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Sample records for axon reflex test

  1. Functional testing of the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR

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    Stefano eRamat

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The experimental assessment of the vestibulo-ocular-reflex (VOR gain provides an objective and quantitative measure of VOR performance which is nonetheless difficult to correlate with its efficiency in everyday living conditions. We developed the Head Impulse Testing Device (HITD based on an inertial sensing system allowing to investigate the functional performance of the VOR by testing its gaze stabilization ability in response to head impulses at different head angular accelerations. HITD results on a population of 39 vestibular patients were compared to those of 22 controls. Overall the sensitivity of the HITD was 92% against the results of the clinical head impulse test and 83% against the clinical diagnosis, while the specificity was 58% against the clinical head impulse test and 83% against the diagnosis. The HITD appears to be a very promising tool for detecting abnormal VOR performance while providing information on the functional performance of the rotational VOR. As compared to the usual testing devices the HITD tests higher frequencies and accelerations that characterize head movements in everyday life activities and provides a functional assessment that is more likely to be related to the subject’s self-feeling.

  2. Soleus H-reflex tests in causalgia-dystonia compared with dystonia and mimicked dystonic posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelman, J. H.; Hilgevoord, A. A.; Bour, L. J.; Speelman, J. D.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    Dystonia in the causalgia-dystonia syndrome is characterized by a fixed dystonic posture. To identify involvement of central pathophysiologic mechanisms, we analyzed soleus H-reflex tests in five patients with causalgia-dystonia. Soleus H-reflex test results in these patients differed from those in

  3. [Experimental testing of Pflüger's reflex hypothesis of menstruation in late 19th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer, H H

    1980-07-01

    Pflüger's hypothesis of a nerve reflex as the cause of menstruation published in 1865 and accepted by many, nonetheless did not lead to experimental investigations for 25 years. According to this hypothesis the nerve reflex starts in the ovary by an increase of the intraovarian pressure by the growing follicles. In 1884 Adolph Kehrer proposed a program to test the nerve reflex, but only in 1890, Cohnstein artificially increased the intraovarian pressure in women by bimanual compression from the outside and the vagina. His results were not convincing. Six years later, Strassmann injected fluids into ovaries of animals and obtained changes in the uterus resembling those of oestrus. His results seemed to verify a prognosis derived from Pflüger's hypothesis. Thus, after a long interval, that hypothesis had become a paradigma. Though reasons can be given for the delay, it is little understood, why experimental testing started so late.

  4. Does diurnal variation in cough reflex testing exist in healthy young adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sarah; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether diurnal variation in cough reflex sensitivity exists in healthy young adults when a tidal-breathing method is used. Fifty-three participants (19-37 years) underwent cough reflex testing on two occasions: once in the morning (between 9 am - midday) and once in the afternoon (between 2-5 pm). The order of testing was counter-balanced. Within each assessment, participants inhaled successively higher citric acid concentrations via a facemask, with saline solution randomly interspersed to control for a placebo response. The lowest concentration that elicited a reflexive cough response was recorded. Morning cough thresholds (mean=0.6mol/L) were not different from afternoon cough thresholds (mean=0.6mol/L), p=0.16, T=101, r=-0.14. We found no evidence of diurnal variability in cough reflex testing. There was, however, an order effect irrespective of time of day, confirming that healthy participants are able to volitionally modulate their cough response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. BLINK REFLEX IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS: AN ANCILLARY TEST FOR DETECTING BRAIN STEM LESIONS

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    M ETEMEDYFAR

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Electrodiagnostic tests are one of the ancillary procedures that are used for diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS. This study investigates the frequency of abnormal blink reflex in patients with MS. Methods. In this cross sectional diagnostic study, 100 patients (26 male and 74 female with definite MS were selected based on clinical and MRI findings. they were referred to Al- zahra hospital (affiliated to iUMSHS during year 2000. Blink reflex (BR waves including R1, R2, R2 were recorded inpatients through the stimulation of supraorbital nerve. Results. The frequency of abnormal BR in MS patients with brain stem involvement was 77.9 percent and in those without brain stem involvement was 36.6 percent (P < 0.001. There was a significant relationship between the duration of MS and the abnormality in BR. Discussion. The frequency of abnormal blink reflex in MS is significantly associated with site of involvement in the brain. The majority of MS patients with brain stem involvement have abnormal BR. It is proposed that in patients with symptoms and signs of MS if there was no accessibility for MRI or if the results of MRI were equivocal, blink reflex test should be performed in addition to other ancillary tests.

  6. Oculomotor Reflexes as a Test of Visual Dysfunctions in Cognitively Impaired Observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    oculomotor reflexes. All hardware and software components of the data acquisition and analysis pipeline were finalized and tested in realistic... Gantt chart for the project. As specified in the Statement of Work, the main goal of the first 12 months of the project was to design e↵ective stimuli...be translated to the probabilities of various visual dysfunctions, hence validating the proposed diagnostic method. Figure 1 shows a Gantt chart

  7. Test-retest reliability of the soleus H-reflex excitability measured during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate with what accuracy the soleus H-reflex modulation and excitability could be measured during human walking on two occasions separated by days. The maximal M-wave (Mmax) was measured at rest in the standing position. During treadmill walking every stimulus...... in every sweep. The Pearson product was used to identify one participant at a time on Day 1 among all seven participants on Day 2. For both normalization procedures 5 of 7 participants were identified by this test. Since 5 of 7 participants were recognized between days, it must be recommended to use 10......% lower on Day 2 than on Day 1 (p=.32). However, when the peak H-reflex was normalized to Mmax in every sweep, Day 2 showed a significant 15% lower amplitude (p=.037). The same pattern was found for the mean H-reflex. Spearman's Rho was .92 when normalized to resting Mmax but .88 when normalized to Mmax...

  8. Prenatal reflex DNA screening for Down syndrome: enhancing the screening performance of the initial first trimester test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Nicholas J; Bestwick, Jonathan P

    2016-04-01

    To estimate the effect of adding three biochemical markers (alphafetoprotein, inhibin-A, and placental growth factor) and two ultrasound markers (ductus venosus pulsatility index and nasal bone examination) to enhance the initial Combined test in prenatal reflex DNA screening for Down syndrome. Published data were used to estimate screening performance [detection rates (DRs) and false-positive rates (FPRs)] of reflex DNA screening according to the additional markers used, the proportion of women with the highest initial test risks reflexed to DNA testing and the gestational age at the time of blood collection. If 10% of women are reflexed, the addition of the three biochemical markers to the Combined test increases the DR from 90.8% to 92.3% (FPR 0.025% to 0.027%) with markers measured at 11 completed weeks' gestation. With markers measured at 13 completed weeks' gestation the DR increases from 87.7% to 95.2% (FPRs both 0.027%). The further addition of the two ultrasound markers increases the DR to 96.8% and 97.5% at 11 and 13 weeks' respectively (FPR to 0.024% and 0.022% respectively). Adding the specified markers to the Combined test can maintain or improve screening performance with a lower proportion of women reflexed. Our results can be used to determine the most cost-effective reflex DNA screening policy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. In vivo electrophysiological measurement of the rat ulnar nerve with axonal excitability testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Brandon M.; Morris, Renée; Moldovan, Mihai

    2018-01-01

    by providing information regarding the activity of ion channels, pumps and exchangers that relate to acute function and may precede degenerative events. As such, the use of axonal excitability in animal models of neurological disorders may provide a useful in vivo measure to assess novel therapeutic...

  10. An investigation into the stability and sterility of citric acid solutions used for cough reflex testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, James R; Wu, Zimei; Lau, Hugo; Suen, Joanna; Wang, Lucy; Pottinger, Sarah; Lee, Elaine; Alazawi, Nawar; Kallesen, Molly; Gargiulo, Derryn A; Swift, Simon; Svirskis, Darren

    2014-10-01

    Citric acid is used in cough reflex testing in clinical and research settings to assess reflexive cough in patients at risk of swallowing disorders. To address a lack of knowledge in this area, this study investigated the stability and sterility of citric acid solutions. Triplicate solutions of citric acid (0.8 M) in isotonic saline were stored at 4 ± 2 °C for up to 28 days and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbiological sterility of freshly prepared samples and bulk samples previously used for 2 weeks within the hospital was determined using a pour plate technique. Microbial survival in citric acid was determined by inoculating Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Candida albicans into citric acid solution and monitoring the number of colony-forming units/mL over 40 min. Citric acid solutions remained stable at 4 °C for 28 days (98.4 ± 1.8 % remained). The freshly prepared and clinical samples tested were sterile. However, viability studies revealed that citric acid solution allows for the survival of C. albicans but not for S. aureus or E. coli. The microbial survival study showed that citric acid kills S. aureus and E. coli but has no marked effect on C. albicans after 40 min. Citric acid samples at 0.8 M remained stable over the 4-week testing period, with viable microbial cells absent from samples tested. However, C. albicans has the ability to survive in citric acid solution if inadvertently introduced in practice. For this reason, in clinical and research practice it is suggested to use single-use aliquots prepared aseptically which can be stored for up to 28 days at 4 °C.

  11. Infant reflexes

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    ... twitch their hips toward the touch in a dancing movement. GRASP REFLEX This reflex occurs if you ... Infant reflexes can occur in adults who have: Brain damage Stroke When to Contact a Medical Professional ...

  12. DVA as a Diagnostic Test for Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Appelbaum, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) stabilizes vision on earth-fixed targets by eliciting eyes movements in response to changes in head position. How well the eyes perform this task can be functionally measured by the dynamic visual acuity (DVA) test. We designed a passive, horizontal DVA test to specifically study the acuity and reaction time when looking in different target locations. Visual acuity was compared among 12 subjects using a standard Landolt C wall chart, a computerized static (no rotation) acuity test and dynamic acuity test while oscillating at 0.8 Hz (+/-60 deg/s). In addition, five trials with yaw oscillation randomly presented a visual target in one of nine different locations with the size and presentation duration of the visual target varying across trials. The results showed a significant difference between the static and dynamic threshold acuities as well as a significant difference between the visual targets presented in the horizontal plane versus those in the vertical plane when comparing accuracy of vision and reaction time of the response. Visual acuity increased proportional to the size of the visual target and increased between 150 and 300 msec duration. We conclude that dynamic visual acuity varies with target location, with acuity optimized for targets in the plane of rotation. This DVA test could be used as a functional diagnostic test for visual-vestibular and neuro-cognitive impairments by assessing both accuracy and reaction time to acquire visual targets.

  13. Acoustic stapedial reflexes in healthy neonates: normative data and test-retest reliability.

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    Kei, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The acoustic stapedial reflex (ASR) test provides useful information about the function of the auditory system. While it is frequently used with adults and children in a clinical setting, its use with young infants is limited. Presently, there are few data for neonates and inadequate research into the test-retest reliability of the ASR test. This study aimed to establish normative data and evaluate the test-retest reliability of the ASR test in healthy neonates. A cross-sectional experimental design was used to establish ASR normative data and assess the test-retest reliability of ASR thresholds obtained from healthy neonates. Sixty-eight full-term neonates with mean chronological age of 2.5 days (SD = 1.8 day), who passed the automated auditory brainstem response, transient evoked otoacoustic emission, and high frequency (1 kHz) tympanometry (HFT) tests. One randomly selected ear from each neonate was tested using TEOAE (transient evoked otoacoustic emission), HFT, and ASR tests using a 1 kHz probe tone. ASR thresholds were elicited by presenting pure tones of 0.5, 2, and 4 kHz and broadband noise (BBN) separately to the test ear in an ipsilateral stimulation mode. The ASR procedure was repeated to acquire retest data within the same testing session. Descriptive statistics, χ2, and analysis of variance with repeated measures tests were used to analyze ASR data. All neonates exhibited ASR when stimulated by tonal stimuli or BBN. The mean ASRTs (acoustic stapedial reflex thresholds) for the 0.5, 2, and 4 kHz tones were 81.6 ± 7.9, 71.3 ± 7.9, and 65.4 ± 8.7 dB HL, respectively. The mean ASRT for the BBN was estimated to be smaller than 57.2 dB HL, given the limitation of the equipment. The 95th percentiles of the ASRT were 95, 85, 80, and 75 dB HL for the 0.5, 2, and 4 kHz and BBN, respectively. The test-retest reliability of the ASR test for all stimuli was high, with no significant difference in mean ASRTs across the test and retest conditions. Test

  14. Blink Reflex as a Complementary Test to MRI in Early Detection of Brainstem Infarctions: Comparison of Blink Reflex Abnormalities in Anterior Versus Posterior Circulation Strokes

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    K Basiri

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early detection of vertebro-basilar insufficiency is of paramount importance. Brain MRI was the only method of diagnosis for many years, but in addition to high cost and delay in report, it may not detect all brain stem lesions. In this study Blink reflex (BR was evaluated as a complementary test to MRI. Methods: Fifty-four patients were studied [27 anterior circulation stroke patients (ACSP and 27 posterior circulation stroke patients (PCSP]. MRI was performed within the first week after the onset of stroke. Nineteen age and sex matched healthy people enrolled as controls. BR was performed within the first 24 hours of the onset. Frequency of abnormal blink reflex in ACSP and PCSP was compared with MRI findings. Then abnormal responses in two groups were compared by chi-square test. Results: In both ACSP and PCSP, two patients had normal BR responses, and in 25 patients R1 or R2 components of blink responses were absent or prolonged (92.5%. R1was absent or delayed in 16 PCSP, but it was abnormal in only two ACSP (P < 0.001. Abnormal R2 responses were detected in 22 PCSP and 24 ACSP. Conclusion: BR abnormalities had high correlation with MRI findings in PCSP (92.5% BR can be performed within the first 24 hours of onset of stroke, and its results is available immediately. This test is easy to perform and comfortable for the patient, has low cost, and is available every where. Therefore we introduced BR as a complementary (but not replacing test to MRI in early detection of brainstem infarctions. Comparison of BR responses in ACSP and PCSP showed that abnormalities of R1 responses had high accuracy in differentiation between anterior and posterior circulation strokes. We concluded that BR responses not only can detect brainstem infarctions rapidly and readily in its early stages, but also can differentiate ACSP from PCSP with high accuracy. Keywords: Blink Reflex, Anterior Circulation Stroke, Posterior Circulation Stroke Patients

  15. The blink reflex test does not show abnormalities in a large group of patients with chronic migraine

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    Joseph Bruno Bidin Brooks

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The blink reflex – a simple, non-invasive and inexpensive test – may be indicative of lesions or dysfunctions of the brainstem, and particularly assesses the trigeminal-facial arch. Results from alterations of the blink reflex in patients with headaches have provided controversial data. Method Registration of the waves R1 and R2 (ipsilateral to the stimulus and R2c (contralateral to the stimulus by electroneuromyography. Results A large number of controls (n=160 and patients with chronic migraine (n=160 were studied. No significant differences were observed between the two groups. Conclusion It is possible that this relatively simple and primitive reflex is not affected unless there is significant damage to the brainstem.

  16. Assessing sensorimotor excitability after spinal cord injury: a reflex testing method based on cycling with afferent stimulation.

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    Piazza, Stefano; Torricelli, Diego; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Serrano-Muñoz, Diego; Ávila-Martín, Gerardo; Galán-Arriero, Iriana; Pons, José Luis; Taylor, Julian

    2018-01-17

    Several studies have examined spinal reflex modulation during leg cycling in healthy and spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects. However, the effect of cutaneous plantar afferent input on spinal excitability during leg cycling after SCI has not been characterised. The aim of the study was to test the feasibility of using controlled leg cycling in combination with plantar cutaneous electrical stimulation (ES) cycling to assess lower limb spinal sensorimotor excitability in subjects with motor complete or incomplete SCI. Spinal sensorimotor excitability was estimated by measuring cutaneomuscular-conditioned soleus H-reflex activity. Reflex excitability was tested before and after a 10-min ES cycling session in 13 non-injured subjects, 6 subjects with motor incomplete SCI (iSCI) who had moderately impaired gait function, 4 subjects with motor iSCI who had severely impaired gait function, and 5 subjects with motor complete SCI (cSCI). No modulation of soleus H-reflex with plantar cutaneous stimuli was observed after either iSCI or cSCI when compared to non-injured subjects. However, after ES cycling, reflex excitability significantly increased in subjects with iSCI and moderately impaired gait function. ES cycling facilitated spinal sensorimotor excitability only in subjects with motor iSCI with residual gait function. Increased spinal excitability induced with a combination of exercise and afferent stimulation could be adopted with diagnostic and prognostic purposes to reveal the activity-based neurorehabilitation profile of individual subjects with motor iSCI. ISRCTN 26172500 ; retrospectively registered on 15 July 2016 Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  17. Contribution of laser Doppler flowmetry with venoarteriolar reflex, cold, and rewarming testing, and intravital capillaroscopy to diagnose Raynaud's phenomenon

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    Zeman J

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jan Zeman,1 Oksana Turyanytsya,1 Vojtĕch Kapsa,2 Mojmír Eliáš3 1Department of Clinical Cardiology and Angiology, Hospital Bulovka, 2Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, 3Kooperativa a.s., Pobrezni, Prague, Czech Republic Background: The early differential diagnosis of Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP is crucial for the prognosis and therapy of these patients. In our microcirculatory laboratory, we use intravital capillaroscopy (IC, plethysmography (P, and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF for examining acrosyndromes. We combine LDF with venoarteriolar reflex test, cold test, and rewarming test to achieve more reliable diagnoses of acrosyndromes. Patients and methods: We examined LDF and IC according to a strict protocol using a battery of tests (venoarteriolar reflex test, cold test, rewarming test applied to five different groups of people and compared their results: healthy controls, primary Raynaud’s phenomenon (PRP, systemic scleroderma, vibration white finger, and peripheral artery occlusive disease. Our tests included 340 individuals (72 patients plus 268 controls. Results: Although all tests provided some differences between controls and patients, only the rewarming test offered significant results for differential diagnoses. Conclusion: IC and LDF combined with the battery of tests (venoarteriolar reflex test, cold test, rewarming test under standard conditions can be used as reliable tools to distinguish between PRP and some types of secondary RP (especially in the case of systemic scleroderma, vibration white fingers, or peripheral artery occlusive disease; RPs with organic occlusions of the small arteries causing the diseases. Our methodology can help to distinguish between other types of RP, as well. Keywords: Raynaud’s phenomenon, acrosyndrome, laser Doppler flowmetry, intravital capillaroscopy, scleroderma, vibration white finger, peripheral artery occlusive disease

  18. Ascending Midbrain Dopaminergic Axons Require Descending GAD65 Axon Fascicles for Normal Pathfinding

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    Claudia Marcela Garcia-Peña

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Nigrostriatal pathway (NSP is formed by dopaminergic axons that project from the ventral midbrain to the dorsolateral striatum as part of the medial forebrain bundle. Previous studies have implicated chemotropic proteins in the formation of the NSP during development but little is known of the role of substrate-anchored signals in this process. We observed in mouse and rat embryos that midbrain dopaminergic axons ascend in close apposition to descending GAD65-positive axon bundles throughout their trajectory to the striatum. To test whether such interaction is important for dopaminergic axon pathfinding, we analyzed transgenic mouse embryos in which the GAD65 axon bundle was reduced by the conditional expression of the diphtheria toxin. In these embryos we observed dopaminergic misprojection into the hypothalamic region and abnormal projection in the striatum. In addition, analysis of Robo1/2 and Slit1/2 knockout embryos revealed that the previously described dopaminergic misprojection in these embryos is accompanied by severe alterations in the GAD65 axon scaffold. Additional studies with cultured dopaminergic neurons and whole embryos suggest that NCAM and Robo proteins are involved in the interaction of GAD65 and dopaminergic axons. These results indicate that the fasciculation between descending GAD65 axon bundles and ascending dopaminergic axons is required for the stereotypical NSP formation during brain development and that known guidance cues may determine this projection indirectly by instructing the pathfinding of the axons that are part of the GAD65 axon scaffold.

  19. The Genetics of Axon Guidance and Axon Regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Chisholm, Andrew D.; Hutter, Harald; Jin, Yishi; Wadsworth, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The correct wiring of neuronal circuits depends on outgrowth and guidance of neuronal processes during development. In the past two decades, great progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of axon outgrowth and guidance. Genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans has played a key role in elucidating conserved pathways regulating axon guidance, including Netrin signaling, the slit Slit/Robo pathway, Wnt signaling, and others. Axon guidance factors were first identified by screens for mutations affecting animal behavior, and by direct visual screens for axon guidance defects. Genetic analysis of these pathways has revealed the complex and combinatorial nature of guidance cues, and has delineated how cues guide growth cones via receptor activity and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Several axon guidance pathways also affect directed migrations of non-neuronal cells in C. elegans, with implications for normal and pathological cell migrations in situations such as tumor metastasis. The small number of neurons and highly stereotyped axonal architecture of the C. elegans nervous system allow analysis of axon guidance at the level of single identified axons, and permit in vivo tests of prevailing models of axon guidance. C. elegans axons also have a robust capacity to undergo regenerative regrowth after precise laser injury (axotomy). Although such axon regrowth shares some similarities with developmental axon outgrowth, screens for regrowth mutants have revealed regeneration-specific pathways and factors that were not identified in developmental screens. Several areas remain poorly understood, including how major axon tracts are formed in the embryo, and the function of axon regeneration in the natural environment. PMID:28114100

  20. Reflex Testing Rules for Cell Count and Differentiation of Nucleated Elements in Pleural and Ascitic Fluids on Sysmex XE-5000.

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    Buoro, Sabrina; Appassiti Esposito, Sara; Vavassori, Mauro; Mecca, Tommaso; Ottomano, Cosimo; Dominoni, Paola; Seghezzi, Michela; Candiago, Elisabetta; Farina, Claudio; Gianatti, Andrea; Crippa, Alberto; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Flow cytometry is widely used in many laboratories for automated nucleated cell counts and their differentiation in body fluids. The implementation of new reflex testing rules on these automated instruments could open new frontiers in laboratory workflow, improving characterization of body fluids and clinical diagnosis and decreasing costs. Ascitic (150) and pleural (33) fluids were collected and assessed by XE-5000 and optical microscopy. Cell counts performed with the methods showed a Pearson's correlation of 0.98 (p fluids, the best diagnostic performance was found for polymorphonuclear and neutrophil counts on XE-5000, which exhibited areas under the curve (AUCs) 0.98 (p fluids the best diagnostic performance was found for polymorphonuclear percent parameter, which displayed 0.97 (p fluids. We acknowledge that further studies should be planned to validate our findings according to clinical data. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  1. Reflexives and reflexive constructions in Afrikaans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    2. Reflexives. Afrikaans items belonging to the traditional lexical category of reflexives (or reflexive ... reflexive and non-reflexive pronouns are syntactically derived from the same lexical root pronoun √PRON. The ...... 32 The matrix verbs in (33) and (34) both concern a future activity of an entity: belowe (“promise”) in the (a).

  2. Avaliando a leitura em inglês: uma reflexão sobre itens de testes

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    Celso Henrique Soufen Tumolo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento de testes de qualquer natureza requer um estágio de investigação dos itens elaborados, investigação essa que deve ser feita considerando como critério principal a validade de construto. Neste artigo, trazemos uma análise de itens de testes desenvolvidos para avaliar a habilidade de leitura em inglês como língua estrangeira. Dividimos os itens em defensáveis e não defensáveis: os defensáveis permitem a demonstração da habilidade como definida no construto, enquanto os não defensáveis não permitem coletar evidências para uma interpretação válida da habilidade relevante. Sugerimos uma divisão dos itens não defensáveis em três categorias: itens independentes do texto, itens com pistas para a resposta e itens de vocabulário, cada qual apresentando problemas para validação de construto. É possível concluir que itens usados em testes podem não ser adequados ao objetivo para o qual foram desenvolvidos. As análises e conclusões aqui feitas pretendem colaborar com o desenvolvimento de testes que possibilitem coletar evidências para uma interpretação mais válida da habilidade de leitura em inglês.Test development of any nature requires a stage for the investigation of the items designed, which must be carried out considering construct validity as the main criterion. In this article we bring an analysis of test itens designed to assess the reading ability in English as a foreign language. We divide the items into defensible and non-defensible: defensible items allow for the demonstration of the reading ability as described in the construct, whereas non-defensible items do not allow for collecting evidence for a more valid interpretation of the relevant ability. We suggest a division of the non-defensible itens into 3 categories: text-independent items, items with unintended clues for the answer, and vocabulary items, each one presenting some problems for construct validation. It is possible to

  3. Wake and sleep cardiovascular reflex tests and GH profiles in diabetic patients.

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    Silvestri, R; Lasco, A; Marabello, L; Puglisi, R M; Casella, C; Cucinotta, D; Manganaro, O; Frisina, N; Di Perri, R

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen diabetic patients (13 males, 1 female, 7 IDDM and 7 NIDDM) were tested during wakefulness with a battery of tests examining parasympathetic and sympathetic control of the cardiovascular system. Subsequently sleep recordings including EEG, EOG, submental, left and right anterior tibialis EMGs, ECG, nasal airflow, thoracic and abdominal respirograms, nocturnal penile tumescence, were performed in each subject. The assessment of cardiovascular functions during sleep was based on the following parameters: Rbm, R-wake, apnea index, adequate penile tumescence during phase REM. Parasympathetic and sympathetic control of cardiovascular system were both impaired during wakefulness in only one patient, who also showed a low Rbm index indicative of ascertained autonomic neuropathy. Indices Rbm sufficiently low to be considered an evidence of probable autonomic neuropathy were found in 5 patients (3 IDDM and 2 NIDDM); all but one with normal cardiovascular tests during wakefulness. Five patients showed gross deficiency upon nocturnal penile tumescence monitoring. In comparison with a control group the patients showed a significantly lower overall Rbm index (p less than 0.001). IDDM patients showed an increased plasma GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia compared to NIDDM and normal subjects. Increased GH secretion was furthermore confirmed by GH values obtained in blood samples drawn during the first REM stage of the night in IDDM patients. The evaluation of the variables taken into consideration during sleep appears to be crucial for the assessment and prevention of autonomic neuropathies and neuroendocrine dysregulation in diabetic patients.

  4. A variational model for propagation time, volumetric and synchronicity optimization in the spinal cord axon network, and a method for testing it

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    Mota, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Most information in the central nervous system in general and the (simpler) spinal cord in particular, is transmitted along bundles of parallel axons. Each axon's transmission time increases linearly with length and decreases as a power law of caliber. Therefore, evolution must find a distribution of axonal numbers, lengths and calibers that balances the various tradeoffs between gains in propagation time, signal throughput and synchronicity, against volumetric and metabolic costs. Here I apply a variational method to calculate the distribution of axonal caliber in the spinal cord as a function of axonal length, that minimizes the average axonal signal propagation time, subject to the constraints of white matter total volume and the variance of propagation times, and allowing for arbitrary fiber priorities and end-points. The Lagrange multipliers obtained thereof can be naturally interpreted as 'exchange rates', e.g., how much evolution is willing to pay, in white matter added volume, per unit time decrease of propagation time. This is, to my knowledge, the first model that quantifies explicitly these evolutionary tradeoffs, and can obtain them empirically by measuring the distribution of axonal calibers. We are in the process of doing so using the isotropic fractionator method. I thank FAPERJ for financial support.

  5. Acute nutritional axonal neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Johanna; Logigian, Eric L

    2018-01-01

    This study describes clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features of a severe acute axonal polyneuropathy common to patients with acute nutritional deficiency in the setting of alcoholism, bariatric surgery (BS), or anorexia. Retrospective analysis of clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory data of patients with acute axonal neuropathy. Thirteen patients were identified with a severe, painful, sensory or sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy that developed over 2-12 weeks with sensory ataxia, areflexia, variable muscle weakness, poor nutritional status, and weight loss, often with prolonged vomiting and normal cerebrospinal fluid protein. Vitamin B6 was low in half and thiamine was low in all patients when obtained before supplementation. Patients improved with weight gain and vitamin supplementation, with motor greater than sensory recovery. We suggest that acute or subacute axonal neuropathy in patients with weight loss or vomiting associated with alcohol abuse, BS, or dietary deficiency is one syndrome, caused by micronutrient deficiencies. Muscle Nerve 57: 33-39, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Reflex immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability testing of colorectal tumors for Lynch syndrome among US cancer programs and follow-up of abnormal results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, Laura C; Grant, Marcia L; Espenschied, Carin R; Blazer, Kathleen R; Hampel, Heather L; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; MacDonald, Deborah J

    2012-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 protein expression and microsatellite instability (MSI) are well-established tools to screen for Lynch syndrome (LS). Although many cancer centers have adopted these tools as reflex LS screening after a colorectal cancer diagnosis, the standard of care has not been established, and no formal studies have described this practice in the United States. The purpose of this study was to describe prevalent practices regarding IHC/MSI reflex testing for LS in the United States and the subsequent follow-up of abnormal results. A 12-item survey was developed after interdisciplinary expert input. A letter of invitation, survey, and online-survey option were sent to a contact at each cancer program. A modified Dillman strategy was used to maximize the response rate. The sample included 39 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers (NCI-CCCs), 50 randomly selected American College of Surgeons-accredited Community Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Programs (COMPs), and 50 Community Hospital Cancer Programs (CHCPs). The overall response rate was 50%. Seventy-one percent of NCI-CCCs, 36% of COMPs, and 15% of CHCPs were conducting reflex IHC/MSI for LS; 48% of the programs used IHC, 14% of the programs used MSI, and 38% of the programs used both IHC and MSI. One program used a presurgical information packet, four programs offered an opt-out option, and none of the programs required written consent. Although most NCI-CCCs use reflex IHC/MSI to screen for LS, this practice is not well-adopted by community hospitals. These findings may indicate an emerging standard of care and diffusion from NCI-CCC to community cancer programs. Our findings also described an important trend away from requiring written patient consent for screening.

  7. Detecting dementia in patients with normal neuropsychological screening by Short Smell Test and Palmo-Mental Reflex Test: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Sven; Limacher, Andreas; Zeller, Andreas; Bürge, Markus

    2015-07-25

    General practitioners (GPs) are in best position to suspect dementia. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Clock Drawing Test (CDT) are widely used. Additional neurological tests may increase the accuracy of diagnosis. We aimed to evaluate diagnostic ability to detect dementia with a Short Smell Test (SST) and Palmo-Mental Reflex (PMR) in patients whose MMSE and CDT are normal, but who show signs of cognitive dysfunction. This was a 3.5-year cross-sectional observational study in the Memory Clinic of the University Department of Geriatrics in Bern, Switzerland. Participating patients with normal MMSE (>26 points) and CDT (>5 points) were referred by GPs because they suspected dementia. All were examined according to a standardized protocol. Diagnosis of dementia was based on DSM-IV TR criteria. We used SST and PMR to determine if they accurately detected dementia. In our cohort, 154 patients suspected of dementia had normal MMSE and CDT test results. Of these, 17 (11%) were demented. If SST or PMR were abnormal, sensitivity was 71% (95% CI 44-90%), and specificity 64% (95% CI 55-72%) for detecting dementia. If both tests were abnormal, sensitivity was 24% (95% CI 7-50%), but specificity increased to 93% (95% CI 88-97%). Patients suspected of dementia, but with normal MMSE and CDT results, may benefit if SST and PMR are added as diagnostic tools. If both SST and PMR are abnormal, this is a red flag to investigate these patients further, even though their negative neuropsychological screening results.

  8. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  9. Differences in excitability properties of FDI and ADM motor axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong Seok; Sawai, Setsu; Misawa, Sonoko; Kanai, Kazuaki; Isose, Sagiri; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2009-03-01

    The first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles are innervated by the same ulnar nerve, but studies have shown that the former is much more severely affected in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, threshold tracking was used to investigate whether membrane properties differ between FDI and ADM motor axons. In 12 normal subjects, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from FDI and ADM after ulnar nerve stimulation at the wrist. The strength-duration time constant was significantly longer in the FDI axons than in the ADM axons, and latent addition studies showed greater threshold changes at the conditioning-test stimulus of 0.2 ms in FDI than in ADM axons. These findings suggest that nodal persistent sodium conductances are more prominent in FDI axons than in ADM axons, and therefore excitability is physiologically higher in FDI axons. Even in the same nerve at the same sites, membrane properties of FDI and ADM motor axons differ significantly, and thus their axonal/neuronal responses to disease may also differ.

  10. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ruth L S

    2003-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome type I, is a multisymptom syndrome usually affecting one or more extremities. It is inadequately understood and, therefore, often frustrating to treat. This article presents a case study of a 23-year career nurse who developed reflex sympathetic dystrophy of the left knee. It also reviews the rationale for reflex sympathetic dystrophy, treatment, and life-care planning for a patient with reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

  11. Is reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome type I a small-fiber neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaklander, Anne Louise; Fields, Howard L

    2009-06-01

    Neurologist S. Weir Mitchell first described "causalgia" following wartime nerve injury, with its persistent distal limb burning pain, swelling, and abnormal skin color, temperature, and sweating. Similar post-traumatic symptoms were later identified in patients without overt nerve injuries after trauma. This was labeled reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD; now complex regional pain syndrome type I [CRPS-I]). The pathophysiology of symptoms is unknown and treatment options are limited. We propose that persistent RSD/CRPS-I is a post-traumatic neuralgia associated with distal degeneration of small-diameter peripheral axons. Small-fiber lesions are easily missed on examination and are undetected by standard electrophysiological testing. Most CRPS features-spreading pain and skin hypersensitivity, vasomotor instability, osteopenia, edema, and abnormal sweating-are explicable by small-fiber dysfunction. Small fibers sense pain and temperature but also regulate tissue function through neuroeffector actions. Indeed, small-fiber-predominant polyneuropathies cause CRPS-like abnormalities, and pathological studies of nerves from chronic CRPS-I patients confirm small-fiber-predominant pathology. Small distal nerve injuries in rodents reproduce many CRPS features, further supporting this hypothesis. CRPS symptoms likely reflect combined effects of axonal degeneration and plasticity, inappropriate firing and neurosecretion by residual axons, and denervation supersensitivity. The resulting tissue edema, hypoxia, and secondary central nervous system changes can exacerbate symptoms and perpetuate pathology. Restoring the interest of neurologists in RSD/CRPS should improve patient care and broaden our knowledge of small-fiber functions.

  12. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  13. Epidemiology of reflex syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colman, N.; Nahm, K.; Ganzeboom, K. S.; Shen, W. K.; Reitsma, J.; Linzer, M.; Wieling, W.; Kaufmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    Cost-effective diagnostic approaches to reflex syncope require knowledge of its frequency and causes in different age groups. For this purpose we reviewed the available literature dealing with the epidemiology of reflex syncope. The incidence pattern of reflex syncope in the general population and

  14. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  15. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T. [Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Perera, Surangi N. [Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53205 (United States); Svoboda, Kurt R., E-mail: svobodak@uwm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53205 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  16. SnoN facilitates axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun L Do

    Full Text Available Adult CNS neurons exhibit a reduced capacity for growth compared to developing neurons, due in part to downregulation of growth-associated genes as development is completed. We tested the hypothesis that SnoN, an embryonically regulated transcription factor that specifies growth of the axonal compartment, can enhance growth in injured adult neurons. In vitro, SnoN overexpression in dissociated adult DRG neuronal cultures significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, TGF-β1, a negative regulator of SnoN, inhibited neurite outgrowth, and SnoN over-expression overcame this inhibition. We then examined whether SnoN influenced axonal regeneration in vivo: indeed, expression of a mutant form of SnoN resistant to degradation significantly enhanced axonal regeneration following cervical spinal cord injury, despite peri-lesional upregulation of TGF-β1. Thus, a developmental mechanism that specifies extension of the axonal compartment also promotes axonal regeneration after adult CNS injury.

  17. Signal propagation along the axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Debanne, Dominique

    2018-03-08

    Axons link distant brain regions and are usually considered as simple transmission cables in which reliable propagation occurs once an action potential has been generated. Safe propagation of action potentials relies on specific ion channel expression at strategic points of the axon such as nodes of Ranvier or axonal branch points. However, while action potentials are generally considered as the quantum of neuronal information, their signaling is not entirely digital. In fact, both their shape and their conduction speed have been shown to be modulated by activity, leading to regulations of synaptic latency and synaptic strength. We report here newly identified mechanisms of (1) safe spike propagation along the axon, (2) compartmentalization of action potential shape in the axon, (3) analog modulation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission and (4) alteration in conduction time after persistent regulation of axon morphology in central neurons. We discuss the contribution of these regulations in information processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy of childhood: one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouary, T; Boralevi, F; Pillet, P; Taieb, A; Léauté-Labrèze, C

    2002-10-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1) is little known by dermatologists. We report a pediatric case of reflex sympathetic dystrophy with predominant cutaneous involvement. A 10 year-old girl presented a warm, painful and relapsing right hand edema for seven months (three outbreaks). The hand was cyanotic, pigmented and painful. Routine blood tests were normal. Radiography and radionuclide bone scan were consistent with stage 1 reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Physiotherapy led to dramatic improvement. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is known since the XVIIIth century. In the last decade, progress in radiology and bone scan have provided elements for understanding the physiopathology of the disease. Microvascular abnormalities under the control of sympathetic nervous system are characteristic of different stages of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Recently, neurovascular system experiments showed that sympathetic reflex tonus changes may be controlled by the central nervous system. Dermatologic changes of reflex sympathetic dystrophy are well known: edema and erythema in first stage, cyanosis in second stage, sclerosis and atrophia in third stage, but pediatric cases are rarely reported. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a complex disease, however its physiopathology is now understood. The clinical presentation can be atypical and the dermatologist may be the first to be consulted.

  19. Reflexivity: Licensing or enforcing

    OpenAIRE

    Schadler, D.

    2014-01-01

    During my research I looked at 117 languages and their anaphoric systems. The main goal of this study was to analyse reflexivization, its reasons and effects, by covering cross-linguistic data and by taking into account the variation we find on a macro- and micro-level. To be more precise, throughout this dissertation I investigated: whether we find indeed some special marking for reflexivity, i.e. licensing of reflexivity, across languages. whether there are complex reflexives that do not ha...

  20. Cruciate ligament reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, M.R.; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Fischer-Rasmussen, T.

    2002-01-01

    The idea of muscular reflexes elicited from sensory nerves of the cruciate ligaments is more than 100 years old, but the existence of such reflexes has not been proven until the recent two decades. First in animal experiments, a muscular excitation could be elicited in the hamstrings when the ant...

  1. Too Busy for Reflexivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Helene

    colleagues” (Lynch 2000:46). Some 20 years later, these debates still linger in the shadows with some anthropologists refer to their work as “postreflexive” (eg. Maurer 2005, Riles 2000). This suggests a need to move beyond reflexivity without leaving it entirely behind. While reflexivity today still...

  2. Sensory axonal dysfunction in cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Hung, Kuo-Sheng; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in sensory axonal excitability in the distal nerve in patients with cervical radiculopathy. The patients were classified by the findings of cervical MRI into two subgroups: 22 patients with C6/7 root compression and 25 patients with cervical cord and root compression above/at C6/7. Patients were investigated using conventional nerve conduction studies (NCS) and nerve excitability testing. Sensory nerve excitability testing was undertaken with stimulation at the wrist and recording from digit II (dermatome C6/7). The results were compared with healthy controls. Both preoperative and postoperative tests were performed if the patient underwent surgery. Sensory axonal excitability was significantly different in both cohorts compared with healthy controls, including prolonged strength-duration time constant, reduced S2 accommodation, increased threshold electrotonus hyperpolarisation (TEh (90-100 ms)), and increased superexcitability. The changes in these excitability indices are compatible with axonal membrane hyperpolarisation. In five patients who underwent surgery, the postoperative sensory excitability was tested after 1 week, and showed significant changes in TE (TEh (90-100 ms) and TEh slope, pcervical radiculopathy. These findings suggest that the hyperpolarised pattern might be due to Na(+)-K(+) ATPase overactivation induced by proximal ischaemia, or could reflect the remyelinating process. Distal sensory axons were hyperpolarised even though there were no changes in NCS, suggesting that nerve excitability testing may be more sensitive to clinical symptoms than NCS in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Optogenetically enhanced axon regeneration: motor versus sensory neuron-specific stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Patricia J; Clanton, Scott L; English, Arthur W

    2018-02-01

    Brief neuronal activation in injured peripheral nerves is both necessary and sufficient to enhance motor axon regeneration, and this effect is specific to the activated motoneurons. It is less clear whether sensory neurons respond in a similar manner to neuronal activation following peripheral axotomy. Further, it is unknown to what extent enhancement of axon regeneration with increased neuronal activity relies on a reflexive interaction within the spinal circuitry. We used mouse genetics and optical tools to evaluate the precision and selectivity of system-specific neuronal activation to enhance axon regeneration in a mixed nerve. We evaluated sensory and motor axon regeneration in two different mouse models expressing the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2). We selectively activated either sensory or motor axons using light stimulation combined with transection and repair of the sciatic nerve. Regardless of genotype, the number of ChR2-positive neurons whose axons had regenerated successfully was greater following system-specific optical treatment, with no effect on the number of ChR2-negative neurons (whether motor or sensory neurons). We conclude that acute system-specific neuronal activation is sufficient to enhance both motor and sensory axon regeneration. This regeneration-enhancing effect is likely cell autonomous. © 2018 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Quantitative sensory and autonomic testing in male diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, A; Sharief, M K; Knowles, C H; Misra, V P; Kopelman, P; Ralph, D; Anand, P

    1999-01-01

    To correlate abnormalities of nerve fibres in the lower limbs with erectile dysfunction in male diabetic patients, using a range of quantitative sensory and autonomic function tests. The study included 68 male diabetic patients with symptomatic erectile dysfunction and 11 matched diabetics without erectile dysfunction; none had clinical evidence of peripheral vascular disease or psychological disorder. Patients were evaluated with a symptom questionnaire based on the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument questionnaire and examined clinically. Sural and peroneal nerve-conduction studies, and quantitative sensory and autonomic tests (vibration, thermal, light-touch thresholds, sensory and autonomic cutaneous axon-reflexes) were used to detect nerve abnormalities in the lower limbs, which were correlated with erectile dysfunction. Symptoms of neuropathy were more common in the group with male erectile dysfunction (MED), but statistically significant only for neuropathic pain (53% MED, 18% nonMED, P<0.05, chi-square test) and gastroparesis (44% MED, 0% nonMED, P<0.05). Tests of unmyelinated afferents (warming perception and capsaicin-induced sensory axon-reflex vasodilatation) were most often abnormal, sometimes with no other abnormalities on tests or neurological examination. However, abnormality of warm perception was not significantly different between groups (81% MED, 70% nonMED), suggesting that it is a poorer discriminant than abnormal sensory axon-reflex vasodilatation (89% MED, 22% nonMED, P<0.001). The only other significant test difference was decreased sural nerve action potential (70% MED, 22% non-MED, P<0.01). There appeared to be preferential involvement of unmyelinated sensory fibres that mediate axon-reflex vasodilatation in the limbs of diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction. This test appears to be a helpful indicator of neurological involvement in erectile dysfunction, and may be used to monitor the effect of new treatments.

  5. Etnography and Reflexivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cardano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay deals with a relevant and controversial topic – objectivity in ethnographic research. More specifically, I would like to examine how reflexive procedures, more precisely “reflexive account”, can increase the robustness of results gained through an ethnographic research. The essay is organized in five parts. I will start by giving a preliminary definition of the two key concepts which are at the center of the analysis – objectivity and reflexivity. I will then give a brief description of the epistemological framework in which the proposed conceptions of objectivity and reflexivity are located. Thirdly, I move on to consider the epistemic status of ethnographic research, and will emphasize that ethnographies are not just “theory-laden”, as many writers have stated, but also “praxis” or “procedure laden”. In other words, I will stress that it is not only theories which are inevitably embedded in research, influencing how observations can be made; much the same can also be said of the concrete research practices which contribute to determine the experience of the ethnographer and its representation in a text. Fourthly, I will discuss why it is useful to employ reflexive practices, and then immediately afterwards will illustrate the ways in which reflexive descriptions can contribute to greater objectivity of ethnographic accounts. In conclusion, I will discuss a number of objections which have been raised against this use of reflexivity.

  6. The reliability and response stability of dynamic testing of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in patients with vestibular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Maha T; Whitney, Susan L; Marchetti, Gregory F; Sparto, Patrick J; Ward, Bryan K; Furman, Joseph M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the test-retest reliability and response stability of the Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and Gaze Stabilization Test (GST) in patients with vestibular disorders. Twenty-nine patients with vestibular disease (16-78 years) participated. Subjects performed the GST and DVA in pitch and yaw planes, twice in one session and once after 7-10 days. The GST output is the maximum head velocity at which the patient was able to identify orientation of the letter E. The DVA output is the change in visual acuity when moving the head compared to static acuity. Subjects indicated their level of dizziness and visual blurring using a visual analog scale. Within- and between-sessions intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between 0-0.5 for the DVA and GST measures, with better correlations for within-session assessments. Response stability (standard error of measurement / mean) of the GST ranged between 21-32% and the DVA ranged between 25-69% with vertical DVA being most influenced by measurement error. Subjects' symptoms did not correlate with performance on either test. The current test protocol needs refinement to enhance reliability and stability in persons with vestibular disorders.

  7. Stretch Reflex as a Simple Measure to Evaluate the Efficacy of Potential Flight Countermeasures Using the Bed Rest Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerisano, J. M.; Reschke, M. F.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Harm, D. L.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spaceflight is acknowledged to have significant effects on the major postural muscles. However, it has been difficult to separate the effects of ascending somatosensory changes caused by the unloading of these muscles during flight from changes in sensorimotor function caused by a descending vestibulo-cerebellar response to microgravity. It is hypothesized that bed rest is an adequate model to investigate postural muscle unloading given that spaceflight and bed rest may produce similar results in both nerve axon and muscle tissue. METHODS: To investigate this hypothesis, stretch reflexes were measured on 18 subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 deg at a peak velocity of approximately 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender and compared with spaceflight data. RESULTS: Although no gender differences were found, bed rest induced changes in reflex latency and CV similar to the ones observed during spaceflight. Also, a relationship between CV and loss of muscle strength in the lower leg was observed for most bed rest subjects. CONCLUSION: Even though bed rest (limb unloading) alone may not mimic all of the synaptic and muscle tissue loss that is observed as a result of spaceflight, it can serve as a working analog of flight for the evaluation of potential countermeasures that may be beneficial in mitigating unwanted changes in the major postural muscles that are observed post flight.

  8. An αII Spectrin-Based Cytoskeleton Protects Large-Diameter Myelinated Axons from Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Claire Yu-Mei; Zhang, Chuansheng; Zollinger, Daniel R; Leterrier, Christophe; Rasband, Matthew N

    2017-11-22

    Axons must withstand mechanical forces, including tension, torsion, and compression. Spectrins and actin form a periodic cytoskeleton proposed to protect axons against these forces. However, because spectrins also participate in assembly of axon initial segments (AISs) and nodes of Ranvier, it is difficult to uncouple their roles in maintaining axon integrity from their functions at AIS and nodes. To overcome this problem and to determine the importance of spectrin cytoskeletons for axon integrity, we generated mice with αII spectrin-deficient peripheral sensory neurons. The axons of these neurons are very long and exposed to the mechanical forces associated with limb movement; most lack an AIS, and some are unmyelinated and have no nodes. We analyzed αII spectrin-deficient mice of both sexes and found that, in myelinated axons, αII spectrin forms a periodic cytoskeleton with βIV and βII spectrin at nodes of Ranvier and paranodes, respectively, but that loss of αII spectrin disrupts this organization. Avil-cre;Sptan1 f/f mice have reduced numbers of nodes, disrupted paranodal junctions, and mislocalized Kv1 K + channels. We show that the density of nodal βIV spectrin is constant among axons, but the density of nodal αII spectrin increases with axon diameter. Remarkably, Avil-cre;Sptan1 f/f mice have intact nociception and small-diameter axons, but severe ataxia due to preferential degeneration of large-diameter myelinated axons. Our results suggest that nodal αII spectrin helps resist the mechanical forces experienced by large-diameter axons, and that αII spectrin-dependent cytoskeletons are also required for assembly of nodes of Ranvier. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A periodic axonal cytoskeleton consisting of actin and spectrin has been proposed to help axons resist the mechanical forces to which they are exposed (e.g., compression, torsion, and stretch). However, until now, no vertebrate animal model has tested the requirement of the spectrin cytoskeleton in

  9. Axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the corticospinal tract in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus measured by q-space imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouhei Kamiya

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Previous studies suggest that compression and stretching of the corticospinal tract (CST potentially cause treatable gait disturbance in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH. Measurement of axon diameter with diffusion MRI has recently been used to investigate microstructural alterations in neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated alterations in the axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction of the CST in iNPH by q-space imaging (QSI analysis. METHODS: Nineteen patients with iNPH and 10 age-matched controls were recruited. QSI data were obtained with a 3-T system by using a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence with the diffusion gradient applied parallel to the antero-posterior axis. By using a two-component low-q fit model, the root mean square displacements of intra-axonal space ( =  axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction of the CST were calculated at the levels of the internal capsule and body of the lateral ventricle, respectively. RESULTS: Wilcoxon's rank-sum test revealed a significant increase in CST intra-axonal volume fraction at the paraventricular level in patients (p<0.001, whereas no significant difference was observed in the axon diameter. At the level of the internal capsule, neither axon diameter nor intra-axonal volume fraction differed significantly between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that in patients with iNPH, the CST does not undergo irreversible axonal damage but is rather compressed and/or stretched owing to pressure from the enlarged ventricle. These analyses of axon diameter and intra-axonal fraction yield insights into microstructural alterations of the CST in iNPH.

  10. On Reflexive Data Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  11. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marta; Manuela, Manuela; Cantinho, Guilhermina

    2011-01-01

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy is rare in pediatrics. It is a complex regional pain syndrome, of unknown etiology, usually post-traumatic, characterized by dysfunctions of the musculoskeletal, vascular and skin systems: severe persistent pain of a limb, sensory and vascular alterations, associated disability and psychosocial dysfunction. The diagnosis is based in high clinical suspection. In children and adolescents there are aspects that are different from the adult ones. Excessive tests may result in worsening of the clinical symptoms. Bone scintigraphy can help. Pain treatment is difficult, not specific. Physical therapies and relaxation technics give some relief. Depression must be treated. This syndrome includes fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome type I. We present a clinical report of an adolescent girl, referred for pain, cold temperature, pallor and functional disability of an inferior limb, all signals disclosed by a minor trauma. She had been diagnosed depression the year before. The bone scintigraphy was a decisive test. The treatment with gabapentin, C vitamin, physiotherapy and pshycotherapy has been effective.

  12. Multifunctional Silk Nerve Guides for Axon Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupaj, Marie C.

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a critical issue as 2.8% of trauma patients present with this type of injury, estimating a total of 200,000 nerve repair procedures yearly in the United States. While the peripheral nervous system exhibits slow regeneration, at a rate of 0.5 mm -- 9 mm/day following trauma, this regenerative ability is only possible under certain conditions. Clinical repairs have changed slightly in the last 30 years and standard methods of treatment include suturing damaged nerve ends, allografting, and autografting, with the autograft the gold standard of these approaches. Unfortunately, the use of autografts requires a second surgery and there is a shortage of nerves available for grafting. Allografts are a second option however allografts have lower success rates and are accompanied by the need of immunosuppressant drugs. Recently there has been a focus on developing nerve guides as an "off the shelf" approach. Although some natural and synthetic guidance channels have been approved by the FDA, these nerve guides are unfunctionalized and repair only short gaps, less than 3 cm in length. The goal of this project was to identify strategies for functionalizing peripheral nerve conduits for the outgrowth of neuron axons in vitro . To accomplish this, two strategies (bioelectrical and biophysical) were indentified for increasing axon outgrowth and promoting axon guidance. Bioelectrical strategies exploited electrical stimulation for increasing neurite outgrowth. Biophysical strategies tested a range of surface topographies for axon guidance. Novel methods were developed for integrating electrical and biophysical strategies into silk films in 2D. Finally, a functionalized nerve conduit system was developed that integrated all strategies for the purpose of attaching, elongating, and guiding nervous tissue in vitro. Future directions of this work include silk conduit translation into a rat sciatic nerve model in vivo for the purpose of repairing long

  13. Reflex syncope: Diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sutton

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For the diagnosis of reflex syncope, diligent history-building with the patient and a witness is required. In the Emergency Department (ED, the assessment of syncope is a challenge which may be addressed by an ED Observation Unit or by a referral to a Syncope Unit. Hospital admission is necessary for those with life-threatening cardiac conditions although risk stratification remains an unsolved problem. Other patients may be investigated with less urgency by carotid sinus massage (>40 years, tilt testing, and electrocardiogram loop recorder insertion resulting in a clear cause for syncope. Management includes, in general terms, patient education, avoidance of circumstances in which syncope is likely, increase in fluid and salt consumption, and physical counter-pressure maneuvers. In older patients, those that will benefit from cardiac pacing are now well defined. In all patients, the benefit of drug therapy is often disappointing and there remains no ideal drug. A role for catheter ablation may emerge for the highly symptomatic reflex syncope patient. Keywords: Cardiac pacing, Catheter ablation, Diagnosis, Drugs, Management, Reflex syncope

  14. Developmental time windows for axon growth influence neuronal network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sol; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    Early brain connectivity development consists of multiple stages: birth of neurons, their migration and the subsequent growth of axons and dendrites. Each stage occurs within a certain period of time depending on types of neurons and cortical layers. Forming synapses between neurons either by growing axons starting at similar times for all neurons (much-overlapped time windows) or at different time points (less-overlapped) may affect the topological and spatial properties of neuronal networks. Here, we explore the extreme cases of axon formation during early development, either starting at the same time for all neurons (parallel, i.e., maximally overlapped time windows) or occurring for each neuron separately one neuron after another (serial, i.e., no overlaps in time windows). For both cases, the number of potential and established synapses remained comparable. Topological and spatial properties, however, differed: Neurons that started axon growth early on in serial growth achieved higher out-degrees, higher local efficiency and longer axon lengths while neurons demonstrated more homogeneous connectivity patterns for parallel growth. Second, connection probability decreased more rapidly with distance between neurons for parallel growth than for serial growth. Third, bidirectional connections were more numerous for parallel growth. Finally, we tested our predictions with C. elegans data. Together, this indicates that time windows for axon growth influence the topological and spatial properties of neuronal networks opening up the possibility to a posteriori estimate developmental mechanisms based on network properties of a developed network.

  15. Improving the performance of reflex Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) testing in triaging women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS): A restrospective study in a tertiary hospital in United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhreldin, Marwa; Elmasry, Karim

    2016-02-03

    Cervical cancer is the second commonest cancer in women worldwide. Infection with oncogenic types of human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important risk factor for developing cervical cancer. Reflex High risk HPV (HR-HPV) testing is of significant value in the assessment of Papanicolaou (Pap) smear results where ASCUS are identified. To improve the performance of reflex HR-HPV testing in triage of ASCUS and analyze the factors impacting it. In this study, we generated a database of 9641 women who had cervical smears collected during the study period from the cytopathology record in a large tertiary hospital in UAE. These included 297 smears with ASCUS diagnosis. All cases were retrospectively followed up with a mean duration of 2.44 years. We analyzed data according to the outcome based on several follow-up Pap smear analysis as the reference assessment. We detected HR-HPV infection in 17.9% of cases. 9.1% <25, 28.8% 25-34 and 62.1% ≥35 years old. HR-HPV prevalence was higher among premenopausal women (20.7%) compared to postmenopausal women (9.5%) (P-value=0.044). The rate of progression to high grade lesions was also higher (28.7%) in the premenopausal group compared to (12.8%) in the postmenopausal group. Reflex HPV testing had an overall sensitivity of 41.1%, specificity of 88.2%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 62.1%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 75.9% in detection of cervical lesions. These figures were higher on combining premenopausal status and complaint of abnormal bleeding or discharge/itching (66.7%, 93.3%, 66.8% and 93.3% respectively). The sensitivity, specificity and NPV of reflex HPV testing in the triage of ASCUS cases can be more accurate in premenopausal women upon adding age group and presenting complaint as a triage item. This improves the performance of reflex HPV testing and the subsequent selection of high risk patients for colposcopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Too Busy for Reflexivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Helene

    of a “corrosive relativism in which everything is but a more or less clever expression of opinion” (Geertz 1988:2, 3) and it has suffered the little flattering accusations of piling "layer upon layer of self-consciousness to no avail" (Latour 1988:170) with little “interest [for] … theoretically ambitious...... of reflexivity. Facing these challenges, the managers employ a pragmatic moral, which allows them to bracket or defer their epistemological ideal of reflexivity while keeping it alive as exactly that: a promise of a future settlement. The paper concludes by comparing academics’ and school managers’ versions...

  17. Reflexivity and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksimovic, Tijana; Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft

    2017-01-01

    Career practitioners’ reflexive understanding of their professional role as change agents in career guidance and counselling practices has a major impact on how social justice can be achieved. This entitles an awareness of the way in which guidance and counselling practices are embedded in the co......Career practitioners’ reflexive understanding of their professional role as change agents in career guidance and counselling practices has a major impact on how social justice can be achieved. This entitles an awareness of the way in which guidance and counselling practices are embedded...

  18. Corneomandibular reflex: Anatomical basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Pistacchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corneomandibular reflex is a pathological phenomenon evident in cases of severe brainstem damage. It is considered to be a pathological exteroceptive reflex, associated with precentro bulbar tract lesions. The sign is useful in distinguishing central neurological injuries to metabolic disorders in acutely comatose patients, localizing lesions to the upper brainstem area, determining the depth of coma and its evolution, providing evidence of uncal or transtentorial herniation in acute cerebral hemisphere lesions, and it is a marker of supraspinal level impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. This sign was evident in a patient with severe brain damage. We discuss the literature findings and its relevance in prognosis establishment.

  19. Reflexivity in qualitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Adam Brian; Nistrup, Anne; Henderson, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    practice, that is, to reflect on our own values, beliefs, and biographies. It can be difficult to know exactly how a researcher should engage in these practices, however. Here, we discuss our reflexive practice in two case studies, both which utilized the same figurational theoretical framework....... In Study 2, changes in study goals meant that retrospective reflexive practice was necessary, while the principal researcher had an established relationship with participants in the study, which made reflection on her perspective vital. We conclude by highlighting the importance of methodological...

  20. CSPGs inhibit axon branching by impairing mitochondria-dependent regulation of actin dynamics and axonal translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainath, Rajiv; Ketschek, Andrea; Grandi, Leah; Gallo, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) inhibit the formation of axon collateral branches. The regulation of the axonal cytoskeleton and mitochondria are important components of the mechanism of branching. Actin-dependent axonal plasticity, reflected in the dynamics of axonal actin patches and filopodia, is greatest along segments of the axon populated by mitochondria. It is reported that CSPGs partially depolarize the membrane potential of axonal mitochondria, which impairs the dynamics of the axonal actin cytoskeleton and decreases the formation and duration of axonal filopodia, the first steps in the mechanism of branching. The effects of CSPGs on actin cytoskeletal dynamics are specific to axon segments populated by mitochondria. In contrast, CSPGs do not affect the microtubule content of axons, or the localization of microtubules into axonal filopodia, a required step in the mechanism of branch formation. It is also reported that CSPGs decrease the mitochondria-dependent axonal translation of cortactin, an actin associated protein involved in branching. Finally, the inhibitory effects of CSPGs on axon branching, actin cytoskeletal dynamics and the axonal translation of cortactin are reversed by culturing neurons with acetyl-l-carnitine, which promotes mitochondrial respiration. Collectively these data indicate that CSPGs impair mitochondrial function in axons, an effect which contributes to the inhibition of axon branching. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 419-437, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Reflexivity of Routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamauchi, Yutaka; Hiramoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    This study reconsiders the meaning and implications of reflexivity for the theory of routines. Due to their mundane nature, routines tend to be considered unambiguous phenomena that everyone can readily understand. The performative theory of routines has challenged this view by suggesting there i...

  2. The axonal cytoskeleton : from organization to function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kevenaar, Josta T|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338771042; Hoogenraad, Casper C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/227263502

    The axon is the single long fiber that extends from the neuron and transmits electrical signals away from the cell body. The neuronal cytoskeleton, composed of microtubules (MTs), actin filaments and neurofilaments, is not only required for axon formation and axonal transport but also provides the

  3. Slowing of axonal regeneration is correlated with increased axonal viscosity during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidemann Steven R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As we age, the speed of axonal regeneration declines. At the biophysical level, why this occurs is not well understood. Results To investigate we first measured the rate of axonal elongation of sensory neurons cultured from neonatal and adult rats. We found that neonatal axons grew 40% faster than adult axons (11.5 µm/hour vs. 8.2 µm/hour. To determine how the mechanical properties of axons change during maturation, we used force calibrated towing needles to measure the viscosity (stiffness and strength of substrate adhesion of neonatal and adult sensory axons. We found no significant difference in the strength of adhesions, but did find that adult axons were 3 times intrinsically stiffer than neonatal axons. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest decreasing axonal stiffness may be part of an effective strategy to accelerate the regeneration of axons in the adult peripheral nervous system.

  4. A Case of Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy Mimicking Brain Death and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya eRavikumar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case report of fulminant Guillain-Barré syndrome mimicking brain death. A previously healthy 60-year-old male was admitted to the neurointensive care unit after developing rapidly progressive weakness and respiratory failure. On presentation, the patient was found to have absent brainstem and spinal cord reflexes resembling that of brain death. Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN, a subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome, was diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid and nerve conduction velocity testing. An electroencephalogram showed that the patient had normal, appropriately reactive brain function. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound showed appropriate blood flow to the brain. Guillain-Barré syndrome rarely presents with weakness so severe as to mimic brain death. This article provides a review of similar literature. This case demonstrates the importance of performing a proper brain death examination, which includes evaluation for irreversible cerebral injury, exclusion of any confounding conditions, and performance of tests such as electroencephalography and transcranial dopplers when uncertainty exists about the reliability of the clinical exam.

  5. Uncovering sensory axonal dysfunction in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available This study investigated sensory and motor nerve excitability properties to elucidate the development of diabetic neuropathy. A total of 109 type 2 diabetes patients were recruited, and 106 were analyzed. According to neuropathy severity, patients were categorized into G0, G1, and G2+3 groups using the total neuropathy score-reduced (TNSr. Patients in the G0 group were asymptomatic and had a TNSr score of 0. Sensory and motor nerve excitability data from diabetic patients were compared with data from 33 healthy controls. Clinical assessment, nerve conduction studies, and sensory and motor nerve excitability testing data were analyzed to determine axonal dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy. In the G0 group, sensory excitability testing revealed increased stimulus for the 50% sensory nerve action potential (P<0.05, shortened strength-duration time constant (P<0.01, increased superexcitability (P<0.01, decreased subexcitability (P<0.05, decreased accommodation to depolarizing current (P<0.01, and a trend of decreased accommodation to hyperpolarizing current in threshold electrotonus. All the changes progressed into G1 (TNSr 1-8 and G2+3 (TNSr 9-24 groups. In contrast, motor excitability only had significantly increased stimulus for the 50% compound motor nerve action potential (P<0.01 in the G0 group. This study revealed that the development of axonal dysfunction in sensory axons occurred prior to and in a different fashion from motor axons. Additionally, sensory nerve excitability tests can detect axonal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. These insights further our understanding of diabetic neuropathy and enable the early detection of sensory axonal abnormalities, which may provide a basis for neuroprotective therapeutic approaches.

  6. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: reflections from a clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Eric

    2007-05-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is defined as chronic musculoskeletal pain and autonomic dysfunction. It is a difficult diagnosis to make, and the adolescent often sees many specialists before arriving at the correct diagnosis. In this article I review reflex sympathetic dystrophy and reflect on the differential diagnosis, pertinent medical history, personal characteristics of patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, physical examination, and laboratory evaluation. Principles of management are considered, including physical therapy, pharmacology, psychological therapy, and alternative therapies. Accurate diagnosis and management are critical for not prolonging the adolescent's and the family's suffering. It is important to provide aggressive physical therapy, stress management, relaxation training, and close follow-up. It is also critical to avoid immobilization, surgery, or invasive procedures and unnecessary tests.

  7. Reflex epilepsy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nikkhah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interesting phenomena of reflex epileptic syndromes are characterized by epileptic seizures each one induced by specific stimulus with a variety of types. Simple triggers, which lead to seizures within seconds, are of sensory type (most commonly visual, most rarely tactile or proprioceptive stimuli. Complex triggers, which are mostly of cognitive type such as praxis, reading, talking, and music, usually induce the epileptic event within minutes. It should differ from what most epileptic patients report as provocative precipitants for seizures (such as emotional stress, fatigue, fever, sleep deprivation, alcohol, and menstrual cycle. The identification of a specific trigger is not only important for patients or their parents to avoid seizures, but also it might help neurologists to choose the most effective antiepileptic drug for each case. In addition, research in this area may possibly reveal some underlying pathophysiology of epileptic phenomena in the brain.In this review, we briefly introduce reported reflex epileptic seizures, their clinical features and management.

  8. The axon-protective WLD(S) protein partially rescues mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis after axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godzik, Katharina; Coleman, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The axon-protective Wallerian degeneration slow (WLD(S)) protein can ameliorate the decline in axonal ATP levels after neurite transection. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this effect is associated with maintenance of mitochondrial respiration and/or glycolysis. We used isolated neurites of superior cervical ganglion (SCG) cultures in the Seahorse XF-24 Metabolic Flux Analyser to determine mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis under different conditions. We observed that both mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis declined significantly during the latent phase of Wallerian degeneration. WLD(S) partially reduced the decline both in glycolysis and in mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that depleting NAD levels in uncut cultures led to changes in mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis similar to those rescued by WLD(S) after cut, suggesting that the maintenance of NAD levels in Wld(S) neurites after axonal injury at least partially underlies the maintenance of ATP levels. However, by using another axon-protective mutation (Sarm1(-/-)), we could demonstrate that rescue of basal ECAR (and hence probably glycolysis) rather than basal OCR (mitochondrial respiration) may be part of the protective phenotype to delay Wallerian degeneration. These findings open new routes to study glycolysis and the connection between NAD and ATP levels in axon degeneration, which may help to eventually develop therapeutic strategies to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Corporeal reflexivity and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Elinor

    2015-06-01

    Ethnographic video recordings of high functioning children with autism or Aspergers Syndrome in everyday social encounters evidence their first person perspectives. High quality visual and audio data allow detailed analysis of children's bodies and talk as loci of reflexivity. Corporeal reflexivity involves displays of awareness of one's body as an experiencing subject and a physical object accessible to the gaze of others. Gaze, demeanor, actions, and sotto voce commentaries on unfolding situations indicate a range of moment-by-moment reflexive responses to social situations. Autism is associated with neurologically based motor problems (e.g. delayed action-goal coordination, clumsiness) and highly repetitive movements to self-soothe. These behaviors can provoke derision among classmates at school. Focusing on a 9-year-old girl's encounters with peers on the playground, this study documents precisely how autistic children can become enmeshed as unwitting objects of stigma and how they reflect upon their social rejection as it transpires. Children with autism spectrum disorders in laboratory settings manifest diminished understandings of social emotions such as embarrassment, as part of a more general impairment in social perspective-taking. Video ethnography, however, takes us further, into discovering autistic children's subjective sense of vulnerability to the gaze of classmates.

  10. Prevalence of family history in patients with reflex syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Benn, Marianne; Kaijer, Michelle Nymann

    2013-01-01

    among subtypes of reflex syncope, as these have different autonomic responses and pathogeneses may be diverse. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of a positive family history of syncope and cardiovascular characteristics in patients with cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor reflex syncope......Reflex syncope is defined by a rapid transient loss of consciousness caused by global cerebral hypoperfusion resulting from vasodilatation and/or bradycardia attributable to inappropriate cardiovascular reflexes. A hereditary component has been suggested, but prevalence of family history may differ....... Patients (n=74) were classified into subtypes of reflex syncope - cardioinhibition/asystole (Vasovagal Syncope International Study subtypes II-B [VASIS II-B], n=38) or vasodepressor (VASIS III, n=36) - using the head-up tilt test. Family history was obtained by questionnaires supplemented by interview...

  11. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Pierce, C. W.; Milner, T. E.

    2001-01-01

    the crank cycle, producing ankle dorsiflexion perturbations of similar trajectory. The stretch reflex was greatest during the power phase of the crank cycle and was decreased to the level of background EMG during recovery. Matched perturbations were induced under static conditions at the same crank angle...... active cycling as has been shown with the H-reflex. This lack of depression may reflect a decreased susceptibility of the stretch reflex to inhibition, possibly originating from presynaptic mechanisms....

  12. Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Fernando M; Bonni, Azad; Sousa, Mónica M

    2014-01-01

    Although neurons execute a cell intrinsic program of axonal growth during development, following the establishment of connections, the developmental growth capacity declines. Besides environmental challenges, this switch largely accounts for the failure of adult central nervous system (CNS) axons to regenerate. Here, we discuss the cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration, including not only the regulation of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, but also the modulation of local protein translation, retrograde and anterograde axonal transport, and microtubule dynamics. We further explore the causes underlying the failure of CNS neurons to mount a vigorous regenerative response, and the paradigms demonstrating the activation of cell intrinsic axon growth programs. Finally, we present potential mechanisms to support axon regeneration, as these may represent future therapeutic approaches to promote recovery following CNS injury and disease. PMID:24531721

  13. N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine regulates Hedgehog signaling and promotes growth of cortical axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgi Kharebava

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Axonogenesis, a process for the establishment of neuron connectivity, is central to brain function. The role of metabolites derived from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3 that is specifically enriched in the brain, has not been addressed in axon development. In this study, we tested if synaptamide (N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine, an endogenous metabolite of DHA, affects axon growth in cultured cortical neurons. We found that synaptamide increased the average axon length, inhibited GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1 transcription and sonic hedgehog (Shh target gene expression while inducing cAMP elevation. Similar effects were produced by cyclopamine, a regulator of the Shh pathway. Conversely, Shh antagonized elevation of cAMP and blocked synaptamide-mediated increase in axon length. Activation of Shh pathway by a smoothened (SMO agonist (SAG or overexpression of SMO did not inhibit axon growth mediated by synaptamide or cyclopamine. Instead, adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 abolished synaptamide-mediated axon growth indicating requirement of cAMP elevation for this process. Our findings establish that synaptamide promotes axon growth while Shh antagonizes synaptamide-mediated cAMP elevation and axon growth by a SMO-independent, non-canonical pathway.

  14. Sorting of Dendritic and Axonal Vesicles at the Pre-axonal Exclusion Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginny G. Farías

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized sorting of newly synthesized proteins to the somatodendritic and axonal domains of neurons occurs by selective incorporation into distinct populations of vesicular transport carriers. An unresolved issue is how the vesicles themselves are sorted to their corresponding neuronal domains. Previous studies concluded that the axon initial segment (AIS is an actin-based filter that selectively prevents passage of somatodendritic vesicles into the axon. We find, however, that most somatodendritic vesicles fail to enter the axon at a more proximal region in the axon hillock, herein referred to as the pre-axonal exclusion zone (PAEZ. Forced coupling of a somatodendritic cargo protein to an axonally directed kinesin is sufficient to drive transport of whole somatodendritic vesicles through the PAEZ toward the distal axon. Based on these findings, we propose that polarized sorting of transport vesicles occurs at the PAEZ and depends on the ability of the vesicles to acquire an appropriately directed microtubule motor.

  15. Evaluation of relationship between feeding reflexes and articulation in spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Hadian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is the term used to describe a movement disorder though to be the result of nonprogressive brain damage. Due to damage to CNS, it is associated with articulation disorder and abnormal feeding reflex. Lack of oral function control and coordination following feeding reflex disorders. Articulation disorders are seen in most of the cerebral palsied patients.This research aimed to determine the relationship between feeding reflexes and articulation in cerebral palsy (spasticchildren. Methods: This study was cross sectionally carried out on 52 children with cerebral palsy, 5 to 10 yrs old, in rehabilitation centers and private clinics. The information related to feeding reflexes was collected through direct observation of patient and evaluation of sound articulation through phonetic information test. Results: Statistical analysis carried out by SPSS and chi-square and fisher exact tests. Abnomal chewing and tongue reflex are more prevalent than other feeding reflexes.The relationship between lip reflex and articulation of p/m/r/y/f/č and chewing reflex with articulation of/z/š/ is meaningful. The relationship between biting reflex with articulation of /z/j/l/š/ is meaningful. The relationship between tongue reflex and rooting reflex with articulation of sound is not meaningful. Conclusion: With regard to the result of this research, it can be suggested that in children with cerebral palsy following feeding reflex disorders, abnormal posture during speech occurs that could have effect on articulation.

  16. Evaluation of cranial tibial and extensor carpi radialis reflexes before and after anesthetic block in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudury, Eduardo Alberto; de Figueiredo, Marcella Luiz; Fernandes, Thaiza Helena Tavares; Araújo, Bruno Martins; Bonelli, Marília de Albuquerque; Diogo, Camila Cardoso; Silva, Amanda Camilo; Santos, Cássia Regina Oliveira; Rocha, Nadyne Lorrayne Farias Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    Objectives This study aimed to test the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats before and after anesthetic block of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus, respectively, to determine whether they depend on a myotatic reflex arc. Methods Fifty-five cats with a normal neurologic examination that were referred for elective gonadectomy were divided into group 1 (29 cats) for testing the extensor carpi radialis reflex, and group 2 (26 cats) for testing the cranial tibial reflex. In group 1, the extensor carpi radialis reflex was tested after anesthetic induction and 15 mins after brachial plexus block with lidocaine. In group 2, the cranial tibial, withdrawal and patellar reflexes were elicited in 52 hindlimbs and retested 15 mins after epidural anesthesia. Results In group 1, before the anesthetic block, 55.17% of the cats had a decreased and 44.83% had a normal extensor carpi radialis reflex. After the block, 68.96% showed a decreased and 27.59% a normal reflex. No cat had an increased or absent reflex before anesthetic block. In group 2, prior to the anesthetic block, 15.38% of the cats had a decreased cranial tibial reflex and 84.62% had a normal response, whereas after the block it was decreased in 26.92% and normal in 73.08% of the cats. None of the cats had an increased or absent reflex. Regarding the presence of both reflexes before and after anesthetic block, there was no significant difference at 1% ( P = 0.013). Conclusions and relevance The extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats are not strictly myotatic reflexes, as they are independent of the reflex arc, and may be idiomuscular responses. Therefore, they are not reliable for neurologic examination in this species.

  17. A novel Asp121Asn mutation of myelin protein zero is associated with late-onset axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hearing loss and pupil abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Duan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Myelin protein zero (MPZ is a major component of compact myelin in peripheral nerves. Mutations in MPZ have been associated with different Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT phenotypes (CMT1B, CMT2I/J, CMTDI, Dejerine–Sottas syndrome, and congenital hypomyelination neuropathy. Here, we report phenotypic variability in a four-generation Chinese family with the MPZ mutation Asp121Asn. Genetic testing was performed on 9 family members and 200 controls. Clinical, electrophysiological and skeletal muscle MRI assessments were available for review in 6 family members. A novel heterozygous missense mutation, Asp121Asn, was observed in 5 affected members of the family. Unaffected relatives and 200 normal controls were without the mutation. Four of the affected members of the family displayed late-onset, predominantly axonal sensory and motor neuropathy, pupil abnormalities, and progressive sensorineural hearing loss. One young affected member presented with Argyll–Robertson pupils and diminished deep tendon reflexes in the lower limbs. The MPZ mutation Asp121Asn may be associated with late-onset axonal neuropathy, early-onset hearing loss and pupil abnormalities. Our report expands the number and phenotypic spectrum of MPZ mutations.

  18. Radial glia phagocytose axonal debris from degenerating overextending axons in the developing olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Daniel A; Wegner, Michael; Stolt, C Claus; Chehrehasa, Fatemeh; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James A

    2015-02-01

    Axon targeting during the development of the olfactory system is not always accurate, and numerous axons overextend past the target layer into the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. To date, the fate of the mis-targeted axons has not been determined. We hypothesized that following overextension, the axons degenerate, and cells within the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb phagocytose the axonal debris. We utilized a line of transgenic mice that expresses ZsGreen fluorescent protein in primary olfactory axons. We found that overextending axons closely followed the filaments of radial glia present in the olfactory bulb during embryonic development. Following overextension into deeper layers of the olfactory bulb, axons degenerated and radial glia responded by phagocytosing the resulting debris. We used in vitro analysis to confirm that the radial glia had phagocytosed debris from olfactory axons. We also investigated whether the fate of overextending axons was altered when the development of the olfactory bulb was perturbed. In mice that lacked Sox10, a transcription factor essential for normal olfactory bulb development, we observed a disruption to the morphology and positioning of radial glia and an accumulation of olfactory axon debris within the bulb. Our results demonstrate that during early development of the olfactory system, radial glia play an important role in removing overextended axons from the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Action Potential Dynamics in Fine Axons Probed with an Axonally Targeted Optical Voltage Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yihe; Bayguinov, Peter O; Jackson, Meyer B

    2017-01-01

    The complex and malleable conduction properties of axons determine how action potentials propagate through extensive axonal arbors to reach synaptic terminals. The excitability of axonal membranes plays a major role in neural circuit function, but because most axons are too thin for conventional electrical recording, their properties remain largely unexplored. To overcome this obstacle, we used a genetically encoded hybrid voltage sensor (hVOS) harboring an axonal targeting motif. Expressing this probe in transgenic mice enabled us to monitor voltage changes optically in two populations of axons in hippocampal slices, the large axons of dentate granule cells (mossy fibers) in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region and the much finer axons of hilar mossy cells in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Action potentials propagated with distinct velocities in each type of axon. Repetitive firing broadened action potentials in both populations, but at an intermediate frequency the degree of broadening differed. Repetitive firing also attenuated action potential amplitudes in both mossy cell and granule cell axons. These results indicate that the features of use-dependent action potential broadening, and possible failure, observed previously in large nerve terminals also appear in much finer unmyelinated axons. Subtle differences in the frequency dependences could influence the propagation of activity through different pathways to excite different populations of neurons. The axonally targeted hVOS probe used here opens up the diverse repertoire of neuronal processes to detailed biophysical study.

  20. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg.

  1. Reflexive Dressing: Rethinking Retro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella North

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article undertakes a philosophical exploration of the act we know, or think we know, as ‘dressing’. Inhabiting, in thought, the moment in which we dress, I examine some of its constituent mechanisms, attending to the impulses by which dressing is generated out of subjective experience.  When those impulses are temporally marked, as they are in the case of retro dress, this generation is a two-pronged process, in which the holding of the body in time, and the holding of time in the body, recalibrate one another. The process of ‘dressing,’ in this understanding, has a reflexivity which is double; it entails the turning of the body, with dress as medium, towards itself, and the turning of present experience towards some felt notion of the past. Reflexively dressing, we are always becoming ourselves, and becoming other than ourselves, at once; a movement of circuitous internalisation and externalisation by which the ambiguation inherent in material experience is realised.

  2. Blink reflex in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkholy, Saly H; Hosny, Hanan M; Shalaby, Nevein M; El-Hadidy, Reem A; Abd El-Rahim, Noha T; Mohamed, Manal M

    2014-12-01

    An evaluation of the extent of damage of the central nervous system in diabetes mellitus is of high value in current research. Electrophysiological abnormalities are frequently present in asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic cranial neuropathy is one of the complications of the disease. Blink reflex is used to diagnose subclinical cranial neuropathy. The objective is to test the utility of blink reflex in detecting subclinical cranial nerve involvement in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Forty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged from 30 to 60 years examined clinically and neurologically. Blink reflex and nerve conduction studies for the upper and lower limbs were performed and compared with 20 matched normal controls. Diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy showed significant prolonged distal latency and reduced amplitudes of the R2C response compared with the control, patients without peripheral neuropathy showed insignificant changes. Alteration of R2 correlated with the type of treatment and the duration of the disease. In patients without peripheral neuropathy, ulnar sensory distal latencies showed significant positive correlation with R2I latency, whereas its Conduction Velocity (CV) showed significant positive correlation with R2C amplitudes and negative correlation with R2C latency. R2C is the most sensitive parameter in the blink reflex, which can help in the diagnosis of subclinical diabetic cranial neuropathy.

  3. Regulating Axonal Responses to Injury: The Intersection between Signaling Pathways Involved in Axon Myelination and The Inhibition of Axon Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sudheendra N. R.; Pearse, Damien D.

    2016-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors adversely affect the gene programs that govern the expression of regeneration-associated genes (RAGs) and the production of a diversity of extracellular matrix molecules (ECM). Insufficient RAG expression in the injured neuron and the presence of inhibitory ECM at the lesion, leads to structural alterations in the axon that perturb the growth machinery, or form an extraneous barrier to axonal regeneration, respectively. Here, the role of myelin, both intact and debris, in antagonizing axon regeneration has been the focus of numerous investigations. These studies have employed antagonizing antibodies and knockout animals to examine how the growth cone of the re-growing axon responds to the presence of myelin and myelin-associated inhibitors (MAIs) within the lesion environment and caudal spinal cord. However, less attention has been placed on how the myelination of the axon after SCI, whether by endogenous glia or exogenously implanted glia, may alter axon regeneration. Here, we examine the intersection between intracellular signaling pathways in neurons and glia that are involved in axon myelination and axon growth, to provide greater insight into how interrogating this complex network of molecular interactions may lead to new therapeutics targeting SCI. PMID:27375427

  4. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  5. Torsional Behavior of Axonal Microtubule Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Carole; Soheilypour, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal microtubule (MT) bundles crosslinked by microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau are responsible for vital biological functions such as maintaining mechanical integrity and shape of the axon as well as facilitating axonal transport. Breaking and twisting of MTs have been previously observed in damaged undulated axons. Such breaking and twisting of MTs is suggested to cause axonal swellings that lead to axonal degeneration, which is known as “diffuse axonal injury”. In particular, overstretching and torsion of axons can potentially damage the axonal cytoskeleton. Following our previous studies on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension and compression, this work seeks to characterize the mechanical behavior of MT bundles under pure torsion as well as a combination of torsional and tensile loads using a coarse-grained computational model. In the case of pure torsion, a competition between MAP tau tensile and MT bending energies is observed. After three turns, a transition occurs in the mechanical behavior of the bundle that is characterized by its diameter shrinkage. Furthermore, crosslink spacing is shown to considerably influence the mechanical response, with larger MAP tau spacing resulting in a higher rate of turns. Therefore, MAP tau crosslinking of MT filaments protects the bundle from excessive deformation. Simultaneous application of torsion and tension on MT bundles is shown to accelerate bundle failure, compared to pure tension experiments. MAP tau proteins fail in clusters of 10–100 elements located at the discontinuities or the ends of MT filaments. This failure occurs in a stepwise fashion, implying gradual accumulation of elastic tensile energy in crosslinks followed by rupture. Failure of large groups of interconnecting MAP tau proteins leads to detachment of MT filaments from the bundle near discontinuities. This study highlights the importance of torsional loading in axonal damage after traumatic brain injury

  6. On orbit-reflexive operators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, Vladimír; Vršovský, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 2 (2009), s. 497-510 ISSN 0024-6107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : reflexive operators * orbit-reflexivity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.798, year: 2009

  7. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  8. Nonpharmacological treatment of reflex syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, Wouter; Colman, Nancy; Krediet, C. T. Paul; Freeman, Roy

    2004-01-01

    Reflex syncope is a common medical problem. Vasovagal reflex syncope is the most frequent form. Although the prognosis of the disorder is excellent, it may impose substantial changes in life style and cause profound psychological distress. Thus, management of this disorder is an important issue.

  9. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  10. IMP2 axonal localization, RNA interactome, and function in the development of axon trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preitner, Nicolas; Quan, Jie; Li, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    RNA-based regulatory mechanisms play important roles in the development and plasticity of neural circuits and neurological disease. Developing axons provide a model well suited to the study of RNA-based regulation, and contain specific subsets of mRNAsthat are locally translated and have roles...... to strong defects in commissural axon trajectories at the midline intermediate target. These results reveal a highly distinctive axonal enrichment of IMP2, show that it interacts with a network of axon guidance-related mRNAs, and reveal that it is required for normal axon pathfinding during vertebrate...

  11. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome and neuromediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thao; Lafforgue, Pierre

    2003-02-01

    Concepts related to the pathophysiology of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) are changing. Although sympathetic influences are still viewed as the most likely mechanism underlying the development and/or perpetuation of RSDS, these influences are no longer ascribed to an increase in sympathetic tone. Rather, the most likely mechanism may be increased sensitivity to catecholamines due to sympathetic denervation with an increase in the number and/or sensitivity of peripheral axonal adrenoceptors. Several other pathophysiological mechanisms have been suggested, including neurogenic inflammation with the release of neuropeptides by primary nociceptive afferents and sympathetic efferents. These neuromediators, particularly substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and neuropeptide Y (NPY), may play a pivotal role in the genesis of pain in RSDS. They induce an inflammatory response (cutaneous erythema and edema) and lower the pain threshold. Neurogenic inflammation at the site of the lesion with neuromediator accumulation or depletion probably contributes to the pathophysiology of RSDS. However, no single neuromediator has been proved responsible, and other hypotheses continue to arouse interest.

  12. Cough reflex hypersensitivity: A role for neurotrophins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hashim, Ahmed Z; Jaffal, Sahar M

    2017-03-01

    Cough is one of the most common complaints for which sufferers seek medical assistance. However, currently available drugs are not very effective in treating cough, particularly that which follows an upper respiratory tract infection. Nonetheless, there has been a significant increase in our understanding of the mechanisms and pathways of the defensive cough as well as the hypersensitive/pathophysiological cough, both at airway and central nervous system (CNS) levels. Numerous molecules and signaling pathways have been identified as potential targets for antitussive drugs, including neurotrophins (NTs). NTs belong to a family of trophic factors and are critical for the development and maintenance of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system including sympathetic efferents, sensory neuron afferents, and immune cells. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was the first member of the NT family to be discovered, with wide ranging actions associated with synapse formation, survival, proliferation, apoptosis, axonal and dendritic outgrowth, expression and activity of functionally important proteins such as ion channels, receptors, and neurotransmitters. In addition, NGF has been implicated in several disease states particularly neuropathic pain and most recently in the sensitization of the cough reflex. This review will briefly address the peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms of airway neurons and will then focus on NGF signaling and its role in cough hypersensitivity.

  13. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokkaya, Nilufer Kutay Ordu; Aras, Meltem; Yesiltepe, Elcin; Koseoglu, Fusun

    2006-12-01

    There is a high incidence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy of the upper limbs in patients with hemiplegia, and its painful and functional consequences present a problem to specialists in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This study was designed to assess the role of several factors in the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in patients with hemiplegia. Ninety-five consecutive stroke patients (63 male and 32 female, mean age 59+/-12 years) admitted to our hospital were evaluated. Of the study group, 29 patients (30.5%) were found to develop reflex sympathetic dystrophy. There were no significant differences between the hemiplegic patient groups with or without reflex sympathetic dystrophy regarding age, gender, etiology, side of involvement, disease duration and the presence of comorbidities. The recovery stages of hemiplegia, as shown by Brunnstrom functional classification, were significantly different between the two groups; patients in lower recovery stages tended to develop reflex sympathetic dystrophy more frequently (Preflex sympathetic dystrophy. Glenohumeral subluxation was present in 37 patients (38.9%) in our study group and the presence of this complication was related to the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. The presence of glenohumeral subluxation was significantly higher in patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy (21/29, 72.4%) when compared to the patients without reflex sympathetic dystrophy (16/66, 24.2%) (Preflex sympathetic dystrophy. These results suggest that lower recovery stages, reduced tonus and glenohumeral subluxation significantly contribute to the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the hemiplegic patient. We believe that preventive and treatment measures should consider these factors as they seem to have in common a higher risk of traumatizing the paralyzed upper limb and causing reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

  14. Squid Giant Axons Synthesize NF Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, Marianna; Chun, Jong Tai; Giuditta, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Squid giant axon has been an excellent model system for studying fundamental topics in neurobiology such as neuronal signaling. It has been also useful in addressing the questions of local protein synthesis in the axons. Incubation of isolated squid giant axons with [ 35 S]methionine followed by immunoprecipitation with a rabbit antibody against all squid neurofilament (NF) proteins demonstrates the local synthesis of a major 180 kDa NF protein and of several NF proteins of lower molecular weights. Their identification as NF proteins is based on their absence in the preimmune precipitates. Immunoprecipitates washed with more stringent buffers confirmed these results. Our data are at variance with a recent study based on the same experimental procedure that failed to visualize the local synthesis of NF proteins by the giant axon and thereby suggested their exclusive derivation from nerve cell bodies (as reported by Gainer et al. in Cell Mol Neurobiol 37:475-486, 2017). By reviewing the pertinent literature, we confute the claims that mRNA translation is absent in mature axons because of a putative translation block and that most proteins of mature axons are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. Given the intrinsic axonal capacity to synthesize proteins, we stress the glial derivation of axonal and presynaptic RNAs and the related proposal that these neuronal domains are endowed with largely independent gene expression systems (as reported by Giuditta et al. in Physiol Rev 88:515-555, 2008).

  15. Reflexivity and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksimovic, Tijana; Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft

    2017-01-01

    in the complexity of causes of social injustice in their own environment – i.e. how these are perpetuated in the design and implementation of national and organisational policies and how they influence counselling relationships. A generic challenge in career guidance is, for instance, to help individuals follow......Career practitioners’ reflexive understanding of their professional role as change agents in career guidance and counselling practices has a major impact on how social justice can be achieved. This entitles an awareness of the way in which guidance and counselling practices are embedded....... In this chapter, we argue that career practitioners may perpetuate social inequalities by not reflecting on how they themselves potentially take part in the reproduction of dominant discourses when they navigate and handle these tensions. In particular, the dominance of neo-liberal discourse in institutional...

  16. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  17. Meninges-derived cues control axon guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Tracey A C S; DeLoughery, Zachary J; Jaworski, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    The axons of developing neurons travel long distances along stereotyped pathways under the direction of extracellular cues sensed by the axonal growth cone. Guidance cues are either secreted proteins that diffuse freely or bind the extracellular matrix, or membrane-anchored proteins. Different populations of axons express distinct sets of receptors for guidance cues, which results in differential responses to specific ligands. The full repertoire of axon guidance cues and receptors and the identity of the tissues producing these cues remain to be elucidated. The meninges are connective tissue layers enveloping the vertebrate brain and spinal cord that serve to protect the central nervous system (CNS). The meninges also instruct nervous system development by regulating the generation and migration of neural progenitors, but it has not been determined whether they help guide axons to their targets. Here, we investigate a possible role for the meninges in neuronal wiring. Using mouse neural tissue explants, we show that developing spinal cord meninges produce secreted attractive and repulsive cues that can guide multiple types of axons in vitro. We find that motor and sensory neurons, which project axons across the CNS-peripheral nervous system (PNS) boundary, are attracted by meninges. Conversely, axons of both ipsi- and contralaterally projecting dorsal spinal cord interneurons are repelled by meninges. The responses of these axonal populations to the meninges are consistent with their trajectories relative to meninges in vivo, suggesting that meningeal guidance factors contribute to nervous system wiring and control which axons are able to traverse the CNS-PNS boundary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2006-08-16

    Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. In mammalian cells, NAD can be synthesized from multiple precursors, including tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside (NmR), via multiple enzymatic steps. To determine whether other components of these NAD biosynthetic pathways are capable of delaying axonal degeneration, we overexpressed each of the enzymes involved in each pathway and/or exogenously administered their respective substrates in DRG cultures and assessed their capacity to protect axons after axotomy. Among the enzymes tested, Nmnat1 had the strongest protective effects, whereas nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase showed moderate protective activity in the presence of their substrates. Strong axonal protection was also provided by Nmnat3, which is predominantly located in mitochondria, and an Nmnat1 mutant localized to the cytoplasm, indicating that the subcellular location of NAD production is not crucial for protective activity. In addition, we showed that exogenous application of the NAD precursors that are the substrates of these enzymes, including nicotinic acid mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, and NmR, can also delay axonal degeneration. These results indicate that stimulation of NAD biosynthetic pathways via a variety of interventions may be useful in preventing or delaying axonal degeneration.

  19. Reflexivity in Narratives on Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft; Olesen, Lektor Birgitte Ravn

    Previous research has shown how reflexivity is a precondition for knowledge co-production through productive dialogue in organisational contexts because it entails a re-ordering, re-arranging and re-designing of what one knows and therefore creates new angles of vision. In this paper, we draw...... on Bakhtinian dialogic communication theory and discursive psychology to investigate the written practice narratives of 23 students on a Masters Degree Programme in Educational Studies, focusing on how the process of writing narratives accentuates reflexivity. Our findings indicate that the narratives invite...... have the potential to bring about productive learning in organizational contexts since they appear to stimulate participants’ relational engagement and reflexivity....

  20. Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Ayvaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (chronic regional pain syndrome isn’t frequently encountered in practical pediatrics and childhood. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD is a disorder characterized by widespread localized pain, often along with swelling, discoloration, trophic changes and autonomic abnormalities such as vasomotor disorders. Its etio-pathogenesis hasn’t been completely determined.The disease can form in an area innerved by a partially damaged nerve and usually follows minor injury or trauma. In this paper, two girl patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy are discussed along with the laboratory and clinic finding by accompaniment the literature as it is rarely seen in childhood.

  1. Developmental downregulation of LIS1 expression limits axonal extension and allows axon pruning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Kumamoto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The robust axonal growth and regenerative capacities of young neurons decrease substantially with age. This developmental downregulation of axonal growth may facilitate axonal pruning and neural circuit formation but limits functional recovery following nerve damage. While external factors influencing axonal growth have been extensively investigated, relatively little is known about the intrinsic molecular changes underlying the age-dependent reduction in regeneration capacity. We report that developmental downregulation of LIS1 is responsible for the decreased axonal extension capacity of mature dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. In contrast, exogenous LIS1 expression or endogenous LIS1 augmentation by calpain inhibition restored axonal extension capacity in mature DRG neurons and facilitated regeneration of the damaged sciatic nerve. The insulator protein CTCF suppressed LIS1 expression in mature DRG neurons, and this reduction resulted in excessive accumulation of phosphoactivated GSK-3β at the axon tip, causing failure of the axonal extension. Conversely, sustained LIS1 expression inhibited developmental axon pruning in the mammillary body. Thus, LIS1 regulation may coordinate the balance between axonal growth and pruning during maturation of neuronal circuits.

  2. Dynamics of target recognition by interstitial axon branching along developing cortical axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastmeyer, M; O'Leary, D D

    1996-02-15

    Corticospinal axons innervate their midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal targets by extending collateral branches interstitially along their length. To establish that the axon shaft rather than the axonal growth cone is responsible for target recognition in this system, and to characterize the dynamics of interstitial branch formation, we have studied this process in an in vivo-like setting using slice cultures from neonatal mice containing the entire pathway of corticospinal axons. Corticospinal axons labeled with the dye 1,1'-dioctodecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (or Dil) were imaged using time-lapse video microscopy of their pathway overlying the basilar pons, their major hindbrain target. The axon shaft millimeters behind the growth cone exhibits several dynamic behaviors, including the de novo formation of varicosities and filopodia-like extensions, and a behavior that we term "pulsation," which is characterized by a variable thickening and thining of short segments of the axon. An individual axon can have multiple sites of branching activity, with many of the branches being transient. These dynamic behaviors occur along the portion of the axon shaft overlying the basilar pons, but not just caudal to it. Once the collaterals extend into the pontine neuropil, they branch further in the neuropil, while the parent axon becomes quiescent. Thus, the branching activity is spatially restricted to specific portions of the axon, as well as temporally restricted to a relatively brief time window. These findings provide definitive evidence that collateral branches form de novo along corticospinal axons and establish that the process of target recognition in this system is a property of the axon shaft rather than the leading growth cone.

  3. Proprioceptive reflexes in patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, A C; Van de Beek, W J T; Van Hilten, J J; Van der Helm, F C T

    2003-07-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is a syndrome that frequently follows an injury and is characterized by sensory, autonomic and motor features of the affected extremities. One of the more common motor features of RSD is tonic dystonia, which is caused by impairment of inhibitory interneuronal spinal circuits. In this study the circuits that modulate the gain of proprioceptive reflexes of the shoulder musculature are quantitatively assessed in 19 RSD patients, 9 of whom presented with dystonia. The proprioceptive reflexes are quantified by applying two types of force disturbances: (1) disturbances with a fixed low frequency and a variable bandwidth and (2) disturbances with a small bandwidth around a prescribed centre frequency. Compared to controls, patients have lower reflex gains for velocity feedback in response to the disturbances around a prescribed centre frequency. Additionally, patients with dystonia lack the ability to generate negative reflex gains for position feedback, for these same disturbances. Proprioceptive reflexes to the disturbances with a fixed low frequency and variable bandwidth present no difference between patients and controls. Although dystonia in the RSD patients was limited to the distal musculature, the results suggest involvement of interneuronal circuits that mediate postsynaptic inhibition of the motoneurons of the proximal musculature.

  4. Nociceptive afferents to the premotor neurons that send axons simultaneously to the facial and hypoglossal motoneurons by means of axon collaterals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Dong

    Full Text Available It is well known that the brainstem premotor neurons of the facial nucleus and hypoglossal nucleus coordinate orofacial nociceptive reflex (ONR responses. However, whether the brainstem PNs receive the nociceptive projection directly from the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus is still kept unclear. Our present study focuses on the distribution of premotor neurons in the ONR pathways of rats and the collateral projection of the premotor neurons which are involved in the brainstem local pathways of the orofacial nociceptive reflexes of rat. Retrograde tracer Fluoro-gold (FG or FG/tetramethylrhodamine-dextran amine (TMR-DA were injected into the VII or/and XII, and anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected into the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc. The tracing studies indicated that FG-labeled neurons receiving BDA-labeled fibers from the Vc were mainly distributed bilaterally in the parvicellular reticular formation (PCRt, dorsal and ventral medullary reticular formation (MdD, MdV, supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup and parabrachial nucleus (PBN with an ipsilateral dominance. Some FG/TMR-DA double-labeled premotor neurons, which were observed bilaterally in the PCRt, MdD, dorsal part of the MdV, peri-motor nucleus regions, contacted with BDA-labeled axonal terminals and expressed c-fos protein-like immunoreactivity which induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin into the lip. After retrograde tracer wheat germ agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP was injected into VII or XII and BDA into Vc, electron microscopic study revealed that some BDA-labeled axonal terminals made mainly asymmetric synapses on the dendritic and somatic profiles of WGA-HRP-labeled premotor neurons. These data indicate that some premotor neurons could integrate the orofacial nociceptive input from the Vc and transfer these signals simultaneously to different brainstem motonuclei by axonal collaterals.

  5. Cargo distributions differentiate pathological axonal transport impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cassie S; Lee, Robert H

    2012-05-07

    Axonal transport is an essential process in neurons, analogous to shipping goods, by which energetic and cellular building supplies are carried downstream (anterogradely) and wastes are carried upstream (retrogradely) by molecular motors, which act as cargo porters. Impairments in axonal transport have been linked to devastating and often lethal neurodegenerative diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Huntington's, and Alzheimer's. Axonal transport impairment types include a decrease in available motors for cargo transport (motor depletion), the presence of defective or non-functional motors (motor dilution), and the presence of increased or larger cargos (protein aggregation). An impediment to potential treatment identification has been the inability to determine what type(s) of axonal transport impairment candidates that could be present in a given disease. In this study, we utilize a computational model and common axonal transport experimental metrics to reveal the axonal transport impairment general characteristics or "signatures" that result from three general defect types of motor depletion, motor dilution, and protein aggregation. Our results not only provide a means to discern these general impairments types, they also reveal key dynamic and emergent features of axonal transport, which potentially underlie multiple impairment types. The identified characteristics, as well as the analytical method, can be used to help elucidate the axonal transport impairments observed in experimental and clinical data. For example, using the model-predicted defect signatures, we identify the defect candidates, which are most likely to be responsible for the axonal transport impairments in the G93A SOD1 mouse model of ALS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Mechanism of post-stroke reflex sympathetic dystrophy: study with needle electromyography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Tong; Li, Jing

    2006-10-10

    To explore the mechanism of post-stroke reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) patients electromyographic abnormality and confirm its clinical value. Fifty patients with first-onset stroke, aged 33 - 78, including 30 with RSD and 20 without RSD, underwent needle electromyography (EMG) to test the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV) of bilateral median nerves, and the number and position of spontaneous EMG activity of bilateral short abductor muscles of thumb and abductor muscles little finger. The median nerve compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude of the affected upper extremities of the RSD group was 8.6 mV +/- 2.9 mV, significantly lower than that of the non-RSD group (13.2 mV +/- 4.6 mV, P < 0.01). The incidence of spontaneous electrical potential of the RSD group was 100%; significantly higher than hat of the non-RSD group (65%, P < 0.001). The quantity of spontaneous EMG activity on the short abductor muscles of thumb and abductor muscles little finger was increased in the RSD group (P < 0.01). The motor nerve conduction velocity and electrophysiological presentation of sensory nerve of these 2 groups were all normal and without significant differences between them. Partial axonal degeneration occurs on the distal motor never fibers of the affected upper extremity of the RSD patients, which may be related to subsequent peripheral nerve injury after central nerve system impairment.

  7. Volitional control of reflex cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolser, Donald C.; Davenport, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies suggest a role for the cerebral cortex in the generation of reflex cough in awake humans. Reflex cough is preceded by detection of an urge to cough; strokes specifically within the cerebral cortex can affect parameters of reflex cough, and reflex cough can be voluntarily suppressed. However, it is not known to what extent healthy, awake humans can volitionally modulate the cough reflex, aside from suppression. The aims of this study were to determine whether conscious humans can volitionally modify their reflexive cough and, if so, to determine what parameters of the cough waveform and corresponding muscle activity can be modified. Twenty adults (18–40 yr, 4 men) volunteered for study participation and gave verbal and written informed consent. Participants were seated and outfitted with a facemask and pneumotacograph, and two surface EMG electrodes were positioned over expiratory muscles. Capsaicin (200 μM) was delivered via dosimeter and one-way (inspiratory) valve attached to a side port between the facemask and pneumotachograph. Cough airflow and surface EMG activity were recorded across tasks including 1) baseline, 2) small cough (cough smaller or softer than normal), 3) long cough (cough longer or louder than normal), and 4) not cough (alternative behavior). All participants coughed in response to 200 μM capsaicin and were able to modify the cough. Variables exhibiting changes include those related to the peak airflow during the expiratory phase. Results demonstrate that it is possible to volitionally modify cough motor output characteristics. PMID:22492938

  8. Mechanical Characteristics of Reflex Durign Upright Posture in Paralyzed Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Lee, Bumsuk; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Hyeonki

    The characteristics of flexor reflexes have been investigated in the previous studies with human subjects who were seated or supine position. However, researchers did not describe how the spinal circuits are used in different hip angles for paralyzed subjects, such as the standing position with walker or cane. In upright posture the compatibility between a flexor reflex of leg and body balance is a special problem for lower limb injured subjects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hip angle change on the flexor reflex evoked in standing paralyzed subjects supported by walker. In this study, six spinal cord injured and four stroke subjects were recruited through the inpatient physical therapy clinics of Korea national rehabilitation hospital. A single axis electronic goniometer was mounted on the lateral side of the hip joint of the impaired limb to record movements in the sagittal plane at this joint. The electronic goniometer was connected to a data acquisition system, through amplifiers to a computer. Since subject' posture influenced characteristics of the flexion reflex response, the subjects were supported in an upright posture by the help of parallelogram walder. Two series of tests were performed on each leg. The first series of the tests investigated the influence of hip angle during stationary standing posture on flexion reflex response. The hip angle was adjusted by the foot plate. The second examined the effect of the voluntary action of subject on swing motion during the gait. The electrically induced flexion reflex simultaneously produced the flexion of the hip, knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle enabling the swing phase of walking. Form the experimental results we observed that the reflex response of hip joint was largerwith the hip in the extended position than in the flexed position during standing posture. Under voluntary movement on flexion reflex during gaint, the peak hip angle induced by stimulation was

  9. Genetics Home Reference: giant axonal neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connect the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to muscles and to sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound. However, axons in the central nervous system are affected as well. The signs and symptoms ...

  10. Drug therapy for chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrancken, A. F. J. E.; van Schaik, I. N.; Hughes, R. A. C.; Notermans, N. C.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathy is an insidiously progressive sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy that affects elderly people. Although severe disability or handicap does not occur, it reduces quality of life. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether drug therapy for chronic idiopathic

  11. Dendritic and Axonal Wiring Optimization of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    The way in which a neuronal tree expands plays an important role in its functional and computational characteristics. We aimed to study the existence of an optimal neuronal design for different types of cortical GABAergic neurons. To do this, we hypothesized that both the axonal and dendritic trees of individual neurons optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. We took the branching points of real three-dimensional neuronal reconstructions of the axonal and dendritic trees of different types of cortical interneurons and searched for the minimal wiring arborization structure that respects the branching points. We compared the minimal wiring arborization with real axonal and dendritic trees. We tested this optimization problem using a new approach based on graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques. We concluded that neuronal wiring is near-optimal in most of the tested neurons, although the wiring length of dendritic trees is generally nearer to the optimum. Therefore, wiring economy is related to the way in which neuronal arborizations grow irrespective of the marked differences in the morphology of the examined interneurons.

  12. Oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines contribute to demyelination and axonal damage in a cerebellar culture model of neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Penta, Alessandra; Moreno, Beatriz; Reix, Stephanie; Fernandez-Diez, Begoña; Villanueva, Maite; Errea, Oihana; Escala, Nagore; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Comella, Joan X; Villoslada, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Demyelination and axonal damage are critical processes in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines elicited by inflammation mediates tissue damage. To monitor the demyelination and axonal injury associated with microglia activation we employed a model using cerebellar organotypic cultures stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Microglia activated by LPS released pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα), and increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This activation was associated with demyelination and axonal damage in cerebellar cultures. Axonal damage, as revealed by the presence of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments, mitochondrial accumulation in axonal spheroids, and axonal transection, was associated with stronger iNOS expression and concomitant increases in ROS. Moreover, we analyzed the contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in demyelination and axonal degeneration using the iNOS inhibitor ethyl pyruvate, a free-scavenger and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol, as well as via blockage of pro-inflammatory cytokines using a Fc-TNFR1 construct. We found that blocking microglia activation with ethyl pyruvate or allopurinol significantly decreased axonal damage, and to a lesser extent, demyelination. Blocking TNFα significantly decreased demyelination but did not prevented axonal damage. Moreover, the most common therapy for MS, interferon-beta, was used as an example of an immunomodulator compound that can be tested in this model. In vitro, interferon-beta treatment decreased oxidative stress (iNOS and ROS levels) and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines after LPS stimulation, reducing axonal damage. The model of neuroinflammation using cerebellar culture stimulated with endotoxin mimicked myelin and axonal damage mediated by the combination of oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines

  13. Activation of ganglion cells and axon bundles using epiretinal electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosberg, Lauren E; Ganesan, Karthik; Goetz, Georges A; Madugula, Sasidhar S; Bhaskhar, Nandita; Fan, Victoria; Li, Peter; Hottowy, Pawel; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Sher, Alexander; Litke, Alan M; Mitra, Subhasish; Chichilnisky, E J

    2017-09-01

    Epiretinal prostheses for treating blindness activate axon bundles, causing large, arc-shaped visual percepts that limit the quality of artificial vision. Improving the function of epiretinal prostheses therefore requires understanding and avoiding axon bundle activation. This study introduces a method to detect axon bundle activation on the basis of its electrical signature and uses the method to test whether epiretinal stimulation can directly elicit spikes in individual retinal ganglion cells without activating nearby axon bundles. Combined electrical stimulation and recording from isolated primate retina were performed using a custom multielectrode system (512 electrodes, 10-μm diameter, 60-μm pitch). Axon bundle signals were identified by their bidirectional propagation, speed, and increasing amplitude as a function of stimulation current. The threshold for bundle activation varied across electrodes and retinas, and was in the same range as the threshold for activating retinal ganglion cells near their somas. In the peripheral retina, 45% of electrodes that activated individual ganglion cells (17% of all electrodes) did so without activating bundles. This permitted selective activation of 21% of recorded ganglion cells (7% of expected ganglion cells) over the array. In one recording in the central retina, 75% of electrodes that activated individual ganglion cells (16% of all electrodes) did so without activating bundles. The ability to selectively activate a subset of retinal ganglion cells without axon bundles suggests a possible novel architecture for future epiretinal prostheses. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Large-scale multielectrode recording and stimulation were used to test how selectively retinal ganglion cells can be electrically activated without activating axon bundles. A novel method was developed to identify axon activation on the basis of its unique electrical signature and was used to find that a subset of ganglion cells can be activated at single

  14. Independent signaling by Drosophila insulin receptor for axon guidance and growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Rita Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila insulin receptor (DInR regulates a diverse array of biological processes including growth, axon guidance, and sugar homeostasis. Growth regulation by DInR is mediated by Chico, the Drosophila homolog of vertebrate insulin-receptor-substrate proteins IRS1-4. In contrast, DInR regulation of photoreceptor axon guidance in the developing visual system is mediated by the SH2-SH3 domain adaptor protein Dreadlocks (Dock. In vitro studies by others identified five NPXY motifs, one in the juxtamembrane region and four in the signaling C-terminal tail (C-tail, important for interaction with Chico. Here we used yeast two-hybrid assays to identify regions in the DInR C-tail that interact with Dock. These Dock-binding sites were in separate portions of the C-tail from the previously identified Chico-binding sites. To test whether these sites are required for growth or axon guidance in whole animals, a panel of DInR proteins, in which the putative Chico and Dock interaction sites had been mutated individually or in combination, were tested for their ability to rescue viability, growth, and axon guidance defects of dinr mutant flies. Sites required for viability were identified. Unexpectedly, mutation of both putative Dock binding sites, either individually or in combination, did not lead to defects in photoreceptor axon guidance. Thus, either sites also required for viability are necessary for DInR function in axon guidance and/or there is redundancy built into the DInR/Dock interaction such that Dock is able to interact with multiple regions of DInR. We also found that simultaneous mutation of all 5 NPXY motifs implicated in Chico interaction drastically decreased growth in both male and female adult flies. Mutation of these 5 NPXY motifs did not affect photoreceptor axon guidance, showing that different sites within DInR control growth and axon guidance.

  15. Teste do reflexo vermelho: forma de prevenção à cegueira na infância Test del reflejo rojo: forma de prevención de la ceguera en la niñez Red reflex: prevention way to blindness in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Sousa Carvalho de Aguiar

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Estudo exploratório, quantitativo, que objetivou investigar o resultado e as gradações de cor do teste do reflexo vermelho em recém-nascidos (RN. Amostra composta de 180 RN de uma maternidade em Fortaleza-CE. Destes, 156 tiveram resultado "não alterado" e 24 "suspeito". Quanto ao aspecto do reflexo, em 144 RN a coloração foi a mesma nos dois olhos, enquanto em 35 apresentou-se vermelha, em 33, laranja avermelhada, em 46, alaranjada, em 24, amarelo claro, em 6 amarela com manchas esbranquiçadas centrais. Dos casos suspeitos, o reflexo mostrou-se amarelo claro com manchas esbranquiçadas ou rajadas. O enfermeiro treinado é um dos profissionais competentes para realizar o teste, podendo desempenhar importante papel na Unidade Neonatal com ações de prevenção de alterações oculares na infância.Estudio exploratorio, cuantitativo, que tuvo como objeto investigar el resultado y las gradaciones de color del test del reflejo rojo en recién nacidos (RN. La muestra constó de 180 RN de una maternidad en Fortaleza-CE. De estes, 156 presentaron resultado "no alterado" y 24 "sospechoso". Cuanto al aspecto del reflejo, 144 RN presentaron la misma coloración en los dos ojos, de estes 35 presentó rojo, 33 naranja rojizo, 46 anaranjado, 24 amarillo claro, 6 amarillo con manchas blanquecinas centrales. De los casos sospechosos, el reflejo presentó amarillo claro con manchas blanquecinas con rayas. El enfermero entrenado para realizar el test del reflejo rojo puede desempeñar importante papel en la Unidad Neonatal con acciones de prevención de alteraciones oculares en la niñez.This study had as objective to investigate the result and the colour gradation of red reflex test in newborns (NB. It is a exploratory, quantitative study and the sample was 180 NB from maternity ward in Fortaleza-CE. From this, 156 showed result "no altered" and 24 "suspect". About the aspect of red reflex, 144 NB showed the same coloration in the two eyes, in 35 of

  16. Acoustic Reflex Screening of Conductive Hearing Loss for Third Window Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Robert S; Metz, Christopher M; Bojrab, Dennis I; Babu, Seilesh C; Zappia, John; Sargent, Eric W; Chan, Eleanor Y; Naumann, Ilka C; LaRouere, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of acoustic reflexes in screening for third window disorders (eg, superior semicircular canal dehiscence) prior to middle ear exploration for conductive hearing loss. Case series with chart review. Outpatient tertiary otology center. A review was performed of 212 ears with acoustic reflexes, performed as part of the evaluation of conductive hearing loss in patients without evidence of chronic otitis media. The etiology of hearing loss was determined from intraoperative findings and computed tomography imaging. The relationship between acoustic reflexes and conductive hearing loss etiology was assessed. Eighty-eight percent of ears (166 of 189) demonstrating absence of all acoustic reflexes had an ossicular etiology of conductive hearing loss. Fifty-two percent of ears (12 of 23) with at least 1 detectable acoustic reflex had a nonossicular etiology. The positive and negative predictive values for an ossicular etiology were 89% and 57% when acoustic reflexes were used alone for screening, 89% and 39% when third window symptoms were used alone, and 94% and 71% when reflexes and symptoms were used together, respectively. Acoustic reflex testing is an effective means of screening for third window disorders in patients with a conductive hearing loss. Questioning for third window symptoms should complement screening. The detection of even 1 acoustic reflex or third window symptom (regardless of reflex status) should prompt further workup prior to middle ear exploration. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  17. Axonal Actin Transport Driven By Metastable Actin Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Nilaj; Ganguly, Archan; Roy, Subhojit; Jung, Peter

    Actin is one of the key constituents of the neuronal cytoskeleton and is responsible for driving important cellular processes like axon elongation. Axonal actin is synthesized in the cell body and transported at rates of 0.25 - 3 mm/day, as shown by in-vivo pulse-chase radiolabelling studies. However, the underlying transport mechanisms are unknown. Recent experiments in cultured neurons have revealed a dynamic network of metastable actin filaments (actin trails). Actin trails seem to originate from focal actin hotspots which colocalize with stationary endosomes. Interestingly, the number of actin trails extending anterogradely is higher than the ones extending retrogradely. We hypothesize that the bulk axonal transport of actin originates from this directional asymmetry of the number of actin trails. To test this, we constructed a computational model of actin trail growth and simulated the pulse-chase experiment. In our model, local, metastable trails, which grow with their barbed ends anchored to the hotspots, drive the bulk anterograde transport. Our results indicate that the observed bias of the nucleation probabilities and the elongation rate of actin trails are sufficient to drive the bulk transport of actin at rates that agree with in-vivo pulse chase experiments.

  18. EFA6 regulates selective polarised transport and axon regeneration from the axon initial segment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eva, R.; Koseki, H.; Kanamarlapudi, V.; Fawcett, James

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 21 (2017), s. 3663-3675 ISSN 0021-9533 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : axon regeneration * axon transport * neuronal polarisation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 4.431, year: 2016

  19. Axon initial segment Kv1 channels control axonal action potential waveform and synaptic efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, Maarten H. P.; Letzkus, Johannes J.; Stuart, Greg J.

    2007-01-01

    Action potentials are binary signals that transmit information via their rate and temporal pattern. In this context, the axon is thought of as a transmission line, devoid of a role in neuronal computation. Here, we show a highly localized role of axonal Kv1 potassium channels in shaping the action

  20. Axonal cleaved caspase-3 regulates axon targeting and morphogenesis in the developing auditory brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Rotschafer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Caspase-3 is a cysteine protease that is most commonly associated with cell death. Recent studies have shown additional roles in mediating cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and development of cell morphology. We investigated the role of caspase-3 in the development of chick auditory brainstem nuclei during embryogenesis. Immunofluorescence from embryonic days E6-13 revealed that the temporal expression of cleaved caspase-3 follows the ascending anatomical pathway. Expression is first seen in the auditory portion of VIIIth nerve including central axonal regions projecting to nucleus magnocellularis (NM, then later in NM axons projecting to nucleus laminaris (NL, and subsequently in NL dendrites. To examine the function of cleaved caspase-3 in chick auditory brainstem development, we blocked caspase-3 cleavage in developing chick embryos with the caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK from E6 to E9, then examined NM and NL morphology and NM axonal targeting on E10. NL lamination in treated embryos was disorganized and the neuropil around NL contained a significant number of glial cells normally excluded from this region. Additionally, NM axons projected into inappropriate portions of NL in Z-DEVD-FMK treated embyros. We found that the presence of misrouted axons was associated with more severe NL disorganization. The effects of axonal caspase-3 inhibition on both NL morphogenesis and NM axon targeting suggest that these developmental processes are coordinated, likely through communication between axons and their targets.

  1. Abnormal Axon Reflex-Mediated Sweating Correlates with High State of Anxiety in Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Kijima

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the number of study subjects was little, abnormal AXR sweating in patients with AD was observed. Correlative analysis suggests possible involvement of continuous anxiety and the immune system in such abnormal sudomotor function.

  2. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSarge, Candi L; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C

    2015-03-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offsets the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predict a net increase in granule cell innervation of CA3. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell communication with CA3. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Two ways to support reflexivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Knudsen, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    A current challenge to public managers is the lack of a well-defined role. How can master’s programmes prepare managers to live up to an undefined function? In this paper we argue that the lack of role description enhances the need for reflexivity and show how it is done at Master in Educational......’. This requires participants to conduct experiments in their own organization, to reflect on and analyse their experiences with concepts from the curriculum. While the new language and the experimental teaching format are difficult, the participants learn a reflexive practice that can enable them to life up...

  4. Outside home. Notes on reflexivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Clemente

    2017-01-01

    The paper proffers the idea in which a “reflexive process” on subjectivity can involve and/or hopefully involve the entire experience of the researcher, going beyond the borders of a single research. In the process, unexpected elements of subjectivity can come into play; in other cases the meaning attributed to them can change in time or can have a role different from what had been expected. Some elements, objects of epistemological analyses, as imposed by a reflexive approach, can become objects of attention also on the phenomenological level.

  5. Interlimb reflexes following ipsilateral knee joint rotations are suppressed in an unstable walking environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Interlimb reflexes play an important role in human walking, such as when dynamic stability is threatened by external perturbations or changes in the walking surface. For example, we have previously shown that interlimb reflexes in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) following ipsilateral knee (iKnee...... on experiments investigating intra- and interlimb cutaneous reflexes and soleus H-reflexes (Llewellyn et al., 1990; Haridas et al., 2005; 2006; Krauss and Misiaszek, 2007), we hypothesized that the amplitude of interlimb reflexes following iKnee perturbations is altered when walking in an unstable environment....... To test this, interlimb reflexes were elicited in participants (n = 6) by either iKnee extension rotations during the late stance phase (50%) of the gait cycle or iKnee flexion rotations during the mid-swing phase (80%). The iKnee perturbations were applied while the participants walked normally...

  6. Educating the Reflexive Practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J. Neveu

    2012-09-01

    wearing any clothes.Notwithstanding such issues, I do believe the studio holds the potentialto be an empowering learning experience. The intention of this article is to question the mode of instruction in an architectural studio. I’ve structured the paper in three parts. First, I will briefly describe the findingsof the study made by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancementof Teaching known as the Boyer Report.2 To develop and support the findings of the Boyer Report, I introduce the work of the educator Donald Schön. Though I see much merit in the Boyer Report, and Schön’sproposals, I argue that a more nuanced approach is required. I will recommend, therefore, in the second section of this paper that a meansof architectural education as based on the Socratic method may be amore productive approach. My reading of the Socratic method is basedprimarily on early Socratic dialogues and I will specifically use Charmidesto illustrate the issues that I believe are relevant to studio pedagogy.3 From my analysis of Charmides I will, in the third section of the essay,describe how the Socratic method is beneficial to studio pedagogy threeways: reflexive, non-propositional, and finally how Socrates’ approachmay indeed be practical. This last section will be illustrated with a studentproject. It is my conjecture that the Socratic method offers insight intocurrent discussions of educational theory, namely student-centered,project-based learning.

  7. Increased mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons: implications for multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambonin, Jessica L.; Zhao, Chao; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Campbell, Graham R.; Engeham, Sarah; Ziabreva, Iryna; Schwarz, Nadine; Lee, Sok Ee; Frischer, Josa M.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Trapp, Bruce D.; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial content within axons increases following demyelination in the central nervous system, presumably as a response to the changes in energy needs of axons imposed by redistribution of sodium channels. Myelin sheaths can be restored in demyelinated axons and remyelination in some multiple sclerosis lesions is extensive, while in others it is incomplete or absent. The effects of remyelination on axonal mitochondrial content in multiple sclerosis, particularly whether remyelination completely reverses the mitochondrial changes that follow demyelination, are currently unknown. In this study, we analysed axonal mitochondria within demyelinated, remyelinated and myelinated axons in post-mortem tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis and controls, as well as in experimental models of demyelination and remyelination, in vivo and in vitro. Immunofluorescent labelling of mitochondria (porin, a voltage-dependent anion channel expressed on all mitochondria) and axons (neurofilament), and ultrastructural imaging showed that in both multiple sclerosis and experimental demyelination, mitochondrial content within remyelinated axons was significantly less than in acutely and chronically demyelinated axons but more numerous than in myelinated axons. The greater mitochondrial content within remyelinated, compared with myelinated, axons was due to an increase in density of porin elements whereas increase in size accounted for the change observed in demyelinated axons. The increase in mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons was associated with an increase in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity. In vitro studies showed a significant increase in the number of stationary mitochondria in remyelinated compared with myelinated and demyelinated axons. The number of mobile mitochondria in remyelinated axons did not significantly differ from myelinated axons, although significantly greater than in demyelinated axons. Our neuropathological data and findings in

  8. Guidance of retinal axons in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Eloísa; Erskine, Lynda; Morenilla-Palao, Cruz

    2017-11-26

    In order to navigate through the surrounding environment many mammals, including humans, primarily rely on vision. The eye, composed of the choroid, sclera, retinal pigmented epithelium, cornea, lens, iris and retina, is the structure that receives the light and converts it into electrical impulses. The retina contains six major types of neurons involving in receiving and modifying visual information and passing it onto higher visual processing centres in the brain. Visual information is relayed to the brain via the axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a projection known as the optic pathway. The proper formation of this pathway during development is essential for normal vision in the adult individual. Along this pathway there are several points where visual axons face 'choices' in their direction of growth. Understanding how these choices are made has advanced significantly our knowledge of axon guidance mechanisms. Thus, the development of the visual pathway has served as an extremely useful model to reveal general principles of axon pathfinding throughout the nervous system. However, due to its particularities, some cellular and molecular mechanisms are specific for the visual circuit. Here we review both general and specific mechanisms involved in the guidance of mammalian RGC axons when they are traveling from the retina to the brain to establish precise and stereotyped connections that will sustain vision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Pierce, C. W.; Milner, T. E.

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions durin...

  10. Reflexive fatherhood in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at fathering practices in Denmark, using the findings from a research project on everyday family life in Denmark. It takes a social psychological perspective and employs discursive psychology and theories about reflexive modernisation. It shows how fathers orient towards intima...

  11. The reflexive case study method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the international business research on small to medium-sized enterprises (SME) at the nexus of globalization. Based on a conceptual synthesis across disciplines and theoretical perspectives, it offers management research a reflexive method for case study research of postnational...

  12. Ultrasound imaging of sacral reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Klijn, Aart J.; Vijverberg, Marianne A. W.; de Kort, Laetitia M. O.

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the reliability of examination of the guarding reflex of the pelvic floor by dynamic perineal ultrasonography in children with bladder dysfunction and in controls. A total of 40 patients with nonneurogenic bladder/sphincter dyssynergia, 40 with spina bifida, and 40 controls underwent

  13. Axon and dendrite geography predict the specificity of synaptic connections in a functioning spinal cord network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisyuk Roman

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How specific are the synaptic connections formed as neuronal networks develop and can simple rules account for the formation of functioning circuits? These questions are assessed in the spinal circuits controlling swimming in hatchling frog tadpoles. This is possible because detailed information is now available on the identity and synaptic connections of the main types of neuron. Results The probabilities of synapses between 7 types of identified spinal neuron were measured directly by making electrical recordings from 500 pairs of neurons. For the same neuron types, the dorso-ventral distributions of axons and dendrites were measured and then used to calculate the probabilities that axons would encounter particular dendrites and so potentially form synaptic connections. Surprisingly, synapses were found between all types of neuron but contact probabilities could be predicted simply by the anatomical overlap of their axons and dendrites. These results suggested that synapse formation may not require axons to recognise specific, correct dendrites. To test the plausibility of simpler hypotheses, we first made computational models that were able to generate longitudinal axon growth paths and reproduce the axon distribution patterns and synaptic contact probabilities found in the spinal cord. To test if probabilistic rules could produce functioning spinal networks, we then made realistic computational models of spinal cord neurons, giving them established cell-specific properties and connecting them into networks using the contact probabilities we had determined. A majority of these networks produced robust swimming activity. Conclusion Simple factors such as morphogen gradients controlling dorso-ventral soma, dendrite and axon positions may sufficiently constrain the synaptic connections made between different types of neuron as the spinal cord first develops and allow functional networks to form. Our analysis implies that

  14. Implementation of an iPhone wireless accelerometer application for the quantification of reflex response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren; Nishikawa, Kiisa

    2013-01-01

    The patellar tendon reflex represents an inherent aspect of the standard neurological evaluation. The features of the reflex response provide initial perspective regarding the status of the nervous system. An iPhone wireless accelerometer application integrated with a potential energy impact pendulum attached to a reflex hammer has been successfully developed, tested, and evaluated for quantifying the patellar tendon reflex. The iPhone functions as a wireless accelerometer platform. The wide coverage range of the iPhone enables the quantification of reflex response samples in rural and remote settings. The iPhone has the capacity to transmit the reflex response acceleration waveform by wireless transmission through email. Automated post-processing of the acceleration waveform provides feature extraction of the maximum acceleration of the reflex response ascertained after evoking the patellar tendon reflex. The iPhone wireless accelerometer application demonstrated the utility of the smartphone as a biomedical device, while providing accurate and consistent quantification of the reflex response.

  15. The effect of myelinating Schwann cells on axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, R

    2001-04-01

    Myelinating Schwann cells control the number of neurofilaments and elevate the phosphorylation state of neurofilaments in the axon, eventually leading to the typical large axon caliber. Conversely, absence of myelin leads to lower amounts of neurofilaments, reduced phosphorylation levels, and smaller axon diameters. In addition, myelinating Schwann cells mediate the spacing of Na(+) channel clusters during development of the node of Ranvier. When axons are associated with mutant Schwann cells in inherited neuropathies, their calibers are reduced and their neurofilaments are less phosphorylated and more closely spaced. Also, axonal transport is reduced and axons degenerate at the distal ends of long nerves. Myelin-associated glycoprotein may mediate some aspects of Schwann cell-axon communication, but much remains to be learned about the molecular bases of Schwann cell-axon communication. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Sustained maximal voluntary contraction produces independent changes in human motor axons and the muscle they innervate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Milder

    Full Text Available The repetitive discharges required to produce a sustained muscle contraction results in activity-dependent hyperpolarization of the motor axons and a reduction in the force-generating capacity of the muscle. We investigated the relationship between these changes in the adductor pollicis muscle and the motor axons of its ulnar nerve supply, and the reproducibility of these changes. Ten subjects performed a 1-min maximal voluntary contraction. Activity-dependent changes in axonal excitability were measured using threshold tracking with electrical stimulation at the wrist; changes in the muscle were assessed as evoked and voluntary electromyography (EMG and isometric force. Separate components of axonal excitability and muscle properties were tested at 5 min intervals after the sustained contraction in 5 separate sessions. The current threshold required to produce the target muscle action potential increased immediately after the contraction by 14.8% (p<0.05, reflecting decreased axonal excitability secondary to hyperpolarization. This was not correlated with the decline in amplitude of muscle force or evoked EMG. A late reversal in threshold current after the initial recovery from hyperpolarization peaked at -5.9% at ∼35 min (p<0.05. This pattern was mirrored by other indices of axonal excitability revealing a previously unreported depolarization of motor axons in the late recovery period. Measures of axonal excitability were relatively stable at rest but less so after sustained activity. The coefficient of variation (CoV for threshold current increase was higher after activity (CoV 0.54, p<0.05 whereas changes in voluntary (CoV 0.12 and evoked twitch (CoV 0.15 force were relatively stable. These results demonstrate that activity-dependent changes in motor axon excitability are unlikely to contribute to concomitant changes in the muscle after sustained activity in healthy people. The variability in axonal excitability after sustained activity

  17. Contraction induced h reflexes in the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodofsky, Elliot B; Campellone, Joseph V; Cohen, Stephen J; Caten, Holly N; Schindelheim, Adam M

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether Contraction Induced H Reflexes (CIHR) can accurately detect cervical radiculopathy. Comparison of CIHR results with Needle Electromyography at academic outpatient Electromyography/Nerve Conduction laboratories. Participants were all patients over 18 with a needle electromyography diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. Patients were tested for CIHR in at least two upper extremity muscles in electromyographically proven myotomes bilaterally. Patients were requested to perform a moderate contraction while stimulus was applied proximally (elbow or Erb's point). Outcome measures included H Reflex onset latency and side-to-side latency differences. These were compared against previously established normal values. Overall, 10 of 15 patients who met criteria for cervical radiculopathy showed CIHR abnormalities (sensitivity = 67%; 95% confidence interval, 43-91). Counting each side and level separately, CIHR identified 16/27 radiculopathies (sensitivity = 59.2%; 95% confidence interval, 40.6-77.8). Contraction Induced H Reflexes identified 1 possible radiculopathy not seen on electromyography (specificity = 98%; 95% confidence interval, 95-100). Contraction induced H Reflexes have a sensitivity and specificity for cervical radiculopathy similar to the resting Gastroc-Soleus H Reflex.

  18. Reflex test reminders in required cancer synoptic templates decrease order entry error: An analysis of mismatch repair immunohistochemical orders to screen for Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Kilgore

    2016-01-01

    being before S/O PostImp. Conclusion: This algorithm ensures MMR IHC ordering in women ≤60 with EC and can be applied to similar scenarios. Ancillary tests for management are increasing, especially genetic and molecular-based methods. The burden of managing orders and results remains with the pathologist and relying on human intervention alone is ineffective. Ordering IHC before or at S/O prevents oversight and the additional work of retrospective ordering and reporting.

  19. Neurophysiology and Clinical Implications of the Laryngeal Adductor Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domer, Amanda S; Kuhn, Maggie A; Belafsky, Peter C

    2013-09-01

    The laryngeal adductor reflex (LAR) is an involuntary protective response to stimuli in the larynx. The superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) acts as the afferent limb and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) as the efferent limb of this reflex, which is modulated by the central nervous system. Perhaps the most clinically significant application of the LAR is its use in laryngopharyngeal (LP) sensory discrimination testing. Importantly, aberrations in the LAR may predict dysphagia or portend clinical phenotypes of chronic cough, vocal cord dysfunction or pediatric apneas. LP sensation is a potential target for interventions addressing the aforementioned conditions though currently remains an area of active investigation.

  20. Modeling molecular mechanisms in the axon

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, R.; Miller, K.E.; Kuhl, E.

    2016-01-01

    Axons are living systems that display highly dynamic changes in stiffness, viscosity, and internal stress. However, the mechanistic origin of these phenomenological properties remains elusive. Here we establish a computational mechanics model that interprets cellular-level characteristics as emergent properties from molecular-level events. We create an axon model of discrete microtubules, which are connected to neighboring microtubules via discrete crosslinking mechanisms that obey a set of simple rules. We explore two types of mechanisms: passive and active crosslinking. Our passive and active simulations suggest that the stiffness and viscosity of the axon increase linearly with the crosslink density, and that both are highly sensitive to the crosslink detachment and reattachment times. Our model explains how active crosslinking with dynein motors generates internal stresses and actively drives axon elongation. We anticipate that our model will allow us to probe a wide variety of molecular phenomena–both in isolation and in interaction–to explore emergent cellular-level features under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:28603326

  1. Macrophages Promote Axon Regeneration with Concurrent Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gensel, J.C.; Nakamura, S.; Guan, Z.; Rooijen, van N.; Ankeny, D.P.; Popovich, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    Activated macrophages can promote regeneration of CNS axons. However, macrophages also release factors that kill neurons. These opposing functions are likely induced simultaneously but are rarely considered together in the same experimental preparation. A goal of this study was to unequivocally

  2. Chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon inhibit axonal growth by interfering with the morphogenic activity of acetylcholinesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Dongren; Howard, Angela; Bruun, Donald; Ajua-Alemanj, Mispa; Pickart, Cecile; Lein, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    A primary role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is regulation of cholinergic neurotransmission by hydrolysis of synaptic acetylcholine. In the developing nervous system, however, AChE also functions as a morphogenic factor to promote axonal growth. This raises the question of whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) that are known to selectively bind to and inactivate the enzymatic function of AChE also interfere with its morphogenic function to perturb axonogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to chlorpyrifos (CPF) or its oxon metabolite (CPFO). Both OPs significantly decreased axonal length at concentrations that had no effect on cell viability, protein synthesis or the enzymatic activity of AChE. Comparative analyses of the effects of CPF and CPFO on axonal growth in DRG neurons cultured from AChE nullizygous (AChE -/- ) versus wild type (AChE +/+ ) mice indicated that while these OPs inhibited axonal growth in AChE +/+ DRG neurons, they had no effect on axonal growth in AChE -/- DRG neurons. However, transfection of AChE -/- DRG neurons with cDNA encoding full-length AChE restored the wild type response to the axon inhibitory effects of OPs. These data indicate that inhibition of axonal growth by OPs requires AChE, but the mechanism involves inhibition of the morphogenic rather than enzymatic activity of AChE. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for explaining not only the functional deficits observed in children and animals following developmental exposure to OPs, but also the increased vulnerability of the developing nervous system to OPs

  3. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  4. The Correlation between Modified Ashworth Scale and Biceps T-reflex and Inter-rater and Intra-rater Reliability of Biceps T-reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ji Hong; Shin, Yong-Il; Joa, Kyung Lim; Ko, Sung Hwa; Shin, Myung Jun; Chang, Jae Hyeok; Ko, Hyun-Yoon

    2012-08-01

    To establish a correlation between the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and amplitude and latency of T-reflex and to demonstrate inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of the T-reflex of the biceps muscle for assessing spasticity after stroke. A total of 21 patients with hemiplegia and spasticity after ischemic stroke were enrolled for this study. The spasticity of biceps muscle was evaluated by an occupational therapist using the MAS. The mean value of manual muscle test of biceps muscles was 2.3±0.79. Latency and amplitude of T-reflex were recorded from biceps muscles by two physicians. The onset latency and peak to peak amplitude of the mean of 5 big T-reflex were measured. The examinations were carried out by two physicians at the same time to evaluate the inter-rater reliability. Further, one of the physicians performed the examination again after one week to evaluate the intra-rater reliability. The correlations between MAS and T-reflex, and the intra- and inter-rater reliability of biceps T-reflex were established by calculating the Spearman correlation coefficients and the intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). Amplitude of the biceps T-reflex increased with increasing level of MAS (r(s)=0.464 and 0.573, respectively, p<0.01). ICCs of latency and amplitude of biceps T-reflex were 0.914 and 0.822. The Spearman correlation coefficients of latency and amplitude of biceps T-reflex were 0.937 and 0.635, respectively (p<0.01). Biceps T-reflex demonstrates a good quantitative measurement and correlation tool with MAS for spasticity, and also shows acceptable inter- and intra-rater reliability, which can be used for patients with spasticity after stroke.

  5. Integrating Reflexivity in Livelihoods Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Much poverty and development research is not explicit about its methodology or philosophical foundations. Based on the extended case method of Burawoy and the epistemological standpoint of critical realism, this paper discusses a methodological approach for reflexive inductive livelihoods researc...... that overcomes the unproductive social science dualism of positivism and social constructivism. The approach is linked to a conceptual framework and a menu of research methods that can be sequenced and iterated in light of research questions....

  6. Being reflexive in qualitative grounded theory: discussion and application of a model of reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engward, Hilary; Davis, Geraldine

    2015-07-01

    A discussion of the meaning of reflexivity in research with the presentation of examples of how a model of reflexivity was used in a grounded theory research project. Reflexivity requires the researcher to make transparent the decisions they make in the research process and is therefore important in developing quality in nursing research. The importance of being reflexive is highlighted in the literature in relation to nursing research, however, practical guidance as to how to go about doing research reflexively is not always clearly articulated. This is a discussion paper. The concept of reflexivity in research is explored using the Alvesson and Skoldberg model of reflexivity and practical examples of how a researcher developed reflexivity in a grounded theory project are presented. Nurse researchers are encouraged to explore and apply the concept of reflexivity in their research practices to develop transparency in the research process and to increase robustness in their research. The Alvesson and Skoldberg model is of value in applying reflexivity in qualitative nursing research, particularly in grounded theory research. Being reflexive requires the researcher to be completely open about decisions that are made in the research process. The Alvesson and Skolberg model of reflexivity is a useful model that can enhance reflexivity in the research process. It can be a useful practical tool to develop reflexivity in grounded theory research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cytoplasmic Dynein Transports Axonal Microtubules in a Polarity-Sorting Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand N. Rao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Axonal microtubules are predominantly organized into a plus-end-out pattern. Here, we tested both experimentally and with computational modeling whether a motor-based polarity-sorting mechanism can explain this microtubule pattern. The posited mechanism centers on cytoplasmic dynein transporting plus-end-out and minus-end-out microtubules into and out of the axon, respectively. When cytoplasmic dynein was acutely inhibited, the bi-directional transport of microtubules in the axon was disrupted in both directions, after which minus-end-out microtubules accumulated in the axon over time. Computational modeling revealed that dynein-mediated transport of microtubules can establish and preserve a predominantly plus-end-out microtubule pattern as per the details of the experimental findings, but only if a kinesin motor and a static cross-linker protein are also at play. Consistent with the predictions of the model, partial depletion of TRIM46, a protein that cross-links axonal microtubules in a manner that influences their polarity orientation, leads to an increase in microtubule transport.

  8. Stretched, jumped, and fell: an fMRI investigation of reflexive verbs and other intransitives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetreet, Einat; Friedmann, Naama

    2012-04-15

    This study used fMRI to inform a debate between two theories concerning the representation of reflexive verbs. Reflexives are verbs that denote an action that the subject applies on herself (e.g., The woman stretched). These verbs are derived by a lexical operation that creates a reflexive from its transitive counterpart. Theories differ with respect to which thematic role is reduced by the lexical operation: the agent or the theme, and, consequently, whether the construction of sentences with reflexives in subject-verb order includes movement of the object to the subject position. To test this, we compared reflexive verbs with unaccusative verbs (e.g., The woman fell), and with unergative verbs (e.g., The woman jumped). Unaccusatives are derived by reduction of the role of the agent, and thus SV sentences with unaccusatives include movement to subject position. Unergatives do not undergo lexical operations and do not involve movement in SV sentences. The reflexives behaved like unergatives, and differently from unaccusatives: the activation pattern of unaccusatives compared with reflexives showed similar cortical pattern to that of unaccusatives compared with unergatives, with activations in the left inferior frontal gyrus and the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG). Comparing reflexives and unergatives revealed activation in the right MTG. These results indicate that reflexives differ from unaccusatives in their derivation. That is, reflexives do not involve the reduction of the agent of the parallel transitive, and hence no syntactic movement is involved in sentences in which the subject precedes the reflexive verb. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mitochondria Localize to Injured Axons to Support Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung Min; Baig, Huma S; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-12-21

    Axon regeneration is essential to restore the nervous system after axon injury. However, the neuronal cell biology that underlies axon regeneration is incompletely understood. Here we use in vivo, single-neuron analysis to investigate the relationship between nerve injury, mitochondrial localization, and axon regeneration. Mitochondria translocate into injured axons so that average mitochondria density increases after injury. Moreover, single-neuron analysis reveals that axons that fail to increase mitochondria have poor regeneration. Experimental alterations to axonal mitochondrial distribution or mitochondrial respiratory chain function result in corresponding changes to regeneration outcomes. Axonal mitochondria are specifically required for growth-cone migration, identifying a key energy challenge for injured neurons. Finally, mitochondrial localization to the axon after injury is regulated in part by dual-leucine zipper kinase 1 (DLK-1), a conserved regulator of axon regeneration. These data identify regulation of axonal mitochondria as a new cell-biological mechanism that helps determine the regenerative response of injured neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diffuse Axonal Injury and Oxidative Stress: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Frati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is one of the world’s leading causes of morbidity and mortality among young individuals. TBI applies powerful rotational and translational forces to the brain parenchyma, which results in a traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI responsible for brain swelling and neuronal death. Following TBI, axonal degeneration has been identified as a progressive process that starts with disrupted axonal transport causing axonal swelling, followed by secondary axonal disconnection and Wallerian degeneration. These modifications in the axonal cytoskeleton interrupt the axoplasmic transport mechanisms, causing the gradual gathering of transport products so as to generate axonal swellings and modifications in neuronal homeostasis. Oxidative stress with consequent impairment of endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms plays a significant role in the secondary events leading to neuronal death. Studies support the role of an altered axonal calcium homeostasis as a mechanism in the secondary damage of axon, and suggest that calcium channel blocker can alleviate the secondary damage, as well as other mechanisms implied in the secondary injury, and could be targeted as a candidate for therapeutic approaches. Reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated axonal degeneration is mainly caused by extracellular Ca2+. Increases in the defense mechanisms through the use of exogenous antioxidants may be neuroprotective, particularly if they are given within the neuroprotective time window. A promising potential therapeutic target for DAI is to directly address mitochondria-related injury or to modulate energetic axonal energy failure.

  11. Diffuse Axonal Injury and Oxidative Stress: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frati, Alessandro; Cerretani, Daniela; Fiaschi, Anna Ida; Frati, Paola; Gatto, Vittorio; La Russa, Raffaele; Pesce, Alessandro; Pinchi, Enrica; Santurro, Alessandro; Fraschetti, Flavia; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2017-12-02

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the world's leading causes of morbidity and mortality among young individuals. TBI applies powerful rotational and translational forces to the brain parenchyma, which results in a traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) responsible for brain swelling and neuronal death. Following TBI, axonal degeneration has been identified as a progressive process that starts with disrupted axonal transport causing axonal swelling, followed by secondary axonal disconnection and Wallerian degeneration. These modifications in the axonal cytoskeleton interrupt the axoplasmic transport mechanisms, causing the gradual gathering of transport products so as to generate axonal swellings and modifications in neuronal homeostasis. Oxidative stress with consequent impairment of endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms plays a significant role in the secondary events leading to neuronal death. Studies support the role of an altered axonal calcium homeostasis as a mechanism in the secondary damage of axon, and suggest that calcium channel blocker can alleviate the secondary damage, as well as other mechanisms implied in the secondary injury, and could be targeted as a candidate for therapeutic approaches. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated axonal degeneration is mainly caused by extracellular Ca 2+ . Increases in the defense mechanisms through the use of exogenous antioxidants may be neuroprotective, particularly if they are given within the neuroprotective time window. A promising potential therapeutic target for DAI is to directly address mitochondria-related injury or to modulate energetic axonal energy failure.

  12. Intraneural Injection of ATP Stimulates Regeneration of Primary Sensory Axons in the Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongsheng; Lee, Sena; Luo, Juan; Xia, Haijian; Gushchina, Svetlana; Richardson, Peter M; Yeh, John; Krügel, Ute; Franke, Heike; Zhang, Yi; Bo, Xuenong

    2018-02-07

    Injury to the peripheral axons of sensory neurons strongly enhances the regeneration of their central axons in the spinal cord. It remains unclear on what molecules that initiate such conditioning effect. Because ATP is released extracellularly by nerve and other tissue injury, we hypothesize that injection of ATP into a peripheral nerve might mimic the stimulatory effect of nerve injury on the regenerative state of the primary sensory neurons. We found that a single injection of 6 μl of 150 μm ATP into female rat sciatic nerve quadrupled the number of axons growing into a lesion epicenter in spinal cord after a concomitant dorsal column transection. A second boost ATP injection 1 week after the first one markedly reinforced the stimulatory effect of a single injection. Single ATP injection increased expression of phospho-STAT3 and GAP43, two markers of regenerative activity, in sensory neurons. Double ATP injections sustained the activation of phospho-STAT3 and GAP43, which may account for the marked axonal growth across the lesion epicenter. Similar studies performed on P2X7 or P2Y2 receptor knock-out mice indicate P2Y2 receptors are involved in the activation of STAT3 after ATP injection or conditioning lesion, whereas P2X7 receptors are not. Injection of ATP at 150 μm caused little Wallerian degeneration and behavioral tests showed no significant long-term adverse effects on sciatic nerve functions. The results in this study reveal possible mechanisms underlying the stimulation of regenerative programs and suggest a practical strategy for stimulating axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Injury of peripheral axons of sensory neurons has been known to strongly enhance the regeneration of their central axons in the spinal cord. In this study, we found that injection of ATP into a peripheral nerve can mimic the effect of peripheral nerve injury and significantly increase the number of sensory axons growing across lesion

  13. Axon degeneration: make the Schwann cell great again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keit Men Wong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Axonal degeneration is a pivotal feature of many neurodegenerative conditions and substantially accounts for neurological morbidity. A widely used experimental model to study the mechanisms of axonal degeneration is Wallerian degeneration (WD, which occurs after acute axonal injury. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS, WD is characterized by swift dismantling and clearance of injured axons with their myelin sheaths. This is a prerequisite for successful axonal regeneration. In the central nervous system (CNS, WD is much slower, which significantly contributes to failed axonal regeneration. Although it is well-documented that Schwann cells (SCs have a critical role in the regenerative potential of the PNS, to date we have only scarce knowledge as to how SCs 'sense' axonal injury and immediately respond to it. In this regard, it remains unknown as to whether SCs play the role of a passive bystander or an active director during the execution of the highly orchestrated disintegration program of axons. Older reports, together with more recent studies, suggest that SCs mount dynamic injury responses minutes after axonal injury, long before axonal breakdown occurs. The swift SC response to axonal injury could play either a pro-degenerative role, or alternatively a supportive role, to the integrity of distressed axons that have not yet committed to degenerate. Indeed, supporting the latter concept, recent findings in a chronic PNS neurodegeneration model indicate that deactivation of a key molecule promoting SC injury responses exacerbates axonal loss. If this holds true in a broader spectrum of conditions, it may provide the grounds for the development of new glia-centric therapeutic approaches to counteract axonal loss.

  14. What is a reflex? A guide for understanding disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, David B; Truog, Robert D

    2015-08-11

    Uncertainty in diagnosing disorders of consciousness, and specifically in determining whether consciousness has been lost or retained, poses challenging scientific and ethical questions. Recent neuroimaging-based tests for consciousness have cast doubt on the reliability of behavioral criteria in assessing states of consciousness and generate new questions about the assumptions used in formulating coherent diagnostic criteria. The reflex, a foundational diagnostic tool, offers unique insight into these disorders; behaviors produced by unconscious patients are thought to be purely reflexive, whereas those produced by conscious patients can be volitional. Further investigation, however, reveals that reflexes cannot be reliably distinguished from conscious behaviors on the basis of any generalizable empirical characteristics. Ambiguity between reflexive and conscious behaviors undermines the capacity of the reflex to distinguish between disorders of consciousness and has implications for how these disorders should be conceptualized in future diagnostic criteria. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Motor axon excitability during Wallerian degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Krarup, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Axonal loss and degeneration are major factors in determining long-term outcome in patients with peripheral nerve disorders or injury. Following loss of axonal continuity, the isolated nerve stump distal to the lesion undergoes Wallerian degeneration in several phases. In the initial 'latent' phase...... at ankle distal to axotomy were monitored by 'threshold-tracking'. The plantar compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were recorded under anesthesia in three animal models: 8-week-old wild-type mice, 8-week-old slow Wallerian degeneration mutant mice and 3-year-old cats. We found that the progressive...... decrease in CMAP following crush injury was associated with slowing of conduction and marked abnormalities in excitability: increased peak threshold deviations during both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus, enhanced superexcitability during the recovery cycle and increased rheobase...

  16. B-RAF kinase drives developmental axon growth and promotes axon regeneration in the injured mature CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donovan, Kevin J.; Ma, Kaijie; Guo, Hengchang; Wang, Chen; Sun, Fang; Han, Seung Baek; Kim, Hyukmin; Wong, Jamie K.; Charron, Jean; Zou, Hongyan; Son, Young-Jin; He, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Activation of intrinsic growth programs that promote developmental axon growth may also facilitate axon regeneration in injured adult neurons. Here, we demonstrate that conditional activation of B-RAF kinase alone in mouse embryonic neurons is sufficient to drive the growth of long-range peripheral sensory axon projections in vivo in the absence of upstream neurotrophin signaling. We further show that activated B-RAF signaling enables robust regenerative growth of sensory axons into the spinal cord after a dorsal root crush as well as substantial axon regrowth in the crush-lesioned optic nerve. Finally, the combination of B-RAF gain-of-function and PTEN loss-of-function promotes optic nerve axon extension beyond what would be predicted for a simple additive effect. We conclude that cell-intrinsic RAF signaling is a crucial pathway promoting developmental and regenerative axon growth in the peripheral and central nervous systems. PMID:24733831

  17. Team performance in the Italian NHS: the role of reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbini, Flavio; Callea, Antonino; Chirumbolo, Antonio; Talamo, Alessandra; Ingusci, Emanuela; Ciavolino, Enrico

    2018-04-09

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate the goodness of the input-process-output (IPO) model in order to evaluate work team performance within the Italian National Health Care System (NHS); and second, to test the mediating role of reflexivity as an overarching process factor between input and output. Design/methodology/approach The Italian version of the Aston Team Performance Inventory was administered to 351 employees working in teams in the Italian NHS. Mediation analyses with latent variables were performed via structural equation modeling (SEM); the significance of total, direct, and indirect effect was tested via bootstrapping. Findings Underpinned by the IPO framework, the results of SEM supported mediational hypotheses. First, the application of the IPO model in the Italian NHS showed adequate fit indices, showing that the process mediates the relationship between input and output factors. Second, reflexivity mediated the relationship between input and output, influencing some aspects of team performance. Practical implications The results provide useful information for HRM policies improving process dimensions of the IPO model via the mediating role of reflexivity as a key role in team performance. Originality/value This study is one of a limited number of studies that applied the IPO model in the Italian NHS. Moreover, no study has yet examined the role of reflexivity as a mediator between input and output factors in the IPO model.

  18. Unidirectional ephaptic stimulation between two myelinated axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capllonch-Juan, Miguel; Kolbl, Florian; Sepulveda, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    Providing realistic sensory feedback for prosthetic devices strongly relies on an accurate modelling of machine-nerve interfaces. Models of these interfaces in the peripheral nervous system usually neglect the effects that ephaptic coupling can have on the selectivity of stimulating electrodes. In this contribution, we study the ephaptic stimulation between myelinated axons and show its relation with the separation between fibers and the conductivity of the medium that surrounds them.

  19. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  20. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop an advanced reflexive structure technology system to increase the survivability of future systems constructed of...

  1. Structural cure for reflex syncope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulke, Neil; Eysenck, William; Badiani, Sveeta; Furniss, Stephen

    2016-01-20

    The ROX Coupler is a device that allows creation of a central arteriovenous anastomosis at the iliac level. The device has been shown to improve exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is CE marked for the treatment of resistant and uncontrolled hypertension. Reflex syncope is a challenging clinical condition with limited proven therapeutic options. We describe the resolution of symptoms and tilt table response of a patient who underwent insertion of a ROX Coupler to treat hypertension, and also incidentally had pre-existing vasodepressor syncope. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Dysautonomia, fibromyalgia and reflex dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisinger, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction observed in fibromyalgia, characterized without exception by a sympathetic hyperactivity and hyporeactivity, has been reported. However, several studies demonstrated reduced levels of norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y at rest and after tilt table in some patients, which was improved by beta-stimulating agents. These findings support heterogeneity in fibromyalgia-associated dysautonomia. Fibromyalgia could be a generalized sympathetic dystrophy since both conditions are activated by trauma and partly linked to sympathetic mechanisms. Yet they differ on several points: hormonal and neurochemical abnormalities are observed in fibromyalgia whereas activation by peripheral trauma and hyperosteolysis are observed in reflex sympathetic dystrophy. PMID:17626612

  3. ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼ 40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/MFN2, CMT2B1/LMNA, CMT2B2/MED25, CMT2B5/NEFL, ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/HSPB1, CMT2K/GDAP1, CMT2P/LRSAM1, CMT2R/TRIM2, CMT2S/IGHMBP2, CMT2T/HSJ1, CMTRID/COX6A1, ARAN-NM/HINT and GAN/GAN), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/PGN, SPG15/ZFYVE26, SPG21/ACP33, SPG35/FA2H, SPG46/GBA2, SPG55/C12orf65 and SPG56/CYP2U1), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (SLC12A6). Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and TYMP genes. An additional locus for autosomal recessive Charcot

  4. ALS5/SPG11/ KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L.; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H.; Barsottini, Orlando G. P.; Kawarai, Toshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/ KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/ KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/ MFN2 , CMT2B1/ LMNA , CMT2B2/ MED25 , CMT2B5/ NEFL , ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/ HSPB1 , CMT2K/ GDAP1 , CMT2P/ LRSAM1 , CMT2R/ TRIM2 , CMT2S/ IGHMBP2 , CMT2T/ HSJ1 , CMTRID/ COX6A1 , ARAN-NM/ HINT and GAN/ GAN ), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/ PGN , SPG15/ ZFYVE26, SPG21/ ACP33 , SPG35/ FA2H , SPG46/ GBA2 , SPG55/ C12orf65 and SPG56/ CYP2U1 ), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum ( SLC12A6 ) . Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and

  5. Axonal branching patterns of nucleus accumbens neurons in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Anushree; Prensa, Lucía; Cebrián, Carolina; Mengual, Elisa

    2010-11-15

    The patterns of axonal collateralization of nucleus accumbens (Acb) projection neurons were investigated in the rat by means of single-axon tracing techniques using the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine. Seventy-three axons were fully traced, originating from either the core (AcbC) or shell (AcbSh) compartment, as assessed by differential calbindin D28k-immunoreactivity. Axons from AcbC and AcbSh showed a substantial segregation in their targets; target areas were either exclusively or preferentially innervated from AcbC or AcbSh. Axon collaterals in the subthalamic nucleus were found at higher than expected frequencies; moreover, these originated exclusively in the dorsal AcbC. Intercompartmental collaterals were observed from ventral AcbC axons into AcbSh, and likewise, interconnections at pallidal and mesencephalic levels were also observed, although mostly from AcbC axons toward AcbSh targets, possibly supporting crosstalk between the two subcircuits at several levels. Cell somata giving rise to short-range accumbal axons, projecting to the ventral pallidum (VP), were spatially intermingled with others, giving rise to long-range axons that innervated VP and more caudal targets. This anatomical organization parallels that of the dorsal striatum and provides the basis for possible dual direct and indirect actions from a single axon on either individual or small sets of neurons. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Axonal and Transynaptic Spread of Prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearin, Harold

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural transmission of prion diseases depends upon the spread of prions from the nervous system to excretory or secretory tissues, but the mechanism of prion transport in axons and into peripheral tissue is unresolved. Here, we examined the temporal and spatial movement of prions from the brain stem along cranial nerves into skeletal muscle as a model of axonal transport and transynaptic spread. The disease-specific isoform of the prion protein, PrPSc, was observed in nerve fibers of the tongue approximately 2 weeks prior to PrPSc deposition in skeletal muscle. Initially, PrPSc deposits had a small punctate pattern on the edge of muscle cells that colocalized with synaptophysin, a marker for the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), in >50% of the cells. At later time points PrPSc was widely distributed in muscle cells, but PrPSc deposition at the NMJ, suggesting additional prion replication and dissemination within muscle cells. In contrast to the NMJ, PrPSc was not associated with synaptophysin in nerve fibers but was found to colocalize with LAMP-1 and cathepsin D during early stages of axonal spread. We propose that PrPSc-bound endosomes can lead to membrane recycling in which PrPSc is directed to the synapse, where it either moves across the NMJ into the postsynaptic muscle cell or induces PrPSc formation on muscle cells across the NMJ. IMPORTANCE Prion diseases are transmissible and fatal neurodegenerative diseases in which prion dissemination to excretory or secretory tissues is necessary for natural disease transmission. Despite the importance of this pathway, the cellular mechanism of prion transport in axons and into peripheral tissue is unresolved. This study demonstrates anterograde spread of prions within nerve fibers prior to infection of peripheral synapses (i.e., neuromuscular junction) and infection of peripheral tissues (i.e., muscle cells). Within nerve fibers prions were associated with the endosomal-lysosomal pathway prior to entry into

  7. Independent signaling by Drosophila insulin receptor for axon guidance and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caroline R; Guo, Dongyu; Pick, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila insulin receptor (DInR) regulates a diverse array of biological processes including growth, axon guidance, and sugar homeostasis. Growth regulation by DInR is mediated by Chico, the Drosophila homolog of vertebrate insulin receptor substrate proteins IRS1-4. In contrast, DInR regulation of photoreceptor axon guidance in the developing visual system is mediated by the SH2-SH3 domain adaptor protein Dreadlocks (Dock). In vitro studies by others identified five NPXY motifs, one in the juxtamembrane region and four in the signaling C-terminal tail (C-tail), important for interaction with Chico. Here we used yeast two-hybrid assays to identify regions in the DInR C-tail that interact with Dock. These Dock binding sites were in separate portions of the C-tail from the previously identified Chico binding sites. To test whether these sites are required for growth or axon guidance in whole animals, a panel of DInR proteins, in which the putative Chico and Dock interaction sites had been mutated individually or in combination, were tested for their ability to rescue viability, growth and axon guidance defects of dinr mutant flies. Sites required for viability were identified. Unexpectedly, mutation of both putative Dock binding sites, either individually or in combination, did not lead to defects in photoreceptor axon guidance. Thus, either sites also required for viability are necessary for DInR function in axon guidance and/or there is redundancy built into the DInR/Dock interaction such that Dock is able to interact with multiple regions of DInR. We also found that simultaneous mutation of all five NPXY motifs implicated in Chico interaction drastically decreased growth in both male and female adult flies. These animals resembled chico mutants, supporting the notion that DInR interacts directly with Chico in vivo to control body size. Mutation of these five NPXY motifs did not affect photoreceptor axon guidance, segregating the roles of DInR in the

  8. Goldberg-Shprintzen megacolon syndrome with associated sensory motor axonal neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafsari, Hormos Salimi; Byrne, Susan; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pitt, Matthew; Jongbloed, Jan Dh; Flinter, Frances; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-06-01

    Goldberg-Shprintzen megacolon syndrome (GOSHS) (OMIM 609460) is characterized by a combination of learning difficulties, characteristic dysmorphic features and Hirschsprung's disease. Variable clinical features include iris coloboma, congenital heart defects and central nervous system abnormalities, in particular polymicrogyria. GOSHS has been attributed to recessive mutations in KIAA1279, encoding kinesin family member (KIF)-binding protein (KBP) with a crucial role in neuronal microtubule dynamics. Here we report on a 7-year-old girl with GOSHS as a result of a homozygous deletion of exons 5 and 6 of the KIAA1279 gene. She had been referred with the suspicion of an underlying neuromuscular disorder before the genetic diagnosis was established, prompted by the findings of motor developmental delay, hypotonia, ptosis and absent reflexes. Neurophysiological studies revealed unequivocal evidence of a peripheral axonal sensory motor neuropathy. We hypothesize that an axonal sensory motor neuropathy may be part of the phenotypical spectrum of KIAA1279-related GOSHS, probably reflecting the effects of reduced KBP protein expression on peripheral neuronal function. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Regulation of axon arborization pattern in the developing chick ciliary ganglion: Possible involvement of caspase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katow, Hidetaka; Kanaya, Teppei; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Egawa, Ryo; Yawo, Hiromu

    2017-04-01

    During a certain critical period in the development of the central and peripheral nervous systems, axonal branches and synapses are massively reorganized to form mature connections. In this process, neurons search their appropriate targets, expanding and/or retracting their axons. Recent work suggested that the caspase superfamily regulates the axon morphology. Here, we tested the hypothesis that caspase 3, which is one of the major executioners in apoptotic cell death, is involved in regulating the axon arborization. The embryonic chicken ciliary ganglion was used as a model system of synapse reorganization. A dominant negative mutant of caspase-3 precursor (C3DN) was made and overexpressed in presynaptic neurons in the midbrain to interfere with the intrinsic caspase-3 activity using an in ovo electroporation method. The axon arborization pattern was 3-dimensionally and quantitatively analyzed in the ciliary ganglion. The overexpression of C3DN significantly reduced the number of branching points, the branch order and the complexity index, whereas it significantly elongated the terminal branches at E6. It also increased the internodal distance significantly at E8. But, these effects were negligible at E10 or later. During E6-8, there appeared to be a dynamic balance in the axon arborization pattern between the "targeting" mode, which is accompanied by elongation of terminal branches and the pruning of collateral branches, and the "pathfinding" mode, which is accompanied by the retraction of terminal branches and the sprouting of new collateral branches. The local and transient activation of caspase 3 could direct the balance towards the pathfinding mode. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  10. Effects of p-xylene inhalation on axonal transport in the rat retinal ganglion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, S.S.; Lyerly, D.P. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Although the solvent xylene is suspected of producing nervous system dysfunction in animals and humans, little is known regarding the neurochemical consequences of xylene inhalation. The intent of this study was to determine the effect of intermittent, acute, and subchronic p-xylene exposure on the axonal transport of proteins and glycoproteins within the rat retinofugal tract. A number of different exposure regimens were tested ranging from 50 ppm for a single 6-hr exposure to 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for a total of 8 exposure days. Immediately following removal from the inhalation chambers rats were injected intraocularly with (35S)methionine and (3H)fucose (to label retinal proteins and glycoproteins, respectively) and the axonal transport of labeled macromolecules to axons (optic nerve and optic tract) and nerve endings (lateral geniculate body and superior colliculus) was examined 20 hr after precursor injection. Only relatively severe exposure regimens (i.e., 800 or 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for 1.5 weeks) produced significant reductions in axonal transport; there was a moderate reduction in the axonal transport of 35S-labeled proteins in the 800-ppm-treated group which was more widespread in the 1600 ppm-treated group. Transport of 3H-labeled glycoproteins was less affected. Assessment of retinal metabolism immediately after isotope injection indicated that the rate of precursor uptake was not reduced in either treatment group. Furthermore, rapid transport was still substantially reduced in animals exposed to 1600 ppm p-xylene and allowed a 13-day withdrawal period. These data indicate that p-xylene inhalation decreases rapid axonal transport supplied to the projections of the rat retinal ganglion cells immediately after cessation of inhalation exposure and that this decreased transport is still apparent 13 days after the last exposure.

  11. Effects of p-xylene inhalation on axonal transport in the rat retinal ganglion cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, S.S.; Lyerly, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Although the solvent xylene is suspected of producing nervous system dysfunction in animals and humans, little is known regarding the neurochemical consequences of xylene inhalation. The intent of this study was to determine the effect of intermittent, acute, and subchronic p-xylene exposure on the axonal transport of proteins and glycoproteins within the rat retinofugal tract. A number of different exposure regimens were tested ranging from 50 ppm for a single 6-hr exposure to 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for a total of 8 exposure days. Immediately following removal from the inhalation chambers rats were injected intraocularly with [35S]methionine and [3H]fucose (to label retinal proteins and glycoproteins, respectively) and the axonal transport of labeled macromolecules to axons (optic nerve and optic tract) and nerve endings (lateral geniculate body and superior colliculus) was examined 20 hr after precursor injection. Only relatively severe exposure regimens (i.e., 800 or 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for 1.5 weeks) produced significant reductions in axonal transport; there was a moderate reduction in the axonal transport of 35S-labeled proteins in the 800-ppm-treated group which was more widespread in the 1600 ppm-treated group. Transport of 3H-labeled glycoproteins was less affected. Assessment of retinal metabolism immediately after isotope injection indicated that the rate of precursor uptake was not reduced in either treatment group. Furthermore, rapid transport was still substantially reduced in animals exposed to 1600 ppm p-xylene and allowed a 13-day withdrawal period. These data indicate that p-xylene inhalation decreases rapid axonal transport supplied to the projections of the rat retinal ganglion cells immediately after cessation of inhalation exposure and that this decreased transport is still apparent 13 days after the last exposure

  12. Can injured adult CNS axons regenerate by recapitulating development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Brett J; Bradke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), neurons typically fail to regenerate their axons after injury. During development, by contrast, neurons extend axons effectively. A variety of intracellular mechanisms mediate this difference, including changes in gene expression, the ability to form a growth cone, differences in mitochondrial function/axonal transport and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In turn, these intracellular processes are linked to extracellular differences between the developing and adult CNS. During development, the extracellular environment directs axon growth and circuit formation. In adulthood, by contrast, extracellular factors, such as myelin and the extracellular matrix, restrict axon growth. Here, we discuss whether the reactivation of developmental processes can elicit axon regeneration in the injured CNS. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Regulation and dysregulation of axon infrastructure by myelinating glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Simon; Chan, Jonah R

    2017-12-04

    Axon loss and neurodegeneration constitute clinically debilitating sequelae in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms of secondary degeneration are not well understood. Myelinating glia play a fundamental role in promoting the maturation of the axon cytoskeleton, regulating axon trafficking parameters, and imposing architectural rearrangements such as the nodes of Ranvier and their associated molecular domains. In the setting of demyelination, these changes may be reversed or persist as maladaptive features, leading to axon degeneration. In this review, we consider recent insights into axon-glial interactions during development and disease to propose that disruption of the cytoskeleton, nodal architecture, and other components of axon infrastructure is a potential mediator of pathophysiological damage after demyelination. © 2017 Pan and Chan.

  14. Active polysomes in the axoplasm of the squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, A; Menichini, E; Perrone Capano, C; Langella, M; Martin, R; Castigli, E; Kaplan, B B

    1991-01-01

    Axons and axon terminals are widely believed to lack the capacity to synthesize proteins, relying instead on the delivery of proteins made in the perikaryon. In agreement with this view, axoplasmic proteins synthesized by the isolated giant axon of the squid are believed to derive entirely from periaxonal glial cells. However, squid axoplasm is known to contain the requisite components of an extra-mitochondrial protein synthetic system, including protein factors, tRNAs, rRNAs, and a heterogeneous family of mRNAs. Hence, the giant axon could, in principle, maintain an endogenous protein synthetic capacity. Here, we report that the squid giant axon also contains active polysomes and mRNA, which hybridizes to a riboprobe encoding murine neurofilament protein. Taken together, these findings provide direct evidence that proteins (including the putative neuron-specific neurofilament protein) are also synthesized de novo in the axonal compartment.

  15. Evaluating Red Reflex and Surgeon Preference Between Nearly-Collimated and Focused Beam Microscope Illumination Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cionni, Robert J; Pei, Ron; Dimalanta, Ramon; Lubeck, David

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the intensity and stability of the red reflex produced by ophthalmic surgical microscopes with nearly-collimated versus focused illumination systems and to assess surgeon preference in a simulated surgical setting. This two-part evaluation consisted of postproduction surgical video analysis of red reflex intensity and a microscope use and preference survey completed by 13 experienced cataract surgeons. Survey responses were based on bench testing and experience in a simulated surgical setting. A microscope with nearly-collimated beam illumination and two focused beam microscopes were assessed. Red reflex intensity and stability were greater with the nearly-collimated microscope illumination system. In the bench testing survey, surgeons reported that the red reflex was maintained over significantly greater distances away from pupillary center, and depth of focus was numerically greater with nearly-collimated illumination relative to focused illumination. Most participating surgeons (≥64%) reported a preference for the microscope with nearly-collimated illumination with regard to red reflex stability, depth of focus, visualization, surgical working distance, and perceived patient comfort. The microscope with nearly-collimated illumination produced a more intense and significantly more stable red reflex and was preferred overall by more surgeons. This is the first report of an attempt to quantify red reflex intensity and stability and to evaluate surgically-relevant parameters between microscope systems. The data and methods presented here may provide a basis for future studies attempting to quantify differences between surgical microscopes that may affect surgeon preference and microscope use in ophthalmic surgery.

  16. A Select Subset of Electron Transport Chain Genes Associated with Optic Atrophy Link Mitochondria to Axon Regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M. Knowlton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of mitochondria within injured neurons is an area of active interest since these organelles are vital for the production of cellular energy in the form of ATP. Using mechanosensory neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to test regeneration after neuronal injury in vivo, we surveyed genes related to mitochondrial function for effects on axon regrowth after laser axotomy. Genes involved in mitochondrial transport, calcium uptake, mitophagy, or fission and fusion were largely dispensable for axon regrowth, with the exception of eat-3/Opa1. Surprisingly, many genes encoding components of the electron transport chain were dispensable for regrowth, except for the iron-sulfur proteins gas-1, nduf-2.2, nduf-7, and isp-1, and the putative oxidoreductase rad-8. In these mutants, axonal development was essentially normal and axons responded normally to injury by forming regenerative growth cones, but were impaired in subsequent axon extension. Overexpression of nduf-2.2 or isp-1 was sufficient to enhance regrowth, suggesting that mitochondrial function is rate-limiting in axon regeneration. Moreover, loss of function in isp-1 reduced the enhanced regeneration caused by either a gain-of-function mutation in the calcium channel EGL-19 or overexpression of the MAP kinase DLK-1. While the cellular function of RAD-8 remains unclear, our genetic analyses place rad-8 in the same pathway as other electron transport genes in axon regeneration. Unexpectedly, rad-8 regrowth defects were suppressed by altered function in the ubiquinone biosynthesis gene clk-1. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response via deletion of atfs-1 suppressed the defective regrowth in nduf-2.2 mutants. Together, our data indicate that while axon regeneration is not significantly affected by general dysfunction of cellular respiration, it is sensitive to the proper functioning of a select subset of electron transport chain genes, or

  17. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    OpenAIRE

    White, Robin; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialized glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarization followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is...

  18. Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlappi Mark

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or

  19. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  20. The EGR2 gene is involved in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, T; Sivera, R; Martínez-Rubio, D; Lupo, V; Chumillas, M J; Calpena, E; Dopazo, J; Vílchez, J J; Palau, F; Espinós, C

    2015-12-01

    A three-generation family affected by axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) was investigated with the aim of discovering genetic defects and to further characterize the phenotype. The clinical, nerve conduction studies and muscle magnetic resonance images of the patients were reviewed. A whole exome sequencing was performed and the changes were investigated by genetic studies, in silico analysis and luciferase reporter assays. A novel c.1226G>A change (p.R409Q) in the EGR2 gene was identified. Patients presented with a typical, late-onset axonal CMT phenotype with variable severity that was confirmed in the ancillary tests. The in silico studies showed that the residue R409 is an evolutionary conserved amino acid. The p.R409Q mutation, which is predicted as probably damaging, would alter the conformation of the protein slightly and would cause a decrease of gene expression. This is the first report of an EGR2 mutation presenting as an axonal CMT phenotype with variable severity. This study broadens the phenotype of the EGR2-related neuropathies and suggests that the genetic testing of patients suffering from axonal CMT should include the EGR2 gene. © 2015 EAN.

  1. Schwann Cell Glycogen Selectively Supports Myelinated Axon Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angus M; Evans, Richard D; Black, Joel; Ransom, Bruce R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Interruption of energy supply to peripheral axons is a cause of axon loss. We determined if glycogen was present in mammalian peripheral nerve, and if it supported axon conduction during aglycemia. Methods We used biochemical assay and electron microscopy to determine the presence of glycogen, and electrophysiology to monitor axon function. Results Glycogen was present in sciatic nerve, its concentration varying directly with ambient [glucose]. Electron microscopy detected glycogen granules primarily in myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm and these diminished after exposure to aglycemia. During aglycemia, conduction failure in large myelinated axons (A fibers) mirrored the time-course of glycogen loss. Latency to CAP failure was directly related to nerve glycogen content at aglycemia onset. Glycogen did not benefit the function of slow-conducting, small diameter unmyelinated axons (C fibers) during aglycemia. Blocking glycogen breakdown pharmacologically accelerated CAP failure during aglycemia in A fibers, but not in C fibers. Lactate was as effective as glucose in supporting sciatic nerve function, and was continuously released into the extracellular space in the presence of glucose and fell rapidly during aglycemia. Interpretation Our findings indicated that glycogen is present in peripheral nerve, primarily in myelinating Schwann cells, and exclusively supports large diameter, myelinated axon conduction during aglycemia. Available evidence suggests that peripheral nerve glycogen breaks down during aglycemia and is passed, probably as lactate, to myelinated axons to support function. Unmyelinated axons are not protected by glycogen and are more vulnerable to dysfunction during periods of hypoglycemia. PMID:23034913

  2. Concepts for regulation of axon integrity by enwrapping glia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan eBeirowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Long axons and their enwrapping glia (Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes form a unique compound structure that serves as conduit for transport of electric and chemical information in the nervous system. The peculiar cytoarchitecture over an enormous length as well as its substantial energetic requirements make this conduit particularly susceptible to detrimental alterations. Degeneration of long axons independent of neuronal cell bodies is observed comparatively early in a range of neurodegenerative conditions as a consequence of abnormalities in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes. This leads to the most relevant disease symptoms and highlights the critical role that these glia have for axon integrity, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The quest to understand why and how axons degenerate is now a crucial frontier in disease-oriented research. This challenge is most likely to lead to significant progress if the inextricable link between axons and their flanking glia in pathological situations is recognized. In this review I compile recent advances in our understanding of the molecular programs governing axon degeneration, and mechanisms of enwrapping glia’s non-cell autonomous impact on axon-integrity. A particular focus is placed on emerging evidence suggesting that enwrapping glia nurture long axons by virtue of their intimate association, release of trophic substances, and neurometabolic coupling. The correction of defects in these functions has the potential to stabilize axons in a variety of neuronal diseases in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  3. Axonal branching patterns of ventral pallidal neurons in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Anushree; Prensa, Lucía; Mengual, Elisa

    2013-09-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is a key component of the cortico-basal ganglia circuits that process motivational and emotional information, and also a crucial site for reward. Although the main targets of the two VP compartments, medial (VPm) and lateral (VPl) have already been established, the collateralization patterns of individual axons have not previously been investigated. Here we have fully traced eighty-four axons from VPm, VPl and the rostral extension of VP into the olfactory tubercle (VPr), using the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine in the rat. Thirty to fifty percent of axons originating from VPm and VPr collateralized in the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus and lateral habenula, indicating a close association between the ventral basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop and the reward network at the single axon level. Additional collateralization of these axons in diverse components of the extended amygdala and corticopetal system supports a multisystem integration that may take place at the basal forebrain. Remarkably, we did not find evidence for a sharp segregation in the targets of axons arising from the two VP compartments, as VPl axons frequently collateralized in the caudal lateral hypothalamus and ventral tegmental area, the well-known targets of VPm, while VPm axons, in turn, also collateralized in typical VPl targets such as the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra pars compacta and reticulata, and retrorubral field. Nevertheless, VPl and VPm displayed collateralization patterns that paralleled those of dorsal pallidal components, confirming at the single axon level the parallel organization of functionally different basal ganglia loops.

  4. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) proposes to develop an advanced reflexive structure system to increase the survivability of aerostructures. This reflexive...

  5. Reflexive intergroup bias in third-party punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudkin, Daniel A; Rothmund, Tobias; Twardawski, Mathias; Thalla, Natasha; Van Bavel, Jay J

    2016-11-01

    Humans show a rare tendency to punish norm-violators who have not harmed them directly-a behavior known as third-party punishment. Research has found that third-party punishment is subject to intergroup bias, whereby people punish members of the out-group more severely than the in-group. Although the prevalence of this behavior is well-documented, the psychological processes underlying it remain largely unexplored. Some work suggests that it stems from people's inherent predisposition to form alliances with in-group members and aggress against out-group members. This implies that people will show reflexive intergroup bias in third-party punishment, favoring in-group over out-group members especially when their capacity for deliberation is impaired. Here we test this hypothesis directly, examining whether intergroup bias in third-party punishment emerges from reflexive, as opposed to deliberative, components of moral cognition. In 3 experiments, utilizing a simulated economic game, we varied participants' group relationship to a transgressor, measured or manipulated the extent to which they relied on reflexive or deliberative judgment, and observed people's punishment decisions. Across group-membership manipulations (American football teams, nationalities, and baseball teams) and 2 assessments of reflexive judgment (response time and cognitive load), reflexive judgment heightened intergroup bias, suggesting that such bias in punishment is inherent to human moral cognition. We discuss the implications of these studies for theories of punishment, cooperation, social behavior, and legal practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Reflexive Learning through Visual Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    What. This chapter concerns how visual methods and visual materials can support visually oriented, collaborative, and creative learning processes in education. The focus is on facilitation (guiding, teaching) with visual methods in learning processes that are designerly or involve design. Visual...... or professional, to facilitate with visual methods in a critical, reflective, and experimental way. The chapter offers recommendations for facilitating with visual methods to support playful, emergent designerly processes. The chapter also has a critical, situated perspective. Where. This chapter offers case...... challenges are discussed, including supporting difficult group collaborative processes (such as dealing with interpersonal tensions). You will gain an understanding about how and why to work with visual methods and how to develop a dynamic, reflexive facilitation practice. The chapter contains...

  7. Reflexive criteria of sociological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Ubaydullaeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the sociological criteria of explaining the way of thinking and actions of subjects, their spiritual and moral positions and intellectual forces that form the laws of social life. The author seeks to adapt such categories as ‘meaning of life’, ‘human dignity’, ‘rationality’ etc. for the purposes of sociological analysis by methodological construction of some real life dichotomies such as ‘subjective meaning and social function’, ‘the real and the ideal’, ‘the demanded and the excluded’. Thus, the author studies economic, political and technical processes in terms of both positivity and negativity of social interaction and states that given the increasing differentiation of the society and the contradictory trends of social development the reflexive criteria that take into account the socio-cultural nature of the man help to find one’s own model of development.

  8. Analgesic-antiinflammatory drugs inhibit orbicularis oculi reflexes in humans via a central mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracuti, S; Leardi, M G; Cruccu, G; Fabbri, A; Itil, T M

    1994-01-01

    1. A cross-over single blind study examined the possible central effects of non-opioid analgesic drugs on the trigeminal reflexes. 2. The corneal reflex and blink reflex (R1, R2) were recorded electromyographically and response areas measured in healthy volunteers before and after intramuscular injection of piroxicam (40 mg); and after intravenous injection of lysine acetylsalicylate (500 mg). After the last drug recording the subjects received intravenous naloxone (2 mg) followed 5 minutes later by further reflex testing. Saline was used as a placebo in control experiments. 3. Both analgesics reduced the corneal reflex: piroxicam induced a 27% and lysine acetylsalicylate a 21% a reduction that naloxone did not reverse. Neither drug reduced the early or the late component of the blink reflex. 4. The marked inhibitory changes that the two non-narcotic analgesics produced on the corneal reflex--a nociceptive response--indicate a centrally-mediated action. 5. Naloxone's failure to reverse the induced analgesia argues against opiate receptor mediation.

  9. Death Receptor 6 Promotes Wallerian Degeneration in Peripheral Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Kanchana K; Cheng, Irene; Park, Rachel E; Karim, Mardeen S; Edamura, Kazusa; Hughes, Christopher; Spano, Anthony J; Erisir, Alev; Deppmann, Christopher D

    2017-03-20

    Axon degeneration during development is required to sculpt a functional nervous system and is also a hallmark of pathological insult, such as injury [1, 2]. Despite similar morphological characteristics, very little overlap in molecular mechanisms has been reported between pathological and developmental degeneration [3-5]. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS), developmental axon pruning relies on receptor-mediated extrinsic degeneration mechanisms to determine which axons are maintained or degenerated [5-7]. Receptors have not been implicated in Wallerian axon degeneration; instead, axon autonomous, intrinsic mechanisms are thought to be the primary driver for this type of axon disintegration [8-10]. Here we survey the role of neuronally expressed, paralogous tumor necrosis factor receptor super family (TNFRSF) members in Wallerian degeneration. We find that an orphan receptor, death receptor 6 (DR6), is required to drive axon degeneration after axotomy in sympathetic and sensory neurons cultured in microfluidic devices. We sought to validate these in vitro findings in vivo using a transected sciatic nerve model. Consistent with the in vitro findings, DR6 -/- animals displayed preserved axons up to 4 weeks after injury. In contrast to phenotypes observed in Wld s and Sarm1 -/- mice, preserved axons in DR6 -/- animals display profound myelin remodeling. This indicates that deterioration of axons and myelin after axotomy are mechanistically distinct processes. Finally, we find that JNK signaling after injury requires DR6, suggesting a link between this novel extrinsic pathway and the axon autonomous, intrinsic pathways that have become established for Wallerian degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigating the Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilaments: A Precursor for Optimal Neuronal Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M.

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are the most abundant structure of the neuronal cytoskeleton. Once synthesized within the cell body they are then transported throughout the axon along microtubule tracks, driven by the molecular motors kinesin and dynein. This movement is characterized by long pauses with no movement interrupted by infrequent bouts of rapid movement, resulting in an aggregate dense cytoskeletal structure, which serves to regulate an axon's shape and size. Curiously, the modulated kinetics of these polymers produces a very regular, yet non-uniform, morphology in myelinated axons which are composed of discretely spaced myelin-ensheathed segments that are separated by short constricted regions called "nodes of Ranvier". This unique design optimizes the conduction velocity of myelinated axons at minimal fiber size. Hence, neurofilaments regulate the axon caliber to optimize neuron function. The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the motile mechanism of neurofilament transport as well as the resulting electrophysiological effects that follow. We start by examining highly time-resolved kymograph images generated from recorded neurofilament movement via epifluorescence microscopy. Using kymograph analysis, edge detection algorithms, and pixel smoothing tactics, neurofilament trajectories are extracted and used to obtain statistical distributions for the characteristics of how these filaments move within cells. The results suggest that the observed intermittent and bidirectional motions of these filaments might be explained by a model in which dynein and kinesin motors attach to a single neurofilament cargo and interact through mechanical forces only (i.e. a "tug-of-war" model). We test this hypothesis by developing two discrete-state stochastic models for the kinetic cycles of kinesin and dynein, which are then incorporated into a separate stochastic model that represents the posed tug-of-war scenario. We then

  11. Age-related changes in axonal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolkis, V V; Tanin, S A; Gorban, Y N

    1997-01-01

    In rats the rate of axonal transport (AT) or radiolabeled material decreased in the ventral roots of the spinal cord and the vagal and hypoglossal nerves with aging. A maximum AT deceleration in old age was observed in the vagus. The uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, inhibition of glycolysis and hypoxia induced a greater AT deceleration in old rats as compared to adults. Small doses of sodium fluoride accelerated AT, and this correlated with a rise in cAMP levels in ventral roots. High doses of sodium fluoride decelerated AT more markedly in old rats. It was shown that anabolic hormones (sex steroids and thyroxine) accelerated AT in both adult and old rats, whereas insulin induced a rise in AT rate in only adults. The catabolic steroid, hydrocortisone decelerated AT. In old rats castration diminished AT, while thyroidectomy had no effect. It was also shown that hydrocortisone and testosterone were transported along axons, reached fibers of the skeletal muscles, and hyperpolarized the plasma membrane. In old age the latent period was extended. Following 73 to 74 days of irradiation, AT slowed down in all the nerves studied in both adult and old rats. Following irradiation hormonal effects on AT changed, for example, the stimulatory effect of estradiol became weak, especially in old rats. Changes in AT could be an important mechanism of disordering the growth of neurons and innervated cells in old age.

  12. Subcellular electrical stimulation of neurons enhances the myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae Ung; Blasiak, Agata; Agrawal, Devansh R.; Loong, Daniel Teh Boon; Thakor, Nitish V.; All, Angelo H.; Ho, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Myelin formation has been identified as a modulator of neural plasticity. New tools are required to investigate the mechanisms by which environmental inputs and neural activity regulate myelination patterns. In this study, we demonstrate a microfluidic compartmentalized culture system with integrated electrical stimulation capabilities that can induce neural activity by whole cell and focal stimulation. A set of electric field simulations was performed to confirm spatial restriction of the electrical input in the compartmentalized culture system. We further demonstrate that electrode localization is a key consideration for generating uniform the stimulation of neuron and oligodendrocytes within the compartments. Using three configurations of the electrodes we tested the effects of subcellular activation of neural activity on distal axon myelination with oligodendrocytes. We further investigated if oligodendrocytes have to be exposed to the electrical field to induce axon myelination. An isolated stimulation of cell bodies and proximal axons had the same effect as an isolated stimulation of distal axons co-cultured with oligodendrocytes, and the two modes had a non-different result than whole cell stimulation. Our platform enabled the demonstration that electrical stimulation enhances oligodendrocyte maturation and myelin formation independent of the input localization and oligodendrocyte exposure to the electrical field. PMID:28671962

  13. A phantom axon setup for validating models of action potential recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Guiraud, David; Cathébras, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Electrode designs and strategies for electroneurogram recordings are often tested first by computer simulations and then by animal models, but they are rarely implanted for long-term evaluation in humans. The models show that the amplitude of the potential at the surface of an axon is higher in front of the nodes of Ranvier than at the internodes; however, this has not been investigated through in vivo measurements. An original experimental method is presented to emulate a single fiber action potential in an infinite conductive volume, allowing the potential of an axon to be recorded at both the nodes of Ranvier and the internodes, for a wide range of electrode-to-fiber radial distances. The paper particularly investigates the differences in the action potential amplitude along the longitudinal axis of an axon. At a short radial distance, the action potential amplitude measured in front of a node of Ranvier is two times larger than in the middle of two nodes. Moreover, farther from the phantom axon, the measured action potential amplitude is almost constant along the longitudinal axis. The results of this new method confirm the computer simulations, with a correlation of 97.6 %.

  14. En masse in vitro functional profiling of the axonal mechanosensitivity of sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoskin, Dmitry; Zilberter, Misha; Linnarsson, Sten; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Uhlén, Per; Harkany, Tibor; Ernfors, Patrik

    2010-09-14

    Perception of the environment relies on somatosensory neurons. Mechanosensory, proprioceptor and many nociceptor subtypes of these neurons have specific mechanosensitivity profiles to adequately differentiate stimulus patterns. Nevertheless, the cellular basis of differential mechanosensation remains largely elusive. Successful transduction of sensory information relies on the recruitment of sensory neurons and mechanosensation occurring at their peripheral axonal endings in vivo. Conspicuously, existing in vitro models aimed to decipher molecular mechanisms of mechanosensation test single sensory neuron somata at any one time. Here, we introduce a compartmental in vitro chamber design to deliver precisely controlled mechanical stimulation of sensory axons with synchronous real-time imaging of Ca(2+) transients in neuronal somata that reliably reflect action potential firing patterns. We report of three previously not characterized types of mechanosensitive neuron subpopulations with distinct intrinsic axonal properties tuned specifically to static indentation or vibration stimuli, showing that different classes of sensory neurons are tuned to specific types of mechanical stimuli. Primary receptor currents of vibration neurons display rapidly adapting conductance reliably detected for every single stimulus during vibration and are consistently converted into action potentials. This result allows for the characterization of two critical steps of mechanosensation in vivo: primary signal detection and signal conversion into specific action potential firing patterns in axons.

  15. Tibialis anterior stretch reflex in early stance is suppressed by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuur, Abraham T; Christensen, Mark Schram; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A rapid plantar flexion perturbation in the early stance phase of walking elicits a large stretch reflex in tibialis anterior (TA). In this study we use repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) to test if this response is mediated through a transcortical pathway. TA stretch...... reflexes were elicited in the early stance phase of the step cycle during treadmill walking. 20 minutes of 1 Hz rTMS at 115% resting motor threshold (MTr) significantly decreased (p

  16. Axonal sodium channel distribution shapes the depolarized action potential threshold of dentate granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Geraldine J; Dowling, Margaret J; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Mennerick, Steven

    2010-04-01

    Intrinsic excitability is a key feature dictating neuronal response to synaptic input. Here we investigate the recent observation that dentate granule neurons exhibit a more depolarized voltage threshold for action potential initiation than CA3 pyramidal neurons. We find no evidence that tonic GABA currents, leak or voltage-gated potassium conductances, or the expression of sodium channel isoform differences can explain this depolarized threshold. Axonal initial segment voltage-gated sodium channels, which are dominated by the Na(V)1.6 isoform in both cell types, distribute more proximally and exhibit lower overall density in granule neurons than in CA3 neurons. To test possible contributions of sodium channel distributions to voltage threshold and to test whether morphological differences participate, we performed simulations of dentate granule neurons and of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These simulations revealed that cell morphology and sodium channel distribution combine to yield the characteristic granule neuron action potential upswing and voltage threshold. Proximal axon sodium channel distribution strongly contributes to the higher voltage threshold of dentate granule neurons for two reasons. First, action potential initiation closer to the somatodendritic current sink causes the threshold of the initiating axon compartment to rise. Second, the proximity of the action potential initiation site to the recording site causes somatic recordings to more faithfully reflect the depolarized threshold of the axon than in cells like CA3 neurons, with distally initiating action potentials. Our results suggest that the proximal location of axon sodium channels in dentate granule neurons contributes to the intrinsic excitability differences between DG and CA3 neurons and may participate in the low-pass filtering function of dentate granule neurons. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. A near catastrophe from trigeminocardiac reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmod K Bithal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminocardiac reflex is a brainstem reflex that results from stimulation of any branch of the trigeminal nerve along its course. It produces a constellation of signs and symptoms decrease in blood pressure (BP and heart rate, dysrhythmias, apnoea and increased gastric motility. We present a case of 80-year-old female patient who developed alarming hypotension and bradycardia during craniotomy for meningioma excision resulting from this reflex. In the face of refractory hypotension despite administering ephedrine and phenylephrine, we had to resort to adrenaline to restore her normal BP.

  18. Is action potential threshold lowest in the axon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, Maarten H. P.; Stuart, Greg J.

    2008-01-01

    Action potential threshold is thought to be lowest in the axon, but when measured using conventional techniques, we found that action potential voltage threshold of rat cortical pyramidal neurons was higher in the axon than at other neuronal locations. In contrast, both current threshold and voltage

  19. Protein-synthesizing machinery in the axon compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, E; Giuditta, A

    1999-03-01

    Contrary to the prevailing view that the axon lacks the capacity to synthesize proteins, a substantial body of evidence points to the existence of a metabolically active endogenous translational machinery. The machinery appears to be largely localized in the cortical zone of the axon, where, in vertebrate axons, it is distributed longitudinally as intermittent, discrete domains, called periaxoplasmic plaques. Studies, based on translation assays and probes of RNA transcripts in axon models such as the squid giant axon and selected vertebrate axons, provide evidence of locally synthesized proteins, most of which appear to be constituents of the slow axoplasmic transport rate groups. Metabolic and molecular biological findings are consistent with the view that the synthesis of proteins undergoing local turnover in the axonal compartment of macroneurons depends on the activity of an endogenous translational machinery. The documented presence of a metabolically active machinery in presynaptic terminals of squid photoreceptor neurons is also described. Finally, potential sources of axoplasmic RNAs comprising the machinery, which may include the ensheathing cell of the axon, as well as the cognate cell body, are also discussed.

  20. Wnts guide longitudinal axon tracts in the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prasad, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The human brain contains more than 10 billion neurons that form over 10 trillion connections. The establishment of these connections during development requires axons to extend through the extracellular environment to their synaptic targets. This process of axon guidance is mediated by molecular

  1. Electromyographic tendon reflex recording: An accurate and comfortable method for diagnosis of charcot-marie-tooth disease type 1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonio; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; Álvarez-Paradelo, Silvia; Antolín, Francisco M; Berciano, José

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed the utility of tendon reflex (T-reflex) testing in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). A total of 82 subjects from 27 unrelated CMT1A pedigrees were evaluated prospectively. The series also comprised 28 adult healthy controls. Electrophysiology included evaluation of biceps T-reflex and soleus T-reflex. Seventy-one individuals (62 adults and 9 children) had clinical and electrophysiological features of CMT1A. The remaining 11 (8 adults and 3 children) were unaffected. On electrophysiological testing, the biceps T-reflex was elicited in 58 of 62 (93%) adult CMT1A patients and in all 9 affected children. Latencies of the biceps T-reflex were always markedly prolonged, and a cut-off limit of 16.25 ms clearly separated adult patients and controls or unaffected kin adult individuals. In affected children, the soleus T-reflex latency was also prolonged when compared with age and height normative data. T-reflex testing is an accurate diagnostic technique for CMT1A patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Motor Axonal Regeneration After Partial and Complete Spinal Cord Transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Paul; Blesch, Armin; Graham, Lori; Wang, Yaozhi; Samara, Ramsey; Banos, Karla; Haringer, Verena; Havton, Leif; Weishaupt, Nina; Bennett, David; Fouad, Karim; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    We subjected rats to either partial mid-cervical or complete upper thoracic spinal cord transections and examined whether combinatorial treatments support motor axonal regeneration into and beyond the lesion. Subjects received cAMP injections into brainstem reticular motor neurons to stimulate their endogenous growth state, bone marrow stromal cell grafts in lesion sites to provide permissive matrices for axonal growth, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gradients beyond the lesion to stimulate distal growth of motor axons. Findings were compared to several control groups. Combinatorial treatment generated motor axon regeneration beyond both C5 hemisection and complete transection sites. Yet despite formation of synapses with neurons below the lesion, motor outcomes worsened after partial cervical lesions and spasticity worsened after complete transection. These findings highlight the complexity of spinal cord repair, and the need for additional control and shaping of axonal regeneration. PMID:22699902

  3. The Effects of State Anxiety on Hoffman (H Reflex Parameters in Female University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Delavar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Anxiety, as one of the most common and costly problems in Iran and all over the world, comprises both physical and mental disorders. Previous research has proposed that spinal reflex modulation may mediate anxiety-related changes in postural control. This study aimed to investigate if the H-reflex parameters are influenced by state anxiety. Materials and Methods: A group of 20 healthy female university students with a low anxiety score (lower than 42, based upon the Schpilberger’s questionnaire were recruited in this study and the H-reflex of their Soleus muscle was recorded in four positions. The tested positions included the standard prone lying (the reference position, standing on level ground; and two stability threatening positions including standing on the center and at the edge of a one-meter height stool. The outcome measures were the latency, amplitude and the amplitude needed to record the reflex. Results: No significant differences were shown in the latency of the H-reflex among the four tested positions (p>0.05. In terms of the amplitude of the reflex, however, significant differences were found between all positions when compared to the reference position (prone lying (p=0.001. There are significant differences among all four positions in amplitude needed to record the H-reflex (p=0.034, while the Bonferoni test revealed the significant difference only between the position of standing at the edge of the height relative to the standard prone lying position (p=0.041. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that any postural perturbation results in brain activities and affects more on the amplitudes rather than the latency of the H-reflex. These findings may be helpful in a better understanding of the standing balance in healthy people and people suffering from postural instabilities, fear of falling, elderly persons and also hemiplegic patients.

  4. Correlation of gastroesophageal reflex with aspiration pneumonia after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Tokuji; Hashimoto, Hajime; Noro, Toshio; Takahashi, Tadao; Hino, Yasunori; Kuroiwa, Kouzirou

    1996-01-01

    In order to elucidate the correlation of gastroesophageal reflex (GER) with aspiration pneumonia after surgery, 48 patients (mean, 75.6 years) with gastric cancer treated at the hospital from March, 1994 to December, 1994 were subjected to this prospective study. The pharyngeal stimulation test, nutritional assessment, radionuclide esophageal scintigraphy (34 cases) were performed before surgery and relationship between those results and aspiration pneumonia were studied. Aspiration pneumonia occurred in 3 cases, and all of them were in, significantly, poor nutritional status, compared with other. A significant increase in the frequency of GER was observed when a naso-gastric tube (NGT) was placed, but surprisingly, all the patients with aspiration pneumonia were 3 out of 4 patients who had continuous GER without NGT. It is noteworthy, continuous GER without NGT was significantly (p<0.001) affected postoperative aspiration pneumonia and impaired phalyngeal reflex was frequently correlated with development of aspiration pneumonia, when malnutritional status existed. (author)

  5. Situating reflexivities: voices, positionalities and representations in feminist ethnographic texts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nencel, L.S.

    2014-01-01

    This article traces the feminist discussion concerning the importance of reflexive analysis and reflexive writing for feminist research. It starts by describing two feminist currents that concern the way to be reflexive. The first, reflexivity as a corrective measure accords a great deal of

  6. Measurement of tendon reflexes by surface electromyography in normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method for measuring the tendon reflexes was developed. A manually operated, electronic reflex hammer was applied that enabled measurement of the strength of tendon taps. Reflex responses were recorded by surface electromyography. Stimulus-response relations and latencies of tendon reflexes

  7. Blink and masseter inhibitory reflexes in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenović Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD is a chronic, progressive, neurodegenerative disorder with prevalence from 60 to 187 per 100 000 persons in general population. The aim of the study was to determine the abnormalities of the blink reflex (BR and the masseter inhibitory reflex (MIR in parkinsonian patients, as indices of the functional status of brainstem neuronal network, and abnormality level dependence on disease progression. Methods. The investigation was conducted at the Clinic of Neurology, Clinical Center Niš, comprising a group of 60 subjects of both sexes, suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease in I-IV stages, according to the Hoehn and Yahr scale. The control group included 30 healthy subjects of both sexes and corresponding age. Testing of the patients was performed during the 'on' phase by registering MIR and BR. Results. Latency of polysynaptic R2 and R2' blink reflex responses and latency of polysynaptic S2 response, as well as a silent period of MIR, are linearly shortened in the subjects with PD, and more expressed in the subsequent stages of the disease compared to the control group. Conclusion. There is a positive correlation between the applied neurophysiological tests results and clinical stage of PD.

  8. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Reflexivity and the capacity to think.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Sarah

    2013-02-01

    Reflexivity is fundamental to qualitative health research, yet notoriously difficult to unpack. Drawing on Wilfred Bion's work on the development of the capacity to think and to learn, I show how the capacity to think is an impermanent and fallible capacity, with the potential to materialize or evaporate at any number of different points. I use this conceptualization together with examples from published interview data to illustrate the difficulties for researchers attempting to sustain a reflexive approach, and to direct attention toward the possibilities for recovering and supporting the capacity to think. I counter some of the criticisms suggesting that reflexivity can be self-indulgent, and suggest instead that self-indulgence constitutes a failure of reflexivity. In the concluding discussions I acknowledge tensions accompanying the use of psychoanalytic theories for research purposes, and point to emerging psychosocial approaches as one way of negotiating these.

  10. Entrepreneurship Teaching Conducted as Strategic Reflexive Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael

    The paper intends exploring and ascertaining whether the concept of strategic reflexive conversation can profitably be applied to entrepreneurship. As a start, a process of conceptualisation is undertaken, which is instrumental in placing the notion of strategic reflexive conversation...... into a knowledge management perspective. Strategic reflexive conversation is presented in an enhanced and updated version, which is contrasted to entrepreneurship through reflection. The findings indicate and it can be concluded that, with some important reservations, strategic reflexive conversation can...... advantageously, and on a pilot basis, be applied to entrepreneurship in practical environments and within the framework of entrepreneurship-centred teaching. The present theoretical investigation is solely of an introductory nature and steps are considered that can lead to the planning of additional exploratory...

  11. [ Sudeck's bone atrophy (reflex sympathetic dystrophy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasufumi

    2008-07-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a disease clinically characterized severe pain, allodynia (severe pain caused by a touch) and over-reaction of pain sensation after a minor injury. In 1994, reflex sympathetic dystrophy was given a name of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 by a international congress, because local blockade of the sympathetic nerve has not been found to be invariably effective. Treatment system for reflex sympathetic dystrophy is composed of medicament therapy including oral administration and/or injection of drug, physical therapy such as thermotherapy and gently passive movement, surgical treatment and psychotherapy. Treatment with injection of pamidronate for 23 patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy revealed to reduced the grade of pain to two third compared to pre-treatment period, and local intravenous block with local anesthetic drug and steroid hormone disappeared the almost symptoms in cases of early phase.

  12. Morbidity in reflex sympathetic dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, C.; Cohen, A.; Perkins, T.; Davidson, J.; Sills, J.

    2000-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), an unusual diagnosis in general paediatrics, is well recognised by paediatric rheumatologists. This study reports the presentation and the clinical course of 46 patients (35 female, age range 8-15.2) with RSD. The patients saw professionals from an average of 2.3 specialties (range 1-5). Twenty five (54%) had a history of trauma. Median time to diagnosis was 12 weeks (range 1-130). Many children had multiple investigations and treatments. Once diagnosis was made, treatment followed with physiotherapy and analgesics. Median time to recovery was seven weeks (range 1-140), with 27.5% relapsing. Nine children required assessment by the child and adolescent psychiatry team. This disease, though rare, has significant morbidity and it is therefore important to raise clinicians' awareness of RSD in childhood. Children with the condition may then be recognised and referred for appropriate management earlier, and spared unnecessary investigations and treatments which may exacerbate the condition.

 PMID:10685927

  13. Regional cerebral perfusion in cardiovascular reflex syncope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toeyry, J.P.; Kuikka, J.T.; Laensimies, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the regional cerebral perfusion in subjects with presyncope or syncope, and the impact that autonomic nervous dysfunction has on it. Seven subjects with cardiovascular vasodepressor reflex syncope were studied. A baseline test was performed with the patients standing in the 70 upright position, while the passive head-up tilt table test with and without isoprenaline infusion was employed for provocation. Regional cerebral perfusion was assessed by means of single-photon emission tomography with technetium-99m labelled V-oxo-1,2-N,N 1 -ethylenedylbis-l-cysteine diethylester (baseline, and during blood pressure decline in the provocation test) and the autonomic nervous function by means of spectral analysis of heart rate variability (baseline, and before blood pressure decline in the provocation test). Every subject showed an abrupt decline in blood pressure in the provocation test (five with presyncope and two with syncope). The systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased significantly (P<0.001) between the baseline and the provocation study time points (radiopharmaceutical injection and lowest systolic blood pressure). Mean cerebral perfusion as average count densities decreased upon provocation as compared with baseline (190±63 vs 307±90 counts/voxel, respectively, P=0.013). Hypoperfusion was most pronounced in the frontal lobe. These results suggest that cerebral perfusion decreases markedly during presyncope or syncope with systemic blood pressure decline in subjects with cardiovascular vasodepressor syncope. Furthermore, the autonomic nervous function remains unchanged before the systemic blood pressure decline. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Antioxidants Halt Axonal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of X-Adrenoleukodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Erauskin, Jone; Fourcade, Stéphane; Galino, Jorge; Ruiz, Montserrat; Schlüter, Agatha; Naudi, Alba; Jove, Mariona; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald; Ferrer, Isidre; Pujol, Aurora

    2011-01-01

    Objective Axonal degeneration is a main contributor to disability in progressive neurodegenerative diseases in which oxidative stress is often identified as a pathogenic factor. We aim to demonstrate that antioxidants are able to improve axonal degeneration and locomotor deficits in a mouse model of X-adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Methods X-ALD is a lethal disease caused by loss of function of the ABCD1 peroxisomal transporter of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA). The mouse model for X-ALD exhibits a late onset neurological phenotype with locomotor disability and axonal degeneration in spinal cord resembling the most common phenotype of the disease, adrenomyeloneuropathy (X-AMN). Recently, we identified oxidative damage as an early event in life, and the excess of VLCFA as a generator of radical oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage to proteins in X-ALD. Results Here, we prove the capability of the antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine, α-lipoic acid, and α-tocopherol to scavenge VLCFA-dependent ROS generation in vitro. Furthermore, in a preclinical setting, the cocktail of the 3 compounds reversed: (1) oxidative stress and lesions to proteins, (2) immunohistological signs of axonal degeneration, and (3) locomotor impairment in bar cross and treadmill tests. Interpretation We have established a direct link between oxidative stress and axonal damage in a mouse model of neurodegenerative disease. This conceptual proof of oxidative stress as a major disease-driving factor in X-AMN warrants translation into clinical trials for X-AMN, and invites assessment of antioxidant strategies in axonopathies in which oxidative damage might be a contributing factor. Ann Neurol 2011; PMID:21786300

  15. Somatosensory and acoustic brain stem reflex myoclonus.

    OpenAIRE

    Shibasaki, H; Kakigi, R; Oda, K; Masukawa, S

    1988-01-01

    A patient with brain stem reflex myoclonus due to a massive midbrain infarct was studied electrophysiologically. Myoclonic jerks were elicited at variable latencies by tapping anywhere on the body or by acoustic stimuli, and mainly involved flexor muscles of upper extremities. The existence of convergence of somatosensory and acoustic inputs in the brain stem was suggested. This myoclonus seemed to be mediated by a mechanism similar to the spino-bulbo-spinal reflex.

  16. RhoA Inactivation Prevents Photoreceptor Axon Retraction in an In Vitro Model of Acute Retinal Detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontainhas, Aurora Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. An early injury response to retinal detachment is disruption of synaptic connectivity between photoreceptors and second-order neurons. Most dramatic is the retraction of rod cell axons and their terminals away from the outer synaptic layer and toward their cell bodies. This study tested whether axonal retraction in detached retina was due to the activation of the small GTPase RhoA and was preventable using RhoA antagonists. Methods. Retinal detachments were created in in vitro preparations of porcine eyecups. RhoA activation was determined with a Rhotekin binding assay. To block axon retraction, drugs were applied to neural retinal explants either before or after detachment from the retinal pigment epithelium. Presynaptic movement was quantified by image analysis of double-labeled retinas examined with confocal microscopy. Results. Active RhoA increases transiently after detachment followed by morphologic evidence of axonal retraction over the next 24 hours. Pretreating the retina with a RhoA antagonist, CT-04, or a Rho kinase inhibitor, Y27632, at multiple concentrations significantly inhibited axonal retraction. Reducing calcium influx through L-type calcium channels with nicardipine also blocked retraction. To create a more plausible therapeutic scenario, drug treatments were delayed and applied after retinal detachment. The Rho kinase inhibitor, but not nicardipine, significantly blocked rod axonal retraction when applied up to 6 hours after detachment. Conclusions. Thus, RhoA and downstream Rho kinase activity constitute part of the mechanism that produces rod axonal retraction in retinal explants. Treatments that manipulate RhoA signaling may promote synaptic stability after retinal detachment. PMID:20861490

  17. Fast axonal transport of 3H-leucin-labelled proteins in the unhurt and isolated optical nerve of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of radioactivity of amino acid molecules incorporated in protein after injection of 3 H-Leucin into the right bulb was investigated and determined along optical nerve after 1, 2, and 4 h. A slightly increased radioactivity at the point of entrance of the optical nerves into the optical duct was found. A slightly reduced axon diameter was discussed as a possible cause. The radioactivity brought into the optical nerve via the vascular system was determined by measuring the contralateral optical nerve. In relation to the axonally transported activity, it was low. The speed of the fast axonal transport is 168 mm/d. If the processes ruling the amino acids in the perikaryon are taken into consideration, the transport speed is 240 mm/d. The application of the protein synthesis prohibitor, Cycloheximide, 5 minutes after the injection of Leucinin completely prevented the appearance of axonally transported labelled proteins. When cycloheximide was administered 2 h after Leucin, a significantly loner radioactivity than in the nerve could be determined after another 2 h; i.e. the incorporation of Leucin was not completed yet after 2 h. The profile of active compounds was the same as in the control group. In other experiments, the axonal transport of labelled proteins in isolated optical nerve fibres was tested. If the separation was carried out 2 h after the injection of Leucin an extreme reduction in activity could be determined after 1 or 2 h. The continued distribution of activity after cycloheximide treatment and removal of perikarya in comparison with the control indicate the continuation of the transport, also after separation of the axon from the perikaryon. This means that, during the time of the experiment, the mechanism of the fast axonal transport functions independently of the perikaryon. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Inner tegument proteins of Herpes Simplex Virus are sufficient for intracellular capsid motility in neurons but not for axonal targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Oliver; Ivanova, Lyudmila; Bialy, Dagmara; Pohlmann, Anja; Binz, Anne; Hegemann, Maike; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Rosenhahn, Bodo; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Sodeik, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Upon reactivation from latency and during lytic infections in neurons, alphaherpesviruses assemble cytosolic capsids, capsids associated with enveloping membranes, and transport vesicles harboring fully enveloped capsids. It is debated whether capsid envelopment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) is completed in the soma prior to axonal targeting or later, and whether the mechanisms are the same in neurons derived from embryos or from adult hosts. We used HSV mutants impaired in capsid envelopment to test whether the inner tegument proteins pUL36 or pUL37 necessary for microtubule-mediated capsid transport were sufficient for axonal capsid targeting in neurons derived from the dorsal root ganglia of adult mice. Such neurons were infected with HSV1-ΔUL20 whose capsids recruited pUL36 and pUL37, with HSV1-ΔUL37 whose capsids associate only with pUL36, or with HSV1-ΔUL36 that assembles capsids lacking both proteins. While capsids of HSV1-ΔUL20 were actively transported along microtubules in epithelial cells and in the somata of neurons, those of HSV1-ΔUL36 and -ΔUL37 could only diffuse in the cytoplasm. Employing a novel image analysis algorithm to quantify capsid targeting to axons, we show that only a few capsids of HSV1-ΔUL20 entered axons, while vesicles transporting gD utilized axonal transport efficiently and independently of pUL36, pUL37, or pUL20. Our data indicate that capsid motility in the somata of neurons mediated by pUL36 and pUL37 does not suffice for targeting capsids to axons, and suggest that capsid envelopment needs to be completed in the soma prior to targeting of herpes simplex virus to the axons, and to spreading from neurons to neighboring cells. PMID:29284065

  19. Long-range projection neurons of the mouse ventral tegmental area: a single-cell axon tracing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aransay, Ana; Rodríguez-López, Claudia; García-Amado, María; Clascá, Francisco; Prensa, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Pathways arising from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) release dopamine and other neurotransmitters during the expectation and achievement of reward, and are regarded as central links of the brain networks that create drive, pleasure, and addiction. While the global pattern of VTA projections is well-known, the actual axonal wiring of individual VTA neurons had never been investigated. Here, we labeled and analyzed the axons of 30 VTA single neurons by means of single-cell transfection with the Sindbis-pal-eGFP vector in mice. These observations were complemented with those obtained by labeling the axons of small populations of VTA cells with iontophoretic microdeposits of biotinylated dextran amine. In the single-cell labeling experiments, each entire axonal tree was reconstructed from serial sections, the length of terminal axonal arbors was estimated by stereology, and the dopaminergic phenotype was tested by double-labeling for tyrosine hydroxylase immunofluorescence. We observed two main, markedly different VTA cell morphologies: neurons with a single main axon targeting only forebrain structures (FPN cells), and neurons with multibranched axons targeting both the forebrain and the brainstem (F + BSPN cells). Dopaminergic phenotype was observed in FPN cells. Moreover, four "subtypes" could be distinguished among the FPN cells based on their projection targets: (1) "Mesocorticolimbic" FPN projecting to both neocortex and basal forebrain; (2) "Mesocortical" FPN innervating the neocortex almost exclusively; (3) "Mesolimbic" FPN projecting to the basal forebrain, accumbens and caudateputamen; and (4) "Mesostriatal" FPN targeting only the caudateputamen. While the F + BSPN cells were scattered within VTA, the mesolimbic neurons were abundant in the paranigral nucleus. The observed diversity in wiring architectures is consistent with the notion that different VTA cell subpopulations modulate the activity of specific sets of prosencephalic and brainstem structures.

  20. Plasticity of the Axon Initial Segment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders Victor; Cotel, Florence; Perrier, Jean François

    2017-01-01

    undergo important modifications during development. The development of the AIS is governed by intrinsic mechanisms. In addition, surrounding neuronal networks modify its maturation. As a result, neurons get tuned to particular physiological functions. Neuronal activity also influences the morphology......The axon initial segment (AIS) is a key neuronal compartment because it is responsible for action potential initiation. The local density of Na+ channels, the biophysical properties of K+ channels, as well as the length and diameter of the AIS determine the spiking of neurons. These parameters...... of the mature AIS. When excitatory neurons are hyperactive, their AIS undergo structural changes that decrease their excitability and thereby maintain the activity within a given range. These slow homeostatic regulatory mechanisms occur on a time scale of hours or days. In contrast, the activation...

  1. Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Regulates Axon Guidance by Stabilizing CRMP2A Selectively in Distal Axons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balaštík, Martin; Zhou, X.Z.; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Weissová, Romana; Žiak, Jakub; Pazyra-Murphy, M.F.; Cosker, K.E.; Machoňová, Olga; Kozmiková, Iryna; Chen, CH.; Pastorino, L.; Asara, J.M.; Cole, A.; Sutherland, C.; Segal, R. A.; Lu, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2015), s. 812-828 ISSN 2211-1247 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11213; GA MŠk LK21307; GA ČR GA15-03796S; GA MŠk LO1419 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Pin1 * axon guidance * Semaphorin 3A Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.870, year: 2015

  2. Axon tension regulates fasciculation/defasciculation through the control of axon shaft zippering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmít, Daniel; Fouquet, C.; Pincet, F.; Zápotocký, Martin; Trembleau, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, Apr 19 (2017), č. článku e19907. ISSN 2050-084X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-16755S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12FR002 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : biophysics * cell adhesion * coarsening * developmental biology * mathematical model * mechanical tension * axon guidance Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 7.725, year: 2016

  3. The passive of reflexive verbs in Icelandic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlíf Árnadóttir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Reflexive Passive in Icelandic is reminiscent of the so-called New Passive (or New Impersonal in that the oblique case of a passivized object NP is preserved. As is shown by recent surveys, however, speakers who accept the Reflexive Passive do not necessarily accept the New Passive, whereas conversely, speakers who accept the New Passive do also accept the Reflexive Passive. Based on these results we suggest that there is a hierarchy in the acceptance of passive sentences in Icelandic, termed the Passive Acceptability Hierarchy. The validity of this hierarchy is confirmed by our diachronic corpus study of open access digital library texts from Icelandic journals and newspapers dating from the 19th and 20th centuries (tímarit.is. Finally, we sketch an analysis of the Reflexive Passive, proposing that the different acceptability rates of the Reflexive and New Passives lie in the argument status of the object. Simplex reflexive pronouns are semantically dependent on the verbs which select them, and should therefore be analyzed as syntactic arguments only, and not as semantic arguments of these verbs.

  4. Reflexive convention: civil partnership, marriage and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Brian

    2017-09-14

    Drawing on an analysis of qualitative interview data from a study of formalized same-sex relationships (civil partnerships) this paper examines the enduring significance of marriage and family as social institutions. In doing so, it intervenes in current debates in the sociology of family and personal life about how such institutions are undermined by reflexivity or bolstered by convention. Against the backdrop of dominating sociological frames for understanding the links between the changing nature of marriage and family and same-sex relationship recognition, the paper analyses the diverse and overlapping ways (including the simple, relational, strategic, ambivalent and critical ways) in which same-sex partners reflexively constructed and engaged with marriage and family conventions. My analysis suggests that instead of viewing reflexivity and convention as mutually undermining, as some sociologists of family and personal life do, it is insightful to explore how diverse forms of reflexivity and convention interact in everyday life to reconfigure the social institutions of marriage and family, but do not undermine them as such. I argue the case for recognizing the ways in which 'reflexive convention', or reflexive investment in convention, contributes to the continuing significance of marriage and family as social institutions. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  5. Neuron Morphology Influences Axon Initial Segment Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Allan T; Bravo, Jaime J

    2016-01-01

    In most vertebrate neurons, action potentials are initiated in the axon initial segment (AIS), a specialized region of the axon containing a high density of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. It has recently been proposed that neurons use plasticity of AIS length and/or location to regulate their intrinsic excitability. Here we quantify the impact of neuron morphology on AIS plasticity using computational models of simplified and realistic somatodendritic morphologies. In small neurons (e.g., dentate granule neurons), excitability was highest when the AIS was of intermediate length and located adjacent to the soma. Conversely, neurons having larger dendritic trees (e.g., pyramidal neurons) were most excitable when the AIS was longer and/or located away from the soma. For any given somatodendritic morphology, increasing dendritic membrane capacitance and/or conductance favored a longer and more distally located AIS. Overall, changes to AIS length, with corresponding changes in total sodium conductance, were far more effective in regulating neuron excitability than were changes in AIS location, while dendritic capacitance had a larger impact on AIS performance than did dendritic conductance. The somatodendritic influence on AIS performance reflects modest soma-to-AIS voltage attenuation combined with neuron size-dependent changes in AIS input resistance, effective membrane time constant, and isolation from somatodendritic capacitance. We conclude that the impact of AIS plasticity on neuron excitability will depend largely on somatodendritic morphology, and that, in some neurons, a shorter or more distally located AIS may promote, rather than limit, action potential generation.

  6. Intersession reliability of Hoffmann reflex gain and presynaptic inhibition in the human soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Bradley T; Hicks-Little, Charlie A; Harter, Rod A; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Hoffman, Mark A

    2009-12-01

    Hayes BT, Hicks-Little CA, Harter RA, Widrick JJ, Hoffman MA. Intersession reliability of Hoffmann reflex gain and presynaptic inhibition in the human soleus muscle. To determine the day-to-day reliability of Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) gain and presynaptic inhibition of spinal reflexes in the human soleus muscle. Controlled trial. Research laboratory. Volunteers (N=30; mean +/- SD age, 23.4+/-3.9y; height, 175.64+/-10.87cm; mass, 84.50+/-24.18kg) with no history of lower extremity pathology and/or injury participated. Subjects lay prone with the head, shoulders, arms, and hips supported in a static position by a massage body pillow and the ankle positioned at 90 degrees . Recording electrodes were placed over the soleus and tibialis anterior muscle bellies, and the stimulating electrodes were positioned over the tibial nerve in the popliteal space and the common peroneal nerve near the fibular head. The H-reflex and motor wave recruitment curves were then measured and recorded. Presynaptic inhibition was also assessed in the soleus muscle, and a conditioning stimulation of the common peroneal nerve (1 x motor threshold = motor threshold) was used prior to soleus H-reflex measurement. Two testing sessions took place between 2 and 7 days, and each session occurred at the same time of day. Assessments of H-reflex gain and presynaptic inhibition yielded test-retest reliability of R equal to . 95 and .91, respectively. Measures of presynaptic inhibition and H-reflex gain (H slope/M slope) in the human soleus muscle are consistent and reliable day to day.

  7. Genetic deletion of paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B does not promote axonal plasticity or functional recovery after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoto, Shusaku; Ueno, Masaki; Mochio, Soichiro; Takai, Toshiyuki; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2010-09-29

    The rewiring of neural networks is a fundamental step in recovering behavioral functions after brain injury. However, there is limited potential for axonal plasticity in the adult CNS. The myelin-associated proteins Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), and oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) are known to inhibit axonal plasticity, and thus targeting the inhibitory pathways they participate in is a potential means of promoting plasticity and functional recovery. Each of Nogo, MAG, and OMgp interacts with both the Nogo receptor (NgR) and paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB). Here, we determined whether blocking PirB activity enhances axonal reorganization and functional recovery after cortical injury. We found that axons of the contralesional corticospinal tract sprouted into the denervated side of the cervical spinal cord after unilateral injury of the motor cortex. The extent to which this axonal reorganization occurred was far greater in mice lesioned during early postnatal days than in mice lesioned at an age when myelin had begun to form. This suggests that myelin-associated proteins might limit axonal remodeling in vivo. However, the number of sprouting fibers within either the corticospinal or corticorubral tract was not enhanced in PirB(-/-) mice. Blocking PirB signaling also failed to enhance functional recovery with three motor tests. Our results suggest that blocking the function of PirB is not sufficient to promote axonal reorganization or functional recovery after cortical injury.

  8. Axonal Regulation of Central Nervous System Myelination: Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingseisen, Anna; Lyons, David A

    2018-02-01

    Approximately half of the human brain consists of myelinated axons. Central nervous system (CNS) myelin is made by oligodendrocytes and is essential for nervous system formation, health, and function. Once thought simply as a static insulator that facilitated rapid impulse conduction, myelin is now known to be made and remodeled in to adult life. Oligodendrocytes have a remarkable capacity to differentiate by default, but many aspects of their development can be influenced by axons. However, how axons and oligodendrocytes interact and cooperate to regulate myelination in the CNS remains unclear. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of how such interactions generate the complexity of myelination known to exist in vivo. We highlight intriguing results that indicate that the cross-sectional size of an axon alone may regulate myelination to a surprising degree. We also review new studies, which have highlighted diversity in the myelination of axons of different neuronal subtypes and circuits, and structure-function relationships, which suggest that myelinated axons can be exquisitely fine-tuned to mediate precise conduction needs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how neuronal activity regulates CNS myelination, and aim to provide an integrated overview of how axon-oligodendrocyte interactions sculpt neuronal circuit structure and function.

  9. Regeneration of axons in the mouse retina after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, P; Berry, M

    1982-01-01

    It is generally accepted that most axons in the mammalian CNS show only transient growth in response to injury, and numerous hypotheses have been advanced to account for this phenomenon. Detailed knowledge of the time-course and extent of this so-called 'abortive regeneration' is, however, surprisingly lacking. The retina of the adult albino mouse provides a convenient system in which to quantify the response of central axons to injury, since the retina can be prepared as a whole mount, allowing silver-impregnated axons to be followed along their entire course. Using this experimental model, sprouting of injured axons was observed as early as 14 h post lesion (hpl) with rapid growth (20 micrometers/day on average) continuing until 10 dpl. Thereafter, a decline in the overall growth rate was observed, presumably regenerated sprouts began to degenerate. However, not all axons showed this abortive response: numerous unfasciculated axons continued in random growth until at least 100 dpl. One possible interpretation of these results is that the concept of abortive regeneration of injured axons is untenable in regions of the CNS which are lacking in myelin.

  10. Axonal and presynaptic RNAs are locally transcribed in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, the long-standing opinion that axonal and presynaptic proteins are exclusively derived from the neuron cell body has been substantially modified by the demonstration that active systems of protein synthesis are present in axons and nerve terminals. These observations have raised the issue of the cellular origin of the involved RNAs, which has been generally attributed to the neuron soma. However, data gathered in a number of model systems indicated that axonal RNAs are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. More recent experiments on the perfused squid giant axon have definitively proved that axoplasmic RNAs are transcribed in periaxonal glia. Their delivery to the axon occurs by a modulatory mechanism based on the release of neurotransmitters from the stimulated axon and on their binding to glial receptors. In additional experiments on squid optic lobe synaptosomes, presynaptic RNA has been also shown to be synthesized locally, presumably in nearby glia. Together with a wealth of literature data, these observations indicate that axons and nerve terminals are endowed with a local system of gene expression that supports the maintenance and plasticity of these neuronal domains.

  11. Propagation of action potentials in inhomogeneous axon regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón, F; Joyner, R W; Moore, J W

    1975-04-01

    Described are studies of propagation of action potentials through inhomogenous axon regions through experiments performed on squid giant axons and by computer simulations. The initial speed of propagation of the action potential is dependent upon the stimulus waveform. For a rectangular pulse of current, the action potential travel initally at a high speed that declines over the distance, reaching a constant speed of propagation at about 1-5 resting length constants; this distance depends on the stimulus strength. additional experiments studied the effects of changing the axon diameter and of introducing a temperature step. It was found that the propagated action potential suffers profound modification in shape and velocity as it reaches the region of transition. In both cases, it was possible to obtain reflected action potentials. A region of increased effective diameter was produced experimentally in the squid giant axon by insertion of an axial wire as usually employed in voltage clamps. It was found that the action potential, at the axial wire tip region, undergoes shape changes similar to those obtained tn simulations of a region of increased diameter as in a junction with the axon and soma in motor neurons. It is conducluded that the gaint axon can be used to reproduce simple electrical behaviors in other structures.-Ramón, F., R. W. Joyner and J.W. Moore. Propagation of action potentials in inhomogeneous axon regions.

  12. Blink reflexes in patients with atypical odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; List, Thomas; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Leijon, Göran; Svensson, Peter

    2005-01-01

    To use the human blink reflex (BR) to explore possible neuropathic pain mechanisms in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO). In 13 AO patients, the BR was elicited using a concentric electrode and recorded bilaterally with surface electromyographic (EMG) electrodes on both orbicularis oculi muscles. Electrical stimuli were applied to the skin above branches of the V1, V2, and V3 nerves and to the V branch contralateral to the painful branch. Sensory and pain thresholds were determined. The BR examination of the painful V branch was repeated during a capsaicin pain-provocation test. The data were analyzed with nonparametric statistics. The BR responses (R2 and R3) evoked by stimulation of V3 were significantly smaller than the BR responses evoked by stimulation of V1 and V2 (P .569), and the BR (R2 and R3) was not significantly modulated by experimental pain (P > .080). The sensory thresholds were significantly lower on the painful side compared to the nonpainful side (P = .014). The pain thresholds were not different between sides (P > .910). No major differences between the V nociceptive pathways on the right and left sides were found in a relatively small group of AO patients. Future studies that compare BRs in AO patients and healthy volunteers are needed to provide further knowledge on the pain mechanisms in AO.

  13. Mitotic motors coregulate microtubule patterns in axons and dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shen; Liu, Mei; Mozgova, Olga I; Yu, Wenqian; Baas, Peter W

    2012-10-03

    Microtubules are nearly uniformly oriented in the axons of vertebrate neurons but are non-uniformly oriented in their dendrites. Studies to date suggest a scenario for establishing these microtubule patterns whereby microtubules are transported into the axon and nascent dendrites with plus-ends-leading, and then additional microtubules of the opposite orientation are transported into the developing dendrites. Here, we used contemporary tools to confirm that depletion of kinesin-6 (also called CHO1/MKLP1 or kif23) from rat sympathetic neurons causes a reduction in the appearance of minus-end-distal microtubules in developing dendrites, which in turn causes them to assume an axon-like morphology. Interestingly, we observed a similar phenomenon when we depleted kinesin-12 (also called kif15 or HKLP2). Both motors are best known for their participation in mitosis in other cell types, and both are enriched in the cell body and dendrites of neurons. Unlike kinesin-12, which is present throughout the neuron, kinesin-6 is barely detectable in the axon. Accordingly, depletion of kinesin-6, unlike depletion of kinesin-12, has no effect on axonal branching or navigation. Interestingly, depletion of either motor results in faster growing axons with greater numbers of mobile microtubules. Based on these observations, we posit a model whereby these two motors generate forces that attenuate the transport of microtubules with plus-ends-leading from the cell body into the axon. Some of these microtubules are not only prevented from moving into the axon but are driven with minus-ends-leading into developing dendrites. In this manner, these so-called "mitotic" motors coregulate the microtubule patterns of axons and dendrites.

  14. Batrachotoxin uncouples gating charge immobilization from fast Na inactivation in squid giant axons

    OpenAIRE

    Tanguy, J.; Yeh, J.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The fast inactivation of sodium currents and the immobolization of sodium gating charge are thought to be closely coupled to each other. This notion was tested in the squid axon in which kinetics and steady-state properties of the gating charge movement were compared before and after removal of the Na inactivation by batrachotoxin (BTX), pronase, or chloramine-T. The immobilization of gating charge was determined by measuring the total charge movement (QON) obtained by integrating the ON gati...

  15. Tubulation repair mitigates misdirection of regenerating motor axons across a sciatic nerve gap in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Dan; Mi, Daguo; Zhang, Tuanjie; Zhang, Yanping; Yan, Junying; Wang, Yaxian; Tan, Xuefeng; Yuan, Ying; Yang, Yumin; Gu, Xiaosong; Hu, Wen

    2018-01-01

    The repair of peripheral nerve laceration injury to obtain optimal function recovery remains a big challenge in the clinic. Misdirection of regenerating axons to inappropriate target, as a result of forced mismatch of endoneurial sheaths in the case of end-to-end nerve anastomosis or nerve autografting, represents one major drawback that limits nerve function recovery. Here we tested whether tubulation repair of a nerve defect could be beneficial in terms of nerve regeneration accuracy and ne...

  16. "On Becoming a Critically Reflexive Practitioner" Redux: What Does It Mean to "Be" Reflexive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, Ann L.

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, Cunliffe states that is convinced that reflexivity offers a way of foregrounding our moral and ethical responsibility for people and for the world around us. To "BE" reflexive was defined as embracing "subjective understandings of reality as a basis for thinking more critically about the impact of our…

  17. Reflex and Non-Reflex Torque Responses to Stretch of the Human Knee Extensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mrachacz-Kersting, N

    2001-01-01

    .... The quadriceps muscles were stretched at various background torques, produced either voluntarily or electrically and thus the purely reflex-mediated torque could be calculated. The contribution of the reflex mediated stiffness initially low, increased with increasing background torques for the range of torques investigated.

  18. Axonal Membranes and Their Domains: Assembly and Function of the Axon Initial Segment and Node of Ranvier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Nelson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are highly specialized cells of the nervous system that receive, process and transmit electrical signals critical for normal brain function. Here, we review the intricate organization of axonal membrane domains that facilitate rapid action potential conduction underlying communication between complex neuronal circuits. Two critical excitable domains of vertebrate axons are the axon initial segment (AIS and the nodes of Ranvier, which are characterized by the high concentrations of voltage-gated ion channels, cell adhesion molecules and specialized cytoskeletal networks. The AIS is located at the proximal region of the axon and serves as the site of action potential initiation, while nodes of Ranvier, gaps between adjacent myelin sheaths, allow rapid propagation of the action potential through saltatory conduction. The AIS and nodes of Ranvier are assembled by ankyrins, spectrins and their associated binding partners through the clustering of membrane proteins and connection to the underlying cytoskeleton network. Although the AIS and nodes of Ranvier share similar protein composition, their mechanisms of assembly are strikingly different. Here we will cover the mechanisms of formation and maintenance of these axonal excitable membrane domains, specifically highlighting the similarities and differences between them. We will also discuss recent advances in super resolution fluorescence imaging which have elucidated the arrangement of the submembranous axonal cytoskeleton revealing a surprising structural organization necessary to maintain axonal organization and function. Finally, human mutations in axonal domain components have been associated with a growing number of neurological disorders including severe cognitive dysfunction, epilepsy, autism, neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. Overall, this review highlights the assembly, maintenance and function of axonal excitable domains, particularly the AIS and nodes of

  19. [Professional outcome of reflex sympathetic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauty, M; Renaud, P; Deniaud, C; Tortellier, L; Dubois, C

    2001-03-01

    In spite of physical medicine and rehabilitation care, post-traumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy can be at the origin of articular deficiency, which decrease the capacity to return to work. The aim of this study is to know the professional future of patients who present post-traumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Eighteen months prospective study, carried out from patients in age to work, hospitalized in physical medicine and rehabilitation unit for ostéo-articular traumatism complicated by reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Description of the population and comorbidity factors preventing professional resumption. Determination of the duration of medical certificate and the modalities of professional resumption. From 16 patients in age to work, only 12 were able to resume a full time profession with an average period of 10.5 months +/- 5. The importance of the, the distale articular location of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (wrist - hand, ankle - foot), the association with a comorbidity such as chronic alcoholism represent pejorative factors of working resumption. Organizations of workstation are often necessary in six cases over eight, if the job is not sedentary. In the most complicated cases, inaptitudes in the work are pronounced with demand of professional reclassifying. Post-traumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy represents a real challenge for the rehabilitation team, to minimize deficiencies and to help the patient to become again a worker.

  20. Axon diameter mapping in crossing fibers with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hui; Dyrby, Tim B; Alexander, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    tissue than measures derived from diffusion tensor imaging. Most existing techniques for axon diameter mapping assume a single axon orientation in the tissue model, which limits their application to only the most coherently oriented brain white matter, such as the corpus callosum, where the single......This paper proposes a technique for a previously unaddressed problem, namely, mapping axon diameter in crossing fiber regions, using diffusion MRI. Direct measurement of tissue microstructure of this kind using diffusion MRI offers a new class of biomarkers that give more specific information about...... orientation assumption is a reasonable one. However, fiber crossings and other complex configurations are widespread in the brain. In such areas, the existing techniques will fail to provide useful axon diameter indices for any of the individual fiber populations. We propose a novel crossing fiber tissue...

  1. Fiber Optic Detection of Action Potentials in Axons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smela, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    In prior exploratory research, we had designed a fiber optic sensor utilizing a long period Bragg grating for the purpose of detecting action potentials in axons optically, through a change in index...

  2. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    cells, while other fibers were unmyelinated. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that some of the regenerated fibers were tyrosine hydroxylase- or serotonin-immunoreactive, indicating a central origin. These findings suggest that there is a considerable amount of spontaneous regeneration after spinal cord......Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total...... length of all NF-immunolabeled axons within the lesion cavities was increased 6- to 10-fold at 5, 10, and 15 wk post-lesion compared with 1 wk post-surgery. In ultrastructural studies we found the putatively regenerating axons within the lesion to be associated either with oligodendrocytes or Schwann...

  3. The nigrostriatal pathway: axonal collateralization and compartmental specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensa, L; Giménez-Amaya, J M; Parent, A; Bernácer, J; Cebrián, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews two of the major features of the nigrostriatal pathway, its axonal collateralization, and compartmental specificity, as revealed by single-axon labeling experiments in rodents and immunocytological analysis of human postmortem tissue. The dorsal and ventral tiers of the substantia nigra pars compacta harbor various types of neurons the axons of which branch not only within the striatum but also in other major components of the basal ganglia. Furthermore, some nigrostriatal axons send collaterals both to thalamus and to brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. In humans, the compartmental specificity of the nigrostriatal pathway is revealed by the fact that the matrix compartment is densely innervated by dopaminergic fibers, whereas the striosomes display different densities of dopaminergic terminals depending on their location within the striatum. The nigral neurons most severely affected in Parkinson's disease are the ventral tier cells that project to the matrix and form deep clusters in the substantia nigra pars reticulata.

  4. Syndecan Promotes Axon Regeneration by Stabilizing Growth Cone Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyson J. Edwards

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Growth cones facilitate the repair of nervous system damage by providing the driving force for axon regeneration. Using single-neuron laser axotomy and in vivo time-lapse imaging, we show that syndecan, a heparan sulfate (HS proteoglycan, is required for growth cone function during axon regeneration in C. elegans. In the absence of syndecan, regenerating growth cones form but are unstable and collapse, decreasing the effective growth rate and impeding regrowth to target cells. We provide evidence that syndecan has two distinct functions during axon regeneration: (1 a canonical function in axon guidance that requires expression outside the nervous system and depends on HS chains and (2 an intrinsic function in growth cone stabilization that is mediated by the syndecan core protein, independently of HS. Thus, syndecan is a regulator of a critical choke point in nervous system repair.

  5. Differential compartmentalization of mRNAs in squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, J T; Gioio, A E; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1996-11-01

    Previously, we reported that the squid giant axon contains a heterogeneous population of mRNAs that includes beta-actin, beta-tubulin, kinesin, neurofilament proteins, and enolase. To define the absolute levels and relative distribution of these mRNAs, we have used competitive reverse transcription-PCR to quantify the levels of five mRNAs present in the giant axon and giant fiber lobe (GFL), the location of the parental cell soma. In the GFL, the number of transcripts for these mRNAs varied over a fourfold range, with beta-tubulin being the most abundant mRNA species (1.25 x 10(9) molecules per GFL). Based on transcript number, the rank order of mRNA levels in the GFL was beta-tubulin > beta-actin > kinesin > enolase > microtubule-associated protein (MAP) H1. In contrast, kinesin mRNA was most abundant in the axon (4.1 x 10(7) molecules per axon) with individual mRNA levels varying 15-fold. The rank order of mRNA levels in the axon was kinesin > beta-tubulin > MAP H1 > beta-actin > enolase. The relative abundance of the mRNA species in the axon did not correlate with the size of the transcript, nor was it directly related to their corresponding levels in the GFL. Taken together, these findings confirm that significant amounts of mRNA are present in the giant axon and suggest that specific mRNAs are differentially transported into the axonal domain.

  6. Fcγ receptor-mediated inflammation inhibits axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Anti-glycan/ganglioside antibodies are the most common immune effectors found in patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which is a peripheral autoimmune neuropathy. We previously reported that disease-relevant anti-glycan autoantibodies inhibited axon regeneration, which echo the clinical association of these antibodies and poor recovery in Guillain-Barré Syndrome. However, the specific molecular and cellular elements involved in this antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration are not previously defined. This study examined the role of Fcγ receptors and macrophages in the antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration. A well characterized antibody passive transfer sciatic nerve crush and transplant models were used to study the anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration in wild type and various mutant and transgenic mice with altered expression of specific Fcγ receptors and macrophage/microglia populations. Outcome measures included behavior, electrophysiology, morphometry, immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting. We demonstrate that the presence of autoantibodies, directed against neuronal/axonal cell surface gangliosides, in the injured mammalian peripheral nerves switch the proregenerative inflammatory environment to growth inhibitory milieu by engaging specific activating Fcγ receptors on recruited monocyte-derived macrophages to cause severe inhibition of axon regeneration. Our data demonstrate that the antibody orchestrated Fcγ receptor-mediated switch in inflammation is one mechanism underlying inhibition of axon regeneration. These findings have clinical implications for nerve repair and recovery in antibody-mediated immune neuropathies. Our results add to the complexity of axon regeneration in injured peripheral and central nervous systems as adverse effects of B cells and autoantibodies on neural injury and repair are increasingly recognized.

  7. Modality-Specific Axonal Regeneration: Towards selective regenerative neural interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa eLotfi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed submodality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type-specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5 fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased 3 fold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3-D Y-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a 5-fold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a Y-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted towards the sural nerve, while N-52+ large diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  8. Modality-specific axonal regeneration: toward selective regenerative neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Parisa; Garde, Kshitija; Chouhan, Amit K; Bengali, Ebrahim; Romero-Ortega, Mario I

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed sub-modality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5-fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased threefold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3D "Y"-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a fivefold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a "Y"-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted toward the sural nerve, while N-52+ large-diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  9. MR imaging of a diffuse axonal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yukiya; Okamoto, Hisayo; Mitsushima, Minoru; Hori, Tomokatsu; Sasaki, Mamoru; Teraoka, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    Six patients who had been diagnosed as having so-called a 'Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI)' were examined by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Yokogawa Resona 0.5T and Shimadzu SMT 50A). MRI revealed clear evidence of injured white matter in these patients, while X-ray CT scanning could not demonstrate such lesions definitely. The patients consisted of three adults and three adolescents. They had been injured by traffic accidents or falls. Every patient had lost consciousness immediately, and their coma had continued for at least two weeks after the trauma. X-ray CT scanning demonstrated no complicated lesion, such as intracranial hematoma or brain edema, resulting in increased intracranial pressure and cerebral herniation. In all of the patients, injuries of the deep white matter (corpus callosum, upper pons, or internal capsule, for example) were clearly found by T 2 -weighted imaging. Because these lesions had characteristic features in their localation, as has been described by Adams et al. these patients were diagnosed as having DAI. Also, it was interesting that the focal neurological deficits of these patients correlated well with the local injuries of the white matter. The three young patients recovered to various degrees, but the three adults passed into a vegetative state. The prognosis of the patients seemed to be determined by their age. Because the clinical diagnosis of DAI is controversial, the use of MRI will help in its clinical diagnosis and analysis. (author)

  10. Kinematics of turnaround and retrograde axonal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid axonal transport of a pulse of 35 S-methionine-labelled material was studied in vitro in the sensory neurons of amphibian sciatic nerve using a position-sensitive detector. For 10 nerves studied at 23.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C it was found that a pulse moved in the anterograde direction characterized by front edge, peak, and trailing edge transport rates of (mm/d) 180.8 +/- 2.2 (+/- SEM), 176.6 +/- 2.3, and 153.7 +/- 3.0, respectively. Following its arrival at a distal ligature, a smaller pulse was observed to move in the retrograde direction characterized by front edge and peak transport rates of 158.0 +/- 7.3 and 110.3 +/- 3.5, respectively, indicating that retrograde transport proceeds at a rate of 0.88 +/- 0.04 that of anterograde. The retrograde pulse was observed to disperse at a rate greater than the anterograde. Reversal of radiolabel at the distal ligature began 1.49 +/- 0.15 h following arrival of the first radiolabel. Considerable variation was seen between preparations in the way radiolabel accumulated in the end (ligature) regions of the nerve. Although a retrograde pulse was seen in all preparations, in 7 of 10 preparations there was no evidence of this pulse accumulating within less than 2-3 mm of a proximal ligature; however, accumulation was observed within less than 5 mm in all preparations

  11. MR imaging of a diffuse axonal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yukiya; Okamoto, Hisayo; Mitsushima, Minoru; Hori, Tomokatsu (Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine); Sasaki, Mamoru; Teraoka, Akira

    1989-04-01

    Six patients who had been diagnosed as having so-called a 'Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI)' were examined by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Yokogawa Resona 0.5T and Shimadzu SMT 50A). MRI revealed clear evidence of injured white matter in these patients, while X-ray CT scanning could not demonstrate such lesions definitely. The patients consisted of three adults and three adolescents. They had been injured by traffic accidents or falls. Every patient had lost consciousness immediately, and their coma had continued for at least two weeks after the trauma. X-ray CT scanning demonstrated no complicated lesion, such as intracranial hematoma or brain edema, resulting in increased intracranial pressure and cerebral herniation. In all of the patients, injuries of the deep white matter (corpus callosum, upper pons, or internal capsule, for example) were clearly found by T{sub 2}-weighted imaging. Because these lesions had characteristic features in their localation, as has been described by Adams et al. these patients were diagnosed as having DAI. Also, it was interesting that the focal neurological deficits of these patients correlated well with the local injuries of the white matter. The three young patients recovered to various degrees, but the three adults passed into a vegetative state. The prognosis of the patients seemed to be determined by their age. Because the clinical diagnosis of DAI is controversial, the use of MRI will help in its clinical diagnosis and analysis. (author).

  12. Reflexive Planning as Design and Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissandrello, Enza; Grin, John

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, planning theorists have advanced various interpretations of the notion of reflexivity, inspired by American pragmatism, complexity theory, hermeneutics, discursive and collaborative planning. Scholars agree that “reflexivity” has a strong temporal dimension: it not only aims...... to solve present planning problems, but to imagine and understand alternative trajectories for future action. This article explores the practical utility of reflexivity for planners, through a case study that focuses on a project to promote sustainable development in the Port of Amsterdam. Reflexivity...... in planning emerges as a new tool for generating critical knowledge and dialogue that can synthesise the perspectives of multiple actors in a common understanding, existing structural constraints and a collective imagination of alternative future possibilities. Such research highlights the potential...

  13. Orthodoxy and reflexivity in international comparative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Jens; Valkenburg, Ben

    2002-01-01

    This contribution aims at four points.First we want to argue why we think a reflexive social science is more adequate than the orthodox consensus. In current practice much of the criticism on the orthodox consensus is shared on a theoretical level, without considering the implications and acting...... upon the consequences on the level of empirical research. We want to avoid that, so our second and third subject will be the practical implications of reflexivity for empirical research as well as for social policy. Our discussion on these subjects is based on the practical experiences in the INPART...... project, in which we have tried to deal with these consequences. Fourth, and hopefully as a result of the first three aims, we want to argue that a reflexive approach of international, comparative research is not only desirable, but attainable as well. In order to do so, we begin with a short discussion...

  14. Delaying the onset of treadmill exercise following peripheral nerve injury has different effects on axon regeneration and motoneuron synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Jaclyn; Evans, Jonathan T; Mildenhall, Taylor; Mulligan, Amanda; Konieczny, Aimee; Rose, Samuel J; English, Arthur W

    2015-04-01

    Transection of a peripheral nerve results in withdrawal of synapses from motoneurons. Some of the withdrawn synapses are restored spontaneously, but those containing the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), and arising mainly from primary afferent neurons, are withdrawn permanently. If animals are exercised immediately after nerve injury, regeneration of the damaged axons is enhanced and no withdrawal of synapses from injured motoneurons can be detected. We investigated whether delaying the onset of exercise until after synapse withdrawal had occurred would yield similar results. In Lewis rats, the right sciatic nerve was cut and repaired. Reinnervation of the soleus muscle was monitored until a direct muscle (M) response was observed to stimulation of the tibial nerve. At that time, rats began 2 wk of daily treadmill exercise using an interval training protocol. Both M responses and electrically-evoked H reflexes were monitored weekly for an additional seven wk. Contacts made by structures containing VGLUT1 or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) with motoneurons were studied from confocal images of retrogradely labeled cells. Timing of full muscle reinnervation was similar in both delayed and immediately exercised rats. H reflex amplitude in delayed exercised rats was only half that found in immediately exercised animals. Unlike immediately exercised animals, motoneuron contacts containing VGLUT1 in delayed exercised rats were reduced significantly, relative to intact rats. The therapeutic window for application of exercise as a treatment to promote restoration of synaptic inputs onto motoneurons following peripheral nerve injury is different from that for promoting axon regeneration in the periphery. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin eWhite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialised glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarisation followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasising the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during CNS myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of PLP (proteolipid protein transport by SNARE proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases.

  16. Parametric Probability Distribution Functions for Axon Diameters of Corpus Callosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid eSepehrband

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Axon diameter is an important neuroanatomical characteristic of the nervous system that alters in the course of neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Axon diameters vary, even within a fiber bundle, and are not normally distributed. An accurate distribution function is therefore beneficial, either to describe axon diameters that are obtained from a direct measurement technique (e.g., microscopy, or to infer them indirectly (e.g., using diffusion-weighted MRI. The gamma distribution is a common choice for this purpose (particularly for the inferential approach because it resembles the distribution profile of measured axon diameters which has been consistently shown to be non-negative and right-skewed. In this study we compared a wide range of parametric probability distribution functions against empirical data obtained from electron microscopy images. We observed that the gamma distribution fails to accurately describe the main characteristics of the axon diameter distribution, such as location and scale of the mode and the profile of distribution tails. We also found that the generalized extreme value distribution consistently fitted the measured distribution better than other distribution functions. This suggests that there may be distinct subpopulations of axons in the corpus callosum, each with their own distribution profiles. In addition, we observed that several other distributions outperformed the gamma distribution, yet had the same number of unknown parameters; these were the inverse Gaussian, log normal, log logistic and Birnbaum-Saunders distributions.

  17. Munchausen's syndrome simulating reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Moreno, J; Ruiz-Martin, J M; Mateo-Soria, L; Rozadilla, A; Roig-Escofet, D

    1990-01-01

    A 15 year old girl who had pain, oedema of her left hand, and fever of four months' duration is described. Marked demineralisation of her hand was shown by radiography, and increased articular uptake by technetium-99m bone scan. All these changes were indistinguishable from reflex sympathetic dystrophy. After two admissions to hospital and multiple explorations we discovered that she had induced her symptoms herself and a diagnosis of Munchausen's syndrome was made. As far as we know this presentation has not been previously reported and might help to explain the physiopathology of some signs of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Images PMID:2270960

  18. Probabilities on Streams and Reflexive Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Schumann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Probability measures on streams (e.g. on hypernumbers and p-adic numbers have been defined. It was shown that these probabilities can be used for simulations of reflexive games. In particular, it can be proved that Aumann's agreement theorem does not hold for these probabilities. Instead of this theorem, there is a statement that is called the reflexion disagreement theorem. Based on this theorem, probabilistic and knowledge conditions can be defined for reflexive games at various reflexion levels up to the infinite level. (original abstract

  19. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B

    2017-01-01

    The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail, and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component.

  20. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail , and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component.

  1. Evaluating Red Reflex and Surgeon Preference Between Nearly-Collimated and Focused Beam Microscope Illumination Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cionni, Robert J.; Pei, Ron; Dimalanta, Ramon; Lubeck, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the intensity and stability of the red reflex produced by ophthalmic surgical microscopes with nearly-collimated versus focused illumination systems and to assess surgeon preference in a simulated surgical setting. Methods This two-part evaluation consisted of postproduction surgical video analysis of red reflex intensity and a microscope use and preference survey completed by 13 experienced cataract surgeons. Survey responses were based on bench testing and experience in a simulated surgical setting. A microscope with nearly-collimated beam illumination and two focused beam microscopes were assessed. Results Red reflex intensity and stability were greater with the nearly-collimated microscope illumination system. In the bench testing survey, surgeons reported that the red reflex was maintained over significantly greater distances away from pupillary center, and depth of focus was numerically greater with nearly-collimated illumination relative to focused illumination. Most participating surgeons (≥64%) reported a preference for the microscope with nearly-collimated illumination with regard to red reflex stability, depth of focus, visualization, surgical working distance, and perceived patient comfort. Conclusions The microscope with nearly-collimated illumination produced a more intense and significantly more stable red reflex and was preferred overall by more surgeons. Translational Relevance This is the first report of an attempt to quantify red reflex intensity and stability and to evaluate surgically-relevant parameters between microscope systems. The data and methods presented here may provide a basis for future studies attempting to quantify differences between surgical microscopes that may affect surgeon preference and microscope use in ophthalmic surgery. PMID:26290778

  2. Prognostic Value of Impaired Preoperative Ankle Reflex in Surgical Outcome of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several prognostic factors exist influencing the outcome of surgical discectomy in the patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between severity of preoperative impaired ankle reflex and outcomes of lumbar discectomy in the patients with L5-S1 LDH. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients (108 male and 73 female who underwent simple discectomy in our orthopedic department from April 2009 to April 2013 and followed them up for more than one year. The mean age of the patients was 35.3±8.9 years old. Severity of reflex impairment was graded from 0 to 4+ and radicular pain and disability were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS and Oswestry disability index (ODI questionnaires, respectively. Subjective satisfaction was also evaluated at the last follow-up visit. Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare qualitative variables. Results: Reflex impairment existed in 44.8% preoperatively that improved to 10% at the last follow-up visit. Statistical analyses could not find a significant relationship between the severity of impaired ankle reflex and sex or age (P=0.538 and P=0.709, respectively. There was a remarkable relationship between severity of reflex impairment and preoperative radicular pain or disability (P=0.012 and P=0.002, respectively. Kruskal-Wallis test showed that a more severity in ankle reflex impairment was associated with not only less improvement in postoperative pain and disability but also less satisfaction rate (P Conclusions: In the patients with L5-S1 LDH, more severe ankle reflex impairment is associated with less improvement in postoperative pain, disability, and subjective satisfaction.

  3. Are the unken reflex and the aposematic colouration of Red-Bellied Toads efficient against bird predation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caorsi, Valentina Zaffaroni; Colombo, Patrick; Abadie, Michelle; Brack, Ismael Verrastro; Dasoler, Bibiana Terra; Borges-Martins, Márcio

    2018-01-01

    Aposematic signals as well as body behaviours may be important anti-predator defences. Species of the genus Melanophryniscus are characterised by having toxic lipophilic alkaloids in the skin and for presenting a red ventral colouration, which can be observed when they perform the behaviour called the unken reflex. Both the reflex behaviour and the colouration pattern are described as defence mechanisms. However, there are currently no studies testing their effectiveness against predators. This study aimed to test experimentally if both ventral conspicuous colouration and the unken reflex in Melanophryniscus cambaraensis function as aposematic signals against visually oriented predators (birds). We simulated the species studied using three different clay toad models as follows: (a) in a normal position with green coloured bodies, (b) in the unken reflex position with green coloured body and extremities and (c) in the unken reflex position with a green body and red extremities. Models were distributed on a known M. cambaraensis breeding site and in the adjacent forest. More than half of the attacks on the models were from birds; however, there was no preference for any model type. Thus, just the presence of the red colour associated with the motionless unken reflex position does not seem to prevent attacks from potential predators. It is possible that the effective aposematic signal in Melanophryniscus is achieved through the unken reflex movement together with the subsequent exhibition of the warning colouration and the secretion of toxins. PMID:29596437

  4. Sensory axon-derived neuregulin-1 is required for axoglial signaling and normal sensory function but not for long-term axon maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fricker, F.R.; Zhu, N.; Tsantoulas, C.

    2009-01-01

    to represent large-diameter axons that have failed to myelinate. Conditional neuregulin-1 ablation resulted in a reduced sensitivity to noxious mechanical stimuli. These findings emphasize the importance of neuregulin-1 in mediating the signaling between axons and both myelinating and nonmyelinating Schwann...... cells required for normal sensory function. Sensory neuronal survival and axonal maintenance, however, are not dependent on axon-derived neuregulin-1 signaling in adulthood Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6/17...

  5. Charitable giving and reflexive individuals: How personal reflexivity mediates between structure and agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Balihar

    2017-03-01

    This article examines how individuals are reflexive beings who interpret the world in relation to things that matter to them, and how charitable acts are evaluated and embedded in their lives with different degrees of meaning and importance. Rather than framing the discussion of charitable practices in terms of an altruism/egoism binary or imputing motivations and values to social structures, the article explains how reflexivity is an important and neglected dimension of social practices, and how it interacts with sympathy, sentiments and discourses to shape giving. The study also shows that there are different modes of reflexivity, which have varied effects on charity and volunteering.

  6. Simulating Muscle-Reflex Dynamics in a Simple Hopping Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfarth, Andre; Kalveram, Karl Theodor; Geyer, Hartmut

    In legged systems, springy legs facilitate gaits with subsequent contact and flight phases. Here, we test whether electrical motors can generate leg behaviors suitable for stable hopping. We built a vertically operating sledge actuated by a motor-driven leg. The motor torque simulates either a linear leg spring or a muscle-reflex system. For stable hopping significant energy supply was required after midstance. This was achieved by enhancing leg stiffness or by continuously applying positive force feedback to the simulated muscle. The muscle properties combined with positive force feedback result in spring-like behavior which enables stable hopping with adjustable hopping height.

  7. A simple measurement hammer for quantitative reflex studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.; van Leeuwen, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A reflex hammer for measurement of the mechanical stimulus strength was designed. Combined with standard EMG equipment this instrument permits the study of both stimulus-response relations and latencies of myotatic reflexes. Some results in normal subjects are discussed

  8. Comparison of Stretch Reflex Torques in Ankle Dorsiflexors and Plantarflexors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tung, J

    2001-01-01

    ...) ankle muscles, Pulse, step, and a combination of random perturbation and step inputs were used to identify the reflex and intrinsic contributions to the measured torque, TA reflex torques were very...

  9. The influence of electrospun fibre size on Schwann cell behaviour and axonal outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnavi, S., E-mail: sara.gnavi@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of the Cavalieri-Ottolenghi Foundation, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Fornasari, B.E., E-mail: benedettaelena.fornasari@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of the Cavalieri-Ottolenghi Foundation, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Tonda-Turo, C., E-mail: chiara.tondaturo@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico of Torino, Torino 10100 (Italy); Ciardelli, G., E-mail: gianluca.ciardelli@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico of Torino, Torino 10100 (Italy); CNR-IPCF UOS, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Zanetti, M., E-mail: marco.zanetti@unito.it [Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, University of Torino, Torino 10100 (Italy); Geuna, S., E-mail: stefano.geuna@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of the Cavalieri-Ottolenghi Foundation, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Perroteau, I., E-mail: isabelle.perroteau@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Fibrous substrates functioning as temporary extracellular matrices can be prepared easily by electrospinning, yielding fibrous matrices suitable as internal fillers for nerve guidance channels. In this study, gelatin micro- or nano-fibres were prepared by electrospinning by tuning the gelatin concentration and solution flow rate. The effect of gelatin fibre diameter on cell adhesion and proliferation was tested in vitro using explant cultures of Schwann cells (SC) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Cell adhesion was assessed by quantifying the cell spreading area, actin cytoskeleton organization and focal adhesion complex formation. Nano-fibres promoted cell spreading and actin cytoskeleton organization, increasing cellular adhesion and the proliferation rate. However, both migration rate and motility, quantified by transwell and time lapse assays respectively, were greater in cells cultured on micro-fibres. Finally, there was more DRG axon outgrowth on micro-fibres. These data suggest that the topography of electrospun gelatin fibres can be adjusted to modulate SC and axon organization and that both nano- and micro-fibres are promising fillers for the design of devices for peripheral nerve repair. - Highlights: • Electrospinning used to produce gelatin nano- and micro-fibre matrices. • Nano-fibre matrices promote Schwann cell organization and increase proliferation rate. • Micro-fibre matrices promote Schwann cell migration. • Micro-fibre matrices promote axonal outgrowth.

  10. GDAP1 mutations in Italian axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth patients: Phenotypic features and clinical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzini, I; Geroldi, A; Capponi, S; Gulli, R; Schenone, A; Grandis, M; Doria-Lamba, L; La Piana, C; Cremonte, M; Pisciotta, C; Nolano, M; Manganelli, F; Santoro, L; Mandich, P; Bellone, E

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the ganglioside-induced differentiation associated-protein 1 (GDAP1) gene have been associated with both autosomal recessive (AR) and dominant (AD) Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) axonal neuropathy. The relative frequency of heterozygous, dominant mutations in Italian CMT is unknown. We investigated the frequency of dominant mutations in GDAP1 in a cohort of 109 axonal Italian patients by sequencing genomic DNA and search for copy number variations. We also explored correlations with clinical features. All cases had already been tested for variants in common axonal AD genes. Eight patients (7.3%) harbored five already reported heterozygous mutations in GDAP1 (p.Arg120Gly, p.Arg120Trp, p.His123Arg, p.Gln218Glu, p.Arg226Ser). Mutations had different penetrances in the families; the onset of symptoms is in the first decade and progression is slower than usually seen in GDAP1-related AR-CMT. We show that the relative frequency of mutations in GDAP was slightly higher than those observed in MFN2 and MPZ (7.3% vs 6.3% and 5.0%). The relatively milder clinical features and the quite indolent course observed are relevant for prognostic assessment. On the basis of our experience and the data reported here, we suggest GDAP1 as the first gene that should be analysed in Italian patients affected by CMT2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Dry immersion effects on the mechanisms of metabolic-reflex regulation of hemodynamics during muscular work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravyĭ, Ia R; Bersenev, E Iu; Missina, S S; Borovik, A S; Sharova, A P; Vinogradova, O L

    2008-01-01

    Effects of 4-d dry immersion on metabolic-reflex regulation of hemodynamics were evaluated during local static work (30% of maximum voluntary effort) of the talocrural extensors. One group of immersed test-subjects received low-frequency electrostimulation of leg muscles to offset the immersion effect on EMG of working muscles. Metabolic-reflex regulation was evaluated through comparison of cardiovascular responses to physical tests with and w/o post-exercise vascular occlusion. Immersion vaguely increased heart rate and reduced systolic arterial pressure in resting subjects; however, it did not have a distinct effect on arterial pressure and HR during muscular work or metabolic-reflex potentiation of hemodynamic shifts.

  12. The capsaicin cough reflex in patients with symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, H; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Mosbech, H

    2010-01-01

    Patients with multiple chemical sensitivity and eczema patients with airway symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals have enhanced cough reflex to capsaicin when applying the tidal breathing method. The aims of the present study were to test whether the capsaicin induced cough reflex was enhanced...... when applying the single breath inhalation method in similar groups of patients with symptoms related to odorous chemicals e.g. other persons wearing of perfume; and to investigate to what extent the reporting of lower airway symptoms influenced the cough reflex. Sixteen patients fulfilling Cullen......'s criteria for multiple chemical sensitivity and 15 eczema patients with airway symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals were compared with 29 age-matched, healthy controls. We measured C5--the capsaicin concentration causing five coughs or more--using the single breath inhalation test. No difference was found...

  13. Modelling in vivo action potential propagation along a giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stuart; Foster, Jamie M; Richardson, Giles

    2015-01-01

    A partial differential equation model for the three-dimensional current flow in an excitable, unmyelinated axon is considered. Where the axon radius is significantly below a critical value R(crit) (that depends upon intra- and extra-cellular conductivity and ion channel conductance) the resistance of the intracellular space is significantly higher than that of the extracellular space, such that the potential outside the axon is uniformly small whilst the intracellular potential is approximated by the transmembrane potential. In turn, since the current flow is predominantly axial, it can be shown that the transmembrane potential is approximated by a solution to the one-dimensional cable equation. It is noted that the radius of the squid giant axon, investigated by (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e), lies close to R(crit). This motivates us to apply the three-dimensional model to the squid giant axon and compare the results thus found to those obtained using the cable equation. In the context of the in vitro experiments conducted in (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e) we find only a small difference between the wave profiles determined using these two different approaches and little difference between the speeds of action potential propagation predicted. This suggests that the cable equation approximation is accurate in this scenario. However when applied to the it in vivo setting, in which the conductivity of the surrounding tissue is considerably lower than that of the axoplasm, there are marked differences in both wave profile and speed of action potential propagation calculated using the two approaches. In particular, the cable equation significantly over predicts the increase in the velocity of propagation as axon radius increases. The consequences of these results are discussed in terms of the evolutionary costs associated with increasing the speed of action potential propagation by increasing axon radius.

  14. Molecular Disorganization of Axons Adjacent to Human Cortical Microinfarcts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Coban

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs are microscopically identified wedge-shaped ischemic lesions that occur at or near the cortical surface and result from occlusion of penetrating arterioles. These microscopic lesions can be observed with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging in aging brains and in patients with cerebrovascular disease. Recent studies have suggested that strategically located microinfarcts strongly correlate with cognitive deficits, which can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease as well as other forms of dementia. We have recently shown that the molecular organization of axons into functional microdomains is altered in areas adjacent to white matter lacunar and microinfarcts, creating a peri-infarct penumbral injury in surviving axons. Whether similar changes in nodal, adjacent paranodal, and proximal axon initial segment molecular organization occur in the cortex adjacent to human CMIs is not known. Paraffin-embedded sections of autopsy brain tissue from five patients with CMIs were immunofluorescently labeled for nodal and paranodal markers including beta-IV spectrin, ankyrin-G, and contactin-associated protein. High magnification images from the peri-infarct cortical tissue were generated using confocal microscopy. In surviving cortical tissue adjacent to microinfarcts, we observed a dramatic loss of axon initial segments, suggesting that neuronal firing capacity in adjacent cortical tissue is likely compromised. The number of identifiable nodal/paranodal complexes in surviving cortical tissue is reduced adjacent to microinfarcts, while the average paranodal length is increased indicating a breakdown of axoglial contact. This axonal microdomain disorganization occurs in the relative absence of changes in the structural integrity of myelinated axons as measured by myelin basic protein and neurofilament staining. These findings indicate that the molecular organization of surviving axons adjacent to human CMIs is abnormal

  15. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  16. On Becoming a Critically Reflexive Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, Ann L.

    2004-01-01

    Critically reflexive practice embraces subjective understandings of reality as a basis for thinking more critically about the impact of our assumptions, values, and actions on others. Such practice is important to management education, because it helps us understand how we constitute our realities and identities in relational ways and how we can…

  17. Bases for Cones and Reflexivity | Polyrakis | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is proved that a Banach space E is non-reflexive if and only if E has a closed cone with an unbounded, closed, dentable base. If E is a Banach lattice, the same characterization holds with the extra assumption that the cone is contained in E+. This article is also a survey of the geometry (dentability) of bases for cones.

  18. Reflexivity on Banach Spaces of Analytic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yousefi and J. Doroodgar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available . Let X be a Banach space of functions analytic on a plane domain Ω such that for every λ in Ω the functional of evaluation at λ is bounded. Assume further that X contains the constants and admits multiplication by the independent variable z, Mz, as a bounded operator. We give sufficient conditions for Mz to be reflexive.

  19. Reflex epilepsy: triggers and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okudan ZV

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeynep Vildan Okudan,1 Çiğdem Özkara2 1Department of Neurology, Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Education and Research Hospital, 2Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, University of Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract: Reflex epilepsies (REs are identified as epileptic seizures that are consistently induced by identifiable and objective-specific triggers, which may be an afferent stimulus or by the patient’s own activity. RE may have different subtypes depending on the stimulus characteristic. There are significant clinical and electrophysiologic differences between different RE types. Visual stimuli-sensitive or photosensitive epilepsies constitute a large proportion of the RE and are mainly related to genetic causes. Reflex epilepsies may present with focal or generalized seizures due to specific triggers, and sometimes seizures may occur spontaneously. The stimuli can be external (light flashes, hot water, internal (emotion, thinking, or both and should be distinguished from triggering precipitants, which most epileptic patients could report such as emotional stress, sleep deprivation, alcohol, and menstrual cycle. Different genetic and acquired factors may play a role in etiology of RE. This review will provide a current overview of the triggering factors and management of reflex seizures. Keywords: seizure, reflex epilepsy, photosensitivity, hot water, reading, thinking

  20. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported here…

  1. The acoustic reflex threshold in aging ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, C A; Silman, S; Miller, M H

    1983-01-01

    This study investigates the controversy regarding the influence of age on the acoustic reflex threshold for broadband noise, 500-, 1000-, 2000-, and 4000-Hz activators between Jerger et al. [Mono. Contemp. Audiol. 1 (1978)] and Jerger [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66 (1979)] on the one hand and Silman [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66 (1979)] and others on the other. The acoustic reflex thresholds for broadband noise, 500-, 1000-, 2000-, and 4000-Hz activators were evaluated under two measurement conditions. Seventy-two normal-hearing ears were drawn from 72 subjects ranging in age from 20-69 years. The results revealed that age was correlated with the acoustic reflex threshold for BBN activator but not for any of the tonal activators; the correlation was stronger under the 1-dB than under the 5-dB measurement condition. Also, the mean acoustic reflex thresholds for broadband noise activator were essentially similar to those reported by Jerger et al. (1978) but differed from those obtained in this study under the 1-dB measurement condition.

  2. DiI-labeling of DRG neurons to study axonal branching in a whole mount preparation of mouse embryonic spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hannes; Rathjen, Fritz G

    2011-12-13

    Here we present a technique to label the trajectories of small groups of DRG neurons into the embryonic spinal cord by diffusive staining using the lipophilic tracer 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI). The comparison of axonal pathways of wild-type with those of mouse lines in which genes are mutated allows testing for a functional role of candidate proteins in the control of axonal branching which is an essential mechanism in the wiring of the nervous system. Axonal branching enables an individual neuron to connect with multiple targets, thereby providing the physical basis for the parallel processing of information. Ramifications at intermediate target regions of axonal growth may be distinguished from terminal arborization. Furthermore, different modes of axonal branch formation may be classified depending on whether branching results from the activities of the growth cone (splitting or delayed branching) or from the budding of collaterals from the axon shaft in a process called interstitial branching (Fig. 1). The central projections of neurons from the DRG offer a useful experimental system to study both types of axonal branching: when their afferent axons reach the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) of the spinal cord between embryonic days 10 to 13 (E10-E13) they display a stereotyped pattern of T- or Y-shaped bifurcation. The two resulting daughter axons then proceed in rostral or caudal directions, respectively, at the dorsolateral margin of the cord and only after a waiting period collaterals sprout from these stem axons to penetrate the gray matter (interstitial branching) and project to relay neurons in specific laminae of the spinal cord where they further arborize (terminal branching). DiI tracings have revealed growth cones at the dorsal root entry zone of the spinal cord that appeared to be in the process of splitting suggesting that bifurcation is caused by splitting of the growth cone itself (Fig. 2), however

  3. New Molecular Knowledge Towards the Trigemino-Cardiac Reflex as a Cerebral Oxygen-Conserving Reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sandu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR represents the most powerful of the autonomous reflexes and is a subphenomenon in the group of the so-called “oxygen-conserving reflexes”. Within seconds after the initiation of such a reflex, there is a powerful and differentiated activation of the sympathetic system with subsequent elevation in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF, with no changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2 or in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc. Such an increase in regional CBF without a change of CMRO2 or CMRglc provides the brain with oxygen rapidly and efficiently. Features of the reflex have been discovered during skull base surgery, mediating reflex protection projects via currently undefined pathways from the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata to the upper brainstem and/or thalamus, which finally engage a small population of neurons in the cortex. This cortical center appears to be dedicated to transduce a neuronal signal reflexively into cerebral vasodilatation and synchronization of electrocortical activity; a fact that seems to be unique among autonomous reflexes. Sympathetic excitation is mediated by cortical-spinal projection to spinal preganglionic sympathetic neurons, whereas bradycardia is mediated via projections to cardiovagal motor medullary neurons. The integrated reflex response serves to redistribute blood from viscera to the brain in response to a challenge to cerebral metabolism, but seems also to initiate a preconditioning mechanism. Previous studies showed a great variability in the human TCR response, in special to external stimuli and individual factors. The TCR gives, therefore, not only new insights into novel therapeutic options for a range of disorders characterized by neuronal death, but also into the cortical and molecular organization of the brain.

  4. Short reflex expirations (expiration reflexes) induced by mechanical stimulation of the trachea in anesthetized cats

    OpenAIRE

    Poliacek, Ivan; Rose, Melanie J; Corrie, Lu Wen-Chi; Wang, Cheng; Jakus, Jan; Barani, Helena; Stransky, Albert; Polacek, Hubert; Halasova, Erika; Bolser, Donald C

    2008-01-01

    Fifty spontaneously breathing pentobarbital-anesthetized cats were used to determine the incidence rate and parameters of short reflex expirations induced by mechanical stimulation of the tracheal mucosa (ERt). The mechanical stimuli evoked coughs; in addition, 67.6% of the stimulation trials began with ERt. The expiration reflex mechanically induced from the glottis (ERg) was also analyzed (99.5% incidence, p < 0.001 compared to the incidence of ERt). We found that the amplitudes of abdomina...

  5. Effects of isoflurane on the baroreceptor reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagard, J L; Elegbe, E O; Hopp, F A; Bosnjak, Z J; von Colditz, J H; Kalbfleisch, J H; Kampine, J P

    1983-12-01

    The baroreceptor reflex has been found to be attenuated during anesthesia, but the effects of the relatively new anesthetic, isoflurane, on baroreflex function have not been examined thoroughly. This study was performed to determine the effects of isoflurane on each component of the baroreceptor reflex arc, including the receptors, afferent and efferent nerve pathways, central integratory centers, peripheral ganglia, and the heart. Baroreflex effects on heart rate initiated by systemic pressure changes were examined in conscious and anesthetized dogs (1.3% and 2.6% isoflurane). The effects on individual components of the reflex arc were determined by examining carotid sinus baroreceptor afferent activity, sympathetic efferent nerve activity, and heart rate response to direct sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent nerve stimulation in anesthetized dogs. Preganglionic and postganglionic nerve activities were recorded simultaneously during baroreflex activation to determine ganglionic effects of isoflurane. Baroreflex-induced changes in heart rate were not depressed significantly until 2.6% isoflurane if blood pressure changes due to anesthetic administration were prevented. Significant decreases in baseline sympathetic efferent nerve activity were found at 1.3% and 2.6% isoflurane, with depression of postganglionic activity significantly greater than preganglionic activity at 2.6% isoflurane, indicating a ganglionic effect of isoflurane. Cardiac chronotropic responses to direct stimulation of sympathetic and vagal fibers were attenuated significantly by isoflurane, with sympathetic stimulation showing the greater sensitivity to the anesthetic. Carotid baroreceptor afferent activity was increased by isoflurane, and this sensitization of the baroreceptors appeared to contribute to the decreased levels of sympathetic tone. Therefore, although isoflurane was found to alter the baroreceptor reflex through its effects at multiple sites of the baroreflex arc, significant

  6. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Amanda E; Foust, Amanda J; Bal, Thierry; McCormick, David A

    2015-11-25

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons contain three main

  7. Mechanistic logic underlying the axonal transport of cytosolic proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David A.; Das, Utpal; Tang, Yong; Roy, Subhojit

    2011-01-01

    Proteins vital to presynaptic function are synthesized in the neuronal perikarya and delivered into synapses via two modes of axonal transport. While membrane-anchoring proteins are conveyed in fast axonal transport via motor-driven vesicles, cytosolic proteins travel in slow axonal transport; via mechanisms that are poorly understood. We found that in cultured axons, populations of cytosolic proteins tagged to photoactivable-GFP (PA-GFP) move with a slow motor-dependent anterograde bias; distinct from vesicular-trafficking or diffusion of untagged PA-GFP. The overall bias is likely generated by an intricate particle-kinetics involving transient assembly and short-range vectorial spurts. In-vivo biochemical studies reveal that cytosolic proteins are organized into higher-order structures within axon-enriched fractions that are largely segregated from vesicles. Data-driven biophysical modeling best predicts a scenario where soluble molecules dynamically assemble into mobile supra-molecular structures. We propose a model where cytosolic proteins are transported by dynamically assembling into multi-protein complexes that are directly/indirectly conveyed by motors. PMID:21555071

  8. Functional complexity of the axonal growth cone: a proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estrada-Bernal

    Full Text Available The growth cone, the tip of the emerging neurite, plays a crucial role in establishing the wiring of the developing nervous system. We performed an extensive proteomic analysis of axonal growth cones isolated from the brains of fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. Approximately 2000 proteins were identified at ≥ 99% confidence level. Using informatics, including functional annotation cluster and KEGG pathway analysis, we found great diversity of proteins involved in axonal pathfinding, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular traffic and carbohydrate metabolism, as expected. We also found a large and complex array of proteins involved in translation, protein folding, posttranslational processing, and proteasome/ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Immunofluorescence studies performed on hippocampal neurons in culture confirmed the presence in the axonal growth cone of proteins representative of these processes. These analyses also provide evidence for rough endoplasmic reticulum and reveal a reticular structure equipped with Golgi-like functions in the axonal growth cone. Furthermore, Western blot revealed the growth cone enrichment, relative to fetal brain homogenate, of some of the proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and catabolism. Our study provides a resource for further research and amplifies the relatively recently developed concept that the axonal growth cone is equipped with proteins capable of performing a highly diverse range of functions.

  9. Subtypes of GABAergic neurons project axons in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyoshi Higo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons in the neocortex have been regarded as interneurons and speculated to modulate the activity of neurons locally. Recently, however, several experiments revealed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons project cortico-cortically with long axons. In this study, we illustrate Golgi-like images of the nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons using a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d reaction and follow the emanating axon branches in cat brain sections. These axon branches projected cortico-cortically with other non-labeled arcuate fibers, contra-laterally via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure. The labeled fibers were not limited to the neocortex but found also in the fimbria of the hippocampus. In order to have additional information on these GABAergic neuron projections, we investigated green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled GABAergic neurons in GAD67-Cre knock-in / GFP Cre-reporter mice. GFP-labeled axons emanate densely, especially in the fimbria, a small number in the anterior commissure, and very sparsely in the corpus callosum. These two different approaches confirm that not only nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons but also other subtypes of GABAergic neurons project long axons in the cerebral cortex and are in a position to be involved in information processing.

  10. Axonal transport and axon sprouting in the adult rat dentate gyrus: an autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldowitz, D.; Cotman, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    In response to an entorhinal lesion, the commissural and associational afferents to the dentate gyrus have been shown to expand beyond their normal terminal zone into the area denervated by the entorhinal lesion. The present study has investigated the axonal transport of [ 3 H]-labeled proteins in the commissural and associational projections following an entorhinal lesion. Injections of [ 3 H]proline, [ 3 H]leucine or [ 3 H)fucose were given in the vicinity of the commissural and associational cells of origin before, immediately subsequent to, or at 5 to 15 days after the entorhinal lesion. The disposition of previously- or newly-synthesized proteins was examined in the commissural and associational terminal field at different times after an entorhinal lesion by light-microscopic autoradiography. (author)

  11. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders V.; Johansen, Emil O.; Perrier, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS...... in live tissue can be difficult because its identification is not always reliable. Here we provide a new technique allowing a fast and reliable identification of the AIS in live brain slice preparations. By simultaneous recording of extracellular local field potentials and whole-cell patch-clamp recording...... of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from...

  12. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Victor ePetersen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The axon initial segment (AIS is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS in live tissue can be difficult because its identification is not always reliable. Here we provide a new technique allowing a fast and reliable identification of the AIS in live brain slice preparations. By simultaneous recoding of extracellular local field potentials and whole-cell patch-clamp recording of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from the brain.

  13. Accuracy of Marginal Reflex Distance Measurements in Eyelid Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemet, Arie Y

    2015-10-01

    The marginal reflex distance (MRD), the position of the eyelids with the eyes in the primary position, is fundamental to patient assessment and surgery choice in facial and ophthalmic plastic surgery. This study compares the accuracy of handheld ruler and slit lamp biomicroscope measurements of the MRD1 in patients with blepharoptosis. This is a prospective study of 85 consecutive patients who were referred to our oculoplastic clinic between 2011 and 2013 for unilateral or bilateral ptosis repair. The MRD1 was measured by 2 techniques: 1. With the use of a penlight to illuminate the cornea, the corneal light reflex is observed, and the distance between the cornea and the upper lid margin is recorded. 2. Slit lamp biomicroscope assessment. A comparison between those 2 methods was performed. The mean (SD) MRD1 was 1.18 (1.11) mm and 1.06 (1.18) mm with a penlight and a slit lamp, respectively. There was a significant difference between the 2 measurements, but they were highly correlated in the paired t-test and the Wilcoxon test. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.984, representing excellent reliability. The MRD1 measured by a skilled clinician yields reliable results using a penlight and a ruler. In some cases, measurement of eyelid heights (palpebral fissure, MRD1, brow position) is challenging. The use of a slit lamp biomicroscope and a close front photograph may help determine accurate measurements.

  14. Startle reflex modulation by affective face "Emoji" pictographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluja, Anton; Balada, Ferran; Blanco, Eduardo; Lucas, Ignacio; Blanch, Angel

    2018-02-17

    The current research was designed to assess possible differences in the emotional content of pleasant and unpleasant face emoji using acoustically evoked eyeblink startle reflex response. Stimuli were selected from Emojipedia Webpage. First, we assessed these stimuli with a previous independent sample of 190 undergraduate students (46 males and 144 females) mean age of 21.43 years (SD 3.89). A principal axis method was performed using the 30 selected emoji faces, extracting two factors (15 pleasant and 15 unpleasant emoji). Second, we measured the acoustic startle reflex modulation in 53 young adult women [mean age 22.13 years (SD 4.3)] during the viewing of each of the 30 emoji emotional faces in the context of the theory of motivation and emotion proposed by Lang (1995), but considering only the valence dimension. We expected to find higher acoustically evoked startle responses when viewing unpleasant emoji and lower responses for pleasant ones, similarly to the results obtained in the studies using human faces as emotional stimulus. An ANOVA was conducted to compare acoustic startle responses associated with pleasant and unpleasant emoji. Results yielded main effects for picture valence (λ = 0.80, F(1, 50) = 12.80, p = .001, η 2  = 0.20). Post-hoc t test analysis indicated significant differences in the startle response between unpleasant (50.95 ± 1.75) and pleasant (49.14 ± 2.49) emoji (t (52) = 3.59, p = .001), with a Cohen's d = 0.495. Viewing affective facial emoji expressions modulates the acoustic startle reflex response according to their emotional content.

  15. Modification of Otolith Reflex Asymmetries Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Andrew H.; Schoenfeld, Uwe; Wood, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that changes in otolith-mediated reflexes adapted for microgravity contribute to perceptual, gaze and postural disturbances upon return to Earth s gravity. Our goal was to determine pre- versus post-fight differences in unilateral otolith reflexes that reflect these adaptive changes. This study represents the first comprehensive examination of unilateral otolith function following space flight. Ten astronauts participated in unilateral otolith function tests three times pre-flight and up to four times after Shuttle flights from landing day through the subsequent 10 days. During unilateral centrifugation (UC, +/- 3.5cm at 400deg/s), utricular function was examined by the perceptual changes reflected by the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and by video-oculographic measurement of the otolith-mediated ocular counter-roll (OOR). Unilateral saccular reflexes were recorded by measurement of collic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (cVEMP). Although data from a few subjects were not obtained early post-flight, a general increase in asymmetry of otolith responses was observed on landing day relative to pre-flight baseline, with a subsequent reversal in asymmetry within 2-3 days. Recovery to baseline levels was achieved within 10 days. This fluctuation in the asymmetry measures appeared strongest for SVV, in a consistent direction for OOR, and in an opposite direction for cVEMP. These results are consistent with our hypothesis that space flight results in adaptive changes in central nervous system processing of otolith input. Adaptation to microgravity may reveal asymmetries in otolith function upon to return to Earth that were not detected prior to the flight due to compensatory mechanisms.

  16. Swedish Massage and Abnormal Reflexes of Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Alizad

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Massage therapy is one of the most widely used complementary and alternative medicine therapies for children. This study was conducted to determine the effect of wedish massage on abnormal reflexes in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP. Methods: This study was a single blind clinical trial conducted on forty children with spastic CP who were recruited from clinics of the University of Social Welfare & Rehabilitation Sciences. They were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The routine occupational therapy (OT techniques were performed during a 3 month-period in both groups. The intervention group also received Swedish massage for 30 minutes before every OT session. Primary, spinal, brain stem, midbrain, cortical and automatic reflexes were evaluated at the beginning of the study and 3 months later. The data analysis was done by parametric and nonparametric tests. Results: Finally, thirteen subjects in the intervention group and 14 subjects in the control group were remained and studied. The average ages in the intervention and control groups were 49.5 and 42.1 months respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in abnormal reflexes in the intervention group in comparison to the control (P>0.05. Discussion: Adding Swedish massage to traditional OT techniques had no significant effects on abnormal reflexes in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Evidently more research is required in order to completely reject the effects of Swedish massage on abnormal reflexes of children with CP.

  17. One minute static stretch of plantar flexors transiently increases H reflex excitability and exerts no effect on corticospinal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budini, Francesco; Gallasch, Eugen; Christova, Monica; Rafolt, Dietmar; Rauscher, Andreas Benedikt; Tilp, Markus

    2017-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? What mediates neural responses following static stretching, and how long do these influences last? What is the main finding and its importance? This study shows that 1 min of static stretching inhibits the tendon tap reflex and facilitates the H reflex without influencing motor-evoked potentials. The results indicate that at least two different mechanisms mediate neural responses after static stretching. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the neural responses observed after static stretching are mediated by sensitivity of muscle spindles, spinal excitability or cortical excitability and how long these influences last. Nineteen volunteers (25.7 ± 5.6 years old) were tested for the tendon tap reflex (T-reflex), H reflex and motor-evoked potentials on ankle flexors and extensors immediately, 5 and 10 min after 1 min static stretching applied at individual maximal ankle dorsiflexion, as well as immediately, 5 and 10 min after a control period of the same duration. Comparison of measurements collected immediately after stretching or control conditions revealed that the T-reflex was weaker after stretching than after control (-59.2% P = 0.000). The T-reflex showed a slow recovery rate within the first 150 s after stretching, but 5 min after the inhibition had disappeared. The H reflex increased immediately after stretching (+18.3%, P = 0.036), showed a quick tendency to recover and returned to control values within 5 min from stretching. Motor-evoked potentials were not affected by the procedure. These results suggest that 1 min of static stretching primarily decreases muscle spindle sensitivity and facilitates the H reflex, whereas effects on the motor cortex can be excluded. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  18. Perilesional edema in radiation necrosis reflects axonal degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Torres, Carlos J; Yuan, Liya; Schmidt, Robert E; Rich, Keith M; Ackerman, Joseph JH; Garbow, Joel R

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we characterized a Gamma Knife® radiation necrosis mouse model with various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols to identify biomarkers useful in differentiation from tumors. Though the irradiation was focal to one hemisphere, a contralateral injury was observed that appeared to be localized in the white matter only. Interestingly, this injury was identifiable in T2-weighted images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) maps, but not on post-contrast T1-weighted images. This observation of edema independent of vascular changes is akin to the perilesional edema seen in clinical radiation necrosis. The pathology underlying the observed white-matter MRI changes was explored by performing immunohistochemistry for healthy axons and myelin. The presence of both healthy axons and myelin was reduced in the contralateral white-matter lesion. Based on our immunohistochemical findings, the contralateral white-matter injury is most likely due to axonal degeneration

  19. The nano-architecture of the axonal cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterrier, Christophe; Dubey, Pankaj; Roy, Subhojit

    2017-12-01

    The corporeal beauty of the neuronal cytoskeleton has captured the imagination of generations of scientists. One of the easiest cellular structures to visualize by light microscopy, its existence has been known for well over 100 years, yet we have only recently begun to fully appreciate its intricacy and diversity. Recent studies combining new probes with super-resolution microscopy and live imaging have revealed surprising details about the axonal cytoskeleton and, in particular, have discovered previously unknown actin-based structures. Along with traditional electron microscopy, these newer techniques offer a nanoscale view of the axonal cytoskeleton, which is important for our understanding of neuronal form and function, and lay the foundation for future studies. In this Review, we summarize existing concepts in the field and highlight contemporary discoveries that have fundamentally altered our perception of the axonal cytoskeleton.

  20. The capsaicin cough reflex in patients with symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, H.; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, H.

    2010-01-01

    between groups in age, body mass index or pulmonary function. The median C5 were 129 micromol/L (control group), 48 micromol/L (multiple chemical sensitivity patients), 32 micromol/L (eczema patients). The reporting of lower airway symptoms from odorous chemicals was significantly (p......Patients with multiple chemical sensitivity and eczema patients with airway symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals have enhanced cough reflex to capsaicin when applying the tidal breathing method. The aims of the present study were to test whether the capsaicin induced cough reflex was enhanced...... when applying the single breath inhalation method in similar groups of patients with symptoms related to odorous chemicals e.g. other persons wearing of perfume; and to investigate to what extent the reporting of lower airway symptoms influenced the cough reflex. Sixteen patients fulfilling Cullen...

  1. Recreational soccer can improve the reflex response to sudden trunk loading among untrained women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Randers, Morten Bredsgaard; Skotte, Jørgen H.

    2009-01-01

    assignment was blinded to the test personnel. Physical education students organized the training. During 1 hour of soccer training, the total number of sudden moves including sudden loading of the upper body (e.g. turns, stops, throw-ins, headers, and shoulder tackles) was 192 (63). In SO, time elapsed until......A slower reflex response to sudden trunk loading (SL) has been shown to increase future risk of low back injuries in healthy subjects, and specific readiness training can improve the response to SL among healthy subjects. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of recreational soccer...... the reflex response to SL. The faster reflex response indicates that soccer training can reduce the risk of low back injuries....

  2. The development of the pupillary light reflex and menace response in neonatal lambs and kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoofi, Afshin; Mirfakhraie, Pejman; Yourdkhani, Sorush

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the development of the pupillary light reflex and menace response in neonatal lambs and goat kids. Thirty lambs and 33 kids were assessed daily from birth until the pupillary light reflex and menace response had become established. All animals had a controlled pupillary light reflex within 20 h of birth. Lambs and kids had developed menace responses by 8 ± 3 and 14 ± 2 days, respectively. The Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference (P kids developed a menace response. Male kids developed this response significantly (P = 0.006) later than females. There was no sex difference in the menace response in the lambs. Overall, the findings indicated that lambs develop a menace response earlier than kids, and female kids develop this response more rapidly than their male counterparts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Axoplasmic RNA species synthesized in the isolated squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapallino, M V; Cupello, A; Giuditta, A

    1988-07-01

    Isolated squid stellate nerves and giant fiber lobes were incubated for 8 hr in Millipore filtered sea water containing [3H]uridine. The electrophoretic patterns of radioactive RNA purified from the axoplasm of the giant axon and from the giant fiber lobe (cell bodies of the giant axon) demonstrated the presence of RNA species with mobilities corresponding to tRNA and rRNA. The presence of labeled rRNAs was confirmed by the behavior of the large rRNA component (31S) which, in the squid, readily dissociates into its two constituent moyeties (17S and 20S). Comparable results were obtained with the axonal sheath and the stellate nerve. In all the electrophoretic patterns, additional species of radioactive RNA migrated between the 4S and the 20S markers, i.e. with mobilities corresponding to presumptive mRNAs. Chromatographic analysis of the purified RNAs on oligo(dT)cellulose indicated the presence of labeled poly(A)+ RNA in all tissue samples. Radioactive poly(A)+ RNA represented approximately 1% of the total labeled RNA in the axoplasm, axonal sheath and stellate nerve, but more than 2% in the giant fiber lobe. The labeled poly(A)+ RNAs of the giant fibre lobe showed a prevalence of larger species in comparison to the axonal sheath and stellate nerve. In conclusion, the axoplasmic RNAs synthesized by the isolated squid giant axon appear to include all the major classes of axoplasmic RNAs, that is rRNA, tRNA and mRNA.

  4. Pannexin 1 Modulates Axonal Growth in Mouse Peripheral Nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Horton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The pannexin family of channels consists of three members—pannexin-1 (Panx1, pannexin-2 (Panx2, and pannexin-3 (Panx3 that enable the exchange of metabolites and signaling molecules between intracellular and extracellular compartments. Pannexin-mediated release of intracellular ATP into the extracellular space has been tied to a number of cellular activities, primarily through the activity of type P2 purinergic receptors. Previous work indicates that the opening of Panx1 channels and activation of purinergic receptors by extracellular ATP may cause inflammation and apoptosis. In the CNS (central nervous system and PNS (peripheral nervous system, coupled pannexin, and P2 functions have been linked to peripheral sensitization (pain pathways. Purinergic pathways are also essential for other critical processes in the PNS, including myelination and neurite outgrowth. However, whether such pathways are pannexin-dependent remains to be determined. In this study, we use a Panx1 knockout mouse model and pharmacological inhibitors of the Panx1 and the ATP-mediated signaling pathway to fill gaps in our understanding of Panx1 localization in peripheral nerves, roles for Panx1 in axonal outgrowth and myelination, and neurite extension. Our data show that Panx1 is localized to axonal, myelin, and vascular compartments of the peripheral nerves. Knockout of Panx1 gene significantly increased axonal caliber in vivo and axonal growth rate in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons. Furthermore, genetic knockout of Panx1 or inhibition of components of purinergic signaling, by treatment with probenecid and apyrase, resulted in denser axonal outgrowth from cultured DRG explants compared to untreated wild-types. Our findings suggest that Panx1 regulates axonal growth in the peripheral nervous system.

  5. IFNgamma enhances microglial reactions to hippocampal axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Hegelund, I V; Lomholt, N D

    2000-01-01

    Glial reactivity is implicated in CNS repair and regenerative responses. Microglia, the cells responding earliest to axonal injury, produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), a cytokine with both cytopathic and neuroprotective effects. We have studied activation of hippocampal microglia...... periods. Message for the immune cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) was undetectable, and glial reactivity to axonal lesions occurred as normal in IFNgamma-deficient mice. Microglial responses to lesion-induced neuronal injury were markedly enhanced in myelin basic protein promoter-driven transgenic mice...

  6. Blink reflexes and lateral spreading in patients with synkinesia after Bell's palsy and in hemifacial spasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhof, J. L.; Aramideh, M.; Speelman, J. D.; Devriese, P. P.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    We compared various electrodiagnostical tests in patients with hemifacial spasm and in patients who developed synkinesia after Bell's palsy. We examined the evoked blink reflexes in the orbicularis oculi (o. oculi) and orbicularis oris (o. oris) muscles in 23 patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS), in

  7. The comparison of application of two different frequencies of TENS on excitability of Hoffmann reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbari M

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to compare the effect of applying two transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS current with different frequencies (2 Hz & 100 Hz on Hoffmann reflex recorded from gastrosoleus muscle of healthy people. Forty female subjects between 20 to 30 years of age were participated in this quasi-experimental design. Twenty of them were exposed to the 100 Hz current and the remaining 20 to 2 Hz current on dermatome S1 root. The excitability of the alpha motoneurone was measured by H-reflex amplitude (peak to peak max/2 before and after the application of the TENS current for 30 minutes. The reflex was recorded and at measured before (TO and after the application of TENS at different times (T1, T% and T10 up to 10 minutes. The mean values were compared by multiple paired T test (alpha=0.00825. The results indicate a considerable decrement in Hoffmann reflex amplitude after application of 100 Hz current in comarison with that of before the application. The effect last for 10 minutes after the TENS application, whereas the application of 2 Hz current results in increment of the Hoffmann reflex amplitude. The 5 and 10 minutes interval test dose not show any significance and the results were attenuated befor 5 minutes. As a conclusion high frequency of TENS (100 Hz has an inhibitory effect on excitability of alpha motor neurone reflex lasting for 10 minutes, while low frequency of TENS (2 Hz has an facilatory effect on the same motoneurone with short lasting effect.

  8. Reflexive cartography a new perspective in mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Casti, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Reflexive Cartography addresses the adaptation of cartography, including its digital forms (GIS, WebGIS, PPGIS), to the changing needs of society, and outlines the experimental context aimed at mapping a topological space. Using rigorous scientific analysis based on statement consistency, relevance of the proposals, and model accessibility, it charts the transition from topographical maps created by state agencies to open mapping produced by citizens. Adopting semiotic theory to uncover the complex communicative mechanisms of maps and to investigate their ability to produce their own messages and new perspectives, Reflexive Cartography outlines a shift in our way of conceptualizing maps: from a plastic metaphor of reality, as they are generally considered, to solid tools that play the role of agents, assisting citizens as they think and plan their own living place and make sense of the current world. Applies a range of technologies to theoretical perspectives on mapping to innovatively map the world's geogr...

  9. The Reflexive Principle of Sociological Theorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Ubaidullayeva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to describe the reflexive principle in theory-making, which integrates the basic modern methodological paradigms and lays the foundation for the development of sociology. On the basis of the theoretical ideas of P. Bourdieu, A. Giddens and P. Ricoeur the author defines the concept of social reflexion and reveals its peculiarities in sociology as compared to reflexion in philosophy. According to the author, the fulfillment of reflexive functions in sociology is connected with the task of analyzing the complex structure of the polysemantic object, considering the specific quality of the subjects and their various trends of development. The presence of the poles — objectivity-subjectivity, rationality-irrationality, consciousness-unconsciousness etc, requires a reproduction of the dichotomies engendering them in social life and development of cognitive methods for their study in sociology.

  10. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Talel; Ben Jennet, Salima; Fenniche, Samy; Benmously, Rym; Mokhtar, Inçaf; Hammami, Hatem

    2011-06-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) is a painful condition that usually follows regional trauma. We report the case of a 13-year-old girl that was seen for a painful swelling of the right hand associated with palmar hyperhidrosis, which occurred after a trauma to the hand. Bone scan images showed early tissue abnormality, which was more significant on the right hand and wrist, as well as moderate bone uptake on the right side. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and alternating hot and cold baths led to a marked improvement. RSDS occurs following trauma or subsequent to various diseases or drug intake. This syndrome is related to impaired tissue microvasculature under the influence of abnormal sympathetic reflex hyperactivity. Bone scan is the diagnostic procedure of choice in RSDS, but it may be normal. Physiotherapy should be preferred in pediatric cases.

  11. Human investigations into the exercise pressor reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels H; Amann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    . The importance of the exercise pressor reflex for tight cardiovascular regulation during dynamic exercise is supported by studies using pharmacological blockade of lower limb muscle afferent nerves. These experiments show attenuation of the increase in BP and cardiac output when exercise is performed......During exercise, neural input from skeletal muscles reflexly maintains or elevates blood pressure (BP) despite a maybe fivefold increase in vascular conductance. This exercise pressor reflex is illustrated by similar heart rate (HR) and BP responses to electrically induced and voluntary exercise...... with attenuated neural feedback. Additionally, there is no BP response to electrically induced exercise with paralysing epidural anaesthesia or when similar exercise is evoked in paraplegic patients. Furthermore, BP decreases when electrically induced exercise is carried out in tetraplegic patients. The lack...

  12. Ontogenetic development of vestibular reflexes in amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Straka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Vestibulo-ocular reflexes ensure gaze stability during locomotion and passively induced head/body movements. In precocial vertebrates such as amphibians, vestibular reflexes are required very early at the onset of locomotor activity. While the formation of inner ears and the assembly of sensory-motor pathways is largely completed soon after hatching, angular and translational/tilt vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR display differential functional onsets and mature with different time courses. Otolith-derived eye movements appear immediately after hatching, whereas the appearance and progressive amelioration of semicircular canal-evoked eye movements is delayed and dependent on the acquisition of sufficiently large semicircular canal diameters. Moreover, semicircular canal functionality is also required to tune the initially omnidirectional otolith-derived VOR. The tuning is due to a reinforcement of those vestibulo-ocular connections that are co-activated by semicircular canal and otolith inputs during natural head/body motion. This suggests that molecular mechanisms initially guide the basic ontogenetic wiring, whereas semicircular canal-dependent activity is required to establish the spatio-temporal specificity of the reflex. While a robust VOR is activated during passive head/body movements, locomotor efference copies provide the major source for compensatory eye movements during tail- and limb-based swimming of larval and adult frogs. The integration of active/passive motion-related signals for gaze stabilization occurs in central vestibular neurons that are arranged as segmentally iterated functional groups along rhombomere 1-8. However, at variance with the topographic maps of most other sensory systems, the sensory-motor transformation of motion-related signals occurs in segmentally specific neuronal groups defined by the extraocular motor output targets.

  13. Entrepreneurship Teaching Conducted as Strategic Reflexive Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael

    and be applied to entrepreneurship-centred instructional activities. The concept of strategic reflexive conversation must be regarded as relevant and are of clear pertinence to theoretical and practical entrepreneurship to entrepreneurship-oriented teaching and learning activities....... advantageously, and on a pilot basis, be applied to entrepreneurship in practical environments and within the framework of entrepreneurship-centred teaching. The present theoretical investigation is solely of an introductory nature and steps are considered that can lead to the planning of additional exploratory...

  14. Otolith and canal reflexes in human standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathers, Ian; Day, Brian L; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2005-01-01

    We used galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) to identify human balance reflexes of the semicircular canals and otolith organs. The experiment used a model of vestibular signals arising from GVS modulation of the net signal from vestibular afferents. With the head upright, the model predicts that the GVS-evoked canal signal indicates lateral head rotation while the otolith signal indicates lateral tilt or acceleration. Both signify body sway transverse to the head. With the head bent forward, the model predicts that the canal signal indicates body spin about a vertical axis but the otolith signal still signifies lateral body motion. Thus, we compared electromyograms (EMG) in the leg muscles and body sway evoked by GVS when subjects stood with the head upright or bent forward. With the head upright, GVS evoked a large sway in the direction of the anodal electrode. This response was abolished with the head bent forward leaving only small, oppositely directed, transient responses at the start and end of the stimulus. With the head upright, GVS evoked short-latency (60–70 ms), followed by medium-latency (120 ms) EMG responses, of opposite polarity. Bending the head forward abolished the medium-latency but preserved the short-latency response. This is compatible with GVS evoking separate otolithic and canal reflexes, indicating that balance is controlled by independent canal and otolith reflexes, probably through different pathways. We propose that the short-latency reflex and small transient sway are driven by the otolith organs and the medium-latency response and the large sway are driven by the semicircular canals. PMID:15618274

  15. Evolutionary problems in non-reflexive spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kružík, Martin; Zimmer, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2010), s. 1-22 ISSN 1262-3377 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1075402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : concentrations * energetic solution * energies with linear growth * oscillations * relaxation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.084, year: 2009 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2008/MTR/kruzik-evolutionary problems in non-reflexive spaces.pdf

  16. Analysis of data from the Pericles and reflex experiments using the Codes Trac-PF1/MOD1 and QFLOOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.M.

    1989-09-01

    The computer programs TRAC-FP1/MOD1 and QFLOOD have been used to analyse data obtained from two reflood rigs: PERICLES, a 7 - 51 bundle arranged to investigate the chimney effect, and REFLEX, a single heated tube. TRAC produced poor predictions for PERICLES, the calculated temperature history curves at the 2.03 m elevation differing markedly from experiment. TRAC predictions for the REFLEX base case agreed quite well with experiment, but for a second REFLEX test, at higher inlet water flowrate, TRAC greatly overpredicted the quench front speed. QFLOOD also performed badly against PERICLES, quench time being overpredicted by more than 50%. A number of sensitivity studies were carried out in order to establish the source of the error in the modelling. Several possible explanations were investigated, but definite conclusions could not be drawn. QFLOOD predictions for REFLEX were generally satisfactory

  17. Basic Gravitational Reflexes in the Larval Frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine how a primitive vertebrate, the bullfrog tadpole, is able to sense and process gravitational stimuli. Because of the phylogenetic similarities of the vestibular systems in all vertebrates, the understanding of the gravitational reflexes in this relatively simple vertebrate should elucidate a skeletal framework on a elementary level, upon which the more elaborate reflexes of higher vertebrates may be constructed. The purpose of this study was to understand how the nervous system of the larval amphibian processes gravitational information. This study involved predominantly electrophysiological investigations of the isolated, alert (forebrain removed) bullfrog tadpole head. The focus of these experiments is threefold: (1) to understand from whole extraocular nerve recordings the signals sent to the eye following static gravitational tilt of the head; (2) to localize neuronal centers responsible for generating these signals through reversible pharmacological ablation of these centers; and (3) to record intracellularly from neurons within these centers in order to determine the single neuron's role in the overall processing of the center. This study has provided information on the mechanisms by which a primitive vertebrate processes gravitational reflexes.

  18. Selective rab11 transport and the intrinsic regenerative ability of CNS axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Hiroaki; Donegá, Matteo; Lam, Brian Yh; Petrova, Veselina; van Erp, Susan; Yeo, Giles Sh; Kwok, Jessica Cf; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Eva, Richard; Fawcett, James W

    2017-08-08

    Neurons lose intrinsic axon regenerative ability with maturation, but the mechanism remains unclear. Using an in-vitro laser axotomy model, we show a progressive decline in the ability of cut CNS axons to form a new growth cone and then elongate. Failure of regeneration was associated with increased retraction after axotomy. Transportation into axons becomes selective with maturation; we hypothesized that selective exclusion of molecules needed for growth may contribute to regeneration decline. With neuronal maturity rab11 vesicles (which carry many molecules involved in axon growth) became selectively targeted to the somatodendritic compartment and excluded from axons by predominant retrograde transport However, on overexpression rab11 was mistrafficked into proximal axons, and these axons showed less retraction and enhanced regeneration after axotomy. These results suggest that the decline of intrinsic axon regenerative ability is associated with selective exclusion of key molecules, and that manipulation of transport can enhance regeneration.

  19. Polyfunctionality and distribution of reflexive verbs in Latvian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andra Kalnača

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current paper is to analyze Latvian reflexive verbs from the point of view of their polyfunctionality and distributon.The polysemy of the reflexive verbs is not usually disucussed in the connection with its distribution pattern in the sentence either. This can be partly explianed by the fact that the reflexive verb can have some non-standard language meanings, which following the established practice of the traditional grammars and sometimes even dictionaries,  were not depicted in the language system description either. So the current paper is an attempt to analyze the polyfunctionality of reflexive verbs in connection with their semantic and syntactic functions, without judging the language use from the normative point of view.The classification of Latvian reflexive verbs is based on the relationship between semantic roles and syntactic structure according to the principles devised by Palmer (1994 and Saeed (1997.One and the same reflexive verb may have different lexical meanings with a different distribution for each of the meanings. One and the same verb can belong to different subclasses of the subject and object (or impersonal verbs.Some reflexive verbs have evaluative or aspectual (iterative meanings. The evaluative meanings usually are manifested by a positive or negative assessment of the event (the context can be enhanced by the adverbs good or bad and the consequences while the aspectual meaning is manifested by the intensity of the action, that is – iterativity.The study confirms the assumption that reflexive verbs are independent lexemes as opposed to non-reflexive verb forms. Each reflexive verb has its distinct semantic system and distribution which is different from polysemy of non-reflexive verbs and their distribution. The system of reflexive verbs in Latvian is open where new meanings and even new reflexive verbs arise particularly in colloquial use.

  20. The swallowing reflex and its significance as an airway defensive reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eNishino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Swallowing function, in humans, is very complex. Swallowing plays, not only an important role in food digestion, but also a major role in preventing the entrance of food and/or other materials into the lower respiratory tract. To achieve this, precise coordination is necessary between breathing and swallowing since the pharynx serves as a common pathway for both respiration and digestion. The swallowing reflex consists of afferent pathways, central integration, and efferent pathways. Any defect or disorder along reflex arc can cause a potential delay or impairment in swallow function. The swallowing reflex can be modulated not only by pathological factors but also by physiological factors. Among these, timing of swallows in relation to the phase of respiration may be the most important factor that determines the occurrence of pulmonary aspiration, since phases of inspiration and the expiration-inspiration transition are the most vulnerable for pulmonary aspiration.

  1. The Absence of Sensory Axon Bifurcation Affects Nociception and Termination Fields of Afferents in the Spinal Cord

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    Philip Tröster

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A cGMP signaling cascade composed of C-type natriuretic peptide, the guanylyl cyclase receptor Npr2 and cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (cGKI controls the bifurcation of sensory axons upon entering the spinal cord during embryonic development. However, the impact of axon bifurcation on sensory processing in adulthood remains poorly understood. To investigate the functional consequences of impaired axon bifurcation during adult stages we generated conditional mouse mutants of Npr2 and cGKI (Npr2fl/fl;Wnt1Cre and cGKIKO/fl;Wnt1Cre that lack sensory axon bifurcation in the absence of additional phenotypes observed in the global knockout mice. Cholera toxin labeling in digits of the hind paw demonstrated an altered shape of sensory neuron termination fields in the spinal cord of conditional Npr2 mouse mutants. Behavioral testing of both sexes indicated that noxious heat sensation and nociception induced by chemical irritants are impaired in the mutants, whereas responses to cold sensation, mechanical stimulation, and motor coordination are not affected. Recordings from C-fiber nociceptors in the hind limb skin showed that Npr2 function was not required to maintain normal heat sensitivity of peripheral nociceptors. Thus, the altered behavioral responses to noxious heat found in Npr2fl/fl;Wnt1Cre mice is not due to an impaired C-fiber function. Overall, these data point to a critical role of axonal bifurcation for the processing of pain induced by heat or chemical stimuli.

  2. Multiple sclerosis and anterograde axonal degeneration study by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Pardo, P.; Capdevila Cirera, A.; Sanz Marin, P.M.; Gili Planas, J.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system that affects specifically the myelin. Its diagnosis by imaging techniques is, since the development of magnetic resonance (MR), relatively simple, and its occasional association with anterograde axonal degeneration (WD) has been reported. In both disorders, there is a lengthening of the T1 and T2 relaxation times. In the present report, 76 patients with MS with less than 4 plaques in the typical periventricular position were studied retrospectively, resulting in a rate of association with anterograde axonal degeneration of 8%. We consider that in spite of their same behavior in MR,MS and WD, with moreover represent completely different pathologies, are perfectly differential by MR. The S-E images with longer repetition and echo times in the axial and coronal planes have proved to be those most sensitive for this differentiation. Given that MS is specific pathology of then myelin, the axonal damages in delayed until several plaques adjacent to an axon affect it. We consider that this, added to the restriction of our study group (less than 4 plaques), is the cause of the pow percentage of the MS-WD association in our study. (Author)

  3. Quantifying mechanical force in axonal growth and guidance

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    Ahmad Ibrahim Mahmoud Athamneh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical force plays a fundamental role in neuronal development, physiology, and regeneration. In particular, research has shown that force is involved in growth cone-mediated axonal growth and guidance as well as stretch-induced elongation when an organism increases in size after forming initial synaptic connections. However, much of the details about the exact role of force in these fundamental processes remain unknown. In this review, we highlight (1 standing questions concerning the role of mechanical force in axonal growth and guidance and (2 different experimental techniques used to quantify forces in axons and growth cones. We believe that satisfying answers to these questions will require quantitative information about the relationship between elongation, forces, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal transport, signaling, substrate adhesion, and stiffness contributing to directional growth advance. Furthermore, we address why a wide range of force values have been reported in the literature, and what these values mean in the context of neuronal mechanics. We hope that this review will provide a guide for those interested in studying the role of force in development and regeneration of neuronal networks.

  4. Model of fasciculation and sorting in mixed populations of axons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chaudhuri, D.; Borowski, P.; Zápotocký, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 2 (2011), e021908 ISSN 1539-3755 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : axon guidance * neurogenesis * mathematical model Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.255, year: 2011

  5. Axonal dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in somatosensory cortex.

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    Sally A Marik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical topography can be remapped as a consequence of sensory deprivation, suggesting that cortical circuits are continually modified by experience. To see the effect of altered sensory experience on specific components of cortical circuits, we imaged neurons, labeled with a genetically modified adeno-associated virus, in the intact mouse somatosensory cortex before and after whisker plucking. Following whisker plucking we observed massive and rapid reorganization of the axons of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons, accompanied by a transient increase in bouton density. For horizontally projecting axons of excitatory neurons there was a net increase in axonal projections from the non-deprived whisker barrel columns into the deprived barrel columns. The axon collaterals of inhibitory neurons located in the deprived whisker barrel columns retracted in the vicinity of their somata and sprouted long-range projections beyond their normal reach towards the non-deprived whisker barrel columns. These results suggest that alterations in the balance of excitation and inhibition in deprived and non-deprived barrel columns underlie the topographic remapping associated with sensory deprivation.

  6. Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy in Association with Hepatitis E

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    Araz Al-Saffar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS is an acute peripheral neuropathy that develops as a result of post-infectious immune-mediated nerve injury. It can be classified into classic and variant GBS. Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN is a subtype of GBS with the key clinical features of pure motor weakness, areflexia, absence of sensory symptoms, and lack of neurophysiologic evidence of demyelination. We reported a case of acute motor axonal neuropathy in association with hepatitis E infection. A young woman was referred to us after a period of nausea, fever, and diarrhea. She had unexplained muscle weakness at admission and has been diagnosed with acute hepatitis E infection. A rigorous clinical neurological assessment revealed bilateral symmetrical weakness, which affects the lower limbs more than the upper limbs, with no evidence of sensory involvement. Neurophysiological measurements indicated acute axonal injury without clues to demyelination. A diagnosis of acute motor axonal neuropathy subtype has been made, to which she only received supportive therapy. The symptoms resolved spontaneously and full recovery of motor function was attained after 35 days of weakness onset with complete normalization of neurophysiologic parameters.

  7. Investigation on the mechanism of peripheral axonal injury in glaucoma

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    Jun- Hong Zhao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the angles of longitudinal section of sclera around optic nerve heads and the never fiber layer changes in healthy adults and patients with glaucoma, and to investigate the mechanism of peripheral retinal axonal injury, with the combined knowledge of biomechanics. METHODS: The optical nerves and their peripheral tissue specimen in the 12 eyes from health adult donators and 12 eyes from glaucoma patient donators were dyed by Glees' method to compare the angles of longitudinal section of sclera around optic nerve heads(through optic nerve center, and to observe the anatomical features of the peripheral retinal axons. RESULTS: The mean angle of longitudinal section of sclera around optic nerve in healthy adults was 73.3°, while that in patients with absolute glaucoma was 75.6°. The difference showed no significance(t=1.44, P>0.05. There was a sharp bend in the course of peripheral optical fiber in healthy adults. However, the optic nerve fiber disappeared completely in patients with glaucoma end stage. CONCLUSION: The angle between the medial edge and leading edge of sclera(around optic nerve headsis an acute angle. The optical fiber in glaucoma end stage disappeared completely. The phenomenon may be related to high intraocular pressure, the sclera shape, the shear modulus of sclera and axons, and “axonal bending-injury” mechanism.

  8. IFNgamma enhances microglial reactions to hippocampal axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Hegelund, I V; Lomholt, N D

    2000-01-01

    Glial reactivity is implicated in CNS repair and regenerative responses. Microglia, the cells responding earliest to axonal injury, produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), a cytokine with both cytopathic and neuroprotective effects. We have studied activation of hippocampal microglia to p...

  9. Differential Axonal Projection of Mitral and Tufted Cells in the Mouse Main Olfactory System

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    Shin Nagayama

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, much has been elucidated regarding the functional organization of the axonal connection of olfactory sensory neurons to olfactory bulb (OB glomeruli. However, the manner in which projection neurons of the OB process odorant input and send this information to higher brain centers remains unclear. Here, we report long-range, large-scale tracing of the axonal projection patterns of OB neurons using two-photon microscopy. Tracer injection into a single glomerulus demonstrated widely distributed mitral/tufted cell axonal projections on the lateroventral surface of the mouse brain, including the anterior/posterior piriform cortex (PC and olfactory tubercle (OT. We noted two distinct groups of labeled axons: PC-orienting axons and OT-orienting axons. Each group occupied distinct parts of the lateral olfactory tract. PC-orienting axons projected axon collaterals to a wide area of the PC but only a few collaterals to the OT. OT-orienting axons densely projected axon collaterals primarily to the anterolateral OT (alOT. Different colored dye injections into the superficial and deep portions of the OB external plexiform layer revealed that the PC-orienting axon populations originated in presumed mitral cells and the OT-orienting axons in presumed tufted cells. These data suggest that although mitral and tufted cells receive similar odor signals from a shared glomerulus, they process the odor information in different ways and send their output to different higher brain centers via the PC and alOT.

  10. Strain differences in baroceptor reflex in adult Wistar Kyoto rats

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    Vitor E. Valenti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A subset of normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats show lower baroreflex sensitivity; however, no previous study investigated whether there are differences in baroreflex sensitivity within this subset. Our study compared baroreflex sensitivity among conscious rats of this specific subtype. METHODS: Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats (16 weeks old were studied. Cannulas were inserted into the abdominal aortic artery through the right femoral artery to measure mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR. Baroreflex gain was calculated as the ratio between change in HR and MAP variation (ΔHR/ΔMAP in response to a depressor dose of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 50 µg/kg, i.v. and a pressor dose of phenylephrine (PE, 8 µg/kg, i.v.. Rats were divided into four groups: 1 low bradycardic baroreflex (LB, baroreflex gain (BG between -1 and -2 bpm/mmHg tested with PE; 2 high bradycardic baroreflex (HB, BG < -2 bpm/mmHg tested with PE; 3 low tachycardic baroreflex (LT, BG between -1 and -2 bpm/mmHg tested with SNP and; 4 high tachycardic baroreflex (HT, BG < -2 bpm/mmHg tested with SNP. Significant differences were considered for p < 0.05. RESULTS: Approximately 37% of the rats showed a reduced bradycardic peak, bradycardic reflex and decreased bradycardic gain of baroreflex while roughly 23% had a decreased basal HR, tachycardic peak, tachycardic reflex and reduced sympathetic baroreflex gain. No significant alterations were noted with regard to basal MAP. CONCLUSION: There is variability regarding baroreflex sensitivity among WKY rats from the same laboratory.

  11. Effects of teeth clenching on the soleus H reflex during lower limb muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuyama, Akihiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Ueno, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    We assessed whether the soleus H reflex was depressed or facilitated in association with voluntary teeth clenching during muscle fatigue. A total of 13 and 9 healthy adult subjects were instructed to perform right-side tiptoe standing for 5 (TS1) and 10min (TS2) to induce the soleus muscle fatigue. Electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from the bilateral masseter as well as the right-side soleus muscles. H reflex was evoked using a surface electrode. The isometric muscle strength during plantar flexion was measured. We tested two dental occlusal conditions (1) with maximal voluntary teeth clenching (MVTC) and (2) at mandibular rest position (RP). H reflex was evoked before and after TS1 and TS2. The isometric muscle strength during plantar flexion was measured before and after TS1 and TS2. Mean amplitudes of H reflex with MVTC before and after TS1 were significantly larger than that with RP before and after TS1. The mean peak torque (PT) during isometric plantar flexion was observed significant differences in all subjects. The mean amplitude of H reflex with MVTC before TS2 was significantly larger than that with RP before TS2. No significant difference between RP after TS2 and MVTC after TS2. The mean PT with MVTC before TS2 was significantly larger than that with RP before TS2. There was no significant difference between RP and MVTC after TS2. The present study demonstrated that teeth clenching could facilitate H reflex regardless of the degree of muscle fatigue. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic Deletion of the Transcriptional Repressor NFIL3 Enhances Axon Growth In Vitro but Not Axonal Repair In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kallen, Loek R; Eggers, Ruben; Ehlert, Erich M; Verhaagen, J.; Smit, August B; van Kesteren, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    Axonal regeneration after injury requires the coordinated expression of genes in injured neurons. We previously showed that either reducing expression or blocking function of the transcriptional repressor NFIL3 activates transcription of regeneration-associated genes Arg1 and Gap43 and strongly

  13. Axonal regeneration and development of de novo axons from distal dendrites of adult feline commissural interneurons after a proximal axotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenrich, Keith K; Skelton, Nicole; MacDermid, Victoria E

    2007-01-01

    Following proximal axotomy, several types of neurons sprout de novo axons from distal dendrites. These processes may represent a means of forming new circuits following spinal cord injury. However, it is not know whether mammalian spinal interneurons, axotomized as a result of a spinal cord injur...

  14. Oligodendrocyte Development in the Absence of Their Target Axons In Vivo.

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    Rafael Almeida

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes form myelin around axons of the central nervous system, enabling saltatory conduction. Recent work has established that axons can regulate certain aspects of oligodendrocyte development and myelination, yet remarkably oligodendrocytes in culture retain the ability to differentiate in the absence of axons and elaborate myelin sheaths around synthetic axon-like substrates. It remains unclear the extent to which the life-course of oligodendrocytes requires the presence of, or signals derived from axons in vivo. In particular, it is unclear whether the specific axons fated for myelination regulate the oligodendrocyte population in a living organism, and if so, which precise steps of oligodendrocyte-cell lineage progression are regulated by target axons. Here, we use live-imaging of zebrafish larvae carrying transgenic reporters that label oligodendrocyte-lineage cells to investigate which aspects of oligodendrocyte development, from specification to differentiation, are affected when we manipulate the target axonal environment. To drastically reduce the number of axons targeted for myelination, we use a previously identified kinesin-binding protein (kbp mutant, in which the first myelinated axons in the spinal cord, reticulospinal axons, do not fully grow in length, creating a region in the posterior spinal cord where most initial targets for myelination are absent. We find that a 73% reduction of reticulospinal axon surface in the posterior spinal cord of kbp mutants results in a 27% reduction in the number of oligodendrocytes. By time-lapse analysis of transgenic OPC reporters, we find that the reduction in oligodendrocyte number is explained by a reduction in OPC proliferation and survival. Interestingly, OPC specification and migration are unaltered in the near absence of normal axonal targets. Finally, we find that timely differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes does not depend at all on the presence of target axons

  15. Adult onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) and Nasu-Hakola disease: lesion staging and dynamic changes of axons and microglial subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Kinoshita, Michiaki; Suzuki-Kouyama, Emi; Inoue, Teruhiko; Nakahara, Asa; Tokiwai, Mika; Arai, Nobutaka; Satoh, Jun-Ichi; Aoki, Naoya; Jinnai, Kenji; Yazawa, Ikuru; Arai, Kimihito; Ishihara, Kenji; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Yagisita, Saburo; Amano, Naoji; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Terada, Seishi; Yoshida, Mari; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mitsuyama, Yoshio; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2017-11-01

    The brains of 10 Japanese patients with adult onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) encompassing hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) and eight Japanese patients with Nasu-Hakola disease (N-HD) and five age-matched Japanese controls were examined neuropathologically with special reference to lesion staging and dynamic changes of microglial subsets. In both diseases, the pathognomonic neuropathological features included spherically swollen axons (spheroids and globules), axon loss and changes of microglia in the white matter. In ALSP, four lesion stages based on the degree of axon loss were discernible: Stage I, patchy axon loss in the cerebral white matter without atrophy; Stage II, large patchy areas of axon loss with slight atrophy of the cerebral white matter and slight dilatation of the lateral ventricles; Stage III, extensive axon loss in the cerebral white matter and dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles without remarkable axon loss in the brainstem and cerebellum; Stage IV, devastated cerebral white matter with marked dilatation of the ventricles and axon loss in the brainstem and/or cerebellum. Internal capsule and pontine base were relatively well preserved in the N-HD, even at Stage IV, and the swollen axons were larger with a higher density in the ALSP. Microglial cells immunopositive for CD68, CD163 or CD204 were far more obvious in ALSP, than in N-HD, and the shape and density of the cells changed in each stage. With progression of the stage, clinical symptoms became worse to apathetic state, and epilepsy was frequently observed in patients at Stages III and IV in both diseases. From these findings, it is concluded that (i) shape, density and subsets of microglia change dynamically along the passage of stages and (ii) increase of IBA-1-, CD68-, CD163- and CD204-immunopositive cells precedes loss of axons in ALSP. © 2016

  16. High levels of sound pressure: acoustic reflex thresholds and auditory complaints of workers with noise exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Scalli Mathias Duarte

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The clinical evaluation of subjects with occupational noise exposure has been difficult due to the discrepancy between auditory complaints and auditory test results. This study aimed to evaluate the contralateral acoustic reflex thresholds of workers exposed to high levels of noise, and to compare these results to the subjects' auditory complaints.METHODS: This clinical retrospective study evaluated 364 workers between 1998 and 2005; their contralateral acoustic reflexes were compared to auditory complaints, age, and noise exposure time by chi-squared, Fisher's, and Spearman's tests.RESULTS: The workers' age ranged from 18 to 50 years (mean = 39.6, and noise exposure time from one to 38 years (mean = 17.3. We found that 15.1% (55 of the workers had bilateral hearing loss, 38.5% (140 had bilateral tinnitus, 52.8% (192 had abnormal sensitivity to loud sounds, and 47.2% (172 had speech recognition impairment. The variables hearing loss, speech recognition impairment, tinnitus, age group, and noise exposure time did not show relationship with acoustic reflex thresholds; however, all complaints demonstrated a statistically significant relationship with Metz recruitment at 3000 and 4000 Hz bilaterally.CONCLUSION: There was no significance relationship between auditory complaints and acoustic reflexes.

  17. Motricidade reflexa na morte cerebral The reflex activity in the brain death

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    Wilson L. Sanvito

    1972-03-01

    Full Text Available O diagnóstico de morte cerebral está baseado em critérios clínicos, eletrencefalográficos e angiográficos. Do ponto de vista clínico deve ser evidenciado o seguinte quadro: coma profundo, midríase paralítica bilateral, ausência de reação a qualquer estímulo externo, apnéia, arreflexia superficial e profunda. Do ponto de vista eletrencefalográfico são necessários dois registros, separados por um intervalo de 24 horas, evidenciando traçados iselétricos. No presente trabalho são estudados 15 pacientes com morte cerebral comprovada do ponto de vista clínico e eletrencefalográfico. Em 8 pacientes havia persistência de atividade reflexa durante a fase de morte cerebral (reflexos profundos e/ou superficiais. Fenômenos de automatismos medulares também foram verificados em 3 pacientes.The diagnosis of brain death is based in clinical, electroencephalographic and angiographic data. The criteria for diagnosis of brain death are: deep coma with unreceptivity and unresponsiveness, no movements or breathing (the patient's respiration must be maintained artificially, bilateral dilated and fixed pupils, absence of corneal reflexes, no response to caloric test, absence of deep tendon reflexes and of the superficial abdominal and plantar reflexes, isoelectric EEG maintained for twenty-four hours. The purpose of this study was to observe the natural clinical courses of 15 patients with brain death, specially the data concerning the deep and superficial reflexes. From 15 patients fulfilling the criteria of brain death, 8 maintained spinal reflexes up to the time of cardiac arrest; in five of these patients the superficial abdominal reflexes were present and the reflexes of spinal automatism could be elicited. These results show that the absence of deep and superficial reflexes can't be considered as essencial for the diagnosis of brain death.

  18. The legacy of care as reflexive learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Marta Rodríguez; Moya, Jose Luis Medina

    2016-06-14

    to analyze whether the tutor's use of reflexive strategies encourages the students to reflect. The goal is to discover what type of strategies can help to achieve this and how tutors and students behave in the practical context. a qualitative and ethnographic focus was adopted. Twenty-seven students and 15 tutors from three health centers participated. The latter had received specific training on reflexive clinical tutoring. The analysis was developed through constant comparisons of the categories. the results demonstrate that the tutors' use of reflexive strategies such as didactic questioning, didactic empathy and pedagogical silence contributes to encourage the students' reflection and significant learning. reflexive practice is key to tutors' training and students' learning. analisar se o uso de estratégias reflexivas por parte da tutora de estágio clínico estimula a reflexão nos estudantes. A intenção é descobrir qual tipo de estratégias podem ajudar a fazê-lo e como as tutoras e os estudantes se comportam no contexto prático. foi adotado um enfoque qualitativo de cunho etnográfico em que participaram 27 estudantes e 15 tutores de três centros de saúde que haviam recebido formação específica sobre tutoria clínica reflexiva. A análise foi realizada por meio de comparações constantes das categorias. os resultados demonstram que o uso de estratégias reflexivas como a interrogação didática, a empatia didática e o silêncio pedagógico por parte das tutoras, contribui para fomentar a reflexão do estudante e sua aprendizagem significativa. a prática reflexiva é a chave para a formação dos tutores e para a aprendizagem dos estudantes. analizar si el uso de estrategias reflexivas por parte de la tutora de prácticas clínicas fomenta la reflexión en los estudiantes. Se trata de conocer qué tipo de estrategias pueden ayudar a hacerlo y cómo se comportan tutoras y estudiantes en el contexto práctico. se ha utilizado un enfoque

  19. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop an advanced reflexive structure technology system to increase the survivability of future systems constructed of...

  20. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno......Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...

  1. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following pacemaker insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londhey, Vikram A; Singh, Nishant; Kini, Seema

    2011-09-01

    A 55 year old male presented with pain and swelling over dorsum of right hand and small joints, and loss of sweating over right hand since two months. He was a known case of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) with mitral regurgitation and complete heart block for which pacemaker was implanted 1 year back. Bilateral wrist X-ray was suggestive of pronounced demineralization (osteopenia) in the right hand. He was thus diagnosed to have reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) considered to be induced by pacemaker insertion. After treatment with amitryptiline and indomethacin his symptoms dramatically improved.

  2. Effects of brainstem lesions on the masseter inhibitory reflex. Functional mechanisms of reflex pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.; Cruccu, G.; Manfredi, M.; Koelman, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    The masseter inhibitory reflex (MIR) was investigated in 16 patients with localized brainstem lesions involving the trigeminal system. The MIR consists of two phases of EMG silence (S1 and S2) evoked by stimulation of the mental nerve during maximal clenching of the teeth. The extent of the lesions

  3. A novel therapy to promote axonal fusion in human digital nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Ravinder; Waitayawinyu, Thanapong; Nookala, Ratnam; Riley, David Colton; Boyer, Richard B; Sexton, Kevin W; Boonyasirikool, Chinnakart; Niempoog, Sunyarn; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Does, Mark D; Dortch, Richard D; Shack, Robert Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P

    2016-11-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can have a devastating impact on our military and veteran population. Current strategies for peripheral nerve repair include techniques such as nerve tubes, nerve grafts, tissue matrices, and nerve growth guides to enhance the number of regenerating axons. Even with such advanced techniques, it takes months to regain function. In animal models, polyethylene glycol (PEG) therapy has shown to improve both physiologic and behavioral outcomes after nerve transection by fusion of a portion of the proximal axons to the distal axon stumps. The objective of this study was to show the efficacy of PEG fusion in humans and to retrospectively compare PEG fusion to standard nerve repair. Patients with traumatic lacerations involving digital nerves were treated with PEG after standard microsurgical neurorrhaphy. Sensory assessment after injury was performed at 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, and 2 months using static two-point discrimination and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing. The Medical Research Council Classification (MRCC) for Sensory Recovery Scale was used to evaluate the level of injury. The PEG fusion group was compared to patient-matched controls whose data were retrospectively collected. Four PEG fusions were performed on four nerve transections in two patients. Polyethylene glycol therapy improves functional outcomes and speed of nerve recovery in clinical setting assessed by average MRCC score in week 1 (2.8 vs 1.0, p = 0.03). At 4 weeks, MRCC remained superior in the PEG fusion group (3.8 vs 1.3, p = 0.01). At 8 weeks, there was improvement in both groups with the PEG fusion cohort remaining statistically better (4.0 vs 1.7, p = 0.01). Polyethylene glycol fusion is a novel therapy for peripheral nerve repair with proven effectiveness in animal models. Clinical studies are still in early stages but have had encouraging results. Polyethylene glycol fusion is a potential revolutionary therapy in peripheral nerve repair but needs further

  4. Atypical Electrophysiological Findings in a Patient with Acute Motor and Sensory Axonal Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Versace

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS is an immune-mediated polyradiculoneuropathy with acute onset and rapid clinical worsening; early diagnosis and immunomodulating therapy can ameliorate the course of disease. During the first days, however, nerve conduction studies (NCSs are not always conclusive. Here, we describe a 73-year-old man presenting with progressive muscular weakness of the lower limbs, ascending to the upper limbs, accompanied by distal sensory disturbances. Neuroimaging of brain and spine and NCSs were unremarkable; cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed no albuminocytologic dissociation. Based on typical clinical features, and on positivity for serum GD1b-IgM antibodies, GBS with proximal conduction failure at multiple radicular levels was postulated, and a standard regime of intravenous immunoglobulin was administered. Four weeks later, the patient presented with flaccid tetraparesis, areflexia, and reduction of position sense, tingling paresthesias, and initial respiratory distress. Repeat NCS still revealed almost normal findings, except for the disappearance of right ulnar nerve F-waves. A few days thereafter, the patient developed severe respiratory insufficiency requiring mechanical ventilation for 2 weeks. On day 50, NCS revealed for the first time markedly reduced compound muscle action potentials and sensory nerve action potentials in all tested nerves, without signs of demyelination; needle electromyography documented widespread denervation. The diagnosis of acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy was made. After 3 months of intensive rehabilitation, the patient regained the ability to walk with little assistance and was discharged home. In conclusion, normal NCS findings up to several weeks do not exclude the diagnosis of GBS. Very proximal axonal conduction failure with late distal axonal degeneration should be taken into consideration, and electrodiagnostic follow-up examinations, even employing unusual techniques

  5. Another cause for conductive hearing loss with present acoustic reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M; Buchman, Craig A

    2008-11-01

    There are numerous potential causes of conductive hearing loss (HL). It is important to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete examination, including audiometric testing and radiographic evaluation when necessary. In this report, we present a patient with an intact tympanic membrane, no history of ear disease or trauma who as an adult developed progressive, conductive HL because of an anomalous course of a dehiscent facial nerve. In the patient with a conductive HL and at least partially intact reflexes, superior semicircular canal dehiscence, fracture of the stapes superstructure proximal to the tendon, other third window phenomena, and now dehiscence of the facial nerve resulting in decreased mobility of the ossicular chain must be considered.

  6. Pharmacogenetic stimulation of neuronal activity increases myelination in an axon-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitew, Stanislaw; Gobius, Ilan; Fenlon, Laura R; McDougall, Stuart J; Hawkes, David; Xing, Yao Lulu; Bujalka, Helena; Gundlach, Andrew L; Richards, Linda J; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Merson, Tobias D; Emery, Ben

    2018-01-22

    Mounting evidence suggests that neuronal activity influences myelination, potentially allowing for experience-driven modulation of neural circuitry. The degree to which neuronal activity is capable of regulating myelination at the individual axon level is unclear. Here we demonstrate that stimulation of somatosensory axons in the mouse brain increases proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) within the underlying white matter. Stimulated axons display an increased probability of being myelinated compared to neighboring non-stimulated axons, in addition to being ensheathed with thicker myelin. Conversely, attenuating neuronal firing reduces axonal myelination in a selective activity-dependent manner. Our findings reveal that the process of selecting axons for myelination is strongly influenced by the relative activity of individual axons within a population. These observed cellular changes are consistent with the emerging concept that adaptive myelination is a key mechanism for the fine-tuning of neuronal circuitry in the mammalian CNS.

  7. Effect of vesicle traps on traffic jam formation in fast axonal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for simulation of the formation of organelle traps in fast axonal transport. Such traps may form in the regions of microtubule polar mismatching. Depending on the orientation of microtubules pointing toward the trap region, these traps can accumulate either plus-end or minus-end oriented vesicles. The model predicts that the maximum concentrations of organelles occur at the boundaries of the trap regions; the overall concentration of organelles in the axon with traps is greatly increased compared to that in a healthy axon, which is expected to contribute to mechanical damages of the axon. The organelle traps induce hindrance to organelle transport down the axon; the total organelle flux down the axon with traps is found to be significantly reduced compared to that in a healthy axon. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficient retrograde transport of pseudorabies virus within neurons requires local protein synthesis in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Orkide O; Perlman, David H; Enquist, Lynn W

    2013-01-16

    After replicating in epithelial cells, alphaherpesviruses such as pseudorabies virus (PRV) invade axons of peripheral nervous system neurons and undergo retrograde transport toward the distant cell bodies. Although several viral proteins engage molecular motors to facilitate transport, the initial steps and neuronal responses to infection are poorly understood. Using compartmented neuron cultures to physically separate axon infection from cell bodies, we found that PRV infection induces local protein synthesis in axons, including proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling, intracellular trafficking, signaling, and metabolism. This rapid translation of axonal mRNAs is required for efficient PRV retrograde transport and infection of cell bodies. Furthermore, induction of axonal damage, which also induces local protein synthesis, prior to infection reduces virion trafficking, suggesting that host damage signals and virus particles compete for retrograde transport. Thus, similar to axonal damage, virus infection induces local protein translation in axons, and viruses likely exploit this response for invasion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Retinal ganglion cells: Energetics, compartmentation, axonal transport, cytoskeletons and vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dao-Yi; Cringle, Stephen J; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Morgan, William H; Yu, Paula K; Su, Er-Ning

    2013-09-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are specialized projection neurons that relay an immense amount of visual information from the retina to the brain. RGC signal inputs are collected by dendrites and output is distributed from the cell body via very thin (0.5-1 μm) and long (∼50 mm) axons. The RGC cell body is larger than other retinal neurons, but is still only a very small fraction (one ten thousandths) of the length and total surface area of the axon. The total distance traversed by RGCs extends from the retina, starting from synapses with bipolar and amacrine cells, to the brain, to synapses with neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus. This review will focus on the energy demands of RGCs and the relevant tissues that surround them. RGC survival and function unexceptionally depends upon free energy, predominantly adenosine triphosphate (ATP). RGC energy metabolism is vastly different when compared to that of the photoreceptors. Each subcellular component of the RGC is remarkably different in terms of structure, function and extracellular environment. The energy demands and distribution of each component are also distinct as evidenced by the uneven distribution of mitochondria and ATP within the RGC - signifying the presence of intracellular energy gradients. In this review we will describe RGCs as having four subcellular components, (1) Dendrites, (2) Cell body, (3) Non-myelinated axon, including intraocular and optic nerve head portions, and (4) Myelinated axon, including the intra-orbital and intracranial portions. We will also describe how RGCs integrate information from each subcellular component in order achieve intracellular homeostatic stability as well as respond to perturbations in the extracellular environment. The possible cellular mechanisms such as axonal transport and axonal cytoskeleton proteins that are involved in maintaining RGC energy homeostasis during normal and disease conditions will also be discussed in depth. The emphasis of this

  10. Inosine enhances axon sprouting and motor recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel; Zai, Laila; Liang, Peng; Schaffling, Colleen; Ahlborn, David; Benowitz, Larry I

    2013-01-01

    Although corticospinal tract axons cannot regenerate long distances after spinal cord injury, they are able to sprout collateral branches rostral to an injury site that can help form compensatory circuits in cases of incomplete lesions. We show here that inosine enhances the formation of compensatory circuits after a dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord in mature rats and improves coordinated limb use. Inosine is a naturally occurring metabolite of adenosine that crosses the cell membrane and, in neurons, activates Mst3b, a protein kinase that is part of a signal transduction pathway that regulates axon outgrowth. Compared to saline-treated controls, rats with dorsal hemisections that were treated with inosine showed three times as many synaptic contacts between corticospinal tract collaterals and long propriospinal interneurons that project from the cervical cord to the lumbar level. Inosine-treated rats also showed stronger serotonergic reinnervation of the lumbar cord than saline-treated controls, and performed well above controls in both open-field testing and a horizontal ladder rung-walking test. Inosine was equally effective whether delivered intracranially or intravenously, and has been shown to be safe for other indications in humans. Thus, inosine might be a useful therapeutic for improving outcome after spinal cord injury.

  11. Inosine enhances axon sprouting and motor recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kim

    Full Text Available Although corticospinal tract axons cannot regenerate long distances after spinal cord injury, they are able to sprout collateral branches rostral to an injury site that can help form compensatory circuits in cases of incomplete lesions. We show here that inosine enhances the formation of compensatory circuits after a dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord in mature rats and improves coordinated limb use. Inosine is a naturally occurring metabolite of adenosine that crosses the cell membrane and, in neurons, activates Mst3b, a protein kinase that is part of a signal transduction pathway that regulates axon outgrowth. Compared to saline-treated controls, rats with dorsal hemisections that were treated with inosine showed three times as many synaptic contacts between corticospinal tract collaterals and long propriospinal interneurons that project from the cervical cord to the lumbar level. Inosine-treated rats also showed stronger serotonergic reinnervation of the lumbar cord than saline-treated controls, and performed well above controls in both open-field testing and a horizontal ladder rung-walking test. Inosine was equally effective whether delivered intracranially or intravenously, and has been shown to be safe for other indications in humans. Thus, inosine might be a useful therapeutic for improving outcome after spinal cord injury.

  12. Plasminogen deficiency causes reduced corticospinal axonal plasticity and functional recovery after stroke in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwu Liu

    Full Text Available Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA has been implicated in neurite outgrowth and neurological recovery post stroke. tPA converts the zymogen plasminogen (Plg into plasmin. In this study, using plasminogen knockout (Plg-/- mice and their Plg-native littermates (Plg+/+, we investigated the role of Plg in axonal remodeling and neurological recovery after stroke. Plg+/+ and Plg-/- mice (n = 10/group were subjected to permanent intraluminal monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. A foot-fault test and a single pellet reaching test were performed prior to and on day 3 after stroke, and weekly thereafter to monitor functional deficit and recovery. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected into the left motor cortex to anterogradely label the corticospinal tract (CST. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after stroke. Neurite outgrowth was also measured in primary cultured cortical neurons harvested from Plg+/+ and Plg-/- embryos. In Plg+/+ mice, the motor functional deficiency after stroke progressively recovered with time. In contrast, recovery in Plg-/- mice was significantly impaired compared to Plg+/+ mice (p0.82, p<0.01. Plg-/- neurons exhibited significantly reduced neurite outgrowth. Our data suggest that plasminogen-dependent proteolysis has a beneficial effect during neurological recovery after stroke, at least in part, by promoting axonal remodeling in the denervated spinal cord.

  13. Recovery of Vestibular Ocular Reflex Function and Balance Control after a Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Allum, J. H. J.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the effect of unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (UPVD) on balance control for stance and gait tests. Because a UPVD is normally defined based on vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) tests, we compared recovery observed in balance control with patterns of recovery in VOR function. Two general types of UPVD are considered; acute vestibular neuritis (AVN) and vestibular neurectomy. The latter was subdivided into vestibular loss after cerebellar pontine angle tumor surgery ...

  14. Neural reflex regulation of arterial pressure in pathophysiological conditions: interplay among the baroreflex, the cardiopulmonary reflexes and the chemoreflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.C. Vasquez

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of arterial pressure at levels adequate to perfuse the tissues is a basic requirement for the constancy of the internal environment and survival. The objective of the present review was to provide information about the basic reflex mechanisms that are responsible for the moment-to-moment regulation of the cardiovascular system. We demonstrate that this control is largely provided by the action of arterial and non-arterial reflexes that detect and correct changes in arterial pressure (baroreflex, blood volume or chemical composition (mechano- and chemosensitive cardiopulmonary reflexes, and changes in blood-gas composition (chemoreceptor reflex. The importance of the integration of these cardiovascular reflexes is well understood and it is clear that processing mainly occurs in the nucleus tractus solitarii, although the mechanism is poorly understood. There are several indications that the interactions of baroreflex, chemoreflex and Bezold-Jarisch reflex inputs, and the central nervous system control the activity of autonomic preganglionic neurons through parallel afferent and efferent pathways to achieve cardiovascular homeostasis. It is surprising that so little appears in the literature about the integration of these neural reflexes in cardiovascular function. Thus, our purpose was to review the interplay between peripheral neural reflex mechanisms of arterial blood pressure and blood volume regulation in physiological and pathophysiological states. Special emphasis is placed on the experimental model of arterial hypertension induced by N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME in which the interplay of these three reflexes is demonstrable

  15. A growing field: The regulation of axonal regeneration by Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Armando L; Udeh, Adanna; Kalahasty, Karthik; Hackam, Abigail S

    2018-01-01

    The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a highly conserved signaling cascade that plays critical roles during embryogenesis. Wnt ligands regulate axonal extension, growth cone guidance and synaptogenesis throughout the developing central nervous system (CNS). Recently, studies in mammalian and fish model systems have demonstrated that Wnt/β-catenin signaling also promotes axonal regeneration in the adult optic nerve and spinal cord after injury, raising the possibility that Wnt could be developed as a therapeutic strategy. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence that reveals novel roles for Wnt signaling in the injured CNS, and discuss possible mechanisms by which Wnt ligands could overcome molecular barriers inhibiting axonal growth to promote regeneration. A central challenge in the neuroscience field is developing therapeutic strategies that induce robust axonal regeneration. Although adult axons have the capacity to respond to axonal guidance molecules after injury, there are several major obstacles for axonal growth, including extensive neuronal death, glial scars at the injury site, and lack of axonal guidance signals. Research in rodents demonstrated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in retinal neurons and radial glia induced neuronal survival and axonal growth, but that activation within reactive glia at the injury site promoted proliferation and glial scar formation. Studies in zebrafish spinal cord injury models confirm an axonal regenerative role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and identified the cell types responsible. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt induces axonal and neurite growth through transcription-dependent effects of its central mediator β-catenin, potentially by inducing regeneration-promoting genes. Canonical Wnt signaling may also function through transcription-independent interactions of β-catenin with cytoskeletal elements, which could stabilize growing axons and control growth cone

  16. Squid Giant Axon Contains Neurofilament Protein mRNA but does not Synthesize Neurofilament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Harold; House, Shirley; Kim, Dong Sun; Chin, Hemin; Pant, Harish C

    2017-04-01

    When isolated squid giant axons are incubated in radioactive amino acids, abundant newly synthesized proteins are found in the axoplasm. These proteins are translated in the adaxonal Schwann cells and subsequently transferred into the giant axon. The question as to whether any de novo protein synthesis occurs in the giant axon itself is difficult to resolve because the small contribution of the proteins possibly synthesized intra-axonally is not easily distinguished from the large amounts of the proteins being supplied from the Schwann cells. In this paper, we reexamine this issue by studying the synthesis of endogenous neurofilament (NF) proteins in the axon. Our laboratory previously showed that NF mRNA and protein are present in the squid giant axon, but not in the surrounding adaxonal glia. Therefore, if the isolated squid axon could be shown to contain newly synthesized NF protein de novo, it could not arise from the adaxonal glia. The results of experiments in this paper show that abundant 3H-labeled NF protein is synthesized in the squid giant fiber lobe containing the giant axon's neuronal cell bodies, but despite the presence of NF mRNA in the giant axon no labeled NF protein is detected in the giant axon. This lends support to the glia-axon protein transfer hypothesis which posits that the squid giant axon obtains newly synthesized protein by Schwann cell transfer and not through intra-axonal protein synthesis, and further suggests that the NF mRNA in the axon is in a translationally repressed state.

  17. Neocortical axon arbors trade-off material and conduction delay conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian M L Budd

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The brain contains a complex network of axons rapidly communicating information between billions of synaptically connected neurons. The morphology of individual axons, therefore, defines the course of information flow within the brain. More than a century ago, Ramón y Cajal proposed that conservation laws to save material (wire length and limit conduction delay regulate the design of individual axon arbors in cerebral cortex. Yet the spatial and temporal communication costs of single neocortical axons remain undefined. Here, using reconstructions of in vivo labelled excitatory spiny cell and inhibitory basket cell intracortical axons combined with a variety of graph optimization algorithms, we empirically investigated Cajal's conservation laws in cerebral cortex for whole three-dimensional (3D axon arbors, to our knowledge the first study of its kind. We found intracortical axons were significantly longer than optimal. The temporal cost of cortical axons was also suboptimal though far superior to wire-minimized arbors. We discovered that cortical axon branching appears to promote a low temporal dispersion of axonal latencies and a tight relationship between cortical distance and axonal latency. In addition, inhibitory basket cell axonal latencies may occur within a much narrower temporal window than excitatory spiny cell axons, which may help boost signal detection. Thus, to optimize neuronal network communication we find that a modest excess of axonal wire is traded-off to enhance arbor temporal economy and precision. Our results offer insight into the principles of brain organization and communication in and development of grey matter, where temporal precision is a crucial prerequisite for coincidence detection, synchronization and rapid network oscillations.

  18. Cough reflex sensitization from esophagus and nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennel, Michal; Brozmanova, Mariana; Kollarik, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The diseases of the esophagus and nose are among the major factors contributing to chronic cough although their role in different patient populations is debated. Studies in animal models and in humans show that afferent C-fiber activators applied on esophageal or nasal mucosa do not initiate cough, but enhance cough induced by inhaled irritants. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of esophageal and nasal C-fibers contribute to cough reflex hypersensitivity observed in chronic cough patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic rhinitis, respectively. The afferent nerves mediating cough sensitization from the esophagus are probably the neural crest-derived vagal jugular C-fibers. In addition to their responsiveness to high concentration of acid typical for gastroesophageal reflux (pHcough sensitization are less understood. Increased cough reflex sensitivity was also reported in many patients with GERD or rhinitis who do not complain of cough indicating that additional endogenous or exogenous factors may be required to develop chronic coughing in these diseases. PMID:26498387

  19. Venoarteriolar reflex responses in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyneva, Z; Velcheva, I; Antonova, N; Titianova, E; Koleva, I

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the venoarteriolar reflex (VAR) responses in type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) diabetes mellitus (DM) with polyneuropathy and to estimate their relationship with age, DM duration, initial cutaneous temperature and body mass index. Four groups of subjects were investigated: 1st group -20 patients with T1DM; 2nd group -50 patients with T2DM; 3rd group of 20 healthy subjects with similar age and body mass index (BMI) to the T1DM group; 4th group (Control2) of 24 healthy subjects adjusted by age and BMI to the T2DM group. The cutaneous perfusions of the big toe pulp were monitored as baseline perfusions at a temperature of 32°C in supine and sitting position with hanging legs and back in supine position. Loss of venoarteriolar reflex responses was established in 75% of T1DM patients, 78% of T2DM patients and in none of the investigated healthy controls. Reduced venoarteriolar perfusion responses were established in both T1DM and T2DM patients with polyneuropathy compared with healthy subjects. Reliable positive associations between VAR responses and the age, DM duration and initial cutaneous temperature were found.

  20. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eFrazier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1, where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. 1. Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence?Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1, differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3 or finite (2 and 4, and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2 or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4.The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Exp. 3 and 4, wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure.

  1. Coevolution of axon guidance molecule Slit and its receptor Robo.

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    Qi Yu

    Full Text Available Coevolution is important for the maintenance of the interaction between a ligand and its receptor during evolution. The interaction between axon guidance molecule Slit and its receptor Robo is critical for the axon repulsion in neural tissues, which is evolutionarily conserved from planarians to humans. However, the mechanism of coevolution between Slit and Robo remains unclear. In this study, we found that coordinated amino acid changes took place at interacting sites of Slit and Robo by comparing the amino acids at these sites among different organisms. In addition, the high level correlation between evolutionary rate of Slit and Robo was identified in vertebrates. Furthermore, the sites under positive selection of slit and robo were detected in the same lineage such as mosquito and teleost. Overall, our results provide evidence for the coevolution between Slit and Robo.

  2. Activated retinal glia mediated axon regeneration in experimental glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Barbara; Guidi, Alessandra; Fawcett, James W; Martin, Keith R

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of retinal ganglion cell axons in the optic nerve and their cell bodies in the retina. Reactive retinal glial changes have been observed in glaucoma but the role of such glial changes in the pathogenesis of the condition remains unclear. In the present study we found that retinal ganglion cells in an experimental animal model of glaucoma have an increased axon regenerative potential. Regeneration of adult rat retinal ganglion cell axons after optic nerve crush was significantly increased in vivo when combined with intraocular pressure-induced experimental glaucoma. This enhanced axon regeneration response was correlated with a significant increase in activation of glial fibrillary acidic protein+retinal glia. Using a dissociated retinal ganglion cell culture model we showed that reducing the number of activated retinal glia with a glial specific toxin, α-Aminoadipic acid, significantly reduced the growth potential of retinal ganglion cells from glaucomatous rat eyes, suggesting that activated retinal glia mediate, at least in part, the growth promoting effect. This was shown to be mediated by both membrane-bound and soluble glial-derived factors. Neurotrophin and ciliary neurotrophic/leukemia inhibitory factor blockers did not affect the regenerative potential, excluding these growth factors as principal mediators of the enhanced growth response occurring in glaucomatous retinal cultures. These observations are the first to reveal that retinal ganglion cells from glaucomatous rat eyes have an enhanced regenerative capacity. Furthermore, our results suggest that activated retinal glia mediate at least part of this response. Further work to understand and enhance the regeneration-promoting effect of activated retinal glia is required to determine if this approach could be useful as part of a therapeutic strategy to encourage optic nerve regeneration in glaucoma

  3. [Craniocerebral trauma: magnetic resonance imaging of diffuse axonal injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallouhi, A

    2014-09-01

    Acceleration-deceleration rotational brain trauma is a common cause of disability or death in young adults and often leads to a focal destruction of axons. The resulting pathology, axonal shear injury is referred to as diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The DAI-associated lesions occur bilaterally, are widely dispersed and have been observed in the surface and deep white matter. They are found near to and far from the impact site. When DAI is clinically suspected, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the method of choice for further clarification, especially in patients where cranial computed tomography (CT) is inconspicuous. To investigate the presence of DAI after traumatic brain injury (TBI), a multimodal MRI approach is applied including the common structural and also functional imaging sequences. For structural MRI, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) weighted and susceptibility contrast imaging (SWI) are the sequences mainly used. The SWI technique is extremely sensitive to blood breakdown products, which appear as small signal voids at three locations, at the gray-white interface, in the corpus callosum and in the brain stem. Functional MRI comprises a group of constantly developing techniques that have great potential in optimal evaluation of the white matter in patients after craniocerebral trauma. These imaging techniques allow the visualization of changes associated with shear injuries, such as functional impairment of axons and decreased blood flow and abnormal metabolic activity of the brain parts affected. The multimodal MRI approach in patients with DAI results in a more detailed and differentiated representation of the underlying pathophysiological changes of the injured nerve tracts and helps to improve the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of MRI. When DAI is suspected multimodal MRI should be performed as soon as possible after craniocerebral injury.

  4. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    cells, while other fibers were unmyelinated. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that some of the regenerated fibers were tyrosine hydroxylase- or serotonin-immunoreactive, indicating a central origin. These findings suggest that there is a considerable amount of spontaneous regeneration after spinal cord...... lesions in rodents and that the fibers remain several months after injury. The findings of tyrosine hydroxylase- and serotonin-immunoreactivity in the axons suggest that descending central fibers contribute to this endogenous repair of ischemic spinal cord injury....

  5. Polyethylene glycol restores axonal conduction after corpus callosum transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Ravinder; Riley, D Colton; Boyer, Richard B; Pollins, Alonda C; Shack, R Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P

    2017-05-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been shown to restore axonal continuity after peripheral nerve transection in animal models. We hypothesized that PEG can also restore axonal continuity in the central nervous system. In this current experiment, coronal sectioning of the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats was performed after animal sacrifice. 3Brain high-resolution microelectrode arrays (MEA) were used to measure mean firing rate (MFR) and peak amplitude across the corpus callosum of the ex-vivo brain slices. The corpus callosum was subsequently transected and repeated measurements were performed. The cut ends of the corpus callosum were still apposite at this time. A PEG solution was applied to the injury site and repeated measurements were performed. MEA measurements showed that PEG was capable of restoring electrophysiology signaling after transection of central nerves. Before injury, the average MFRs at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum were 0.76, 0.66, and 0.65 spikes/second, respectively, and the average peak amplitudes were 69.79, 58.68, and 49.60 μV, respectively. After injury, the average MFRs were 0.71, 0.14, and 0.25 spikes/second, respectively and peak amplitudes were 52.11, 8.98, and 16.09 μV, respectively. After application of PEG, there were spikes in MFR and peak amplitude at the injury site and contralaterally. The average MFRs were 0.75, 0.55, and 0.47 spikes/second at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum, respectively and peak amplitudes were 59.44, 45.33, 40.02 μV, respectively. There were statistically differences in the average MFRs and peak amplitudes between the midline and non-midline corpus callosum groups ( P < 0.01, P < 0.05). These findings suggest that PEG restores axonal conduction between severed central nerves, potentially representing axonal fusion.

  6. Polyethylene glycol restores axonal conduction after corpus callosum transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Bamba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG has been shown to restore axonal continuity after peripheral nerve transection in animal models. We hypothesized that PEG can also restore axonal continuity in the central nervous system. In this current experiment, coronal sectioning of the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats was performed after animal sacrifice. 3Brain high-resolution microelectrode arrays (MEA were used to measure mean firing rate (MFR and peak amplitude across the corpus callosum of the ex-vivo brain slices. The corpus callosum was subsequently transected and repeated measurements were performed. The cut ends of the corpus callosum were still apposite at this time. A PEG solution was applied to the injury site and repeated measurements were performed. MEA measurements showed that PEG was capable of restoring electrophysiology signaling after transection of central nerves. Before injury, the average MFRs at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum were 0.76, 0.66, and 0.65 spikes/second, respectively, and the average peak amplitudes were 69.79, 58.68, and 49.60 μV, respectively. After injury, the average MFRs were 0.71, 0.14, and 0.25 spikes/second, respectively and peak amplitudes were 52.11, 8.98, and 16.09 μV, respectively. After application of PEG, there were spikes in MFR and peak amplitude at the injury site and contralaterally. The average MFRs were 0.75, 0.55, and 0.47 spikes/second at the ipsilateral, midline, and contralateral corpus callosum, respectively and peak amplitudes were 59.44, 45.33, 40.02 μV, respectively. There were statistically differences in the average MFRs and peak amplitudes between the midline and non-midline corpus callosum groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.05. These findings suggest that PEG restores axonal conduction between severed central nerves, potentially representing axonal fusion.

  7. Two stable steady states in the Hodgkin-Huxley axons

    OpenAIRE

    Aihara, K.; Matsumoto, G.

    1983-01-01

    Two stable steady states were found in the numerical solution of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations for the intact squid axon bathed in potassium-rich sea water with an externally applied inward current. Under the conditions the two stable steady-states exist, the Hodgkin-Huxley equations have a complex bifurcation structure including, in addition to the two stable steady-states, a stable limit cycle, two unstable equilibrium points, and one asymptotically stable equilibrium point. It was also conc...

  8. Suprasegmental neurophysiological monitoring with H reflex and TcMEP in spinal surgery. Transient loss due to hypotension. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Saponaro-González

    Full Text Available Objective: H-reflex is a well known neurophysiological test used to evaluate sensory afferent and motor efferent impulses of S1 root. Despite its simplicity and feasibility, it is not used very often in the operating room. Methods: We report the case of a 16-year-old male patient who undergoes a surgical correction for a severe paralytic scoliosis (160°. On account of previous deficits, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring was achieved through TcMEP and H-reflex. Results: Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM showed a transient and simultaneous loss of bilateral TcMEP and H-reflex, coinciding with an abrupt hypotension during pedicle screw placement. After having dismissed mechanical injury and after increasing blood pressure, TcMEP and H-reflex were equivalent to those at baseline. Conclusions: The H-reflex is a classic neurophysiological test not used very frequently in the operating room. It is a feasible and reliable technique that can be helpful during spine surgery IONM, especially in patients with preexisting neurological deficits. Although simultaneous TcMEP and H-reflex monitoring has been previously described, to our knowledge, this is the first recorded case of a decline in both associated with abrupt hypotension. Keywords: Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, TcMEP, H-reflex, Scoliosis, Hypotension

  9. Internalization and Axonal Transport of the HIV Glycoprotein gp120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berth, Sarah; Caicedo, Hector Hugo; Sarma, Tulika; Morfini, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    The HIV glycoprotein gp120, a neurotoxic HIV glycoprotein that is overproduced and shed by HIV-infected macrophages, is associated with neurological complications of HIV such as distal sensory polyneuropathy, but interactions of gp120 in the peripheral nervous system remain to be characterized. Here, we demonstrate internalization of extracellular gp120 in a manner partially independent of binding to its coreceptor CXCR4 by F11 neuroblastoma cells and cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Immunocytochemical and pharmacological experiments indicate that gp120 does not undergo trafficking through the endolysosomal pathway. Instead, gp120 is mainly internalized through lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent manner, with a minor fraction being internalized by fluid phase pinocytosis. Experiments using compartmentalized microfluidic chambers further indicate that, after internalization, endocytosed gp120 selectively undergoes retrograde but not anterograde axonal transport from axons to neuronal cell bodies. Collectively, these studies illuminate mechanisms of gp120 internalization and axonal transport in peripheral nervous system neurons, providing a novel framework for mechanisms for gp120 neurotoxicity. PMID:25636314

  10. Inner membrane fusion mediates spatial distribution of axonal mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yiyi; Lee, Hao-Chih; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Suhan, Joseph; Qiu, Minhua; Ba, Qinle; Yang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria form a dynamic interconnected network to respond to changing needs at different subcellular locations. A fundamental yet unanswered question regarding this network is whether, and if so how, local fusion and fission of individual mitochondria affect their global distribution. To address this question, we developed high-resolution computational image analysis techniques to examine the relations between mitochondrial fusion/fission and spatial distribution within the axon of Drosophila larval neurons. We found that stationary and moving mitochondria underwent fusion and fission regularly but followed different spatial distribution patterns and exhibited different morphology. Disruption of inner membrane fusion by knockdown of dOpa1, Drosophila Optic Atrophy 1, not only increased the spatial density of stationary and moving mitochondria but also changed their spatial distributions and morphology differentially. Knockdown of dOpa1 also impaired axonal transport of mitochondria. But the changed spatial distributions of mitochondria resulted primarily from disruption of inner membrane fusion because knockdown of Milton, a mitochondrial kinesin-1 adapter, caused similar transport velocity impairment but different spatial distributions. Together, our data reveals that stationary mitochondria within the axon interconnect with moving mitochondria through fusion and fission and that local inner membrane fusion between individual mitochondria mediates their global distribution. PMID:26742817

  11. Prediction of Functional Outcome in Axonal Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Eun Jung; Kim, Dae Yul; Chang, Min Cheol; Ko, Eun Jae

    2016-06-01

    To identify the factors that could predict the functional outcome in patients with the axonal type of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). Two hundred and two GBS patients admitted to our university hospital between 2003 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. We defined a good outcome as being "able to walk independently at 1 month after onset" and a poor outcome as being "unable to walk independently at 1 month after onset". We evaluated the factors that differed between the good and poor outcome groups. Twenty-four patients were classified into the acute motor axonal neuropathy type. There was a statistically significant difference between the good and poor outcome groups in terms of the GBS disability score at admission, and GBS disability score and Medical Research Council sum score at 1 month after admission. In an electrophysiologic analysis, the good outcome group showed greater amplitude of median, ulnar, deep peroneal, and posterior tibial nerve compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) and greater amplitude of median, ulnar, and superficial peroneal sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) than the poor outcome group. A lower GBS disability score at admission, high amplitude of median, ulnar, deep peroneal, and posterior tibial CMAPs, and high amplitude of median, ulnar, and superficial peroneal SNAPs were associated with being able to walk at 1 month in patients with axonal GBS.

  12. Iris Pigmentation and Fractionated Reaction and Reflex Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Bruce D.; And Others

    Behavioral measures, fractionated reaction and reflex times by means of electromyography, were used to determine if the eye color differences are found in the central or peripheral regions of the nervous system. The purpose of this research was to determine the truth of the hypothesis that dark-eyed individuals have faster reflex and reaction time…

  13. Low Incidence Of Extensor Plantar Reflex In Newborns In An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Healthy term newborns with Apgar score of 8 and above at one minute were recruited into the study consecutively in a maternity hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria. The plantar reflex was elicited by stroking the lateral side of the sole with firm pressure, between 24 - 48 hours after delivery. Results Of 461 newborns, the plantar reflex ...

  14. On the Property of Reflexivity for Multiplication Operators on Banach ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    21

    operator Mz are reflexive on a Banach space of functions analytic on a plane domain. AMS Subject Classification: 47B37; 46A25. Keywords: Banach spaces of analytic functions, multiplication operators, reflexive oper- ator, multipliers, Caratheodory hull, bounded point evaluation, spectral set. Introduction. For any set E and ...

  15. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  16. [The development of I. P. Pavlov's conditioned reflex theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, O J

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), a Russian physiologist who presented for the first time the systematic theory of the function of the brain that controls the whole behavior of animals, i.e. higher nervous activity through experimental studies. This paper, principally based on Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928), investigates the development of conditioned reflex theory from its beginning by dividing it into three periods. First, during the period from 1898 to 1906, the fundamental concept of conditioned reflex was established and the study of conditioned reflex became an independent discipline. From 1907 to 1916, the second period, Pavlov theorized on higher nervous activity on the basis of extensive data from his laboratory experiments of conditioned reflex. And Pavlov complemented conditioned reflex theory, during the third period from 1916 to 1928, and extended the boundaries of it through applications of conditioned reflex theory to psychopathology and typology. The study contributes to the understanding that conditioned reflex theory was historically developed, and not presented as a complete form from the beginning, and that Pavlov intended to study the higher nervous activity through the method of neurophysiology.

  17. Lemmatization of reflexives in Northern Sotho | Prinsloo | Lexikos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to evaluate current strategies in the lemmatization of reflexives in Northern Sotho. In particular the so-called "traditional" approach according to which reflexives are lemmatized randomly, as well as the more "rule orientated" alternative, will be critically evaluated mainly against the background of ...

  18. Reflexivity as a control factor of personal coping behavior

    OpenAIRE

    BEKHTER A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the issue of coping behavior control. The author defines the criteria, levels and aspects of reflexivity within the framework of personal coping behavior. In conclusion the author describes the key facets of coping behavior control and how reflexivity affects them.

  19. Epithelioid sarcoma presenting as the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, C. L.; Shahi, M.

    1987-01-01

    A case of reflex sympathetic dystrophy caused by an epithelioid sarcoma is presented. This is the first report of a local peripheral tumour associated with the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3671265

  20. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: Early treatment and psychological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; De Bruijn, H.; De Bruijn-Kofman, A.T.; Arendzen, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of two prospective studies of early treatment and psychological aspects in a series of 26 patients with sympathetic reflex dystrophy of the hand in which treatment was started within 3 months after diagnosis. Ismelin blocks is an often used therapy in sympathetic reflex

  1. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... hammer. (a) Identification. A powered reflex hammer is a motorized device intended for medical purposes...

  2. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3am

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Sames

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF, Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF, The Neuropathy Association (TNA and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies

  3. A Critical Reflexive Perspective on Othering in Collaborative Knowledge Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    2018-01-01

    -reflexive analyses of reflexive processes within collaborative knowledge production We use an analytical framework combining Bakhtin and Foucault to investigate processes of inclusion and exclusion in the interplay between dominant and subordinated voices in a moment-by-moment analysis of two incidents from...... interdisciplinary workshops. Findings The analysis illuminates how differences between voices challenge participants’ reflexive awareness and lead to the reproduction of contextual power and knowledge hierarchies and the concomitant silencing of particular participants. Thus, the findings draw attention...... to the complex and ethical nature of collaborative knowledge production. Practical implications To invite researchers to be reflexive about the complex, situated and emergent character of reflexive processes and consider ethics to be a critical stance that encourages continuous reflection and critique...

  4. Stretch reflex regulation in healthy subjects and patients with spasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Petersen, Nicolas; Crone, Clarissa

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, part of the muscle resistance in spastic patients has been explained by changes in the elastic properties of muscles. However, the adaptive spinal mechanisms responsible for the exaggeration of stretch reflex activity also contribute to muscle stiffness. The available data suggest...... of the spastic symptoms. A recent finding also shows no sign of exaggerated stretch reflexes in muscles voluntarily activated by the spastic patient in general. This is easily explained by the control of stretch reflex activity in healthy subjects. In healthy subjects, the stretch reflex activity is increased...... movements, antagonist muscles should remain silent and maximally relaxed. This is ensured by increasing transmission in several spinal inhibitory pathways. In spastic patients, this control is inadequate, and therefore stretch reflexes in antagonist muscles are easily evoked at the beginning of voluntary...

  5. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno......Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...... skeletal muscle, cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues of the limbs indicate that the situation is more complex. Measurements have been carried out during acute as well as chronic sympathetic denervation. Spinal sympathetic reflex mechanisms have been evaluated in tetraplegic patients, where supraspinal...

  6. Voluntary Control of the Near Reflex: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil Akar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Spasm of the near reflex is a rare disorder that involves intermittent and variable episodes of esotropia, pseudomyopia, and pupillary myosis. It is usually functional in origin and is seen mainly in young patients. Treatment options for spasm of the near reflex have had variable success. In instances where the etiology of spasm of the near reflex was suspected to be hysteria, psychotherapy has proven beneficial. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl who had functional spasm of the near reflex. The symptoms persisted for two years. Symptomatic relief was achieved by cycloplegia and spectacle correction (added plus lenses at near. The patient also underwent psychological counseling. In our case, the functional spasm of the near reflex spontaneously resolved after 2 years. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 161-3

  7. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery L Twiss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthesis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been documented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regenerating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regenerating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  8. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present in Salvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study, in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 μg/mL. For in vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of regenerating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

  9. Sodium Channel β2 Subunits Prevent Action Potential Propagation Failures at Axonal Branch Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, In Ha; Panzera, Lauren C; Chin, Morven; Hoppa, Michael B

    2017-09-27

    Neurotransmitter release depends on voltage-gated Na + channels (Na v s) to propagate an action potential (AP) successfully from the axon hillock to a synaptic terminal. Unmyelinated sections of axon are very diverse structures encompassing branch points and numerous presynaptic terminals with undefined molecular partners of Na + channels. Using optical recordings of Ca 2+ and membrane voltage, we demonstrate here that Na + channel β2 subunits (Na v β2s) are required to prevent AP propagation failures across the axonal arborization of cultured rat hippocampal neurons (mixed male and female). When Na v β2 expression was reduced, we identified two specific phenotypes: (1) membrane excitability and AP-evoked Ca 2+ entry were impaired at synapses and (2) AP propagation was severely compromised with >40% of axonal branches no longer responding to AP-stimulation. We went on to show that a great deal of electrical signaling heterogeneity exists in AP waveforms across the axonal arborization independent of axon morphology. Therefore, Na v β2 is a critical regulator of axonal excitability and synaptic function in unmyelinated axons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels are fulcrums of neurotransmission that convert electrical inputs into chemical outputs in the form of vesicle fusion at synaptic terminals. However, the role of the electrical signal, the presynaptic action potential (AP), in modulating synaptic transmission is less clear. What is the fidelity of a propagating AP waveform in the axon and what molecules shape it throughout the axonal arborization? Our work identifies several new features of AP propagation in unmyelinated axons: (1) branches of a single axonal arborization have variable AP waveforms independent of morphology, (2) Na + channel β2 subunits modulate AP-evoked Ca 2+ -influx, and (3) β2 subunits maintain successful AP propagation across the axonal arbor. These findings are relevant to understanding the flow of excitation in the

  10. Effect of anesthetics on reflex micturition in the chronic cannula-implanted rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, S; Downie, J W

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that urethane is a suitable anesthetic for acute studies and has been extensively recommended for investigations related to micturition physiology. This is mainly because of the capability of urethane anesthesia to spare reflex micturition as well as its easily established long-lasting and stable anesthetic level. However, urethane anesthesia is usually restricted to acute experiments due to its potential toxicity. This study searched for an alternative to urethane that would be suitable for studies in which recovery from anesthesia was needed. The list of administered drugs was as follows: pentobarbital, thiobutabarbital, ketamine-acepromazine, ketamine-diazepam, tiletamine-zolazepam, fentanyl-droperidol, alphaxalone-alphadolone, propofol, isoflurane, methoxyflurane, azaperone, tribromoethanol, and buprenorphine. Among these drugs, only tiletamine-zolazepam spared the reflex micturition contractions. However, the duration of this anesthesia was too short (approximately 30 minutes) to complete the necessary testing and additional dosing of the anesthetic generally obliterated the micturition reflex. On the other hand, rats given i.v. urethane infusion (10% solution in 0.9% saline, 3.2-4.0 mg/kg/min, total dose 0.56-1.03 g/kg) maintained a stable anesthesia that permitted both reflex micturition and stereotaxic procedures. Rats moved spontaneously 3-16 hours after cessation of i.v. urethane anesthesia and completely recovered in 2 days without significant after-effects. Bladder function was normal. No pathological changes were seen 1 week later. The present results suggest that urethane is the most suitable anesthetic for acute and chronic physiological experiments that require demonstration of reflex micturition. Neurourol. Urodynam. 19:87-99, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Lienhard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05, and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05. This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity.

  12. The middle ear muscle reflex in the diagnosis of cochlear neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Michelle D; Hancock, Kenneth E; Liberman, M Charles

    2016-02-01

    Cochlear neuropathy, i.e. the loss of auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) without loss of hair cells, may cause hearing deficits without affecting threshold sensitivity, particularly if the subset of ANFs with high thresholds and low spontaneous rates (SRs) is preferentially lost, as appears to be the case in both aging and noise-damaged cochleas. Because low-SR fibers may also be important drivers of the medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) and middle-ear muscle reflex (MEMR), these reflexes might be sensitive metrics of cochlear neuropathy. To test this hypothesis, we measured reflex strength and reflex threshold in mice with noise-induced neuropathy, as documented by confocal analysis of immunostained cochlear whole-mounts. To assay the MOCR, we measured contra-noise modulation of ipsilateral distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) before and after the administration of curare to block the MEMR or curare + strychnine to also block the MOCR. The modulation of DPOAEs was 1) dominated by the MEMR in anesthetized mice, with a smaller contribution from the MOCR, and 2) significantly attenuated in neuropathic mice, but only when the MEMR was intact. We then measured MEMR growth functions by monitoring contra-noise induced changes in the wideband reflectance of chirps presented to the ipsilateral ear. We found 1) that the changes in wideband reflectance were mediated by the MEMR alone, and 2) that MEMR threshold was elevated and its maximum amplitude was attenuated in neuropathic mice. These data suggest that the MEMR may be valuable in the early detection of cochlear neuropathy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Reflexive regulation of CSR to promote sustainablility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    This article discusses Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of governmental regulation as a measure to promote public policy interests through public-private regulation intended to influence firms’ self-regulation. Presenting a ‘government case’ for CSR, the connection between...... in order to balance power disparities among participants. Finally, the analysis suggests that a juridification of CSR is taking place. This development is welcome because legal theory and scholarship’s insight into institutionalisation of norms of conduct has much to offer to society’s interests...... in promoting companies’ responsibility with regard to aspects of sustainable development, such as climate impact. Keywords: Sustainable development, sustainable companies, reflexive regulation, climate change, CSR, EU law, public-private regulation, companies' self-regulation...

  14. Reflexive regulation of CSR to promote sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of governmental regulation as a measure to promote public policy interests through public-private regulation intended to influence firms’ self-regulation. Presenting a ‘government case’ for CSR, the connection between...... and the EU CSR Alliance. Focusing on human rights based in international law, it analyses the patterns of negotiation in the MSF and the background for the launch of the CSR Alliance. It shows that analysing public-private regulation of CSR from the perspective of reflexive law theory assists us...... climate change and environmental sustainability, and social, economic and other human rights lend human rights as part of CSR a potential for meeting some environmental and climate concerns and handling adverse side-effects. The article analyses two EU initiatives: The EU Multi-Stakeholder (MSF) on CSR...

  15. Study of the Reflex-Klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia A, R.

    1981-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is the theoretical study and the development of a technique for designing. A low power Reflex-Klystron, in order to construct it in the graduated section laboratories of the Instituto Politecnico Nacional. It is pretended to attain a power of 15-45 m W in frequencies of 8-10 GHz with low acceleration potentials (300-400 V) and electric current of 15-25 m A; the device will be mechanically tuned and will have a fine tuning through the potential of the reflector (150-180 V negative with respect to the resonator). The International System of Units is used in this thesis. (Author)

  16. Persisting primitive reflexes in medication-naïve girls with attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konicarova J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Jana Konicarova,1 Petr Bob,1,2 Jiri Raboch11Center for Neuropsychiatric Research of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Central European Institute of Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech RepublicBackground and objectives: Recent and historical findings suggest that later-developed functions during brain ontogenesis related to higher levels of cognitive and motor integration tend to replace the older, more primitive, ones, and the persistence of the older functions may be linked to specific neuropsychiatric disorders. Currently, there is growing evidence to suggest that persisting primitive reflexes may be related to developmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Preliminary data also suggest that persisting primitive reflexes may be specifically linked to attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD.Methods: In the study reported here, we tested to what extent the persisting primitive asymmetric tonic neck reflex and symmetric tonic neck reflex are related to ADHD symptoms measured by Conners' Parent Questionnaire in 35 medication-naïve girls of school age (8–11 years with ADHD. The results were compared with those of a control group of 30 girls of the same age.Results: This study showed that persisting primitive reflexes are closely linked to ADHD symptoms.Conclusion: The data suggest that ADHD symptoms may be linked to more primitive neural mechanisms interfering with higher brain functions due to insufficiently developed cognitive and motor integration.Keywords: ADHD, asymmetric tonic neck reflex, symmetric tonic neck reflex, developmental disorders

  17. Variable impact of tizanidine on the medium latency reflex of upper and lower limbs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtzer, Isaac; Bouyer, Laurent J.; Bouffard, J.

    2018-01-01

    Sudden limb displacement evokes a complex sequence of compensatory muscle activity. Following the short-latency reflex and preceding voluntary reactions is an epoch termed the medium-latency reflex (MLR) that could reflect spinal processing of group II muscle afferents. One way to test...... this possibility is oral ingestion of tizanidine, an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist that inhibits the interneurons transmitting group II signals onto spinal motor neurons. We examined whether group II afferents contribute to MLR activity throughout the major muscles that span the elbow and shoulder. MLRs of ankle...... muscles were also tested during walking on the same day, in the same participants as well as during sitting in a different group of subjects. In contrast to previous reports, the ingestion of tizanidine had minimal impact on MLRs of arm or leg muscles during motor actions. A significant decrease...

  18. Following Spinal Cord Injury Transected Reticulospinal Tract Axons Develop New Collateral Inputs to Spinal Interneurons in Parallel with Locomotor Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacnicte May

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The reticulospinal tract (RtST descends from the reticular formation and terminates in the spinal cord. The RtST drives the initiation of locomotion and postural control. RtST axons form new contacts with propriospinal interneurons (PrINs after incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI; however, it is unclear if injured or uninjured axons make these connections. We completely transected all traced RtST axons in rats using a staggered model, where a hemisection SCI at vertebra T10 is followed by a contralateral hemisection at vertebra T7. In one group of the animals, the T7 SCI was performed 2 weeks after the T10 SCI (delayed; dSTAG, and in another group, the T10 and T7 SCIs were concomitant (cSTAG. dSTAG animals had significantly more RtST-PrIN contacts in the grey matter compared to cSTAG animals (p<0.05. These results were accompanied by enhanced locomotor recovery with dSTAG animals significantly outperforming cSTAG animals (BBB test; p<0.05. This difference suggests that activity in neuronal networks below the first SCI may contribute to enhanced recovery, because dSTAG rats recovered locomotor ability before the second hemisection. In conclusion, our findings support the hypothesis that the injured RtST forms new connections and is a key player in the recovery of locomotion post-SCI.

  19. The disruption of mitochondrial axonal transport is an early event in neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Errea, Oihana; Moreno, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba

    2015-01-01

    of neuroprotective therapies. Energy depletion due to mitochondrial dysfunction has been postulated as an important step in the damage of axons. This prompted us to study the effects of acute inflammation and oxidative stress on the morphology, transport, and function of mitochondria in axons. METHODS: Mouse......BACKGROUND: In brain inflammatory diseases, axonal damage is one of the most critical steps in the cascade that leads to permanent disability. Thus, identifying the initial events triggered by inflammation or oxidative stress that provoke axonal damage is critical for the development...... in axons, increasing the proportion of stationary mitochondria in axons after LPS challenge. Indeed, the two challenges used produced different effects: inflammation mostly reducing retrograde transport and oxidative stress slightly enhancing retrograde transportation. CONCLUSIONS: Neuroinflammation...

  20. Segregation of Axial Motor and Sensory Pathways via Heterotypic Trans-Axonal Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallarda, Benjamin W.; Bonanomi, Dario; Müller, Daniel; Brown, Arthur; Alaynick, William A.; Andrews, Shane E.; Lemke, Greg; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Marquardt, Till

    2011-01-01

    Execution of motor behaviors relies on circuitries effectively integrating immediate sensory feedback to efferent pathways controlling muscle activity. It remains unclear how, during neuromuscular circuit assembly, sensory and motor projections become incorporated into tightly coordinated, yet functionally separate pathways. We report that, within axial nerves, establishment of discrete afferent and efferent pathways depends on coordinate signaling between coextending sensory and motor projections. These heterotypic axon-axon interactions require motor axonal EphA3/EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinases activated by cognate sensory axonal ephrin-A ligands. Genetic elimination of trans-axonal ephrin-A → EphA signaling in mice triggers drastic motor-sensory miswiring, culminating in functional efferents within proximal afferent pathways. Effective assembly of a key circuit underlying motor behaviors thus critically depends on trans-axonal signaling interactions resolving motor and sensory projections into discrete pathways. PMID:18403711

  1. Role of calpains in the injury-induced dysfunction and degeneration of the mammalian axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Marek

    2013-12-01

    Axonal injury and degeneration, whether primary or secondary, contribute to the morbidity and mortality seen in many acquired and inherited central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders, such as traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, cerebral ischemia, neurodegenerative diseases, and peripheral neuropathies. The calpain family of proteases has been mechanistically linked to the dysfunction and degeneration of axons. While the direct mechanisms by which transection, mechanical strain, ischemia, or complement activation trigger intra-axonal calpain activity are likely different, the downstream effects of unregulated calpain activity may be similar in seemingly disparate diseases. In this review, a brief examination of axonal structure is followed by a focused overview of the calpain family. Finally, the mechanisms by which calpains may disrupt the axonal cytoskeleton, transport, and specialized domains (axon initial segment, nodes, and terminals) are discussed. © 2013.

  2. A Combinatorial Approach to Induce Sensory Axon Regeneration into the Dorsal Root Avulsed Spinal Cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeber, Jan; Konig, Niclas; Trolle, Carl

    2017-01-01

    restores sensory functions. In this study, we elucidate mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated ingrowth of sensory axons after dorsal root avulsion (DRA). We show that human spinal cord neural stem/progenitor cells (hscNSPC), and also, mesoporous silica particles loaded with growth factor mimetics (Meso......MIM), supported sensory axon regeneration. However, when hscNSPC and MesoMIM were combined, sensory axon regeneration failed. Morphological and tracing analysis showed that sensory axons grow through the newly established glial scar along “bridges” formed by migrating stem cells. Coimplantation of Meso......MIM prevented stem cell migration, “bridges” were not formed, and sensory axons failed to enter the spinal cord. MesoMIM applied alone supported sensory axons ingrowth, but without affecting glial scar formation. In vitro, the presence of MesoMIM significantly impaired migration of hscNSPC without affecting...

  3. Analysing responses to climate change through the lens of reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Debra

    2012-12-01

    Sociologists are increasingly directing attention toward social responses to climate change. As is true of any new field of inquiry, theoretical frameworks guiding the research to date have room for improvement. One advance could be achieved through closer engagement with Reflexivity Theory, particularly the work of Margaret Archer, who asks just how individuals come to give attention to certain problems, and formulate responses to them. Individuals vary significantly in regard to their understanding of and concern for anthropogenic climate change, and these standpoints in turn influence commitment to mitigation and adaptation. The emergent social interactions among all such agents in turn influence the morphogenetic trajectories through which social structures will evolve, but the role of 'meta-reflexives' is particularly crucial. Identifying pathways of individual climate change reflexivity can make a valuable contribution to our understanding of the potential for and nature of collective responses. In this paper, I explore climate change reflexivity, with particular attention to climate change meta-reflexives, through a qualitative analysis of personal interviews with residents of two small communities in Alberta, Canada. Applying Reflexivity Theory to this context articulates dimensions of reflexive processing not elaborated in current theoretical treatments, including future outlook and comfort with uncertainty, among others. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2012.

  4. Inter-axonal interaction defines tiled presynaptic innervation in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Mizumoto, Kota; Shen, Kang

    2013-01-01

    Cellular interactions between neighboring axons are essential for global topographic map formation. Here we show that axonal interactions also precisely instruct the location of synapses. Motoneurons form en passant synapses in Caenorhabditis elegans. While axons from the same neuron class significantly overlap, each neuron innervates a unique and tiled segment of the muscle field by restricting its synapses to a distinct subaxonal domain—a phenomenon we term “synaptic tiling”. Using DA8 and ...

  5. Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0524 TITLE:Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey D...29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Oligodendroglial MCT1 and Metabolic Support of Axons in Multiple Sclerosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0524...MCT1 in injured oligodendroglia of multiple sclerosis patients contributes to axon neurodegeneration and that increasing MCT1 will be protective in the

  6. Acutely damaged axons are remyelinated in multiple sclerosis and experimental models of demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Verena; van der Meer, Franziska; Wrzos, Claudia; Scheidt, Uta; Bahn, Erik; Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang; Junker, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Remyelination is in the center of new therapies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis to resolve and improve disease symptoms and protect axons from further damage. Although remyelination is considered beneficial in the long term, it is not known, whether this is also the case early in lesion formation. Additionally, the precise timing of acute axonal damage and remyelination has not been assessed so far. To shed light onto the interrelation between axons and the myelin sheath during de- and remyelination, we employed cuprizone- and focal lysolecithin-induced demyelination and performed time course experiments assessing the evolution of early and late stage remyelination and axonal damage. We observed damaged axons with signs of remyelination after cuprizone diet cessation and lysolecithin injection. Similar observations were made in early multiple sclerosis lesions. To assess the correlation of remyelination and axonal damage in multiple sclerosis lesions, we took advantage of a cohort of patients with early and late stage remyelinated lesions and assessed the number of APP- and SMI32- positive damaged axons and the density of SMI31-positive and silver impregnated preserved axons. Early de- and remyelinating lesions did not differ with respect to axonal density and axonal damage, but we observed a lower axonal density in late stage demyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions than in remyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions. Our findings suggest that remyelination may not only be protective over a long period of time, but may play an important role in the immediate axonal recuperation after a demyelinating insult. © 2017 The Authors GLIA Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effect of pelvic floor muscle contraction on vesical and rectal function with identification of puborectalis-rectovesical inhibitory reflex and levator-rectovesical excitatory reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A; El-Sibai, O

    2001-08-01

    changes. Repetition of the test using saline instead of xylocaine resulted in rectal and vesical pressure responses similar to those without the use of saline. In conclusion, the decline in rectal and vesical responses upon PR muscle contraction indicates a reflex relationship which we term 'puborectalis rectovesical inhibitory reflex'. This reflex is suggested to abort the urge to defecate or urinate. In contrast, LA muscle contraction produced rectal and vesical pressure elevation which is suggested to be mediated through the 'levator rectovesical excitatory reflex'. 'This reflex is probably evoked to promote rectal and vesical evacuation.

  8. Ribosomes and polyribosomes are present in the squid giant axon: an immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, J R; Kun, A; Benech, J C; Giuditta, A; Morillas, J; Benech, C R

    1999-05-01

    Ribosomes and polyribosomes were detected by immuno-electron microscopy in the giant axon and small axons of the squid using a polyclonal antibody against rat brain ribosomes. The ribosomal fraction used as antigen was purified by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient and shown to contain ribosomal RNAs and native ribosomes. The polyclonal antibody raised in rabbits reacted with at least ten proteins on immunoblots of purified rat brain ribosomes as well as with a set of multiple ribosomal proteins prepared from the squid giant fiber lobe. Immunoreactions were performed on cryostat sections of the stellate nerve cut at a distance of more than 3 cm from the stellate ganglion, using pre-embedding techniques. Ribosomes and polyribosomes were identified within the giant axon and small axons using electron microscopic methods, following binding of peroxidase-conjugated anti-rabbit IgG secondary antibody. Polysomes were more frequently localized in peripheral axoplasm, including the cortical layer of the giant axon, and were generally associated with unidentified cytoskeletal filaments or with dense matrix material. The immunochemical demonstration of ribosomes and polyribosomes in the giant axon and small axons of the squid confirms similar observations in the squid and the goldfish obtained with the method of electron spectroscopic imaging, and strongly supports the view that a local system of protein synthesis is present in axons. The immunochemical method here described offers an alternative tool for the selective identification of ribosomes, and is likely to prove of value in the analyses of other axonal systems.

  9. Regulation of Axonal Midline Guidance by Prolyl 4-Hydroxylation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torpe, Nanna; Pocock, Roger David John

    2014-01-01

    , little is known of its importance in the control of axon guidance. In a screen of prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) mutants, we found that genetic removal of a specific P4H subunit, DPY-18, causes dramatic defects in C. elegans neuroanatomy. In dpy-18 mutant animals, the axons of specific ventral nerve cord......Neuronal wiring during development requires that the growth cones of axons and dendrites are correctly guided to their appropriate targets. As in other animals, axon growth cones in Caenorhabditis elegans integrate information in their extracellular environment via interactions among transiently...

  10. Forced notch signaling inhibits commissural axon outgrowth in the developing chick central nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A collection of in vitro evidence has demonstrated that Notch signaling plays a key role in the growth of neurites in differentiated neurons. However, the effects of Notch signaling on axon outgrowth in an in vivo condition remain largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, the neural tubes of HH10-11 chick embryos were in ovo electroporated with various Notch transgenes of activating or inhibiting Notch signaling, and then their effects on commissural axon outgrowth across the floor plate midline in the chick developing central nerve system were investigated. Our results showed that forced expression of Notch intracellular domain, constitutively active form of RBPJ, or full-length Hes1 in the rostral hindbrain, diencephalon and spinal cord at stage HH10-11 significantly inhibited commissural axon outgrowth. On the other hand, inhibition of Notch signaling by ectopically expressing a dominant-negative form of RBPJ promoted commissural axonal growth along the circumferential axis. Further results revealed that these Notch signaling-mediated axon outgrowth defects may be not due to the alteration of axon guidance since commissural axon marker TAG1 was present in the axons in floor plate midline, and also not result from the changes in cell fate determination of commissural neurons since the expression of postmitotic neuron marker Tuj1 and specific commissural markers TAG1 and Pax7 was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We first used an in vivo system to provide evidence that forced Notch signaling negatively regulates commissural axon outgrowth.

  11. Alterations in the Local Axonal Environment Influence Target Reinnervation and Neuronal Survival after Postnatal Axotomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dainer, Hugh M

    2000-01-01

    Following peripheral nerve injury in adult animals, Schwann cells (SC) proliferate and provide guidance in the local axonal environment by generating the infrastructure along which regenerating nerves grow...

  12. N-Propionylmannosamine stimulates axonal elongation in a murine model of sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Witzel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that sialic acid plays an important role during nerve regeneration. Sialic acids can be modified in vitro as well as in vivo using metabolic oligosaccharide engineering of the N-acyl side chain. N-Propionylmannosamine (ManNProp increases neurite outgrowth and accelerates the reestablishment of functional synapses in vitro. We investigated the influence of systemic ManNProp application using a specific in vivo mouse model. Using mice expressing axonal fluorescent proteins, we quantified the extension of regenerating axons, the number of regenerating axons, the number of arborising axons and the number of branches per axon 5 days after injury. Sciatic nerves from non-expressing mice were grafted into those expressing yellow fluorescent protein. We began a twice-daily intraperitoneal application of either peracetylated ManNProp (200 mg/kg or saline solution 5 days before injury, and continued it until nerve harvest (5 days after transection. ManNProp significantly increased the mean distance of axonal regeneration (2.49 mm vs. 1.53 mm; P < 0.005 and the number of arborizing axons (21% vs. 16% P = 0.008 5 days after sciatic nerve grafting. ManNProp did not affect the number of regenerating axons or the number of branches per arborizing axon. The biochemical glycoengineering of the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid might be a promising approach for improving peripheral nerve regeneration.

  13. The time course of ongoing activity during neuritis and following axonal transport disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkeviciute, Ieva; Goodwin, George; Bove, Geoffrey M; Dilley, Andrew

    2018-02-21

    Local nerve inflammation (neuritis) leads to ongoing activity and axonal mechanical sensitivity (AMS) along intact nociceptor axons, and disrupts axonal transport. This phenomenon forms the most feasible cause of radiating pain, such as sciatica. We have previously shown that axonal transport disruption without inflammation or degeneration also leads to AMS, but does not cause ongoing activity at the time point when AMS occurs, despite causing cutaneous hypersensitivity. However, there have been no systematic studies of ongoing activity during neuritis or non-inflammatory axonal transport disruption. In this study, we present the time course of ongoing activity from primary sensory neurons following neuritis and vinblastine-induced axonal transport disruption. Whereas 24% of C/slow Aδ-fiber neurons had ongoing activity during neuritis, few (disruption of axonal transport without inflammation does not lead to ongoing activity in sensory neurons, including nociceptors, but does cause a rapid and transient development of AMS. Since it is proposed that AMS underlies mechanically-induced radiating pain, and a transient disruption of axonal transport (as previously reported) leads to transient AMS, it follows that processes that disrupt axonal transport, such as neuritis, must persist to maintain AMS and the associated symptoms.

  14. Segregation of ipsilateral retinal ganglion cell axons at the optic chiasm requires the Shh receptor Boc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Pierre J; Shimogori, Tomomi; Charron, Frédéric

    2010-01-06

    The pattern of contralaterally and ipsilaterally projecting retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons at the optic chiasm is essential for the establishment of binocular vision. Contralateral axons cross the chiasm midline as they progress from the optic nerve to the optic tract. In contrast, ipsilateral axons deviate from the chiasm and continue in the ipsilateral optic tract, avoiding the chiasm midline. The molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not completely understood. Here we show that the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptor Boc is enriched in ipsilateral RGCs of the developing retina. Together with the presence of Shh at the midline, this complementary expression pattern led us to hypothesize that Shh might repel ipsilateral RGC axons at the chiasm. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that only Boc-positive RGC axons retract in vitro in response to Shh and that this response is lost in Boc mutant RGCs. In vivo, we show that Boc is required for the normal segregation of ipsilateral axons at the optic chiasm and, conversely, that Boc expression in contralateral RGCs prevents their axons from crossing the optic chiasm. Together, these results suggest that Shh repels ipsilateral RGC axons at the optic chiasm via its receptor Boc. This work identifies a novel molecular pathway required for the segregation of axons at the optic chiasm.

  15. [Human physiology: images and practices of the reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübben, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    The essay examines the function of visualizations and practices in the formation of the reflex concept from Thomas Willis to Marshall Hall. It focuses on the specific form of reflex knowledge that images and practices can contain. In addition, the essay argues that it is through visual representations and experimental practices that technical knowledge is transferred to the field of human reflex physiology. When using technical metaphors in human physiology authors often seem to feel obliged to draw distinctions between humans, machines and animals. On closer scrutiny, these distinctions sometimes fail to establish firm borders between the human and the technical.

  16. Flexion Reflex Can Interrupt and Reset the Swimming Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, Matthew S; Berkowitz, Ari

    2016-03-02

    The spinal cord can generate the hip flexor nerve activity underlying leg withdrawal (flexion reflex) and the rhythmic, alternating hip flexor and extensor activities underlying locomotion and scratching, even in the absence of brain inputs and movement-related sensory feedback. It has been hypothesized that a common set of spinal interneurons mediates flexion reflex and the flexion components of locomotion and scratching. Leg cutaneous stimuli that evoke flexion reflex can alter the timing of (i.e., reset) cat walking and turtle scratching rhythms; in addition, reflex responses to leg cutaneous stimuli can be modified during cat and human walking and turtle scratching. Both of these effects depend on the phase (flexion or extension) of the rhythm in which the stimuli occur. However, similar interactions between leg flexion reflex and swimming have not been reported. We show here that a tap to the foot interrupted and reset the rhythm of forward swimming in spinal, immobilized turtles if the tap occurred during the swim hip extensor phase. In addition, the hip flexor nerve response to an electrical foot stimulus was reduced or eliminated during the swim hip extensor phase. These two phase-dependent effects of flexion reflex on the swim rhythm and vice versa together demonstrate that the flexion reflex spinal circuit shares key components with or has strong interactions with the swimming spinal network, as has been shown previously for cat walking and turtle scratching. Therefore, leg flexion reflex circuits likely share key spinal interneurons with locomotion and scratching networks across limbed vertebrates generally. The spinal cord can generate leg withdrawal (flexion reflex), locomotion, and scratching in limbed vertebrates. It has been hypothesized that there is a common set of spinal cord neurons that produce hip flexion during flexion reflex, locomotion, and scratching based on evidence from studies of cat and human walking and turtle scratching. We show

  17. Biomarker evidence of axonal injury in neuroasymptomatic HIV-1 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jessen Krut

    Full Text Available Prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-1 infected patients is reported to be high. Whether this is a result of active HIV-related neurodegeneration is unclear. We examined axonal injury in HIV-1 patients by measuring the light subunit of neurofilament protein (NFL in CSF with a novel, sensitive method.With a cross-sectional design, CSF concentrations of neurofilament protein light (NFL (marker of neuronal injury, neopterin (intrathecal immunoactivation and CSF/Plasma albumin ratio (blood-brain barrier integrity were analyzed on CSF from 252 HIV-infected patients, subdivided into untreated neuroasymptomatics (n = 200, HIV-associated dementia (HAD (n = 14 and on combinations antiretroviral treatment (cART (n = 85, and healthy controls (n = 204. 46 HIV-infected patients were included in both treated and untreated groups, but sampled at different timepoints. Furthermore, 78 neuroasymptomatic patients were analyzed before and after treatment initiation.While HAD patients had the highest NFL concentrations, elevated CSF NFL was also found in 33% of untreated neuroasymptomatic patients, mainly in those with blood CD4+ cell counts below 250 cells/μL. CSF NFL concentrations in the untreated neuroasymptomatics and treated groups were equivalent to controls 18.5 and 3.9 years older, respectively. Neopterin correlated with NFL levels in untreated groups while the albumin ratio correlated with NFL in both untreated and treated groups.Increased CSF NFL indicates ongoing axonal injury in many neuroasymptomatic patients. Treatment decreases NFL, but treated patients retain higher levels than controls, indicating either continued virus-related injury or an aging-like effect of HIV infection. NFL correlates with neopterin and albumin ratio, suggesting an association between axonal injury, neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier permeability. NFL appears to be a sensitive biomarker of subclinical and clinical brain injury in HIV and warrants further

  18. Aeromedical evacuation-relevant hypobaria worsens axonal and neurologic injury in rats after underbody blast-induced hyperacceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Julie L; Mello, Kaitlin T; Fang, Raymond; Puche, Adam C; Rosenthal, Robert E; Fourney, William L; Leiste, Ulrich H; Fiskum, Gary

    2017-07-01

    Occupants of military vehicles targeted by explosive devices often suffer from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are typically transported by the aeromedical evacuation (AE) system to a military medical center within a few days. This study tested the hypothesis that exposure of rats to AE-relevant hypobaria worsens cerebral axonal injury and neurologic impairment caused by underbody blasts. Anesthetized adult male rats were secured within cylinders attached to a metal plate, simulating the hull of an armored vehicle. An explosive located under the plate was detonated, resulting in a peak vertical acceleration force on the plate and occupant rats of 100G. Rats remained under normobaria or were exposed to hypobaria equal to 8,000 feet in an altitude chamber for 6 hours, starting at 6 hours to 6 days after blast. At 7 days, rats were tested for vestibulomotor function using the balance beam walking task and euthanized by perfusion. The brains were then analyzed for axonal fiber injury. The number of internal capsule silver-stained axonal fibers was greater in animals exposed to 100G blast than in shams. Animals exposed to hypobaria starting at 6 hours to 6 days after blast exhibited more silver-stained fibers than those not exposed to hypobaria. Rats exposed to 100% oxygen (O2) during hypobaria at 24 hours postblast displayed greater silver staining and more balance beam foot-faults, in comparison with rats exposed to hypobaria under 21% O2. Exposure of rats to blast-induced acceleration of 100G increases cerebral axonal injury, which is significantly exacerbated by exposure to hypobaria as early as 6 hours and as late as 6 days postblast. Rats exposed to underbody blasts and then to hypobaria under 100% O2 exhibit increased axonal damage and impaired motor function compared to those subjected to blast and hypobaria under 21% O2. These findings raise concern about the effects of AE-related hypobaria on TBI victims, the timing of AE after TBI, and whether these effects

  19. Mechanisms of hyperpolarization in regenerated mature motor axons in cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Krarup, Christian

    2004-01-01

    We found persistent abnormalities in the recovery of membrane excitability in long-term regenerated motor nerve fibres in the cat as indicated in the companion paper. These abnormalities could partly be explained by membrane hyperpolarization. To further investigate this possibility, we compared...... the changes in excitability in control nerves and long-term regenerated cat nerves (3-5 years after tibial nerve crush) during manoeuvres known to alter axonal membrane Na(+)-K(+) pump function: polarization, cooling to 20 degrees C, reperfusion after 10 min ischaemia, and up to 60 s of repetitive stimulation...

  20. Jaw-opening reflex and corticobulbar motor excitability changes during quiet sleep in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Dongyuan; Lavigne, Gilles J.; Lee, Jye-Chang

    2013-01-01

    and corticobulbar motor excitability of jaw muscles was determined during the quiet awake state (QW) and quiet sleep (QS) in monkeys (n = 4). Measurements and Results: During QS sleep, compared to QW periods, both tongue stimulation-evoked jaw-opening reflex peak and root mean square amplitudes were significantly......Study Objective: To test the hypothesis that the reflex and corticobulbar motor excitability of jaw muscles is reduced during sleep. Design: Polysomnographic recordings in the electrophysiological study. Setting: University sleep research laboratories. Participants and Interventions: The reflex...... decreased with stimulations at 2-3.5 × thresholds (P sleep was also significantly longer than during QW. Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) within the cortical masticatory area induced rhythmic jaw movements at a stable threshold (≤ 60 μA) during QW...

  1. Leg muscle reflexes mediated by cutaneous A-beta fibres are normal during gait in reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, L; Boks, L M; van Wezel, B M; Goris, R J; Duysens, J E

    2000-04-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is, from the onset, characterized by various neurological deficits such as an alteration of sensation and a decrease in muscle strength. We investigated if afferent A-beta fibre-mediated reflexes are changed in lower extremities affected by acute RSD. The involvement of these fibres was determined by analyzing reflex responses from the tibialis anterior (TA) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles after electrical stimulation of the sural nerve. The reflexes were studied during walking on a treadmill to investigate whether the abnormalities in gait of the patients were related either to abnormal amplitudes or deficient phase-dependent modulation of reflexes. In 5 patients with acute RSD of the leg and 5 healthy volunteers these reflex responses were determined during the early and late swing phase of the step cycle. No significant difference was found between the RSD and the volunteers. During early swing the mean amplitude of the facilitatory P2 responses in BF and TA increased as a function of stimulus intensity (1.5, 2 and 2.5 times the perception threshold) in both groups. At end swing the same stimuli induced suppressive responses in TA. This phase-dependent reflex reversal from facilitation in early swing to suppression in late swing occurred equally in both groups. In the acute phase of RSD of the lower extremity there is no evidence for abnormal A-beta fibre-mediated reflexes or for defective regulation of such reflexes. This finding has implications for both the theory on RSD pathophysiology and RSD models, which are based on abnormal functioning of A-beta fibres.

  2. Reliability of the Spinal Cord Assessment Tool for Spastic Reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Pinar; Atici, Arzu; Ozkan, Feyza U; Aktas, Ilknur; Kulcu, Duygu G; Kurt, Kubra Neslihan

    2017-06-01

    To assess the reliability of the Spinal Cord Assessment Tool for Spastic Reflexes (SCATS). Observational reliability study of the SCATS. Inpatient rehabilitation unit at an education and research hospital. Subjects (N=47) between the ages of 18 and 88 years with spinal cord injury (SCI) and with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grades from A to D with spasticity, who were at least 6 months postinjury. Not applicable. Interrater and test-retest reliability of the SCATS. The SCATS had substantial to almost perfect interrater agreement (κ=.669-1.000) between the 2 physiatrists. Test-retest agreement of the SCATS was also substantial to almost perfect (κ=.614-1.000) as well. There was a significant correlation between the SCATS clonus scores and the Modified Ashworth scores of the hip, knee, and ankle. No correlation was found between SCATS extensor spasm scores and Modified Ashworth scores. The SCATS flexor spasm scores were only correlated significantly with the ankle plantar flexor Modified Ashworth scores (P<.05). The SCATS is a reliable tool for assessing spasm activity and spastic hypertonia in patients with SCI. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy of the left hand and motor impairments of the unaffected right hand : impaired central motor processing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribbers, Gerard M.; Mulder, Theo; Geurts, Alexander C.; Den Otter, R.A.

    Objective: To test whether central motor processing can be impaired in chronic reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD). Design: Experimental 2-group analysis. Setting: Tertiary care center in the Netherlands. Participants: Five patients with stage 3 RSD of the left forearm, free of symptoms and

  4. Linear vestibuloocular reflex during motion along axes between nasooccipital and interaural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, David L.; Paige, Gary D.

    1992-01-01

    Linear vestibuloocular reflexes (LVORs), which stabilize retinal images by producing eye movements to compensate for linear head motion, are of two types: (1) responses to head tilt, which work primarily at low frequencies; and (2) responses to head translation, which act at higher frequencies. This work tested the hypothesis that reflexive eye movements would follow the same kinematics relative to the motion axis regardless of head orientation relative to linear motion. The experiments consisted of recording horizontal and vertical eye movements in squirrel monkeys during linear oscillations at 5 Hz along the head's nasooccipital (NO) axis and along axes lying within +/- 30 deg of the NO axis. It was found that LVORs followed the same kinematics regardless of the eye position in the head or the head orientation relative to motion.

  5. Calpeptin Attenuated Inflammation, Cell Death, and Axonal Damage in Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, M. Kelly; Das, Arabinda; Samantaray, Supriti; Wallace, Gerald C.; Butler, Jonathan T.; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for studying multiple sclerosis (MS). Calpain has been implicated in many inflammatory and neurodegenerative events that lead to disability in EAE and MS. Thus, treating EAE animals with calpain inhibitors may block these events and ameliorate disability. To test this hypothesis, acute EAE Lewis rats were treated dose-dependently with the calpain inhibitor calpeptin (50 – 250 µg/kg). Calpain activity, gliosis, loss of myelin, and axonal damage were attenuated by calpeptin therapy, leading to improved clinical scores. Neuronal and oligodendrocyte death were also decreased with down regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins, suggesting that decreases in cell death were due to decreases in the expression or activity of pro-apoptotic proteins. These results indicate that calpain inhibition may offer a novel therapeutic avenue for treating EAE and MS. PMID:20623621

  6. Plasticity of the cervico-ocular reflex in health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P.A. Kelders (Willem)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe cervico-ocular reflex (COR) is an ocular stabilization reflex that is elicited by rotation of the neck. It works in conjunction with the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and the optokinetic reflex (OKR) in order to prevent visual slip over the retina due to self motion. The VOR

  7. Compensatory increase of the cervico-ocular reflex with age in healthy humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P.A. Kelders (Willem); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); J.N. van der Geest (Jos); L. Feenstra (Louw); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); M.A. Frens (Maarten)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe cervico-ocular reflex (COR) is an ocular stabilization reflex that is elicited by rotation of the neck. It works in conjunction with the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and the optokinetic reflex (OKR) in order to prevent visual slip over the retina due to

  8. Interindividual differences in H reflex modulation during normal walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Alkjaer, T

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous studies, at least two different types of soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation were likely to be found during normal human walking. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to identify different patterns of modulation of the soleus H reflex and to examine whether...... or not subjects with different H reflex modulation would exhibit different walking mechanics and different EMG activity. Fifteen subjects walked across two force platforms at 4.5 km/h (+/-10%) while the movements were recorded on video. The soleus H reflex and EMG activity were recorded separately during...... treadmill walking at 4.5 km/h. Using a two-dimensional analysis joint angles, angular velocities, accelerations, linear velocities and accelerations were calculated, and net joint moments about the ankle, knee and hip joint were computed by inverse dynamics from the video and force plate data. Six subjects...

  9. Non-reflexive Logical Foundation for Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, N. C. A.; de Ronde, C.

    2014-12-01

    On the one hand, non-reflexive logics are logics in which the principle of identity does not hold in general. On the other hand, quantum mechanics has difficulties regarding the interpretation of `particles' and their identity, also known in the literature as `the problem of indistinguishable particles'. In this article, we will argue that non-reflexive logics can be a useful tool to account for such quantum indistinguishability. In particular, we will provide a particular non-reflexive logic that can help us to analyze and discuss this problem. From a more general physical perspective, we will also analyze the limits imposed by the orthodox quantum formalism to consider the existence of indistinguishable particles in the first place, and argue that non-reflexive logics can also help us to think beyond the limits of classical identity.

  10. Pseudodystrophy. A conversion disorder mimicking reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessens, M; Blockx, P; Geuens, G; Dijs, H; Verheyen, G; Stassijns, G

    2002-10-01

    The authors suggest some criteria by which pseudodystrophy and reflex sympathetic dystrophy, although sharing some similar clinical features, can be distinguished as two different conditions, each requiring its own approach and management. The most important distinction is found on bone scintigraphy. In reflex sympathetic dystrophy the bone scan shows a typical increased tracer uptake (at least during stages I and II); in pseudodystrophy there is a normal or decreased tracer uptake in the affected region. Moreover the vascularization is increased in reflex sympathetic dystrophy stage I, whereas in pseudodystrophy hypovascularization is found from the beginning. The clinical features, as well as the results of technical investigations, psychological evaluation and treatment of 4 patients with pseudodystrophy are presented. The importance of distinguishing this condition from reflex sympathetic dystrophy is stressed.

  11. Relationship of acute axonal damage, Wallerian degeneration, and clinical disability in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailender; Dallenga, Tobias; Winkler, Anne; Roemer, Shanu; Maruschak, Brigitte; Siebert, Heike; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2017-03-17

    Axonal damage and loss substantially contribute to the incremental accumulation of clinical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis. Here, we assessed the amount of Wallerian degeneration in brain tissue of multiple sclerosis patients in relation to demyelinating lesion activity and asked whether a transient blockade of Wallerian degeneration decreases axonal loss and clinical disability in a mouse model of inflammatory demyelination. Wallerian degeneration and acute axonal damage were determined immunohistochemically in the periplaque white matter of multiple sclerosis patients with early actively demyelinating lesions, chronic active lesions, and inactive lesions. Furthermore, we studied the effects of Wallerian degeneration blockage on clinical severity, inflammatory pathology, acute axonal damage, and long-term axonal loss in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis using Wallerian degeneration slow (Wld S ) mutant mice. The highest numbers of axons undergoing Wallerian degeneration were found in the perilesional white matter of multiple sclerosis patients early in the disease course and with actively demyelinating lesions. Furthermore, Wallerian degeneration was more abundant in patients harboring chronic active as compared to chronic inactive lesions. No co-localization of neuropeptide Y-Y1 receptor, a bona fide immunohistochemical marker of Wallerian degeneration, with amyloid precursor protein, frequently used as an indicator of acute axonal transport disturbance, was observed in human and mouse tissue, indicating distinct axon-degenerative processes. Experimentally, a delay of Wallerian degeneration, as observed in Wld S mice, did not result in a reduction of clinical disability or acute axonal damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, further supporting that acute axonal damage as reflected by axonal transport disturbances does not share common molecular mechanisms with Wallerian degeneration. Furthermore, delaying Wallerian degeneration

  12. Gogo receptor contributes to retinotopic map formation and prevents R1-6 photoreceptor axon bundling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Hein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topographic maps form the basis of neural processing in sensory systems of both vertebrate and invertebrate species. In the Drosophila visual system, neighboring R1-R6 photoreceptor axons innervate adjacent positions in the first optic ganglion, the lamina, and thereby represent visual space as a continuous map in the brain. The mechanisms responsible for the establishment of retinotopic maps remain incompletely understood. RESULTS: Here, we show that the receptor Golden goal (Gogo is required for R axon lamina targeting and cartridge elongation in a partially redundant fashion with local guidance cues provided by neighboring axons. Loss of function of Gogo in large clones of R axons results in aberrant R1-R6 fascicle spacing. Gogo affects target cartridge selection only indirectly as a consequence of the disordered lamina map. Interestingly, small clones of gogo deficient R axons perfectly integrate into a proper retinotopic map suggesting that surrounding R axons of the same or neighboring fascicles provide complementary spatial guidance. Using single photoreceptor type rescue, we show that Gogo expression exclusively in R8 cells is sufficient to mediate targeting of all photoreceptor types in the lamina. Upon lamina targeting and cartridge selection, R axons elongate within their individual cartridges. Interestingly, here Gogo prevents bundling of extending R1-6 axons. CONCLUSION: Taken together, we propose that Gogo contributes to retinotopic map formation in the Drosophila lamina by controlling the distribution of R1-R6 axon fascicles. In a later developmental step, the regular position of R1-R6 axons along the lamina plexus is crucial for target cartridge selection. During cartridge elongation, Gogo allows R1-R6 axons to extend centrally in the lamina cartridge.

  13. N-cadherin regulates primary motor axon growth and branching during zebrafish embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusés, Juan L

    2011-06-15

    N-cadherin is a classical type I cadherin that contributes to the formation of neural circuits by regulating growth cone migration and the formation of synaptic contacts. This study analyzed the role of N-cadherin in primary motor axons growth during development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. After exiting the spinal cord, primary motor axons migrate ventrally through a common pathway and form the first neuromuscular junction with the muscle pioneer cells located at the horizontal myoseptum, which serves as a choice point for cell-type-specific pathway selection. Analysis of N-cadherin mutants (cdh2(hi3644Tg) ) and embryos injected with N-cadherin antisense morpholinos showed primary motor axons extending aberrant axonal branches at the choice point in ∼40% of the somitic hemisegments and an ∼150% increase in the number of branches per axon length within the ventral myotome. Analysis of individual axons trajectories showed that the caudal (CaP) and rostral (RoP) motor neurons axons formed aberrant branches at the choice point that abnormally extended in the rostrocaudal axis and ventrally to the horizontal myoseptum. Expression of a dominant-interfering N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain in primary motor neurons caused some axons to stall abnormally at the horizontal myoseptum and to impair their migration into the ventral myotome. However, in N-cadherin-depleted embryos, the majority of primary motor axons innervated their appropriate myotomal territories, indicating that N-cadherin regulates motor axon growth and branching without severely affecting the mechanisms that control axonal target selection. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Plexin A3 and turnout regulate motor axonal branch morphogenesis in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Sainath

    Full Text Available During embryogenesis motor axons navigate to their target muscles, where individual motor axons develop complex branch morphologies. The mechanisms that control axonal branching morphogenesis have been studied intensively, yet it still remains unclear when branches begin to form or how branch locations are determined. Live cell imaging of individual zebrafish motor axons reveals that the first axonal branches are generated at the ventral extent of the myotome via bifurcation of the growth cone. Subsequent branches are generated by collateral branching restricted to their synaptic target field along the distal portion of the axon. This precisely timed and spatially restricted branching process is disrupted in turnout mutants we identified in a forward genetic screen. Molecular genetic mapping positioned the turnout mutation within a 300 kb region encompassing eight annotated genes, however sequence analysis of all eight open reading frames failed to unambiguously identify the turnout mutation. Chimeric analysis and single cell labeling reveal that turnout function is required cell non-autonomously for intraspinal motor axon guidance and peripheral branch formation. turnout mutant motor axons form the first branch on time via growth cone bifurcation, but unlike wild-type they form collateral branches precociously, when the growth cone is still navigating towards the ventral myotome. These precocious collateral branches emerge along the proximal region of the axon shaft typically devoid of branches, and they develop into stable, permanent branches. Furthermore, we find that null mutants of the guidance receptor plexin A3 display identical motor axon branching defects, and time lapse analysis reveals that precocious branch formation in turnout and plexin A3 mutants is due to increased stability of otherwise short-lived axonal protrusions. Thus, plexin A3 dependent intrinsic and turnout dependent extrinsic mechanisms suppress collateral branch

  15. Sympathetic skin responses in reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolel, K; Hizmetli, S; Akyüz, A

    2006-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the utility of sympathetic skin response (SSR) in evaluating the sympathetic function and to follow up the effects of sympathetic blockade in reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD). Thirty patients having RSD with upper extremity involvement were randomly divided into two groups. Besides medical therapy and exercise, physical therapy agents were applied to both the groups. In addition to this treatment protocol, stellar ganglion blockade was done by diadynamic current in Group II. The normal sides of the patients were used for the control group. SSRs were measured in all the patients before and after the therapy. The amplitude was found to be increased and the latency was found to be decreased in the affected side in both the groups before the therapy. After the therapy, the amplitude was decreased and latency was increased in both the groups. But, the differences in amplitude (P = 0.001) and latency (P = 0.002) before and after the therapy were significantly higher in Group II. (Before the treatment, SSRs were significantly different between the normal and the affected sides in both the groups. The observed change in SSRs after the treatment was higher in Group II.) It was concluded that, SSR can be a useful and noninvasive method in diagnosing the sympathetic dysfunction in RSD and can be used for evaluating the response to sympathetic blockade and other treatment modalities.

  16. Clinical neurophysiology and quantitative sensory testing in the investigation of orofacial pain and sensory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Satu K

    2004-01-01

    Chronic orofacial pain represents a diagnostic and treatment challenge for the clinician. Some conditions, such as atypical facial pain, still lack proper diagnostic criteria, and their etiology is not known. The recent development of neurophysiological methods and quantitative sensory testing for the examination of the trigeminal somatosensory system offers several tools for diagnostic and etiological investigation of orofacial pain. This review presents some of these techniques and the results of their application in studies on orofacial pain and sensory dysfunction. Clinical neurophysiological investigation has greater diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity than clinical examination in the detection of the neurogenic abnormalities of either peripheral or central origin that may underlie symptoms of orofacial pain and sensory dysfunction. Neurophysiological testing may also reveal trigeminal pathology when magnetic resonance imaging has failed to detect it, so these methods should be considered complementary to each other in the investigation of orofacial pain patients. The blink reflex, corneal reflex, jaw jerk, sensory neurography of the inferior alveolar nerve, and the recording of trigeminal somatosensory-evoked potentials with near-nerve stimulation have all proved to be sensitive and reliable in the detection of dysfunction of the myelinated sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve or its central connections within the brainstem. With appropriately small thermodes, thermal quantitative sensory testing is useful for the detection of trigeminal small-fiber dysfunction (Adelta and C). In neuropathic conditions, it is most sensitive to lesions causing axonal injury. By combining different techniques for investigation of the trigeminal system, an accurate topographical diagnosis and profile of sensory fiber pathology can be determined. Neurophysiological and quantitative sensory tests have already highlighted some similarities among various orofacial pain conditions

  17. Development of Improved HDAC6 Inhibitors as Pharmacological Therapy for Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoy, Veronick; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Jarpe, Matthew; Van Damme, Philip; Robberecht, Wim; Van Den Bosch, Ludo

    2017-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy, with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 2500. The degeneration of motor and sensory nerve axons leads to motor and sensory symptoms that progress over time and have an important impact on the daily life of these patients. Currently, there is no curative treatment available. Recently, we identified histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which deacetylates α-tubulin, as a potential therapeutic target in axonal CMT (CMT2). Pharmacological inhibition of the deacetylating function of HDAC6 reversed the motor and sensory deficits in a mouse model for mutant "small heat shock protein B1" (HSPB1)-induced CMT2 at the behavioral and electrophysiological level. In order to translate this potential therapeutic strategy into a clinical application, small drug-like molecules that are potent and selective HDAC6 inhibitors are essential. To screen for these, we developed a method that consisted of 3 distinct phases and that was based on the pathological findings in the mutant HSPB1-induced CMT2 mouse model. Three different inhibitors (ACY-738, ACY-775, and ACY-1215) were tested and demonstrated to be both potent and selective HDAC6 inhibitors. Moreover, these inhibitors increased the innervation of the neuromuscular junctions in the gastrocnemius muscle and improved the motor and sensory nerve conduction, confirming that HDAC6 inhibition is a potential therapeutic strategy in CMT2. Furthermore, ACY-1215 is an interesting lead molecule as it is currently tested in clinical trials for cancer. Taken together, these results may speed up the translation of pharmacological inhibition of HDAC6 into a therapy against CMT2.

  18. Reflexive Pronouns in Dagbani Samuel Alhassan Issah1 Abstract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    between a reflexive and its antecedent is accounted for using c-command. Haegeman (1994:212) claims that a node A c-commands a node B if (1) A does not dominate B; (2) B does not dominate A; and ..... reflexive o-maŋa “himself” has the subject of the embedded clause Abu as its antecedent. These two arguments, Abu ...

  19. Intranasal Midazolam May Prevent Gagging Reflex: a Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Demir, Necla; Ileri, Zehra; Erdur, Aybuke; Apiliogullari, Seza

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Gagging can become a conditioned response that makes dental treatment difficult or impossible for both the individual and the dentist. The aim of this study is to report a 50 year old female and two children (15 and 11 years old) with exaggerated gag reflex referred to Faculty of Dentistry of Selçuk University. Methods During obtaining records, taking impression procedure was elicited the patients’ hypersensitive gagging reflex. Therefore, it was decided to administer intr...

  20. [Reflexive education in post-modernity: a bibliographic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Jomara Brandini; Casagrande, Lisete Diniz Ribas

    2002-01-01

    This is a bibliographical review that aimed at considering teaching at the actual historical moment, denominated post-modernity, and that has resulted in a pragmatic change in all levels of human being understanding. Thus, authors rescued and presented the presuppositions for a post-modern education, emphasizing among them the reflexive education proposed by Donald A. Shön, that is based on practical learning centered in "reflexion-in-action", as an alternative for the formation of a reflexive professional.

  1. Potentiation of fentanyl suppression of the jaw-opening reflex by transcranial electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alantar, A; Azerad, J; Limoge, A; Robert, C; Rokyta, R; Pollin, B

    1997-07-18

    Stinus et al. [L. Stinus, M. Auriacombe, J. Tignol, A. Limoge, M. Le Moal, Transcranial electrical stimulation with high frequency intermittent current (Limoge's) potentiates opiate-induced analgesia: blind studies, Pain, 42 (1990) 351-363.] observed that transcranial electrical stimulation (TCES) with high-frequency intermittent current potentiated opiate-induced analgesia using the tail-flick test. In unanesthetized, chronic preparations, electrical stimulation (0.5 Hz) of the lower incisor pulp of rats elicits a short-(6 ms) and a long-latency (12-18 ms) jaw-opening reflex (JOR) without any evidence of aversive behavior [J. Azerad, F. Fuentes, I. Lendais, A. Limoge, B. Pollin, Methods for selective tooth pulp stimulation in acute and chronic preparations in rats, J. Physiol., 406 (1988) 3P.]. Fentanyl increases thresholds of both reflexes and transiently suppresses the long-latency JOR. We then decided to look at the influence of TCES on both drug-induced mean of maximal threshold variation (MMTV) and duration of JOR suppression period. These parameters have been investigated in 43 Wistar rats with or without TCES administered for 3 h before the drug injection and throughout the testing period. TCES alone has no effect. In contrast, it significantly increases the duration of the reflex suppression period (149 +/- 5% vs. control, P < 0.001) while fentanyl-increased reflex thresholds remain unchanged. The fentanyl-induced JOR suppression period returns to the control values 2 days later. When a second 3-h TCES session is delivered 2 or 4 days after the first TCES session, a similar increase of this suppression period is observed. Moreover, 2 days after a second TCES session, an increase of the duration of the fentanyl-induced JOR suppression period is systematically observed. In contrast, a 6-h TCES session never induces such effects. These results confirm a potentiating effect of TCES on opioid action and demonstrate the value of repeated TCES sessions.

  2. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  3. Imaging findings in diffuse axonal injury after closed head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizel, P.M.; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Goethem, J.W. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Schepper, A.M. de [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Edegem (Belgium); Dillen, C.; Cosyns, P. [Department of Psychiatry, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Edegem (Belgium); Verlooy, J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Edegem (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    Even in patients with closed head trauma, brain parenchyma can be severely injured due to disruption of axonal fibers by shearing forces during acceleration, deceleration, and rotation of the head. In this article we review the spectrum of imaging findings in patients with diffuse axonal injuries (DAI) after closed head trauma. Knowledge of the location and imaging characteristics of DAI is important to radiologists for detection and diagnosis. Common locations of DAI include: cerebral hemispheric gray-white matter interface and subcortical white matter, body and splenium of corpus callosum, basal ganglia, dorsolateral aspect of brainstem, and cerebellum. In the acute phase, CT may show punctate hemorrhages. The true extent of brain involvement is better appreciated with MR imaging, because both hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic lesions (gliotic scars) can be detected. The MR appearance of DAI lesions depends on several factors, including age of injury, presence of hemorrhage or blood-breakdown products (e. g., hemosiderin), and type of sequence used. Technical aspects in MR imaging of these patients are discussed. Non-hemorrhagic lesions can be detected with fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), proton-density-, or T2-weighted images, whereas gradient echo sequences with long TE increase the visibility of old hemorrhagic lesions. (orig.) With 12 figs., 12 refs.

  4. Rapid signaling in distinct dopaminergic axons during locomotion and reward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, MW; Dombeck, DA

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dopaminergic projections from the midbrain to striatum are critical for motor control, as their degeneration in Parkinson’s disease results in profound movement deficits. Paradoxically, most recording methods report rapid phasic dopamine signaling (~100ms bursts) to unpredicted rewards, with little evidence for movement-related signaling. The leading model posits that phasic signaling in striatum targeting dopamine neurons drive reward-based learning, while slow variations in firing (tens of seconds to minutes) in these same neurons bias animals towards or away from movement. However, despite widespread acceptance of this model, current methods have provided little evidence to support or refute it. Here, using new optical recording methods, we report the discovery of rapid phasic signaling in striatum-targeting dopaminergic axons that was associated with, and capable of triggering, locomotion in mice. Axons expressing these signals were largely distinct from those signaling during unexpected rewards. These results suggest that dopaminergic neuromodulation can differentially impact motor control and reward learning with sub-second precision and suggest that both precise signal timing and neuronal subtype are important parameters to consider in the treatment of dopamine-related disorders. PMID:27398617

  5. Avian reflex and electroencephalogram responses in different states of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, Dale A; Auckburally, Adam; Flaherty, Derek; Sandilands, Victoria; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2014-06-22

    Defining states of clinical consciousness in animals is important in veterinary anaesthesia and in studies of euthanasia and welfare assessment at slaughter. The aim of this study was to validate readily observable reflex responses in relation to different conscious states, as confirmed by EEG analysis, in two species of birds under laboratory conditions (35-week-old layer hens (n=12) and 11-week-old turkeys (n=10)). We evaluated clinical reflexes and characterised electroencephalograph (EEG) activity (as a measure of brain function) using spectral analyses in four different clinical states of consciousness: conscious (fully awake), semi-conscious (sedated), unconscious-optimal (general anaesthesia), unconscious-sub optimal (deep hypnotic state), as well as assessment immediately following euthanasia. Jaw or neck muscle tone was the most reliable reflex measure distinguishing between conscious and unconscious states. Pupillary reflex was consistently observed until respiratory arrest. Nictitating membrane reflex persisted for a short time (power (PTOT) significantly increased, whereas median (F50) and spectral edge (F95) frequencies significantly decreased. This study demonstrates that EEG analysis can differentiate between clinical states (and loss of brain function at death) in birds and provides a unique integration of reflex responses and EEG activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Student Mobility and Transnational Social Ties as Factors of Reflexivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Golob

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article seeks to develop and apply new quantitative measurement instruments capable of significantly improving understanding of the relationship between the transnational mobility and transnational social ties of students, along with their reflexive capacities. With a focus on students building their personal networks, educational and professional activities that extend beyond the nation’s borders and organising their day-to-day routines in transnational social spaces, we analyse the role of mobility in their reflexive capacities. Applying a tool that is line with Archer’s theory and indicators to measure reflexivity, and transnational social ties as proposed by Molina et al., we analyse data collected via an on-line survey questionnaire administered to Slovenian students. In addition, students from the Middle East (Lebanon and the USA (Hawai’i are added for comparative purposes. The results of path analysis show the Slovenian students’ mobility as such implies higher scores for meta reflexivity, combined with lower scores for communicative and fractured reflexivity. Further, social transactions reaching beyond one’s physical localities in terms of transnational social ties implies they have higher levels of reflexivity in general.

  7. Doppler sonographic assessment of posttraumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekindil, Gökhan; Pekindil, Yesim; Sarikaya, Ali

    2003-04-01

    To reveal the arterial Doppler sonographic findings in cases of posttraumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy Eleven patients had hand reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and 9 had foot reflex sympathetic dystrophy. The duration of symptoms ranged from 1 to 28 weeks, and the history of fracture ranged from 6 to 48 weeks. Bilateral brachial or popliteal arteries proximal to injuries were evaluated by Doppler sonography with a 7.5-MHz linear transducer. All patients also had triphasic bone scintigraphy and extremity thermography Two patients had monophasic waveforms and 4 had low-pulsatility triphasic waveforms on the affected limbs when compared with the asymptomatic limbs. All opposite asymptomatic limbs had normal triphasic waveforms in these 6 cases. Spectral analysis revealed a loss or decrease of a normal reversed flow component with a reduced pulsatility index on the affected limb. Fourteen other patients had symmetric triphasic waveforms. We observed that the patients who had stage 1 reflex sympathetic dystrophy and warm limbs with durations of symptoms of more than 2 weeks had positive Doppler sonographic findings, whereas all patients with stage 2 reflex sympathetic dystrophy and all with normal skin temperature, regardless of stage, had normal waveforms. Doppler sonography revealed loss of normal triphasic arterial waveforms in some of the cases of stage 1 disease, whereas many cases of stage 1 disease and all cases of stage 2 disease had normal findings. Therefore, we think that Doppler sonography cannot be used for the diagnosis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy but may help in assessing hemodynamic stages of the disease.

  8. The Kinesin Adaptor Calsyntenin-1 Organizes Microtubule Polarity and Regulates Dynamics during Sensory Axon Arbor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C. Halloran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Axon growth and branching, and development of neuronal polarity are critically dependent on proper organization and dynamics of the microtubule (MT cytoskeleton. MTs must organize with correct polarity for delivery of diverse cargos to appropriate subcellular locations, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating MT polarity remain poorly understood. Moreover, how an actively branching axon reorganizes MTs to direct their plus ends distally at branch points is unknown. We used high-speed, in vivo imaging of polymerizing MT plus ends to characterize MT dynamics in developing sensory axon arbors in zebrafish embryos. We find that axonal MTs are highly dynamic throughout development, and that the peripheral and central axons of sensory neurons show differences in MT behaviors. Furthermore, we show that Calsyntenin-1 (Clstn-1, a kinesin adaptor required for sensory axon branching, also regulates MT polarity in developing axon arbors. In wild type neurons the vast majority of MTs are directed in the correct plus-end-distal orientation from early stages of development. Loss of Clstn-1 causes an increase in MTs polymerizing in the retrograde direction. These misoriented MTs most often are found near growth cones and branch points, suggesting Clstn-1 is particularly important for organizing MT polarity at these locations. Together, our results suggest that Clstn-1, in addition to regulating kinesin-mediated cargo transport, also organizes the underlying MT highway during axon arbor development.

  9. The role of mitochondria in axonal degeneration and tissue repair in MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Horssen, J.; Witte, M.E.; Ciccarelli, O.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal injury is a key feature of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and is currently seen as the main correlate for permanent clinical disability. Although little is known about the pathogenetic mechanisms that drive axonal damage and loss, there is accumulating evidence highlighting the central

  10. Structure and Function of an Actin-Based Filter in the Proximal Axon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varuzhan Balasanyan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The essential organization of microtubules within neurons has been described; however, less is known about how neuronal actin is arranged and the functional implications of its arrangement. Here, we describe, in live cells, an actin-based structure in the proximal axon that selectively prevents some proteins from entering the axon while allowing the passage of others. Concentrated patches of actin in proximal axons are present shortly after axonal specification in rat and zebrafish neurons imaged live, and they mark positions where anterogradely traveling vesicles carrying dendritic proteins halt and reverse. Patches colocalize with the ARP2/3 complex, and when ARP2/3-mediated nucleation is blocked, a dendritic protein mislocalizes to the axon. Patches are highly dynamic, with few persisting longer than 30 min. In neurons in culture and in vivo, actin appears to form a contiguous, semipermeable barrier, despite its apparently sparse distribution, preventing axonal localization of constitutively active myosin Va but not myosin VI. : Balasanyan et al. find dynamic patches of actin in proximal axons of live neurons, mature and newly differentiated, in culture and in vivo. Patches contribute to a filter that sequesters some proteins within the somatodendritic domain while allowing others to pass into the axon, leading to polarized localization of proteins.

  11. The progeroid gene BubR1 regulates axon myelination and motor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, C.I.; Yoo, K.H.; Hussaini, S.M.; Jeon, B.T.; Welby, J.; Gan, H.; Scarisbrick, I.A.; Zhang, Z.; Baker, D.J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Rodriguez, M.; Jang, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Myelination, the process by which oligodendrocytes form the myelin sheath around axons, is key to axonal signal transduction and related motor function in the central nervous system (CNS). Aging is characterized by degenerative changes in the myelin sheath, although the molecular underpinnings of

  12. Modeling of the axon membrane skeleton structure and implications for its mechanical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihao Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that, unlike the soma and dendrites, the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under tension. Currently, the structure-function relationship of the axonal structure is unclear. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM to show that the stiffness of the axon plasma membrane is significantly higher than the stiffnesses of dendrites and somata. To examine whether the structure of the axon plasma membrane determines its overall stiffness, we introduced a coarse-grain molecular dynamics model of the axon membrane skeleton that reproduces the structure identified by super-resolution microscopy. Our proposed computational model accurately simulates the median value of the Young's modulus of the axon plasma membrane determined by atomic force microscopy. It also predicts that because the spectrin filaments are under entropic tension, the thermal random motion of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav, which are bound to ankyrin particles, a critical axonal protein, is reduced compared to the thermal motion when spectrin filaments are held at equilibrium. Lastly, our model predicts that because spectrin filaments are under tension, any axonal injuries that lacerate spectrin filaments will likely lead to a permanent disruption of the membrane skeleton due to the inability of spectrin filaments to spontaneously form their initial under-tension configuration.

  13. Axonal and presynaptic protein synthesis: new insights into the biology of the neuron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuditta, A.; Kaplan, B.B.; van Minnen, J.; Alvarez, J.; Koenig, E.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of a local mRNA translation system in axons and terminals was proposed almost 40 years ago. Over the ensuing period, an impressive body of evidence has grown to support this proposal - yet the nerve cell body is still considered to be the only source of axonal and presynaptic proteins.

  14. Blast overpressure induced axonal injury changes in rat brainstem and spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasu Kallakuri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blast induced neurotrauma has been the signature wound in returning soldiers from the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of importance is understanding the pathomechansim(s of blast overpressure (OP induced axonal injury. Although several recent animal models of blast injury indicate the neuronal and axonal injury in various brain regions, animal studies related to axonal injury in the white matter (WM tracts of cervical spinal cord are limited. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of axonal injury in WM tracts of cervical spinal cord in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to a single insult of blast OP. Materials and Methods: Sagittal brainstem sections and horizontal cervical spinal cord sections from blast and sham animals were stained by neurofilament light (NF-L chain and beta amyloid precursor protein immunocytochemistry and observed for axonal injury changes. Results: Observations from this preliminary study demonstrate axonal injury changes in the form of prominent swellings, retraction bulbs, and putative signs of membrane disruptions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord WM tracts of rats subjected to blast OP. Conclusions: Prominent axonal injury changes following the blast OP exposure in brainstem and cervical spinal WM tracts underscores the need for careful evaluation of blast induced injury changes and associated symptoms. NF-L immunocytochemistry can be considered as an additional tool to assess the blast OP induced axonal injury.

  15. A high mitochondrial transport rate characterizes CNS neurons with high axonal regeneration capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Cartoni

    Full Text Available Improving axonal transport in the injured and diseased central nervous system has been proposed as a promising strategy to improve neuronal repair. However, the contribution of each cargo to the repair mechanism is unknown. DRG neurons globally increase axonal transport during regeneration. Because the transport of specific cargos after axonal insult has not been examined systematically in a model of enhanced regenerative capacity, it is unknown whether the transport of all cargos would be modulated equally in injured central nervous system neurons. Here, using a microfluidic culture system we compared neurons co-deleted for PTEN and SOCS3, an established model of high axonal regeneration capacity, to control neurons. We measured the axonal transport of three cargos (mitochondria, synaptic vesicles and late endosomes in regenerating axons and found that the transport of mitochondria, but not the other cargos, was increased in PTEN/SOCS3 co-deleted axons relative to controls. The results reported here suggest a pivotal role for this organelle during axonal regeneration.

  16. Schwann Cell and Axon: An Interlaced Unit-From Action Potential to Phenotype Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Felipe A; Alvarez, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Here we propose a model of a peripheral axon with a great deal of autonomy from its cell body-the autonomous axon-but with a substantial dependence on its ensheathing Schwann cell (SC), the axon-SC unit. We review evidence in several fields and show that (i) axons can extend sprouts and grow without the concurrence of the cell body, but regulated by SCs; (ii) axons synthesize their proteins assisted by SCs that supply them with ribosomes and, probably, with mRNAs by way of exosomes; (iii) the molecular organization of the axoplasm, i.e., its phenotype, is regulated by the SC, as illustrated by the axonal microtubular content, which is down-regulated by the SC; and (iv) the axon has a program for self-destruction that is boosted by the SC. The main novelty of this model axon-SC unit is that it breaks with the notion that all proteins of the nerve cell are specified by its own nucleus. The notion of a collaborative specification of the axoplasm by more than one nucleus, which we present here, opens a new dimension in the understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and is also a frame of reference to understand other tissues or cell associations.

  17. Organophosphate-Related Alterations in Myelin and Axonal Transport in the Living Mammalian Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    510. Duncan JE, Goldstein LS. 2006. The Genetics of Axonal Transport and Axonal Transport Disorders PLoS Genet . 2(9): e124. 25 Duysen EG, Li...Gitajn L, Rea W, Yang Y, Stein EA.2007. Cocaine -induced brain activation detected by dynamic manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI

  18. Misdirection and guidance of regenerating axons after experimental nerve injury and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, Godard C W; Spinner, Robert J; Verhaagen, J.; Malessy, Martijn J A

    Misdirection of regenerating axons is one of the factors that can explain the limited results often found after nerve injury and repair. In the repair of mixed nerves innervating different distal targets (skin and muscle), misdirection may, for example, lead to motor axons projecting toward skin,

  19. Misdirection and guidance of regenerating axons after experimental nerve injury and repair A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, G.C.W.; Spinner, R.J.; Verhaagen, J.; Malessay, M.J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Misdirection of regenerating axons is one of the factors that can explain the limited results often found after nerve injury and repair. In the repair of mixed nerves innervating different distal targets (skin and muscle), misdirection may, for example, lead to motor axons projecting toward skin,

  20. Misdirection and guidance of regenerating motor axons after experimental nerve injury and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, Godard de

    2013-01-01

    Misdirection of regenerating motor axons is one of the factors that can explain the disappointing recovery of function often observed after nerve injury and repair. In the first part of this thesis we quantified misdirection of motor axon regeneration after different types of nerve injury and repair

  1. Frizzled3 controls axonal polarity and intermediate target entry during striatal pathway development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morello, Francesca; Prasad, Asheeta A.; Rehberg, Kati; Baptista Vieira de Sá, Renata; Antón-Bolaños, Noelia; Leyva-Diaz, Eduardo; Adolfs, Youri; Tissir, Fadel; López-Bendito, Guillermina; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    The striatum is a large brain nucleus with an important role in the control of movement and emotions.Mediumspiny neurons (MSNs) are striatal output neurons forming prominent descending axon tracts that target different brain nuclei. However, how MSN axon tracts in the forebrain develop remains

  2. Axon-somatic back-propagation in detailed models of spinal alpha motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eBalbi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Antidromic action potentials following distal stimulation of motor axons occasionally fail to invade the soma of alpha motoneurons in spinal cord, due to their passing through regions of high non-uniformity.Morphologically detailed conductance-based models of cat spinal alpha motoneurons have been developed, with the aim to reproduce and clarify some aspects of the electrophysiological behavior of the antidromic axon-somatic spike propagation. Fourteen 3D morphologically detailed somata and dendrites of cat spinal alpha motoneurons have been imported from an open-access web-based database of neuronal morphologies, NeuroMorpho.org, and instantiated in neurocomputational models. An axon hillock, an axonal initial segment and a myelinated axon are added to each model.By sweeping the diameter of the axonal initial segment (AIS and the axon hillock, as well as the maximal conductances of sodium channels at the AIS and at the soma, the developed models are able to show the relationships between different geometric and electrophysiological configurations and the voltage attenuation of the antidromically travelling wave.In particular, a greater than usually admitted sodium conductance at AIS is necessary and sufficient to overcome the dramatic voltage attenuation occurring during antidromic spike propagation both at the myelinated axon-AIS and at the AIS-soma transitions.

  3. Axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract after stroke: how does rehabilitative training modulate it?

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    Naohiko Okabe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke causes long-term disability, and rehabilitative training is commonly used to improve the consecutive functional recovery. Following brain damage, surviving neurons undergo morphological alterations to reconstruct the remaining neural network. In the motor system, such neural network remodeling is observed as a motor map reorganization. Because of its significant correlation with functional recovery, motor map reorganization has been regarded as a key phenomenon for functional recovery after stroke. Although the mechanism underlying motor map reorganization remains unclear, increasing evidence has shown a critical role for axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract. In this study, we review previous studies investigating axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract after stroke and discuss which mechanisms may underlie the stimulatory effect of rehabilitative training. Axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract can be classified into three types based on the location and the original targets of corticospinal neurons, and it seems that all the surviving corticospinal neurons in both ipsilesional and contralesional hemisphere can participate in axonal remodeling and motor map reorganization. Through axonal remodeling, corticospinal neurons alter their output selectivity from a single to multiple areas to compensate for the lost function. The remodeling of the corticospinal axon is influenced by the extent of tissue destruction and promoted by various therapeutic interventions, including rehabilitative training. Although the precise molecular mechanism underlying rehabilitation-promoted axonal remodeling remains elusive, previous data suggest that rehabilitative training promotes axonal remodeling by upregulating growth-promoting and downregulating growth-inhibiting signals.

  4. Neurobiology of axonal transport defects in motor neuron diseases: Opportunities for translational research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Kurt J; Hafezparast, Majid

    2017-09-01

    Intracellular trafficking of cargoes is an essential process to maintain the structure and function of all mammalian cell types, but especially of neurons because of their extreme axon/dendrite polarisation. Axonal transport mediates the movement of cargoes such as proteins, mRNA, lipids, membrane-bound vesicles and organelles that are mostly synthesised in the cell body and in doing so is responsible for their correct spatiotemporal distribution in the axon, for example at specialised sites such as nodes of Ranvier and synaptic terminals. In addition, axonal transport maintains the essential long-distance communication between the cell body and synaptic terminals that allows neurons to react to their surroundings via trafficking of for example signalling endosomes. Axonal transport defects are a common observation in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, and mutations in components of the axonal transport machinery have unequivocally shown that impaired axonal transport can cause neurodegeneration (reviewed in El-Kadi et al., 2007, De Vos et al., 2008; Millecamps and Julien, 2013). Here we review our current understanding of axonal transport defects and the role they play in motor neuron diseases (MNDs) with a specific focus on the most common form of MND, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A method of reflexive balancing in a pragmatic, interdisciplinary and reflexive bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an 'abstract' philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of 'empirical' (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but can perhaps best be understood as a substantive attempt to engage with the nature of that interdisciplinarity and to articulate the relationship between the many different disciplines (some of them empirical) that contribute to the field. It can also be described as an endeavour to explain how different disciplinary approaches can be integrated to effectively answer normative questions in bioethics, and fundamental to that endeavour is the need to think about how a robust methodology can be articulated that successfully marries apparently divergent epistemological and metaethical perspectives with method. This paper proposes 'Reflexive Bioethics' (RB) as a methodology for interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics, which utilizes a method of 'Reflexive Balancing' (RBL). RBL has been developed in response to criticisms of various forms of reflective equilibrium, and is built upon a pragmatic characterization of Bioethics and a 'quasi-moral foundationalism', which allows RBL to avoid some of the difficulties associated with RE and yet retain the flexible egalitarianism that makes it intuitively appealing to many. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Sensory axon-derived neuregulin-1 is required for axoglial signaling and normal sensory function but not for long-term axon maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fricker, F.R.; Zhu, N.; Tsantoulas, C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 has a key role in mediating signaling between axons and Schwann cells during development. A limitation to studying its role in adulthood is the embryonic lethality of global Nrg1 gene deletion. We used the Cre-loxP system to generate transgenic mice in which neuregulin-1 is condition......Neuregulin-1 has a key role in mediating signaling between axons and Schwann cells during development. A limitation to studying its role in adulthood is the embryonic lethality of global Nrg1 gene deletion. We used the Cre-loxP system to generate transgenic mice in which neuregulin-1...... is conditionally ablated in the majority of small-diameter and a proportion of large-diameter sensory neurons that have axons conducting in the C- and Adelta-fiber range, respectively. Sensory neuron-specific neuregulin-1 ablation resulted in abnormally large Remak bundles with axons clustered in "polyaxonal...... cells required for normal sensory function. Sensory neuronal survival and axonal maintenance, however, are not dependent on axon-derived neuregulin-1 signaling in adulthood Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6/17...

  7. [Complex regional pain syndrome. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy and causalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, R; Binder, A; Ulrich, W; Maier, C

    2002-04-01

    Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS) occur as the inadequate response to painful trauma in a distal extremity. With CRPS I (sympathetic reflex dystrophy), no lesion of the nerve is present. Aside from sensory disturbances, burning deep spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia are characteristic. Disturbances in the skin blood circulation, sweating, edema, and trophic disturbances of the skin, joints, and bones are typical. Reduction in muscle strength, tremor, and late dystonic changes comprise the motor disturbances. All symptoms are distributed in the distal extremity and not limited to the region of the peripheral nerves. Complex regional pain syndrome II (causalgia), develops following a partial peripheral nerve lesion. The distally generalized symptoms are identical. Successful therapy depends on an early start of interdisciplinary treatment. In addition to the pain therapy, physiotherapy plays a decisive role in rehabilitation. During the acute phase, freedom from pain at rest and retrogression of the edema must be achieved. With slight spontaneous pain, a conservative therapeutic method may be applied (analgesics, rest, raised position). In case of insufficient improvement and in difficult cases, the effect of intervention (sympathetic blockade) should be tested and possibly a blockade series performed. After reduced spontaneous pain, physiotherapy should be increased stepwise.

  8. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy secondary to piriformis syndrome: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçali, Didem; Taş, Ayça; Cizmeci, Pelin; Oktar, Suna; Zinnuroğlu, Murat; Arslan, Emre; Köseoğlu, Hüseyin; Babacan, Avni

    2009-04-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a rare cause of hip and foot pain which may be due to sciatic nerve irritation because of anatomic abnormalities of sciatic nerve and piriformis muscle or herniated disc, facet syndrome, trochanteric bursit, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, endometriosis and other conditions where sciatic nerve is irritated. There has been no reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) case presented due to piriformis syndrome before. A sixty-two-year-old female patient had right foot and hip pain (VNS: 8), redness and swelling in the foot since 15 days. Her history revealed long walks and travelling 3 weeks ago and sitting on the foot for a long time for a couple of days. Physical examination revealed painful hip movement, positive straight leg rise. Erythema and hyperalgesia was present in dorsum of the right foot. Right foot dorsiflexion was weak and hyperesthesia was found in right L4-5 dermatome. Medical treatment and ultrasound treatment to piriformis muscle was not effective. The patient was injected 40 mg triamcinolon and local anesthetic in right piriformis muscle under floroscopy by diagnosis of piriformis syndrome, neuropathic pain and RSD. Pain and hyperalgesia resolved and motor weakness was better. During follow-up right foot redness resolved and pain decreased (VNS: 1). In this case report, there was vascular, muscle and skeletal signs supporting RSD, which shows us the therapoetic effect of diagnostic piriformis injection. The patient history, physical examination and diagnostic tests were evaluated by a multidisciplinary team which contributed to the treatment.

  9. Intra-axonal Synthesis of SNAP25 Is Required for the Formation of Presynaptic Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia F.R. Batista

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Localized protein synthesis is a mechanism for developing axons to react acutely and in a spatially restricted manner to extracellular signals. As such, it is important for many aspects of axonal development, but its role in the formation of presynapses remains poorly understood. We found that the induced assembly of presynaptic terminals required local protein synthesis. Newly synthesized proteins were detectable at nascent presynapses within 15 min of inducing synapse formation in isolated axons. The transcript for the t-SNARE protein SNAP25, which is required for the fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane, was recruited to presynaptic sites and locally translated. Inhibition of intra-axonal SNAP25 synthesis affected the clustering of SNAP25 and other presynaptic proteins and interfered with the release of synaptic vesicles from presynaptic sites. This study reveals a critical role for the axonal synthesis of SNAP25 in the assembly of presynaptic terminals.

  10. JMJD-1.2/PHF8 controls axon guidance by regulating Hedgehog-like signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riveiro, Alba; Mariani, Luca; Malmberg, Kim Emily

    2017-01-01

    Components of the KDM7 family of histone demethylases are implicated in neuronal development and one member, PHF8, is often found to be mutated in cases of X-linked mental retardation. However, how PHF8 regulates neurodevelopmental processes and contributes to the disease is still largely unknown...... the axonal defects. Deficiency of either wrt-8 or grl-16, or reduced expression of homologs of genes promoting Hedgehog signaling, restores correct axon guidance in jmjd-1.2 mutants. Genetic and overexpression data indicate that Hedgehog-related genes act on axon guidance through actin remodelers. Thus, our...... study highlights a novel function of jmjd-1.2 in axon guidance that might be relevant for the onset of X-linked mental retardation and provides compelling evidence of a conserved function of the Hedgehog pathway in C. elegans axon migration....

  11. Lost in the jungle: new hurdles for optic nerve axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Vincent; Schwab, Martin E

    2014-07-01

    The poor regenerative capacity of injured central nervous system (CNS) axons leads to permanent neurological deficits after brain, spinal cord, or optic nerve lesions. In the optic nerve, recent studies showed that stimulation of the cytokine or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways potently enhances sprouting and regeneration of injured retinal ganglion cell axons in adult mice, but does not allow the majority of axons to reach their main cerebral targets. New analyses have revealed axon navigation defects in the optic nerve and at the optic chiasm under conditions of strong growth stimulation. We propose that a balanced growth stimulatory treatment will have to be combined with guidance factors and suppression of local growth inhibitory factors to obtain the full regeneration of long CNS axonal tracts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of axon guidance by compartmentalized nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colak, Dilek; Ji, Sheng-Jian; Porse, Bo T

    2013-01-01

    Growth cones enable axons to navigate toward their targets by responding to extracellular signaling molecules. Growth-cone responses are mediated in part by the local translation of axonal messenger RNAs (mRNAs). However, the mechanisms that regulate local translation are poorly understood. Here we...... show that Robo3.2, a receptor for the Slit family of guidance cues, is synthesized locally within axons of commissural neurons. Robo3.2 translation is induced by floor-plate-derived signals as axons cross the spinal cord midline. Robo3.2 is also a predicted target of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.......2 expression. These data show that local translation is regulated by mRNA stability and that NMD acts locally to influence axonal pathfinding....

  13. PACSIN1, a Tau-interacting protein, regulates axonal elongation and branching by facilitating microtubule instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Lv, Kaosheng; Li, Zenglong; Yu, Albert C H; Chen, Jianguo; Teng, Junlin

    2012-11-16

    Tau is a major member of the neuronal microtubule-associated proteins. It promotes tubulin assembly and stabilizes axonal microtubules. Previous studies have demonstrated that Tau forms cross-bridges between microtubules, with some particles located on cross-bridges, suggesting that some proteins interact with Tau and might be involved in regulating Tau-related microtubule dynamics. This study reports that PACSIN1 interacts with Tau in axon. PACSIN1 blockade results in impaired axonal elongation and a higher number of primary axonal branches in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons, which is induced by increasing the binding ability of Tau to microtubules. In PACSIN1-blocked dorsal root ganglia neurons, a greater amount of Tau is inclined to accumulate in the central domain of growth cones, and it promotes the stability of the microtubule network. Taken together, these results suggest that PACSIN1 is an important Tau binding partner in regulating microtubule dynamics and forming axonal plasticity.

  14. Axonal sprouting regulates myelin basic protein gene expression in denervated mouse hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Poulsen, F R; Finsen, B

    2000-01-01

    to 35 days after transection of the entorhino-hippocampal perforant path axonal projection. In situ hybridization analysis showed that anterograde axonal and terminal degeneration lead to upregulated oligodendrocyte MBP mRNA expression starting between day 2 and day 4, in (1) the deep part of stratum...... axonal and terminal degeneration, myelin degenerative changes, microglial activation and axotomi-induced axonal sprouting. Oligodendrocyte MBP mRNA expression reached maximum in both these areas at day 7. MBP gene transcription remained constant in stratum radiatum, stratum pyramidale and stratum oriens...... of CA1, areas that were unaffected by perforant path transection. These results provide strong evidence that oligodendrocyte MBP gene expression can be regulated by axonal sprouting independently of microglial activation in the injured adult CNS....

  15. Bisphosphonate therapy of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, S; Fossaluzza, V; Gatti, D; Fracassi, E; Braga, V

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) is a painful limb disorder, for which a consistently effective treatment has not yet been identified. The disease is associated with increased bone resorption and patchy osteoporosis, which might benefit from treatment with bisphosphonates, powerful inhibitors of bone resorption.
METHODS—Twenty patients with RSDS of foot and hand, were randomly assigned to blind administration of either alendronate intravenously (Istituto Gentili, Pisa, Italy) 7.5 mg dissolved in 250 ml saline solution or placebo saline infusions daily for three days. Two weeks later all patients had an identical treatment course with open labelled alendronate (7.5 mg/day for three days), independent from the results of the first blind treatment.
RESULTS—In the patients treated with blind alendronate the diminution in spontaneous pain, tenderness, and swelling (circumference of the affected limb) and the improvement in motion were significantly different from baseline (p<0.001), from those observed within the first two weeks in the control group (p<0.01), and from week 2 to week 4 (p<0.01). In the patients given blind placebo infusions no relevant symptomatic changes were observed after the first two weeks of follow up, but they responded to the open alendronate therapy given afterwards. In 12 patients with RSDS of the hand the ultradistal bone mineral content (BMC) of the affected arm was considerably lower than that of the controlateral arm (mean (SD)) (426(82) mg/cm versus 688(49)). Six weeks after the beginning of the trial BMC rose by 77(12) mg/cm (p<0.001) in the affected arm, but it did not change in the controlateral.
CONCLUSIONS—These results indicate that bisphosphonates should be considered for the treatment of RSDS, producing consistent and rapid remission of the disease.

 PMID:9135227

  16. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances the trigeminocardiac reflex via serotonin receptor facilitation in brainstem pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorini, C; Jameson, H; Woerman, A L; Perry, D C; Mendelowitz, D

    2013-08-15

    In this study we used a rat model for prenatal nicotine exposure to test whether clinically relevant concentrations of brain nicotine and cotinine are passed from dams exposed to nicotine to her pups, whether this changes the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR), and whether serotonergic function in the TCR brainstem circuitry is altered. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 6 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) of nicotine via osmotic minipumps for the duration of pregnancy. Following birth dams and pups were killed, blood was collected, and brain nicotine and cotinine levels were measured. A separate group of prenatal nicotine-exposed pups was used for electrophysiological recordings. A horizontal brainstem slice was obtained by carefully preserving the trigeminal nerve with fluorescent identification of cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus. Stimulation of the trigeminal nerve evoked excitatory postsynaptic current in CVNs. Our data demonstrate that prenatal nicotine exposure significantly exaggerates both the TCR-evoked changes in heart rate in conscious unrestrained pups, and the excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs upon trigeminal afferent nerve stimulation within this brainstem reflex circuit. Application of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (100 μM) and 5-HT2A/C receptor antagonist ketanserin (10 μM)significantly decreased neurotransmission, indicating an increased facilitation of 5-HT function in prenatal nicotine-exposed animals. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances activation of 5-HT receptors and exaggerates the trigeminocardiac reflex.

  17. Cervical vagotomy increased the distal colon distention to urinary bladder inhibitory reflex in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddumi, Ezidin G

    2016-02-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the convergence of vagal inputs into brainstem centers with inputs from the urinary bladder and colon, as well as the convergence of vagal inputs into other centers controlling the urinary bladder and colon reflexes. However, the effect of the vagal inputs on the interaction between the urinary bladder and other pelvic organs has not been studied. In this study, the effect of bilateral cervical vagotomy on the distal colon to urinary bladder reflex was examined. Changes to cystometry parameters in response to increased distal colon distensions (1, 2, and 3 ml) were tested in urethane-anesthetized male rats with or without bilateral cervical vagotomy. In animals with intact vagus nerves, 1 and 2 ml distal colon distentions had no significant effects on micturition frequency; however, 3 ml distal colon distention significantly decreased the frequency of micturition cycles. Also, 3 ml distal colon distention inhibited micturition cycles in 37.5 % of these animals. On the other hand, following cervical vagotomy, 1 ml distal colon distention was enough to significantly decrease the frequency of micturition cycles and to inhibit the cycles in 75 % of the animals. These results demonstrate the presence of supraspinal inhibitory regulation, via the vagus nerve, over the distal colon to urinary bladder inhibitory reflex.

  18. H-reflexes reduce fatigue of evoked contractions after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, Austin J; Wiest, Matheus J; Okuma, Yoshino; Collins, David F

    2014-08-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) over a muscle belly (mNMES) generates contractions predominantly through M-waves, while NMES over a nerve trunk (nNMES) can generate contractions through H-reflexes in people who are neurologically intact. We tested whether the differences between mNMES and nNMES are present in people with chronic motor-complete spinal cord injury and, if so, whether they influence contraction fatigue. Plantar-flexion torque and soleus electromyography were recorded from 8 participants. Fatigue protocols were delivered using mNMES and nNMES on separate days. nNMES generated contractions that fatigued less than mNMES. Torque decreased the least when nNMES generated contractions, at least partly through H-reflexes (n = 4 participants; 39% decrease), and torque decreased the most when contractions were generated through M-waves, regardless of NMES site (nNMES 71% decrease, n = 4; mNMES, 73% decrease, n = 8). nNMES generates contractions that fatigue less than mNMES, but only when H-reflexes contribute to the evoked contractions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Deprivation and Recovery of Sleep in Succession Enhances Reflexive Motor Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Andreas; Weber, Frederik D; Machner, Bjoern; Talamo, Silke; Scheffelmeier, Sabine; Bethke, Judith; Helmchen, Christoph; Gais, Steffen; Kimmig, Hubert; Born, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Sleep deprivation impairs inhibitory control over reflexive behavior, and this impairment is commonly assumed to dissipate after recovery sleep. Contrary to this belief, here we show that fast reflexive behaviors, when practiced during sleep deprivation, is consolidated across recovery sleep and, thereby, becomes preserved. As a model for the study of sleep effects on prefrontal cortex-mediated inhibitory control in humans, we examined reflexive saccadic eye movements (express saccades), as well as speeded 2-choice finger motor responses. Different groups of subjects were trained on a standard prosaccade gap paradigm before periods of nocturnal sleep and sleep deprivation. Saccade performance was retested in the next morning and again 24 h later. The rate of express saccades was not affected by sleep after training, but slightly increased after sleep deprivation. Surprisingly, this increase augmented even further after recovery sleep and was still present 4 weeks later. Additional experiments revealed that the short testing after sleep deprivation was sufficient to increase express saccades across recovery sleep. An increase in speeded responses across recovery sleep was likewise found for finger motor responses. Our findings indicate that recovery sleep can consolidate motor disinhibition for behaviors practiced during prior sleep deprivation, thereby persistently enhancing response automatization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Peripheral venous distension elicits a blood pressure raising reflex in young and middle-aged adults.

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    Matthews, Evan L; Brian, Michael S; Coyle, Dana E; Edwards, David G; Stocker, Sean D; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2016-06-01

    Distension of peripheral veins in humans elicits a pressor and sympathoexcitatory response that is mediated through group III/IV skeletal muscle afferents. There is some evidence that autonomic reflexes mediated by these sensory fibers are blunted with increasing age, yet to date the venous distension reflex has only been studied in young adults. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the venous distension reflex would be attenuated in middle-aged compared with young adults. Nineteen young (14 men/5 women, 25 ± 1 yr) and 13 middle-aged (9 men/4 women, 50 ± 2 yr) healthy normotensive participants underwent venous distension via saline infusion through a retrograde intravenous catheter in an antecubital vein during limb occlusion. Beat-by-beat blood pressure, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and model flow-derived cardiac output (Q), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were recorded throughout the trial. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased during the venous distension in both young (baseline 83 ± 2, peak 94 ± 3 mmHg; P blood pressure, MSNA, and TPR were similar between young and middle-aged adults. Additionally, no correlation was found between age and the response to venous distension (all P > 0.05). These findings suggest that peripheral venous distension elicits a pressor and sympathetic response in middle-aged adults similar to the response observed in young adults. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Activity-dependent myelination of parvalbumin interneurons mediated by axonal morphological plasticity.

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    Stedehouder, J; Brizee, D; Shpak, G; Kushner, S A

    2018-03-05

    Axonal myelination of neocortical pyramidal neurons is dynamically modulated by neuronal activity. Recent studies have shown that a substantial proportion of neocortical myelin content is contributed by fast-spiking, parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons. However, it remains unknown whether the myelination of PV + interneurons is also modulated by intrinsic activity. Here, we utilized cell-type specific Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) in adult male and female mice to activate a sparse population of medial prefrontal cortex PV + interneurons. Using single-cell axonal reconstructions, we find that DREADD-stimulated PV + interneurons exhibit a nearly two-fold increase in total length of myelination, predominantly mediated by a parallel increase of axonal arborization and number of internodes. In contrast, the distribution of axonal inter-branch segment distance and myelin internode length were not significantly altered. Topographical analysis revealed that myelination of DREADD-stimulated cells extended to higher axonal branch orders, while retaining a similar inter-branch distance threshold for myelination. Together, our results demonstrate that chemogenetically-induced neuronal activity increases the myelination of neocortical PV + interneurons mediated at least in part by an elaboration of their axonal morphology. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelination is the wrapping of an axon in order to optimize conduction velocity in an energy-efficient manner. Previous studies have shown that myelination of neocortical pyramidal neurons is experience and activity-dependent. We now show that activity-dependent myelin plasticity in the adult neocortex extends to parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking interneurons. Specifically, chemogenetic stimulation of parvalbumin interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex significantly enhanced axonal myelination, which was paralleled by an increase in axonal arborization. This suggests that activity

  2. Axon Counts Yield Multiple Options for Triceps Fascicular Nerve to Axillary Nerve Transfer.

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    Khair, M Michael; Schreiber, Joseph J; Rosenblatt, Lauren; Byun, David J; Lee, Steve K; Wolfe, Scott W

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the relative axonal match between potential donor and recipient nerves, so that maximal reinnervation potential may be reached with the least chance of donor site morbidity. In 10 fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens, the main trunk and anterior, posterior, sensory and teres minor branches of the axillary nerve were identified, as were the radial nerve branches to the long, medial, and lateral heads of the triceps. The swing distances of the triceps fascicular nerve branches and the axillary nerve branches relative to the inferior border of the teres major muscle were recorded. Histomorphological analysis and axon counts were performed on sections of each branch. The median number of axons in the main axillary trunk was 7,887, with 4,052, 1,242, and 1,161 axons in the anterior, posterior, and teres minor branches, respectively. All specimens had a single long head triceps branch (median, 2,302 axons), a range of 1 to 3 branches to the medial head of the triceps (composite axon count, 2,198 axons), and 1 to 3 branches to the lateral head of the triceps (composite average, 1,462 axons). The medial and lateral head branches had sufficient swing distance to reach the anterior branch of the axillary nerve in all 10 specimens, with only 4 specimens having adequate long head branch swing distances. It is anatomically feasible to transfer multiple branches of the radial nerve supplying the medial, lateral, and sometimes, long head of the triceps to all branches of the axillary nerve in an attempt to reinnervate the deltoid and teres minor muscles. Understanding the axon counts of the different possible transfer combinations will improve operative flexibility and enable peripheral nerve surgeons to reinnervate for both abduction and external rotation with the highest donor/recipient axon count ratios. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dorsal column sensory axons degenerate due to impaired microvascular perfusion after spinal cord injury in rats

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    Muradov, Johongir M.; Ewan, Eric E.; Hagg, Theo

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to axon loss after spinal cord injury (SCI) are largely unknown but may involve microvascular loss as we have previously suggested. Here, we used a mild contusive injury (120 kdyn IH impactor) at T9 in rats focusing on ascending primary sensory dorsal column axons, anterogradely traced from the sciatic nerves. The injury caused a rapid and progressive loss of dorsal column microvasculature and oligodendrocytes at the injury site and penumbra and a ~70% loss of the sensory axons, by 24 hours. To model the microvascular loss, focal ischemia of the T9 dorsal columns was achieved via phototoxic activation of intravenously injected rose bengal. This caused an ~53% loss of sensory axons and an ~80% loss of dorsal column oligodendrocytes by 24 hours. Axon loss correlated with the extent and axial length of microvessel and oligodendrocyte loss along the dorsal column. To determine if oligodendrocyte loss contributes to axon loss, the glial toxin ethidium bromide (EB; 0.3 µg/µl) was microinjected into the T9 dorsal columns, and resulted in an ~88% loss of dorsal column oligodendrocytes and an ~56% loss of sensory axons after 72 hours. EB also caused an ~72% loss of microvessels. Lower concentrations of EB resulted in less axon, oligodendrocyte and microvessel loss, which were highly correlated (R2 = 0.81). These data suggest that focal spinal cord ischemia causes both oligodendrocyte and axon degeneration, which are perhaps linked. Importantly, they highlight the need of limiting the penumbral spread of ischemia and oligodendrocyte loss after SCI in order to protect axons. PMID:23978615

  4. Modeling Huntington disease in Drosophila: Insights into axonal transport defects and modifiers of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krench, Megan; Littleton, J Troy

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) gene. Despite years of research, there is no treatment that extends life for patients with the disorder. Similarly, little is known about which cellular pathways that are altered by pathogenic Huntingtin (Htt) protein expression are correlated with neuronal loss. As part of a longstanding effort to gain insights into HD pathology, we have been studying the protein in the context of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. We generated transgenic HD models in Drosophila by engineering flies that carry a 12-exon fragment of the human Htt gene with or without the toxic trinucleotide repeat expansion. We also created variants with a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) tag fused to Htt that allows in vivo imaging of Htt protein localization and aggregation. While wild-type Htt remains diffuse throughout the cytoplasm of cells, pathogenic Htt forms insoluble aggregates that accumulate in neuronal soma and axons. Aggregates can physically block transport of numerous organelles along the axon. We have also observed that aggregates are formed quickly, within just a few hours of mutant Htt expression. To explore mechanisms of neurodegeneration in our HD model, we performed in vivo and in vitro screens to search for modifiers of viability and pathogenic Htt aggregation. Our results identified several novel candidates for HD therapeutics that can now be tested in mammalian models of HD. Furthermore, these experiments have highlighted the complex relationship between aggregates and toxicity that exists in HD.

  5. Comment on "Penetration of Action Potentials During Collision in the Median and Lateral Giant Axons of Invertebrates"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rune W.; Stauning, Marius Tving; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Jahnsen, Henrik

    2017-04-01

    The action potential (AP) is an electrical impulse elicited by depolarization of the neuronal membrane from the resting membrane potential (around -70 mV ). It propagates along the axon, allowing for rapid and distant communication. Recently, it was claimed that two APs traveling in opposite direction will pass unhindered through each other (penetrate) upon collision [Gonzalez-Perez et al.Phys. Rev. X 4, 031047 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevX.4.031047]. We tested this claim under carefully controlled conditions and found that we cannot reproduce penetration. Instead, APs consistently annihilated upon collision. This is consistent with a vast body of literature.

  6. Reflex Cough and Disease Duration as Predictors of Swallowing Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

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    Troche, Michelle S; Schumann, Beate; Brandimore, Alexandra E; Okun, Michael S; Hegland, Karen W

    2016-12-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have progressive and pervasive disorders of airway protection. Recent work has highlighted the relationship between reflex and voluntary cough and swallowing safety. The goal of this study was to test the sensitivity and specificity of several airway protective and disease-specific factors for predicting swallowing safety outcomes in PD. Sixty-four participants (44 males) completed measures of voluntary and reflex cough, and swallowing safety. Clinical predictors included disease severity and duration, and cough airflow and sensitivity measures. ROC and Chi-square analyses identified predictors of swallowing safety (penetration-aspiration score) in PD. Disease duration significantly discriminated between patients with normal and abnormal swallowing safety (p = 0.027, sensitivity: 71 %, specificity: 55.4 %). Cough reflex sensitivity significantly discriminated between patients who penetrated above the level of the vocal folds and those with more severe penetration/aspiration (p = 0.021, sensitivity: 71.0 %, specificity 57.6 %). Urge-to-cough sensitivity (log-log linear slope) was the only variable which significantly discriminated between patients with penetration versus aspiration (p = 0.017, sensitivity: 85.7 %, specificity 73.2 %). It is important to identify the factors which influence airway protective outcomes in PD especially given that aspiration pneumonia is a leading cause of death. Results from this study highlight the ecological validity of reflex cough in the study of airway protection and this study further identifies important factors to consider in the screening of airway protective deficits in PD.

  7. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloot, Lizeth H; van den Noort, Josien C; van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163-191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  8. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth H Sloot

    Full Text Available Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163-191 ms. Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally

  9. The babkin reflex in infants: clinical significance and neural mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagi, Yasuyuki; Yanagihara, Keiko; Mogami, Yukiko; Ikeda, Tae; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2013-09-01

    There have been very few studies concerning the Babkin reflex-opening of the mouth and flexion of the arms in response to stimulation of the palms. We attempted to clarify the clinical significance and neural mechanism of the reflex through systematic review. Searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, and Google Scholar from their inception through August 2012. In normal term infants, the Babkin reflex can be elicited from the time of birth, becomes increasingly suppressed with age, and disappears in the great majority by the end of the fifth month of age. A marked response in the fourth or fifth month of age and persistence of the reflex beyond the fifth month of age are generally regarded as abnormal. On the other hand, because there are some normal infants showing no response during the neonatal period or early infancy, the absence of the response during these periods is not necessarily an abnormal finding. Infants with these abnormal findings should be carefully observed for the appearance of neurological abnormalities including cerebral palsy and mental retardation. It is most likely that the Babkin reflex is mediated by the reticular formation of the brainstem, which receives inputs from the nonprimary motor cortices. On the basis of the hand-mouth reflex, more adaptive movement develops as control of the nonprimary motor cortices over the reflex mechanism in the reticular formation increases. Soon it evolves into the voluntary eye-hand-mouth coordination necessary for food intake as the control of the prefrontal cortex over the nonprimary motor cortices becomes predominant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of the superior laryngeal nerve in esophageal reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medda, B. K.; Jadcherla, S.; Shaker, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in the following esophageal reflexes: esophago-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex (EUCR), esophago-lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation reflex (ELIR), secondary peristalsis, pharyngeal swallowing, and belch. Cats (N = 43) were decerebrated and instrumented to record EMG of the cricopharyngeus, thyrohyoideus, geniohyoideus, and cricothyroideus; esophageal pressure; and motility of LES. Reflexes were activated by stimulation of the esophagus via slow balloon or rapid air distension at 1 to 16 cm distal to the UES. Slow balloon distension consistently activated EUCR and ELIR from all areas of the esophagus, but the distal esophagus was more sensitive than the proximal esophagus. Transection of SLN or proximal recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN) blocked EUCR and ELIR generated from the cervical esophagus. Distal RLN transection blocked EUCR from the distal cervical esophagus. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus except the most proximal few centimeters activated secondary peristalsis, and SLN transection had no effect on secondary peristalsis. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus inconsistently activated pharyngeal swallows, and SLN transection blocked generation of pharyngeal swallows from all levels of the esophagus. Slow distension of the esophagus inconsistently activated belching, but rapid air distension consistently activated belching from all areas of the esophagus. SLN transection did not block initiation of belch but blocked one aspect of belch, i.e., inhibition of cricopharyngeus EMG. Vagotomy blocked all aspects of belch generated from all areas of esophagus and blocked all responses of all reflexes not blocked by SLN or RLN transection. In conclusion, the SLN mediates all aspects of the pharyngeal swallow, no portion of the secondary peristalsis, and the EUCR and ELIR generated from the proximal esophagus. Considering that SLN is not

  11. Trigeminal cardiac reflex and cerebral blood flow regulation

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    Dominga Lapi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals. During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart and brain, and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is requested within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing.The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral level, reducing the arterial blood pressure and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activated the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial. Therefore the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension, because produced opposite effects compared to those elicited by the diving reflex as it induces hypotension and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone.

  12. Modest enhancement of sensory axon regeneration in the sciatic nerve with conditional co-deletion of PTEN and SOCS3 in the dorsal root ganglia of adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaher, Zachary R; Steward, Oswald

    2018-05-01

    Axons within the peripheral nervous system are capable of regeneration, but full functional recovery is rare. Recent work has shown that conditional deletion of two key signaling inhibitors of the PI3K and Jak/Stat pathways-phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), respectively-promotes regeneration of normally non-regenerative central nervous system axons. Moreover, in studies of optic nerve regeneration, co-deletion of both PTEN and SOCS3 has an even greater effect. Here, we test the hypotheses (1) that PTEN deletion enhances axon regeneration following sciatic nerve crush and (2) that PTEN/SOCS3 co-deletion further promotes regeneration. PTEN fl/fl and PTEN/SOCS3 fl/fl mice received direct injections of AAV-Cre into the fourth and fifth lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) two weeks prior to sciatic nerve crush. Western blot analysis of whole cell lysates from DRG using phospho-specific antibodies revealed that PTEN deletion did not enhance or prolong PI3K signaling following sciatic nerve crush. However, PTEN/SOCS3 co-deletion activated PI3K for at least 7 days post-injury in contrast to controls, where activation peaked at 3 days. Quantification of SCG10-expressing regenerating sensory axons in the sciatic nerve after crush injury revealed longer distance regeneration at 3 days post-injury with both PTEN and PTEN/SOCS3 co-deletion. Additionally, analysis of noxious thermosensation and mechanosensation with PTEN/SOCS3 co-deletion revealed enhanced sensation at 14 and 21 days after crush, respectively, after which all treatment groups reached the same functional plateau. These findings indicate that co-deletion of PTEN and SOCS3 results in modest but measureable enhancement of early regeneration of DRG axons following crush injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reversible Axonal Dystrophy by Calcium Modulation in Frataxin-Deficient Sensory Neurons of YG8R Mice

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    Belén Mollá

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA is a peripheral neuropathy involving a loss of proprioceptive sensory neurons. Studies of biopsies from patients suggest that axonal dysfunction precedes the death of proprioceptive neurons in a dying-back process. We observed that the deficiency of frataxin in sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG of the YG8R mouse model causes the formation of axonal spheroids which retain dysfunctional mitochondria, shows alterations in the cytoskeleton and it produces impairment of axonal transport and autophagic flux. The homogenous distribution of axonal spheroids along the neurites supports the existence of continues focal damages. This lead us to propose for FRDA a model of distal axonopathy based on axonal focal damages. In addition, we observed the involvement of oxidative stress and dyshomeostasis of calcium in axonal spheroid formation generating axonal injury as a primary cause of pathophysiology. Axonal spheroids may be a consequence of calcium imbalance, thus we propose the quenching or removal extracellular Ca2+ to prevent spheroids formation. In our neuronal model, treatments with BAPTA and o-phenanthroline reverted the axonal dystrophy and the mitochondrial dysmorphic parameters. These results support the hypothesis that axonal pathology is reversible in FRDA by pharmacological manipulation of intracellular Ca2+ with Ca2+ chelators or metalloprotease inhibitors, preventing Ca2+-mediated axonal injury. Thus, the modulation of Ca2+ levels may be a relevant therapeutic target to develop early axonal protection and prevent dying-back neurodegeneration.

  14. ATZ (3-amino-1,2,4-triazole injected into the fourth cerebral ventricle influences the Bezold-Jarisch reflex in conscious rats

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    Vitor E. Valenti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Many studies have investigated the importance of oxidative stress on the cardiovascular system. In this study we evaluated the effects of central catalase inhibition on cardiopulmonary reflex in conscious Wistar rats. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were implanted with a stainless steel guide cannula in the fourth cerebral ventricle. The femoral artery and vein were cannulated for mean arterial pressure and heart rate measurement and for drug infusion, respectively. After basal mean arterial pressure and heart rate recordings, the cardiopulmonary reflex was