-Waals agglomerates, but agrees quite well with other observations. Conclusion Although direct conclusions regarding the behavior of inhaled diesel aerosol in contact with body fluids cannot be drawn from such measurements, the results imply that highly agglomerated soot aerosol particles are unlikely to break up into units smaller than roughly the size distribution emitted as tail pipe soot.

  1. Optical scattering on ferrofluid agglomerates

    OpenAIRE

    Bacri, J. -C.; Salin, D.

    1982-01-01

    Direct microscopic observation of a thin sample of ionic ferrofluid, in the presence of a magnetic field, shows the existence of a locally hexagonal lattice of agglomerates. We have observed the unusual pattern of the light scattered by this array.

  2. Nucleation of point defect agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory of the agglomeration of point defects into dislocation loops and voids is formulated. A critical comparison between theory and experiment is made for nickel and copper irradiated in a high voltage electron microscope

  3. Motor Axon Pathfinding

    OpenAIRE

    Bonanomi, Dario; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2010-01-01

    Motor neurons are functionally related, but represent a diverse collection of cells that show strict preferences for specific axon pathways during embryonic development. In this article, we describe the ligands and receptors that guide motor axons as they extend toward their peripheral muscle targets. Motor neurons share similar guidance molecules with many other neuronal types, thus one challenge in the field of axon guidance has been to understand how the vast complexity of brain connection...

  4. Optimal agglomerations in dynamic economics

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, William A.; Xepapadeas, Anastasios; Athanasios. N. Yannacopoulos

    2012-01-01

    We study rational expectations equilibrium problems and social optimum problems in innite horizon spatial economies in the context of a Ramsey type capital accumulation problem with geographical spillovers. We identify sufficient local and global conditions for the emergence (or not) of optimal agglomeration, using techniques from monotone operator theory and spectral theory in innite dimensional Hilbert spaces. We show that agglomerations may emerge, with any type of returns to scale (increa...

  5. Agglomeration processes in aging societies

    OpenAIRE

    Theresa Grafeneder-Weissteiner; Klaus Prettner

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates agglomeration processes in aging societies by introducing an overlapping generation structure into a New Economic Geography model. Whether higher economic integration leads to spatial concentration of economic activity crucially hinges on the economies' demographic properties. While population aging as represented by declining birth rates strengthens agglomeration processes, declining mortality rates weaken them. This is due to the fact that we allow for nonconstant ...

  6. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs

  7. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  8. Characterization of the geometrical properties of agglomerated aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the absolute mass determination of agglomerated aerosol particles is presented. Based on this method it is possible to determine simultaneously and in situ mass, exposed surface and mobility diameter. From these measurements the fractal dimension of aerosol particles can be derived. For silver agglomerates produced by spark discharge it was found that they are bifractal. The fractal dimension was 3 in the free molecular regime and 1.9 in the transition regime. By variation of the gas mean free path it was shown that the region where the agglomerate structure changes from close-packed particle to low density agglomerates depends on the Knudsen number. In the free molecular regime the fractal dimension was not at all affected by any change of the generation conditions. Only sintering caused an increase in the density which was attributed to mass transport within the agglomerate. In the transition regime the fractal dimension remained constant with increasing monomer concentration and with increasing flow rate, but it increased with increasing pressure, increasing Ar:He ratio and with increasing sintering temperature. For sintering this effect was explained by the minimization of the surface free energy. It was found that the structure changing rate is proportional to the product of sintering temperature and residence time in the sintering oven. By carefully adjusting the temperature it is possible to produce agglomerates of a well defined structure. In desorption experiments of 136I from silver and carbon agglomerates it could be shown that the desorption behavior is different. It was found that the desorption enthalpy of iodine from graphite and silver particles were -142 kJ/mol and -184 kJ/mol, respectively. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the 136I attachment to particles is different for silver agglomerates with the same mobility, but different structures. (author) 41 figs., refs

  9. The soundscape dynamics of human agglomeration

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, H V; Lenzi, E K; Mendes, R S; Evangelista, L R

    2011-01-01

    We report a statistical analysis about people agglomeration soundscape. Specifically, we investigate the normalized sound amplitudes and intensities that emerge from people collective meetings. Our findings support the existence of nontrivial dynamics characterized by heavy tail distributions in the sound amplitudes, long-range correlations in the sound intensity and non-exponential distributions in the return interval distributions. Additionally, motivated by the time-dependent behavior present in the volatility/variance series, we compare the observational data with those obtained from a minimalist autoregressive stochastic model, a GARCH process, finding a good agreement.

  10. The problem of providing food resources in urban agglomerations (the case study of the Kuzbass agglomeration)

    OpenAIRE

    ZOBOVA L.L.; SHABASHEV V.A.

    2016-01-01

    Urban agglomerations are the result of a process of spatial competition for resources. To analyze the functioning of specific urban centers, it is necessary to make a distinction between the process of agglomeration and the state of agglomeration in the spatial structure. This paper shows the interrelation of the process of urban agglomeration and the agglomeration of the production activity as its economic foundation. The study reveals the connection between the urban agglomeration process a...

  11. Metal extraction by solid-liquid agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved metal values are extracted from a liquid e.g. uranium from phosphoric acid by contacting the liquid with agglomerates for a time to load the agglomerate with the metal value, separating the loaded agglomerates from the liquid phase and stripping the metal value from the loaded agglomerate. The agglomerate may be made by combining finely divided solid particles with a binding liquid to form a paste, adding a suspending liquid to form a mixture, the suspending liquid and binding liquid being immiscible in each other and the solid particles being insoluble in the suspending liquid and shearing the mixture to form the agglomerate. (author)

  12. Determinants of axonal regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Frisén, J

    1997-01-01

    Axons often regrow to their targets and lost functions may be restored after an injury in the peripheral nervous system. In contrast, axonal regeneration is generally very limited after injuries in the central nervous system, and functional impairment is usually permanent. The regenerative capacity depends on intrinsic neuronal factors as weil as the interaction of neurons with other cells. Glial cells may, in different situations, either support or inhibit axo...

  13. Agglomeration and networks in spatial economies

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Börje; Quigley, John M.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the parallel developments in the economics of agglomeration and the economics of networks. We explore the complementarities between the productivity benefits of agglomeration and those of network linkages, arguing that networks of actors dispersed over space may substitute for agglomerations of actors at a single point.

  14. Agglomeration effects : studying agglomeration e ffects from Norwegian hydroelectricity plants

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Marius; Risa, Erling

    2015-01-01

    This thesis aims to answer the research question \\To what extent did the shocks to eco- nomic activity and population following openings of Norwegian hydroelectricity plants in the early 20th century lead to long run agglomeration eff ects?". The question is answered using data on population density and taxable income in 67 Norwegian municipalities in the period between 1876 and 2013. We utilize the fact that hydroelectricity plants opened before transportation of electricity o...

  15. The characteristics of bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bed agglomeration behaviors were investigated experimentally when eucalyptus bark was burning tested in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. The focuses of this work were the influences of operating conditions and bed materials on the bed agglomeration tendency and the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease in measured bed pressure. The growth of bed particle and accumulation of agglomerates during combustion provided the partial to complete defluidization. The defluidization was promoted by the increase of bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of fluidizing air velocity. The SEM-EDS analyses revealed that the bed agglomeration was mainly attributed to the formation of potassium silicate compounds as liquid phase during the combustion. This was initiated by the chemical reaction between the bed particle and the released ash constituents. In this study, the inorganic migration from fuel particle to bed particle was likely dominated by the condensation/reaction. The thermodynamic examination by ternary phase diagram analysis corroborated that the liquid phase formation of the ash derived materials controlled the agglomeration. The alumina sand prevented the bed agglomeration since it was inactive in the formation of viscous molten substances during combustion at the observed temperatures. - Highlights: • The behaviors of bed agglomeration were studied during the fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark. • The increase in bed temperature and sand size, and the decrease of air velocity promoted bed defluidization. • The formation of molten potassium silicate compounds conduced to the bed agglomeration. • Condensation/reaction was the dominant inorganic migration mechanism from fuel particle to bed particle. • The alumina sand prevented effectively the bed

  16. Agglomeration, Integration and Tax Harmonization

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Baldwin; Paul Krugman

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers tax competition and tax harmonization in the presence of agglomeration forces and falling trade costs. With agglomerative forces operating, industry is not indifferent to location in equilibrium, so perfectly mobile capital becomes a quasi-fixed factor. This suggests that the tax game is something subtler than a race to the bottom. Advanced 'core' nations may act like limit-pricing monopolists toward less advanced 'periphery' countries. Consequently, integration need not ...

  17. Agglomeration of food powder and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanalakshmi, K; Ghosal, S; Bhattacharya, S

    2011-05-01

    Agglomeration has many applications in food processing and major applications include easy flow table salt, dispersible milk powder and soup mix, instant chocolate mix, beverage powder, compacted cubes for nutritional-intervention program, health bars using expanded/puffed cereals, etc. The main purpose of agglomeration is to improve certain physical properties of food powders such as bulk density, flowability, dispersability, and stability. Agglomerated products are easy to use by the consumers and hence are preferred over the traditional non-agglomerated products that are usually non-flowable in nature. The properties of food agglomerates and the process of agglomeration like employing pressure, extrusion, rewetting, spray-bed drying, steam jet, heat/sintering, and binders have been reviewed. The physical and instant properties of agglomerated food products have also been discussed. PMID:21491268

  18. Targeting Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Lesions to a Predetermined Axonal Tract System Allows for Refined Behavioral Testing in an Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kerschensteiner, Martin; Stadelmann, Christine; Buddeberg, Bigna S.; Merkler, Doron; Bareyre, Florence M.; Anthony, Daniel C.; Linington, Christopher; Brück, Wolfgang; Schwab, Martin E.

    2004-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) the structural damage to axons determines the persistent clinical deficit patients acquire during the course of the disease. It is therefore important to test therapeutic strategies that can prevent or reverse this structural damage. The conventional animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), typically shows disseminated inflammation in the central nervous system, which leads to a clinical deficit that cannot be directly attributed to a def...

  19. Mechanisms for selective agglomeration of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1989-05-01

    Work continued on the basic mechanisms which underlie various processes for beneficiating aqueous suspensions of coal by selective agglomeration with oil. A new method was demonstrated for characterizing the agglomerability of coal suspensions. This method utilizes a photometric dispersion analyzer to monitor changes in the turbidity of a particle suspension as increasing amounts of oil are added to the suspension in a batch agglomeration test. Agglomeration of the particles leads to a marked decrease in the turbidity of the suspension. Another experimental technique was also demonstrated for characterizing oil agglomeration. This technique involves measuring the rate of growth of agglomerates in a continuous flow system operating under stead-state conditions. The data are analyzed by means of a population balance. The results of a preliminary set of experiments in which Indiana V seam coal was agglomerated with tetralin seemed to fit a particular growth model very well. Equipment was also constructed for studying the kinetics of agglomeration in a batch process. While earlier work showed that quebracho (a commercially available dispersant) is a strong agglomeration depressant for pyrite, recent experiments with mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and mineral pyrite showed that quebracho does not appear to be sufficiently selective. Further consideration was given to the separation of mixtures of coal and pyrite agglomeration with heptane. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Agglomeration and the product mix

    OpenAIRE

    Dalvai, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide trade flows are dominated by high-productivity firms, that have a large range of products. Since the product range of firms reflects partly trade flows, it is a source of economic differences in space. In this paper, I analyze the effects of the product mix of firms on agglomeration. I build a theoretical model of multiproduct firms à la Mayer, Melitz, and Ottaviano (2014, AER), expand it with skilled, mobile workers and a spatial equilibrium. I show that a larger product mix of fir...

  1. Restoration of Visual Function by Enhancing Conduction in Regenerated Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Fengfeng; Lee, Henry Hing Cheong; Liu, Xuefeng; Gunner, Georgia; Jin, Hai; Ma, Long; Wang, Chen; Hou, Lijun; Hensch, Takao K; Frank, Eric; Sanes, Joshua R; Chen, Chinfei; Fagiolini, Michela; He, Zhigang

    2016-01-14

    Although a number of repair strategies have been shown to promote axon outgrowth following neuronal injury in the mammalian CNS, it remains unclear whether regenerated axons establish functional synapses and support behavior. Here, in both juvenile and adult mice, we show that either PTEN and SOCS3 co-deletion, or co-overexpression of osteopontin (OPN)/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1)/ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), induces regrowth of retinal axons and formation of functional synapses in the superior colliculus (SC) but not significant recovery of visual function. Further analyses suggest that regenerated axons fail to conduct action potentials from the eye to the SC due to lack of myelination. Consistent with this idea, administration of voltage-gated potassium channel blockers restores conduction and results in increased visual acuity. Thus, enhancing both regeneration and conduction effectively improves function after retinal axon injury. PMID:26771493

  2. Neurofilament gene expression: a major determinant of axonal caliber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the wide spectrum of axonal diameters occurring in mammalian nerve fibers, each class of neurons has a relatively restricted range of axonal calibers. The control of caliber has functional significance because diameter is the principal determinant of conduction velocity in myelinated nerve fibers. Previous observations support the hypothesis that neurofilaments (NF) are major intrinsic determinants of axonal caliber in large myelinated nerve fibers. Following interruption of axons (axotomy) by crushing or cutting a peripheral nerve, caliber is reduced in the proximal axonal stumps, which extend from the cell bodies to the site of axotomy. This reduction in axonal caliber in the proximal stumps is associated with a selective diminution in the amount of NF protein undergoing slow axonal transport in these axons, with a decrease in axonal NF content, and with reduced conduction velocity. The present report demonstrates that changes in axonal caliber after axotomy correlate with a selective alteration in NF gene expression. Hybridization with specific cDNAs was used to measure levels of mRNA encoding the 68-kDa neurofilament protein (NF68), β-tubulin, and actin in lumbar sensory neurons of rat at various times after crushing the sciatic nerve. Between 4 and 42 days after axotomy by nerve crush, the levels of NF68 mRNA were reduced 2- to 3-fold. At the same times, the levels of tubulin and actin mRNAs were increased several-fold. These findings support the hypothesis that the expression of a single set of neuron-specific genes (encoding NF) directly determines axonal caliber, a feature neuronal morphology with important consequences for physiology and behavior

  3. Simulation research on monomer agglomeration of nonmetallic inclusions in steel with a diffusion limited aggregation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The monomer agglomeration of nonmetallic inclusions was simulated with a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model of the fractal theory.The simulation study with a random two-dimensional diffusion was carried out.The results indicate that the DLA model can be used for the simulation of agglomeration behavior of the cluster-type inclusions.The morphology of clusters was observed with SEM and compared with the simulated agglomerates.The modelling procedure of the DLA model is applicable for the agglomeration process.The uncertainty of agglomeration process and the persuasive average agglomerative ratio was analyzed.The factors about the agglomerative ratio with the collision path distance and the size of particles or seed were discussed.The adherence of the nonmetallic inclusions on the dam, the weir and the walls of a tundish, and the absorption of inclusions by stopper or nozzle were also discussed.

  4. Prediction of mass fraction of agglomerated debris in a LWR severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ex-vessel termination of accident progression in Swedish type Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is contingent upon efficacy of melt fragmentation and solidification in a deep pool of water below reactor vessel. When liquid melt reaches the bottom of the pool it can create agglomerated debris and “cake” regions that increase hydraulic resistance of the bed and affect coolability of the bed. This paper discusses development and application of a conservative-mechanistic approach to quantify mass fractions of agglomerated debris. Experimental data from the DEFOR-A (Debris Bed Formation and Agglomeration) tests with high superheat of binary oxidic simulant material melt is used for validation of the methods. Application of the approach to plant accident analysis suggests that melt superheat has less significant influence on agglomeration of the debris than jet penetration depth. The paper also discusses the impact of the uncertainty in the jet disintegration and penetration behavior on the agglomeration mode map. (author)

  5. Human Capital, Talent, Agglomeration and Regional Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Charlie; Johansson, Börje; Stough, Roger R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an introductory overview highlighting some of the current knowledge as regards three critical questions related to the emerging knowledge economy: i) Why does human capital and talent tend to agglomerate in large urban regions?, ii) How does this agglomeration affect the location of different types of economic activities?, and iii) How does this agglomeration affect regional growth? There are different underlying agglomerative forces creating spatially concentrated increasing re...

  6. Industrial Scope of Agglomeration Economies in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Maria Bonomi Barufi; Eduardo A. Haddad, Peter Nijkamp

    2015-01-01

    The tendency towards urbanization in the emerging world accompanied by the constant pursuit for higher productivity prompts an urge for studies aiming at understanding agglomeration economies. In the context of Brazil, a country with extremely high regional disparities, exploring this issue is important not only for private stakeholders, but also for public policy practitioners. In the framework of static agglomeration effects, we investigate the industrial scope of agglomeration economies in...

  7. Brain injury tolerance limit based on computation of axonal strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and permanent impairment over the last decades. In both the severe and mild TBIs, diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is the most common pathology and leads to axonal degeneration. Computation of axonal strain by using finite element head model in numerical simulation can enlighten the DAI mechanism and help to establish advanced head injury criteria. The main objective of this study is to develop a brain injury criterion based on computation of axonal strain. To achieve the objective a state-of-the-art finite element head model with enhanced brain and skull material laws, was used for numerical computation of real world head trauma. The implementation of new medical imaging data such as, fractional anisotropy and axonal fiber orientation from Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) of 12 healthy patients into the finite element brain model was performed to improve the brain constitutive material law with more efficient heterogeneous anisotropic visco hyper-elastic material law. The brain behavior has been validated in terms of brain deformation against Hardy et al. (2001), Hardy et al. (2007), and in terms of brain pressure against Nahum et al. (1977) and Trosseille et al. (1992) experiments. Verification of model stability has been conducted as well. Further, 109 well-documented TBI cases were simulated and axonal strain computed to derive brain injury tolerance curve. Based on an in-depth statistical analysis of different intra-cerebral parameters (brain axonal strain rate, axonal strain, first principal strain, Von Mises strain, first principal stress, Von Mises stress, CSDM (0.10), CSDM (0.15) and CSDM (0.25)), it was shown that axonal strain was the most appropriate candidate parameter to predict DAI. The proposed brain injury tolerance limit for a 50% risk of DAI has been established at 14.65% of axonal strain. This study provides a key step for a realistic novel injury metric for DAI. PMID:27038501

  8. Brain gangliosides in axon-myelin stability and axon regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides, sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids, are expressed at high abundance and complexity in the brain. Altered ganglioside expression results in neural disorders, including seizures and axon degeneration. Brain gangliosides function, in part, by interacting with a ganglioside-binding lectin, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). MAG, on the innermost wrap of the myelin sheath, binds to gangliosides GD1a and GT1b on axons. MAG-ganglioside binding ensures optimal axon-myelin cell-ce...

  9. Microfluidic control of axonal guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ling; Black, Bryan; Ordonez, Simon; Mondal, Argha; Jain, Ankur; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2014-10-01

    The precision of axonal pathfinding and the accurate formation of functional neural circuitry are crucial for an organism during development as well as during adult central and peripheral nerve regeneration. While chemical cues are believed to be primarily responsible for axonal pathfinding, we hypothesize that forces due to localized fluid flow may directly affect neuronal guidance during early organ development. Here, we report direct evidence of fluid flow influencing axonal migration, producing turning angles of up to 90°. Microfluidic flow simulations indicate that an axon may experience significant bending force due to cross-flow, which may contribute to the observed axonal turning. This method of flow-based guidance was successfully used to fasciculate one advancing axon onto another, showcasing the potential of this technique to be used for the formation of in vitro neuronal circuits.

  10. Design of Agglomerated Crystals of Ibuprofen During Crystallization: Influence of Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sIbuprofen is a problematic drug in tableting, and dissolution due to its poor solubility, hydrophobicity, and tendency to stick to surface. Because of the bad compaction behavior ibuprofen has to be granulated usually before tableting. However, it would be more satisfactory to obtain directly during the crystallization step crystalline particles that can be directly compressed and quickly dissolved. Materials and Methods Crystallization of ibuprofen was carried out using the quasi emulsion solvent diffusion method in presence of surfactant (sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS, Tween 80. The particles were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD and were evaluated for particle size, flowability, drug release and tableting behavior. ResultsIbuprofen particles obtained in the presence of surfactants consisted of numerous plate- shaped crystals which had agglomerated together as near spherical shape. The obtained agglomerates exhibited significantly improved micromeritic properties as well as tableting behavior than untreated drug crystals. The agglomerates size and size distribution was largely controlled by surfactant concentration, but there was no significant influence found on the tableting properties. The dissolution tests showed that the agglomerates obtained in presence of SLS exhibited enhanced dissolution rate while the agglomerates made in the presence of Tween 80 had no significant impact on dissolution rate of ibuprofen in comparison to untreated sample. The XRPD and DSC results showed that during the agglomeration process, ibuprofen did not undergo any polymorphic changes.Conclusion The study highlights the influence of surfactants on crystallization process leading to modified performance.

  11. SPHERICAL AGGLOMERATION – DIRECT TABLETTING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Pradnya B.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct tabletting technique is the modern and the most efficient process used in tablet manufacturing and has been successfully employed for various poorly soluble and poorly compressible drugs. Spherical agglomeration is particle engineering technique which involves the transformation of fine crystals into spherical shape particles which enhances the powder properties such as particle size, shape, flow properties, solubility and bioavailability of pharmaceutical drug substances. This technique can also be applied to sustain the drug release from solid dosage forms. The present article is on the detailed comprehensive review about advantages and disadvantages, mechanism, different manufacturing methods of spherical agglomerates and characterization of spherical agglomerates.

  12. Agglomeration of microparticles in complex plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Cheng-Ran; Ivlev, Alexei; Konopka, Uwe; Morfill, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Agglomeration of highly charged microparticles was observed and studied in complex plasma experiments carried out in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The agglomeration was caused by strong dust density waves triggered in a particle cloud by decreasing neutral gas pressure. Using a high-speed camera during this unstable regime, it was possible to resolve the motion of individual microparticles and to show that the relative velocities of some particles were sufficiently high to overcome the mutual Coulomb repulsion and hence to result in agglomeration. After stabilising the cloud again through the increase of the pressure, we were able to observe the aggregates directly with a long-distance microscope. We show that the agglomeration rate deduced from our experiments is in good agreement with theoretical estimates. In addition, we briefly discuss the mechanisms that can provide binding of highly charged microparticles in a plasma.

  13. Agglomeration process engineering approach to evaluate the ability of different technologies to agglomerate food powder.

    OpenAIRE

    Hafsa, Ines; Mandato, Sandra; Lafond, Charleyne; Mejean, Serge; Dolivet, Anne; jin Kim, S.; Chevallier, S.; Le Bail, A.; Ruiz, Thierry; Cuq, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Agglomeration technologies are considered as a relevant way to improve functionalities of food powders. The agglomeration process makes it possible to limit segregation phenomena, to reduce dust production, to improve wettability and powders hydration during use, etc. Although largely used in the field of dairy or cereal food products, agglomeration processes are still managed with more or less empirical approaches, and tools. The objective of the present study is to investigate the agglomera...

  14. Correcting agglomeration economies: How air pollution matters

    OpenAIRE

    Drut, Marion; Mahieu, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to correct standard measures of agglomeration economies to account for air pollution generated by commuting. This paper examines the impact of nitrogen oxide (NOX) ? a pollutant mainly released by transportation ? on worker productivity. On one side, literature on agglomeration economies highlights the positive role of employment density on productivity, without accounting for the environmental impact of a better accessibility. On the other side, several studies (Graham, 2007;...

  15. Agglomeration of Charged Nanopowders in Suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Werth, J. H.; Linsenbuehler, M.; Dammer, S. M.; Farkas, Z.; Hinrichsen, H.; Wirth, K. -E.; Wolf, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work is to understand agglomeration of charged powders suspended in nonpolar fluids. The concerted influence of electromagnetic, hydrodynamic and van der Waals forces as well as Brownian motion leads to a complex agglomeration behaviour which depends on several parameters, e.g., the ratios of electric charges, particle sizes, temperature and concentrations of the particles. Both experimental and theoretical considerations are presented.

  16. The magnitude and causes of agglomeration economies

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Puga

    2009-01-01

    Firms and workers are much more productive in large and dense urban environments. There is substantial evidence of such agglomeration economies based on three aproaches. First, on a clustering of production beyond what can be explained by chance or comparative advantage. Second, on spatial patterns in wages and rents. Third, on systematic variations in productivity with the urban environment. However, more needs to be learned about the causes of agglomeration economies. We have good models of...

  17. Control of optical active borates nanocrystals agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    I. Cieślik; R. Węgłowski; J. Żmija; K. Kurzydłowski; M. Płocińska; M. Oćwieja

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study explore the possibility of total control the agglomeration of nanoborates powders. The great potential of PDLCs can be enhanced by using dye-doped or nanoparticles-doped materials, such as borates [1]. It is important to know how to prepare nanoparticles in order to obtain a high level of dispersion in the composites. Otherwise, even small an agglomeration does not give a possibility on the appropriate characteristic of properties and interp...

  18. Industrial Agglomeration and Use of the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chia-Lin; McAleer, Michael; Wu, Yu-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTaiwan has been hailed as a world leader in the development of global innovation and industrial clusters for the past decade. This paper investigates the effects of industrial agglomeration on the use of the internet and internet intensity for Taiwan manufacturing firms, and analyses whether the relationships between industrial agglomeration and total expenditure on internet usage for industries are substitutes or complements. The sample observations are based on 153,081 manufactu...

  19. Industrial Agglomeration and Use of the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, C-L; McAleer, M.J.; Wu, Y-C

    2015-01-01

    Taiwan has been hailed as a world leader in the development of global innovation and industrial clusters for the past decade. This paper investigates the effects of industrial agglomeration on the use of the internet and internet intensity for Taiwan manufacturing firms, and analyses whether the relationships between industrial agglomeration and total expenditure on internet usage for industries are substitutes or complements. The sample observations are based on 153,081 manufacturing plants,...

  20. The genetics of axonal transport and axonal transport disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E Duncan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are specialized cells with a complex architecture that includes elaborate dendritic branches and a long, narrow axon that extends from the cell body to the synaptic terminal. The organized transport of essential biological materials throughout the neuron is required to support its growth, function, and viability. In this review, we focus on insights that have emerged from the genetic analysis of long-distance axonal transport between the cell body and the synaptic terminal. We also discuss recent genetic evidence that supports the hypothesis that disruptions in axonal transport may cause or dramatically contribute to neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Theoretical studies on aerosol agglomeration processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, K.E.J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1997-12-31

    In this thesis, theoretical modeling of certain aerosol systems has been presented. At first, the aerosol general dynamic equation is introduced, along with a discretization routine for its numerical solution. Of the various possible phenomena affecting aerosol behaviour, this work is mostly focused on aerosol agglomeration. The fundamentals of aerosol agglomeration theory are thus briefly reviewed. The two practical applications of agglomeration studied in this thesis are flue gas cleaning using an electrical agglomerator and nanomaterial synthesis with a free jet reactor. In an electrical agglomerator the aerosol particles are charged and brought into an alternating electric field. The aim is to remove submicron particles from flue gases by collisions with larger particles before conventional gas cleaning devices that have a clear penetration window in the problematic 0.1-1{mu}m size range. A mathematical model was constructed to find out the effects of the different system parameters on the agglomerator`s performance. A crucial part of this task was finding out the collision efficiencies of particles of varying size and charge. The original idea was to use unipolar charging of the particles, and a laboratory scale apparatus was constructed for this purpose. Both theory and experiments clearly show that significant removal of submicron particles can not be achieved by such an arrangement. The theoretical analysis further shows that if the submicron particles and the large collector particles were charged with opposite polarity, significant removal of the submicron particles could be obtained. The second application of agglomeration considered in this thesis is predicting/controlling nanoparticle size in the gas-to-particle aerosol route to material synthesis. In a typical material reactor, a precursor vapor reacts to form molecules of the desired material. In a cooling environment, a particulate phase forms, the dynamics of which are determined by the rates of

  2. Axonal tubulin and axonal microtubules: biochemical evidence for cold stability

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Nerve extracts containing tubulin labeled by axonal transport were analyzed by electrophoresis and differential extraction. We found that a substantial fraction of the tubulin in the axons of the retinal ganglion cell of guinea pigs is not solubilized by conventional methods for preparation of microtubules from whole brain. In two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis this cold-insoluble tubulin was biochemically distinct from tubulin obtained from whole brain microtubules prepared b...

  3. Fcγ receptor-mediated inflammation inhibits axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Anti-glycan/ganglioside antibodies are the most common immune effectors found in patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which is a peripheral autoimmune neuropathy. We previously reported that disease-relevant anti-glycan autoantibodies inhibited axon regeneration, which echo the clinical association of these antibodies and poor recovery in Guillain-Barré Syndrome. However, the specific molecular and cellular elements involved in this antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration are not previously defined. This study examined the role of Fcγ receptors and macrophages in the antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration. A well characterized antibody passive transfer sciatic nerve crush and transplant models were used to study the anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration in wild type and various mutant and transgenic mice with altered expression of specific Fcγ receptors and macrophage/microglia populations. Outcome measures included behavior, electrophysiology, morphometry, immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting. We demonstrate that the presence of autoantibodies, directed against neuronal/axonal cell surface gangliosides, in the injured mammalian peripheral nerves switch the proregenerative inflammatory environment to growth inhibitory milieu by engaging specific activating Fcγ receptors on recruited monocyte-derived macrophages to cause severe inhibition of axon regeneration. Our data demonstrate that the antibody orchestrated Fcγ receptor-mediated switch in inflammation is one mechanism underlying inhibition of axon regeneration. These findings have clinical implications for nerve repair and recovery in antibody-mediated immune neuropathies. Our results add to the complexity of axon regeneration in injured peripheral and central nervous systems as adverse effects of B cells and autoantibodies on neural injury and repair are increasingly recognized.

  4. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pulsed laser irradiation of dense gold nanoparticles colloidal solution can result in their agglomeration. • Gas bubbles in-phase pulsation induced by laser radiation accounts for nanoparticles agglomeration. • Time evolution of the size distribution function proceeds in activation mode. • The electrostatic-like model of nanoparticles agglomeration is in good correspondence with the experimental data. - Abstract: Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 1014 particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data

  5. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A.; Shcherbina, M.E. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, P.G., E-mail: qzzzma@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kirichenko, N.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed laser irradiation of dense gold nanoparticles colloidal solution can result in their agglomeration. • Gas bubbles in-phase pulsation induced by laser radiation accounts for nanoparticles agglomeration. • Time evolution of the size distribution function proceeds in activation mode. • The electrostatic-like model of nanoparticles agglomeration is in good correspondence with the experimental data. - Abstract: Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 10{sup 14} particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data.

  6. Quantitative characterization of agglomerate abrasion in a tumbling blender by using the Stokes number approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Nguyen, Tien Thanh; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2013-03-01

    Removal of microcrystalline cellulose agglomerates in a dry-mixing system (lactose, 100 M) predominantly occurs via abrasion. The agglomerate abrasion rate potential is estimated by the Stokes abrasion (StAbr) number of the system. The StAbr number equals the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. Basically, the StAbr number concept describes the blending condition of the dry-mixing system. The concept has been applied to investigate the relevance of process parameters on agglomerate abrasion in tumbling blenders. Here, process parameters such as blender rotational speed and relative fill volumes were investigated. In this study, the StAbr approach revealed a transition point between abrasion rate behaviors. Below this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerate abrasion is dominated by the kinetic energy density of the powder blend. Above this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerates show (undesirable) slow abrasion rates. In this situation, the blending condition is mainly determined by the high fill volume of the filler. PMID:23250711

  7. Neurofilament Polymer Transport in Axons

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Yanping; Brown, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Neurofilament proteins are known to be transported along axons by slow axonal transport, but the form in which they move is controversial. In previous studies on cultured rat sympathetic neurons, we found that green fluorescent protein-tagged neurofilament proteins move predominantly in the form of filamentous structures, and we proposed that these structures are single neurofilament polymers. In the present study, we have tested this hypothesis by using a rapid perfusion technique to capture...

  8. Local translation and directional steering in axons

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Andrew C; Holt, Christine E.

    2007-01-01

    The assembly of functional neural circuits in the developing brain requires neurons to extend axons to the correct targets. This in turn requires the navigating tips of axons to respond appropriately to guidance cues present along the axonal pathway, despite being cellular ‘outposts' far from the soma. Work over the past few years has demonstrated a critical role for local translation within the axon in this process in vitro, making axon guidance another process that requires spatially locali...

  9. Compression Behaviour of Porous Dust Agglomerates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    The early planetesimal growth proceeds through a sequence of sticking collisions of dust agglomerates. Very uncertain is still the relative velocity regime in which growth rather than destruction can take place. The outcome of a collision depends on the bulk properties of the porous dust agglomerates. Continuum models of dust agglomerates require a set of material parameters that are often difficult to obtain from laboratory experiments. Here, we aim at determining those parameters from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our goal is to improveon the existing model that describe the interaction of individual monomers. We use a molecular dynamics approach featuring a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. The model includes normal forces, rolling, twisting and sliding between the dust grains. We present a new treatment of wall-particle interaction that allows us to perform customized simulations that directly correspond to laboratory experiments. We find that the existing i...

  10. Measuring Agglomeration Forces in a Financial Center

    OpenAIRE

    Bourgain, Arnaud; Pieretti, Patrice

    2006-01-01

    Basing on Scitovsky's (1954) definition of external economies and applying the method of Caballero and Lyons (1990) to macro data of Luxembourg services industry, we find significant agglomeration forces between financial intermediaries (downstream industry) on the one hand and business services and computer industry (upstream industries) on the other.

  11. Industrial Agglomeration and Use of the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); M.J. McAleer (Michael); Y-C. Wu (Yu-Chieh)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTaiwan has been hailed as a world leader in the development of global innovation and industrial clusters for the past decade. This paper investigates the effects of industrial agglomeration on the use of the internet and internet intensity for Taiwan manufacturing firms, and analyses whe

  12. The characteristics of bed agglomeration/defluidization in fluidized bed firing palm fruit bunch and rice straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviors of bed particle agglomeration and defluidization were investigated during the combustion of oil palm bunch and rice straw in a laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor. The study focused on (1) the effects of fuel inorganic properties and operating variables on the bed agglomeration tendency and (2) the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was experimentally found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease of measured bed pressure. The accumulation and growth of the agglomerates provided the partial to complete defluidization. The fuel inorganic composition was the significant influence on the bed agglomeration. The combustion of palm bunch showed higher in the bed agglomeration tendency than the straw combustion in every experimental condition. The defluidization was accelerated in response to the increase in bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of air velocity and static bed height. In the SEM/EDS analysis, the agglomeration was attributed to the formation of the molten substance rich in silicon and fuel derived potassium, likely the potassium silicate compounds, which presented as the adhesive coating and bonding layer. The filling of irregularity on the bed particle surface by the liquid material to form the adhesive layer was dominated by the collision with burning fuel particles. The propagation/reaction inward the bed particles by some reactive constituents was found. The thermodynamic analysis on the ternary phase diagram corroborated that the formation of the liquid material derived from the fuel inorganic elements controlled the agglomeration; the large melt fraction in the adhesive materials at the observed bed temperature range (62–99%) was estimated. - Highlights: • The bed agglomeration was investigated during the FBC of palm bunch and rice straw. • Bed temperature, sand size, air

  13. Bipolar charged aerosol agglomeration and collection by a two zone agglomerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In older to collect fine particles more efficiently, a new-type electrostatic agglomerator with two sones was developed. The distinguishing feature of this electrostatic agglomerator is that the particles are bipolarly charged and coagulated in the same alternating electric field simultaneously. The silica flour with 2 μm mass median diameter and the smoke from burning wood powder were used as test aerosol. The comparison experimental results have shown that when the mean electric field is 4 kV/cm the collection efficiency of the new electrostatic agglomerator was 98.2% for silica flour and 67.4% for wood powder smoke. Under the same experimental condition, the collection efficiency of the electrostatic agglomerator with three zones was 97.4% for collecting silica flour and the collection efficiency of the electrostatic precipitator was 56.3% for wood powder smoke.

  14. Fibre agglomerate transport in a horizontal flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of coolant accidents in the primary circuit of pressure and boiling water reactors can cause the damage of adjacent insulation materials. These materials may then find their way to the containment sump where water is drawn into the ECCS (emergency core cooling system). Strainers in the containment sump may become fully or partially blocked by the insulation materials. The consequences of such blockages are an increased pressure drop acting on the operating ECCS pumps. If the strainers are partially blocked smaller particles can also penetrate the strainers. These smaller particles can therefore enter the reactor coolant system and then accumulate in the reactor pressure vessel. An experimental and theoretical study that concentrates on mineral wool fibre transport in the containment sump and the ECCS is being performed. The study entails the generation of fibre agglomerates and the assessment of their transport in single and multi-effect experiments. The experiments include measurement of the terminal settling velocity, the strainer pressure drop, fibre sedimentation and resuspension in a channel flow, jet flow in a rectangular tank and the importance of chemical effects on any filter cake formed on the strainer. An integrated test facility is also operated to assess the compounded effects. Each experimental facility is used to provide data for the validation of equivalent computational fluid dynamic models. The channel flow facility allows the determination of the steady state distribution of the fibres at different flow velocities. The channel has a racetrack configuration with nine straight sections (1 m by 1 m by 0.1 m) and two 90 deg. bends with a radius of 0.5 m to the channel midpoint. The height of the bends is also 1 m and the channel width is 0.1 m. An elliptical section located upstream of one of the bends is used to house the impellers, which drives the flow into the next bend. Laser Doppler anemometry, particle image velocimetry, ultrasound

  15. Axon density and axon orientation dispersion in children born preterm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, Claire E.; Thompson, Deanne K.; Chen, Jian; Leemans, Alexander; Adamson, Christopher L.; Inder, Terrie E.; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Doyle, Lex W.; Anderson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Very preterm birth (VPT, <32 weeks' gestation) is associated with altered white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), the biological basis of which is uncertain but may relate to changes in axon density and/or dispersion, which can be measured using Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density

  16. Outsourcing CREB translation to axons to survive

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Andrew C; Holt, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    Nerve growth factor induces sensory neuron survival via retrograde signalling from the axon to the cell body. Local translation of the transcription factor CREB in the axon, followed by its transport to the nucleus, is involved in this process.

  17. Effect of Rubber Nanoparticle Agglomeration on Properties of Thermoplastic Vulcanizates during Dynamic Vulcanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanguang Wu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the dispersed rubber microparticles in ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM/polypropylene (PP thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs are actually agglomerates of rubber nanoparticles. In this study, based on this new understanding of the microstructure of TPV, we further revealed the microstructure-properties relationship of EPDM/PP TPV during dynamic vulcanization, especially the effect of the size of rubber nanoparticle agglomerates (dn, the thicknesses of PP ligaments (IDpoly and the rubber network on the properties of EPDM/PP TPV. We were able to simultaneously obtain a high tensile strength, elongation at break, elastic modulus, and elasticity for the EPDM/PP TPV by the achievement of a smaller dn, a thinner IDpoly and a denser rubber network. Interestingly, the effect of dn and IDpoly on the elastic modulus of EPDM/PP TPV composed of rubber nanoparticle agglomerates is different from that of EPDM/PP TPVs composed of rubber microparticles reported previously. The deformation behavior of the TPVs during stretching was studied to understand the mechanism for the achievement of good mechanical properties. Interestingly, the rubber nanoparticle agglomerates are oriented along the tensile direction during stretching. The TPV samples with smaller and more numerous rubber nanoparticle agglomerates can slow down the development of voids and cracks more effectively, thus leading to increase in tensile strength and elongation at break of the EPDM/PP TPV.

  18. Axon damage and repair in multiple sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, V.H.; Anthony, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that within long-standing multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions there is axonal loss but whether it is an early or late event has been more difficult to establish. The use of immunocytochemical methods that reveal axonal end-bulbs is a valuable approach to investigating acute axonal injury in human pathological material. The application of these techniques to multiple sclerosis tissue reveals evidence of axonal injury in acute lesions; the distribution of the end-bulbs in acute and...

  19. Industry-specific firm growth and agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Duschl, Matthias; Scholl, Tobias; Brenner, Thomas; Luxen, Dennis; Raschke, Falk

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the industry-specific relationship between industrial clustering and firm growth. The literature usually considers industrial clusters as positive for the general economic development of regions. In particular, their relationship with the formation rate of new firms and the survival rate of existing firms is well documented. However, the impact of agglomeration effects on growth prospects of firms is less clear. Because of the heterogeneity of industries, different agglomer...

  20. Sports Facilities, Agglomeration, and Urban Redevelopment

    OpenAIRE

    Humphreys, Brad; Zhou, Li

    2013-01-01

    We develop a monopolistic competition model of urban service consumption and production that includes spatial structure and property values. The model shows that the introduction of a new professional sports facility and team generates agglomeration effects that change the mix of services and property values, and increases local welfare, part of which is transferred to the team as subsidies for the construction of the facility. The distributional consequences of the new facility and the impli...

  1. Specialization and Agglomeration Patterns in Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman, Sheila A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates specialization and agglomeration trends in EU-27 NUTS2 regions over 1991-2011 by means of two versions of the relative Theil indicator that use employment data. The paper’s main focus is on Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs regions. As a legacy of central planning, in the early ‘Nineties these regions presented significantly above-average specialization and agglomeration. The paper shows that over 1991-2011 these features change very little; moreover, while disproportions fall in the other EU members, they rise in CEECs, implying growing divergence among the two groups in real terms, notwithstanding EU emphasis on real convergence. Indicators disaggregated by sectors show that for CEECs specialization/agglomeration change most in agriculture, market services and manufacturing. The paper focuses on the last two sectors. It argues that performance in the service sector is largely due to capital regions catching up on previous underdevelopment in the sector, therefore getting closer to Western regions. Non-capital regions instead lag behind, moving away from the EU sectoral average. As far as manufacturing is concerned, CEECs regions continue to specialize in the more traditional lines of production, for which also agglomeration remains extremely high. Consideration of the changes over time gives a partially different picture and shows that the higher specialization in overall manufacturing results from the development of a small but dynamic medium-high technology sub-sector that is significantly disseminated across regions, thus appearing to result from successful industrial restructuring and reconversion.

  2. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising

  3. The Power of Hydroelectric Dams: Agglomeration Spillovers

    OpenAIRE

    Severnini, Edson R.

    2014-01-01

    How much of the geographic clustering of economic activity is attributable to agglomeration spillovers as opposed to natural advantages? I present evidence on this question using data on the long-run effects of large scale hydroelectric dams built in the U.S. over the 20th century, obtained through a unique comparison between counties with or without dams but with similar hydropower potential. Until mid-century, the availability of cheap local power from hydroelectric dams conveyed an importa...

  4. Control of optical active borates nanocrystals agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cieślik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purposes of this study explore the possibility of total control the agglomeration of nanoborates powders. The great potential of PDLCs can be enhanced by using dye-doped or nanoparticles-doped materials, such as borates [1]. It is important to know how to prepare nanoparticles in order to obtain a high level of dispersion in the composites. Otherwise, even small an agglomeration does not give a possibility on the appropriate characteristic of properties and interpretation of the results. The deagglomeration methods applied until now give the decrease of agglomeration to a lesser extent than our method. Characteristic size and shape of particles made with sol-gel process is difficult to perform. Design/methodology/approach: Nanopowders samples of YAB and LCBO were prepared with sol-gel method. Deagglomeration process was carried out using acetic acid. The morphology and size of nanopowders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The crystallite sizes were determinated with IPS UA method. Findings: It was confirmed that the acetic acid influence on the decrease of agglomeration. It was also determined of conditions for preparation borates nanopowders samples (concentration acetic acind time and temperature of drying prepared samples. We have proved that a reagent used for deagglomeration process does not affect the structure of the investigated nanoborates used in an experimental. Research limitations/implications: The results can be used to the prepared of nanocompades of borates to observe a morphology and reliable assessment of nanocrystalline size. Originality/value: Our study shows how to prepare a sample of particles to observe morphology and measure the size of nanograins. In our study we found excellent solution, the medium, which not influence the inorganic nanomaterial structure. Result seems to be excellent and very perspective. We have showed as that measurement type influence the results of particles size.

  5. Development of a Gas-Promoted Oil Agglomeration Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Nelson; F. Zhang; J. Drzymala; M. Shen; R. Abbott; T. D. Wheelock

    1997-11-01

    The preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal was carried out with scale model mixing systems in which aqueous suspensions of ultrafine coal particles were treated with a liquid hydrocarbon and a small amount of air. The resulting agglomerates were recovered by screening. During a batch agglomeration test the progress of agglomeration was monitored by observing changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated suspensions or by observing changes in turbidity in the case of dilute suspensions. Dilute suspensions were employed for investigating the kinetics of agglomeration, whereas concentrated suspensions were used for determining parameters that characterize the process of agglomeration. A key parameter turned out to be the minimum time te required to produce compact spherical agglomerates. Other important parameters included the projected area mean particle diameter of the agglomerates recovered at the end of a test as well as the ash content and yield of agglomerates. Batch agglomeration tests were conducted with geometrically similar mixing tanks which ranged in volume from 0.346 to 11.07 liters. Each tank was enclosed to control the amount of air present. A variable speed agitator fitted with a six blade turbine impeller was used for agitation. Tests were conducted with moderately hydrophobic Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and with more hydrophobic Upper Freeport coal using either n-heptane, i-octane, or hexadecane as an agglomerant.

  6. Axon-somatic back-propagation in detailed models of spinal alpha motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eBalbi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Antidromic action potentials following distal stimulation of motor axons occasionally fail to invade the soma of alpha motoneurons in spinal cord, due to their passing through regions of high non-uniformity.Morphologically detailed conductance-based models of cat spinal alpha motoneurons have been developed, with the aim to reproduce and clarify some aspects of the electrophysiological behavior of the antidromic axon-somatic spike propagation. Fourteen 3D morphologically detailed somata and dendrites of cat spinal alpha motoneurons have been imported from an open-access web-based database of neuronal morphologies, NeuroMorpho.org, and instantiated in neurocomputational models. An axon hillock, an axonal initial segment and a myelinated axon are added to each model.By sweeping the diameter of the axonal initial segment (AIS and the axon hillock, as well as the maximal conductances of sodium channels at the AIS and at the soma, the developed models are able to show the relationships between different geometric and electrophysiological configurations and the voltage attenuation of the antidromically travelling wave.In particular, a greater than usually admitted sodium conductance at AIS is necessary and sufficient to overcome the dramatic voltage attenuation occurring during antidromic spike propagation both at the myelinated axon-AIS and at the AIS-soma transitions.

  7. Human intraretinal myelination: Axon diameters and axon/myelin thickness ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGibbon, Thomas; Nestorovski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Human intraretinal myelination of ganglion cell axons occurs in about 1% of the population. We examined myelin thickness and axon diameter in human retinal specimens containing myelinated retinal ganglion cell axons. Materials and Methods: Two eyes containing myelinated patches were prepared for electron microscopy. Two areas were examined in one retina and five in the second retina. Measurements were compared to normal retinal and optic nerve samples and the rabbit retina, which normally contains myelinated axons. Measurements were made using a graphics tablet. Results: Mean axon diameter of myelinated axons at all locations were significantly larger than unmyelinated axons (P ≤ 0.01). Myelinated axons within the patches were significantly larger than axons within the optic nerve (P < 0.01). The relationship between axon diameter/fiber diameter (the G-ratio) seen in the retinal sites differed from that in the nerve. G-ratios were higher and myelin thickness was positively correlated to axon diameter (P < 0.01) in the retina but negatively correlated to axon diameter in the nerve (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Intraretinally myelinated axons are larger than non-myelinated axons from the same population and suggests that glial cells can induce diameter changes in retinal axons that are not normally myelinated. This effect is more dramatic on intraretinal axons compared with the normal transition zone as axons enter the optic nerve and these changes are abnormal. Whether intraretinal myelin alters axonal conduction velocity or blocks axonal conduction remains to be clarified and these issues may have different clinical outcomes. PMID:24212308

  8. Gravitational agglomeration of post-HCDA LMFBR aerosols: nonspherical particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerosol behavior analysis computer programs have shown that temporal aerosol size distributions in nuclear reactor containments are sensitive to shape factors. This research investigates shape factors by a detailed theoretical analysis of hydrodynamic interactions between a nonspherical particle and a spherical particle undergoing gravitational collisions in an LMFBR environment. First, basic definitions and expressions for settling speeds and collisional efficiencies of nonspherical particles are developed. These are then related to corresponding quantities for spherical particles through shape factors. Using volume equivalent diameter as the defining length in the gravitational collision kernel, the aerodynamic shape factor, the density correction factor, and the gravitational collision shape factor, are introduced to describe the collision kernel for collisions between aerosol agglomerates. The Navier-Stokes equation in oblate spheroidal coordinates is solved to model a nonspherical particle and then the dynamic equations for two particle motions are developed. A computer program (NGCEFF) is constructed, and the dynamical equations are solved by Gear's method

  9. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steini Moura, Cassio [Faculty of Physics, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, 90619-900, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Balzaretti, Naira Maria; Amaral, Livio [Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, C.P.: 15051, 91501-070, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gribel Lacerda, Rodrigo; Pimenta, Marcos A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, C.P.: 702, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  10. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  11. Models of agglomeration and glass transition

    CERN Document Server

    Kerner, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This book is for any physicist interested in new vistas in the domain of non-crystalline condensed matter, aperiodic and quasi-crystalline networks and especially glass physics and chemistry. Students with an elementary background in thermodynamics and statistical physics will find the book accessible. The physics of glasses is extensively covered, focusing on their thermal and mechanical properties, as well as various models leading to the formation of the glassy states of matter from overcooled liquids. The models of agglomeration and growth are also applied to describe the formation of quasicrystals, fullerenes and, in biology, to describe virus assembly pathways.

  12. Isolation and analyses of axonal ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron-Mandel, Ella; Alber, Stefanie; Oses, Juan A; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Burlingame, Alma L; Fainzilber, Mike; Twiss, Jeffery L; Lee, Seung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Cytoskeleton-dependent RNA transport and local translation in axons are gaining increased attention as key processes in the maintenance and functioning of neurons. Specific axonal transcripts have been found to play roles in many aspects of axonal physiology including axon guidance, axon survival, axon to soma communication, injury response and regeneration. This axonal transcriptome requires long-range transport that is achieved by motor proteins carrying transcripts as messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes along microtubules. Other than transport, the mRNP complex plays a major role in the generation, maintenance, and regulation of the axonal transcriptome. Identification of axonal RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and analyses of the dynamics of their mRNPs are of high interest to the field. Here, we describe methods for the study of interactions between RNA and proteins in axons. First, we describe a protocol for identifying binding proteins for an RNA of interest by using RNA affinity chromatography. Subsequently, we discuss immunoprecipitation (IP) methods allowing the dissection of protein-RNA and protein-protein interactions in mRNPs under various physiological conditions. PMID:26794529

  13. Analysis and synthesis of solutions for the agglomeration process modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babuk, V. A.; Dolotkazin, I. N.; Nizyaev, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The present work is devoted development of model of agglomerating process for propellants based on ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium dinitramide (ADN), HMX, inactive binder, and nanoaluminum. Generalization of experimental data, development of physical picture of agglomeration for listed propellants, development and analysis of mathematical models are carried out. Synthesis of models of various phenomena taking place at agglomeration implementation allows predicting of size and quantity, chemical composition, structure of forming agglomerates and its fraction in set of condensed combustion products. It became possible in many respects due to development of new model of agglomerating particle evolution on the surface of burning propellant. Obtained results correspond to available experimental data. It is supposed that analogical method based on analysis of mathematical models of particular phenomena and their synthesis will allow implementing of the agglomerating process modeling for other types of metalized solid propellants.

  14. Contributions to assessing the relative dimension of agglomeration theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion POHOAŢĂ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to structure, from a historical and spatial point of view, the existing specialists' concerns in developing theories about agglomeration. The complete and complex evaluation of agglomeration economies allows us to make important contributions to assessing the relative dimension of agglomeration theories, placing them within the research area of spatial economy and identifying them with the science of location and currently with the new economic geography (NEG.

  15. Agglomeration Economies in Semi-industrialized Countries: Evidence from Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    José A. Borello; Hernán Morhorlang; Diego Silva Failde

    2011-01-01

    This paper identifies and problematizes three gaps in the existing literature on agglomeration economies. First, it argues that the ontology of agglomeration economies, the way in which these economies are conceptualized, needs to be revised. Far from being something “in the air” for all firms to profit from them, tapping these economies requires a conscious and sustained effort from firms. Second, it takes issue with the idea that the functioning of agglomeration economies in semi-industrial...

  16. Trade and Agglomeration: the Strategic use of Protection Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Thede, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the strategic motive for protection present in trade and agglomeration models, in the so-called new economic geography framework, is sensitive to the standard assumption that there is a sole agglomeration industry. We first investigate unilateral trade policy effects on the international production and trade pattern and the resulting national welfare levels in a new economic geography model including several agglomeration industries. The strateg...

  17. The Structure of Agglomerates consisting of Polydisperse Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Eggersdorfer, M. L.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Agglomeration is encountered in many natural or industrial processes, like growth of aerosol particles in the atmosphere and during material synthesis or even flocculation of suspensions, granulation, crystallization and with colloidal particle processing. These particles collide by different mechanisms and stick together forming irregular or fractal-like agglomerates. Typically, the structure of these agglomerates is characterized with the fractal dimension, Df, and pre-exponential factor, k...

  18. Mechanisms for selective agglomeration of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1989-05-01

    The investigation of basic mechanisms which underlie various processes for cleaning coal by selective agglomeration with oil was continued. Further measurements were made of the heat of wetting or immersion of various types of coal and graphite. The heat of immersion is an indicator of hydrophobicity which appears to correlate with other indicators such as induction time. The heat of immersion of Upper Freeport coal was increased greatly by heating the material in air at 150{degree}C for 7 days. The increase appeared due to a combination of surface oxidation and other factors such as an increase in the heats of rehydration and swelling. Leaching Upper Freeport coal with boiling hydrochloric acid increased the heat of immersion at low pH. Further consideration was given to potential pyrite depressants and quebracho was selected for evaluation. The degree of suppression was observed to depend on the nature of the solids and the amount of agglomerant (heptane) as well as the concentration of quebracho. 12 figs.

  19. Voluntary exercise increases axonal regeneration from sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Molteni, Raffaella; Zheng, Jun-Qi; Ying, Zhe; Gómez-Pinilla, Fernando; Twiss, Jeffery L

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the role of neurotrophins on activity-dependent plasticity have provided insight into how behavior can affect specific aspects of neuronal biology. We present evidence that voluntary exercise can prime adult dorsal root ganglion neurons for increased axonal regeneration through a neurotrophin-dependent mechanism. Dorsal root ganglion neurons showed an increase in neurite outgrowth when cultured from animals that had undergone 3 or 7 days of exercise compared w...

  20. Effect of agglomeration on flowability of baby food powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulc, Karolina; Lenart, Andrzej

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the wet agglomeration in a fluidized bed on flowability of agglomerated products, such as baby food powders. The agglomeration process was performed in the fluidized bed. The wetting liquid used to the process was: water, 2% lecithin solution, and 50% sugar solution. Food powders flowability was expressed as: Hausner Ratio, pouring time, angles of sliding and of repose and flow function. The composition of materials, used to prepare mixtures, has a significant influence on tested properties. The higher milk powder of the mixtures caused decreasing of their flowability. Wet agglomeration of baby food powders caused an increase in the mean diameter of particles, which made it possible to receive agglomerates with good flowability and decreased bulk density. The increase of milk powder content from 0 to 73% in the mixture before the agglomeration contributed to improve its flowability. Wet agglomeration with 2% lecithin solution and 50% sugar solution reduced particle size and bulk density, improved flowability of received agglomerates in relation to agglomerates received with water as a wetting liquid. PMID:20629874

  1. Agglomerates processing on in-flight images of granular products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Frederic; Guillaume, S.; Sevila, Francis

    1993-11-01

    Image analysis can be used to characterize granular populations in many processes in food industry or in agricultural engineering. Either global or individual parameters can be extracted from the image. However, granular products may appear agglomerate on the image, bringing biasing on individual parameters. Combining statistical and neural network technics enables the build of a system which can recognize if products are agglomerate or not. To process images after agglomerates detection, two approaches have been studied: the first is based on erosion, followed by conditional dilation with the original image; the second takes advantage of the graph's properties of the agglomerate's skeleton.

  2. Sorting of Dendritic and Axonal Vesicles at the Pre-axonal Exclusion Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginny G. Farías

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized sorting of newly synthesized proteins to the somatodendritic and axonal domains of neurons occurs by selective incorporation into distinct populations of vesicular transport carriers. An unresolved issue is how the vesicles themselves are sorted to their corresponding neuronal domains. Previous studies concluded that the axon initial segment (AIS is an actin-based filter that selectively prevents passage of somatodendritic vesicles into the axon. We find, however, that most somatodendritic vesicles fail to enter the axon at a more proximal region in the axon hillock, herein referred to as the pre-axonal exclusion zone (PAEZ. Forced coupling of a somatodendritic cargo protein to an axonally directed kinesin is sufficient to drive transport of whole somatodendritic vesicles through the PAEZ toward the distal axon. Based on these findings, we propose that polarized sorting of transport vesicles occurs at the PAEZ and depends on the ability of the vesicles to acquire an appropriately directed microtubule motor.

  3. Coordinating gene expression and axon assembly to control axon growth: potential role of GSK3 signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengquan Zhou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Axon growth requires coordinated regulation of gene expression in the neuronal soma, anterograde transport of synthesized raw materials along the axon, and assembly of cytoskeleton and membranes in the nerve growth cone. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 signaling has recently been shown to play key roles in regulation of axonal transport and cytoskeletal assembly during axon growth. GSK3 signaling is also known to regulate gene expression via controlling the functions of many transcription factors, suggesting that GSK3 may be an important regulator of gene transcription supporting axon growth. Here we will review signaling pathways that control local axon assembly at the growth cone and gene expression in the soma during developmental or regenerative axon growth and discuss the potential involvement of GSK3 signaling in these processes, with a particular focus on how GSK3 signaling modulates the function of axon growth-associated transcription factors.

  4. Mitochondrial Transport and Docking in Axons

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2009-01-01

    Proper transport and distribution of mitochondria in axons and at synapses are critical for the normal physiology of neurons. Mitochondria in axons display distinct motility patterns and undergo saltatory and bidirectional movement, where mitochondria frequently stop, start moving again, and change direction. While approximately one-third of axonal mitochondria are mobile in mature neurons, a large proportion remains stationary. Their net movement is significantly influenced by recruitment to...

  5. Fluidization and mixing of nanoparticle agglomerates assisted via magnetic impaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scicolone, James V.; Lepek, Daniel; Louie, Lin; Dave, Rajesh N., E-mail: dave@adm.njit.edu [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical, Biological and Pharmaceutical Engineering (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Mixing of nanopowders in an environmentally benign magnetically assisted fluidized bed (MAFB) system was studied. Examination of fluidization behavior of agglomerate particulate fluidization (APF; silica R974 or R972) and agglomerate bubbling fluidization (ABF; alumina or titania) nano-powders in un-assisted and MAFB systems confirmed previous results on decreased minimum fluidization velocity and increased bed expansion of APF and ABF powders due to magnetic assistance. APF and ABF powder mixtures behaved like APF powders with the bed expansions in between those of individual constituents. Unlike previous MAFB studies, fluidization as a function of time was studied to examine its influence on nano-mixing. With time, the bed expansion reduced, and reduction was faster as magnet-to-powder ratio increased from 0:1 to 5:1, although fluidization was sustained, confirmed via the pressure drop measurements. Reduction in bed expansion was attributed to change in the nature of nanoagglomerates, which showed increased density as a function of processing time, ruling out electrostatics or elutriation as major factors. Mixtures of silica (APF) and alumina (ABF), processed at various magnet-to-powder ratios, were characterized via statistical analysis from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy using field emission scanning electron microscope to compute homogeneity of mixing (HoM). Magnetic assistance improved the HoM as a function of time, and was strongly related to the product of number of magnets and time, similar to previous results in magnetically assisted impaction mixing (MAIM). The best achievable HoM was significantly better than unassisted fluidization and comparable to previous results for rapid expansion of high-pressure suspensions and MAIM.

  6. Fluidization and mixing of nanoparticle agglomerates assisted via magnetic impaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixing of nanopowders in an environmentally benign magnetically assisted fluidized bed (MAFB) system was studied. Examination of fluidization behavior of agglomerate particulate fluidization (APF; silica R974 or R972) and agglomerate bubbling fluidization (ABF; alumina or titania) nano-powders in un-assisted and MAFB systems confirmed previous results on decreased minimum fluidization velocity and increased bed expansion of APF and ABF powders due to magnetic assistance. APF and ABF powder mixtures behaved like APF powders with the bed expansions in between those of individual constituents. Unlike previous MAFB studies, fluidization as a function of time was studied to examine its influence on nano-mixing. With time, the bed expansion reduced, and reduction was faster as magnet-to-powder ratio increased from 0:1 to 5:1, although fluidization was sustained, confirmed via the pressure drop measurements. Reduction in bed expansion was attributed to change in the nature of nanoagglomerates, which showed increased density as a function of processing time, ruling out electrostatics or elutriation as major factors. Mixtures of silica (APF) and alumina (ABF), processed at various magnet-to-powder ratios, were characterized via statistical analysis from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy using field emission scanning electron microscope to compute homogeneity of mixing (HoM). Magnetic assistance improved the HoM as a function of time, and was strongly related to the product of number of magnets and time, similar to previous results in magnetically assisted impaction mixing (MAIM). The best achievable HoM was significantly better than unassisted fluidization and comparable to previous results for rapid expansion of high-pressure suspensions and MAIM.

  7. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg. PMID:27594833

  8. Axonal regeneration through arterial grafts.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, P. N.; Turmaine, M.

    1986-01-01

    The left common peroneal nerves of adult inbred mice were severed and allowed to regenerate through the lumina of Y-shaped tubes comprising grafts of abdominal aorta and its bifurcation. Very little regeneration took place within the grafts unless the distal nerve stump was inserted into one limb of the Y-tube. Using syngeneic grafts virtually all the axons regenerating through the lumen grew down the limb of the Y-tube containing the distal nerve. Using non-syngeneic grafts, however, a subst...

  9. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  10. Agglomeration of coal fines for premium fuel application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on fine coal in liquid suspension, which can be agglomerated in a number of ways. One of the oldest procedures involves the addition of electrolyte to the suspension to cause a reduction in the zeta potential and allow colliding particles to agglomerate. A second method involves the use of polymeric flocculants to bridge between particles. Both of these technologies are being used in the wastewater treatment plants for removal of fine waste particles from contaminated water. A third method involves the addition of a second immiscible liquid preferentially to wet the particles and cause adhesion by capillary interfacial forces. While the bonding forces in the first two methods are small and result in rather weak and voluminous agglomerates, the third method is postulated to produce more dense and much stronger agglomerates. In the case of fine coals, the carbonaceous constituents can be agglomerated and recovered from the aqueous suspension with many different coagulants. Inorganic or ash-forming constituents are also agglomerated along with the fine coal particles. As the froth floatation, agglomeration using coal and colloidal dust to effect a separation. Froth floatation, however, becomes less effective where extremely fine particles of cal must be treated or if there is considerable clay-size particle present. In contrast, there appears to be virtually no lower limit on the particle size suitable for agglomeration uses

  11. Fluid bed agglomeration with a narrow droplet size distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, SH; Vonk, P; Kossen, NWF

    2000-01-01

    In the fluid bed agglomeration processes liquid distribution influences the agglomerate growth. We developed a new nozzle that produces uniform droplets, which allows droplets to be easily controlled in size independently of liquid- and airflow of the nozzle. It was found that the spray rate and the

  12. Agglomeration effects on countries' competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance

    OpenAIRE

    Páger, Balázs; Komlósi, Éva

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to elaborate the role of agglomeration effects on countries' competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance. Our research contributes to the understanding of the relationship that exists between a country's urban system characterized by spatial agglomeration (concentration) or deglomeration (deconcentration) processes, and its competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance, respectively. Urbanization economies refer to considerable cost savings generated through the locating...

  13. Neurofilament spacing, phosphorylation, and axon diameter in regenerating and uninjured lamprey axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijak, D S; Hall, G F; Tenicki, P J; Boulos, A S; Lurie, D I; Selzer, M E

    1996-05-13

    It has been postulated that phosphorylation of the carboxy terminus sidearms of neurofilaments (NFs) increases axon diameter through repulsive electrostatic forces that increase sidearm extension and interfilament spacing. To evaluate this hypothesis, the relationships among NF phosphorylation, NF spacing, and axon diameter were examined in uninjured and spinal cord-transected larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus). In untransected animals, axon diameters in the spinal cord varied from 0.5 to 50 microns. Antibodies specific for highly phosphorylated NFs labeled only large axons (> 10 microns), whereas antibodies for lightly phosphorylated NFs labeled medium-sized and small axons more darkly than large axons. For most axons in untransected animals, diameter was inversely related to NF packing density, but the interfilament distances of the largest axons were only 1.5 times those of the smallest axons. In addition, the lightly phosphorylated NFs of the small axons in the dorsal columns were widely spaced, suggesting that phosphorylation of NFs does not rigidly determine their spacing and that NF spacing does not rigidly determine axon diameter. Regenerating neurites of giant reticulospinal axons (GRAs) have diameters only 5-10% of those of their parent axons. If axon caliber is controlled by NF phosphorylation via mutual electrostatic repulsion, then NFs in the slender regenerating neurites should be lightly phosphorylated and densely packed (similar to NFs in uninjured small caliber axons), whereas NFs in the parent GRAs should be highly phosphorylated and loosely packed. However, although linear density of NFs (the number of NFs per micrometer) in these slender regenerating neurites was twice that in their parent axons, they were highly phosphorylated. Following sectioning of these same axons close to the cell body, axon-like neurites regenerated ectopically from dendritic tips. These ectopically regenerating neurites had NF linear densities 2.5 times those of

  14. EEG functional connectivity, axon delays and white matter disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Paul L.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Fields, R. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Both structural and functional brain connectivities are closely linked to white matter disease. We discuss several such links of potential interest to neurologists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, and non-clinical neuroscientists. Methods Treatment of brains as genuine complex systems suggests major emphasis on the multi-scale nature of brain connectivity and dynamic behavior. Cross-scale interactions of local, regional, and global networks are apparently responsible for much of EEG's oscillatory behaviors. Finite axon propagation speed, often assumed to be infinite in local network models, is central to our conceptual framework. Results Myelin controls axon speed, and the synchrony of impulse traffic between distant cortical regions appears to be critical for optimal mental performance and learning. Results Several experiments suggest that axon conduction speed is plastic, thereby altering the regional and global white matter connections that facilitate binding of remote local networks. Conclusions Combined EEG and high resolution EEG can provide distinct multi-scale estimates of functional connectivity in both healthy and diseased brains with measures like frequency and phase spectra, covariance, and coherence. Significance White matter disease may profoundly disrupt normal EEG coherence patterns, but currently these kinds of studies are rare in scientific labs and essentially missing from clinical environments. PMID:24815984

  15. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in wat

  16. Cable energy function of cortical axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na(+)-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na(+)-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20-70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship. PMID:27439954

  17. Cable energy function of cortical axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L.; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na+-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na+-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20–70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship. PMID:27439954

  18. Neuronal Development: SAD Kinases Make Happy Axons

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Lei; Newbern, Jason M.; Snider, William D

    2013-01-01

    The polarity proteins LKB1 and SAD-A/B are key regulators of axon specification in the developing cerebral cortex. Recent studies now show that this mechanism cannot be generalized to other classes of neurons: instead, SAD-A/B functions downstream of neurotrophin signaling in sensory neurons to mediate a later stage of axon development — arborization in the target field.

  19. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-09-30

    Heap leaching is one of the methods being used to recover metal from low grade ore deposits. The main problem faced during heap leaching is the migration of fine grained particles through the heap, forming impermeable beds which result in poor solution flow. The poor solution flow leads to less contact between the leach solution and the ore, resulting in low recovery rates. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses prevents fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Currently, there is one facility in the United States which uses agglomeration. This operation agglomerates their ore using leach solution (raffinate), but is still experiencing undesirable metal recovery from the heaps due to agglomerate breakdown. The use of a binder, in addition to the leach solution, during agglomeration would help to produce stronger agglomerates that did not break down during processing. However, there are no known binders that will work satisfactorily in the acidic environment of a heap, at a reasonable cost. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. Increasing copper recovery in heap leaching by the use of binders and agglomeration would result in a significant decrease in the amount of energy consumed. Assuming that 70% of all the leaching heaps would convert to using agglomeration technology, as much as 1.64*10{sup 12} BTU per year would be able to be saved if a 25% increase in copper recovery was experienced, which is equivalent to saving approximately 18% of the energy currently being used in leaching heaps. For every week a leach cycle was decreased, a savings of as much as 1.23*10{sup 11} BTU per week would result. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures. These binders and experimental procedures will be able to be used for use in improving the energy efficiency of

  20. Effect of drug content and agglomerate size on tabletability and drug release characteristics of bromhexine hydrochloridetalc agglomerates prepared by crystallo-co-agglomeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Namdeo; Pawar, Atmaram; Paradkar, Anant

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the investigation was to study the effect of bromhexine hydrochloride (BXH) content and agglomerate size on mechanical, compressional and drug release properties of agglomerates prepared by crystallo-co-agglomeration (CCA). Studies on optimized batches of agglomerates (BXT1 and BXT2) prepared by CCA have showed adequate sphericity and strength required for efficient tabletting. Trend of strength reduction with a decrease in the size of agglomerates was noted for both batches, irrespective of drug loading. However, an increase in mean yield pressure (14.189 to 19.481) with an increase in size was observed for BXT2 having BXH-talc (1:15.7). Surprisingly, improvement in tensile strength was demonstrated by compacts prepared from BXT2, due to high BXH load, whereas BXT1, having a low amount of BXH (BXH-talc, 1:24), showed low tensile strength. Consequently, increased tensile strength was reflected in extended drug release from BXT2 compacts (Higuchi model, R(2) = 0.9506 to 0.9981). Thus, it can be concluded that interparticulate bridges formed by BXH and agglomerate size affect their mechanical, compressional and drug release properties. PMID:20228039

  1. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  2. Dynamics of Mitochondrial Transport in Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niescier, Robert F; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Joo, Se Hun; Chang, Karen T; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons. PMID:27242435

  3. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure. PMID:22715881

  4. Operational source receptor calculations for large agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauss, Michael; Shamsudheen, Semeena V.; Valdebenito, Alvaro; Pommier, Matthieu; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    For Air quality policy an important question is how much of the air pollution within an urbanized region can be attributed to local sources and how much of it is imported through long-range transport. This is critical information for a correct assessment of the effectiveness of potential emission measures. The ratio between indigenous and long-range transported air pollution for a given region depends on its geographic location, the size of its area, the strength and spatial distribution of emission sources, the time of the year, but also - very strongly - on the current meteorological conditions, which change from day to day and thus make it important to provide such calculations in near-real-time to support short-term legislation. Similarly, long-term analysis over longer periods (e.g. one year), or of specific air quality episodes in the past, can help to scientifically underpin multi-regional agreements and long-term legislation. Within the European MACC projects (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) and the transition to the operational CAMS service (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) the computationally efficient EMEP MSC-W air quality model has been applied with detailed emission data, comprehensive calculations of chemistry and microphysics, driven by high quality meteorological forecast data (up to 96-hour forecasts), to provide source-receptor calculations on a regular basis in forecast mode. In its current state, the product allows the user to choose among different regions and regulatory pollutants (e.g. ozone and PM) to assess the effectiveness of fictive emission reductions in air pollutant emissions that are implemented immediately, either within the agglomeration or outside. The effects are visualized as bar charts, showing resulting changes in air pollution levels within the agglomeration as a function of time (hourly resolution, 0 to 4 days into the future). The bar charts not only allow assessing the effects of emission

  5. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  6. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler; K. Lewandowski

    2005-09-30

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  7. XRD and DTA Analysis of Developed Agglomerated Fluxes for Submerged Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique study of structural and chemical analysis of crystalline phases in developed agglomerated fluxes was carried out. Thirty-two fluxes were developed by using a mixture of oxides, halides, carbonates, silicates, and ferroalloys for submerged arc welding. The present paper focuses on only ten (out of thirty-two fluxes which were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD to know the different types of oxides formed and changed in oxidation number of metallic centers after sintering process at around 850∘C. To know the effect of temperature over phase transformation and melting of different compounds, differential thermal analysis (DTA was carried out from 1000 to 1400∘C. This study aims to know the quantity of ions present (percentage and melting behavior of developed agglomerated fluxes for submerged arc welding process.

  8. How coupling agent ordering on the surface of zirconia nanocrystals influences their agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The ordering of dodecyl chains has been investigated in mixed monolayers of phosphonic acid capping agents on the surface of hydrothermal prepared zirconia nanocrystals. As co-capping agent for the mixed monolayer formation, methyl-, phenyl-, pyryl- and tert-butyl phosphonic acid have been used to investigate series with different mixing ratios. In this study, the influence of the various molecules on the alkyl chain disordering is discussed. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies show that with increasing amount of co-capping agent the agglomeration of the particles decreases. This behavior correlates with the ordering of the surface bond alkyl chains investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It can be concluded that interparticle bilayers, formed via long alkyl chain packing, are responsible for the formation of dense particle agglomerates and can be controlled on a molecular level by co-adsorbing various molecules. (author)

  9. Colloidal agglomerates in tank sludge: Impact on waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control of agglomeration phenomena. Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control

  10. Public Action and Innovationsupport Institutions in New Technological Agglomerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borras, Susana; Bacaria, Jordi; Fernandez-Ribas, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    engaged in enhancing the technological capabilities and knowledge flow of the territory. Taking this consideration as a starting point, the article presents the dynamics of the technological agglomeration of the Vallès Occidental County, located within Catalonia, Spain. It has supplied information on the......In all industrial and technological agglomerations several types of public and semi-public actors coexist. The same happens with the levels of government. Consequently, the daily reality of agglomerations is characterized by a wide diversity of innovation-support institutions more or less actively...

  11. WP/084 Measuring Industry Agglomeration and Identifying the Driving Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, Emma; Tarp, Finn; Newman, Carol

    Understanding industry agglomeration and its driving forces is critical for the formulation of industrial policy in developing countries. Crucial to this process is the definition and measurement of agglomeration. We propose a new measure and examine what it reveals about the importance of...... transport costs, labour market pooling, and technology transfer for agglomeration processes. We contrast this analysis with insights from existing measures in the literature and find very different underlying stories at work. An exceptionally rich set of data from Vietnam makes us confident that our measure...

  12. Externalities, Floating Population and Spatial Agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Yu; Wang Chuansheng; Fan Jie

    2007-01-01

    With the further development of socialist market economy,the mobility of factor markets in China,especially the labor market.is strengthened.Extemalities interacts with the agglomeration of productive factors.Under the framework of new economic geographg this article presents a theoretical model involving the endogenous population density affected by urban externalities.Results show that the population density is more concentrated around the center because the degree and extent of interaction between individuals intensifies when the distance from the center decreases.When there are several extemalifies resonurces,the aggregation of externalities changes the configuration of spatial factor allocation.These results fit well with the empirical facts about the decreasing density of floating population along the cities of Guangzhou,Dongguan and Shenzhen in Guangdong Province which is situat d in the eastern coast of the Pearl River Delta.We find that under the impacts of externalities released from Hong Kong into the coast,floating population Was more concentrated around Shenzhen and Dongguan,which are more adjacent to Hong Kong compared with Guangzhou City.

  13. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation attenuates axonal injur y in stroke rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Xu; Shiwei Du; Xinguang Yu; Xiao Han; Jincai Hou; Hao Guo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural functional recovery after stroke, but the neurorestorative mechanisms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that functional recovery of myelinated axons may be one of underlying mechanisms. In this study, an ischemia/reperfusion rat model was established using the middle cerebral artery occlusion method. Rats were used to test the hypothesis that in-travenous transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the femoral vein could exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia via a mechanism associated with the ability to attenuate axonal injury. The results of behavioral tests, infarction volume analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that cerebral ischemia caused severe damage to the myelin sheath and axons. After rats were intravenously transplanted with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the levels of axon and myelin sheath-related proteins, including mi-crotubule-associated protein 2, myelin basic protein, and growth-associated protein 43, were elevated, infarct volume was decreased and neural function was improved in cerebral ischemic rats. These ifndings suggest that intravenously transplanted human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promote neural function. Possible mechanisms underlying these beneifcial effects in-clude resistance to demyelination after cerebral ischemia, prevention of axonal degeneration, and promotion of axonal regeneration.

  14. CONSOLIDATION OF K BASIN SLUDGE DATA AND EXPERIENCES ON AGGLOMERATE FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of high sludge strength agglomerates is a key concern to the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) to ensure the sludge can be retrieved after planned storage for up to 10 years in Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) at T Plant. This report addresses observations of agglomerate formation, conditions that the data shows lead to agglomeration, the frequency of agglomerate formation and postulated physiochemical mechanisms that may lead to agglomeration. Although the exact underlying chemistry of K Basin sludge agglomerate formation is not known, the factors that lead to agglomeration formation, based on observations, are as follows: (1) High Total Uranium Content (i.e., sample homogeneity and influence from other constituents); (2) Distribution of Uranium Phases (i.e., extent of conversion from uraninite to uranium oxide hydroxide compounds); (3) Sample Dry-out (loss of cover water); (4) Elevated temperature; (5) Solubility ofU(IV) phases vs. U(VI) phases; and (6) Long storage times. Agglomerated sludge has occurred infrequently and has only been observed in four laboratory samples, five samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (performed for 7 to 10 hours at ∼185 C and 225 psig), and indirectly during six sampling events in the KE Basin. In the four laboratory samples where agglomerates were observed, the agglomerates exhibited high shear strength and the sample container typically had to be broken to remove the solids. The total uranium content (dry basis) for the four samples (KE Pit, KC-2/3 SS, KC-2/3 M250 and 96-13) were ∼8 wt%, ∼59.0 wt%, 68.3 wt% and 82 wt%. The agglomerates that were present during the six sampling events were undoubtedly disturbed and easily broken apart during sample collection, thus no agglomerates were observed in subsequent laboratory analyses. The highest shear strengths measured for K Basin sludge samples were obtained after hydrothermal treatment (7 to 10 hr at 185 C) of high-uranium-content KE canister sludge

  15. CONSOLIDATION OF K BASIN SLUDGE DATA AND EXPERIENCES ON AGGLOMERATE FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HILL SR

    2010-06-10

    The formation of high sludge strength agglomerates is a key concern to the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) to ensure the sludge can be retrieved after planned storage for up to 10 years in Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) at T Plant. This report addresses observations of agglomerate formation, conditions that the data shows lead to agglomeration, the frequency of agglomerate formation and postulated physiochemical mechanisms that may lead to agglomeration. Although the exact underlying chemistry of K Basin sludge agglomerate formation is not known, the factors that lead to agglomeration formation, based on observations, are as follows: (1) High Total Uranium Content (i.e., sample homogeneity and influence from other constituents); (2) Distribution of Uranium Phases (i.e., extent of conversion from uraninite to uranium oxide hydroxide compounds); (3) Sample Dry-out (loss of cover water); (4) Elevated temperature; (5) Solubility ofU(IV) phases vs. U(VI) phases; and (6) Long storage times. Agglomerated sludge has occurred infrequently and has only been observed in four laboratory samples, five samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (performed for 7 to 10 hours at {approx}185 C and 225 psig), and indirectly during six sampling events in the KE Basin. In the four laboratory samples where agglomerates were observed, the agglomerates exhibited high shear strength and the sample container typically had to be broken to remove the solids. The total uranium content (dry basis) for the four samples (KE Pit, KC-2/3 SS, KC-2/3 M250 and 96-13) were {approx}8 wt%, {approx}59.0 wt%, 68.3 wt% and 82 wt%. The agglomerates that were present during the six sampling events were undoubtedly disturbed and easily broken apart during sample collection, thus no agglomerates were observed in subsequent laboratory analyses. The highest shear strengths measured for K Basin sludge samples were obtained after hydrothermal treatment (7 to 10 hr at 185 C) of high-uranium-content KE

  16. Evolution of Zipf's Law for Indian Urban Agglomerations vis-\\`{a}-vis Chinese Urban Agglomerations

    CERN Document Server

    Gangopadhyay, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    We investigate into the rank-size distributions of urban agglomerations for India between 1981 to 2011. The incidence of a power law tail is prominent. A relevant question persists regarding the evolution of the power tail coefficient. We have developed a methodology to meaningfully track the power law coefficient over time, when a country experience population growth. A relevant dynamic law, Gibrat's law, is empirically tested in this connection. We argue that these empirical findings for India goes in contrast with the findings in case of China, another country with population growth but monolithic political system.

  17. Amenability of Muzret bituminous coal to oil agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahinoglu, E.; Uslu, T. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Mining Engineering, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-12-15

    Laboratory scale agglomeration tests were undertaken to investigate the amenability of Muzret (Yusufeli-Artvin) bituminous coal to oil agglomeration. Kerosene was extensively used as oil in the tests. In addition, fuel oil, diesel oil, and hazelnut oil were also used in order to determine the effect of oil type. The effects of the parameters including coal content, kerosene content, agglomeration time, coal particle size, pH, oil type, and agitation rate, on the combustible matter recovery, ash reduction and pyritic sulphur reduction, were investigated. It was found that Muzret bituminous coal could be readily cleaned by oil agglomeration with substantial reductions in ash and pyritic sulphur content. Maximum combustible matter recovery, ash reduction and pyritic sulphur reduction were achieved to be 85.54%, 59.98%, and 85.17%, respectively. (author)

  18. Genetics Home Reference: giant axonal neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in giant axonal neuropathy: new insights into disease mechanisms. Muscle Nerve. 2012 Aug;46(2):246-56. ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  19. Does firm agglomeration drive product innovation and renewal?.

    OpenAIRE

    De Beule, Filip; Van Beveren, Ilke

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Community Innovation Survey for Belgium to evaluate to what extent regional concentration (clusters) of firms, also known as agglomeration economies, may be enhancing for innovation. These agglomeration economies are positive externalities that benefit firms in various ways. For innovative performance, especially externalities related to knowledge spillovers matter. Knowledge spillovers or learning externalities typically emerge between firms that belong to the s...

  20. Differential labor mobility, agglomeration, and skill-biased migration policies

    OpenAIRE

    Russek, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyzes the impact of skill-biased migration policies under the economics of agglomeration. It therefore develops an agglomeration model with two types of mobile worker who are heterogeneous and differ both within and between skill groups with respect to their migration propensity. On the one hand, the model reveals that the effectiveness of migration policies depends on the level on trade costs. On the other hand, it shows that increasing (reducing) political barriers to migration...

  1. Wet agglomeration of particles in a fluidized bed

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez-Munguia, Maria-Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Particles agglomeration allows to modify their initial physical properties (size, shape, density, porosity) and to improve powder end-use properties like flowability, mechanical resistance and dispersibility, very important for pharmaceutics and food products. Fluidized bed agglomeration is obtained by spraying a liquid (solvent, binder solution) on fluidized particles to allow liquid bridges formation when wet particles collide. These bridges consolidate due to drying by the hot fluidizing a...

  2. Defect agglomeration in ferroelectric ceramics under cyclic electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The agglomeration of point defects in ferroelectric ceramics could be driven by repeated domain switching under cyclic electric field. The evolution equation of pore concentration under cyclic electric field is derived, with the help of a relation between the pore concentration and the extent of pore agglomeration. The results of the simulation agree quantitatively with the experimental data. An integrated framework about the mechanisms of electrically induced fatigue is proposed, which links the mechanisms at different scales.

  3. Marshallian Agglomeration Economies and Entrepreneurship: The Spanish Case

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Roberto Dopeso

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes to what extent marshallian agglomeration economies affect the creation of new entrepreneurial ventures at the metropolitan level. The measuring of agglomeration economies is based on the construction of indexes using the methodology of Glaeser and Kerr (2009). The indexes attempt to capture the effects of resource sharing, labor matching and knowledge spillovers according to the taxonomy proposed by Marshall (1920). Also an index to measure the influence of small suppliers...

  4. Viewpoint: Agglomeration research in the age of disaggregation

    OpenAIRE

    William C. Strange

    2009-01-01

    This paper selectively reviews recent research on the economics of agglomeration. Theory offers a long list of forces that might explain the spatial concentration of economic activity. The increased availability of disaggregated data - by firm, by worker, and by geographical unit - presents opportunities to substantially advance the understanding of urban growth and industrial clustering. At present, however, there remains great uncertainty about the forces that produce agglomeration. This su...

  5. Industrial Performance, Agglomeration, and Foreign Manufacturing Investment in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Nigel Driffield; Max Munday

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between the comparative advantage of UK industries, and new inward investment into these industries. The paper demonstrates that the extent of foreign manufacturing investment in an industry, and the spatial agglomeration of that industry, are significant determinants of industry comparative advantage, thus providing evidence of agglomeration benefits to both domestic and foreign firms. The paper then shows that industry comparative advantage itself, toget...

  6. Using Raster Based Solutions to Identify Spatial Economic Agglomerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian DARDALA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient economic activities incline to be concentrated in space, and therefore there is an increased attention over the forces of spatial economic agglomerations and the role of location in economic development. This paper proposes some solutions to automate the identification of spatial agglomerations and their intensities, function on the spatial distribution of items in the geographical areas. The software components developed to accomplish this task are Geographic Information Systems specific tools.

  7. Study on the Flow of Particle Agglomerates in Desulfurization Tower

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Jian-Xiang; Xu Chun-Xing; Zhang Wei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the flow feature of particle agglomerates in a desulfurization tower, a three-dimensional numerical simulation of the gas-solid two phase flow in the tower is carried out by use of the LES model and the cohesive particles kinetics theory. Based on the experimental model of the internal circulation multistage spray desulfurization tower, the simulation successfully captures the key flow features in a desulfurization tower, find that: agglomerates forming a stable fluidization...

  8. NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; J.A. Gurtler; C.A. Hardison; K. Lewandowski

    2004-04-01

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking.

  9. Kinetic modelling of methane hydrate formation and agglomeration with and without anti-agglomerants from emulsion in pipelines

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Trung-Kien; Melchuna, Aline; Cameirao, Ana; Herri, Jean-Michel; Duchet-Suchaux, Pierre; Glenat, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Offshore systems mainly containing crude oil, natural gas and water operate at low temperature and high pressure which favour conditions for gas hydrate formation and agglomeration. Gas hydrate is a serious issue in flow assurance; it may cause many troubles, especially, plugging in oil and gas pipeline. This work is to intend to develop a kinetic model to predict gas hydrate formation, agglomeration and plugging in flowlines based on the experimental data obtained from Archimede Flowloop fro...

  10. Flexibility in the nervous system: Regulation of axonal spike initiation in a sensory neuron fine-tunes signal integration

    OpenAIRE

    Städele, Carola

    2016-01-01

    Generating appropriate behavioral responses to sensory inputs is a pivotal function of the nervous system. Changes in internal conditions or the environment elicit action potentials that travel along the axon of sensory neurons to inform the central nervous system of the occurred changes. My work shows for the first time that neurons in the central nervous system feed back to the sensory system and regulate action potential initiation in the sensory axon. This regulation increases the activit...

  11. A revisit to agglomerates of early-type Hipparcos stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J. A.; Dinis, L.

    2008-10-01

    % We study the spatial structure and sub-structure of regions rich in {Hipparcos} stars with blue B_T-V_T colours. These regions, which comprise large stellar complexes, OB associations, and young open clusters, are tracers of on-going star formation in the Galaxy. The DBSCAN (Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise) data clustering algorithm is used to look for spatial overdensities of early-type stars. Once an overdensity, ``agglomerate'', is identified, we carry out a data and bibliographic compilation of their star member candidates. The actual membership in agglomerate of each early-type star is studied based on its heliocentric distance, proper motion, and previous spectro-photometric information. We identify 35 agglomerates of early-type {Hipparcos} stars. Most of them are associated to previously known clusters and OB associations. The previously unknown P Puppis agglomerate is subject of a dedicated study with Virtual Observatory tools. It is actually a new, nearby, young open cluster (d ˜ 470 pc, age ˜ 20 Ma) with a clear radial density gradient. We list P Puppis and other six agglomerates (including NGC 2451 A, vdBH 23, and Trumpler 10) as new sites for substellar searches because of their youth, closeness, and spatial density. We investigate in detail the sub-structure in the Orion, CMa-Pup and Pup-Vel OB complexes (``super-agglomerates''). We confirm or discover some stellar overdensities in the Orion complex, like the 25 Ori group, the Horsehead region (including the σ Orionis cluster), and the η Orionis agglomerate. Finally, we derive accurate parallactic distances to the Pleiades, NGC 2451 A, and IC 2391, describe several field early-type stars at d < 200 pc, and discuss the incompleteness of our search.

  12. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-12-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures that can be used for improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching, by preventing the ''ponding'' and ''channeling'' effects that currently cause reduced recovery and extended leaching cycle times. Methods have also been developed for iron ore

  13. Crystallo-co-agglomeration: A novel particle engineering technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradkar Anant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallo-co-agglomeration (CCA is a novel particle engineering/design technique developed by Kadam et al, to overcome the limitations of spherical crystallization (SC. Basically, it′s single step process used for size enlargement of single, two or more, small dose or large dose drugs, in combination with or without diluent. The process of CCA involves simultaneous crystallization and agglomeration of drug/s with/without excipients/s from good solvent and/or bridging liquid by addition of a non-solvent. Till date CCA has been applied for spherical agglomeration of talc, bromhexine hydrochloride-talc, ibuprofen-talc, ibuprofen-paracetamol, and naproxen-starch. The spherical agglomerates obtained by CCA can be used as intact beads (encapsulated spansules or directly compressible tablet intermediates having satisfactory micromeritic (flowability, mechanical (friability, crushing, compressional (compressibility, compactibility, and drug release properties. Modified drug release from agglomerates and compacts thereof can be achieved using suitable polymer composition in the process design. Thus, it can be concluded that, CCA is a simple and cost effective process, which can be tailor-made for particle design of all majority of drugs and combinations thereof.

  14. Theranostic potential of gold nanoparticle-protein agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpui, Pallab; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the ever-increasing applications, glittered with astonishing success of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in biomedical research as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, the study of Au NP-protein interaction seems critical for maximizing their theranostic efficiency, and thus demands comprehensive understanding. The mutual interaction of Au NPs and proteins at physiological conditions may result in the aggregation of protein, which can ultimately lead to the formation of Au NP-protein agglomerates. In the present article, we try to appreciate the plausible steps involved in the Au NP-induced aggregation of proteins and also the importance of the proteins' three-dimensional structures in the process. The Au NP-protein agglomerates can potentially be exploited for efficient loading and subsequent release of various therapeutically important molecules, including anticancer drugs, with the unique opportunity of incorporating hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drugs in the same nanocarrier system. Moreover, the Au NP-protein agglomerates can act as `self-diagnostic' systems, allowing investigation of the conformational state of the associated protein(s) as well as the protein-protein or protein-Au NP interaction within the agglomerates. Furthermore, the potential of these Au NP-protein agglomerates as a novel platform for multifunctional theranostic application along with exciting future-possibilities is highlighted here.

  15. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  16. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Convergence rates of multigrid cycles are verified with quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the two-grid cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum sorting and kinesin-1 command the targeting of axonal GABAB receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Valdés

    Full Text Available In neuronal cells the intracellular trafficking machinery controls the availability of neurotransmitter receptors at the plasma membrane, which is a critical determinant of synaptic strength. Metabotropic γ amino-butyric acid (GABA type B receptors (GABA(BRs are neurotransmitter receptors that modulate synaptic transmission by mediating the slow and prolonged responses to GABA. GABA(BRs are obligatory heteromers constituted by two subunits, GABA(BR1 and GABA(BR2. GABA(BR1a and GABA(BR1b are the most abundant subunit variants. GABA(BR1b is located in the somatodendritic domain whereas GABA(BR1a is additionally targeted to the axon. Sushi domains located at the N-terminus of GABA(BR1a constitute the only difference between both variants and are necessary and sufficient for axonal targeting. The precise targeting machinery and the organelles involved in sorting and transport have not been described. Here we demonstrate that GABA(BRs require the Golgi apparatus for plasma membrane delivery but that axonal sorting and targeting of GABA(BR1a operate in a pre-Golgi compartment. In the axon GABA(BR1a subunits are enriched in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and their dynamic behavior and colocalization with other secretory organelles like the ER-to-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC suggest that they employ a local secretory route. The transport of axonal GABA(BR1a is microtubule-dependent and kinesin-1, a molecular motor of the kinesin family, determines axonal localization. Considering that progression of GABA(BRs through the secretory pathway is regulated by an ER retention motif our data contribute to understand the role of the axonal ER in non-canonical sorting and targeting of neurotransmitter receptors.

  18. A multi-component model of the developing retinocollicular pathway incorporating axonal and synaptic growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith B Godfrey

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available During development, neurons extend axons to different brain areas and produce stereotypical patterns of connections. The mechanisms underlying this process have been intensively studied in the visual system, where retinal neurons form retinotopic maps in the thalamus and superior colliculus. The mechanisms active in map formation include molecular guidance cues, trophic factor release, spontaneous neural activity, spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP, synapse creation and retraction, and axon growth, branching and retraction. To investigate how these mechanisms interact, a multi-component model of the developing retinocollicular pathway was produced based on phenomenological approximations of each of these mechanisms. Core assumptions of the model were that the probabilities of axonal branching and synaptic growth are highest where the combined influences of chemoaffinity and trophic factor cues are highest, and that activity-dependent release of trophic factors acts to stabilize synapses. Based on these behaviors, model axons produced morphologically realistic growth patterns and projected to retinotopically correct locations in the colliculus. Findings of the model include that STDP, gradient detection by axonal growth cones and lateral connectivity among collicular neurons were not necessary for refinement, and that the instructive cues for axonal growth appear to be mediated first by molecular guidance and then by neural activity. Although complex, the model appears to be insensitive to variations in how the component developmental mechanisms are implemented. Activity, molecular guidance and the growth and retraction of axons and synapses are common features of neural development, and the findings of this study may have relevance beyond organization in the retinocollicular pathway.

  19. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of [3H]proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the [3H]proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced [3H]proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins [3H]proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons

  20. How Schwann Cells Sort Axons: New Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltri, M Laura; Poitelon, Yannick; Previtali, Stefano Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves contain large myelinated and small unmyelinated (Remak) fibers that perform different functions. The choice to myelinate or not is dictated to Schwann cells by the axon itself, based on the amount of neuregulin I-type III exposed on its membrane. Peripheral axons are more important in determining the final myelination fate than central axons, and the implications for this difference in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes are discussed. Interestingly, this choice is reversible during pathology, accounting for the remarkable plasticity of Schwann cells, and contributing to the regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system. Radial sorting is the process by which Schwann cells choose larger axons to myelinate during development. This crucial morphogenetic step is a prerequisite for myelination and for differentiation of Remak fibers, and is arrested in human diseases due to mutations in genes coding for extracellular matrix and linkage molecules. In this review we will summarize progresses made in the last years by a flurry of reverse genetic experiments in mice and fish. This work revealed novel molecules that control radial sorting, and contributed unexpected ideas to our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control radial sorting of axons. PMID:25686621

  1. Calpain activity promotes the sealing of severed giant axons

    OpenAIRE

    Godell, Christopher M.; Smyers, Mark E.; Eddleman, Christopher S.; Ballinger, Martis L.; Fishman, Harvey M.; Bittner, George D.

    1997-01-01

    A barrier (seal) must form at the cut ends of a severed axon if a neuron is to survive and eventually regenerate. Following severance of crayfish medial giant axons in physiological saline, vesicles accumulate at the cut end and form a barrier (seal) to ion and dye diffusion. In contrast, squid giant axons do not seal, even though injury-induced vesicles form after axonal transection and accumulate at cut axonal ends. Neither axon seals in Ca2+-free salines. The addition of calpain to the bat...

  2. Reconstruction of Industrial Location in View of Industrial Agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Huayou; DING Sibao

    2006-01-01

    The Industrial Agglomeration Theory has been evolving all the time. The study on the industrial location has become the focus of the massive theoretical location problems about agglomeration since the 1970s. The authors here analyze the evolution and the characteristics of the Industrial Agglomeration Theory and study its effect on the reconstruction of industrial location. The study suggests that the new idea of reconstruction of industrial location is to cultivate regional innovative system. On this basis, the authors analyze two cases of old industrial bases on their construction-Tiexi Industrial District in Shenyang City and Changchun Industrial Economic Development Zone. Finally, the authors put forward some suggestions that should be regarded, which include: 1) to combine industrial location reconstruction and enterprises' inner reform; 2) to speed up adjustment of resources and opening to the world; 3) to combine government mechanism with the market mechanism properly.

  3. Ultrasonic de-agglomeration of barium titanate powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, S; Mitrić, M; Starcević, G; Uskoković, D

    2008-01-01

    BaTiO3 (BT) powder, with average particle size of 1.4 microm, was synthesized by solid-state reaction. A high-intensity ultrasound irradiation (ultrasonication) was used to de-agglomerate micro-sized powder to nano-sized one. The crystal structure, crystallite size, morphology, particle size, particle size distribution, and specific surface area of the BT powder de-agglomerated for different ultrasonication times (0, 10, 60, and 180 min) were determined. It was found that the particles size of the BT powder was influenced by ultrasonic treatment, while its tetragonal structure was maintained. Therefore, ultrasonic irradiation can be proposed as an environmental-friendly, economical, and effective tool for the de-agglomeration of barium titanate powders. PMID:17845864

  4. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerous measurements of the heat of immersion of coal were conducting using several different particle size fractions of No. 2 Gas Seam coal from Raleigh County, West Virginia. The heat of immersion was determined in water, methanol, heptane, hexadecane and neohexane (2,2-dimethybutane). A comparison of the results with those determined previously for Illinois No. 6 coal is discussed. A number of potential pyrite depressants for use in oil agglomeration of coal were screened by testing the response of sulfidized mineral pyrite to agglomeration with heptane in the presence of the potential depressant. The following were tested; sodium dithionite, sodium thiosulfate, ferrous sulfate, ferric sulfate, titanous chloride, hydrogen peroxide, Oxone (a form of potassium monopersulfate), pyrogallol, quebracho (colloidal dispersant derived from tree bark), milk whey, and several organic thiols. Ferric chloride was applied to mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and sulfidized mineral pyrite before subjecting the mixtures to agglomeration with heptane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Microfluidic device for unidirectional axon growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malishev, E.; Pimashkin, A.; Gladkov, A.; Pigareva, Y.; Bukatin, A.; Kazantsev, V.; Mukhina, I.; Dubina, M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the communication and connectivity development of neuron networks, we designed microfluidic devices with several chambers for growing dissociated neuronal cultures from mice fetal hippocampus (E18). The chambers were connected with microchannels providing unidirectional axonal growth between “Source” and “Target” neural sub-networks. Experiments were performed in a hippocampal cultures plated in a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip, aligned with a 60 microelectrode array (MEA). Axonal growth through microchannels was observed with brightfield, phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, and after 7 days in vitro electrical activity was recorded. Visual inspection and spike propagation analysis showed the predominant axonal growth in microchannels in a direction from “Source” to “Target”.

  6. Diverse modes of axon elaboration in the developing neocortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of axonal arbors is a critical step in the establishment of precise neural circuits, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms of axonal elaboration in the neocortex. We used in vivo two-photon time-lapse microscopy to image axons in the neocortex of green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice over the first 3 wk of postnatal development. This period spans the elaboration of thalamocortical (TC and Cajal-Retzius (CR axons and cortical synaptogenesis. Layer 1 collaterals of TC and CR axons were imaged repeatedly over time scales ranging from minutes up to days, and their growth and pruning were analyzed. The structure and dynamics of TC and CR axons differed profoundly. Branches of TC axons terminated in small, bulbous growth cones, while CR axon branch tips had large growth cones with numerous long filopodia. TC axons grew rapidly in straight paths, with frequent interstitial branch additions, while CR axons grew more slowly along tortuous paths. For both types of axon, new branches appeared at interstitial sites along the axon shaft and did not involve growth cone splitting. Pruning occurred via retraction of small axon branches (tens of microns, at both CR and TC axons or degeneration of large portions of the arbor (hundreds of microns, for TC axons only. The balance between growth and retraction favored overall growth, but only by a slight margin. Given the identical layer 1 territory upon which CR and TC axons grow, the differences in their structure and dynamics likely reflect distinct intrinsic growth programs for axons of long projection neurons versus local interneurons.

  7. Imaging axonal degeneration and repair in pre-clinical animal models of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya S Yandamuri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a central nervous system (CNS disease characterized by chronic neuroinflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage. Infiltration of activated lymphocytes and myeloid cells are thought to be primarily responsible for white matter damage and axonopathy. Over time, this neurologic damage manifests clinically as debilitating motor and cognitive symptoms. Existing MS therapies focus on symptom relief and delay of disease progression through reduction of neuroinflammation. However, long-term strategies to remyelinate, protect, or regenerate axons have remained elusive, posing a challenge to treating progressive forms of MS. Preclinical mouse models and techniques such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and genomic and proteomic analysis have provided advances in our understanding of discrete time-points of pathology following disease induction. More recently, in vivo and in situ two-photon microscopy (2P has made it possible to visualize continuous real-time cellular behavior and structural changes occurring within the CNS during neuropathology. Research utilizing 2P imaging to study axonopathy in neuroinflammatory demyelinating disease has focused on five areas: (1 axonal morphologic changes (2 organelle transport and health, (3 relationship to inflammation, (4 neuronal excitotoxicity, and (5 regenerative therapies. 2P imaging may also be used to identify novel therapeutic targets via identification and clarification of dynamic cellular and molecular mechanisms of axonal regeneration and remyelination. Here, we review tools that have made 2P accessible for imaging neuropathologies and advances in our understanding of axonal degeneration and repair in preclinical models of demyelinating diseases.

  8. Automated Axon Counting in Rodent Optic Nerve Sections with AxonJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Kasra; Scheetz, Todd E.; Christopher, Mark; Miller, Kathy; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Tandon, Anamika; Anderson, Michael G.; Fingert, John H.; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a publicly available tool, AxonJ, which quantifies the axons in optic nerve sections of rodents stained with paraphenylenediamine (PPD). In this study, we compare AxonJ’s performance to human experts on 100x and 40x images of optic nerve sections obtained from multiple strains of mice, including mice with defects relevant to glaucoma. AxonJ produced reliable axon counts with high sensitivity of 0.959 and high precision of 0.907, high repeatability of 0.95 when compared to a gold-standard of manual assessments and high correlation of 0.882 to the glaucoma damage staging of a previously published dataset. AxonJ allows analyses that are quantitative, consistent, fully-automated, parameter-free, and rapid on whole optic nerve sections at 40x. As a freely available ImageJ plugin that requires no highly specialized equipment to utilize, AxonJ represents a powerful new community resource augmenting studies of the optic nerve using mice. PMID:27226405

  9. Axonal transport of ribonucleoprotein particles (vaults).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J Y; Volknandt, W; Dahlstrom, A; Herrmann, C; Blasi, J; Das, B; Zimmermann, H

    1999-01-01

    RNA was previously shown to be transported into both dendritic and axonal compartments of nerve cells, presumably involving a ribonucleoprotein particle. In order to reveal potential mechanisms of transport we investigated the axonal transport of the major vault protein of the electric ray Torpedo marmorata. This protein is the major protein component of a ribonucleoprotein particle (vault) carrying a non-translatable RNA and has a wide distribution in the animal kingdom. It is highly enriched in the cholinergic electromotor neurons and similar in size to synaptic vesicles. The axonal transport of vaults was investigated by immunofluorescence, using the anti-vault protein antibody as marker, and cytofluorimetric scanning, and was compared to that of the synaptic vesicle membrane protein SV2 and of the beta-subunit of the F1-ATPase as a marker for mitochondria. Following a crush significant axonal accumulation of SV2 proximal to the crush could first be observed after 1 h, that of mitochondria after 3 h and that of vaults after 6 h, although weekly fluorescent traces of accumulations of vault protein were observed in the confocal microscope as early as 3 h. Within the time-period investigated (up to 72 h) the accumulation of all markers increased continuously. Retrograde accumulations also occurred, and the immunofluorescence for the retrograde component, indicating recycling, was weaker than that for the anterograde component, suggesting that more than half of the vaults are degraded within the nerve terminal. High resolution immunofluorescence revealed a granular structure-in accordance with the biochemical characteristics of vaults. Of interest was the observation that the increase of vault immunoreactivity proximal to the crush accelerated with time after crushing, while that of SV2-containing particles appeared to decelerate, indicating that the crush procedure with time may have induced perikaryal alterations in the production and subsequent export to the axon

  10. Spray drying engineering: particle stickiness in relation with agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Gianfrancesco, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Food instant powders like milk, soups, juices, coffee, are usually produced by spray drying followed by a further step of agglomeration to get larger particles (from 50-100 μm to 250-500 μm) with a narrow size distribution and modified structure (porosity) to obtain good handling and instant properties (wettability, dispersability, solubility). Agglomeration of spray dried powders is performed either outside or inside the drying chamber in a fluid bed, or by return of dry fines into the chamb...

  11. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1994-07-01

    The overall objective of this work is to determine the important principles and basic mechanisms which underlie various selective oil agglomeration processes for beneficiating fine-size coal in order to facilitate the technical development and application of such processes to various types of coal. The recent work described herein has involved a more detailed study of the effects of mild oxidation on the surface properties of different types of coal and the relationship between the agglomerability of oxidized coals and their surface properties. In addition, the work has involved developing more effective means for separating coal and pyrite by finding and applying selective depressants for pyrite.

  12. MSC p43 required for axonal development in motor neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Liu, Yang; Yin, Yanqing; Shao, Aiyun; Zhang, Bo; Kim, Sunghoon; Zhou, Jiawei

    2009-01-01

    Neuron connectivity and correct neural function largely depend on axonal integrity. Neurofilaments (NFs) constitute the main cytoskeletal network maintaining the structural integrity of neurons and exhibit dynamic changes during axonal and dendritic growth. However, the mechanisms underlying axonal development and maintenance remain poorly understood. Here, we identify that multisynthetase complex p43 (MSC p43) is essential for NF assembly and axon maintenance. The MSC p43 protein was predominantly expressed in central neurons and interacted with NF light subunit in vivo. Mice lacking MSC p43 exhibited axon degeneration in motor neurons, defective neuromuscular junctions, muscular atrophy, and motor dysfunction. Furthermore, MSC p43 depletion in mice caused disorganization of the axonal NF network. Mechanistically, MSC p43 is required for maintaining normal phosphorylation levels of NFs. Thus, MSC p43 is indispensable in maintaining axonal integrity. Its dysfunction may underlie the NF disorganization and axon degeneration associated with motor neuron degenerative diseases. PMID:19717447

  13. Functions of axon guidance molecules in synapse formation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shih-Yu; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2009-01-01

    Axon guidance and synapse formation are important developmental events for establishing a functional neuronal circuitry. These two related cellular processes occur in a coordinated fashion but previous studies from multiple model organisms seemed to suggest that axon guidance and synapse formation are mediated by distinct molecular cues. Thus, axon guidance molecules are responsible for guiding the navigating axon toward its target area, while other adhesion or ligand-receptor molecules speci...

  14. Morphometry of Axons in Optic Nerves of Siamese's Twins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinzu Gu; Zhenping Zhang; Qi Lin; Jiongji Liang; Wenyu Lu; Xiulan Ye; A A Sadun

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the development of optic nerve, we examined four optic nerves from Siameses Twins by absolute counts of axons.Methods: Mean axon diameter, mean axon density, totally axonal population and optic nerve area were noted for each optic nerve. The mean axon diameter and the mean axon density were compared between paraxial (inner sectors)and cortical (outer sectors)areas of the nerves.Results: More myelinated axons were seen in the inner sectors as compared to the outer sectors(average 11 axons/1 000 μm2 in inner sectors and 34 axons/l 000 μm2 in outer sectors( P=0. 036) . The myelinated fibers were also smaller(63 microns) in the outer sectors as compared to the inner sectors(72 microns) ( P = 0. 001 ). The average cross sectors area for the four 40 week stage optical nerves of Siamese Twins was 3.32 × 103 as compared to 1 million axons for 32-week-old normals.Conclusion: Our finding of fewer axonal number and small myelinated fibers in the Siamese Twins suggests hypoplasia. Myelination was more abnormal in the paraxial optic nerve than that in the peripheral sectors, suggesting anomalous development of optic nerve peripherally and delayed developnent centrally. Axonal density is higher in inner sectors than that in outer sectors, suggesting delayed development of the outer nerve sector.

  15. Electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth for dynamically configurable neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honegger, Thibault; Scott, Mark A; Yanik, Mehmet F; Voldman, Joel

    2013-02-21

    Axons in the developing nervous system are directed via guidance cues, whose expression varies both spatially and temporally, to create functional neural circuits. Existing methods to create patterns of neural connectivity in vitro use only static geometries, and are unable to dynamically alter the guidance cues imparted on the cells. We introduce the use of AC electrokinetics to dynamically control axonal growth in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We find that the application of modest voltages at frequencies on the order of 10(5) Hz can cause developing axons to be stopped adjacent to the electrodes while axons away from the electric fields exhibit uninhibited growth. By switching electrodes on or off, we can reversibly inhibit or permit axon passage across the electrodes. Our models suggest that dielectrophoresis is the causative AC electrokinetic effect. We make use of our dynamic control over axon elongation to create an axon-diode via an axon-lock system that consists of a pair of electrode 'gates' that either permit or prevent axons from passing through. Finally, we developed a neural circuit consisting of three populations of neurons, separated by three axon-locks to demonstrate the assembly of a functional, engineered neural network. Action potential recordings demonstrate that the AC electrokinetic effect does not harm axons, and Ca(2+) imaging demonstrated the unidirectional nature of the synaptic connections. AC electrokinetic confinement of axonal growth has potential for creating configurable, directional neural networks. PMID:23314575

  16. Spatial temperature gradients guide axonal outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bryan; Vishwakarma, Vivek; Dhakal, Kamal; Bhattarai, Samik; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Jain, Ankur; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2016-07-01

    Formation of neural networks during development and regeneration after injury depends on accuracy of axonal pathfinding, which is primarily believed to be influenced by chemical cues. Recently, there is growing evidence that physical cues can play crucial role in axonal guidance. However, detailed mechanism involved in such guidance cues is lacking. By using weakly-focused near-infrared continuous wave (CW) laser microbeam in the path of an advancing axon, we discovered that the beam acts as a repulsive guidance cue. Here, we report that this highly-effective at-a-distance guidance is the result of a temperature field produced by the near-infrared laser light absorption. Since light absorption by extracellular medium increases when the laser wavelength was red shifted, the threshold laser power for reliable guidance was significantly lower in the near-infrared as compared to the visible spectrum. The spatial temperature gradient caused by the near-infrared laser beam at-a-distance was found to activate temperature-sensitive membrane receptors, resulting in an influx of calcium. The repulsive guidance effect was significantly reduced when extracellular calcium was depleted or in the presence of TRPV1-antagonist. Further, direct heating using micro-heater confirmed that the axonal guidance is caused by shallow temperature-gradient, eliminating the role of any non-photothermal effects.

  17. Axonal PPARγ promotes neuronal regeneration after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezana, Juan Pablo; Dagan, Shachar Y; Robinson, Ari; Goldstein, Ronald S; Fainzilber, Mike; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bronfman, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    PPARγ is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor best known for its involvement in adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. PPARγ activity has also been associated with neuroprotection in different neurological disorders, but the mechanisms involved in PPARγ effects in the nervous system are still unknown. Here we describe a new functional role for PPARγ in neuronal responses to injury. We found both PPAR transcripts and protein within sensory axons and observed an increase in PPARγ protein levels after sciatic nerve crush. This was correlated with increased retrograde transport of PPARγ after injury, increased association of PPARγ with the molecular motor dynein, and increased nuclear accumulation of PPARγ in cell bodies of sensory neurons. Furthermore, PPARγ antagonists attenuated the response of sensory neurons to sciatic nerve injury, and inhibited axonal growth of both sensory and cortical neurons in culture. Thus, axonal PPARγ is involved in neuronal injury responses required for axonal regeneration. Since PPARγ is a major molecular target of the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of drugs used in the treatment of type II diabetes, several pharmaceutical agents with acceptable safety profiles in humans are available. Our findings provide motivation and rationale for the evaluation of such agents for efficacy in central and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26446277

  18. Early cellular signaling responses to axonal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used optic nerve injury as a model to study early signaling events in neuronal tissue following axonal injury. Optic nerve injury results in the selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. The time course of cell death takes place over a period of days with the earliest detection of RGC death at about 48 hr post injury. We hypothesized that in the period immediately following axonal injury, there are changes in the soma that signal surrounding glia and neurons and that start programmed cell death. In the current study, we investigated early changes in cellular signaling and gene expression that occur within the first 6 hrs post optic nerve injury. Results We found evidence of cell to cell signaling within 30 min of axonal injury. We detected differences in phosphoproteins and gene expression within the 6 hrs time period. Activation of TNFα and glutamate receptors, two pathways that can initiate cell death, begins in RGCs within 6 hrs following axonal injury. Differential gene expression at 6 hrs post injury included genes involved in cytokine, neurotrophic factor signaling (Socs3 and apoptosis (Bax. Conclusion We interpret our studies to indicate that both neurons and glia in the retina have been signaled within 30 min after optic nerve injury. The signals are probably initiated by the RGC soma. In addition, signals activating cellular death pathways occur within 6 hrs of injury, which likely lead to RGC degeneration.

  19. A revisit to agglomerates of early-type Hipparcos stars

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, J A

    2008-01-01

    We study the spatial structure and sub-structure of regions rich in Hipparcos stars with blue B_T-V_T colours. These regions, which comprise large stellar complexes, OB associations, and young open clusters, are tracers of on-going star formation in the Galaxy. The DBSCAN (Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise) data clustering algorithm is used to look for spatial overdensities of early-type stars. Once an overdensity, "agglomerate", is identified, we carry out a data and bibliographic compilation of their star member candidates. The actual membership in agglomerate of each early-type star is studied based on its heliocentric distance, proper motion, and previous spectro-photometric information. We identify 35 agglomerates of early-type Hipparcos stars. Most of them are associated to previously known clusters and OB associations. The previously unknown P Puppis agglomerate is subject of a dedicated study with Virtual Observatory tools. It is actually a new, nearby, young open cluster (d ...

  20. Experimental studies of the gravitational agglomeration of aerosols. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the influence of gravitational agglomeration as an aerosol depletion process in a small containment vessel. The resulting data will aid in the development of computer codes that describe aerosol transport processes following severe reactor accidents. (author)

  1. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.C.; Tyson, D.; Ziaoping, Qiu, Lessa, A.

    1990-04-01

    The overall objective is to determine the basic principles and mechanisms which underlie a number of selective oil agglomeration processes that have been proposed for beneficiating fine-size coal. An understanding of the basic principles and mechanisms will greatly facilitate technical development and application of such processes to various types of coal. 5 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Quantitative characterization of nanoparticle agglomeration within biological media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondow, Nicole, E-mail: n.hondow@leeds.ac.uk; Brydson, Rik [University of Leeds, Institute for Materials Research (United Kingdom); Wang, Peiyi [University of Leeds, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology (United Kingdom); Holton, Mark D.; Brown, M. Rowan; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D. [Swansea University, Centre for Nanohealth, College of Engineering (United Kingdom); Brown, Andy [University of Leeds, Institute for Materials Research (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Quantitative analysis of nanoparticle dispersion state within biological media is essential to understanding cellular uptake and the roles of diffusion, sedimentation, and endocytosis in determining nanoparticle dose. The dispersion of polymer-coated CdTe/ZnS quantum dots in water and cell growth medium with and without fetal bovine serum was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. Characterization by TEM of samples prepared by plunge freezing the blotted solutions into liquid ethane was sensitive to the dispersion state of the quantum dots and enabled measurement of agglomerate size distributions even in the presence of serum proteins where DLS failed. In addition, TEM showed a reduced packing fraction of quantum dots per agglomerate when dispersed in biological media and serum compared to just water, highlighting the effect of interactions between the media, serum proteins, and the quantum dots. The identification of a heterogeneous distribution of quantum dots and quantum dot agglomerates in cell growth medium and serum by TEM will enable correlation with the previously reported optical metrology of in vitro cellular uptake of this quantum dot dispersion. In this paper, we present a comparative study of TEM and DLS and show that plunge-freeze TEM provides a robust assessment of nanoparticle agglomeration state.

  3. Patterns of growth, axonal extension and axonal arborization of neuronal lineages in the developing Drosophila brain

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Camilla; Shy, Diana; Spindler, Shana R; Fung, Siaumin; Pereanu, Wayne; Younossi -Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila central brain is composed of approximately 100 paired lineages, with most lineages comprising 100–150 neurons. Most lineages have a number of important characteristics in common. Typically, neurons of a lineage stay together as a coherent cluster and project their axons into a coherent bundle visible from late embryo to adult. Neurons born during the embryonic period form the primary axon tracts (PATs) that follow stereotyped pathways in the neuropile. Apoptotic cell death remo...

  4. White-matter astrocytes, axonal energy metabolism, and axonal degeneration in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambron, Melissa; D'Haeseleer, Miguel; Laureys, Guy; Clinckers, Ralph; Debruyne, Jan; De Keyser, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a diffuse axonal degeneration occurring throughout the white matter of the central nervous system causes progressive neurologic disability. The underlying mechanism is unclear. This review describes a number of pathways by which dysfunctional astrocytes in MS might lead to axonal degeneration. White-matter astrocytes in MS show a reduced metabolism of adenosine triphosphate-generating phosphocreatine, which may impair the astrocytic sodium potassium pump and lead to a reduced sodium-dependent glutamate uptake. Astrocytes in MS white matter appear to be deficient in β2 adrenergic receptors, which are involved in stimulating glycogenolysis and suppressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). Glutamate toxicity, reduced astrocytic glycogenolysis leading to reduced lactate and glutamine production, and enhanced nitric oxide (NO) levels may all impair axonal mitochondrial metabolism, leading to axonal degeneration. In addition, glutamate-mediated oligodendrocyte damage and impaired myelination caused by a decreased production of N-acetylaspartate by axonal mitochondria might also contribute to axonal loss. White-matter astrocytes may be considered as a potential target for neuroprotective MS therapies. PMID:22214904

  5. Mislocalization of neuronal mitochondria reveals regulation of Wallerian degeneration and NMNAT/WLDS-mediated axon protection independent of axonal mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Kitay, Brandon M.; McCormack, Ryan; Wang, Yunfang; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Zhai, R. Grace

    2013-01-01

    Axon degeneration is a common and often early feature of neurodegeneration that correlates with the clinical manifestations and progression of neurological disease. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylytransferase (NMNAT) is a neuroprotective factor that delays axon degeneration following injury and in models of neurodegenerative diseases suggesting a converging molecular pathway of axon self-destruction. The underlying mechanisms have been under intense investigation and recent reports suggest...

  6. AxonQuant: A Microfluidic Chamber Culture-Coupled Algorithm That Allows High-Throughput Quantification of Axonal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Published methods for imaging and quantitatively analyzing morphological changes in neuronal axons have serious limitations because of their small sample sizes, and their time-consuming and nonobjective nature. Here we present an improved microfluidic chamber design suitable for fast and high-throughput imaging of neuronal axons. We developed the AxonQuant algorithm, which is suitable for automatic processing of axonal imaging data. This microfluidic chamber-coupled algorithm allows calculation of an ‘axonal continuity index' that quantitatively measures axonal health status in a manner independent of neuronal or axonal density. This method allows quantitative analysis of axonal morphology in an automatic and nonbiased manner. Our method will facilitate large-scale high-throughput screening for genes or therapeutic compounds for neurodegenerative diseases involving axonal damage. When combined with imaging technologies utilizing different gene markers, this method will provide new insights into the mechanistic basis for axon degeneration. Our microfluidic chamber culture-coupled AxonQuant algorithm will be widely useful for studying axonal biology and neurodegenerative disorders. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Effect of polymers on crystallo-co-agglomeration of ibuprofen-paracetamol: Factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study the effect of concentration of polyethylene glycol and ethyl cellulose on the properties of agglomerates of ibuprofen-paracetamol obtained by crystallo-co-agglomeration technique. The process of crystallo-co-agglomeration involved recrystallization of ibuprofen and its simultaneous agglomeration with paracetamol in presence polymers. The effect of combination of polyethylene glycol and ethylcellulose was studied by 2 2 factorial design. Ibuprofen content of the agglomerate increased with increase in ethyl cellulose while paracetamol content was decreased with increase in polyethylene glycol. Differential scanning calorimetry thermograms of agglomerates showed the unchanged endotherm for ibuprofen melting, whereas paracetamol endotherm was diffused with low enthalpy. The agglomerates were spherical but increase in polyethylene glycol caused its deformation. Agglomerates containing ethylcellulose with polyethylene glycol have higher resistance for fragmentation, modulus of elasticity but impart high tensile strength.

  8. Formation of the economic efficiency of industrial Dnipropetrovsk and Dniprodzerzhynsk agglomeration. O. V. Gladkyj

    OpenAIRE

    Gladkyj O.V.

    2009-01-01

    The features are opened of the formation of polycentric economic efficiency of industrial agglomerations. An assessment of the effectiveness of industrial Dnipropetrovsk Dneprodzerzhinskoy agglomeration and recommendations on optimization of its functional structure.

  9. Formation of the economic efficiency of industrial Dnipropetrovsk and Dniprodzerzhynsk agglomeration. O. V. Gladkyj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladkyj O.V.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The features are opened of the formation of polycentric economic efficiency of industrial agglomerations. An assessment of the effectiveness of industrial Dnipropetrovsk Dneprodzerzhinskoy agglomeration and recommendations on optimization of its functional structure.

  10. Tri-partite complex for axonal transport drug delivery achieves pharmacological effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederickson Martyn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted delivery of pharmaceutical agents into selected populations of CNS (Central Nervous System neurons is an extremely compelling goal. Currently, systemic methods are generally used for delivery of pain medications, anti-virals for treatment of dermatomal infections, anti-spasmodics, and neuroprotectants. Systemic side effects or undesirable effects on parts of the CNS that are not involved in the pathology limit efficacy and limit clinical utility for many classes of pharmaceuticals. Axonal transport from the periphery offers a possible selective route, but there has been little progress towards design of agents that can accomplish targeted delivery via this intraneural route. To achieve this goal, we developed a tripartite molecular construction concept involving an axonal transport facilitator molecule, a polymer linker, and a large number of drug molecules conjugated to the linker, then sought to evaluate its neurobiology and pharmacological behavior. Results We developed chemical synthesis methodologies for assembling these tripartite complexes using a variety of axonal transport facilitators including nerve growth factor, wheat germ agglutinin, and synthetic facilitators derived from phage display work. Loading of up to 100 drug molecules per complex was achieved. Conjugation methods were used that allowed the drugs to be released in active form inside the cell body after transport. Intramuscular and intradermal injection proved effective for introducing pharmacologically effective doses into selected populations of CNS neurons. Pharmacological efficacy with gabapentin in a paw withdrawal latency model revealed a ten fold increase in half life and a 300 fold decrease in necessary dose relative to systemic administration for gabapentin when the drug was delivered by axonal transport using the tripartite vehicle. Conclusion Specific targeting of selected subpopulations of CNS neurons for drug delivery by axonal

  11. Effect of polymers on crystallo-co-agglomeration of ibuprofen-paracetamol: Factorial design

    OpenAIRE

    Pawar A; Paradkar A; Kadam S; Mahadik K

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of concentration of polyethylene glycol and ethyl cellulose on the properties of agglomerates of ibuprofen-paracetamol obtained by crystallo-co-agglomeration technique. The process of crystallo-co-agglomeration involved recrystallization of ibuprofen and its simultaneous agglomeration with paracetamol in presence polymers. The effect of combination of polyethylene glycol and ethylcellulose was studied by 2 2 factorial design. Ibuprofen con...

  12. Sparing of descending axons rescues interneuron plasticity in the lumbar cord to allow adaptive learning after thoracic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Nelson Hansen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the role of spared axons on structural and behavioral neuroplasticity in the lumbar enlargement after a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI. Previous work has demonstrated that recovery in the presence of spared axons after an incomplete lesion increases behavioral output after a subsequent complete spinal cord transection (TX. This suggests that spared axons direct adaptive changes in below-level neuronal networks of the lumbar cord. In response to spared fibers, we postulate that lumbar neuron networks support behavioral gains by preventing aberrant plasticity. As such, the present study measured histological and functional changes in the isolated lumbar cord after complete TX or incomplete contusion (SCI. To measure functional plasticity in the lumbar cord, we used an established instrumental learning paradigm. In this paradigm, neural circuits within isolated lumbar segments demonstrate learning by an increase in flexion duration that reduces exposure to a noxious leg shock. We employed this model using a proof-of-principle design to evaluate the role of sparing on lumbar learning and plasticity early (7 days or late (42 days after midthoracic SCI in a rodent model. Early after SCI or TX at 7d, spinal learning was unattainable regardless of whether the animal recovered with or without axonal substrate. Failed learning occurred alongside measures of cell soma atrophy and aberrant dendritic spine expression within interneuron populations responsible for sensorimotor integration and learning. Alternatively, exposure of the lumbar cord to a small amount of spared axons for 6 weeks produced near-normal learning late after SCI. This coincided with greater cell soma volume and fewer aberrant dendritic spines on interneurons. Thus, an opportunity to influence activity-based learning in locomotor networks depends on spared axons limiting maladaptive plasticity. Together, this work identifies a time dependent interaction between

  13. Oxidative stress inhibits axonal transport: implications for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS released by microglia and other inflammatory cells can cause axonal degeneration. A reduction in axonal transport has also been implicated as a cause of axonal dystrophies and neurodegeneration, but there is a paucity of experimental data concerning the effects of ROS on axonal transport. We used live cell imaging to examine the effects of hydrogen peroxide on the axonal transport of mitochondria and Golgi-derived vesicles in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Results Hydrogen peroxide rapidly inhibited axonal transport, hours before any detectable changes in mitochondrial morphology or signs of axonal degeneration. Mitochondrial transport was affected earlier and was more severely inhibited than the transport of Golgi-derived vesicles. Anterograde vesicle transport was more susceptible to peroxide inhibition than retrograde transport. Axonal transport partially recovered following removal of hydrogen peroxide and local application of hydrogen peroxide inhibited transport, suggesting that the effects were not simply a result of nerve cell death. Sodium azide, an ATP synthesis blocker, had similar effects on axonal transport, suggesting that ATP depletion may contribute to the transport inhibition due to hydrogen peroxide. Conclusions These results indicate that inhibition of axonal transport is an early consequence of exposure to ROS and may contribute to subsequent axonal degeneration.

  14. Axon Membrane Skeleton Structure is Optimized for Coordinated Sodium Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yihao; Li, He; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-01-01

    Axons transmit action potentials with high fidelity and minimal jitter. This unique capability is likely the result of the spatiotemporal arrangement of sodium channels along the axon. Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under entropic tension. Sodium channels also exhibit a periodic distribution pattern, as they bind to ankyrin G, which associates with spectrin. Here, we elucidate the relationship between the axon membrane skeleton structure and the function of the axon. By combining cytoskeletal dynamics and continuum diffusion modeling, we show that spectrin filaments under tension minimize the thermal fluctuations of sodium channels and prevent overlap of neighboring channel trajectories. Importantly, this axon skeletal arrangement allows for a highly reproducible band-like activation of sodium channels leading to coordinated sodium propagation along the axon.

  15. Axon position within the corpus callosum determines contralateral cortical projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Wen, Yunqing; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-Nan; Liu, Lu; Richards, Linda J; Poo, Mu-Ming

    2013-07-16

    How developing axons in the corpus callosum (CC) achieve their homotopic projection to the contralateral cortex remains unclear. We found that axonal position within the CC plays a critical role in this projection. Labeling of nearby callosal axons in mice showed that callosal axons were segregated in an orderly fashion, with those from more medial cerebral cortex located more dorsally and subsequently projecting to more medial contralateral cortical regions. The normal axonal order within the CC was grossly disturbed when semaphorin3A/neuropilin-1 signaling was disrupted. However, the order in which axons were positioned within the CC still determined their contralateral projection, causing a severe disruption of the homotopic contralateral projection that persisted at postnatal day 30, when the normal developmental refinement of contralateral projections is completed in wild-type (WT) mice. Thus, the orderly positioning of axons within the CC is a primary determinant of how homotopic interhemispheric projections form in the contralateral cortex. PMID:23812756

  16. EFFECTS OF PH ON AGGLOMERATION STATE OF Al2O3 – ZrO2 (ZTA NANOCOMPOSITE POWDERS SYNTHESIZED BY TARTARIC GEL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Tuncer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alumina – 20 vol% zirconia (ZTA nanocomposites were synthesized by the tartaric acid sol-gel method. The precursors gelled from solutions at different pH were prepared and then calcined from 1000 to 1500°C. Surface area measurement (BET, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to characterize the synthesized powders. Control of agglomeration state was carried out by changing the pH of the solution. Weakly agglomerated powders were obtained at pH=6, whereas the solution at pH=1 revealed hard agglomerated powders, (agglomeration degrees, N, were found to be 16425 at pH=1 and 102 at pH=6, respectively. The pH dependence of agglomeration was explained by the dissociation behavior of tartaric acid at various pH environments. XRD results showed that the powders have been fully tetragonal phase at 1000°C, while they exhibited tetragonal zirconia with minor monoclinic phase as well as a-Al2O3 at 1500°C. The presence of a-Al2O3 in the nanocrystalline composite contributes the wide range of temperature stability for t-ZrO2 up to 1500°C. TEM micrograph confirmed that alumina and zirconia were dispersed homogenously. Mechanical properties (hardness and indentation fracture toughness of sintered samples were also determined.

  17. Remediation of a heavy metal-contaminated soil by means of agglomeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polettini, Alessandra; Pomi, Raffaella; Valente, Mattia

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of treating a heavy metal-contaminated soil by means of a solidification/stabilization treatment consisting of a granulation process is discussed in the present article. The aim of the study was to attain contaminant immobilization within the agglomerated solid matrix. The soil under concern was characterized by varying levels of heavy metal contamination, ranging from 50 to 500 mg kg(-1) dry soil for chromium. from 300 to 2000 mg kg(-1) dry soil for lead and from 270 to 5000 mg kg(-1) dry soil for copper. An artificially contaminated soil with contaminant concentrations corresponding to the upper level of the mentioned ranges was prepared from a sample of uncontaminated soil by means of spiking experiments. Pure soluble species of chromium, copper and lead. namely CrCl3.6H2O, CuCl2.2H2O and Pb(NO3)2, were selected for the spiking experiments, which were arranged according to a 2(3) full factorial design. The solidification/stabilization treatment was based on an agglomeration process making use of hydraulic binders including Portland cement, hydrated lime and sodium methasilicate, which were selected on the basis of preliminary test runs. It was found that after 7 days of curing the applied treatment was able to efficiently immobilize the investigated heavy metals within the hydrated matrix. Good acid neutralization behavior was also observed, indicating improved matrix resistance to acid attack and decreased potential for metal leaching. PMID:15137715

  18. AGGLOMERATION AND RADIATION EFFECT OF THE PULL OF URBANIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Jin-li

    2003-01-01

    In order to explore the train of thought for China's urbanizing development and coordinated rural eco-nomic development, and to find good ways of solving rural problems through urbanization, this paper absorbs the push-and-pull forces theory and the systematic dynamic theory in the traditional population migration theories, views urbanization as a dynamic system, makes research on the push-and-pull mechanism of urbanization. The pull ingpower of urbanization is analyzed according to two aspects, the agglomeration effect and the radiation effect of cities. The agglomeration effect provides continuous propelling force for urbanization, and the radiation effect furtheraccelerates the urbanization process by pushing forward the development of rural economy. Of course, the slow de-velopment of urbanization can result in the hindrance to rural economic development.

  19. Bifurcation theory for hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Kiyohiro

    2014-01-01

    This book contributes to an understanding of how bifurcation theory adapts to the analysis of economic geography. It is easily accessible not only to mathematicians and economists, but also to upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in nonlinear mathematics. The self-organization of hexagonal agglomeration patterns of industrial regions was first predicted by the central place theory in economic geography based on investigations of southern Germany. The emergence of hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography models was envisaged by Krugman. In this book, after a brief introduction of central place theory and new economic geography, the missing link between them is discovered by elucidating the mechanism of the evolution of bifurcating hexagonal patterns. Pattern formation by such bifurcation is a well-studied topic in nonlinear mathematics, and group-theoretic bifurcation analysis is a well-developed theoretical tool. A finite hexagonal lattice is used to express uniformly distri...

  20. Experimental study of fluidized bed agglomeration of acerola powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Dacanal

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the main effects of acerola powder on fluidized bed agglomeration. A 2(4-1 fractional factoring design was used to evaluate the main operating conditions (fluidizing air temperature, fluidizing air velocity, atomizing air flow and height of nozzle in the bed. The mechanical and physicochemical product changes were determined by analysis of particle diameter, moisture content, wetting time and bed porosity. The particle enlargement by agglomeration occurred when the relative humidity in the bed increased and, thus, the moisture of the product increased. However, the excessive increase in relative humidity resulted in a decrease in yield, caused by caking and product incrustation. The consolidation of small granules resulted in an increase in the instant properties, decreasing the wetting time and increasing the solubility in a short period of agitation.

  1. Study on the Flow of Particle Agglomerates in Desulfurization Tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Jian-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the flow feature of particle agglomerates in a desulfurization tower, a three-dimensional numerical simulation of the gas-solid two phase flow in the tower is carried out by use of the LES model and the cohesive particles kinetics theory. Based on the experimental model of the internal circulation multistage spray desulfurization tower, the simulation successfully captures the key flow features in a desulfurization tower, find that: agglomerates forming a stable fluidization and stable internal circulation in the tower, present a typical ring-nuclear flow distribution trend. And the effects of the inlet gas velocity and inlet mass flux to the internal circulation are also analyzed.

  2. Flocculation, hydrophobic agglomeration and filtration of ultrafine coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhimin

    In coal preparation plant circuits, fine coal particles are aggregated either by oil agglomeration or by flocculation. In a new hydrophobic agglomeration process, recently developed hydrophobic latices are utilized. While the selectivity of such aggregation processes determines the beneficiation results, the degree of aggregation has a strong effect on fine coal filtration. The aim of this research was to study the fundamentals and analyze the common grounds for these processes, including the potential effect of the coal surface properties. The selective flocculation tests, in which three types of coal, which differed widely in surface wettability, and three additives (hydrophobic latices, a semi-hydrophobic flocculant and a typical hydrophilic polyelectrolyte) were utilized, showed that coal wettability plays a very important role in selective flocculation. The abstraction of a hydrophobic latex on coal and silica revealed that the latex had a much higher affinity towards hydrophobic coal than to hydrophilic mineral matter. As a result, the UBC-1 hydrophobic latex flocculated only hydrophobic coal particles while the polyelectrolyte (PAM) flocculated all the tested coal samples and minerals, showing no selectivity in the fine coal beneficiation. The oil agglomeration was tested using kerosene emulsified with various surfactants (e.g. cationic, anionic and non-ionic). Surfactants enhance not only oil emulsification, hence reducing oil consumption (down to 0.25--0.5%), but also entirely change the electrokinetic properties of the droplets and affect the interaction energy between oil droplets and coal particles. Consequently, the results found in the course of the experimental work strongly indicate that even oxidized coals can be agglomerated if cationic surfactants are used to emulsify the oil. Oil agglomeration of the Ford-4 ultrafine coal showed that even at extremely low oil consumption (0.25 to 0.5%), a clean coal product with an ash content around 5% at over

  3. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Trace element removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Southern Company Services, Inc., (SCS) was contracted in 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a commercially acceptable selective agglomeration technology to enhance the use of high-sulfur coals by 1993. The project scope involved development of a bench-scale process and components, as well as the design, testing, and evaluation of a proof-of-concept (POC) facility. To that end, a two-ton-per-hour facility was constructed and tested near Wilsonville, Alabama. Although it was not the primary focus of the test program, SCS also measured the ability of selective agglomeration to remove trace elements from coal. This document describes the results of that program.

  4. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  5. Potential pyrite depressants for use in oil agglomeration of fine-size coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D. (Iowa State University, Ames, IA (USA). Ames Laboratory and Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Potential pyrite depressants for use in coal beneficiation involving oil agglomeration were identified. Particles of sulphurized pyrite, chosen because it was readily agglomerated, were treated with the potential depressants prior to agglomeration with heptane. The following suppressed the agglomeration of sulphurized pyrite, ferric chloride; potassium monopersulphate; hydrogen peroxide; ferrous sulphate; sodium dithionite; sodium thiosulphate; sodium sulphide; titanous chloride; pyrogallol; quebracho; and milk whey. The separation of Upper Freeport coal and sulphurized pyrite by agglomeration with heptane was greatly improved by treatment with ferric chloride. 20 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Computer simulation of aerosol dynamics with a unified agglomeration kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerosol dynamics have been simulated with the computer code CONTAIN using a modified agglomeration kernel. The time (t) evolution of the size distribution (nk(t)) and the suspended mass concentration of particles of size index k was calculated for both the new kernel and the standard superposition kernel. In addition, the fractal nature of the particle geometry has been accounted for and the implications on the distributions are discussed. (author)

  7. Rural-to-urban migration, human capital, and agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Oded; Fan, C. Simon

    2007-01-01

    A new general-equilibrium model that links together rural-to-urban migration, the externality effect of the average level of human capital, and agglomeration economies shows that in developing countries, unrestricted rural-to-urban migration reduces the average income of both rural and urban dwellers in equilibrium. Various measures aimed at curtailing rural-to-urban migration by unskilled workers can lead to a Pareto improvement for both the urban and rural dwellers. In addition, the governm...

  8. Heterogenous skills and homogeneous land: segmentation and agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Wrede, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of skill heterogeneity on regional patterns of production and housing in the presence of pecuniary externalities within a general equilibrium framework assuming monopolistic competition at intermediate good markets. It shows that the interplay of heterogenous skills and relatively homogeneous land demand triggers skill segmentation and agglomeration. The core region, being more attractive to high skilled workers, has a disproportionately large share of productio...

  9. Heterogeneous Skills and Homogeneous Land: Segmentation and Agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Wrede, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of skill heterogeneity on regional patterns of production and housing in the presence of pecuniary externalities within a general-equilibrium framework assuming monopolistic competition at intermediate good markets. It shows that the interplay of heterogeneous skills and relatively homogeneous land demand triggers skill segmentation and agglomeration. The core region, being more attractive to high skilled workers, has a disproportionately large share of producti...

  10. Industry Relatedness, Agglomeration Externalities and Firm Survival in China

    OpenAIRE

    Canfei He; Qi Guo; David Rigby

    2015-01-01

    The importance of agglomeration externalities for economic activities is widely recognized. Recent developments highlight the importance of industry relatedness to the performance of firms, industries and regions. This study explores the determinants of firm survival in China and tests the significance of industry relatedness using firm-level data over the period 1999-2007. Industry relatedness is developed from the co-occurrence analysis of paired industries. Results based on Cox regression ...

  11. Acquisition of skills, education subsidies, and agglomeration of firms

    OpenAIRE

    Toulemonde, Eric

    2003-01-01

    An analytically solvable model of new economic geography is developed. Acquisition of skills is costly for workers but it allows them to earn wages that are larger than those of the unskilled. Moreover, skills acquisition can be subsidized by a regional government. For large transport costs, firms spread more or less evenly between regions, their precise location being determined by the level of education subsidies. For low transport costs, firms agglomerate in one region. We also identify eq...

  12. Do Agglomeration Economies Exist in the Hospital Services Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Laurie J. Bates; Rexford E. Santerre

    2005-01-01

    Given the importance of knowledge flows and the continued emphasis on face-to-face encounters especially for medical care, close proximity of hospitals may be essential for the efficient delivery of medical care. That is, hospital productivity might be greater where hospitals cluster and allow knowledge to more easily and quickly disperse among personnel in the various organizations. To add to the understanding about agglomeration economies in the hospital services sector, this study analyzes...

  13. Spatial costs in a monocentric city (and implications for agglomeration)

    OpenAIRE

    Hugh B. Wenban-Smith

    2009-01-01

    Using water supply as a model for a wider range of infrastructure services, the effect of a negative exponential density gradient on distribution costs is investigated for four monocentric urban development scenarios: (a) Densification; (b) Dispersion; (c) Suburbanisation; and (d) Constant density. It is shown that economies of scale in production can be outweighed by diseconomies in distribution in cases (b) and (c), suggesting that the agglomeration benefits of infrastructure cannot be take...

  14. Reynolds number effects on particle agglomeration in turbulent channel flow

    OpenAIRE

    M Afkhami; A. Hassanpour; Fairweather, M.; Njobuenwu, DO

    2014-01-01

    The work described in this paper employs large eddy simulation and a discrete element method to study particle-laden flows, including particle dispersion and agglomeration, in a horizontal channel. The particle-particle interaction model is based on the Hertz- Mindlin approach with Johnson-Kendall-Roberts cohesion to allow the simulation of Van der Waals forces in a dry air flow. The influence of different flow Reynolds numbers, and therefore the impact of turbulence, on particle agglomeratio...

  15. Estimating agglomeration economies in Spain: evidence from geographically disaggregated data

    OpenAIRE

    Dapena, Alberto Díaz; Vázquez, Esteban Fernández; Morollón, Fernando Rubiera

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we estimate agglomeration economies in Spain in 2009 basing on Ciccone?s (2002) model, which explains average labor productivity in one spatial unit on employment density and other controls. The novelty of our analysis is that the empirical model is estimated at a highly disaggregated spatial scale, oppositely to the convention of taking as unit of analysis NUTS-2 or NUTS-3 regions. Recent contributions to New Economic Geography (NEG) base their theoretical analysis on geographi...

  16. Informality and agglomeration economies: in search of the missing links

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Isabel Moreno Monroy; Michiel Gerritse

    2011-01-01

    The informal sector absorbs on average 50% of employment in developing countries. However, it has not been considered in New Economic Geography (NEG) models that try to explain urbanization and agglomeration in developing countries. In a first attempt to bridge this gap, we develop a NEG model that incorporates the informal sector. Empirical evidence shows that the informal sector is mainly composed of relatively small firms that are unskilled labor intensive, face capital restrictions and th...

  17. Reversible or not? Distinguishing agglomeration and aggregation at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Stanislav V; Tschulik, Kristina; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Compton, Richard G

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles are prone to clustering either via aggregation (irreversible) or agglomeration (reversible) processes. It is exceedingly difficult to distinguish the two via conventional techniques such as dynamic light scattering (DLS), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), or electron microscopy imaging (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) as such techniques only generally confirm the presence of large particle clusters. Herein we develop a joint approach to tackle the issue of distinguishing between nanoparticle aggregation vs agglomeration by characterizing a colloidal system of Ag NPs using DLS, NTA, SEM imaging and the electrochemical nanoimpacts technique. In contrast to the conventional techniques which all reveal the presence of large clusters of particles, electrochemical nanoimpacts provide information regarding individual nanoparticles in the solution phase and reveal the presence of small nanoparticles (detection of small nanoparticles in high ionic strength media evidence the clustering to be a reversible process. As a result it is concluded that agglomeration rather than irreversible aggregation takes place. This observation is of general importance for all colloids as it provides a feasible analysis technique for a wide range of systems with an ability to distinguish subtly different processes. PMID:26352558

  18. One-step aerosol synthesis of nanoparticle agglomerate films: simulation of film porosity and thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for designing nanoparticle agglomerate films with desired film porosity and film thickness. Nanoparticle agglomerates generated in aerosol reactors can be directly deposited on substrates to form uniform porous films in one step, a significant advance over existing technologies. The effect of agglomerate morphology and deposition mechanism on film porosity and thickness are discussed. Film porosity was calculated for a given number and size of primary particles that compose the agglomerates, and fractal dimension. Agglomerate transport was described by the Langevin equation of motion. Deposition enhancing forces such as thermophoresis are incorporated in the model. The method was validated for single spherical particles using previous theoretical studies. An S-shape film porosity dependence on the particle Peclet number typical for spherical particles was also observed for agglomerates, but films formed from agglomerates had much higher porosities than films from spherical particles. Predicted film porosities compared well with measurements reported in the literature. Film porosities increased with the number of primary particles that compose an agglomerate and higher fractal dimension agglomerates resulted in denser films. Film thickness as a function of agglomerate deposition time was calculated from the agglomerate deposition flux in the presence of thermophoresis. The calculated film thickness was in good agreement with measured literature values. Thermophoresis can be used to reduce deposition time without affecting the film porosity

  19. One-step aerosol synthesis of nanoparticle agglomerate films: simulation of film porosity and thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maedler, Lutz; Lall, Anshuman A; Friedlander, Sheldon K [Nanoparticle Technology and Air Quality Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 5531-G Boelter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2006-10-14

    A method is described for designing nanoparticle agglomerate films with desired film porosity and film thickness. Nanoparticle agglomerates generated in aerosol reactors can be directly deposited on substrates to form uniform porous films in one step, a significant advance over existing technologies. The effect of agglomerate morphology and deposition mechanism on film porosity and thickness are discussed. Film porosity was calculated for a given number and size of primary particles that compose the agglomerates, and fractal dimension. Agglomerate transport was described by the Langevin equation of motion. Deposition enhancing forces such as thermophoresis are incorporated in the model. The method was validated for single spherical particles using previous theoretical studies. An S-shape film porosity dependence on the particle Peclet number typical for spherical particles was also observed for agglomerates, but films formed from agglomerates had much higher porosities than films from spherical particles. Predicted film porosities compared well with measurements reported in the literature. Film porosities increased with the number of primary particles that compose an agglomerate and higher fractal dimension agglomerates resulted in denser films. Film thickness as a function of agglomerate deposition time was calculated from the agglomerate deposition flux in the presence of thermophoresis. The calculated film thickness was in good agreement with measured literature values. Thermophoresis can be used to reduce deposition time without affecting the film porosity.

  20. Analysis on the Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of Financial Agglomeration with Markov Chain Approach in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard approach to studying financial industrial agglomeration is to construct measures of the degree of agglomeration within financial industry. But such measures often fail to exploit the convergence or divergence of financial agglomeration. In this paper, we apply Markov chain approach to diagnose the convergence of financial agglomeration in China based on the location quotient coefficients across the provincial regions over 1993–2011. The estimation of Markov transition probability matrix offers more detailed insights into the mechanics of financial agglomeration evolution process in China during the research period. The results show that the spatial evolution of financial agglomeration changes faster in the period of 2003–2011 than that in the period of 1993–2002. Furthermore, there exists a very uneven financial development patterns, but there is regional convergence for financial agglomeration in China.

  1. Focal axonal swellings and associated ultrastructural changes attenuate conduction velocity in central nervous system axons: a computer modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaric, Katarina V; Thomson, Gemma; Edgar, Julia M; Brown, Angus M

    2013-08-01

    The constancy of action potential conduction in the central nervous system (CNS) relies on uniform axon diameter coupled with fidelity of the overlying myelin providing high-resistance, low capacitance insulation. Whereas the effects of demyelination on conduction have been extensively studied/modeled, equivalent studies on the repercussions for conduction of axon swelling, a common early pathological feature of (potentially reversible) axonal injury, are lacking. The recent description of experimentally acquired morphological and electrical properties of small CNS axons and oligodendrocytes prompted us to incorporate these data into a computer model, with the aim of simulating the effects of focal axon swelling on action potential conduction. A single swelling on an otherwise intact axon, as occurs in optic nerve axons of Cnp1 null mice caused a small decrease in conduction velocity. The presence of single swellings on multiple contiguous internodal regions (INR), as likely occurs in advanced disease, caused qualitatively similar results, except the dimensions of the swellings required to produce equivalent attenuation of conduction were significantly decreased. Our simulations of the consequences of metabolic insult to axons, namely, the appearance of multiple swollen regions, accompanied by perturbation of overlying myelin and increased axolemmal permeability, contained within a single INR, revealed that conduction block occurred when the dimensions of the simulated swellings were within the limits of those measured experimentally, suggesting that multiple swellings on a single axon could contribute to axonal dysfunction, and that increased axolemmal permeability is the decisive factor that promotes conduction block. PMID:24303138

  2. Early ultrastructural defects of axons and axon-glia junctions in mice lacking expression of Cnp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Julia M; McLaughlin, Mark; Werner, Hauke B; McCulloch, Mailis C; Barrie, Jennifer A; Brown, Angus; Faichney, Andrew Blyth; Snaidero, Nicolas; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Griffiths, Ian R

    2009-12-01

    Most axons in the central nervous system (CNS) are surrounded by a multilayered myelin sheath that promotes fast, saltatory conduction of electrical impulses. By insulating the axon, myelin also shields the axoplasm from the extracellular milieu. In the CNS, oligodendrocytes provide support for the long-term maintenance of myelinated axons, independent of the myelin sheath. Here, we use electron microscopy and morphometric analyses to examine the evolution of axonal and oligodendroglial changes in mice deficient in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) and in mice deficient in both CNP and proteolipid protein (PLP/DM20). We show that CNP is necessary for the formation of a normal inner tongue process of oligodendrocytes that myelinate small diameter axons. We also show that axonal degeneration in Cnp1 null mice is present very early in postnatal life. Importantly, compact myelin formed by transplanted Cnp1 null oligodendrocytes induces the same degenerative changes in shiverer axons that normally are dysmyelinated but structurally intact. Mice deficient in both CNP and PLP develop a more severe axonal phenotype than either single mutant, indicating that the two oligodendroglial proteins serve distinct functions in supporting the myelinated axon. These observations support a model in which the trophic functions of oligodendrocytes serve to offset the physical shielding of axons by myelin membranes. PMID:19459211

  3. Dynamics of axon fasciculation in the presence of neuronal turnover

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Debasish; Mohanty, P K; Zapotocky, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We formulate and characterize a model aiming to describe the formation of fascicles of axons mediated by contact axon-axon interactions. The growing axons are represented as interacting directed random walks in two spatial dimensions. To mimic axonal turnover in the mammalian olfactory system, the random walkers are injected and removed at specified rates. In the dynamical steady state, the position-dependent distribution of fascicle sizes obeys a scaling law. We identify several distinct time scales that emerge from the dynamics, are sensitive functions of the microscopic parameters of the model, and can exceed the average axonal lifetime by orders of magnitude. We discuss our findings in terms of an analytically tractable, effective model of fascicle dynamics.

  4. Axonal Protein Synthesis and the Regulation of Local Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Axons and presynaptic nerve terminals of both invertebrate and mammalian SCG neurons contain a heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs and a local cytosolic protein synthetic system. Nearly one quarter of the total protein synthesized in these structural/functional domains of the neuron is destined for mitochondria. Acute inhibition of axonal protein synthesis markedly reduces the functional activity of mitochondria. The blockade of axonal protein into mitochondria had...

  5. Axonal protein synthesis and the regulation of local mitochondrial function

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, B.B.; Gioio, A.E.; Hillefors, M.; Aschrafi, A.

    2009-01-01

    Axons and presynaptic nerve terminals of both invertebrate and mammalian SCG neurons contain a heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs and a local cytosolic protein synthetic system. Nearly one quarter of the total protein synthesized in these structural/functional domains of the neuron is destined for mitochondria. Acute inhibition of axonal protein synthesis markedly reduces the functional activity of mitochondria. The blockade of axonal protein into mitochondria had...

  6. Action potentials reliably invade axonal arbors of rat neocortical neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Charles L.; Denk, Winfried; Tank, David W.; Svoboda, Karel

    2000-01-01

    Neocortical pyramidal neurons have extensive axonal arborizations that make thousands of synapses. Action potentials can invade these arbors and cause calcium influx that is required for neurotransmitter release and excitation of postsynaptic targets. Thus, the regulation of action potential invasion in axonal branches might shape the spread of excitation in cortical neural networks. To measure the reliability and extent of action potential invasion into axonal arbors, we have used two-photon...

  7. Axon diameter mapping in crossing fibers with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hui; Dyrby, Tim B; Alexander, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    tissue than measures derived from diffusion tensor imaging. Most existing techniques for axon diameter mapping assume a single axon orientation in the tissue model, which limits their application to only the most coherently oriented brain white matter, such as the corpus callosum, where the single...... technique by establishing reasonable axon diameter indices in the crossing region at the interface of the cingulum and the corpus callosum....

  8. Axon target matching in the developing visual system

    OpenAIRE

    Osterhout, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is made up of trillions of connections between specific sets of highly specialized neurons. How each individual neuron finds and connects to the correct synaptic partner remains an important and unresolved issue in neuroscience. Using the mouse visual system as a model I probed the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern one of the key steps leading to CNS development: axon target matching. Axon target matching is the process by which axons to find and i...

  9. Axon Regeneration in the Peripheral and Central Nervous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Huebner, Eric A.; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2009-01-01

    Axon regeneration in the mature mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is extremely limited after injury. Consequently, functional deficits persist after spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury, stroke, and related conditions that involve axonal disconnection. This situation differs from that in the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS), where long- distance axon regeneration and substantial functional recovery can occur in the adult. Both extracellular molecules and the intrinsi...

  10. Myelin sheath survival after guanethidine-induced axonal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Membrane-membrane interactions between axons and Schwann cells are required for initial myelin formation in the peripheral nervous system. However, recent studies of double myelination in sympathetic nerve have indicated that myelin sheaths continue to exist after complete loss of axonal contact (Kidd, G. J., and J. W. Heath. 1988. J. Neurocytol. 17:245-261). This suggests that myelin maintenance may be regulated either by diffusible axonal factors or by nonaxonal mechanisms. To test these hy...

  11. Axonal autophagy during regeneration of the rat sciatic nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kangrong Lu; Zhongxian Piao; Zhenxi Liu; Weiwang Gu; Wanshan Wang; Nngjie Piao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The removal of degenerated axonal debris during Wallerian degeneration is very important for nerve regeneration. However, the mechanism by which debris is removed is not been completely understood. Considerable controversy remains as to the clearance pathway and cells that are involved. OBJECTIVE: To investigate axonal autophagy during removal of degenerated axonal debris by transecting the sciatic nerve in a rat Wallerian degeneration model.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Experimental neuropathological analysis. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory Animal Service Center of the Southern Medical University between January and June 2005. MATERIALS: Fifty-four adult, Wistar rats of either sex, weighing 180-250 g, were obtained from the Laboratory Animal Service Center of the Southern Medical University. Animals were randomly divided into nine groups of six rats. METHODS: Wallerian degeneration was induced by transecting the rat sciatic nerve, and tissue samples from the distal stump were obtained 0.2, 0.4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, and 15 days post-transection. Ultrathin sections were prepared for electron microscopy to study ultrastructure and enzyme cytochemistry staining. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ultrastructure (axon body, autophagic body, and cystoskeleton) of axons and myelin sheaths observed with electron microscopy; acidic phosphatase activity detected by Gomori staining using electron microscopy. RESULTS: The major changes of degenerating axons after transection were axoplasm swelling and separation of axons from their myelin sheath between five hours and two days post-transection. At four days post-transection, the axoplasm condensed and axons were completely separated from the myelin sheath, forming dissociative axon bodies. Vacuoles of different sizes formed in axons during the early phase after lesion. Larger dissociative axon bodies were formed when the axons were completely separated from the myelin sheath during a late phase. The axolemma

  12. Localization of Axonal Motor Molecules Machinery in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Florenzano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport and neuronal survival depend critically on active transport and axon integrity both for supplying materials and communication to different domains of the cell body. All these actions are executed through cytoskeleton, transport and regulatory elements that appear to be disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases. Motor-driven transport both supplies and clears distal cellular portions with proteins and organelles. This transport is especially relevant in projection and motor neurons, which have long axons to reach the farthest nerve endings. Thus, any disturbance of axonal transport may have severe consequences for neuronal function and survival. A growing body of literature indicates the presence of alterations to the motor molecules machinery, not only in expression levels and phosphorylation, but also in their subcellular distribution within populations of neurons, which are selectively affected in the course of neurodegenerative diseases. The implications of this altered subcellular localization and how this affects axon survival and neuronal death still remain poorly understood, although several hypotheses have been suggested. Furthermore, cytoskeleton and transport element localization can be selectively disrupted in some disorders suggesting that specific loss of the axonal functionality could be a primary hallmark of the disorder. This can lead to axon degeneration and neuronal death either directly, through the functional absence of essential axonal proteins, or indirectly, through failures in communication among different cellular domains. This review compares the localization of cytoskeleton and transport elements in some neurodegenerative disorders to ask what aspects may be essential for axon survival and neuronal death.

  13. Optical detection of nanoparticle agglomeration in a living system under the influence of a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles are important in diagnosis and therapy. In order to apply their potential, an understanding of the behavior of particles in the body is crucial. However, in vitro experiments usually do not mimic the dynamic conditions of the in vivo situation. The aim of our work was an in vivo observation of particle transport in chicken egg vessels in the presence of a magnetic field by particle tracking. For that we demonstrate the spatial resolution of our observations in a vein and a temporal resolution by observation of the cardiac cycle in an artery. Microscopic images were recorded in dark field reflection and fluorescence mode. - Highlights: • Optically accessible blood circulation in hen's egg CAV model. • Observation of transport of magnetic particles in chicken egg vessels. • Irreversibility of agglomerates after removing the magnetic field

  14. Optical detection of nanoparticle agglomeration in a living system under the influence of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Robert, E-mail: robert.mueller@ipht-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Stranik, Ondrej [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Schlenk, Florian; Werner, Sebastian [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Institute of Pharmacy, Friedrich Schiller University, Otto-Schott-Str. 41, 07745 Jena (Germany); Malsch, Daniéll [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Fischer, Dagmar [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Institute of Pharmacy, Friedrich Schiller University, Otto-Schott-Str. 41, 07745 Jena (Germany); Fritzsche, Wolfgang [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Nanoparticles are important in diagnosis and therapy. In order to apply their potential, an understanding of the behavior of particles in the body is crucial. However, in vitro experiments usually do not mimic the dynamic conditions of the in vivo situation. The aim of our work was an in vivo observation of particle transport in chicken egg vessels in the presence of a magnetic field by particle tracking. For that we demonstrate the spatial resolution of our observations in a vein and a temporal resolution by observation of the cardiac cycle in an artery. Microscopic images were recorded in dark field reflection and fluorescence mode. - Highlights: • Optically accessible blood circulation in hen's egg CAV model. • Observation of transport of magnetic particles in chicken egg vessels. • Irreversibility of agglomerates after removing the magnetic field.

  15. Agglomeration of Ag and TiO2 nanoparticles in surface and wastewater: Role of calcium ions and of organic carbon fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to investigate factors leading to agglomeration of citrate coated silver (AgNP-Cit), polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPPVP and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in surface waters and wastewater. ENPs (1 mg/L) were spiked to unfiltered, filtered, ultrafiltered (<10 kDa and <1 kDa) samples. Z-average particle sizes were measured after 1 h, 1 day and 1 week. AgNP-PVP was stable in all fractions of the samples and kept their original size around 60 nm over 1 week. Agglomeration of AgNP-Cit and TiO2 was positively correlated with Ca2+ concentration, but dissolved organic carbon concentrations > 2 mg/L contributed to stabilizing these NP. Moreover, agglomeration of AgNP-Cit in the various organic matter fractions showed that high molecular weight organic compounds such as biopolymers provide stabilization in natural water. A generalized scheme for the agglomeration behavior of AgNP-Cit, AgNP-PVP and TiO2 in natural waters was proposed based on their relation with Ca2+, Mg2+ and DOC concentration. - Highlights: • Agglomeration of AgNP-Cit was positively correlated with Ca2+ concentration. • DOC > 2 mg/L contributes to stabilizing AgNP-Cit and TiO2. • High molecular weight biopolymers provide stabilization in natural water. • Z-average sizes of AgNP-Cit in filtered samples were higher than in unfiltered ones. • AgNP-PVP is stable in surface and wastewater over 1 week. - Agglomeration of ENP in natural waters and wastewater was mostly dependent on the calcium ion and dissolved organic carbon concentrations

  16. Insights into methane hydrate formation, agglomeration, and dissociation in water + diesel oil dispersed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hydrate agglomeration occurs at initial hydrate formation or under shutting down stages. • The agglomeration of hydrate is inhibited and dispersed with the action of anti-agglomerants. • The appearance of surface water may cause the agglomeration of hydrate during hydrate dissociation. • A mechanism was proposed to describe hydrate dissociation from water in oil dispersed system. - Abstract: Methane hydrate formation and dissociation in (5 vol% water + 95 vol% diesel oil) dispersed system containing a combined anti-agglomerant were experimentally studied using a high pressure autoclave installed with particle video microscope and focused beam reflectance measurement probes. The agglomeration of hydrate was found to occur at the initial hydrate formation stage. With the continuous formation of hydrate, the agglomeration of hydrate will be inhibited and hydrate was dispersed with the action of the anti-agglomerant. The agglomeration of hydrate also occurs when the hydrate containing fluid is under static state for a certain time. Larger hydrate particles attached by gas bubble with grape-like shape were found during hydrate dissociation. The dissociated surface water would contact with un-dissociated hydrate and accumulate to larger water/hydrate particles may be the reason that causes the agglomeration during initial hydrate dissociation process. A mechanism was proposed to describe hydrate dissociation from water in oil dispersed system

  17. Focal axonal swellings and associated ultrastructural changes attenuate conduction velocity in central nervous system axons: a computer modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Kolaric, Katarina V; Thomson, Gemma; Edgar, Julia M; Brown, Angus M.

    2013-01-01

    The constancy of action potential conduction in the central nervous system (CNS) relies on uniform axon diameter coupled with fidelity of the overlying myelin providing high-resistance, low capacitance insulation. Whereas the effects of demyelination on conduction have been extensively studied/modeled, equivalent studies on the repercussions for conduction of axon swelling, a common early pathological feature of (potentially reversible) axonal injury, are lacking. The recent description of ex...

  18. Patterns of growth, axonal extension and axonal arborization of neuronal lineages in the developing Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Camilla; Shy, Diana; Spindler, Shana R; Fung, Siaumin; Pereanu, Wayne; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-11-15

    The Drosophila central brain is composed of approximately 100 paired lineages, with most lineages comprising 100-150 neurons. Most lineages have a number of important characteristics in common. Typically, neurons of a lineage stay together as a coherent cluster and project their axons into a coherent bundle visible from late embryo to adult. Neurons born during the embryonic period form the primary axon tracts (PATs) that follow stereotyped pathways in the neuropile. Apoptotic cell death removes an average of 30-40% of primary neurons around the time of hatching. Secondary neurons generated during the larval period form secondary axon tracts (SATs) that typically fasciculate with their corresponding primary axon tract. SATs develop into the long fascicles that interconnect the different compartments of the adult brain. Structurally, we distinguish between three types of lineages: PD lineages, characterized by distinct, spatially separate proximal and distal arborizations; C lineages with arborizations distributed continuously along the entire length of their tract; D lineages that lack proximal arborizations. Arborizations of many lineages, in particular those of the PD type, are restricted to distinct neuropile compartments. We propose that compartments are "scaffolded" by individual lineages, or small groups thereof. Thereby, the relatively small number of primary neurons of each primary lineage set up the compartment map in the late embryo. Compartments grow during the larval period simply by an increase in arbor volume of primary neurons. Arbors of secondary neurons form within or adjacent to the larval compartments, resulting in smaller compartment subdivisions and additional, adult specific compartments. PMID:19538956

  19. Intra-metropolitan migration in the Warsaw agglomeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykiel, Z

    1984-01-01

    "Two questions of intra-metropolitan migration are analyzed in the paper, intra-metropolitan hierarchy and intra-metropolitan spatial barriers. The former embraces four detailed questions: ranking of centers; spatial pattern of hierarchical subordination; degree of unequivocalness of the subordinations, or degree of dominance; and degree of hierarchicality of interrelationships. Two specialties of the Warsaw [Poland] agglomeration are discussed, the influence of the present crisis, and the administrative restrictions to migration to the city, or the spatial barriers. Social connotations of the latter are also presented." PMID:12312885

  20. Agglomeration techniques for the production of spheres for packed beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One attractive fusion-breeder-blanket design features a lithium bearing ceramic in the form of spheres packed into a random array. The spheres have diameters of 3 mm and 0.3 mm. This report surveys techniques used to produce ceramic spheres on an industrial scale. The methods examined include tumbling and mixing granulation, extrusion, briquetting and pelletizing. It is concluded that the required quantities of 0.3 mm diameter spheres can be produced by the tumbling agglomeration of a feed powder. The 3 mm diameter spheres will be made using a process of extrusion, chopping and rolling

  1. Agglomeration and Deposition Behaviour of Solid Recovered Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Hjuler, Klaus;

    2016-01-01

    formation, or accumulation of impurities. The combustion of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), wood, and SRF were studied in a rotary drum furnace. The combustion was recorded on a camera (60 frames per second), so that any agglomeration or deposition of fuel or ash...... a careful combustion control. The ash from SRF or wood does not pose a significant risk of melting and deposits at temperatures up to 1000 °C, but the presence of glass impurities in some SRF may limit operation temperatures to 900 °C as a result of ash melting....

  2. Ion channel clustering at the axon initial segment and node of Ranvier evolved sequentially in early chordates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis S Hill

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In many mammalian neurons, dense clusters of ion channels at the axonal initial segment and nodes of Ranvier underlie action potential generation and rapid conduction. Axonal clustering of mammalian voltage-gated sodium and KCNQ (Kv7 potassium channels is based on linkage to the actin-spectrin cytoskeleton, which is mediated by the adaptor protein ankyrin-G. We identified key steps in the evolution of this axonal channel clustering. The anchor motif for sodium channel clustering evolved early in the chordate lineage before the divergence of the wormlike cephalochordate, amphioxus. Axons of the lamprey, a very primitive vertebrate, exhibited some invertebrate features (lack of myelin, use of giant diameter to hasten conduction, but possessed narrow initial segments bearing sodium channel clusters like in more recently evolved vertebrates. The KCNQ potassium channel anchor motif evolved after the divergence of lampreys from other vertebrates, in a common ancestor of shark and humans. Thus, clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels was a pivotal early innovation of the chordates. Sodium channel clusters at the axon initial segment serving the generation of action potentials evolved long before the node of Ranvier. KCNQ channels acquired anchors allowing their integration into pre-existing sodium channel complexes at about the same time that ancient vertebrates acquired myelin, saltatory conduction, and hinged jaws. The early chordate refinements in action potential mechanisms we have elucidated appear essential to the complex neural signaling, active behavior, and evolutionary success of vertebrates.

  3. Influences of seed size and number on agglomeration in synthetic Bayer liquors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bin; ZHOU Ke-chao; CHEN Qi-yuan

    2006-01-01

    By means of Malvern laser particle size analyzer and scanning electron microscopy, the influences of seed size and number on agglomeration in Bayer process were investigated. Agglomeration is almost finished in 8 h,seeds, below 5 μm, especially below 2 μm, gather together rapidly and almost disappear in 8 h. In the same supersaturation of aluminate solution and seed size, the smaller the number of seed is, the bigger the degree of agglomeration is. With the same primary number of seed, the agglomeration of larger seed is superior to that of small seed,and the agglomeration does not happen among the coarse seeds. The agglomeration mainly happens among fine particles, and the combinations among the fine particles are unconsolidated.

  4. Large Agglomerations and Economic Growth in Urban India: An Application of Panel Data Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Sabyasachi

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of urban agglomeration on urban economic growth, using static and dynamic panel data approach, based on data of 52 large cities in India for the period 2000 to 2009. The results shows that agglomeration has a strong positive effect on urban economic growth and support the “Williamson hypothesis” that agglomeration increases economic growth only up to certain level of economic development. The critical level per-capita city income is estimated about Rs. 37049...

  5. HYDROPHOBIC AGGLOMERATION OF MINERAL FINES IN AQUEOUS SUSPENSIONS AND ITS APPLICATION IN FLOTATION: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    BINGQIAO YANG; SHAOXIAN SONG

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic agglomeration is originated from the hydrophobic attraction between particles, which is essentially different from electrolyte coagulation and polymer flocculation. It is applied to mineral processing in floc-flotation process to improve the recovery of mineral fines. In this paper, the applications of this phenomenon in mineral fines were summarized, including the origin of hydrophobic agglomeration, the main factors affect hydrophobic agglomeration (particle hydrophobicity, shea...

  6. Study on the Policy Factors of Innovative Talents Agglomeration in Jiangsu Province based on Data Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Li Wenfei; Li Min

    2016-01-01

    Innovative talent is the key factor to promote the development of innovative economy and realize innovative drive in Jiangsu Province. Innovative talent agglomeration can fully play the effect of innovative talents through the agglomeration efficiency. Among many factors that affect the agglomeration of innovative talents, the guiding role of government policy factors is becoming more and more important. Based on the survey of domestic and foreign literature, through questionnaire survey, thi...

  7. Impact of agglomeration on the regional growth of Latin American countries

    OpenAIRE

    Rosero, Grace Carolina Guevara

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical approaches have been developed to examine the effect of agglomeration on growth. However, the understanding of the mechanisms of agglomeration in developing countries remains unaddressed. This paper aims to give empirical evidence of the role of agglomeration on the growth of Latin American regions. The study of the subcontinent is crucial because of the evidence of a rapid pace of urbanization process. Using a database with information of 162 regions of 8 Latin American countries...

  8. Do urban social enterprises benefit from agglomeration? Evidence from four UK cities

    OpenAIRE

    Pinch, Steven; Sunley, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pinch S. and Sunley P. Do urban social enterprises benefit from agglomeration? Evidence from four UK cities, Regional Studies. This paper examines the relevance of clustering theory for an understanding of the location of social enterprises (SEs). This is accomplished through an analysis of the extent to which managers of SEs in four major UK cities perceive themselves to benefit from agglomeration effects. The paper concentrates on two broad sets of agglomeration processes: the first is Mars...

  9. New insights into mRNA trafficking in axons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gumy, Laura; Katrukha, Eugene; Kapitein, Lukas; Hoogenraad, Casper

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has been demonstrated that mRNAs localize to axons of young and mature central and peripheral nervous system neurons in culture and in vivo. Increasing evidence is supporting a fundamental role for the local translation of these mRNAs in neuronal function by regulating axon growt

  10. Regulation of myelin genes implicated in psychiatric disorders by functional activity in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip R Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelination is a highly dynamic process that continues well into adulthood in humans. Several recent gene expression studies have found abnormal expression of genes involved in myelination in the prefrontal cortex of brains from patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Defects in myelination could contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness by impairing information processing as a consequence of altered impulse conduction velocity and synchrony between cortical regions carrying out higher level cognitive functions. Myelination can be altered by impulse activity in axons and by environmental experience. Psychiatric illness is treated by psychotherapy, behavioral modification, and drugs affecting neurotransmission, raising the possibility that myelinating glia may not only contribute to such disorders, but that activity-dependent effects on myelinating glia could provide one of the cellular mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effects of these treatments. This review examines evidence showing that genes and gene networks important for myelination can be regulated by functional activity in axons.

  11. Automated Manufacture of Fertilizing Agglomerates from Burnt Wood Ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svantesson, Thomas

    2002-12-01

    In Sweden, extensive research is conducted to find alternative sources of energy that should partly replace the electric power production from nuclear power. With the ambition to create a sustainable system for producing energy, the use of renewable energy is expected to grow further and biofuels are expected to account for a significant part of this increase. However, when biofuels are burned or gasified, ash appears as a by-product. In order to overcome the problems related to deposition in land fills, the idea is to transform the ashes into a product - agglomerates - that easily could be recycled back to the forest grounds; as a fertilizer, or as a tool to reduce the acidification in the forest soil at the spreading area. This work considers the control of a transformation process, which transforms wood ash produced at a district heating plant into fertilizing agglomerates. A robust machine, built to comply with the industrial requirements for continuous operation, has been developed and is controlled by an industrial control system in order to enable an automated manufacture.

  12. Directly Compressible Glibenclamide Tablet Prepared from Spherical Agglomerates: A Comparative Evaluation with Marketed Tablet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachinkumar Patil*,

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Agglomerates were prepared using methanol, chloroform and water as good solvent, bridging liquid and poor solvent, respectively. Directcompressible tablets of the agglomerates showed appropriate hardness, friability, weight variation and disintegration time with improved drug release than conventional marketed tablets. Tablets were adequately stable as per regulatory guidelines. Pharmacokinetic study indicated rapid absorption with higher bioavailability of the drug from the prepared tablets of agglomerates than marketed tablet (Glyburide; Sandoz. Hence, the tablets prepared with the agglomerates of glibenclamide may reduce the total dose of drug and could improve the patient compliance by reducing the dose-related side effects.

  13. Numerical derivation of forces on particles and agglomerates in a resonant acoustic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2013-10-01

    Particles and agglomerates are investigated in gaseous acoustic flow fields. Acoustic fields exert forces on solid objects, which can influence the shape of the exposed bodies, even to the point of breakage of the structures. Motivated by experimentally observed breakage of agglomerates in an acoustic levitator (f = 20 kHz), a numerical study is presented that derives the acoustic forces on a complex model agglomerate from the pressure and velocity fields of a resonant standing ultrasound wave, calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is distinguished between the drag and lift/lateral forces on the overall agglomerate and on the different primary particles of the model.

  14. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Molecular Switches Regulating CNS Axon Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthy Vigneswara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The poor or lack of injured adult central nervous system (CNS axon regeneration results in devastating consequences and poor functional recovery. The interplay between the intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributes to robust inhibition of axon regeneration of injured CNS neurons. The insufficient or lack of trophic support for injured neurons is considered as one of the major obstacles contributing to their failure to survive and regrow their axons after injury. In the CNS, many of the signalling pathways associated with neuronal survival and axon regeneration are regulated by several classes of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK that respond to a variety of ligands. This paper highlights and summarises the most relevant recent findings pertinent to different classes of the RTK family of molecules, with a particular focus on elucidating their role in CNS axon regeneration.

  15. SnoN facilitates axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun L Do

    Full Text Available Adult CNS neurons exhibit a reduced capacity for growth compared to developing neurons, due in part to downregulation of growth-associated genes as development is completed. We tested the hypothesis that SnoN, an embryonically regulated transcription factor that specifies growth of the axonal compartment, can enhance growth in injured adult neurons. In vitro, SnoN overexpression in dissociated adult DRG neuronal cultures significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, TGF-β1, a negative regulator of SnoN, inhibited neurite outgrowth, and SnoN over-expression overcame this inhibition. We then examined whether SnoN influenced axonal regeneration in vivo: indeed, expression of a mutant form of SnoN resistant to degradation significantly enhanced axonal regeneration following cervical spinal cord injury, despite peri-lesional upregulation of TGF-β1. Thus, a developmental mechanism that specifies extension of the axonal compartment also promotes axonal regeneration after adult CNS injury.

  16. 4S RNA is transported axonally in normal and regenerating axons of the sciatic nerves of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were designed to determine if following injection of [3H]uridine into the lumbar spinal cord of the rat, [3H]RNA could be demonstrated within axons of the sciatic nerve, and if 4S RNA is the predominant predominant RNA species present in these axons. (Auth.)

  17. Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Regulates Axon Guidance by Stabilizing CRMP2A Selectively in Distal Axons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balaštík, Martin; Zhou, X.Z.; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Weissová, Romana; Žiak, Jakub; Pazyra-Murphy, M.F.; Cosker, K.E.; Machoňová, Olga; Kozmiková, Iryna; Chen, CH.; Pastorino, L.; Asara, J.M.; Cole, A.; Sutherland, C.; Segal, R. A.; Lu, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2015), s. 812-828. ISSN 2211-1247 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11213; GA MŠk LK21307; GA ČR GA15-03796S; GA MŠk LO1419 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Pin1 * axon guidance * Semaphorin 3A Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.358, year: 2014

  18. Clinical features of diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the mechanism of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) and study the relationship between DAI and brain concussion, brain contusion, and primary brain stem injury.Methods: The clinical data and iconographic characteristics of 56 patients with DAI were analyzed retrospectively.Results: Traffic accidents were the main cause of DAI. Among the 56 cases, 34 were injured for at least twice, and 71.43% of the patients were complicated with contusion.Conclusions: It is considered that DAI is a common pattern of primary brain injury, which is often underestimated. And DAI includes cerebral concussion and primary brain injury, and is often complicated by cerebral cortex contusion. Therefore, it is very simple and practical to divide primary brain injuries into local and diffuse injuries.

  19. Coating and melt induced agglomeration in a poultry litter fired fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion of poultry litter, which is rich in phosphorus, in a fluidized bed combustor (FBC) is associated with agglomeration problems, which can lead to bed defluidization and consequent shutdown of the installation. Whereas earlier research indicated coating induced agglomeration as the dominant mechanism for bed material agglomeration, it is shown experimentally in this paper that both coating and melt induced agglomeration occur. Coating induced agglomeration mainly takes place at the walls of the FBC, in the freeboard above the fluidized bed, where at the prevailing temperature the bed particles are partially molten and hence agglomerate. In the ash, P2O5 forms together with CaO thermodynamically stable Ca3(PO4)2, thus reducing the amount of calcium silicates in the ash. This results in K/Ca silicate mixtures with lower melting points. On the other hand, in-bed agglomeration is caused by thermodynamically unstable, low melting HPO42− and H2PO4− salts present in the fuel. In the hot FBC these salts may melt, may cause bed particles to stick together and may subsequently react with Ca salts from the bed ash, forming a solid bridge of the stable Ca3(PO4)2 between multiple particles. - Highlights: • Coating induced agglomeration not due to K phosphates, but due to K silicates. • Melt induced agglomeration due to H2PO4− and HPO42− salts in the fuel. • Wall agglomeration corresponds to coating induced mechanism. • In-bed agglomeration corresponds to melt induced mechanism

  20. Membrane turnover and receptor trafficking in regenerating axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausott, Barbara; Klimaschewski, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral axonal regeneration requires surface-expanding membrane addition. The continuous incorporation of new membranes into the axolemma allows the pushing force of elongating microtubules to drive axonal growth cones forwards. Hence, a constant supply of membranes and cytoskeletal building blocks is required, often for many weeks. In human peripheral nerves, axonal tips may be more than 1 m away from the neuronal cell body. Therefore, in the initial phase of regeneration, membranes are derived from pre-existing vesicles or synthesised locally. Only later stages of axonal regeneration are supported by membranes and proteins synthesised in neuronal cell bodies, considering that the fastest anterograde transport mechanisms deliver cargo at 20 cm/day. Whereas endocytosis and exocytosis of membrane vesicles are balanced in intact axons, membrane incorporation exceeds membrane retrieval during regeneration to compensate for the loss of membranes distal to the lesion site. Physiological membrane turnover rates will not be established before the completion of target reinnervation. In this review, the current knowledge on membrane traffic in axonal outgrowth is summarised, with a focus on endosomal vesicles as the providers of membranes and carriers of growth factor receptors required for initiating signalling pathways to promote the elongation and branching of regenerating axons in lesioned peripheral nerves. PMID:26222895

  1. Astrocyte scar formation aids central nervous system axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark A; Burda, Joshua E; Ren, Yilong; Ao, Yan; O'Shea, Timothy M; Kawaguchi, Riki; Coppola, Giovanni; Khakh, Baljit S; Deming, Timothy J; Sofroniew, Michael V

    2016-04-14

    Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system. Astrocytic scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or ablating chronic astrocytic scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. By contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocytic scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth-supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to the prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents central nervous system axon regeneration. PMID:27027288

  2. Discussion on the dispersion & agglomeration of aircraft industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Chu

    2009-01-01

    The aircraft industry is crucial to the economy and security of a nation. In this paper, the spatial characteristics and patterns of the aircraft industry are analyzed on different spatial scales. It is found that there is a 'Matthew effect' in the global aircraft industry and the spatial evolution of the industry is consistent with the industrialization process of the whole country. It is also revealed that the spatial evolution of the country is driven by both the centripetal forces including capital, talents, technology and agglomeration economies and the centrifugal forces including the comparative advantage, cost &risk sharing, emerging markets, development policy for less-developed regions and the military imperative. These forces have both market-stabilizing and market-disrupting effects on the spatial evolution of the aircraft industry. The study suggests that lessons drawn from the experiences in the United States and France are expected to be conducive to the rise of China's aircraft industry in the future.

  3. Method and apparatus for preventing agglomeration within fluid hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a process for treating a fluid hydrocarbon fuel for retarding the agglomeration between particles thereof and for retarding the growth of bacteria and fungi therein. The process includes that steps of transporting a plurality of unit volumes of said fluid hydrocarbon fuel through an irradiating location and irradiating each unit of the plurality of unit volumes at the irradiating location with either neutron or gamma radiation. An apparatus for treating the fluid hydrocarbon fuels with the nuclear radiation also is provided. The apparatus includes a generally conical central irradiating cavity which is surrounded by a spiral outer irradiating cavity. The fluid hydrocarbon fuel is transported through the cavities while being irradiated by the nuclear radiation

  4. Intensive drying and the related microstructure features in agglomerate spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlyk, Rostyslav

    Most metal ore concentrates are fine particulates with a wide particle-size distribution. Industrially they are pelletized by tumbling in balling discs or drums into spheres, an operation which requires the addition of typically up to 10% by weight of water. Further processing of these agglomerates involves first drying and then induration by heating up to 1250°C. The main objective of this thesis was the study of the interrelationship between the microstructure of the agglomerates with, on the one hand, the mechanical and physical properties of the pellets and their behaviour during intensive drying, on the other. The previously developed model of the drying process identified the loss of capillarity, resulting from the vapour lock, to be a critical component of the mechanism of intense as opposed to 'classical' drying. It was shown that the absence of the constant-rate drying period is a natural consequence of this effect. Several significant shortcomings of the previous model have been identified. This model treats the period of transition between surface- and shrinking-core drying as an instantaneous event. The new extended model, which overcomes the original model limitations, was developed in this project. In its formalism, the new model includes the pore-size distribution and thus simulates a gradual surface/shrinking-core transition. It was shown that the nature of the transition between the surface- and shrinking-core drying regimes during intensive drying is fundamentally different from that of classical drying, i.e. carried out at mild temperatures. In the latter case, liquid is being delivered to the surface through the network of interconnected small pores reaching the surface. The transition occurs when the larger pores, also reaching the surface, are being drained. On the other hand, under intense-drying conditions, the rate-limiting factor is the vapour lock. The latter phenomenon will occur in the smaller pores first, as they have smaller liquid

  5. Agglomeration and Deposition Behaviour of Solid Recovered Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Nielsen, Mads;

    2015-01-01

    Waste derived fuels such as Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) are increasingly being used in the cement industry as a means to reduce cost [1]. SRF is produced by separating the combustible fraction from industrial or municipal solid waste (MSW). The recovered fraction has a higher content of combustible...... materials such as plastic and paper than mixed MSW [2]. The inhomogeneous nature of SRF [3] makes it difficult to combust and many problems may arise concerning e.g. combustion control, feeding of fuel [2,4], deposit formation [5], or accumulation of impurities [3]. Laboratory ash fusion tests typically...... contains significant quantities of common plastics such as polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Fluidized bed experiments to examine the pyrolysis of polymers have shown that bed agglomeration can result from melting plastics or sticky char residues in the case of...

  6. Remediation of Sucarnoochee soil by agglomeration with fine coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine-sized Blue Creek coal was used to remove high molecular weight hydrocarbons from Sucarnoochee soil, a fine-sized high-organic soil. Fine coal in slurry form was blended with Sucarnoochee soil contaminated with 15.0% by wt of crude oil, and agglomerates were removed in a standard flotation cell. Crude oil in the remediated soil was reduced from the original 15.0% to less than a tenth of a wt% by a two-step process. Oil removal of approx. 99.3% was obtained. An added benefit was that the low-grade coal used in the process was simultaneously upgraded. The final level of cleaning was not affected by initial oil concentration. The process compared favorably with a hot water wash technique used to recovery oils from contaminated soil

  7. Gender Differences of Shoppers in the Marketing and Management of Retail Agglomerations

    OpenAIRE

    Teller, C; Thomson, A

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to first identify gender differences in perception and evaluation of retail agglomerations, and second, discuss the implications of these differences for marketing and management. Based on a conceptual model 2151 agglomeration shoppers were surveyed using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Structural equation modelling revealed that accessibility, parking and infrastructure are perceived differently between gender groups. The attractiveness in terms of satisfaction, rete...

  8. Statistical Evaluation of Non-Agglomerating Coating for Granulated Natural Asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjokorde Walmiki Samadhi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Agglomeration of granulated Buton natural asphalt during storage is of major concern in its large-scale commercial application. This work develops a simple test method to evaluate the performance of agglomeration-resistant coating for granulated Buton asphalt, consisting of water-based polymeric primary coating and mineral-based secondary coating. The method uses a static load cell to measure the agglomerated granule count fraction under simulated storage conditions. A 24-1 fractional factorial experiment with two replications is employed to evaluate the effect of coating drying temperature, drying time, asphalt to secondary coating mass ratio, and secondary coating type on the agglomerated count fraction at ambient temperature and 60 oC. The test is able to measure a statistically significant increase in agglomeration resistance when the coating is applied, with an agglomerated fraction of 17.5% at 60 oC. The test identifies asphalt to secondary coating weight ratio as a significant factor, with an ANOVA p-value much lower than other effects. A decrease in this mass ratio from 5:1 to 5:2 increases the agglomeration, which is hypothesized to be attributed to the hydrated cementitious phase between granular external surfaces. More work is needed to identify the acceptable fraction of agglomerated granules.

  9. Humid storage conditions increase the dissolution rate of diazepam from solid dispersions prepared by melt agglomeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna Cecilia; Torstenson, Anette Seo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of cooling mode and storage conditions on the dissolution rate of a solid dispersion prepared by melt agglomeration. The aim has been to relate this effect to the solid state properties of the agglomerates. The cooling mode had an effect on t...

  10. Intra-axonal myosin and actin in nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Irvine G; Lund, Linda M

    2009-10-01

    A focused review of sciatic nerve regeneration in the rat model, based on research conducted by the authors, is presented. We examine structural proteins carried distally in the axon by energy-requiring motor enzymes, using protein chemistry and molecular biology techniques in combination with immunohistochemistry. Relevant findings from other laboratories are cited and discussed. The general conclusion is that relatively large amounts of actin and tubulin are required to construct a regenerating axon and that these materials mainly originate in the parent axon. The motor enzymes that carry these proteins forward as macromolecules include kinesin and dynein but probably also include myosin. PMID:19927086

  11. Axon guidance and neuronal migration research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Proper migration of neuronal somas and axonal growth cones to designated locations in the developing brain is essential for the assembly of functional neuronal circuits.Rapid progress in research of axon guidance and neuronal migration has been made in the last twenty years.Chinese researchers began their exploration in this field ten years ago and have made significant contributions in clarifying the signal transduction of axon guidance and neuronal migration.Several unique experimental approaches,including the migration assay of single isolated neurons in response to locally delivered guidance cues,have been developed by Chinese neuroscientists to investigate the molecular machinery underlying these guidance events.

  12. Polarization-dependent responses of fluorescent indicators partitioned into myelinated axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micu, Ileana; Brideau, Craig; Stys, Peter K.

    2012-02-01

    Myelination, i.e. the wrapping of axons in multiple layers of lipid-rich membrane, is a unique phenomenon in the nervous systems of both vertebrates and invertebrates, that greatly increases the speed and efficiency of signal transmission. In turn, disruption of axo-myelinic integrity underlies disability in numerous clinical disorders. The dependence of myelin physiology on nanometric organization of its lamellae makes it difficult to accurately study this structure in the living state. We expected that fluorescent probes might become highly oriented when partitioned into the myelin sheath, and in turn, this anisotropy could be interrogated by controlling the polarization state of the exciting laser field used for 2-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF). Live ex vivo myelinated rodent axons were labeled with a series of lipohilic and hydrophilic fluorescenct probes, and TPEF images acquired while laser polarization was varied at the sample over a broad range of ellipticities and orientations of the major angle [see Brideau, Micu & Stys, abstract this meeting]. We found that most probes exhibited strong dependence on both the major angle of polarization, and perhaps more surprisingly, on ellipticity as well. Lipophilic vs. hydrophilic probes exhibited distinctly different behavior. We propose that polarization-dependent TPEF microscopy represents a powerful tool for probing the nanostructural architecture of both myelin and axonal cytoskeleton in a domain far below the resolution limit of visible light microscopy. By selecting probes with different sizes and physicochemical properties, distinct aspects of cellular nanoarchitecture can be accurately interrogated in real-time in living tissue.

  13. Acoustic agglomeration of power-plant fly ash. A comprehensive semi-annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reethof, G.

    1980-02-01

    Results obtained during the reporting period are presented. The agglomeration of submicron fly ash particles has been studied as a function of sound pressure level, sound frequency, loading, and exposure time. A second generation model of the agglomeration process is being developed. A high-frequency, high-intensity variable speed siren delivering at least 600 W at frequencies up to 4000 Hz has been developed and tested. Details on the design and operation are presented. The agglomeration chamber has been completely cleaned and the aerosol generating system has been rebuilt. A mathematical model of the acoustics of agglomeration is being developed. Preliminary results of computerized electron microscopic scanning of fly ash particles during agglomeration are presented. (DMC)

  14. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE HYDROPHOBIC AGGLOMERATION CHARACTERISTICS OF EASY DEGRADATION COAL FINES IN WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王力; 陈鹏

    1997-01-01

    The separation of ultrafine coal from three Chinese coal samples of easy degradation coal fines in water has been investigated by the application of a hydrophobic agglomeration process. In addition to yielding clean coal with high recovery, this process requires significantly less oil concentration for agglomeration (less than 0.4% in oil-water weight ratio) and produces stabler agglomerates than general oil agglomeration process, the cost of the oil would no longer be an important consideration for its commercial application. Neutral diesel oil was used to make oleophilic coal particles agglomerated with good rejection of clay minerals under little oil consumption and certain agitation speed at 2000 r/min. An important advantage of this process compared with other cleaning fine coal methods is that it can extremely reduce or eliminate the effects of coal degradation and some clay minerals on coal preparation.

  15. Agglomeration behaviour of high ash Indian coals in fluidized bed gasification pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although gasification of high ash Indian coals is gaining importance, the resultant uncertainties associated with agglomerate formation are still unresolved. To address this, a suitable pilot scale Fluidized Bed Gasifier was utilized in this study. Stabilized operating conditions in terms of coal feed rate, air feed rate, bed temperature, etc., already identified for maximum possible carbon conversion, were maintained in all experiments and the steam flow rate was only varied. Though the ash fusion temperature of the coals were above 1200 °C, agglomerate was formed during gasification at 950 °C with ‘steam to coal ratio’ less than 0.15 (kg/kg). On increasing this ratio above 0.2 local heat-concentration and agglomeration could be avoided with certainty. Chemical composition alone was not sufficient to explain the relative strength of ash-agglomerates. Compositional variation and state of iron within the matrix were assessed through SEM-EDX and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study, respectively. The probing also required the ash-loading and iron-loading factors to be freshly defined in the context of gasification. Localized heat, large compositional variation, presence of iron in Fe2+ state, ash-loading/iron-loading factors influenced intensity of agglomerate formation. Finally, low temperature agglomerate formation was explained by SiO2–Al2O3–FeO phase diagram. - Highlights: • Pilot plant studies on agglomerate formation during high ash coal gasification. • AFT, chemical analysis of coal ash could not give proper indication. • Ash-/iron-loading factors, compositional variation, Fe2+ leads to agglomeration. • Steam to coal ratio was controlled judiciously to avoid agglomeration. • Cause for agglomeration investigated in depth and remedial adjustment was focused

  16. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuromyotonia is a disorder that affects the peripheral nerves. Peripheral nerves connect the brain and spinal cord to muscles ... caused by damage to a particular part of peripheral nerves called axons , which are the extensions of nerve ...

  17. Internodal function in normal and regenerated mammalian axons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, M; Krarup, C

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Following Wallerian degeneration, peripheral myelinated axons have the ability to regenerate and, given a proper pathway, establish functional connections with targets. In spite of this capacity, the clinical outcome of nerve regeneration remains unsatisfactory. Early studies have found that...

  18. Syndecan Promotes Axon Regeneration by Stabilizing Growth Cone Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyson J. Edwards

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Growth cones facilitate the repair of nervous system damage by providing the driving force for axon regeneration. Using single-neuron laser axotomy and in vivo time-lapse imaging, we show that syndecan, a heparan sulfate (HS proteoglycan, is required for growth cone function during axon regeneration in C. elegans. In the absence of syndecan, regenerating growth cones form but are unstable and collapse, decreasing the effective growth rate and impeding regrowth to target cells. We provide evidence that syndecan has two distinct functions during axon regeneration: (1 a canonical function in axon guidance that requires expression outside the nervous system and depends on HS chains and (2 an intrinsic function in growth cone stabilization that is mediated by the syndecan core protein, independently of HS. Thus, syndecan is a regulator of a critical choke point in nervous system repair.

  19. Recent Advances in the Development and Application of Power Plate Transducers in Dense Gas Extraction and Aerosol Agglomeration Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, E.; Cardoni, A.; Gallego-Juárez, J. A.; Acosta, V. M.; Blanco, A.; Rodríguez, G.; Blasco, M.; Herranz, L. E.

    Power ultrasound (PU) is an emerging, innovative, energy saving and environmental friendly technology that is generating a great interest in sectors such as food and pharmaceutical industries, green chemistry, environmental pollution, and other processes, where sustainable and energy efficient methods are required to improve and/or produce specific effects. Two typical effects of PU are the enhancement of mass transfer in gases and liquids, and the induction of particle agglomeration in aerosols. These effects are activated by a variety of mechanisms associated to the nonlinear propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves such as diffusion, agitation, entrainment, turbulence, etc. During the last years a great effort has been jointly made by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the company Pusonics towards introducing novel processes into the market based on airborne ultrasonic plate transducers. This technology was specifically developed for the treatment of gas and multiphasic media characterized by low specific acoustic impedance and high acoustic absorption. Different strategies have been developed to mitigate the effects of the nonlinear dynamic behavior of such ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers in order to enhance and stabilize their response at operational power conditions. This work deals with the latter advances in the mitigation of nonlinear problems found in power transducers; besides it describes two applications assisted by ultrasound developed at semi-industrial and laboratory scales and consisting in extraction via dense gases and particle agglomeration. Dense Gas Extraction (DGE) assisted by PU is a new process with a potential to enhance the extraction kinetics with supercritical CO2. Acoustic agglomeration of fine aerosol particles has a great potential for the treatment of air pollution problems generated by particulate materials. Experimental and numerical results in both processes will be shown and discussed.

  20. Treadmill Training Promotes Axon Regeneration in Injured Peripheral Nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Sabatier, Manning J.; Redmon, Natalie; Schwartz, Gail; English, Arthur W.

    2008-01-01

    Physical activity after spinal cord injury promotes improvements in motor function, but its effects following peripheral nerve injury are less clear. Although axons in peripheral nerves are known to regenerate better than those in the CNS, methods of accelerating regeneration are needed due to the slow overall rate of growth. Therefore we studied the effect of two weeks of treadmill locomotion on the growth of regenerating axons in peripheral nerves following injury. The common fibular nerves...

  1. Modality-Specific Axonal Regeneration: Towards selective regenerative neural interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario I Romero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed submodality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type-specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5 fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased 3 fold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3-D “Y”-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a 5-fold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a “Y”-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted towards the sural nerve, while N-52+ large diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  2. Axonal integrity predicts cortical reorganisation following cervical injury

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, P.; Wheeler-Kingshott, C.A.; Nagy, Z.; Gorgoraptis, N.; N. Weiskopf; Friston, K.; Thompson, A J; Hutton, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to disruption of axonal architecture and macroscopic tissue loss with impaired information flow between the brain and spinal cord—the presumed basis of ensuing clinical impairment. Objective The authors used a clinically viable, multimodal MRI protocol to quantify the axonal integrity of the cranial corticospinal tract (CST) and to establish how microstructural white matter changes in the CST are related to cross-sectional spinal cord area a...

  3. Axonal neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    GORSON, K.; Ropper, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is typically a predominantly demyelinating process that may have additional features of axonal degeneration. Sixteen patients with MGUS and a pure or predominantly axonal neuropathy are reported and compared with 20 consecutive patients with demyelinating neuropathy and MGUS who were seen during the same period.
METHODS—Retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients w...

  4. Changes in prefrontal axons may disrupt the network in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Zikopoulos, Basilis; Barbas, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Neural communication is disrupted in autism by unknown mechanisms. Here we examined whether in autism there are changes in axons, which are the conduit for neural communication. We investigated single axons and their ultrastructure in the white matter of post-mortem human brain tissue below the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), orbitofrontal (OFC), and lateral (LPFC) prefrontal cortices, which are associated with attention, social interactions, and emotions and have been consistently implicate...

  5. Axonal maintenance, glia, exosomes, and heat shock proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Tytell; Lasek, Raymond J.; Harold Gainer

    2016-01-01

    Of all cellular specializations, the axon is especially distinctive because it is a narrow cylinder of specialized cytoplasm called axoplasm with a length that may be orders of magnitude greater than the diameter of the cell body from which it originates. Thus, the volume of axoplasm can be much greater than the cytoplasm in the cell body. This fact raises a logistical problem with regard to axonal maintenance. Many of the components of axoplasm, such as soluble proteins and cytoskeleton, are...

  6. THEORETICAL PRINCIPLES UNDERLYING OPTICAL STIMULATION OF MYELINATED AXONS EXPRESSING CHANNELRHODOPSIN-2

    OpenAIRE

    ARLOW, R. L.; FOUTZ, T. J.; MCINTYRE, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous clinical conditions can be treated by neuromodulation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Typical electrical PNS therapies activate large diameter axons at lower electrical stimulus thresholds than small diameter axons. However, recent animal experiments with peripheral optogenetic neural stimulation (PONS) of myelinated axons expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) have shown that this technique activates small diameter axons at lower irradiances than large diameter axons. We hypot...

  7. Spinal irradiation does not inhibit distal axonal sprouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to determine the relative importance of the nerve cell body and of the axon in initiating and controlling axonal regeneration, nerve cell bodies were irradiated and the ability of the distal axon to sprout was examined. Mice were subjected to either 25 or 50 Gray (Gy) of x-irradiation localized to the lumbar spinal cord. After times varying from 1 day to 6 months after irradiation, a sublethal dose of botulinum toxin (BoTx) was injected into the calf muscles of one leg. The soleus muscle was examined histologically after times varying from 1 week to 6 months after injection, and BoTx-induced ultraterminal axonal sprouting was assessed by the number of motor endplates showing sprouts, the length of the sprouts, and the long term endplate morphology. Apart from some irradiated subgroups having slightly shorter sprout lengths, no significant differences were found between irradiated and nonirradiated groups. The results suggest either that the processes in the nerve cell body responsible for initiating and supporting axonal growth are resistant to large doses of irradiation, or that growth regulatory mechanisms in the distal axon are under local control

  8. Dynamics of signal propagation and collision in axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follmann, Rosangela; Rosa, Epaminondas; Stein, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Long-range communication in the nervous system is usually carried out with the propagation of action potentials along the axon of nerve cells. While typically thought of as being unidirectional, it is not uncommon for axonal propagation of action potentials to happen in both directions. This is the case because action potentials can be initiated at multiple "ectopic" positions along the axon. Two ectopic action potentials generated at distinct sites, and traveling toward each other, will collide. As neuronal information is encoded in the frequency of action potentials, action potential collision and annihilation may affect the way in which neuronal information is received, processed, and transmitted. We investigate action potential propagation and collision using an axonal multicompartment model based on the Hodgkin-Huxley equations. We characterize propagation speed, refractory period, excitability, and action potential collision for slow (type I) and fast (type II) axons. In addition, our studies include experimental measurements of action potential propagation in axons of two biological systems. Both computational and experimental results unequivocally indicate that colliding action potentials do not pass each other; they are reciprocally annihilated.

  9. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin eWhite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialised glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarisation followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasising the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during CNS myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of PLP (proteolipid protein transport by SNARE proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases.

  10. Spherically agglomerated solid dispersions of valsartan to improve solubility, dissolution rate and micromeritic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit R. Tapas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to enhance the solubility and dissolution rate of valsartan (VAL a poorly water soluble antihypertensive, by spherically agglomerated solid dispersions using methanol, water and dichloromethane as good solvent, poor solvent and bridging liquid, respectively. The hydrophilic polymers like polyvinyl pyrrolidone, Hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin, Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose were used in agglomeration process. The pure drug (VAL and its agglomerates with different polymers were characterize by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD, IR spectroscopic studies and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The DSC results indicated that decrease in melting enthalpy related to disorder in the crystalline content. XRD studies also showed changes in crystallanity, IR spectroscopy revealed that there were no chemical changes in the recrystallized agglomerates. The spherically agglomerated solid dispersions with different polymers exhibited marked increase in solubility, dissolution rate and micromeritic properties (bulk density, flow property, compactability compared with VAL. The SEM studies showed that the agglomerates posseeses a good spherical shape.Keywords: Valsartan; Spherical agglomeration; Solid dispersion; Solubility; Dissolution rate; Micromeritic properties.

  11. Nanoparticle agglomeration in an evaporating levitated droplet for different acoustic amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijerino, Erick; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2013-01-01

    Radiatively heated levitated functional droplets with nanosilica suspensions exhibit three distinct stages namely pure evaporation, agglomeration, and finally structure formation. The temporal history of the droplet surface temperature shows two inflection points. One inflection point corresponds to a local maximum and demarcates the end of transient heating of the droplet and domination of vaporization. The second inflection point is a local minimum and indicates slowing down of the evaporation rate due to surface accumulation of nanoparticles. Morphology and final precipitation structures of levitated droplets are due to competing mechanisms of particle agglomeration, evaporation, and shape deformation. In this work, we provide a detailed analysis for each process and propose two important timescales for evaporation and agglomeration that determine the final diameter of the structure formed. It is seen that both agglomeration and evaporation timescales are similar functions of acoustic amplitude (sound pressure level), droplet size, viscosity, and density. However, we show that while the agglomeration timescale decreases with initial particle concentration, the evaporation timescale shows the opposite trend. The final normalized diameter can be shown to be dependent solely on the ratio of agglomeration to evaporation timescales for all concentrations and acoustic amplitudes. The structures also exhibit various aspect ratios (bowls, rings, spheroids) which depend on the ratio of the deformation timescale (tdef) and the agglomeration timescale (tg). For tdef

  12. Coke yield and heat transfer in reaction of liquid-solid agglomerates of Athabasca vacuum residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M.; Courtney, M.; Boddez, L.; Gray, M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2010-02-15

    Delayed coking and fluid-bed coking are the most common commercial processes used by the petroleum industry for the thermal conversion of vacuum residues into petroleum distillate products. This paper presented the results of an experimental study of coke yield at long reaction times from agglomerates of coke particles and Athabasca vacuum residue (AVR). The ultimate coke yield was determined for a range of agglomerate thicknesses, liquid concentrations and reaction temperatures. The agglomerates were heated on Curie-point alloy strips in an induction furnace at 503 and 530 degrees C until all toluene-soluble material was converted. A simple heat transfer model was used to describe the temperature profile within the agglomerates. Coke yield results from agglomerates were compared to the coke yield results from reacting thin films of vacuum residue. The average coke yield from the agglomerates was 23 per cent, while the coke yield from thin films of 20 {mu}m thickness was 11 per cent, which supports the role of mass transfer in coke formation reactions. The ultimate coke yield was insensitive to vacuum residue concentration, agglomerate size, and reaction temperature. According to control experiments on thin films of liquid at different heating rates, the temperature-time history has little effect on the ultimata coke yield. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  13. APPLICATION OF SPHERICAL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUE TO IMPROVE MICROMERITIC PROPERTIES AND DISSOLUTION CHARACTERISTICS OF NABUMETONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradnya Patil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed to enhance the solubility and dissolution rate of Nabumetone, 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphalenyl-2-butanone water insoluble anti-inflammatory drug by spherical agglomeration technique using a solvent change method consisting of acetone, water and dichloromethane as solvent, non solvent and bridging liquid respectively. The hydrophilic polymers like poly vinyl pyrrolidone K-30 (PVP and sodium alginate were used in the agglomeration process. Infrared (I.R spectroscopic studies, Differential scanning calorimetery (DSC and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used for characterization of pure drug and its agglomerates. The I.R spectroscopy revealed that there is no chemical interaction between drug and polymers, also indicated that no chemical changes in the crystallized agglomerates .The agglomerates exhibited significantly improved solubility, dissolution rate and micromeritic properties (angle of repose, Carr’s index, bulk density, tapped density. Hausner’s ratio compared with pure drug Nabumetone. The aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of the drug from spherical agglomerates was significantly (p < 0.05 increased (nearly two times. SEM studies revealed that the agglomerates possess a good spherical shape. The study revealed that Micromeritic Properties, Solubility and Invitro drug release rate is increased with increase in PVP concentration from 0.25% to 1% as compared to sodium alginate.

  14. Ultrastructural observation of effect of moderate hypothermia on axonal damage in an animal model of diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓川; 唐文渊; 郑履平

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of moderate hypothermia on responses of axonal cytoskeleton to axonal injury in the acute stage of injury. Methods: Of fifteen adult guinea pigs, twelve animals were subjected to stretch injury to the right optic nerves and divided into the normothermic group (n=6) in which the animal's core temperature was maintained at 36.0-37.5℃ and the hypothermia group (n=6) in which the core temperature was reduced to 32.0-32.5℃ after stretch injury. Remaining three animals sustained no injury to the right optic nerves and served as control group. Half of injured animals (n=3) of either normothermic group or hypothermic group were killed at either 2 hours or 4 hours after injury. The ultrastructural changes of axonal cytoskeleton of the right optic nerve fibers from the animals were examined under a transmission electron microscope and analyzed by quantitative analysis with a computer image analysis system. Results: At 2 hours after stretch injury, there was a significant reduction in the mean number of microtubules (P<0.001), and a significant increase in the mean intermicrotubule spacing (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in axons of all sizes in normothermic animals. The mean number of neurofilaments also decreased statistically (P<0.01) in large and medium subgroups of axons in the same experimental group at 2 hours. By 4 hours, the large subgroup of axons in normothermic animals still demonstrated a significant decline in the mean number of microtubules (P<0.01) and an increase in the mean intermicrotubule spacing (P<0.05), while the medium and small subgroups of axons displayed a significant increase in the mean number of neurofilaments (P<0.05) and reduction in the mean interneurofilament spacing (P<0.05). On the contrary, either the mean number of microtubules and the mean intermicrotubule spacing, or the mean number of neurofilaments and interneurofilament spacing in axons of all sizes in hypothermic stretch-injured animals was not

  15. Regeneration of motor axons in the rat sciatic nerve studied by labeling with axonally transported radioactive proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeling regenerating axons with axonally transported radioactive proteins provides information about the location of the entire range of axons from the fastest growing ones to those which are trapped in the scar. This technique has been used to study the regeneration of motor axons in the rat sciatic nerve after a crush lesion. From 2 to 14 days after the crush the lumbar spinal cord was exposed by laminectomy and multiple injections of [3H]proline were made stereotactically in the ventral horn. Twenty-four hours later the nerves were removed and the distribution of radioactivity along the nerve was measured by liquid scintillation counting. There was a peak of radioactivity in the regenerating axons distal to the crush due to an accumulation of label in the tips of these axons. After a delay of 3.2 +- 0.2 (S.E.) days, this peak advanced down the nerve at a rate of 3.0 +- 0.1 (S.E.) mm/day. The leading edge of this peak, which marks the location of the endings of the most rapidly growing labeled fibers, moved down the nerve at a rate of 4.4 +- 0.2 mm/day after a delay of 2.1 +- 0.2 days; this is the same time course as that of the most rapidly regenerating sensory axons in the rat sciatic nerve, measured by the pinch test. Another peak of radioactivity at the crush site, presumed to represent the ends of unregenerated axons or misdirected sprouts, declined rapidly during the first week, and more slowly thereafter. (Auth.)

  16. MORPHOLOGICAL AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CHANGES DURING THE HEATING OF SPHERICAL CALCIUM ORTHOPHOSPHATE AGGLOMERATES PREPARED BY SPRAY PYROLYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiyoshi Itatani; Mari Abe; Tomohiro Umeda; Ian J. Davies; Seiichiro Koda

    2004-01-01

    The microstructural changes taking place during heating of calcium orthophosphate (Ca3(PO4)2) agglomerates were examined in this study. The starting powder was prepared by the spray-pyrolysis of calcium phosphate (Ca/P air-liquid nozzle. The spray-pyrolyzed powder was found to be composed of dense spherical agglomerates with a mean diameter of 1.3 μm. This powder was further heat-treated at a temperature between 800 and 1400 ℃ for 10 min. When the spray-pyrolyzed powder was heated up to 900 ℃, only βCa3(PO4)2 was detected, and the mean pore size of the spherical agglomerates increased via the (i) elimination of residual water and nitrates, (ii) rearrangement of primary particles within the agglomerates, (iii) coalescence of small pores (below 0.1 μm), and (iv) coalescence of agglomerates with diameters below 1 μm into the larger agglomerates. Among the heat-treated powders, pore sizes within the spherical agglomerates were observed to be the largest (mean diameter: 1.8 μm) for the powder heat-treated at 900 ℃ for 10 min.With an increase in heat-treatment temperature up to 1000 ℃, the spherical agglomerates were composed of dense shells. Upon further heating up to 1400 ℃, the hollow spherical agglomerates collapsed as a result of sintering via the phase transformation from β- to α-Ca3(PO4)2 (1150 ℃), thus leading to the formation of a three-dimensional porous network.

  17. Understanding lateritic ore agglomeration behaviour as a precursor to enhanced heap leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although nickel (Ni) laterite ores constitute the majority of Ni mineralization resource world-wide, in contrast to Ni sulphides, their processing via conventional beneficiation (e.g. multi-gravity and flotation) and hydrometallurgical routes is intractable as they are predominantly low grade and complex, both mineralogically and chemically. Due to their physico-chemical characteristics, low grade lateritic ores require more aggressive but costly chemical and hydrometallurgical techniques (e.g., leaching in high pressurized tanks) for value metal (Ni and Co) extraction. Processing such ores through cost-competitive heap (4-10 m high) leaching as an alternative, requires successful agglomeration of the feed into robust and porous granules. To date, producing of granules with desirable attributes poses a major geotechnical challenge to industry. In the present work, we investigate agglomeration behaviour of siliceous goethite Ni laterite ore and selected oxides and clay minerals (hematite, quartz and kao-linite) which constitute the predominant host gangue phases of typical low grade Ni laterite ores. Fundamental knowledge and understanding of the agglomeration mechanisms and kinetics which are essential for producing robust real ore granules, and pivotal to the subsequent heap leaching process, are gleaned. Isothermal, batch agglomeration tests involving 30 and 44 % w/w sulphuric acid solution as a binder indicated that 5 – 40 mm granules of differing roughness and morphologies were produced in 8-14 min. The results showed feed characteristics (e.g., mineralogy and particle size distribution) and binder content (15-25 wt.%) dependent agglomeration behaviour. Slow agglomerate nucleation and growth were displayed by the kaolinite clay mineral whilst the oxides exhibited faster agglomeration kinetics. Siliceous goethite feed ore fine/coarse ratio, H2SO4 binder dosage and acid content, product drying temperature and aging conditions, all showed significant impact on

  18. Cooperative Game Among Cities in Urban Agglomerations and Economical Sustainable Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shah Weidong

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses redounded profits of cooperation and non-cooperation among cities in urban agglomerations based on game theory. It discusses the problems of economical development among cities with feeble cooperation, and deduces the conclusion that only cooperation of cities produces the maximum profits and realizes Pareto efficiency for cities and urban agglomerations. The paper states that cooperation is the cornerstone of economic sustainable development in urban agglomerations in profits produced by cooperation among cities.Some suggestions to accelerate cooperation among cities are proposed.

  19. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,'' there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  20. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,`` there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  1. Assessment of Traffic Noise on Highway Passing from Urban Agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Kori, Chandan; Kumar, Manoj; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of traffic noise pollution in developing countries is complex due to heterogeneity in traffic conditions like traffic volume, road width, honking, etc. To analyze the impact of such variables, a research study was carried out on a national highway passing from an urban agglomeration. Traffic volume and noise levels (L10, Lmin, Lmax, Leq and L90) were measured during morning and evening peak hours. Contribution of noise by individual vehicle was estimated using passenger car noise unit. Extent of noise pollution and impact of noisy vehicles were estimated using noise pollution level and traffic noise index, respectively. Noise levels were observed to be above the prescribed Indian and International standards. As per audio spectrum analysis of traffic noise, honking contributed an additional 3-4 dB(A) noise. Based on data analysis, a positive relationship was observed between noise levels and honking while negative correlation was observed between noise levels and road width. The study suggests that proper monitoring and analysis of traffic data is required for better planning of noise abatement measures.

  2. Capillary condensation onto titania (TiO2) nanoparticle agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonmin; Ehrman, Sheryl H

    2007-02-27

    A capillary condensation process was developed for the purpose of forming interconnections between nanoparticles at low temperatures. The process was performed in a temperature-controlled flow chamber on nanoparticle agglomerates deposited at submonolayer coverage on a transmission electron microscope grid. The partial pressure of the condensing species, tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the temperature of the chamber were adjusted in order to obtain the various saturation conditions for capillary condensation. The modified samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, BET surface area method, and scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron energy-loss spectrometry. Experimental results show that bridge-shaped layers were dominantly formed in the neck region between particles and were composed of amorphous silica. The analysis of TEM micrographs verified that the coverage of the layers is strongly dependent on the saturation ratio. Image analysis of TEM micrographs shows that this dependency is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the classical Kelvin equation for the specific geometries in our system. PMID:17243733

  3. The surface properties of nanoparticles determine the agglomeration state and the size of the particles under physiological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bantz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the recent widespread application of nanomaterials to biological systems, a careful consideration of their physiological impact is required. This demands an understanding of the complex processes at the bio–nano interface. Therefore, a comprehensive and accurate characterization of the material under physiological conditions is crucial to correlate the observed biological impact with defined colloidal properties. As promising candidates for biomedical applications, two SiO2-based nanomaterial systems were chosen for extensive size characterization to investigate the agglomeration behavior under physiological conditions. To combine the benefits of different characterization techniques and to compensate for their respective drawbacks, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation were applied. The investigated particle systems were (i negatively charged silica particles and (ii poly(organosiloxane particles offering variable surface modification opportunities (positively charged, polymer coated. It is shown that the surface properties primarily determine the agglomeration state of the particles and therefore their effective size, especially under physiological conditions. Thus, the biological identity of a nanomaterial is clearly influenced by differentiating surface properties.

  4. Axonal synapses utilize multiple synaptic ribbons in the mammalian retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Lim Kim

    Full Text Available In the mammalian retina, bipolar cells and ganglion cells which stratify in sublamina a of the inner plexiform layer (IPL show OFF responses to light stimuli while those that stratify in sublamina b show ON responses. This functional relationship between anatomy and physiology is a key principle of retinal organization. However, there are at least three types of retinal neurons, including intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs and dopaminergic amacrine cells, which violate this principle. These cell types have light-driven ON responses, but their dendrites mainly stratify in sublamina a of the IPL, the OFF sublayer. Recent anatomical studies suggested that certain ON cone bipolar cells make axonal or ectopic synapses as they descend through sublamina a, thus providing ON input to cells which stratify in the OFF sublayer. Using immunoelectron microscopy with 3-dimensional reconstruction, we have identified axonal synapses of ON cone bipolar cells in the rabbit retina. Ten calbindin ON cone bipolar axons made en passant ribbon synapses onto amacrine or ganglion dendrites in sublamina a of the IPL. Compared to the ribbon synapses made by bipolar terminals, these axonal ribbon synapses were characterized by a broad postsynaptic element that appeared as a monad and by the presence of multiple short synaptic ribbons. These findings confirm that certain ON cone bipolar cells can provide ON input to amacrine and ganglion cells whose dendrites stratify in the OFF sublayer via axonal synapses. The monadic synapse with multiple ribbons may be a diagnostic feature of the ON cone bipolar axonal synapse in sublamina a. The presence of multiple ribbons and a broad postsynaptic density suggest these structures may be very efficient synapses. We also identified axonal inputs to ipRGCs with the architecture described above.

  5. Processing and Sintering of Agglomerate-free CaO-ZrO2 Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping LIANG; Shu'e DANG; Dong WU; Yuhan SUN

    2004-01-01

    Coprecipitation supercritical fluid drying technology has been employed to synthesize calcia-stabilized zirconia ultrafine powder with low-cost inorganic salts as the starting materials. The sintering behaviors of these powders were also investigated. The results showed that supercritical fluid drying could effectively alleviate the hard agglomeration of grains during the gel drying process, and the morphology of the powder retained the network texture of the original gel.The resulting particles were characterized by small particle size (5~20 nm), better monodispersity and high surface area, which gave rise to high activity and sinterability. Consequently, these powders could readily be compacted into the desired shape and their densification could be carried out in shorter time and at lower temperatures. For instance,nanometer-sized powder calcined at 600℃ for 2 h could be cold-pressed into a green body and sintered at 1100° for 0.5 h to attain a dense body with bulk density of 5.9718 g/cm3 and specific pore volume of 0.0008 cm3/g.

  6. A novel recovery technology of trace precious metals from waste water by combining agglomeration and adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel and efficient technology for separating and recovering precious metals from waste water containing traces of Pd and Ag was studied by the combination of agglomeration and adsorption. The recovery process and the impacts of operating conditions such as pH value of waste water, adsorption time, additive quantity of the flocculant and adsorbent on the recovery efficiency were studied experimentally. The results show that Freundlich isothermal equation is suitable for describing the behavior of the recovery process, and the apparent first-order adsorption rate constant k at 25 ℃ is about 0.233 4 h-1 The optimum technology conditions during the recovery process are that pH value is 8-9; the volume ratio of flocculant to waste water is about 1 :(2 000-4 000); the mass ratio of adsorbent to waste water is 1 :(30-40); and processing time is 2-4 h. Finally, the field tests were done at the optimum technology conditions, which show that the total concentration of Pd and Ag in the waste water below 11 mg/L can be reduced to be less than 1 mg/L.

  7. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  8. In vivo imaging of axonal transport using MRI: aging and Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI using manganese as a trans-synaptic axonal tracing agent can unveil dynamics of axonal transport in living subjects. We use this technology to test the hypotheses if impaired axonal transport is a significant pathophysiological process in aging and early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in part accounting for ''selective vulnerability'' of projection neurons in AD. To allow quantitative assessment of axonal transport in vivo, we developed voxel-based statistical mapping technology as well as a tracer kinetic modeling method based on mass transport for manganese-enhanced MRI to estimate axonal transport rates in aging rats and AD transgenic mice. These techniques demonstrated manganese-enhanced signal changes in axonal projections of the olfactory tract and decreased axonal transport rates in rodent models of aging and AD. Altered axonal transport may be a critical pathophysiological process in aging and AD. Manganese-enhanced MRI provides exciting opportunities for the investigations of altered axonal transport in AD and related disorders. (orig.)

  9. Regulation of Microtubule Dynamics in Axon Regeneration: Insights from C. elegans [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngang Heok Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of an axon to regenerate is regulated by its external environment and by cell-intrinsic factors. Studies in a variety of organisms suggest that alterations in axonal microtubule (MT dynamics have potent effects on axon regeneration. We review recent findings on the regulation of MT dynamics during axon regeneration, focusing on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In C. elegans the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK promotes axon regeneration, whereas the exchange factor for Arf6 (EFA-6 inhibits axon regeneration. Both DLK and EFA-6 respond to injury and control axon regeneration in part via MT dynamics. How the DLK and EFA-6 pathways are related is a topic of active investigation, as is the mechanism by which EFA-6 responds to axonal injury. We evaluate potential candidates, such as the MT affinity-regulating kinase PAR-1/MARK, in regulation of EFA-6 and axonal MT dynamics in regeneration.

  10. Daqing Petrochemical Adopted Technology of Agglomeration New Energy Saving Production%Daqing Petrochemical Adopted Technology of Agglomeration New Energy Saving Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    To reduce energy consumption of equipment and exhaust emission to the uttermost, Daqing Petrochemical Company has developed pre-agglomeration production flow successfully and confirmed an optimized energy-saving method of differential pressure agglomeration. For a long time, BR equipment of 80,000 tons per year in Daqing Petrochemical Company have been adopting general isobaric technology and elutriation method to separate polymer and solvent, which caused over 10 tons of steam per ton of rubber and restricted the energy conservation and emission reduction of the enterprise.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Agglomerate of early-type Hipparcos stars (Caballero+, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J. A.; Dinis, L.

    2009-01-01

    We study the spatial structure and sub-structure of regions rich in Hipparcos stars with blue BT-VT colours. These regions, which comprise large stellar complexes, OB associations, and young open clusters, are tracers of on-going star formation in the Galaxy. The DBSCAN (Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise) data clustering algorithm is used to look for spatial overdensities of early-type stars. Once an overdensity, "agglomerate", is identified, we carry out a data and bibliographic compilation of their star member candidates. The actual membership in agglomerate of each early-type star is studied based on its heliocentric distance, proper motion, and previous spectro-photometric information. We identify 35 agglomerates of early-type Hipparcos stars. Most of them are associated to previously known clusters and OB associations. The previously unknown P Puppis agglomerate is subject of a dedicated study with Virtual Observatory tools. (2 data files).

  12. The Integration and Sustainable Development of Chengdu-Chongqing Urban Agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jie; Mao Hanying

    2006-01-01

    Urban Agglomeration is an inevitable outcome of urbanization and industrialization, and a main form of urban development. Based on the analysis of urbanization and urban system situation, this paper will discuss the integration of urban agglomeration development, using the urban area of Cheng (Chengdu)-Yu (Chongqing)Urban agglomeration (CYUA) as a case study. By means of industries, population and spatial integrations, the function, strength and competition of CYUA will be improved and this urban agglomeration will transit from a budding state to a growing and mature one in future. The sustainable development of CYUA will depend on countermeasures, such as accelerating industrialization and urbanization, building a traffic network and express roads, strengthening the ability of self-sufficiency,enlarging the ecological construction and environmental protection, and establishing the synergetic institution of cross districts.

  13. Dynamic forces on agglomerated particles caused by high-intensity ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the acoustic forces on particles and agglomerates caused by high-intensity ultrasound in gaseous atmosphere are derived by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Sound induced forces cause an oscillating stress scenario where the primary particles of an agglomerate are alternatingly pressed together and torn apart with the frequency of the applied wave. A comparison of the calculated acoustic forces with respect to the inter particle adhesion forces from Van-der-Waals and liquid bridge interactions reveals that the separation forces may reach the same order of magnitude for 80 μm sized SiO2-particles. Hence, with finite probability acoustically agitated gases may de-agglomerate/disperse solid agglomerate structures. This effect is confirmed by dispersion experiments in an acoustic particle levitation setup. PMID:24152872

  14. Agglomeration Evolution of Nano-Particles Aluminium in Normal Incident Shock Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zheng-Xin; WU Jing-He; HU Dong; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2006-01-01

    Agglomeration behaviour of nano-particle aluminium (nano-Al) in normal incident shock waves is investigated by our devised shock tube technology. The morphology, particle size, agglomeration process of nano-Al studied in normal incident shock waves are comprehensible evaluated by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The above-mentioned techniques show that the high strength and temperature of incident shock wave give a chance for activity of nano-Al in the reactions and decrease the agglomeration, and the morphology of agglomeration is affected by the temperature of nano-Al reaction region. The dynamic temperature of reaction region determined by the intensity ratio of two AlO bands is 2602K, which is closer to nano-Al actual reacted temperature than the determined temperature of ordinary methods (i.e. six channel instantaneous optical pyrometer; plank black body radiation law, etc.)

  15. Role of Solvents in Improvement of Dissolution Rate of Drugs: Crystal Habit and Crystal Agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization is often used for manufacturing drug substances. Advances of crystallization have achieved control over drug identity and purity, but control over the physical form remains poor. This review discusses the influence of solvents used in crystallization process on crystal habit and agglomeration of crystals with potential implication for dissolution. According to literature it has been known that habit modification of crystals by use of proper solvents may enhance the dissolution properties by changing the size, number and the nature of crystal faces exposed to the dissolution medium. Also, the faster dissolution rate of drug from the agglomerates of crystals compared with the single crystals may be related to porous structure of the agglomerates and consequently their better wettability. It is concluded from this review that in-depth understanding of role of the solvents in crystallization process can be applied to engineering of crystal habit or crystal agglomeration, and predictably dissolution improvement in poorly soluble drugs.

  16. Agglomeration Economies, Inventors and Entrepreneurs as Engines of European Regional Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, Niels; van Oort, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In economic agglomeration studies, the distinction of various externalities circumstances related to knowledge spillovers remains largely unclear. This paper introduces human capital, innovation and several types of entrepreneurship as potential drivers of regional economic performance with an impac

  17. Application of agglomerated acid heap leaching of clay-bearing uranium ore in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The permeability of ore mass has a great influence on the leaching period of heap leaching and the leaching efficiency, hence the uranium ores with high content of clay present a significant difficulty to acidic heap leaching. The Research Institute of Uranium Mining has engaged over years of studies on the cementing agents of acidic agglomeration, agglomeration method, as well as the curing measures of pelletted balls. On the basis of these studies, several types of clay-bearing ores have been tested with good results. The technique of agglomerated acid heap leaching has been successfully applied in a uranium mine. Since agglomeration has effectively increased the permeability of ore mass, its leaching period is decreased from 200 days to 60 days, the leaching efficiency from less than 40% up to 96%, comparing with direct heap leaching programme. (author)

  18. Mechanism of Agglomerating Development of Industrial Space: A Case Study on Shenzhen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The agglomeration of industries refers to the concentration and aggregation of the same or different industries in a certain area. After analyzing the spatial pattern of the economic activities in the world, it can be found

  19. Light-Induced Agglomeration and Diffusion of Different Particles with Optical Tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-Cong; SUN Xiu-Dong; LIU Hong-Peng; ZHANG Jian-Long

    2010-01-01

    @@ The dynamic process of light-induced agglomeration of carbon nanotubes(CNTs),C60 and Escherichia coli(E.coli)in aqueous solutions is demonstrated using an optical tweezers system.Based on the results,the diameter of the agglomerated region and the agglomeration rate increase with the increasing laser power.After the saturation-stable period,CNTs diffuse completely,C60 dusters only diffuse partially,and E.coli never diffuses in the agglomeration region.Theoretical analyses show that the molecular polarization and thermal diffusion of particles play crucial roles in the diffusion process.The results indicate the possibility of using light to aggregate and sort nanoparticles.

  20. Particle Size Distribution, Powder Agglomerates and Their Effects on Sinterability of Ultrafine Alumina Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An intensive study of the particle size distribution of four commercial ultrafine alumina powders to obtain information about the powder agglomeration and relate them to the compactibility and the sinterability has been made.

  1. Spatial Agglomeration and Productivity of Textile and Leather Manufacturing in the Punjab Province of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Asim Iqba; Muhammad Wasif Siddiqi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether spatial agglomeration of textile and leather industry facilitates to enhance its own productivity at establishment level in the Punjab province of Pakistan. The empirical analysis is based on the survey data for the years 1995-96, 2000-2001 and 2005-06 collected from the Punjab Bureau of Statistics (PBS). The production function framework has been utilized. The results of production function suggest that spatial agglomeration of textile and leather industry pla...

  2. Explaining the productivity advantages of manufacturing firms in Russian urban agglomerations

    OpenAIRE

    Gonchar, Ksenia; Ratnikova, Tatyana

    2013-01-01

    This paper empirically analyzes the agglomeration-related productivity premium at the enterprise level of the manufacturing industry in Russia. A settlement is counted as part of an urban agglomeration in two cases: that of a large, central city and that of a town located within 50 kilometers of the central city. Data obtained from a 2009 manufacturing enterprise survey conducted by the Higher School of economics are used, along with linked data on hosting regions and cities. We employ a mult...

  3. A Treatise on the Geographical Scale of Agglomeration Externalities and the MAUP

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Martijn J.; van Oort, Frank G.; Bert van der Knaap

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we test to what extent the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP) moderates the effect of agglomeration externalities on areal sectoral employment growth by varying the initial geographical scale of analysis. Using spatial cross-regressive modelling, we find different effects of agglomeration forces across geographical scales. As the MAUP is a theoretical as well as a methodological problem, research should not only work with proper statistical specifications, but also relate t...

  4. Tourism agglomeration and its impact on social welfare: an empirical approach to the Spanish case

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This paper measures two descriptors of tourism namely, its scale and agglomeration level and subsequently evaluates both descriptors according to their direct and joint impacts on the host communities' quality of life. The key constructs for this research are the following: (1) a tourism evaluation function that incorporates the scale and agglomeration of tourism, which is constructed for each one of the 50 Spanish provinces; and (2) a measure of the host communities' quality of life that com...

  5. Agglomeration Economies, Inventors and Entrepreneurs as Engines of European Regional Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Bosma, Niels; van Oort, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In economic agglomeration studies, the distinction of various externalities circumstances related to knowledge spillovers remains largely unclear. This paper introduces human capital, innovation and several types of entrepreneurship as potential drivers of regional economic performance with an impact of agglomeration economies. We use measures of specific types of entrepreneurship, discerned at the individual level, as well as human capital and invention through patenting activity for the per...

  6. How agglomeration in the financial services industry influences economic growth: Evidence from Chinese cities

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Lin; Lin, Shanglang; LI, YONG

    2014-01-01

    This paper empirically tests the effect of financial knowledge spillovers on agglomeration in China's financial services industry and examines the external effects on cities' economies. The authors apply hierarchical linear modeling to examine a data set that comprises 276 Chinese cities and draw the following conclusions. Firstly, they find that agglomeration in the financial services industry and the Jacobs spillovers of industry diversification both promote financial knowledge spillovers i...

  7. Distribution Characteristics and Compressibility of Agglomerates as a Reflection of Granulation Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Macho Oliver; Peciar Peter; Peciar Marián; Svěrák Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Selective adjustment of the properties of particular material agglomeration has its inherent place in the chemical, food, but especially in the pharmaceutical, industry. The requirement to produce an agglomerate with desired particle size at a given strength is often formulated. To create the targeted product, it is necessary to know the process parameters affecting the preparation of its features. This paper deals with survey distribution characteristics and compressibility changes of an agg...

  8. Strategic location behaviour: Temporal and spatial proximity in situation of agglomeration effects

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Thierry; Mucchielli, Jean-Louis

    1996-01-01

    We address the question of competition within the location choices of firms. In a framework of agglomeration effects, both spatial and temporal dimensions of the firms' decisions are studied. We show that the competition consequences of preemptive move and optimal time of entry can interfere with the geographical decisions. Our results contrast with those of agglomeration economics models which generally provide extreme results of mono-location. The Stackelberg equilibria described here tend ...

  9. Competitors, Complementors, Parents and Places: Explaining Regional Agglomeration in the U.S. Auto Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Cabral; Zhu Wang; Daniel Yi Xu

    2013-01-01

    Taking the early U.S. automobile industry as an example, we evaluate four competing hypotheses on regional industry agglomeration: intra-industry local externalities, inter-industry local externalities, employee spinouts, and location fixed-effects. Our findings suggest that inter-industry spillovers, particularly the development of the carriage and wagon industry, play an important role. Spinouts play a secondary role and only contribute to agglomeration at later stages of industry evolution...

  10. Hedonic and Utilitarian Shopper Types in Evolved and Created Retail Agglomerations

    OpenAIRE

    Teller, C; Reutterer, T; Schnedlitz, P

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of hedonic and utilitarian values of shopping on retail agglomeration patronage issues, in particular on the shopping behaviour and the perception of retail agglomerations. Our empirical study is based on a discussion of agglomerations’ potential to attract utilitarian and hedonic shopper types. A sample of 2,139 customers were interviewed in a peripheral shopping mall and an inner city shopping street and confronted with a multi-item scale operationalising sh...

  11. Agglomeration in counter-current spray drying towers. Part B: Interaction between multiple spraying levels

    OpenAIRE

    Francia, V; Martín, L; Bayly, AE; Simmons, MJH

    2016-01-01

    A new experimental method is developed here to investigate agglomeration in spray drying towers operating with multiple nozzles. It allows studying independently the contribution of each spray to the product and obtaining a valuable insight into the agglomeration processes. The paper studies a two level swirl counter-current dryer of detergent in a full-scale production system. It shows that operation with two nozzle levels increases the energy efficiency compared to the use of single sprays,...

  12. Stable Partial Agglomeration in a New Economic Geography Model with Urban Frictions

    OpenAIRE

    Barde, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends the Puga (1999) model by introducing urban frictions. It assumes that the agglomeration of manufacturing in a city imposes a cost on the inhabitants of the agglomerated region. Furthermore, an implicit function methodology is developed to provide a numerical stability function that does not require prior analytical work. Simulations reveal that these numerical stability conditions are consistent with the original Puga (1999) analytical predictions. The central finding is th...

  13. Functional complexity of the axonal growth cone: a proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estrada-Bernal

    Full Text Available The growth cone, the tip of the emerging neurite, plays a crucial role in establishing the wiring of the developing nervous system. We performed an extensive proteomic analysis of axonal growth cones isolated from the brains of fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. Approximately 2000 proteins were identified at ≥ 99% confidence level. Using informatics, including functional annotation cluster and KEGG pathway analysis, we found great diversity of proteins involved in axonal pathfinding, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular traffic and carbohydrate metabolism, as expected. We also found a large and complex array of proteins involved in translation, protein folding, posttranslational processing, and proteasome/ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Immunofluorescence studies performed on hippocampal neurons in culture confirmed the presence in the axonal growth cone of proteins representative of these processes. These analyses also provide evidence for rough endoplasmic reticulum and reveal a reticular structure equipped with Golgi-like functions in the axonal growth cone. Furthermore, Western blot revealed the growth cone enrichment, relative to fetal brain homogenate, of some of the proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and catabolism. Our study provides a resource for further research and amplifies the relatively recently developed concept that the axonal growth cone is equipped with proteins capable of performing a highly diverse range of functions.

  14. A novel technique using hydrophilic polymers to promote axonal fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravinder Bamba; D Colton Riley; Nathaniel D Kelm; Mark D Does; Richard D Dortch; Wesley P hTayer

    2016-01-01

    The management of traumatic peripheral nerve injury remains a considerable concern for clinicians. With minimal innovations in surgical technique and a limited number of specialists trained to treat peripheral nerve injury, outcomes of surgical intervention have been unpredictable. The inability to manipulate the pathophysiology of nerve injury (i.e., Wallerian degeneration) has left scientists and clinicians depending on the slow and lengthy process of axonal regeneration (~1 mm/day). When axons are severed, the endings undergo calcium-mediated plasmalemmal sealing, which limits the ability of the axon to be primarily re-paired. Polythethylene glycol (PEG) in combination with a bioengineered process overcomes the inability to fuse axons. The mechanism for PEG axonal fusion is not clearly understood, but multiple studies have shown that a providing a calcium-free environment is essential to the process known as PEG fusion. The proposed mechanism is PEG-induced lipid bilayer fusion by removing the hydration barrier surrounding the axolemma and reducing the activation energy required for membrane fusion to occur. This review highlights PEG fusion, its past and current studies, and future directions in PEG fusion.

  15. Highly effective photonic cue for repulsive axonal guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan J Black

    Full Text Available In vivo nerve repair requires not only the ability to regenerate damaged axons, but most importantly, the ability to guide developing or regenerating axons along paths that will result in functional connections. Furthermore, basic studies in neuroscience and neuro-electronic interface design require the ability to construct in vitro neural circuitry. Both these applications require the development of a noninvasive, highly effective tool for axonal growth-cone guidance. To date, a myriad of technologies have been introduced based on chemical, electrical, mechanical, and hybrid approaches (such as electro-chemical, optofluidic flow and photo-chemical methods. These methods are either lacking in desired spatial and temporal selectivity or require the introduction of invasive external factors. Within the last fifteen years however, several attractive guidance cues have been developed using purely light based cues to achieve axonal guidance. Here, we report a novel, purely optical repulsive guidance technique that uses low power, near infrared light, and demonstrates the guidance of primary goldfish retinal ganglion cell axons through turns of up to 120 degrees and over distances of ∼90 µm.

  16. Subtypes of GABAergic neurons project axons in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyoshi Higo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons in the neocortex have been regarded as interneurons and speculated to modulate the activity of neurons locally. Recently, however, several experiments revealed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons project cortico-cortically with long axons. In this study, we illustrate Golgi-like images of the nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons using a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d reaction and follow the emanating axon branches in cat brain sections. These axon branches projected cortico-cortically with other non-labeled arcuate fibers, contra-laterally via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure. The labeled fibers were not limited to the neocortex but found also in the fimbria of the hippocampus. In order to have additional information on these GABAergic neuron projections, we investigated green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled GABAergic neurons in GAD67-Cre knock-in / GFP Cre-reporter mice. GFP-labeled axons emanate densely, especially in the fimbria, a small number in the anterior commissure, and very sparsely in the corpus callosum. These two different approaches confirm that not only nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons but also other subtypes of GABAergic neurons project long axons in the cerebral cortex and are in a position to be involved in information processing.

  17. Human neural stem cells promote corticospinal axons regeneration and synapse reformation in injured spinal cord of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Peng; JIN Lian-hong; LIANG Tao; LIU En-zhong; ZHAO Shi-guang

    2006-01-01

    Background Axonal regeneration in lesioned mammalian central nervous system is abortive, and this causes permanent disabilities in individuals with spinal cord injuries. This paper studied the action of neural stem cell (NSC) in promoting corticospinal axons regeneration and synapse reformation in rats with injured spinal cord.Methods NSCs were isolated from the cortical tissue of spontaneous aborted human fetuses in accordance with the ethical request. The cells were discarded from the NSC culture to acquire NSC-conditioned medium. Sixty adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=15 in each): NSC graft, NSC medium, graft control and medium control groups. Microsurgical transection of the spinal cord was performed in all the rats at the T11. The NSC graft group received stereotaxic injections of NSCs suspension into both the spinal cord stumps immediately after transection; graft control group received DMEM injection. In NSC medium group,NSC-conditioned medium was administered into the spinal cord every week; NSC culture medium was administered to the medium control group. Hindlimb motor function was assessed using the BBB Locomotor Rating Scale. Regeneration of biotin dextran amine (BDA) labeled corticospinal tract was assessed. Differentiation of NSCs and the expression of synaptophysin at the distal end of the injured spinal cord were observed under a confocal microscope. Group comparisons of behavioral data were analyzed with ANOVA.Results NSCs transplantation resulted in extensive growth of corticospinal axons and locomotor recovery in adult rats after complete spinal cord transection, the mean BBB scores reached 12.5 in NSC graft group and 2.5 in graft control group (P< 0.05). There was also significant difference in BBB score between the NSC medium (11.7) and medium control groups (3.7, P< 0.05). BDA traces regenerated fibers sprouted across the lesion site and entered the caudal part of the spinal cord. Synaptophysin expression

  18. A Study on the Density of Agglomerates Prepared from Cork Wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The density of black regranulate (BR) of cork and of black agglomerate (BA) and composite agglomerate (CA) prepared fromsuch a waste by different methods was investigated. The preparation of the agglomerates was undertaken by controlling thespecimen thickness for BA and the particle size for BR and the binder dosage for CA. The mass changes produced in theoven-drying treatment at 376.15 K of the agglomerates and in their subsequent stabilization under ambient conditions werealso analyzed. The density was determined by standard methods. For BR, the bulk density first decreased and then increasedwith decreasing particle size. It was much lower than the apparent density of the agglomeration products of cork. Although toa lesser extent, the density was also lower for BA than for CA. It was higher for the smaller thickness specimens of BA. In thecase of CA, the density followed the same variation trends as for BR. Furthermore it increased significantly with the increasein resin dosage. This resulted in a noticeable increase in the weight loss during the oven-drying and in a significant decreasein the degree of moisture adsorption during the stabilization period of the agglomerate.

  19. Study on the Policy Factors of Innovative Talents Agglomeration in Jiangsu Province based on Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wenfei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Innovative talent is the key factor to promote the development of innovative economy and realize innovative drive in Jiangsu Province. Innovative talent agglomeration can fully play the effect of innovative talents through the agglomeration efficiency. Among many factors that affect the agglomeration of innovative talents, the guiding role of government policy factors is becoming more and more important. Based on the survey of domestic and foreign literature, through questionnaire survey, this paper combines relevant analysis and regression analysis to study the mechanism between the of scientific research funds investment, household registration policy, outstanding achievement award and patent licensing and the innovative talent agglomeration. The results show that the investment of scientific research funds, the household registration policy, the outstanding achievement award and the patent authorization have remarkable influence on the innovation talent agglomeration. The conclusion of this study not only expands the theoretical research field of government policy and innovative talent agglomeration, but also provides practical guidance for the government of Jiangsu Province in the era of innovation knowledge.

  20. Effect of hydration repulsion on nanoparticle agglomeration evaluated via a constant number Monte–Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of hydration repulsion on the agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions was investigated via the description of agglomeration by the Smoluchowski coagulation equation using constant number Monte–Carlo simulation making use of the classical DLVO theory extended to include the hydration repulsion energy. Evaluation of experimental DLS measurements for TiO2, CeO2, SiO2, and α-Fe2O3 (hematite) at high IS (up to 900 mM) or low |ζ-potential| (≥1.35 mV) demonstrated that hydration repulsion energy can be above electrostatic repulsion energy such that the increased overall repulsion energy can significantly lower the agglomerate diameter relative to the classical DLVO prediction. While the classical DLVO theory, which is reasonably applicable for agglomeration of NPs of high |ζ-potential| (∼>35 mV) in suspensions of low IS (∼<1 mM), it can overpredict agglomerate sizes by up to a factor of 5 at high IS or low |ζ-potential|. Given the potential important role of hydration repulsion over a range of relevant conditions, there is merit in quantifying this repulsion energy over a wide range of conditions as part of overall characterization of NP suspensions. Such information would be of relevance to improved understanding of NP agglomeration in aqueous suspensions and its correlation with NP physicochemical and solution properties. (paper)

  1. Two-level hierarchical structure in nano-powder agglomerates in gas media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Martin, Lilian; Bouwman, Wim G.; van Ommen, J. Ruud

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticles in high concentration in a gas form agglomerates due to the interparticle van der Waals forces. The size and the internal structure of these nanoparticles agglomerates strongly influence their dynamics and their interaction with other objects. This information is crucial, for example, when studying inhalation of nanoparticles. It is common to model the structure of these agglomerates using a fractal approach and to compare their dimension with the dimension obtained from aggregation models, such diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). In this work we have analyzed the structure of nanoparticles agglomerates in situ by means of Spin-Echo Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SESANS), while they were fluidized in a gas stream. The advantage of SESANS over conventional SANS is that SESANS can measure scales up to 20 microns, while SANS does not exceed a few hundred of nanometers. We have observed that when agglomerates interact, their structure cannot be characterized by using only one scaling parameter, the fractal dimension. We have found that there are at least two structure levels in the agglomerates and hence, we need at least two parameters to describe the autocorrelation function in each level.

  2. Involvement of SARA in Axon and Dendrite Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Cristina Isabel; Siri, Sebastián Omar; Conde, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    SARA (Smad Anchor for Receptor Activation) plays a crucial role in Rab5-mediated endocytosis in cell lines localizing to early endosomes where it regulates morphology and function. Here, we analyzed the role of SARA during neuronal development and tested whether it functions as a regulator of endocytic trafficking of selected axonal and membrane proteins. Suppression of SARA perturbs the appearance of juxtanuclear endocytic recycling compartments and the neurons show long axons with large growth cones. Furthermore, surface distribution of the cell adhesion molecule L1 in axons and the fusion of vesicles containing transferring receptor (TfR) in dendrites were increased in neurons where SARA was silenced. Conversely, SARA overexpression generated large early endosomes and reduced neurite outgrowth. Taken together, our findings suggest a significant contribution of SARA to key aspects of neuronal development, including neurite formation. PMID:26405814

  3. Neurofilament proteins in axonal regeneration and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao Wang; Minfei Wu; Chuanjun Zhan; Enyuan Ma; Maoguang Yang; Xiaoyu Yang; Yingpu Li

    2012-01-01

    Neurofilament protein is a component of the mature neuronal cytoskeleton, and it interacts with the zygosome, which is mediated by neurofilament-related proteins. Neurofilament protein regulates enzyme function and the structure of linker proteins. In addition, neurofilament gene expression plays an important role in nervous system development. Previous studies have shown that neurofilament gene transcriptional regulation is crucial for neurofilament protein expression, especially in axonal regeneration and degenerative diseases. Post-transcriptional regulation increased neurofilament protein gene transcription during axonal regeneration, ultimately resulting in a pattern of neurofilament protein expression. An expression imbalance of post-transcriptional regulatory proteins and other disorders could lead to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or other neurodegenerative diseases. These findings indicated that after transcription, neurofilament protein regulated expression of related proteins and promoted regeneration of damaged axons, suggesting that regulation disorders could lead to neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T. [Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Perera, Surangi N. [Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53205 (United States); Svoboda, Kurt R., E-mail: svobodak@uwm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53205 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  5. Biomass equipments. Dryers. Drying, crushing, agglomeration of agro-industrial products; Materiels pour la biomasse. Les secheurs, sechage, broyage, agglomeration de produits agro-industriels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deur, O. [Promill (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the French Promill Company activity in the design and manufacturing of complete drying-crushing-agglomerating units for agro-industrial products (pulp of beet, lucerne, etc..). The paper focusses on the thermal and mechanical efficiency of the high temperature dryer and on the pulp granulating squeezer. (J.S.)

  6. [A clinical and pathological study of diffuse axonal injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, S; Kobayashi, S; Yokota, H; Shimura, T

    1989-03-01

    There is increasing evidence from human and experimental studies that the most important factor governing the outcome in head injury is the severity of diffuse axonal injuries. The authors have experienced 18 cases of severe diffuse axonal injury which showed post-traumatic coma for more than 24 hours and CT findings resembling those of shearing injuries of the cerebral white matter such as have been presented by Zimmerman et al. (1978). The consciousness levels on admission were 6 or less on the Glasgow Coma Scale and all cases were shown clinically to have primary brain stem injury. The main type of head trauma resulted from road traffic accidents (83%). Skull fractures were found in only 5 cases (28%). These findings suggested that acceleration/deceleration injury produce in the patients severe diffuse axonal injury. Initial ICP was below 20 mmHg in 11 cases out of 13 (85%). Parenchymal small hemorrhagic lesions of initial CT were basal ganglia (7 cases), corpus callosum (4 cases), pons (4 cases), midbrain (3 cases) and thalamus (2 cases). Extraparenchymal hemorrhagic lesions included intraventricular hemorrhage (6 cases) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (6 cases). Two autopsied cases of severe diffuse axonal injury (acute case and chronic case) showed remarkable congestion and edema in the deep part of the frontal white matter. Microscopic examination revealed marked axonal degeneration including axonal retraction ball in the corpus callosum, in the internal capsule and in the white matter of the brain stem. Glasgow Outcome Scale of the 18 patients at 3 months after the trauma made us concerned that no patients indicated good recovery or even only moderate disability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2770962

  7. Stretched Exponential Change of Magnetic Weight of Magnetite Ferrofluid: Distribution of Energy Barrier for Agglomeration of Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Daeseong; Kim, Hackjin [Chungnam National University, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles usually agglomerate reversibly under magnetic field. Magnetophoretic transport demonstrates the possibilities of the biomedical applications such as intercellular manipulation of magnetic nanoparticles for imaging or drug delivery. Magnetization of ferro fluid occurs by Neel and Brownian mechanism and aggregation of nanoparticles. We have recently reported the magnetization of magnetite ferro fluid studied by measuring the change of magnetic weight. The stretched exponential behaviors have been observed for the samples of different concentrations under various magnetic fields. When we study the transmission change of the fluid as like in Refs 2 and 12, the single or double exponential decay is observed, which suggests that the particle movement in the fluid is affected by diffusion but the structural relaxations of aggregates cause the stretched exponential dynamics.

  8. Stretched Exponential Change of Magnetic Weight of Magnetite Ferrofluid: Distribution of Energy Barrier for Agglomeration of Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic nanoparticles usually agglomerate reversibly under magnetic field. Magnetophoretic transport demonstrates the possibilities of the biomedical applications such as intercellular manipulation of magnetic nanoparticles for imaging or drug delivery. Magnetization of ferro fluid occurs by Neel and Brownian mechanism and aggregation of nanoparticles. We have recently reported the magnetization of magnetite ferro fluid studied by measuring the change of magnetic weight. The stretched exponential behaviors have been observed for the samples of different concentrations under various magnetic fields. When we study the transmission change of the fluid as like in Refs 2 and 12, the single or double exponential decay is observed, which suggests that the particle movement in the fluid is affected by diffusion but the structural relaxations of aggregates cause the stretched exponential dynamics

  9. Preparation of sustained release matrix pellets by melt agglomeration in the fluidized bed: influence of formulation variables and modelling of agglomerate growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli-Bruns, Anette; Knop, Klaus; Lippold, Bernhard C

    2010-03-01

    The one-step preparation of sustained release matrix pellets, using a melting procedure in a fluidized bed apparatus, was tested in a 2(3) full factorial design of experiments, using microcrystalline wax as lipophilic binder, theophylline as model drug and talc as additional matrix forming agent. The three influence parameters were (A) size of binder particles, (B) fraction of theophylline in solid particles and (C) fraction of microcrystalline wax in formulation. The response variables were agglomerate size and size distribution, dissolution time, agglomerate crush resistance, sphericity, yield and porosity. Nearly spherical pellets comprising a smooth, closed surface could be obtained with the used method, exhibiting the hollow core typical for the immersion and layering mechanism. The reproducibility was very good concerning all responses. The size of agglomerates is proportional to the size of the binder particles, which serve as cores for pellet formation in the molten state in the fluidized bed. Additionally, the agglomerate size is influenced by the volume of the solid particles in relation to the binder particles, with more solid particles leading to larger agglomerates and vice versa. Dissolution times vary in a very wide range, resulting from the interplay between amount of drug in relation to the meltable matrix substance microcrystalline wax and the non-meltable matrix substance talc. The change of binder particle size does not lead to a structural change of the matrix; both dissolution times and porosity are not significantly altered. Agglomerate crush resistance is low due to the hollow core of the pellets. However, it is significantly increased if the volume fraction of microcrystalline wax in the matrix is high, which means that the matrix is mechanically better stabilized. A theoretical model has been established to quantitatively explain agglomerate growth and very good accordance of the full particle size distributions between predicted and

  10. Axon-glial interactions in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Butt, Arthur; Bay, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Axon-glial interactions are critical for brain information transmission and processing. In the CNS, this is a function of the major types of glia – astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and novel NG2-glia. This special issue of the Journal of Anatomy comprises contributions arising from a symposium entitled ‘Axon-glial interactions in the CNS’, held at the University of Portsmouth, UK in July 2010. The aim of the special issue is to bring together an international group of experts to demonstrate the c...

  11. A chloride channel in rat and human axons

    OpenAIRE

    Strupp, Michael; Grafe, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Current recordings from single chloride channels were obtained from excised and cell-attached patches of rat and human axons. In rat axons the channels showed an outwardly rectifying current-voltage relationship with a slope conductance of 33 pS at negative membrane potentials and 65 pS at positive potentials (symmetrical 150 mM CsCl). They were measurably for cations (PNa/PCs/PCl=0.1/0.2/1). Channel currents were independent of cytoplasmatic calcium concentration. Inactivation was not observ...

  12. Tuning the orchestra: transcriptional pathways controlling axon regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tedeschi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma in the adult mammalian central nervous system leads to irreversible structural and functional impairment due to failed regeneration attempts. In contrast, neurons in the peripheral nervous system exhibit a greater regenerative ability. It has been proposed that an orchestrated sequence of transcriptional events controlling the expression of specific sets of genes may be the underlying basis of an early cell-autonomous regenerative response. Understanding whether transcriptional fine tuning, in parallel with strategies aimed at counteracting extrinsic impediments promotes axon re-growth following central nervous system injuries represents an exciting challenge for future studies. Transcriptional pathways controlling axon regeneration are presented and discussed in this review.

  13. Networks of Polarized Actin Filaments in the Axon Initial Segment Provide a Mechanism for Sorting Axonal and Dendritic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Watanabe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking of proteins specifically to the axonal or somatodendritic membrane allows neurons to establish and maintain polarized compartments with distinct morphology and function. Diverse evidence suggests that an actin-dependent vesicle filter within the axon initial segment (AIS plays a critical role in polarized trafficking; however, no distinctive actin-based structures capable of comprising such a filter have been found within the AIS. Here, using correlative light and scanning electron microscopy, we visualized networks of actin filaments several microns wide within the AIS of cortical neurons in culture. Individual filaments within these patches are predominantly oriented with their plus ends facing toward the cell body, consistent with models of filter selectivity. Vesicles carrying dendritic proteins are much more likely to stop in regions occupied by the actin patches than in other regions, indicating that the patches likely prevent movement of dendritic proteins to the axon and thereby act as a vesicle filter.

  14. Membrane potential dynamics of axons in cultured hippocampal neurons probed by second-harmonic-generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuriya, Mutsuo; Yasui, Masato

    2010-03-01

    The electrical properties of axons critically influence the nature of communication between neurons. However, due to their small size, direct measurement of membrane potential dynamics in intact and complex mammalian axons has been a challenge. Furthermore, quantitative optical measurements of axonal membrane potential dynamics have not been available. To characterize the basic principles of somatic voltage signal propagation in intact axonal arbors, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging is applied to cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. When FM4-64 is applied extracellularly to dissociated neurons, whole axonal arbors are visualized by SHG imaging. Upon action potential generation by somatic current injection, nonattenuating action potentials are recorded in intact axonal arbors. Interestingly, however, both current- and voltage-clamp recordings suggest that nonregenerative subthreshold somatic voltage changes at the soma are poorly conveyed to these axonal sites. These results reveal the nature of membrane potential dynamics of cultured hippocampal neurons, and further show the possibility of SHG imaging in physiological investigations of axons.

  15. Axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the corticospinal tract in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus measured by q-space imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouhei Kamiya

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Previous studies suggest that compression and stretching of the corticospinal tract (CST potentially cause treatable gait disturbance in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH. Measurement of axon diameter with diffusion MRI has recently been used to investigate microstructural alterations in neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated alterations in the axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction of the CST in iNPH by q-space imaging (QSI analysis. METHODS: Nineteen patients with iNPH and 10 age-matched controls were recruited. QSI data were obtained with a 3-T system by using a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence with the diffusion gradient applied parallel to the antero-posterior axis. By using a two-component low-q fit model, the root mean square displacements of intra-axonal space ( =  axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the CST were calculated at the levels of the internal capsule and body of the lateral ventricle, respectively. RESULTS: Wilcoxon's rank-sum test revealed a significant increase in CST intra-axonal volume fraction at the paraventricular level in patients (p<0.001, whereas no significant difference was observed in the axon diameter. At the level of the internal capsule, neither axon diameter nor intra-axonal volume fraction differed significantly between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that in patients with iNPH, the CST does not undergo irreversible axonal damage but is rather compressed and/or stretched owing to pressure from the enlarged ventricle. These analyses of axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction yield insights into microstructural alterations of the CST in iNPH.

  16. Synapses formed by identified retinogeniculate axons during the segregation of eye input.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, G; Shatz, C J

    1992-01-01

    The synaptic organization of identified retinogeniculate axons was studied during the prenatal development of eye-specific layers in the LGN of the cat. During this period, retinogeniculate axons undergo stereotyped morphological changes. Retinogeniculate axons originating from one eye and passing through LGN territory destined to be solely innervated by the other eye (inappropriate territory) initially give rise to many side branches. As the eye-specific layers emerge, these axons elaborate ...

  17. Differential Axonal Projection of Mitral and Tufted Cells in the Mouse Main Olfactory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Nagayama

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, much has been elucidated regarding the functional organization of the axonal connection of olfactory sensory neurons to olfactory bulb (OB glomeruli. However, the manner in which projection neurons of the OB process odorant input and send this information to higher brain centers remains unclear. Here, we report long-range, large-scale tracing of the axonal projection patterns of OB neurons using two-photon microscopy. Tracer injection into a single glomerulus demonstrated widely distributed mitral/tufted cell axonal projections on the lateroventral surface of the mouse brain, including the anterior/posterior piriform cortex (PC and olfactory tubercle (OT. We noted two distinct groups of labeled axons: PC-orienting axons and OT-orienting axons. Each group occupied distinct parts of the lateral olfactory tract. PC-orienting axons projected axon collaterals to a wide area of the PC but only a few collaterals to the OT. OT-orienting axons densely projected axon collaterals primarily to the anterolateral OT (alOT. Different colored dye injections into the superficial and deep portions of the OB external plexiform layer revealed that the PC-orienting axon populations originated in presumed mitral cells and the OT-orienting axons in presumed tufted cells. These data suggest that although mitral and tufted cells receive similar odor signals from a shared glomerulus, they process the odor information in different ways and send their output to different higher brain centers via the PC and alOT.

  18. Quantifying mechanical force in axonal growth and guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ibrahim Mahmoud Athamneh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical force plays a fundamental role in neuronal development, physiology, and regeneration. In particular, research has shown that force is involved in growth cone-mediated axonal growth and guidance as well as stretch-induced elongation when an organism increases in size after forming initial synaptic connections. However, much of the details about the exact role of force in these fundamental processes remain unknown. In this review, we highlight (1 standing questions concerning the role of mechanical force in axonal growth and guidance and (2 different experimental techniques used to quantify forces in axons and growth cones. We believe that satisfying answers to these questions will require quantitative information about the relationship between elongation, forces, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal transport, signaling, substrate adhesion, and stiffness contributing to directional growth advance. Furthermore, we address why a wide range of force values have been reported in the literature, and what these values mean in the context of neuronal mechanics. We hope that this review will provide a guide for those interested in studying the role of force in development and regeneration of neuronal networks.

  19. Traction Force and Tension Fluctuations During Axon Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamison ePolackwich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Actively generated mechanical forces play a central role in axon growthand guidance, but the mechanisms that underly force generation andregulation in growing axons remain poorly understood. We reportmeasurements of the dynamics of traction stresses from growth cones ofactively advancing axons from postnatal rat DRG neurons. By tracking themovement of the growth cone and analyzing the traction stress field froma reference frame that moves with it, we are able to show that there isa clear and consistent average stress field that underlies the complexspatial stresses present at any one time. The average stress field hasstrong maxima on the sides of the growth cone, directed inward towardthe growth cone neck. This pattern represents a contractile stresscontained within the growth cone, and a net force that is balanced bythe axon tension. Using high time-resolution measurements of the growthcone traction stresses, we show that the stress field is composed offluctuating local stress peaks, with a large number peaks that live fora short time, a population of peaks whose lifetime distribution followsan exponential decay, and a small number of very long-lived peaks. Weshow that the high time-resolution data also reveal that the tensionappears to vary randomly over short time scales, roughly consistent withthe lifetime of the stress peaks, suggesting that the tensionfluctuations originate from stochastic adhesion dynamics.

  20. Model of fasciculation and sorting in mixed populations of axons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chaudhuri, D.; Borowski, P.; Zápotocký, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 2 (2011), e021908. ISSN 1539-3755 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : axon guidance * neurogenesis * mathematical model Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.255, year: 2011

  1. Spectrins in axonal cytoskeletons: Dynamics revealed by extensions and fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lipeng; Cao, Jianshu

    2014-07-01

    The macroscopic properties, the properties of individual components, and how those components interact with each other are three important aspects of a composited structure. An understanding of the interplay between them is essential in the study of complex systems. Using axonal cytoskeleton as an example system, here we perform a theoretical study of slender structures that can be coarse-grained as a simple smooth three-dimensional curve. We first present a generic model for such systems based on the fundamental theorem of curves. We use this generic model to demonstrate the applicability of the well-known worm-like chain (WLC) model to the network level and investigate the situation when the system is stretched by strong forces (weakly bending limit). We specifically studied recent experimental observations that revealed the hitherto unknown periodic cytoskeleton structure of axons and measured the longitudinal fluctuations. Instead of focusing on single molecules, we apply analytical results from the WLC model to both single molecule and network levels and focus on the relations between extensions and fluctuations. We show how this approach introduces constraints to possible local dynamics of the spectrin tetramers in the axonal cytoskeleton and finally suggests simple but self-consistent dynamics of spectrins in which the spectrins in one spatial period of axons fluctuate in-sync.

  2. PTEN inhibition and axon regeneration and neural repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yosuke Ohtake; Umar Hayat; Shuxin Li

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic growth ability of all the neurons declines during development although some may grow better than others. Numerous intracellular signaling proteins and transcription factors have been shown to regulate the intrinsic growth capacity in mature neurons. Among them, PI3 kinase/Akt pathway is important for controlling axon elongation. As a negative regulator of this pathway, the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) appears critical to con-trol the regenerative ability of young and adult neurons. This review will focus on recent research progress in axon regeneration and neural repair by PTEN inhibition and therapeutic potential of blocking this phosphatase for neurological disorders. Inhibition of PTEN by deletion in con-ditional knockout mice, knockdown by short-hairpin RNA, or blockade by pharmacological approaches, including administration of selective PTEN antagonist peptides, stimulates various degrees of axon regrowth in juvenile or adult rodents with central nervous system injuries. Im-portantly, post-injury PTEN suppression could enhance axonal growth and functional recovery in adult central nervous system after injury.

  3. THE EFFECT OF OFFSET PRINTING INK ON LASER TONER INK AGGLOMERATION UNDER NEUTRAL PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Xie,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available 1-octadecanol is known to be a highly effective agglomerating agent for laser toner ink. However, the office waste paper used in the actual production often contains various types of inks. The effect of the offset ink and types of surfactants with different charge characteristics were studied relative to the agglomeration of the laser toner ink under neutral pulping conditions. It was found that the addition of a small amount of the offset ink printed waste paper was beneficial for the agglomeration of the laser toner ink. The optimal percentage of addition is 12.5% to 25%. The offset printed ink had a positive charge of 0.001±0.0005 mEq/g when the offset ink was treated by 70˚C water at neutral conditions. Addition of a proper amount of cationic surfactant was beneficial to improve the agglomeration at any ratio of the mixed laser printed and offset waste papers. When the percentage of offset waste paper was less than 50%, the addition of anionic surfactant and nonionic surfactant was harmful for agglomeration, and there was no significant effect at higher offset content.

  4. Morphological characterization of diesel soot agglomerates based on the Beer–Lambert law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method is proposed for the determination of the number of primary particles composing soot agglomerates emitted from diesel engines as well as their individual fractal dimension. The method is based on the Beer–Lambert law and it is applied to micro-photographs taken in high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Differences in the grey levels of the images lead to a more accurate estimation of the geometry of the agglomerate (in this case radius of gyration) than other methods based exclusively on the planar projections of the agglomerates. The method was validated by applying it to different images of the same agglomerate observed from different angles of incidence, and proving that the effect of the angle of incidence is minor, contrary to other methods. Finally, the comparisons with other methods showed that the size, number of primary particles and fractal dimension (the latter depending on the particle size) are usually underestimated when only planar projections of the agglomerates are considered. (paper)

  5. Possible ways of suppression of agglomeration of particles in fluidized bed combustion of selected waste biomass fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of biomass is often complicated by agglomeration of particles within the bed. The alkali compounds from biomass ash have tendency to accumulate esp. in a bed with sand particles. For typical cases of FBC of straw, wood and sewage sludge from a paper mill the experimental results on fluidized bed particle agglomeration are presented and possible ways for agglomeration abatement are critically assessed (author)

  6. Effects of Slurry Chemistry on the Rate of Agglomeration of Alumina Nanoparticles for Chemical Mechanical Planarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Neil Anjan

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is a polishing process used during the manufacture of microelectronic integrated circuits. During fabrication of multilevel circuitry, excess deposited material must be removed and the wafer surface globally planarized for proper function of devices. This is especially necessary with copper interconnects, thus, copper CMP was the focus of this study. CMP requires the use of a slurry containing nanometer-sized abrasive particles along with a variety of chemical additives. The particles and chemicals act synergistically to mechanically and chemically remove material and provide a near globally planar surface. For optimal CMP performance, the effective abrasive particle size must be controlled. If particles aggregate, CMP performance may diminish and possibly even cause defective devices. The chemistry of the slurry (pH, ions present, etc) can not only affect the mean aggregate size of the abrasive particles, but also growth of aggregate over time. This research investigated the aggregation behavior of suspensions of 150 nm alumina particles in 1mM KNO3 with various additives (glycine, H2O2, benzotriazole, and sodium dodecyl sulfate) used in CMP of copper through effective particle (agglomerate) size versus time and zeta potential measurements. Aggregate size rate data were analyzed to elucidate the mechanism of aggregation, as well its effect on the structure of the resultant aggregate. The effects of temperature of the slurry were also explored. Finally, particle size distribution data collected at various stages of aggregation were incorporated into the Luo and Dornfeld model of CMP to investigate the dynamic nature of the CMP process.

  7. β₂-adrenergic receptors protect axons during energetic stress but do not influence basal glio-axonal lactate shuttling in mouse white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureys, G; Valentino, M; Demol, F; Zammit, C; Muscat, R; Cambron, M; Kooijman, R; De Keyser, J

    2014-09-26

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that β2-adrenergic receptor activation stimulates glycogen degradation in astrocytes, generating lactate as a potential energy source for neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis in mouse cerebellar white matter we demonstrate continuous axonal lactate uptake and glial-axonal metabolic coupling of glutamate/lactate exchange. However, this physiological lactate production was not influenced by activation (clenbuterol) or blocking (ICI 118551) of β2-adrenergic receptors. In two-photon imaging experiments on ex vivo mouse corpus callosum subjected to aglycemia, β2-adrenergic activation rescued axons, whereas inhibition of axonal lactate uptake by α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4-CIN) was associated with severe axonal loss. Our results suggest that axonal protective effects of glial β2-adrenergic receptor activation are not mediated by enhanced lactate production. PMID:25064060

  8. TIPsy tour guides: How microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs facilitate axon guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Bearce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth cone is a dynamic cytoskeletal vehicle, which drives the end of a developing axon. It serves to interpret and navigate through the complex landscape and guidance cues of the early nervous system. The growth cone’s distinctive cytoskeletal organization offers a fascinating platform to study how extracellular cues can be translated into mechanical outgrowth and turning behaviors. While many studies of cell motility highlight the importance of actin networks in signaling, adhesion, and propulsion, both seminal and emerging works in the field have highlighted a unique and necessary role for microtubules in growth cone navigation. Here, we focus on the role of singular pioneer microtubules, which extend into the growth cone periphery and are regulated by a diverse family of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs. These +TIPs accumulate at the dynamic ends of microtubules, where they are well-positioned to encounter and respond to key signaling events downstream of guidance receptors, catalyzing immediate changes in microtubule stability and actin cross-talk, that facilitate both axonal outgrowth and turning events.

  9. The impact of agglomeration and storage on flavor and flavor stability of whey protein concentrate 80% and whey protein isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, B J; Zevchak, S E; Wright, J M; Drake, M A

    2009-01-01

    The impact of agglomeration on flavor and flavor stability of whey protein concentrates 80% (WPC80) and whey protein isolates (WPI) has not been widely addressed. This study examined the impact of agglomeration on the flavor and flavor stability of commercial WPC80 and WPI across 18 mo of storage. Duplicate agglomerated and nonagglomerated WPC80 and WPI were collected from 4 facilities and stored at 21 degrees C, 50% relative humidity. Volatile analysis using solid phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and descriptive sensory analysis were conducted every 2 mo. Solubility index, bulk volume, dispersibility, moisture, and color (L, a, b) were tested every 3 or 6 mo. Consumer acceptance testing with protein beverages was conducted with fresh and stored whey proteins. Higher intensities and more rapid development of lipid oxidation flavors (cardboard, raisin/brothy, cucumber, and fatty) were noted in agglomerated powders compared to nonagglomerated powders (P agglomerated products compared to nonagglomerated powders (P agglomerated WPC80 stored for 12 mo and agglomerated or nonagglomerated WPI stored for 18 mo compared to fresh products while trained panelists detected differences among beverages and rehydrated proteins earlier. Agglomeration with or without lecithin decreased the storage stability of whey proteins. These results indicate that the optimum shelf life at 21 degrees C for nonagglomerated whey proteins is 12 to 15 mo and 8 to 12 mo for agglomerated whey proteins. PMID:19200117

  10. THE EFFECT OF CHARGE AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF CATIONIC SURFACTANTS ON LASER TONER AGGLOMERATION UNDER ALKALINE PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Jiang,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale agglomeration experiments followed by image analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of different cationic surfactants on the 1-octadecanol agglomeration of a negatively charged laser toner. Various types of surfactants with different geometric structures were investigated. It was found that this toner became agglomerated under neutral pulping conditions, but it did not agglomerate under alkaline conditions at all. A small amount of the cationic surfactant compensated for the agglomeration disruption caused by the negative surface charge of the toner and made this toner agglomerate very well. These cationic surfactants consist of a chemical structure of C12 to C18 saturated alkyl hydrophobic chains. The positive charge of these surfactants played the major role in alleviating agglomeration disruption. Additionally, an extra phenol group on these surfactants contributed only minor advantages for toner agglomeration in the presence of 1-octadecanol. The best co-agglomeration performance occurred within a very narrow range of similar total positive charge densities based on the total toner weight. It was also found that this positive charge effect could not be applied to the chemical compounds of high molecular weight polymeric materials.

  11. IH activity is increased in populations of slow versus fast motor axons of the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad eLorenz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Much is known about the electrophysiological variation in motoneuron somata across different motor units. However comparatively less is known about electrophysiological variation in motor axons and how this could impact function or electrodiagnosis in healthy or diseased states. We performed nerve excitability testing on two groups of motor axons in Sprague-Dawley rats that are known to differ significantly in their chronic daily activity patterns and in the relative proportion of motor unit types: one group innervating the soleus (slow motor axons and the other group innervating the tibialis anterior (fast motor axons muscles. We found that slow motor axons have significantly larger accommodation compared to fast motor axons upon application of a 100 ms hyperpolarizing conditioning stimulus that is 40% of axon threshold (Z = 3.24, p = 0.001 or 20% of axon threshold (Z = 2.67, p = 0.008. Slow motor axons had larger accommodation to hyperpolarizing currents in the current-threshold measurement (-80% Z = 3.07, p = 0.002; -90% Z = 2.98, p = 0.003. In addition, we found that slow motor axons have a significantly smaller rheobase than fast motor axons (Z = -1.99, p = 0.047 accompanied by a lower threshold in stimulus-response curves. The results provide evidence that slow motor axons have greater activity of the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying cation conductance (IH than fast motor axons. It is possible that this difference between fast and slow axons is caused by an adaptation to their chronic differences in daily activity patterns, and that this adaptation might have a functional effect on the motor unit. Moreover, these findings indicate that slow and fast motor axons may react differently to pathological conditions.

  12. White matter involvement after TBI: Clues to axon and myelin repair capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Regina C; Mierzwa, Amanda J; Marion, Christina M; Sullivan, Genevieve M

    2016-01-01

    Impact-acceleration forces to the head cause traumatic brain injury (TBI) with damage in white matter tracts comprised of long axons traversing the brain. White matter injury after TBI involves both traumatic axonal injury (TAI) and myelin pathology that evolves throughout the post-injury time course. The axon response to initial mechanical forces and secondary insults follows the process of Wallerian degeneration, which initiates as a potentially reversible phase of intra-axonal damage and proceeds to an irreversible phase of axon fragmentation. Distal to sites of axon disconnection, myelin sheaths remain for prolonged periods, which may activate neuroinflammation and inhibit axon regeneration. In addition to TAI, TBI can cause demyelination of intact axons. These evolving features of axon and myelin pathology also represent opportunities for repair. In experimental TBI, demyelinated axons exhibit remyelination, which can serve to both protect axons and facilitate recovery of function. Myelin remodeling may also contribute to neuroplasticity. Efficient clearance of myelin debris is a potential target to attenuate the progression of chronic pathology. During the early phase of Wallerian degeneration, interventions that prevent the transition from reversible damage to axon disconnection warrant the highest priority, based on the poor regenerative capacity of axons in the CNS. Clinical evaluation of TBI will need to address the challenge of accurately detecting the extent and stage of axon damage. Distinguishing the complex white matter changes associated with axons and myelin is necessary for interpreting advanced neuroimaging approaches and for identifying a broader range of therapeutic opportunities to improve outcome after TBI. PMID:25697845

  13. Axonal regeneration and development of de novo axons from distal dendrites of adult feline commissural interneurons after a proximal axotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenrich, Keith K; Skelton, Nicole; MacDermid, Victoria E;

    2007-01-01

    Following proximal axotomy, several types of neurons sprout de novo axons from distal dendrites. These processes may represent a means of forming new circuits following spinal cord injury. However, it is not know whether mammalian spinal interneurons, axotomized as a result of a spinal cord injur...

  14. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Smeenk, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    Experiments performed support the hypothesis that a reducing atmosphere during fluidized bed coal combustion contributes to the formation of agglomerates. Reducing conditions are imposed by controlling the amount of combustion air supplied to the combustor, 50% of theoretical in these experiments. These localized reducing conditions may arise from either poor lateral bed mixing or oxygen-starved conditions due to the coal feed locations. Deviations from steady-state operating conditions in bed pressure drop may be used to detect agglomerate formation. Interpretation of the bed pressure drop was made more straightforward by employing a moving average difference method. During steady-state operation, the difference between the moving point averages should be close to zero, within {plus_minus}0.03 inches of water. Instability within the combustor, experienced once agglomerates begin to form, can be recognized as larger deviations from zero, on the magnitude of {plus_minus}0.15 inches of water.

  15. Effect of whey protein agglomeration on spray dried microcapsules containing Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duongthingoc, Diep; George, Paul; Katopo, Lita; Gorczyca, Elizabeth; Kasapis, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    This work investigates the effect of whey protein agglomeration on the survivability of Saccharomyces boulardii within spray dried microcapsules. It attempts to go beyond phenomenological observations by establishing a relationship between physicochemical characteristics of the polymeric matrix and its effect on probiotic endurance upon spray drying. It is well known that this type of thermal shock has lethal consequences on the yeast cells. To avoid such undesirable outcome, we take advantage of the early agglomeration phenomenon observed for whey protein by adjusting the pH value of preparations close to isoelectric point (pH 4-5). During the subsequent process of spray drying, development of whey protein agglomerates induces formation of an early crust, and the protein in this molten globular state creates a cohesive network encapsulating the yeast cells. It appears that the early crust formation at a given sample pH and temperature regime during spray drying benefits the survivability of S. boulardii within microcapsules. PMID:23870891

  16. On the Mechanism of Ultrasound-Driven Deagglomeration of Nanoparticle Agglomerates in Aluminum Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashova, Olga; Vorozhtsov, Sergey

    2016-05-01

    One of the promising directions in the technology of composite alloys with improved mechanical properties is reinforcement of the metallic matrix with nanopowders introduced in the liquid metal. Ultrasonic processing is known to significantly improve the introduction of submicrone particles to the metallic melt. This study focuses on the mechanisms of deagglomeration and wettability of such particles by the melt under the action of ultrasound. The suggested mechanism involves the penetration of the liquid metal into the pores and cracks of the agglomerates under the excess pressure created by imploding cavitation bubbles and further destruction of the agglomerate by the sound wave. The main dependences connecting the acoustic parameters and processing time with the physical and chemical properties of particles and the melt are obtained through analytical modeling. The mathematical description of the ultrasonic deagglomeration in liquid metal is presented; a dependence of the threshold intensity of ultrasound for the break-up of agglomerates on their size is reported.

  17. Distribution Characteristics and Compressibility of Agglomerates as a Reflection of Granulation Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macho Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective adjustment of the properties of particular material agglomeration has its inherent place in the chemical, food, but especially in the pharmaceutical, industry. The requirement to produce an agglomerate with desired particle size at a given strength is often formulated. To create the targeted product, it is necessary to know the process parameters affecting the preparation of its features. This paper deals with survey distribution characteristics and compressibility changes of an agglomerate in dependence on the duration of the granulation process through the usage of the most modern devices working with particulate materials. The investigated product will be prepared for coating granulating disc designed at the Institute of Process Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava.

  18. Internal migration, regional labor markets and the role of agglomeration economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo Friedel; Schmidt, Torben Dall

    2015-01-01

    economies are indeed key drivers of internal migration flows in Denmark. That is, while we obtain mixed evidence with regard to the role of traditional labor and housing market variables, most of the included proxies for agglomeration economies such as the region’s population density, patent intensity......We analyze the determinants and regional implications of internal migration flows across Danish municipalities in 2006–2012. Besides assessing the role of labor market and housing market factors in driving a region’s net migration rate, we particularly focus on agglomeration factors identified by...... for the role of space–time dynamic adjustment processes and simultaneity among migration and labor market variables and finally test for heterogeneity in the migration response to regional labor market disparities among low- and high-skilled migrants. Our results support the view that agglomeration...

  19. CRYSTALLO-CO-AGGLOMERATION: A NOVEL TECHNIQUE TO IMPROVE FLOW AND COMPRESSIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita B Rahate

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Crystallo-co-agglomeration is a particle design technique in which a drug is crystallized and agglomerated with an excipient or another drug, which may or may not be crystallized in same system. The various parameters optimized were type, amount and mode of addition of bridging liquid, temperature and agitation speed. They were characterized for micrometritic properties (particle size and shape, flowability, packability, bulk density, wettability and compressibility. The prepared spherical crystals with different polymers exhibited excellent physicochemical properties like flowability, pack ability and wettability compared with the pure drug. The process is simple and inexpensive enough for scaling upto a commercial level. It reduces time and cost by enabling faster operation, less machinery and fewer personnel. Keywords: Crystallo-co-agglomeration, flowability, compressibility, bioavailability.

  20. Effect of agglomeration during coprecipitation: Delayed spinellization of magnesium aluminate hydrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soumen Pal; A K Bandyopadhyay; S Mukherjee; B N Samaddar; P G Pal

    2010-08-01

    Precipitation of magnesium aluminate hydrate with faster addition of ammonia at desired pH causes agglomeration. Agglomerated powder, without any further treatment, on calcination forms intermediate compounds at low temperatures (≤ 900°C). The intermediate compounds on further heat treatment (≥ 1000°C) decompose into MgO, MgAl2O4 and -Al2O3. Effect of agglomeration and absorption of foreign ions such as Cl–, SO$^{2-}_{4}$, and NH$^{+}_{4}$ in complex compounds probably cause loss of Al3+ and Mg2+ ions during heat treatment, and stoichiometry changes. Powders prepared by continuous method with better control of process parameters than batch process yields better spinellization.

  1. FORMATION MECHANISM AND SPATIAL PATTERN OF URBAN AGGLOMERATION IN CENTRAL JILIN OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Gan; ZHANG Ping-yu; JIAO Bin

    2006-01-01

    Urban agglomeration is made up of cities with different sizes to be linked by traffic network in a given area, and it is an inevitable result when urbanization reaches a certain level. Taking urban agglomerationin central Jilin(UACJ) as an example, this article analyzes the formation mechanism and spatial pattern of urban agglomeration in the less-developed area. First, the dynamics of UACJ has been analyzed from the aspects of geographical condition, economic foundation, policy background, and traffic condition. Then the development process is divided into three stages-single city, city group and city cluster. Secondly, the central cities are identified from the aspects of city centrality, and the development axes are classified based on economic communication capacity. Finally, the urban agglomeration is divided into five urban economic regions in order to establish the reasonable distribution of industries.

  2. Mathematical modeling of pigment dispersion taking into account the full agglomerate particle size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2016-01-01

    particle size distribution was simulated. Data from two previous experimental investigations were used for model validation. The first concerns two different yellow organic pigments dispersed in nitrocellulose/ethanol vehicles in a ball mill and the second a red organic pigment dispersed in a solvent...... only adjustable parameter used was an apparent rate constant for the linear agglomerate erosion rate. Model simulations, at selected values of time, for the full agglomerate particle size distribution were in good qualitative agreement with the measured values. A quantitative match of the experimental...... particle size distributions could be obtained using time-dependent fragment distributions, but this resulted in a very slight improvement in the simulated transient mean diameter only. The model provides a mechanistic understanding of the agglomerate breakage process that can be used, e.g., in the...

  3. Combined deterministic-stochastic framework for modeling the agglomeration of colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuza, S M; Kariyawasam, Lahiru K; Banerjee, Soumik

    2015-07-01

    We present a multiscale model, based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC), to study the aggregation driven growth of colloidal particles. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations are employed to detect key agglomeration events and calculate the corresponding rate constants. The kMC simulations employ these rate constants in a stochastic framework to track the growth of the agglomerates over longer time scales and length scales. One of the hallmarks of the model is a unique methodology to detect and characterize agglomeration events. The model accounts for individual cluster-scale effects such as change in size due to aggregation as well as local molecular-scale effects such as changes in the number of neighbors of each molecule in a colloidal cluster. Such definition of agglomeration events allows us to grow the cluster to sizes that are inaccessible to molecular simulations as well as track the shape of the growing cluster. A well-studied system, comprising fullerenes in NaCl electrolyte solution, was simulated to validate the model. Under the simulated conditions, the agglomeration process evolves from a diffusion limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) regime to percolating cluster in transition and finally to a gelation regime. Overall the data from the multiscale numerical model shows good agreement with existing theory of colloidal particle growth. Although in the present study we validated our model by specifically simulating fullerene agglomeration in electrolyte solution, the model is versatile and can be applied to a wide range of colloidal systems. PMID:26274304

  4. Agglomeration in Stripper Ash Coolers and Its Possible Remedial Solutions: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravi Inder

    2016-04-01

    The bottom ash of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler contains large amounts of physical heat. When low quality coals are used in these types of boilers, the ash content is normally more than 40 % and the physical heat loss is approximately 3 % if the bottom ash is discharged without cooling. Bottom ash cooler (BAC) is often used to treat the high temperature bottom ash to reclaim heat, and to facilitate the easily handling and transportation of ash. The CFB boiler at BLA Power, Newari, MP (India) is facing problems of clinker formation in strip ash coolers of plant since the installation of unit. These clinkers are basically agglomerates, which leads to defluidization of stripper ash cooler (BAC) units. There are two strip ash coolers in unit. Each strip ash cooler is capable of working independently. The proper functioning of both strip coolers is very important as it is going to increase the combustion efficiency of boiler by stripping of fine unburnt coal particles from ash, which are injected into the furnace. In this paper causes, characterization of agglomerates, thermo gravimetric analysis of fuel used, particular size distribution of coal and sand and possible remedial solution to overcome these agglomerates in strip ash coolers has also been presented. High temperature in compact separators, non uniform supply of coal and not removing small agglomerates from stripper ash cooler are among main causes of agglomeration in stripper ash cooler. Control of compact separator temperature, replacing 10-12 % of bed material and cleaning stripper ash cooler periodically will decrease agglomeration in stripper ash cooler of unit.

  5. Alterations of mitochondrial dynamics allow retrograde propagation of locally initiated axonal insults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassus, Benjamin; Magifico, Sebastien; Pignon, Sandra; Belenguer, Pascale; Miquel, Marie-Christine; Peyrin, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In chronic neurodegenerative syndromes, neurons progressively die through a generalized retraction pattern triggering retrograde axonal degeneration toward the cell bodies, which molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Recent observations suggest that direct activation of pro-apoptotic signaling in axons triggers local degenerative events associated with early alteration of axonal mitochondrial dynamics. This raises the question of the role of mitochondrial dynamics on both axonal vulnerability stress and their implication in the spreading of damages toward unchallenged parts of the neuron. Here, using microfluidic chambers, we assessed the consequences of interfering with OPA1 and DRP1 proteins on axonal degeneration induced by local application of rotenone. We found that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial fission prevented axonal damage induced by rotenone, in low glucose conditions. While alteration of mitochondrial dynamics per se did not lead to spontaneous axonal degeneration, it dramatically enhanced axonal vulnerability to rotenone, which had no effect in normal glucose conditions, and promoted retrograde spreading of axonal degeneration toward the cell body. Altogether, our results suggest a mitochondrial priming effect in axons as a key process of axonal degeneration. In the context of neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, mitochondria fragmentation could hasten neuronal death and initiate spatial dispersion of locally induced degenerative events. PMID:27604820

  6. The Morphology of Urban Agglomerations for Developing Countries: A Case Study with China

    CERN Document Server

    Gangopadhyay, Kausik

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between two well-accepted empirical propositions regarding the distribution of population in cities, namely, Gibrat's law and Zipf's law, are rigorously examined using the Chinese census data. Our findings are quite in contrast with the most of the previous studies performed exclusively for developed countries. This motivates us to build a general environment to explain the morphology of urban agglomerations both in developed and developing countries. A dynamic process of job creation generates a particular distribution for the urban agglomerations and introduction of Special Economic Zones (SEZ) in this abstract environment shows that the empirical observations are in good agreement with the proposed model.

  7. Detailed analysis of a quench bomb for the study of aluminum agglomeration in solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallier, S.; Kratz, J.-G.; Quaglia, N.; Fouin, G.

    2016-07-01

    A standard quench bomb (QB) - widely used to characterize condensed phase from metalized solid propellant combustion - is studied in detail. Experimental and numerical investigations proved that collected particles are mostly unburned aluminum (Al) agglomerates despite large quenching distances. Particles are actually found to quench early as propellant surface is swept by inert pressurant. Further improvements of the QB are proposed which allow measuring both Al agglomerates and alumina residue with the same setup. Finally, the results obtained on a typical aluminized ammonium perchlorate (AP) / hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) propellant are briefly discussed.

  8. In-Situ Agglomeration and De-agglomeration by Milling of Nano-Engineered Lubricant Particulate Composites for Cold Spray Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshastehriz, M.; Smid, I.; Segall, A. E.

    2014-10-01

    Nano-engineered self-lubricating particles comprised of hexagonal-boron-nitride powder (hBN) encapsulated in nickel have been developed for cold spray coating of aluminum components. The nickel encapsulant consists of several nano-sized layers, which are deposited on the hBN particles by electroless plating. In the cold spray deposition, the nickel becomes the matrix in which hBN acts as the lubricant. The coating demonstrated a very promising performance by reducing the coefficient of friction by almost 50% and increasing the wear resistance more than tenfold. The coatings also exhibited higher bond strength, which was directly related to the hardenability of the particles. During the encapsulation process, the hBN particles agglomerate and form large clusters. De-agglomeration has been studied through low- and high-energy ball milling to create more uniform and consistent particle sizes and to improve the cold spray deposition efficiency. The unmilled and milled particles were characterized with Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, BET, and hardness tests. It was found that in low-energy ball milling, the clusters were compacted to a noticeable extent. However, the high-energy ball milling resulted in breakup of agglomerations and destroyed the nickel encapsulant.

  9. The role of T-cadherin in axonal pathway formation in neocortical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Yuki; Zhao, Hong; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Kosei; Norioka, Shigemi; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko

    2014-12-01

    Cortical efferent and afferent fibers are arranged in a stereotyped pattern in the intermediate zone (IZ). Here, we studied the mechanism of axonal pathway formation by identifying a molecule that is expressed in a subset of cortical axons in the rat. We found that T-cadherin (T-cad), a member of the cadherin family, is expressed in deep-layer cell axons projecting to subcortical structures, but not in upper layer callosal axons projecting to the contralateral cortex. Ectopic expression of T-cad in upper layer cells induced axons to project toward subcortical structures via the upper part of the IZ. Moreover, the axons of deep-layer cells in which T-cad expression was suppressed by RNAi projected towards the contralateral cortex via an aberrant route. These results suggest that T-cad is involved in axonal pathway formation in the developing cortex. PMID:25468941

  10. Abnormal growth of the corticospinal axons into the lumbar spinal cord of the hyt/hyt mouse with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jung-Yu C; Stein, Stuart A; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2008-11-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency may cause severe neurological disorders resulting from developmental deficits of the central nervous system. The mutant hyt/hyt mouse, characterized by fetal-onset, life-long hypothyroidism resulting from a point mutation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor of the thyroid gland, displays a variety of abnormalities in motor behavior that are likely associated with dysfunctions of specific brain regions and a defective corticospinal tract (CST). To test the hypothesis that fetal and neonatal hypothyroidism cause abnormal CST development, the growth of the CST was investigated in hypothyroid hyt/hyt mice and their euthyroid progenitors, the BALB/cByJ mice. Anterograde labeling with biotinylated dextran amine demonstrated a decrease in the number of CST axons in the hyt/hyt mouse at the first lumbar level at postnatal day (P) 10. After retrograde tracing with fast blue (FB), fewer FB-labeled neurons were found in the motor cortex, the red nucleus, and the lateral vestibular nucleus of the hyt/hyt mouse. At the fourth lumbar level, the hyt/hyt mouse also showed smaller CST cross-sectional areas and significantly lower numbers of unmyelinated axons, myelinated axons, and growth cones within the CST during postnatal development. At P10, the hyt/hyt mouse demonstrated significantly lower immunoreactivity of embryonic neural cell adhesion molecule in the CST at the seventh cervical level, whereas the expression of growth-associated protein 43 remained unchanged. Our study demonstrated an abnormal development of the CST in the hyt/hyt mouse, manifested by reduced axon quantity and retarded growth pattern at the lumbar spinal cord. PMID:18543337

  11. Biomass fuel leaching for the control of fouling, slagging, and agglomeration in biomass power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Robert Reurd

    The use of straws and other herbaceous biomass as boiler fuel is limited because of rapid formation of boiler deposits (i.e. fouling and slagging), which results in high boiler operating costs. The removal of troublesome elements in biomass that lead to slagging and fouling was tested by washing (leaching) biomass fuels in water. Potassium, sodium, and chlorine are easily removed from rice straw and other biomass in both tap and distilled water. Simple water leaching leads to considerable changes in combustion properties and ash transformation in biomass. In general, leaching elevates the sintering and melting temperatures, improves ash fusibility, and reduces the volatilization of inorganic species. Leaching leads to a notable decline in the alkali index, a broad indicator of the fouling potential of a biomass fuel. Bench-scale combustion tests at 800-1000°C furnace gas temperatures confirm that leaching dramatically changes the combustion behavior of rice straw. Full-scale combustion tests indicate that leached rice straw is technically suitable under normal boiler operating conditions. Two potential strategies to accomplish leaching of rice straw include leaching under controlled circumstances, and leaching by natural precipitation. Under controlled conditions, substantial amounts of K and Cl can be leached from rice straw with water at ambient temperatures, and without extensive particle size reduction. Leaching straw in a full-scale process is estimated to add approximately $15 to 18 Mg-1 to the fuel costs of a combustion facility. Leaving rice straw in the field and exposed to rainy weather leads to similar improvements in combustion behavior as observed with biomass that is leached under controlled circumstances. Collection of naturally leached rice straw in the Sacramento Valley through delayed harvesting is technically feasible, however its commercial implementation is dependent on harvest practices, rainfall distribution, and field-specific factors. The

  12. Relation between axon morphology in C1 spinal cord and spatial properties of medial vestibulospinal tract neurons in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, S I; Iwamoto, Y; Barke, L F; Baker, J F; Peterson, B W

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-one secondary medial vestibulospinal tract neurons were recorded intraaxonally in the ventromedial funiculi of the C1 spinal cord in decerebrate, paralyzed cats. Antidromic stimulation in C6 and the oculomotor nucleus identified the projection pattern of each neuron. Responses to sinusoidal, whole-body rotations in many planes in three-dimensional space were characterized before injection of horseradish peroxidase or Neurobiotin. The spatial response properties of 19 neurons were described by a maximum activation direction vector (MAD), which defines the axis and direction of rotation that maximally excites the neuron. The other two neurons had spatio-temporal convergent behavior and no MAD was calculated. Collateral morphologies were reconstructed from serial frontal sections to reveal terminal fields in the C1 gray matter. Axons gave off multiple collaterals that terminated ipsilaterally to the stem axon. Collaterals of individual axons rarely overlapped longitudinally but projected to similar regions in the ventral horn when viewed in transverse sections. The number of primary collaterals in C1 was different for vestibulo-collic, vestibulo-oculo-collic, and C6-projecting neurons: on average one every 1.34, 1.72, and 4.25 mm, respectively. The heaviest arborization and most terminal boutons were seen in the ventral horn, in laminae VIII and IX. Varicosities on terminal branches in lamina IX were observed adjacent to large cell bodies-putative neck motoneurons-in counterstained tissue. Some collaterals had branches that extended dorsally to lamina VII. Neurons with different spatial properties had terminal fields in different regions of the ventral horn. Axons with type I responses and MADs near those of a semicircular canal pair had widely distributed collateral branches and numerous terminations in the dorsomedial, ventromedial, and spinal accessory nuclei and in lamina VIII. Axons with type I responses that suggested convergent canal pair input, with

  13. Contactin-4 mediates axon-target specificity and functional development of the accessory optic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhout, Jessica A; Stafford, Benjamin K; Nguyen, Phong L; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Huberman, Andrew D

    2015-05-20

    The mammalian eye-to-brain pathway includes more than 20 parallel circuits, each consisting of precise long-range connections between specific sets of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and target structures in the brain. The mechanisms that drive assembly of these parallel connections and the functional implications of their specificity remain unresolved. Here we show that in the absence of contactin 4 (CNTN4) or one of its binding partners, amyloid precursor protein (APP), a subset of direction-selective RGCs fail to target the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT)--the accessory optic system (AOS) target controlling horizontal image stabilization. Conversely, ectopic expression of CNTN4 biases RGCs to arborize in the NOT, and that process also requires APP. Our data reveal critical and novel roles for CNTN4/APP in promoting target-specific axon arborization, and they highlight the importance of this process for functional development of a behaviorally relevant parallel visual pathway. PMID:25959733

  14. Axonal degeneration affects muscle density in older men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bartali, Benedetta; Di Iorio, Angelo; Giacomini, Vittoria; Corsi, Anna Maria; Guralnik, Jack M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2006-08-01

    Using data from InCHIANTI, a prospective population-based survey of older persons, we examined the relationship of peroneal nerve conduction velocity (NCV, a measure of nerve myelination) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP, a measure of axonal degeneration) with calf muscle mass and density, two complementary measures of sarcopenia. NCV and CMAP were assessed by surface electroneurography of the right peroneal nerve conducted in 1162 participants, 515 men and 647 women, age 21-96 years, free of major neurological diseases. Cross-sectional muscle area and calf muscle density were measured using peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT). Both nerve and muscle parameters declined with age although in most cases the decline was not linear. In both sexes, CMAP, but not NCV, was independently and significantly associated with calf muscle density. These findings suggest that intrinsic changes in the muscle tissue are partially caused by a reduction in the number of motor axons. PMID:16085338

  15. Missed connections: photoreceptor axon seeks target neuron for synaptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astigarraga, Sergio; Hofmeyer, Kerstin; Treisman, Jessica E

    2010-08-01

    Extending axons must choose the appropriate synaptic target cells in order to assemble functional neural circuitry. The axons of the Drosophila color-sensitive photoreceptors R7 and R8 project as a single fascicle from each ommatidium, but their terminals are segregated into distinct layers within their target region. Recent studies have begun to reveal the molecular mechanisms that establish this projection pattern. Both homophilic adhesion molecules and specific ligand-receptor interactions make important contributions to stabilizing R7 and R8 terminals in the appropriate target layers. These cell recognition molecules are regulated by the same transcription factors that control R7 and R8 cell fates. Autocrine and repulsive signaling mechanisms prevent photoreceptor terminals from encroaching on their neighbors, preserving the spatial resolution of visual information. PMID:20434326

  16. Bazooka mediates secondary axon morphology in Drosophila brain lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein Volker; Spindler Shana R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the Drosophila brain, neural lineages project bundled axon tracts into a central neuropile. Each lineage exhibits a stereotypical branching pattern and trajectory, which distinguish it from other lineages. In this study, we used a multilineage approach to explore the neural function of the Par-complex member Par3/Bazooka in vivo. Drosophila bazooka is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of the larval brain and localizes within neurons in a lineage-dependent manner. The fact that mul...

  17. Giant axonal neuropathy: observations on a further patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Donaghy, M; Brett, E M; Ormerod, I E; King, R H; Thomas, P. K.

    1988-01-01

    A further child with giant axonal neuropathy (GAN), abnormally curly hair and consanguineous parents is described. Of the 19 patients with GAN so far reported in the literature, six, including the present patient, have resulted from consanguineous marriages. This makes autosomal recessive inheritance of GAN highly probable. Our patient also exhibited cerebellar ataxia and signs of pyramidal tract damage; magnetic resonance brain imaging demonstrated abnormalities within the cerebellar and cer...

  18. Craniocerebral trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging of diffuse axonal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceleration-deceleration rotational brain trauma is a common cause of disability or death in young adults and often leads to a focal destruction of axons. The resulting pathology, axonal shear injury is referred to as diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The DAI-associated lesions occur bilaterally, are widely dispersed and have been observed in the surface and deep white matter. They are found near to and far from the impact site. When DAI is clinically suspected, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the method of choice for further clarification, especially in patients where cranial computed tomography (CT) is inconspicuous. To investigate the presence of DAI after traumatic brain injury (TBI), a multimodal MRI approach is applied including the common structural and also functional imaging sequences. For structural MRI, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) weighted and susceptibility contrast imaging (SWI) are the sequences mainly used. The SWI technique is extremely sensitive to blood breakdown products, which appear as small signal voids at three locations, at the gray-white interface, in the corpus callosum and in the brain stem. Functional MRI comprises a group of constantly developing techniques that have great potential in optimal evaluation of the white matter in patients after craniocerebral trauma. These imaging techniques allow the visualization of changes associated with shear injuries, such as functional impairment of axons and decreased blood flow and abnormal metabolic activity of the brain parts affected. The multimodal MRI approach in patients with DAI results in a more detailed and differentiated representation of the underlying pathophysiological changes of the injured nerve tracts and helps to improve the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of MRI. When DAI is suspected multimodal MRI should be performed as soon as possible after craniocerebral injury. (orig.)

  19. Estimating neuronal connectivity from axonal and dendritic density fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap evan Pelt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurons innervate space by extending axonal and dendritic arborizations. When axons and dendrites come in close proximity of each other, synapses between neurons can be formed. Neurons vary greatly in their morphologies and synaptic connections with other neurons. The size and shape of the arborizations determine the way neurons innervate space. A neuron may therefore be characterized by the spatial distribution of its axonal and dendritic 'mass'. A population mean 'mass' density field of a particular neuron type can be obtained by averaging over the individual variations in neuron geometries. Connectivity in terms of candidate synaptic contacts between neurons can be determined directly on the basis of their arborizations but also indirectly on the basis of their density fields. To decide when a candidate synapse can be formed, we previously developed a criterion defining that axonal and dendritic line pieces should cross in 3D and have an orthogonal distance less than a threshold value. In this paper, we developed new methodology for applying this criterion to density fields. We show that estimates of the number of contacts between neuron pairs calculated from their density fields are fully consistent with the number of contacts calculated from the actual arborizations. However, the estimation of the connection probability and the expected number of contacts per connection cannot be calculated directly from density fields, because density fields do not carry anymore the correlative structure in the spatial distribution of synaptic contacts. Alternatively, these two connectivity measures can be estimated from the expected number of contacts by using empirical mapping functions. The neurons used for the validation studies were generated by our neuron simulator NETMORPH. An example is given of the estimation of average connectivity and Euclidean pre- and postsynaptic distance distributions in a network of neurons represented by their population

  20. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of ...

  1. Abnormal Corticospinal Excitability in Traumatic Diffuse Axonal Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bernabeu, Montse; Demirtas-Tatlidede, Asli; Opisso, Eloy; Lopez, Raquel; Tormos, Jose Mª; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the cortical motor excitability characteristics in diffuse axonal injury (DAI) due to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A variety of excitatory and inhibitory transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms were applied to primary motor cortices of 17 patients and 11 healthy controls. The parameters of testing included resting motor threshold (MT), motor evoked potential (MEP) area under the curve, input-output curves, MEP variability, and silent period (S...

  2. Slowing of the axonal transport of neurofilament proteins during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined age-dependent changes in neurofilament transport in motor axons of the rat sciatic nerve. SDS-PAGE and gel fluorography confirmed that the distribution of labeled neurofilament triplet protein coincides with the major slow component a (SCa) wave in these neurons. The velocity of neurofilament transport was calculated on the basis of the location of the 50th percentile of radioactivity in this wave 33 days after motor neurons were labeled by the intraspinal administration of [3H]leucine and [3H]lysine. Overall, the velocity fell from 1.95 mm/day at 3 weeks of age to 1.12 mm/day at 20 weeks. Between 3 and 10 weeks, it fell at a 6-fold higher rate (0.096 mm/day/week) than between 10 and 20 weeks (0.016 mm/day/week). We also found a marked change in the shape of the slow component wave during development. It appeared to consist of several overlapping peaks moving at slightly different velocities in animals 10 weeks of age or less as compared to a single slower moving peak at 20 weeks. We propose that the velocity of slow axonal transport reflects the level of maturation of the neuron, and that the presence of several overlapping peaks of transported radioactivity in the sciatic nerve of younger animals reflects the presence of several populations of motor axons at different stages of development. We also discuss the relationship between changes in the velocity of neurofilament transport and alterations in the composition of the cytoskeleton that occur as the axon grows in caliber during postnatal development

  3. Adult motor axons preferentially reinnervate predegenerated muscle nerve

    OpenAIRE

    M. Abdullah; O'Daly, A.; A Vyas; Rohde, C.; Brushart, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Preferential motor reinnervation (PMR) is the tendency for motor axons regenerating after repair of mixed nerve to reinnervate muscle nerve and/or muscle rather than cutaneous nerve or skin. PMR may occur in response to the peripheral nerve pathway alone in juvenile rats (Brushart, 1993; Redett et al., 2005), yet the ability to identify and respond to specific pathway markers is reportedly lost in adults (Uschold et al., 2007). The experiments reported here evaluate the relative roles of path...

  4. White matter microstructure from nonparametric axon diameter distribution mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamini, Dan; Komlosh, Michal E; Holtzclaw, Lynne A; Nevo, Uri; Basser, Peter J

    2016-07-15

    We report the development of a double diffusion encoding (DDE) MRI method to estimate and map the axon diameter distribution (ADD) within an imaging volume. A variety of biological processes, ranging from development to disease and trauma, may lead to changes in the ADD in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Unlike previously proposed methods, this ADD experimental design and estimation framework employs a more general, nonparametric approach, without a priori assumptions about the underlying form of the ADD, making it suitable to analyze abnormal tissue. In the current study, this framework was used on an ex vivo ferret spinal cord, while emphasizing the way in which the ADD can be weighted by either the number or the volume of the axons. The different weightings, which result in different spatial contrasts, were considered throughout this work. DDE data were analyzed to derive spatially resolved maps of average axon diameter, ADD variance, and extra-axonal volume fraction, along with a novel sub-micron restricted structures map. The morphological information contained in these maps was then used to segment white matter into distinct domains by using a proposed k-means clustering algorithm with spatial contiguity and left-right symmetry constraints, resulting in identifiable white matter tracks. The method was validated by comparing histological measures to the estimated ADDs using a quantitative similarity metric, resulting in good agreement. With further acquisition acceleration and experimental parameters adjustments, this ADD estimation framework could be first used preclinically, and eventually clinically, enabling a wide range of neuroimaging applications for improved understanding of neurodegenerative pathologies and assessing microstructural changes resulting from trauma. PMID:27126002

  5. Axonal Transport Impairment in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Nicolini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN is a dose-limiting side effect of several antineoplastic drugs which significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Although different molecular mechanisms have been investigated, CIPN pathobiology has not been clarified yet. It has largely been recognized that Dorsal Root Ganglia are the main targets of chemotherapy and that the longest nerves are the most damaged, together with fast axonal transport. Indeed, this bidirectional cargo-specific transport has a pivotal role in neuronal function and its impairment is involved in several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases. Literature data demonstrate that, despite different mechanisms of action, all antineoplastic agents impair the axonal trafficking to some extent and the severity of the neuropathy correlates with the degree of damage on this bidirectional transport. In this paper, we will examine the effect of the main old and new chemotherapeutic drug categories on axonal transport, with the aim of clarifying their potential mechanisms of action, and, if possible, of identifying neuroprotective strategies, based on the knowledge of the alterations induced by each drugs.

  6. Retinal glia promote dorsal root ganglion axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Lorber

    Full Text Available Axon regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS is limited by several factors including a lack of neurotrophic support. Recent studies have shown that glia from the adult rat CNS, specifically retinal astrocytes and Müller glia, can promote regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons. In the present study we investigated whether retinal glia also exert a growth promoting effect outside the visual system. We found that retinal glial conditioned medium significantly enhanced neurite growth and branching of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG in culture. Furthermore, transplantation of retinal glia significantly enhanced regeneration of DRG axons past the dorsal root entry zone after root crush in adult rats. To identify the factors that mediate the growth promoting effects of retinal glia, mass spectrometric analysis of retinal glial conditioned medium was performed. Apolipoprotein E and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC were found to be present in high abundance, a finding further confirmed by western blotting. Inhibition of Apolipoprotein E and SPARC significantly reduced the neuritogenic effects of retinal glial conditioned medium on DRG in culture, suggesting that Apolipoprotein E and SPARC are the major mediators of this regenerative response.

  7. Dysregulated axonal RNA translation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kyota; Mili, Stavroula

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset motor neuron disease that has been associated with a diverse array of genetic changes. Prominent among these are mutations in RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) or repeat expansions that give rise to toxic RNA species. RBPs are additionally central components of pathologic aggregates that constitute a disease hallmark, suggesting that dysregulation of RNA metabolism underlies disease progression. In the context of neuronal physiology, transport of RNAs and localized RNA translation in axons are fundamental to neuronal survival and function. Several lines of evidence suggest that axonal RNA translation is a central process perturbed by various pathogenic events associated with ALS. Dysregulated translation of specific RNA groups could underlie feedback effects that connect and reinforce disease manifestations. Among such candidates are RNAs encoding proteins involved in the regulation of microtubule dynamics. Further understanding of axonally dysregulated RNA targets and of the feedback mechanisms they induce could provide useful therapeutic insights. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:589-603. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1352 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27038103

  8. Axonal Dysfunction Precedes Motor Neuronal Death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Iwai

    Full Text Available Wide-spread fasciculations are a characteristic feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, suggesting motor axonal hyperexcitability. Previous excitability studies have shown increased nodal persistent sodium conductances and decreased potassium currents in motor axons of ALS patients, both of the changes inducing hyperexcitability. Altered axonal excitability potentially contributes to motor neuron death in ALS, but the relationship of the extent of motor neuronal death and abnormal excitability has not been fully elucidated. We performed multiple nerve excitability measurements in the median nerve at the wrist of 140 ALS patients and analyzed the relationship of compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude (index of motor neuronal loss and excitability indices, such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, recovery cycle and current-threshold relationships. Compared to age-matched normal controls (n = 44, ALS patients (n = 140 had longer strength-duration time constant (SDTC: a measure of nodal persistent sodium current; p 5mV. Regression analyses showed that SDTC (R = -0.22 and depolarizing threshold electrotonus (R = -0.22 increased with CMAP decline. These findings suggest that motor nerve hyperexcitability occurs in the early stage of the disease, and precedes motor neuronal loss in ALS. Modulation of altered ion channel function could be a treatment option for ALS.

  9. Axonal Dysfunction Precedes Motor Neuronal Death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Yuta; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Misawa, Sonoko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Watanabe, Keisuke; Amino, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Wide-spread fasciculations are a characteristic feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggesting motor axonal hyperexcitability. Previous excitability studies have shown increased nodal persistent sodium conductances and decreased potassium currents in motor axons of ALS patients, both of the changes inducing hyperexcitability. Altered axonal excitability potentially contributes to motor neuron death in ALS, but the relationship of the extent of motor neuronal death and abnormal excitability has not been fully elucidated. We performed multiple nerve excitability measurements in the median nerve at the wrist of 140 ALS patients and analyzed the relationship of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude (index of motor neuronal loss) and excitability indices, such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, recovery cycle and current-threshold relationships. Compared to age-matched normal controls (n = 44), ALS patients (n = 140) had longer strength-duration time constant (SDTC: a measure of nodal persistent sodium current; p CMAP (> 5mV). Regression analyses showed that SDTC (R = -0.22) and depolarizing threshold electrotonus (R = -0.22) increased with CMAP decline. These findings suggest that motor nerve hyperexcitability occurs in the early stage of the disease, and precedes motor neuronal loss in ALS. Modulation of altered ion channel function could be a treatment option for ALS. PMID:27383069

  10. Direct numerical simulations of agglomeration of circular colloidal particles in two-dimensional shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Joon; Djilali, Ned

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal agglomeration of nanoparticles in shear flow is investigated by solving the fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions in a 2D system. We use an extended finite element method in which the dynamics of the particles is solved in a fully coupled manner with the flow, allowing an accurate description of the fluid-particle interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes or of empirical correlations to account for the hydrodynamic interactions between the particles. Adaptive local mesh refinement using a grid deformation method is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm, and the particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones potential. Motivated by the process used in fabricating fuel cell catalysts from a colloidal ink, the model is applied to investigate agglomeration of colloidal particles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame with varying shear rates and particle fraction ratios. Both external shear and particle fraction are found to have a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension. Segregation intensity and graph theory are used to analyze the underlying agglomeration patterns and structures, and three agglomeration regimes are identified.

  11. Agglomeration, Innovation and Regional Development: Theoretical Perspectives and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de Henri L.F.; Poot, Jacques; Smit, Martijn J.

    2007-01-01

    Innovation and technological change are central to the quest for regional development. In the globally-connected knowledge-driven economy, the relevance of agglomeration forces that rely on proximity continues to increase, paradoxically despite declining real costs of information, communication and

  12. Evidence of zirconium nano-agglomeration in as-cast dilute U–Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructure evaluation of as-cast and annealed U–Zr (Zr = 2, 6 and 10 wt.%) alloys has been carried out for the first time using positrons as a probe. The chemical signature in the matter–antimatter annihilation gamma and the positron lifetime data suggests that majority of positrons are annihilating from Zr sites in the as-cast alloys. The results have been interpreted as due to the presence of Zr nano-agglomerates in the as-cast alloys which have a higher positron affinity as compared to the rest of the U matrix. A minimum agglomerate size of ∼2 nm diameter has been calculated from the difference in positron affinity between the agglomerates and the matrix. Upon annealing, the Zr signature in the annihilation gamma photons vanishes suggesting that the Zr agglomerates diffuse out of U matrix and form micron-sized precipitates. This has been confirmed by scanning electron microscopy which shows a 3 times increase in the surface density of the precipitates in the annealed alloys as compared to the as-cast ones. Shorter positron diffusion length (measured using slow positron beam) as compared to precipitate separation has been invoked to explain the observed data

  13. Interaction between magnetic agglomerates and an extended free radicals network studied by magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guskos, Niko; Zolnierkiewicz, Grzegorz; Typek, Janusz; Guskos, Aleksander; Berczynski, Pawel; Petridis, Dimitri

    2012-02-01

    Solids containing an extended network of free radicals have been prepared and studied by magnetic resonance techniques in the 4-290 K temperature range. One solid contained additionally a small amount of magnetic γ-Fe2O3 in the form of nanoparticle agglomerates. The solid without agglomerates displayed only a narrow, single resonance line centered at g eff = 2.0043. The magnetic resonance measurements of the solid with γ-Fe2O3 agglomerates gave a spectrum composed of two lines attributed to two different magnetic centers: a narrow line due to free radicals and a broad line arising from magnetic iron oxide agglomerates. In the high temperature range the integrated intensities of both lines decreased with decreasing temperature. The resonance field of the broad line shifted to lower magnetic fields upon lowering the temperature with the gradient ΔH r/ΔT = 2.3 G/K, while the narrow line shifted towards higher magnetic fields. The linewidth of the broader line increased with decreasing temperature while for the narrow lines in both samples this change was small. The magnetic iron oxide clusters produce a magnetic field which acts on the free radicals network and its strength depends essentially on the concentration of clusters. The reorientation process in the free radicals network is more intense in the sample without magnetic clusters.

  14. The influence of lisping material in pelletizing and agglomeration of fine coal pieces in laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents a part of laboratory results realized in academy of Friburg, carried on pelletizing and agglomeration of waste material, fine coal from thermal power station, using different lisping materials. Specially the influence of these materials in getting solid fuel, small briquette, formed by rolling press is analyzed. Special interest is attended to their characteristics: hardness and resistance. (Author)

  15. The influence of lisping material in pelletizing and agglomeration of fine coal pieces in laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents a part of laboratory results realized in academy of Firebug, carried on pelletizing and agglomeration of waste material, fine coal from thermal power station, using different lisping materials. Specially the influence of these materials in getting solid fuel, small briquette, formed by rolling press is analyzed. Special interest is attended to their characteristics: hardness and resistance. (Author)

  16. Cities in transition: monitoring growth trends in Delhi urban agglomeration 1991-2001

    OpenAIRE

    Debnath Mookherjee

    2004-01-01

    An analysis based on census data for the decade 1991-2001 indicates change in the urban structure of the Delhi Urban Agglomeration, India. The number and rate of growth of cen-sus towns and the urban core are examined. The pattern shows emerging traits of urban spread and provides an investigative framework for future research.

  17. Cities in transition: monitoring growth trends in Delhi urban agglomeration 1991-2001:

    OpenAIRE

    Debnath Mookherjee; Eugene Hoerauf

    2004-01-01

    An analysis based on census data for the decade 1991-2001 indicates change in the urbanstructure of the Delhi Urban Agglomeration, India. The number and rate of growth of censustowns and the urban core are examined. The pattern shows emerging traits of urbanspread and provides an investigative framework for future research.

  18. Cities in transition: monitoring growth trends in Delhi urban agglomeration 1991-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath Mookherjee

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis based on census data for the decade 1991-2001 indicates change in the urban structure of the Delhi Urban Agglomeration, India. The number and rate of growth of cen-sus towns and the urban core are examined. The pattern shows emerging traits of urban spread and provides an investigative framework for future research.

  19. Biomass ash-bed material interactions leading to agglomeration in FBC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, H.J.M.; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Kiel, J.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    In (bubbling) fluidized-bed combustion and gasification of biomass, several potential problems are associated with the inorganic components of the fuel. A major problem area is defluidization due to bed agglomeration. The most common found process leading to defluidization in commercial-scale ins...

  20. Modelling Inter-Particle Forces and Resulting Agglomerate Sizes in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2005-01-01

    The theory of inter-particle forces versus external shear in cement-based materials is reviewed. On this basis, calculations on maximum agglomerate size present after the combined action of superplasticizers and shear are carried out. Qualitative experimental results indicate that external shear ...

  1. Direct numerical simulations of agglomeration of circular colloidal particles in two-dimensional shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Joon, E-mail: yjchoi@uvic.ca; Djilali, Ned, E-mail: ndjilali@uvic.ca [Institute for Integrated Energy Systems and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Colloidal agglomeration of nanoparticles in shear flow is investigated by solving the fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions in a 2D system. We use an extended finite element method in which the dynamics of the particles is solved in a fully coupled manner with the flow, allowing an accurate description of the fluid-particle interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes or of empirical correlations to account for the hydrodynamic interactions between the particles. Adaptive local mesh refinement using a grid deformation method is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm, and the particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones potential. Motivated by the process used in fabricating fuel cell catalysts from a colloidal ink, the model is applied to investigate agglomeration of colloidal particles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame with varying shear rates and particle fraction ratios. Both external shear and particle fraction are found to have a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension. Segregation intensity and graph theory are used to analyze the underlying agglomeration patterns and structures, and three agglomeration regimes are identified.

  2. Discrete element modelling of the quasi-static uniaxial compression of individual infant formula agglomerates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kevin J. Hanley; Catherine O'Sullivan; Edmond P. Byrne; Kevin Cronin

    2012-01-01

    Infant formula is usually produced in an agglomerated powder form.These agglomerates are subjected to many transient forces following their manufacture.These can be difficult to quantify experimentally because of their small magnitudes and short durations.Numerical models have the potential to address this gap in the experimental data.The objective of the research described here was to calibrate a discrete element model for these agglomerates using experimental data obtained for quasi-static loading,and to use this model to study the mechanics of the particle response in detail.The Taguchi method was previously proposed as a viable calibration approach for discrete element models.In this work,the method was assessed for calibration of the model parameters (e.g.,bond stiffnesses and strengths) considering three responses: the force at failure,strain at failure and agglomerate stiffness.The Weibull moduli for the simulation results and the experimental data were almost identical following calibration and the 37% characteristic stresses were similar.An analysis of the energy terms in the model provided useful insight into the model response.The bond energy and the normal force exerted on the platens were strongly correlated,and bond breakage events coincided with the highest energy dissipation rates.

  3. A Comprehensive Quantitative Evaluation of New Sustainable Urbanization Level in 20 Chinese Urban Agglomerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On 16 March 2014, the State Council of China launched its first urbanization planning initiative dubbed “National New Urbanization Planning (2014–2020” (NNUP. NNUP put forward 20 urban agglomerations and a sustainable development approach aiming to transform traditional Chinese urbanization to sustainable new urbanization. This study quantitatively evaluates the level of sustainability of the present new urbanization process in 20 Chinese urban agglomerations and provides some positive suggestions for the achievement of sustainable new urbanization. A three-level index system which is based on six fundamental elements in a city and a Full Permutation Polygon Synthetic Indicator evaluation method are adopted. The results show that China is undergoing a new urbanization process with a low level of sustainability and there are many problems remaining from traditional urbanization processes. There exists a polarized phenomenon in the urbanization of 20 urban agglomerations. Based on their own development patterns, the 20 urban agglomerations can be divided into seven categories. Every category has its own development characteristics. The analyses also show that waste of water resources, abuse of land resources, and air pollution are three big problems that are closely linked to traditional Chinese urbanization processes. To achieve sustainable new urbanization in China, four relevant suggestions and comments have been provided.

  4. Dispersion of TiO2 Nanoparticle Agglomerates by Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Horst, Allison M.; Neal, Andrea C.; Mielke, Randall E.; Sislian, Patrick R.; Suh, Won Hyuk; Mädler, Lutz; Stucky, Galen D.; Holden, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are increasingly incorporated into consumer products and are emerging as potential environmental contaminants. Upon environmental release, nanoparticles could inhibit bacterial processes, as evidenced by laboratory studies. Less is known regarding bacterial alteration of nanoparticles, including whether bacteria affect physical agglomeration states controlling nanoparticle settling and bioavailability. Here, the effects of an environmental strain of Pseudomonas aerugi...

  5. Sensory axon-derived neuregulin-1 is required for axoglial signaling and normal sensory function but not for long-term axon maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fricker, F.R.; Zhu, N.; Tsantoulas, C.;

    2009-01-01

    " pockets. The total number of axons in the sural nerve was unchanged, but a greater proportion was unmyelinated. In addition, we observed large-diameter axons that were in a 1:1 relationship with Schwann cells, surrounded by a basal lamina but not myelinated. There was no evidence of DRG or Schwann cell...

  6. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  7. Axon Degeneration Gated by Retrograde Activation of Somatic Pro-apoptotic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, David J; Pitts, Jason; Hertz, Nicholas T; Yang, Jing; Yamagishi, Yuya; Olsen, Olav; Tešić Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-02-25

    During development, sensory axons compete for limiting neurotrophic support, and local neurotrophin insufficiency triggers caspase-dependent axon degeneration. The signaling driving axon degeneration upon local deprivation is proposed to reside within axons. Our results instead support a model in which, despite the apoptotic machinery being present in axons, the cell body is an active participant in gating axonal caspase activation and axon degeneration. Loss of trophic support in axons initiates retrograde activation of a somatic pro-apoptotic pathway, which, in turn, is required for distal axon degeneration via an anterograde pro-degenerative factor. At a molecular level, the cell body is the convergence point of two signaling pathways whose integrated action drives upregulation of pro-apoptotic Puma, which, unexpectedly, is confined to the cell body. Puma then overcomes inhibition by pro-survival Bcl-xL and Bcl-w and initiates the anterograde pro-degenerative program, highlighting the role of the cell body as an arbiter of large-scale axon removal. PMID:26898330

  8. Regulation of action potential waveforms by axonal GABAA receptors in cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xia

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb of the main axon trunk of layer -5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors.

  9. Irregular geometries in normal unmyelinated axons: a 3D serial EM analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, M M; Leitao, C; Trogadis, J; Stevens, J K

    1990-12-01

    Axons have generally been represented as straight cylinders. It is not at all uncommon for anatomists to take single cross-sections of an axonal bundle, and from the axonal diameter compute expected conduction velocities. This assumes that each cross-section represents a slice through a perfect cylinder. We have examined the three-dimensional geometry of 98 central and peripheral unmyelinated axons, using computer-assisted serial electron microscopy. These reconstructions reveal that virtually all unmyelinated axons have highly irregular axial shapes consisting of periodic varicosities. The varicosities were, without exception, filled with membranous organelles frequently including mitochondria, and have obligatory volumes similar to that described in other neurites. The mitochondria make contact with microtubules, while the other membraneous organelles were frequently found free floating in the cytoplasm. We conclude that unmyelinated axons are fundamentally varicose structures created by the presence of organelles, and that an axon's calibre is dynamic in both space and time. These irregular axonal geometries raise serious doubts about standard two dimensional morphometric analysis and suggest that electrical properties may be more heterogeneous than expected from single section data. These results also suggest that the total number of microtubules contained in an axon, rather than its single section diameter, may prove to be a more accurate predictor of properties such as conduction velocity. Finally, these results offer an explanation for a number of pathological changes that have been described in unmyelinated axons. PMID:2292722

  10. Soluble axoplasm enriched from injured CNS axons reveals the early modulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Garland

    Full Text Available Axon injury and degeneration is a common consequence of diverse neurological conditions including multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. The molecular events underlying axon degeneration are poorly understood. We have developed a novel method to enrich for axoplasm from rodent optic nerve and characterised the early events in Wallerian degeneration using an unbiased proteomics screen. Our detergent-free method draws axoplasm into a dehydrated hydrogel of the polymer poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, which is then recovered using centrifugation. This technique is able to recover axonal proteins and significantly deplete glial contamination as confirmed by immunoblotting. We have used iTRAQ to compare axoplasm-enriched samples from naïve vs injured optic nerves, which has revealed a pronounced modulation of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton. To confirm the modulation of the actin cytoskeleton in injured axons we focused on the RhoA pathway. Western blotting revealed an augmentation of RhoA and phosphorylated cofilin in axoplasm-enriched samples from injured optic nerve. To investigate the localisation of these components of the RhoA pathway in injured axons we transected axons of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. We observed an early modulation of filamentous actin with a concomitant redistribution of phosphorylated cofilin in injured axons. At later time-points, RhoA is found to accumulate in axonal swellings and also colocalises with filamentous actin. The actin cytoskeleton is a known sensor of cell viability across multiple eukaryotes, and our results suggest a similar role for the actin cytoskeleton following axon injury. In agreement with other reports, our data also highlights the role of the RhoA pathway in axon degeneration. These findings highlight a previously unexplored area of axon biology, which may open novel avenues to prevent axon degeneration. Our method for isolating CNS axoplasm

  11. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Agglomeration Influences Dose-Rates and Modulates Oxidative Stress Mediated Dose-Response Profiles In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-07-31

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm-1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  12. A discrete element and ray framework for rapid simulation of acoustical dispersion of microscale particulate agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2016-03-01

    In industry, particle-laden fluids, such as particle-functionalized inks, are constructed by adding fine-scale particles to a liquid solution, in order to achieve desired overall properties in both liquid and (cured) solid states. However, oftentimes undesirable particulate agglomerations arise due to some form of mutual-attraction stemming from near-field forces, stray electrostatic charges, process ionization and mechanical adhesion. For proper operation of industrial processes involving particle-laden fluids, it is important to carefully breakup and disperse these agglomerations. One approach is to target high-frequency acoustical pressure-pulses to breakup such agglomerations. The objective of this paper is to develop a computational model and corresponding solution algorithm to enable rapid simulation of the effect of acoustical pulses on an agglomeration composed of a collection of discrete particles. Because of the complex agglomeration microstructure, containing gaps and interfaces, this type of system is extremely difficult to mesh and simulate using continuum-based methods, such as the finite difference time domain or the finite element method. Accordingly, a computationally-amenable discrete element/discrete ray model is developed which captures the primary physical events in this process, such as the reflection and absorption of acoustical energy, and the induced forces on the particulate microstructure. The approach utilizes a staggered, iterative solution scheme to calculate the power transfer from the acoustical pulse to the particles and the subsequent changes (breakup) of the pulse due to the particles. Three-dimensional examples are provided to illustrate the approach.

  13. A two dimensional agglomerate model for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two dimensional steady state and isothermal model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is presented. This model is applied to a fuel cell with a counter-flow mode of hydrogen and air along parallel flow channels. In the flow channel and porous media, reactant flow is modelled using the continuity and Navier–Stokes equation. Reactant diffusion and convection are modelled by the Maxwell–Stefan and Navier–Stokes equation, respectively. Water transport is described by the combined mechanism of electro-osmotic drag, back diffusion and hydraulic permeation. The catalyst layer is modelled as a spherical-agglomerate structure in which ionomer and liquid water partially occupy the void space to form a so-called carbon–ionomer–liquid water film inside the agglomerate. A mathematical relationship for the variation in film thickness with the current density is also developed. The effect of platinum and carbon loadings on the cell performance and effectiveness are simulated. The fuel cell polarisation curve based on the agglomerate with a film model gives good agreement to experimental data while the agglomerate without a film model overestimates the current density. The modelling results show that the rapid fall in current density at lower cell voltage is due to an increased oxygen diffusion resistance through the film. - Highlights: • An along channel 2D agglomerate model for a complete PEMFC unit is developed. • Liquid water film thickness (δ)–current density (i) relationship is developed. • δ is larger when higher current density and lower temperature applied. • δ is larger near cathode inlet and smaller near cathode outlet. • Oxygen diffusion rate is reduced by the liquid water film

  14. Characterisation of the de-agglomeration effects of bovine serum albumin on nanoparticles in aqueous suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantra, Ratna; Tompkins, Jordan; Quincey, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of nanoparticle characterisation tools to evaluate the interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and dispersed nanoparticles in aqueous media. Dynamic light scattering, zeta-potential measurements and scanning electron microscopy were used to probe the state of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles in the presence of various concentrations of BSA, throughout a three-day period. BSA was shown to adhere to ZnO but not to TiO(2). The adsorption of BSA led to subsequent de-agglomeration of the sub-micron ZnO clusters into smaller fragments, even breaking them up into individual isolated nanoparticles. We propose that certain factors, such as adsorption kinetics of BSA on to the surface of ZnO, as well as the initial agglomerated state of the ZnO, prior to BSA addition, are responsible for promoting the de-agglomeration process. Hence, in the case of TiO(2) we see no de-agglomeration because: (a) the nanoparticles are more highly agglomerated to begin with and (b) BSA does not adsorb effectively on the surface of the nanoparticles. The zeta-potential results show that, for either ZnO or TiO(2), the presence of BSA resulted in enhanced stability. In the case of ZnO, the enhanced stability is limited to BSA concentrations below 0.5 wt.%. Steric and electrostatic repulsion are thought to be responsible for improved stability of the dispersion. PMID:19775871

  15. Structural properties of silver nanoparticle agglomerates based on transmission electron microscopy: relationship to particle mobility analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Weon Gyu; Wang Jing [University of Minnesota, Department of Mechanical Engineering (United States); Mertler, Michael; Sachweh, Bernd [Fine Particle Technology and Particle Characterization, BASF SE (Germany); Fissan, Heinz [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology e. V. (IUTA) (Germany); Pui, David Y. H., E-mail: dyhpui@umn.ed [The University of Minnesota, Department of Mechanical Engineering (United States)

    2009-01-15

    In this work, the structural properties of silver nanoparticle agglomerates generated using condensation and evaporation method in an electric tube furnace followed by a coagulation process are analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Agglomerates with mobility diameters of 80, 120, and 150 nm are sampled using the electrostatic method and then imaged by TEM. The primary particle diameter of silver agglomerates was 13.8 nm with a standard deviation of 2.5 nm. We obtained the relationship between the projected area equivalent diameter (d{sub pa}) and the mobility diameter (d{sub m}), i.e., d{sub pa} = 0.92 {+-} 0.03 d{sub m} for particles from 80 to 150 nm. We obtained fractal dimensions of silver agglomerates using three different methods: (1) D{sub f} = 1.84 {+-} 0.03, 1.75 {+-} 0.06, and 1.74 {+-} 0.03 for d{sub m} = 80, 120, and 150 nm, respectively from projected TEM images using a box counting algorithm; (2) fractal dimension (D{sub fL}) = 1.47 based on maximum projected length from projected TEM images using an empirical equation proposed by Koylu et al. (1995) Combust Flame 100:621-633; and (3) mass fractal-like dimension (D{sub fm}) = 1.71 theoretically derived from the mobility analysis proposed by Lall and Friedlander (2006) J Aerosol Sci 37:260-271. We also compared the number of primary particles in agglomerate and found that the number of primary particles obtained from the projected surface area using an empirical equation proposed by Koylu et al. (1995) Combust Flame 100:621-633 is larger than that from using the relationship, d{sub pa} = 0.92 {+-} 0.03 d{sub m} or from using the mobility analysis.

  16. A new stochastic approach for the simulation of agglomeration between colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Christophe; Minier, Jean-Pierre; Pozorski, Jacek; Lefèvre, Grégory

    2013-11-12

    This paper presents a stochastic approach for the simulation of particle agglomeration, which is addressed as a two-step process: first, particles are transported by the flow toward each other (collision step) and, second, short-ranged particle-particle interactions lead either to the formation of an agglomerate or prevent it (adhesion step). Particle collisions are treated in the framework of Lagrangian approaches where the motions of a large number of particles are explicitly tracked. The key idea to detect collisions is to account for the whole continuous relative trajectory of particle pairs within each time step and not only the initial and final relative distances between two possible colliding partners at the beginning and at the end of the time steps. The present paper is thus the continuation of a previous work (Mohaupt M., Minier, J.-P., Tanière, A. A new approach for the detection of particle interactions for large-inertia and colloidal particles in a turbulent flow, Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2011, 37, 746-755) and is devoted to an extension of the approach to the treatment of particle agglomeration. For that purpose, the attachment step is modeled using the DLVO theory (Derjaguin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek) which describes particle-particle interactions as the sum of van der Waals and electrostatic forces. The attachment step is coupled with the collision step using a common energy balance approach, where particles are assumed to agglomerate only if their relative kinetic energy is high enough to overcome the maximum repulsive interaction energy between particles. Numerical results obtained with this model are shown to compare well with available experimental data on agglomeration. These promising results assert the applicability of the present modeling approach over a whole range of particle sizes (even nanoscopic) and solution conditions (both attractive and repulsive cases). PMID:24111685

  17. An Empirical Analysis of Industrial Agglomeration in the Western Ethnic Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xionglang; ZHANG Huiyin

    2014-01-01

    Industrial agglomeration refers to a high concentration of the same industry or related industries in a particular geographic area , and a process of gradual concentration of industrial cap-ital elements within a space .The new economic geography considers that industrial agglomeration is caused by circulating cumulative cause and effect . Accidental disturbance destroys the original bal-ance of the symmetrical area , which in turn brings about the expansion of the market in a concentrated industrial area , which then causes the effect of market expansion.This, accordingly, induces the factors of production to begin to concentrate in the area.The concentration of elements and industries brings about the “regional price index effect”.The concentration of manufacturers in the region is helpful in reducing both transportation costs and living costs of the labor .Accordingly , the elements become further concentrated , which causes the ex-pansion of market scale and the concentration of el-ements.Finally, a kind of industrial agglomeration forms.Industrial agglomeration is not only a kind of group concentration of similar enterprises in a specific region , but most importantly it is a kind of common growth among the enterprises .Therefore, the degree of concentration of an industry reflects the competiveness of an industry , which in turn re-flects the economic strength of a region or a coun-try.The concept that industrial concentration could promote the relative competiveness of the industries in the region has already been accepted by most e-conomists .Hence , it has an important meaning re-garding the study of industrial agglomeration in the western ethnic region . There are two ways to measure industrial ag-glomeration.One is the Gini Coefficient index and the other is the Industrial Agglomeration Index of location quotient .The author thinks that the degree of regional industrial agglomeration could either be examined with a static stock index , or a dynamic

  18. Trafifc lights for axon growth:proteoglycans and their neuronal receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjie Shen

    2014-01-01

    Axon growth is a central event in the development and post-injury plasticity of the nervous system. Growing axons encounter a wide variety of environmental instructions. Much like trafifc lights in controlling the migrating axons, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and hepa-ran sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) often lead to“stop”and“go”growth responses in the axons, respectively. Recently, the LAR family and NgR family molecules were identified as neuronal receptors for CSPGs and HSPGs. These discoveries provided molecular tools for further study of mechanisms underlying axon growth regulation. More importantly, the identiifcation of these proteoglycan receptors offered potential therapeutic targets for promoting post-injury axon re-generation.

  19. Coculture of elongated neuron axon with poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) biomembrane in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程飚; 陈峥嵘

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To elongate human nerve axon in culture and search for suitable support matrices for peripheral nervous system transplantation.Methods: Human embryo cortical neuronal cells,seeded on poly ( D, L-lactide-co-glycolide ) ( PLGA )membrane scaffolds, were elongated with a self-made neuro-axon extending device. The growth and morphological changes of neuron axons were observed to measure axolemmal permeability after elongation.Neurofilament protein was stained by immunohistochemical technique.Results: Human embryo neuron axon could be elongated and cultured on the PLGA membrane and retain their normal form and function.Conclusions: Three dimensional scaffolds with elongated neuron axon have the basic characteristics of artificial nerves, indicating a fundemental theory of nerve repair with elongated neuron axon.

  20. Disruption of Cnp1 uncouples oligodendroglial functions in axonal support and myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe-Siefke, Corinna; Goebbels, Sandra; Gravel, Michel; Nicksch, Eva; Lee, John; Braun, Peter E; Griffiths, Ian R; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2003-03-01

    Myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes enables rapid impulse propagation in the central nervous system. But long-term interactions between axons and their myelin sheaths are poorly understood. Here we show that Cnp1, which encodes 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in oligodendrocytes, is essential for axonal survival but not for myelin assembly. In the absence of glial cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, mice developed axonal swellings and neurodegeneration throughout the brain, leading to hydrocephalus and premature death. But, in contrast to previously studied myelin mutants, the ultrastructure, periodicity and physical stability of myelin were not altered in these mice. Genetically, the chief function of glia in supporting axonal integrity can thus be completely uncoupled from its function in maintaining compact myelin. Oligodendrocyte dysfunction, such as that in multiple sclerosis lesions, may suffice to cause secondary axonal loss. PMID:12590258

  1. X11/Mint Genes Control Polarized Localization of Axonal Membrane Proteins in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett G Gross; Lone, G. Mohiddin; Leung, Lok Kwan; Hartenstein, Volker; Guo, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Mislocalization of axonal proteins can result in misassembly and/or miswiring of neural circuits, causing disease. To date, only a handful of genes that control polarized localization of axonal membrane proteins have been identified. Here we report that Drosophila X11/Mint proteins are required for targeting several proteins, including human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Drosophila APP-like protein (APPL), to axonal membranes and for their exclusion from dendrites of the mushroom body i...

  2. Actin turnover is required to prevent axon retraction driven by endogenous actomyosin contractility

    OpenAIRE

    Gallo, Gianluca; Yee, Hal F.; Letourneau, Paul C.

    2002-01-01

    Growth cone motility and guidance depend on the dynamic reorganization of filamentous actin (F-actin). In the growth cone, F-actin undergoes turnover, which is the exchange of actin subunits from existing filaments. However, the function of F-actin turnover is not clear. We used jasplakinolide (jasp), a cell-permeable macrocyclic peptide that inhibits F-actin turnover, to study the role of F-actin turnover in axon extension. Treatment with jasp caused axon retraction, demonstrating that axon ...

  3. Directional specificity and patterning of sensory axons in trigeminal ganglion–whisker pad cocultures

    OpenAIRE

    Gunhan-Agar, Emine; Haeberle, Adam; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2000-01-01

    In the rodent trigeminal pathway, trigeminal axons invade the developing whisker pad from a caudal to rostral direction. We investigated directional specificity of embryonic day (E). 15 rat trigeminal axons within this peripheral target field using explant cocultures. E15 trigeminal axons readily grow into the same age whisker pad explants and form follicle-related patterns along a caudal to rostral direction. They also can grow into this target from its lateral aspects. In contrast, they are...

  4. Differential Effects of NGF and NT-3 on Embryonic Trigeminal Axon Growth Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Ulupinar, Emel; Jacquin, Mark F.; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) on trigeminal axon growth patterns. Embryonic (E13–15) wholemount explants of the rat trigeminal pathway including the whisker pads, trigeminal ganglia, and brainstem were cultured in serum-free medium (SFM) or SFM supplemented with NGF or NT-3 for 3 days. Trigeminal axon growth patterns were analyzed with the use of lipophilic tracer DiI. In wholemount cultures grown in SFM, trigeminal axon projectio...

  5. Axonal Transport Proteomics Reveals Mobilization of Translation Machinery to the Lesion Site in Injured Sciatic Nerve*

    OpenAIRE

    Michaelevski, Izhak; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Lynn, Aenoch; Burlingame, Alma L.; Fainzilber, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Investigations of the molecular mechanisms underlying responses to nerve injury have highlighted the importance of axonal transport systems. To obtain a comprehensive view of the protein ensembles associated with axonal transport in injured axons, we analyzed the protein compositions of axoplasm concentrated at ligatures following crush injury of rat sciatic nerve. LC-MS/MS analyses of iTRAQ-labeled peptides from axoplasm distal and proximal to the ligation sites revealed protein ensembles tr...

  6. RNA Sequence Reveals Mouse Retinal Transcriptome Changes Early after Axonal Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuda, Masayuki; Tanaka, Yuji; Ryu, Morin; Tsuda, Satoru; Nakazawa, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death caused by axonal injury. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in RGC death remain unclear. In this study, we investigated changes in the transcriptome profile following axonal injury in mice (C57BL/6) with RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. The experiment group underwent an optic nerve crush (ONC) procedure to induce axonal injury in the right eye, and the control group underwent a sham proce...

  7. An SEM/EDX study of bed agglomerates formed during fluidized bed combustion of three biomass fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The agglomeration behaviour of three biomass fuels (exhausted and virgin olive husk and pine seed shells) during fluidized bed combustion in a lab-scale reactor was studied by means of SEM/EDX analysis of bed agglomerate samples. The effect of the fuel ash composition, bed temperature and sand particle size on agglomeration was investigated. The study was focused on the main fuel ash components and on their interaction with the bed sand particles. Agglomeration was favoured by high temperature, small sand size, a high fraction of K and Na and a low fraction of Ca and Mg in the fuel ash. An initial fuel ash composition close to the low-melting point eutectic composition appears to enhance agglomeration. The agglomerates examined by SEM showed a hollow structure, with an internal region enriched in K and Na where extensive melting is evident and an external one where sand particles are only attached by a limited number of fused necks. Non-molten or partially molten ash structures deposited on the sand surface and enriched in Ca and Mg were also observed. These results support an ash deposition-melting mechanism: the ash released by burning char particles inside the agglomerates is quantitatively deposited on the sand surface and then gradually embedded in the melt. The low-melting point compounds in the ash migrate towards the sand surface enriching the outermost layer, while the ash structure is progressively depleted of these compounds

  8. Desulfurization and de-ashing of a mixture of subbituminous coal and gangue minerals by selective oil agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayhan, F.D. [Dicle University, Diyarbakir (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2009-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate desulfurization and de-ashing of a mixture of subbituminous coal and gangue minerals by the agglomeration method. For this purpose, experimental studies were conducted on a mixture containing subbituminous coal, pyrite, quartz and calcite. The effects of some parameters that markedly influence the effectiveness of selective oil agglomeration, such as solid concentration, pH, bridging liquid type and concentration, and depressant type and amount, were investigated. Agglomeration results showed that the usage of various depressants (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, FeCl3, corn starch, wheat starch) in the agglomeration medium has a positive effect on the reduction of ash and total sulfur content of agglomerates. It was found that an agglomerate product containing 3.03% total sulfur and 25.01% ash with a total sulfur reduction of 56.71% was obtained from a feed that contained 7% total sulfur and 43.58% ash when FeCl{sub 3} was used in the agglomeration medium.

  9. Tests of Bed Agglomeration Tendency Using a Rotating Furnace; Roterugn foer bedoemning av sintringsbenaegenhet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larfeldt, Jenny; Zintl, Frank [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2003-08-01

    Bed sintering is a well known problem in fluidised bed boilers. In order to avoid bed sintering the bed material turn over ratio is high which leads a high consumption of bed material. This work aims at developing and evaluating a method for testing the bed agglomeration tendency of a FB bed material by using a rotating furnace. A rotating furnace has been designed and tests have shown that three temperatures describing the increasing agglomeration tendency can be evaluated; TA when several particles stick to each other and to the crucible wall, TB when half of the material sticks to the wall and TC when almost all the material forms a ball in the crucible. Comparison with bed agglomeration tests has shown that TA is between 80 deg C to 130 deg C lower than the bed agglomeration temperature from fluid bed tests. It is shown that TB is closer to the bed agglomeration temperature and finally that the temperature TC is higher than the bed agglomeration temperature. It is concluded that in the rotating furnace sticking of particles is visualised early, and that this sticking will not cause defluidisation of the bed until more than half of the material in the crucible is sticky. Repeated tests has been performed at a heating rate of 5 deg/minute and a rotating speed of 12 rpm and a furnace inclination of 20 deg was found to give distinct results in the evaluation. The evaluation has shown to be reproducible at lower temperatures. At higher temperatures, around 1,000 deg C, the evaluation was complicated by a poor picture quality which probably can be improved by proper cooling of the camera. It has also been shown that sticking of material in the rotating furnace could be detected at relatively low temperatures of 750 deg C that disappeared at higher temperatures. This is likely to be explained by melting salts that evaporates as temperature increase. At even higher temperatures the sticking reappeared until a ball was formed in the crucible. The latter sticking is

  10. Thiazolidinediones promote axonal growth through the activation of the JNK pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A Quintanilla

    Full Text Available The axon is a neuronal process involved in protein transport, synaptic plasticity, and neural regeneration. It has been suggested that their structure and function are profoundly impaired in neurodegenerative diseases. Previous evidence suggest that Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors-γ (PPARγ promote neuronal differentiation on various neuronal cell types. In addition, we demonstrated that activation of PPARγby thiazolidinediones (TZDs drugs that selectively activate PPARγ prevent neurite loss and axonal damage induced by amyloid-β (Aβ. However, the potential role of TZDs in axonal elongation and neuronal polarity has not been explored. We report here that the activation of PPARγ by TZDs promoted axon elongation in primary hippocampal neurons. Treatments with different TZDs significantly increased axonal growth and branching area, but no significant effects were observed in neurite elongation compared to untreated neurons. Treatment with PPARγ antagonist (GW 9662 prevented TZDs-induced axonal growth. Recently, it has been suggested that the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK plays an important role regulating axonal growth and neuronal polarity. Interestingly, in our studies, treatment with TZDs induced activation of the JNK pathway, and the pharmacological blockage of this pathway prevented axon elongation induced by TZDs. Altogether, these results indicate that activation of JNK induced by PPARγactivators stimulates axonal growth and accelerates neuronal polarity. These novel findings may contribute to the understanding of the effects of PPARγ on neuronal differentiation and validate the use of PPARγ activators as therapeutic agents in neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Roles of NAD in Protection of Axon against Degeneration via SIRT1 Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Guo, Wei-Hua; Qi, Xiao-Xia; Li, Gui-Bao; Hu, Yan-Lai; Wu, Qi; Ding, Zhao-Xi; Li, Hong-Yu; Hao, Jing; Sun, Jin-Hao

    2016-04-30

    Axonal degeneration is a common pathological change of neurogenical disease which often arises before the neuron death. But it had not found any effective method to protect axon from degeneration. In this study we intended to confirm the protective effect of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), investigate the optimal administration dosage and time of NAD, and identify the relationship between silence signal regulating factor 1 (SIRT1) and axonal degeneration. An axonal degeneration model was established using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons injured by vincristine to observe the protective effects of NAD to the injured axons. In addition, the potential contribution of the SIRT1 in axonal degeneration was also investigated. Through the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, immunochemistry staining, axons counting and length measuring, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation, we demonstrated that NAD played an important role in preventing axonal degeneration. Further study revealed that the expression of SIRT1 and phosphorylated Akt1 (p-Akt1) was up-regulated when NAD was added into the culturing medium. Taking together, our results demonstrated that NAD might delay the axonal degeneration through SIRT1/Akt1 pathways. PMID:27080463

  12. In vivo imaging of axonal transport using MRI: aging and Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoshima, Satoshi [University of Washington, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, 1959 N.E. Pacific Street, RR215, Box 357115, Seattle, WA (United States); Cross, Donna [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, 1959 N.E. Pacific Street, RR215, Box 357115, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    MRI using manganese as a trans-synaptic axonal tracing agent can unveil dynamics of axonal transport in living subjects. We use this technology to test the hypotheses if impaired axonal transport is a significant pathophysiological process in aging and early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in part accounting for ''selective vulnerability'' of projection neurons in AD. To allow quantitative assessment of axonal transport in vivo, we developed voxel-based statistical mapping technology as well as a tracer kinetic modeling method based on mass transport for manganese-enhanced MRI to estimate axonal transport rates in aging rats and AD transgenic mice. These techniques demonstrated manganese-enhanced signal changes in axonal projections of the olfactory tract and decreased axonal transport rates in rodent models of aging and AD. Altered axonal transport may be a critical pathophysiological process in aging and AD. Manganese-enhanced MRI provides exciting opportunities for the investigations of altered axonal transport in AD and related disorders. (orig.)

  13. MicroRNA-210 promotes sensory axon regeneration of adult mice in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi-Wen; Jiang, Jing-Jing; Yan-Gao; Wang, Rui-Ying; Tu, Guan-Jun

    2016-05-27

    Axon regeneration as a critical step in nerve repairing and remodeling after peripheral nerve injury relies on regulation of gene expression. MicroRNAs are emerging to be important epigenetic regulators of gene expression to control axon regeneration. Here we used a novel in vivo electroporation approach to transfect microRNA-210 (miR-210) or siRNAs to adult mice dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, measured the axon length 3days after sciatic nerve crush or dissociated DRG cultures in vitro to detect the effect of miR-210 in sensory axon regeneration. Importantly, we found that miR-210 overexpression could promote sensory axon regeneration and inhibit apoptsosis by ephrin-A3 (EFNA3). In addition, inhibition of endogenous miR-210 in DRG neurons impaired axon regeneration in vitro and in vivo, the regulatory effect of miR-210 was mediated by increased expression of EFNA3 because downregulation of EFNA3 fully rescued axon regeneration. We thus demonstrate that miR-210 is a new physiological regulator of sensory axon regeneration, and EFNA3 may be the functional target of miR-210. We conclude that miR-210 may play an important role in sensory axon regeneration. PMID:27102143

  14. N-Propionylmannosamine stimulates axonal elongation in a murine model of sciatic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Witzel; Werner Reutter; G Bjrn Stark; Georgios Koulaxouzidis

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that sialic acid plays an important role during nerve regeneration. Sialic acids can be modiifed in vitro as well as in vivo using metabolic oligosaccharide engineering of the N-acyl side chain. N-Propionylmannosamine (ManNProp) increases neurite outgrowth and accelerates the reestablishment of functional synapses in vitro. We investigated the inlfuence of systemic ManNProp application using a speciifc in vivo mouse model. Using mice expressing axonal lfuorescent proteins, we quantiifed the extension of regenerating axons, the number of regenerating axons, the number of arborising axons and the number of branches per axon 5 days after injury. Sciatic nerves from non-expressing mice were grafted into those expressing yellow lfuorescent protein. We began a twice-daily intraperitoneal application of either peracetylated ManNProp (200 mg/kg) or saline solution 5 days before injury, and continued it until nerve harvest (5 days after transection). ManNProp signiifcantly increased the mean distance of axonal regeneration (2.49 mm vs. 1.53 mm;P<0.005) and the number of arborizing axons (21%vs. 16%;P=0.008) 5 days after sciatic nerve grafting. ManNProp did not affect the number of regenerating axons or the number of branches per arborizing axon. The biochemical glycoen-gineering of the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid might be a promising approach for improving peripheral nerve regeneration.

  15. N-Propionylmannosamine stimulates axonal elongation in a murine model of sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Witzel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that sialic acid plays an important role during nerve regeneration. Sialic acids can be modified in vitro as well as in vivo using metabolic oligosaccharide engineering of the N-acyl side chain. N-Propionylmannosamine (ManNProp increases neurite outgrowth and accelerates the reestablishment of functional synapses in vitro. We investigated the influence of systemic ManNProp application using a specific in vivo mouse model. Using mice expressing axonal fluorescent proteins, we quantified the extension of regenerating axons, the number of regenerating axons, the number of arborising axons and the number of branches per axon 5 days after injury. Sciatic nerves from non-expressing mice were grafted into those expressing yellow fluorescent protein. We began a twice-daily intraperitoneal application of either peracetylated ManNProp (200 mg/kg or saline solution 5 days before injury, and continued it until nerve harvest (5 days after transection. ManNProp significantly increased the mean distance of axonal regeneration (2.49 mm vs. 1.53 mm; P < 0.005 and the number of arborizing axons (21% vs. 16% P = 0.008 5 days after sciatic nerve grafting. ManNProp did not affect the number of regenerating axons or the number of branches per arborizing axon. The biochemical glycoengineering of the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid might be a promising approach for improving peripheral nerve regeneration.

  16. Regulation of axon guidance by compartmentalized nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colak, Dilek; Ji, Sheng-Jian; Porse, Bo T; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2013-01-01

    show that Robo3.2, a receptor for the Slit family of guidance cues, is synthesized locally within axons of commissural neurons. Robo3.2 translation is induced by floor-plate-derived signals as axons cross the spinal cord midline. Robo3.2 is also a predicted target of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay...... (NMD) pathway. We find that NMD regulates Robo3.2 synthesis by inducing the degradation of Robo3.2 transcripts in axons that encounter the floor plate. Commissural neurons deficient in NMD proteins exhibit aberrant axonal trajectories after crossing the midline, consistent with misregulation of Robo3...

  17. Permissive Schwann cell graft/spinal cord interfaces for axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ryan R; Henao, Martha; Pearse, Damien D; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of autologous Schwann cells (SCs) to repair the injured spinal cord is currently being evaluated in a clinical trial. In support, this study determined properties of spinal cord/SC bridge interfaces that enabled regenerated brainstem axons to cross them, possibly leading to improvement in rat hindlimb movement. Fluid bridges of SCs and Matrigel were placed in complete spinal cord transections. Compared to pregelled bridges of SCs and Matrigel, they improved regeneration of brainstem axons across the rostral interface. The regenerating brainstem axons formed synaptophysin(+) bouton-like terminals and contacted MAP2A(+) dendrites at the caudal interface. Brainstem axon regeneration was directly associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP(+)) astrocyte processes that elongated into the SC bridge. Electron microscopy revealed that axons, SCs, and astrocytes were enclosed together within tunnels bounded by a continuous basal lamina. Neuroglycan (NG2) expression was associated with these tunnels. One week after injury, the GFAP(+) processes coexpressed nestin and brain lipid-binding protein, and the tips of GFAP(+)/NG2(+) processes extended into the bridges together with the regenerating brainstem axons. Both brainstem axon regeneration and number of GFAP(+) processes in the bridges correlated with improvement in hindlimb locomotion. Following SCI, astrocytes may enter a reactive state that prohibits axon regeneration. Elongation of astrocyte processes into SC bridges, however, and formation of NG2(+) tunnels enable brainstem axon regeneration and improvement in function. It is important for spinal cord repair to define conditions that favor elongation of astrocytes into lesions/transplants. PMID:24152553

  18. Studying Axonal Regeneration by Laser Microsurgery and High-Resolution Videomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; López-Schier, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous and unpredictable environmental insult, disease, or trauma can affect the integrity and function of neuronal circuits, leading to irreversible neural dysfunction. The peripheral nervous system can robustly regenerate axons after damage to recover the capacity to transmit sensory information to the brain. The mechanisms that allow axonal repair remain incompletely understood. Here we present a preparation in zebrafish that combines laser microsurgery of sensory axons and videomicroscopy of neurons in multicolor transgenic specimens. This simple protocol allows controlled damage of axons and dynamic high-resolution visualization and quantification of repair. PMID:27464814

  19. Disentangling the effects of polymer coatings on silver nanoparticle agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity to determine mechanisms of nanotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are frequently coated with a variety of polymers, which may affect various interdependent mechanisms of toxicity or antimicrobial action, including agglomeration and dissolution rates. Here, we systematically measure how citrate, dextran, 5 and 20 kDa poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) coatings affect AgNP agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity. In addition, to disentangle the coatings’ effects on agglomeration from their other effects, we produce multiple stable agglomerate sizes of several of the coated ∼23 nm AgNPs ranging from singly-dispersed to mean agglomerate sizes of several hundred nanometers. These dispersions allow us to independently study the effects of agglomeration and polymer coating on dissolution rate and hemolytic toxicity. We find that both hemolytic toxicity and dissolution rate are highest for the 5 kDa PEG coating, and toxicity and dissolution rate decrease significantly with increasing agglomerate size independent of coating. This correlation between toxicity and dissolution rate suggests that both polymer coating and agglomeration may affect hemolytic toxicity largely through their effects on dissolution. Because both the AgNP dissolution rate and hemolysis decrease only moderately compared to the large increases in agglomerate size, AgNPs’ hemolytic toxicity may be caused by their large surface area and consequently high dissolution rate, rather than from other size-specific effects. At the silver concentrations used in this work, silver dissolved from AgNPs is expected to be primarily in the form of AgCl NPs, which are therefore more likely than Ag+ ions to be the primary drivers of hemolytic toxicity. In addition, all AgNPs we tested are much more toxic to horse red blood cells than sheep red blood cells, highlighting the complexity of toxic responses and the need to test toxicity in multiple biological systems.

  20. Experimental determination of bed agglomeration tendencies of some common agricultural residues in fluidized bed combustion and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, E.; Rao, A.N. [Anna University, Madras (India). Centre for New and Renewable Sources of Energy; Ohman, M.; Nordin, A. [Umea University (Sweden). Energy Technology Centre; Gabra, M. [Lulea University of Technology (Sweden). Div. of Energy Engineering; Liliedahl, T. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    1998-12-31

    Ever increasing energy demand and the polluting nature of existing fossil fuel energy sources demonstrate the need for other non-polluting and renewable sources of energy. The agricultural residues available in abundance in many countries can be used for power generation. The fluidized bed technology seems to be suitable for converting a wide range of agricultural residues into energy, due to its inherent advantages of fuel flexibility, low operating temperature and isothermal operating condition. The major ash-related problem encountered in fluidized beds is agglomeration which, in the worst case, may result in total defluidization and unscheduled downtime. The initial agglomeration temperature for some common tropical agricultural residues were experimentally determined by using a newly developed method based on the controlled fluidized bed agglomeration test. The agricultural residues chosen for the study were rice husk, bagasse, cane trash and olive flesh. The results showed that the initial agglomeration temperatures were less than the initial deformation temperature predicted by the ASTM standard ash fusion tests for all fuels considered. The initial agglomeration temperatures of rice husk and bagasse were more than 1000{sup o}C. The agglomeration of cane trash and olive flesh was encountered at relatively low temperatures and their initial agglomeration temperatures in gasification were lower than those in combustion with both bed materials. The use of lime as bed material instead of quartz improved the agglomeration temperature of cane trash and olive flesh in combustion and decreased the same in gasification. The results indicate that rice husk and bagasse can be used in the fluidized bed for energy generation since their agglomeration temperatures are sufficiently high. (author)

  1. Axons, but not cell bodies, are activated by electrical stimulation in cortical gray matter. II. Evidence from selective inactivation of cell bodies and axon initial segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, L G; Bullier, J

    1998-02-01

    The results presented in the companion paper showed that extracellular electrical stimulation of the gray matter directly activates axons, but not cell bodies. The second set of experiments presented here was designed to separate the contribution of the axon initial segments and cell bodies from that of the axonal branches to the pool of presynaptic neuronal elements activated by electrical stimulation. For that purpose, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) iontophoresis was used to induce a selective inactivation of the cell body and of the adjoining portion of the axon by depolarization block, without affecting axonal branches that lack NMDA receptors. After NMDA iontophoresis, the neurons located near the iontophoresis electrode became unable to generate action potentials in an irreversible manner. When the NMDA-induced depolarization block was performed at the site of electrical stimulation, an unexpected increase in the amplitude of the orthodromic responses was observed. Several control experiments suggested that the field potential increase was due to changes of the local environment in the vicinity of the iontophoresis pipette, which led to an increased excitability of the axons. After the period of superexcitability, the orthodromic responses displayed an amplitude that was 15-20% lower than that observed before the NMDA-induced depolarization block, even though cell bodies and axon initial segment at the site of stimulation could not be activated by electrical stimulation. This result shows a low contribution for axon initial segments to the pool of neuronal elements activated by the electrical stimulation. Altogether, these experiments demonstrate that the postsynaptic responses obtained after electrical stimulation of the cortical gray matter result almost exclusively from the activation of axonal branches. Since the neocortex is organised as a network of local and long-range reciprocal connections, great attention must be paid to the interpretation of data

  2. Biomarker evidence of axonal injury in neuroasymptomatic HIV-1 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jessen Krut

    Full Text Available Prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-1 infected patients is reported to be high. Whether this is a result of active HIV-related neurodegeneration is unclear. We examined axonal injury in HIV-1 patients by measuring the light subunit of neurofilament protein (NFL in CSF with a novel, sensitive method.With a cross-sectional design, CSF concentrations of neurofilament protein light (NFL (marker of neuronal injury, neopterin (intrathecal immunoactivation and CSF/Plasma albumin ratio (blood-brain barrier integrity were analyzed on CSF from 252 HIV-infected patients, subdivided into untreated neuroasymptomatics (n = 200, HIV-associated dementia (HAD (n = 14 and on combinations antiretroviral treatment (cART (n = 85, and healthy controls (n = 204. 46 HIV-infected patients were included in both treated and untreated groups, but sampled at different timepoints. Furthermore, 78 neuroasymptomatic patients were analyzed before and after treatment initiation.While HAD patients had the highest NFL concentrations, elevated CSF NFL was also found in 33% of untreated neuroasymptomatic patients, mainly in those with blood CD4+ cell counts below 250 cells/μL. CSF NFL concentrations in the untreated neuroasymptomatics and treated groups were equivalent to controls 18.5 and 3.9 years older, respectively. Neopterin correlated with NFL levels in untreated groups while the albumin ratio correlated with NFL in both untreated and treated groups.Increased CSF NFL indicates ongoing axonal injury in many neuroasymptomatic patients. Treatment decreases NFL, but treated patients retain higher levels than controls, indicating either continued virus-related injury or an aging-like effect of HIV infection. NFL correlates with neopterin and albumin ratio, suggesting an association between axonal injury, neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier permeability. NFL appears to be a sensitive biomarker of subclinical and clinical brain injury in HIV and warrants further

  3. Hyperactivated Stat3 boosts axon regeneration in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Saloni T; Luo, Xueting; Park, Kevin K; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2016-06-01

    Axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is intrinsically and extrinsically inhibited by multiple factors. One major factor contributing to intrinsic regeneration failure is the inability of mature neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) to activate regeneration-associated transcription factors (TFs) post-injury. A prior study identified TFs overexpressed in neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) compared to the CNS; some of these could be involved in the ability of PNS neurons to regenerate. Of these, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), as well its downstream regeneration-associated targets, showed a significant upregulation in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons, and a constitutively active variant of Stat3 (Stat3CA) promoted neurite growth when expressed in cerebellar neurons (Lerch et al., 2012; Smith et al., 2011). To further enhance STAT3's neurite outgrowth enhancing activity, Stat3CA was fused with a viral activation domain (VP16). VP16 hyperactivates TFs by recruiting transcriptional co-factors to the DNA binding domain (Hirai et al., 2010). Overexpression of this VP16-Stat3CA chimera in primary cortical neurons led to a significant increase of neurite outgrowth as well as Stat3 transcriptional activity in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo transduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) with AAV constructs expressing VP16-Stat3CA resulted in regeneration of optic nerve axons after injury, to a greater degree than for those expressing Stat3CA alone. These findings confirm and extend the concept that overexpression of hyperactivated transcription factors identified as functioning in PNS regeneration can promote axon regeneration in the CNS. PMID:27060489

  4. Excitability properties of motor axons in adults with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliff S. Klein

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy (CP is a permanent disorder caused by a lesion to the developing brain that significantly impairs motor function. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying motor impairment are not well understood. Specifically, few have addressed whether motoneuron or peripheral axon properties are altered in CP, even though disruption of descending inputs to the spinal cord may cause them to change. In the present study, we have compared nerve excitability properties in seven adults with CP and fourteen healthy controls using threshold tracking techniques by stimulating the median nerve at the wrist and recording the compound muscle action potential (CMAP over the abductor pollicis brevis. The excitability properties in the CP subjects were found to be abnormal. Early and late depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus was significantly larger (i.e., fanning out, and resting current-threshold (I/V slope was smaller, in CP compared to control. In addition resting threshold and rheobase tended to be larger in CP. According to a modeling analysis of the data, an increase in leakage current under or through the myelin sheath, i.e., the Barrett-Barrett conductance (GBB, combined with a slight hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential, best explained the group differences in excitability properties. There was a trend for those with greater impairment in gross motor function to have more abnormal axon properties. The findings indicate plasticity of motor axon properties far removed from the site of the lesion. We suspect that this plasticity is caused by disruption of descending inputs to the motoneurons at an early age around the time of their injury.

  5. Investigation of coalescence kinetics of microcristalline cellulose in fluidised bed spray agglomeration: experimental studies and modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Peglow

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a model for fluidized bed spray agglomeration is presented. To describe the processes of heat and mass transfer, a physical based model is derived. The model takes evaporation process from the wetted particles as well as the effects of transfer phenomena between suspension gas and bypass gas into account. The change of particle size distribution during agglomeration, modeled by population balances, is linked to the heat and mass transfer model. A new technique is derived to extract agglomeration and nucleation rates from experimental data. Comparisons of experiments and simulations are presented.

  6. Improvement of cobalt-transport in axons by complexing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallyas, F; Lénárd, L; Lázár, G

    1978-09-01

    The use of the cobalt technique is limited by the fact that cobaltous ions travel within axons for a shorter distance than do other intracellular markers. In the present experiments different organic cobaltous complexes were tested in the rat's sciatic nerve. Cobaltous complexes containing ornithine, threonine, lysine or Girard's reagent travelled two or three times further than did the cobaltous ions alone. Using the lysine complex in the frog's visual system, very fine terminals were observed which have never been demonstrated with other techniques. The possible use of other metal complexes as intracellular markers are also discussed. PMID:19605220

  7. Mechanisms of hyperpolarization in regenerated mature motor axons in cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Krarup, Christian

    2004-01-01

    We found persistent abnormalities in the recovery of membrane excitability in long-term regenerated motor nerve fibres in the cat as indicated in the companion paper. These abnormalities could partly be explained by membrane hyperpolarization. To further investigate this possibility, we compared...... the changes in excitability in control nerves and long-term regenerated cat nerves (3-5 years after tibial nerve crush) during manoeuvres known to alter axonal membrane Na(+)-K(+) pump function: polarization, cooling to 20 degrees C, reperfusion after 10 min ischaemia, and up to 60 s of repetitive stimulation...

  8. Study on urban agglomeration: Progress and prospects%城市群研究进展与展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾朝林

    2011-01-01

    Urban agglomeration is a complex with the central city as the core surrounded by two or more cities. It is the objective reflection of the economic growth and social development as well as industrial layout in a region. It has also become a main form of urbanization in developed countries. In fact, the "urban agglomeration" concept in China is the characteristics of a noun, no equivalence in foreign countries. In Western literature, the"urban agglomeration" means "urban cluster", that is, a big city and its surrounding satellite towns in remote sensing image formed the connected irregularities each other, and the spatial range includes "urbanization area (UA)" and "metropolitan area (MA)". Sometimes, some of metropolisesconnected each other are also called as urban agglomeration.United Nations gave a definition of urban agglomeration as follows: "Comprises a city or town proper and also the suburban fringe or thickly settled territory lying outside, but adjacent to, its boundaries. A single large urban agglomeration may comprise several cities or towns and their suburban fringes." Therefore, urban agglomeration in the Western concept includes the cities, towns and urban--region outlying areas. "Urban agglomeration" in China refers to geographical concepts of a group of major cities which are similar and interactions among administrative, transportation, economic, and social fields. In the 21st century, thanks to China's entry into the World Trade Organization, a national coastal urban agglomeration has become the main region for the national trade economy, export and the "world manufacturing bases". Urban agglomeration as an important urban spatial pattern was a unique choice to promote the process of urbanization in China. This article reviewed some progress in studies of urban agglomeration, such as the concept of urban agglomeration, overseas research of urban agglomeration, early researches of Chinese urban agglomeration and studies on Chinese urban

  9. An integrated modeling method for prediction of sulfur content in agglomerate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓方; 桂卫华; 王雅琳; 吴敏

    2003-01-01

    Based on the idea of fusing modeling, an integrated prediction model for sintering process was proposed.A framework for sulfur content prediction was established, which integrated multi modeling ways together, including mathematical model combined with neural network(NN), rule model based on empirical knowledge and modelchoosing coordinator. Via metallurgic mechanism analysis and material balance computation, a mathematical model calculated the sulfur content in agglomerate by the material balance equation with some parameters predicted by NN method. In the other model, the relationship between sulfur content and key factors was described in the form of expert rules. The model-choosing coordinator based on fuzzy logic was introduced to decide the weight of result of each model according to process conditions. The model was tested by industrial application data and produced a relatively satisfactory prediction error. The model also preferably reflected the varying tendency of sulfur content in agglomerate as the evidence of its prediction performance.

  10. Analysis on Ecological Footprint of the Urban Agglomeration in Pearl River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG; Yi; CHENG; Huan; BAI; Zhong-yan; PENG; Xiao-chun

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]The research aimed to calculate and analyze ecological footprint of the urban agglomeration in Pearl River Delta in 2009. [Method]9 cities in Pearl River Delta as research zone, by using calculation model of the ecological footprint, ecological footprint and security of the urban agglomeration in Pearl River Delta were calculated. Current situation and sustainable development condition of the ecological environment in Pearl River Delta were conducted quantitative analysis. [Result] Except construction land and woodland, other 4 kinds of lands were all in ecological deficit states in Pearl River Delta. Especially arable land and fossil fuel land had obvious ecological deficit. [Conclusion]Biological resource consumption level and energy consumption level in Pearl River Delta were higher. We ought to take a variety of measures to reduce ecological deficit, making development manner turn toward sustainable direction.

  11. Colloidal nanoparticles produced from Cu metal in water by laser ablation and their agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hee-Jung; Jung, Euo Chang

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles were prepared from Cu metal in water without any surfactant using a simple one-step laser ablation process with 532 nm Nd-YAG beam irradiation. A surface plasmon band of Cu nanoparticles near 580 nm was not observed; instead, oxidation of the Cu colloidal nanoparticles was noticed. This seems to be due to the partially oxidized copper oxides through the route Cu→Cu2O→CuO. Around 10-nm sized colloidal nanoparticles were agglomerated as a result of oxidation according to the time elapsed, and their sizes were increased to near 200 nm. The agglomeration was confirmed by not only images from transmission electron microscopy but also the long-term observation of the particle size distribution using photon correlation spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown detection, and field flow fractionation.

  12. A Complex Network Approach for Nanoparticle Agglomeration Analysis in Nanoscale Images

    CERN Document Server

    Brandoli, Bruno; Orue, Jonathan; Arruda, Mauro; Goncalves, Diogo; Goncalves, Wesley; Moreira, Raphaell; Rodrigues-Jr, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Complex networks have been widely used in science and technology because of their ability to represent several systems. One of these systems is found in Biochemistry, in which the synthesis of new nanoparticles is a hot topic. However, the interpretation of experimental results in the search of new nanoparticles poses several challenges. This is due to the characteristics of nanoparticles images and due to their multiple intricate properties; one property of recurrent interest is the agglomeration of particles. Addressing this issue, this paper introduces an approach that uses complex networks to detect and describe nanoparticle agglomerates so to foster easier and more insightful analyses. In this approach, each detected particle in an image corresponds to a vertice and the distances between the particles define a criterion for creating edges. Edges are created if the distance is smaller than a radius of interest. Once this network is set, we calculate several discrete measures able to reveal the most outsta...

  13. Agglomeration Economies and Global Cities: The case of London, New York and relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the manner in which agglomeration influenced formation of cities and how this has changed with the evolution of ‘global cities’. Furthermore, a study of global cities concentrating on London and New York, investigating the sales turnover of commercial real estate, is undertaken to investigate any changes in relativity. Changes in capital flows recorded in commercial real estate transactions over time will be analysed using market data supplied by RCA for each city sector ...

  14. Do large agglomerations lead to economic growth? evidence from urban India

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Sabyasachi

    2012-01-01

    The cities and towns of India constitute the world’s second largest urban system besides contributing over 50 per cent of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). This phenomenon has been neglected by the existing studies and writings on urban India. By considering 59 large cities in India and employing new economic geography models, this paper investigates the relevant state and city-specific determinants of urban agglomeration. In addition, the spatial interactions between cities and the...

  15. Quantum dot agglomerates in biological media and their characterization by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moquin, Alexandre; Neibert, Kevin D; Maysinger, Dusica; Winnik, Françoise M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular composition of the biological environment of nanoparticles influences their physical properties and changes their pristine physicochemical identity. In order to understand, or predict, the interactions of cells with specific nanoparticles, it is critical to know their size, shape, and agglomeration state not only in their nascent state but also in biological media. Here, we use asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with on-line multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Visible absorption detections to determine the relative concentration of isolated nanoparticles and agglomerates in the case of three types of semi-conductor quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Media (DMEM) containing 10% of fetal bovine serum (DMEM-FBS). AF4 analysis also yielded the size and size distribution of the agglomerates as a function of the time of QDs incubation in DMEM-FBS. The preferred modes of internalization of the QDs are assessed for three cell-types, N9 microglia, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) and human embryonic kidney cells (Hek293), by confocal fluorescence imaging of live cells, quantitative determination of the intracellular QD concentration, and flow cytometry. There is an excellent correlation between the agglomeration status of the three types of QDs in DMEM-FBS determined by AF4 analysis and their preferred mode of uptake by the three cell lines, which suggests that AF4 yields an accurate description of the nanoparticles as they encounter cells and advocates its use as a means to characterize particles under evaluation. PMID:25542679

  16. Agglomeration and filtration of colloidal suspensions with DVLO interactions in simulation and experiment

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Cake filtration is a widely used solid-liquid separation process. However, the high flow resistance of the nanoporous filter cake lowers the efficiency of the process significantly. The structure and thus the permeability of the filter cakes depend on the compressive load acting on the particles, the particles size, and the agglomeration of the particles. The latter is determined by the particle charge and the ionic strength of the suspension, as described by the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overb...

  17. Agglomeration Effects and Japanese Food Industry Investment in China: Evidence from the Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Shaosheng; TOKUNAGA Suminori; AKUNE Yuko; KAGEYAMA Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses the data from Chugoku Shinshutsu Kigyou Ichiran 2003-2004 (A View of Japanese Enterprises Investments in China 2003-2004) to study 1ocation choice of Japanese food industry investment in 231 Chinese cities from 1992 to 2001, paying a particular attention to agglomeration effects. A negative binominal model indicates that labor cost (WAGE) is the most important factor that deters Japanese food industry investment. Market size (GDP), raw material (MATER), port (PORT) and policy ...

  18. Agglomeration Economies and Industry Location Decisions: The Impacts of Vertical and Horizontal Spillovers

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Jeffrey P.; Morrison Paul, Catherine J.

    2001-01-01

    Economic analysis of production processes and performanace typically neglects consideration of spatial and industry inter-dependencies that may affect economic performance, although there is increasing theoretical recognition that such linkages may be both substantive and expanding. In particular, thick market or agglomeration effects may arise due to knowledge or other types of spillovers associated with own-industry (horizontal), and supply-side or demand-driven(vertical), externalities. ...

  19. Agglomeration Economies and Industry Location Decisions: The Impacts of Vertical and Horizontal Spillovers

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Jeffrey P.; Morrison Paul, Catherine J.

    2001-01-01

    Economic analysis of production processes and performance typically neglects consideration of spatial and industry inter-dependencies that may affect economic performance, although there is increasing theoretical recognition that such linkages may be both substantive and expanding. In particular, thick market or agglomeration effects may arise due to knowledge or other types of spillovers associated with own-industry (horizontal), and supply-side or demand-driven (vertical), externalities. In...

  20. Implications of Agglomeration Economics and Market Access for Firm Growth in Food Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Schmit, Todd M.; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    With the persistant changes in technology and increased competition in food manufacturing, it is important to reassess the effects of agglomeration economies and market access on the performance of firms in the industry. Using survey data from a recent survey of New York state food processors, an ordered logit analysis reveals that firm growth is related to important upstream and downstream market conditions as reflected in increased access to agricultural inputs and growing population canter...

  1. Spherical agglomerates of pure drug nanoparticles for improved pulmonary delivery in dry powder inhalers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to produce micron-sized spherical agglomerates of pure drug nanoparticles to achieve improved aerosol performance in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Sodium cromoglicate was chosen as the model drug. Pure drug nanoparticles were prepared through a bottom-up particle formation process, liquid antisolvent precipitation, and then rapidly agglomerated into porous spherical microparticles by immediate (on-line) spray drying. Nonporous spherical drug microparticles with similar geometric size distribution were prepared by conventional spray drying of the aqueous drug solution, which together with the mechanically micronized drug particles were used as the control samples. The three samples were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, laser diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis, density measurement, powder X-ray diffraction, and in vitro aerosol deposition measurement with a multistage liquid impinger. It was found that drug nanoparticles with a diameter of ∼100 nm were precipitated and agglomerated into highly porous spherical microparticles with a volume median diameter (D50%) of 2.25 ± 0.08 μm and a specific surface area of 158.63 ± 3.27 m2/g. In vitro aerosol deposition studies showed the fine particle fraction of such spherical agglomerates of drug nanoparticles was increased by more than 50 % in comparison with the control samples, demonstrating significant improvements in aerosol performance. The results of this study indicated the potential of the combined particle engineering process of liquid antisolvent precipitation followed by immediate (on-line) spray drying in the development of novel DPI drug products with improved aerosol performance.

  2. Utility assessment of human development indicators: Case of Kolkata Urban agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Keya Chakraborty; Joy Sen

    2011-01-01

    The present paper attempts to establish a set of variables to find out the extent and levels of inequality in Human Development Indicators (HDIs) driven development based on a geographic delineation of Kolkata Urban Agglomeration (KUA). The study is based on the geographic delineation of the region of KUA. Given this background, it assesses health, education and economic scenario of the study area by variables of rates of mortality, literacy and working population, respectively. For the purpo...

  3. Radioisotope studies on the paradox in dispersion and agglomeration of sewage greases discharged from ocean outfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been undertaken in the ocean off Sydney, Australia to monitor the movement and the dispersion of sewage solids. These solids were labelled with a radioisotope, gold-198 prior to ocean discharge. The labelled material was followed at sea using submersible scintillation detectors. Lateral and vertical dispersion coefficients were determined. The experiments showed that under some conditions the labelled sewage grease dispersed and under others the grease agglomerated. This variation is explained in terms of non-conservative processes

  4. Percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of graphene-based nanocomposites with filler agglomeration and interfacial tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Shan, Jerry W.; Weng, George J.

    2015-08-01

    The dispersion state or degree of agglomeration of graphene is known to have a significant influence on the percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of graphene-based polymer nanocomposites. In addition, an imperfectly conducting interface and tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity can also affect the overall conductivity. In this paper, a continuum theory is developed that considers all these factors. We first present a two-scale composite model consisting of graphene-rich regions serving as the agglomerates and a graphene-poor region as the matrix. We then introduce the effective-medium theory to determine the percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of the agglomerate and the composite. To account for the effect of imperfect interfaces, a thin layer of interphase with low conductivity is introduced to build a thinly coated graphene, while to account for the contribution of electron hopping from one graphene to another, Cauchy's statistical function which can reflect the increased tunneling activity near the percolation threshold is introduced. It is shown that the percolation threshold of the nanocomposite is controlled by two dispersion parameters, a and b, and the aspect ratio of agglomerates, αR . It is also shown that the overall conductivity of the nanocomposite mainly depends on the intrinsic conductivity of graphene and polymer matrix, the intrinsic interfacial resistivity, and the tunneling-assisted hopping process. We highlight the conceived theory by demonstrating that a set of recently measured data on the percolation threshold and electrical conductivity of graphene/polystyrene nanocomposites can be well captured by it.

  5. Different roles of municipalities in a urban agglomeration: a regional agent-based economic model

    OpenAIRE

    Baruffini, Moreno; Mini, Valentina; Stricker, Luzius

    2015-01-01

    Historically Switzerland is characterized by numerous small towns. During the twentieth century, the image of Swiss cities has changed: the expansion of the city has reached the limits of administrative urban borders, penetrating in peripheral locations. The main reasons concern not only the territorial environment, but also the possibility to support public services and public investments. Currently, urban agglomerations include dozens of municipalities and this is seen as a virtuous strateg...

  6. The role of specialisation and diversity externalities in the agglomeration of innovative activities

    OpenAIRE

    Paci, Raffaele; Usai, Stefano

    1999-01-01

    This paper contributes to the analysis of the process of spatial agglomeration of innovative activities by investigating directly its determinants. Our main purpose is to identify the extent to which the degree of industrial specialisation (Marshall externalities) or diversity (Jacobs externalities) in the region may affect the innovative output in a particular local industry. Moreover, we test if any relevant difference arises with respect to the role of diversity in metropolitan areas and i...

  7. The Determinants of Regional Specialisation in Business Services: Agglomeration Economies, Vertical Linkages and Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    MELICIANI Valentina; Savona, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The article accounts for the determinants of sectoral specialisation in business services (BS) across the EU-27 regions as determined by: (i) agglomeration economies (ii) the region-specific structure of intermediate linkages (iii) technological innovation and knowledge intensity and (iv) the presence of these factors in neighbouring regions. The empirical analysis draws upon the REGIO panel database over the period 1999–2003. By estimating a Spatial Durbin Model, we find significant spatial ...

  8. Housing Market and Agglomeration of Rent-Seeking Activities: Implications for Regional Development

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Shin-Kun

    2014-01-01

    Rent-seeking is defined as exercising privileges or expending resources in order to obtain uncompensated gain by redistributing the wealth of others without reciprocating any benefits back to society through wealth creation. This paper pioneers in analyzing the agglomeration of rent-seeking activities in geography and the corresponding impact on regional economies. First of all, we construct a theoretical model based on the standard settings in the literature of economic geography with two ty...

  9. Development of clean coal and clean soil technologies using advanced agglomeration technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific objectives of the bituminous coal program were to explore and evaluate the application of advanced agglomeration technology for: (1)desulphurization of bituminous coals to sulphur content acceptable within the current EPA SO2 emission guidelines; (2) deashing of bituminous coals to ash content of less than 10 percent; and (3)increasing the calorific value of bituminous coals to above 13,000 Btu/lb. (VC)

  10. Entrepreneurial Clusters and the Co-agglomeration of Related Industries: Spinouts in Portuguese Plastics and Molds

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Rui; Costa, Carla

    2014-01-01

    The success of ?entrepreneurial clusters' has led policymakers towards extensive efforts to seed local entrepreneurship. A particularly important determinant of the ?supply of entrepreneurs' are industry linkages within cities or regions. Indeed, studies consistently find that the most powerful predictor of future entrepreneurship for a city or region is the presence and strength of incumbent firms in the same or in related industries. This study examines how co-agglomeration (or collocation)...

  11. Bed agglomeration in biomass fueled CFB-boilers; Sintring av baeddmaterial vid biobraensleeldning i CFB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zintl, F. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    In fluidized-bed boilers fired with solid fuels operational problems caused by spontaneous defluidization are sometimes observed. This bed agglomeration can be caused by sintering phenomena where fuel components and/or bed material may be involved. In serious cases the problems can lead to expensive operation breaks. The objective in this project was to show whether this type of operational problems can be minimized by choice of other than conventional bed materials. The study was carried out as model experiments in a larger laboratory scale. In a fluidized bed fired with propane a number of both well known and more unusual bed materials were tried out. The choice of bed materials included some common sands (silver and quartz sand) and, as possible alternatives, olivine sand, zirconium sand, calcined dolomite and the synthetic materials sintered magnesite (MgO) and mullite (alumina silicate). The model experiments were started at about 700 deg C and the temperature then raised until an irreversible bed agglomeration was observed, or to a maximum of 1100 deg C. The most promising results were obtained with calcined dolomite, being an active bed material. With this material no irreversible agglomerations were observed at all. The expensive synthetic materials sintered magnesite and mullite and the zirconium sand turned out as the next best. Olivine sand, on the other hand, showed a clear sensitivity to physical agglomeration and some sensitivity also towards sintering. The common sand types based on silicon oxide clearly showed the worst results. 12 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab 12 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  12. A Free, Open-Source Tool for Identifying Urban Agglomerations Using Point Data

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Jennifer; Chen, Yiqun; Ellis, Peter; Roberts, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a software tool for identifying urban agglomerations in low-information settings. The framework outlined in this paper is designed to work using point data. Our tool and all required data are provided free and in open-source format. This paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of using point-based geographies in regional analysis, discusses the practical and ethical challenges of distinguishing urban from rural regions, details the function of our software, and d...

  13. Urban Amenities or Agglomeration Economies? Locational Behaviour and Entrepreneurial Success of Dutch Fashion Designers

    OpenAIRE

    Rik Wenting; Oedzge Atzema; Koen Frenken

    2008-01-01

    Urban economic growth and industrial clustering is traditionally explained by Marshallian agglomeration economies benefiting co-located firms. The focus on firms rather than people has been challenged by Florida arguing that urban amenities and a tolerant climate attract creative people, and the firms they work for, to certain cities. We analyse to what extent these two mechanisms affect the locational behaviour of Dutch fashion designers. On the basis of a questionnaire, we find that urban a...

  14. Prediction of powder stickiness along spray drying process in relation to agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Gianfrancesco, Alessandro; Turchiuli, Christelle; Dumoulin, Élisabeth; Palzer, S.

    2009-01-01

    The spray drying process consists of a fast convective drying of liquid droplets by hot air. Initially, the water activity (aw) of a drop is close to 1. During drying, the drop surface aw decreases while viscosity increases until reaching a sticky rubbery state before further drying. This can be observed for products such as carbohydrates, leading to particles sticking on walls (product losses) or to adhesion between particles leading to agglomeration. In this study, particle stickiness was i...

  15. Acoustic agglomeration of fine particles based on a high intensity acoustical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Zeng, Xinwu; Tian, Zhangfu

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic agglomeration (AA) is considered to be a promising method for reducing the air pollution caused by fine aerosol particles. Removal efficiency and energy consuming are primary parameters and generally have a conflict with each other for the industry applications. It was proved that removal efficiency is increased with sound intensity and optimal frequency is presented for certain polydisperse aerosol. As a result, a high efficiency and low energy cost removal system was constructed using acoustical resonance. High intensity standing wave is generated by a tube system with abrupt section driven by four loudspeakers. Numerical model of the tube system was built base on the finite element method, and the resonance condition and SPL increase were confirmd. Extensive tests were carried out to investigate the acoustic field in the agglomeration chamber. Removal efficiency of fine particles was tested by the comparison of filter paper mass and particle size distribution at different operating conditions including sound pressure level (SPL), and frequency. The experimental study has demonstrated that agglomeration increases with sound pressure level. Sound pressure level in the agglomeration chamber is between 145 dB and 165 dB from 500 Hz to 2 kHz. The resonance frequency can be predicted with the quarter tube theory. Sound pressure level gain of more than 10 dB is gained at resonance frequency. With the help of high intensity sound waves, fine particles are reduced greatly, and the AA effect is enhanced at high SPL condition. The optimal frequency is 1.1kHz for aerosol generated by coal ash. In the resonace tube, higher resonance frequencies are not the integral multiplies of the first one. As a result, Strong nonlinearity is avoided by the dissonant characteristic and shock wave is not found in the testing results. The mechanism and testing system can be used effectively in industrial processes in the future.

  16. Study on China’s Electronic Information Industrial Agglomeration and Regional Industrial Competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Xuan Zhaohui; Wu Aizhi; Lv Yongbo

    2013-01-01

    Spatial agglomeration and industrial competitiveness are currently two key issues in the study of China’s electronic information industrial development. Based on the data for 1995 - 2010, this paper establishes the indicator system to evaluate the competitiveness of regional electronic information industry. In this paper, location Gini coefficient and the indicator of concentration rate are applied to analyze the characteristics and historical evolution of China’s electronic information indus...

  17. Local Agglomeration, Entrepreneurship and the Great Recession: Evidence from Italian Industrial Districts

    OpenAIRE

    Brunello, Giorgio; Langella, Monica

    2014-01-01

    We ask whether local agglomeration affects how recessions impact on entrepreneurship by comparing the probability of being an entrepreneur before and after the Great 2008 Recession in local labour markets where industrial districts are present and in comparable areas. Using Italian Labour Force quarterly data from 2006 to 2011 and a "difference-in-differences" approach, we find that for males aged 40 to 55, who are more likely to be entrepreneurs, the negative effect of the recession on entre...

  18. Estimating Urban Agglomeration Economies for India: A New Economic Geography Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Sabyasachi

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to provide answer to an important question: Are Indian firms or industries in urban areas operating under decreasing returns to scale or increasing returns to scale? Scale economies are one of the main assumptions of new economic geography models that posit the formation of agglomeration economies. For this purpose, we use Kanemoto et al. (1996) model for estimation of aggregate production function and to derive the magnitude of scale economies. Using firm ...

  19. Location choice of German multinationals in the Czech Republic : the importance of agglomeration economies

    OpenAIRE

    Hecht, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the location choice of German investors in the Czech Republic based on a unique dataset covering all Czech companies with a German equity holder in 2010. The identification of the regional determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI) location is an important regional policy issue as FDI is supposed to improve the labour market conditions of the host region. Using a nested logit approach the impact of agglomeration economies, labour market conditions and distance on the ...

  20. IR STUDY ON MONOMOLECULAR PARTICLE AGGLOMERATES OF POLYSTYRENE OBTAINED BY FREEZE-DRYING OF ITS DILUTE SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Wang; Qing-hua Wang; Rong-shi Cheng

    2002-01-01

    The monomolecular particle agglomerates of polystyrenes were obtained by freeze-drying of its very dilutesolutions of 1.3 x 10-5-2.0 x 10-s g/mL in benzene:cylcohexane (100:1) solvents, and they were annealed at roomtemperature for hundred days before use. According to 13C-NMR measurement the polystyrenes should be practically atactic.The number average molecular weights of the samples are 2.80 x 103, 2.00 x 104, and 1.55 x 106, respectively. The freeze-dried aPS with a molecular weight higher than 104 show two new IR absorption bands at 1098 and 1261 cm-1, which areabsent in the normal aPS and freeze-dried styrene oligomer. it was also found that the low molecular weight samples canonly form powders, whereas the freeze-dried aPS with higher molecular weight form a mixture of powders and fibrils, ofwhich the longer fibrils show a much stronger 1261 cm-1 band than the shorter fibrils and the powder. It seems that the1261 cm-1 band corresponds to the stacking behavior of monomolecular particles.